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Sample records for dural venous sinus

  1. Transarterial venous sinus occlusion of dural arteriovenous fistulas using ONYX.

    PubMed

    Torok, Collin M; Nogueira, Raul G; Yoo, Albert J; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Hirsch, Joshua A; Stapleton, Christopher J; Patel, Aman B; Rabinov, James D

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a case series of transarterial venous sinus occlusion for dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) of the transverse and sigmoid sinuses. From 2006 to 2012, 11 patients with DAVF of the transverse and sigmoid sinuses were treated with transarterial closure of the affected venous sinus using ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (ONYX). The consecutive retrospective cohort included six female and five male patients with an age range of 30-79. Patients presented with stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, seizure, headache, focal neurologic deficit or cognitive change. Lesions were categorized as Cognard II a + b (n = 5) or Cognard II b (n = 6). Four of this latter group consisted of isolated sinus segments. Selection criteria for dural sinus occlusion included direct multi-hole fistulas involving a broad surface in length or circumference of the sinus wall. External carotid artery (ECA) branches were directly embolized when considered safe. High-risk arterial supply from ICA, PICA, AICA or ECA cranial nerve branches were closed via retrograde approach during sinus occlusion. DAVF closure was accomplished in all 11 patients with a total of 17 embolization procedures using ONYX. High-risk arterial collaterals were closed via artery-artery or artery-sinus-artery embolization. The vein of Labbe was spared in the four cases with initial antegrade flow. No neurologic complications occurred, and DAVF closures were durable on three-month angiography. Transarterial closure of the transverse and sigmoid sinuses. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Dangerous Headache: A Case of Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis with Protein S Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Hari; Deepthi, D Angeline; Singh, Deepak Ningombam; Virupakshappa, Banu; Rahul, R

    2017-01-01

    Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis (DVST) is a sporadic cause of headache. DVST is a recherché complication of maxillary sinus infection. Maxillary sinusitis infection may spread directly to orbit via lamina papyracea and it is expedited by the presence veins of breschet. The authors present a clinical case of dural sinus thrombosis with protein S deficiency and also describe an effective management approach for DVST.

  3. Dangerous Headache: A Case of Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis with Protein S Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Deepthi, D Angeline; Singh, Deepak Ningombam; Virupakshappa, Banu; Rahul, R

    2017-01-01

    Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis (DVST) is a sporadic cause of headache. DVST is a recherché complication of maxillary sinus infection. Maxillary sinusitis infection may spread directly to orbit via lamina papyracea and it is expedited by the presence veins of breschet. The authors present a clinical case of dural sinus thrombosis with protein S deficiency and also describe an effective management approach for DVST. PMID:28274079

  4. Diagnostic Performance of Routine Brain MRI Sequences for Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, D; Machnowska, M; Symons, S; Yeung, R; Fox, A J; Aviv, R I; Jabehdar Maralani, P

    2016-06-16

    Signs suggestive of unexpected dural venous sinus thrombosis are detectable on routine MR imaging studies without MRV. We assessed performance characteristics and interrater reliability of routine MR imaging for the diagnosis of dural venous sinus thrombosis, focusing on the superior sagittal, transverse, and sigmoid sinuses. This case series included 350 patients with MRIs performed with contrast-enhanced MRV and 79 patients with routine MRIs performed within 48 hours of a CTV from 2008 to 2014 (total, n = 429). Routine MR images were separated from the contrast-enhanced MRVs and CTVs. Three neuroradiologists, blinded to clinical data, independently reviewed the MRIs for signs of dural venous sinus thrombosis, including high signal on sagittal T1, loss of flow void on axial T2, high signal on FLAIR, high signal on DWI, increased susceptibility effects on T2*-weighted gradient recalled-echo imaging, and filling defects on axial contrast-enhanced spin-echo T1WI and/or volumetric gradient-echo T1WI. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed contrast-enhanced MRVs and CTVs to determine the consensus gold standard. Interrater reliability was calculated by using the κ coefficient. Contrast-enhanced MRV and CTV confirmed that dural venous sinus thrombosis was present in 72 of 429 cases (16.8%). The combination of routine MR sequences had an overall sensitivity of 79.2%, specificity of 89.9%, and moderate interrater reliability (κ = 0.50). The 3 readers did not have similar performance characteristics. 69.4% of positive cases had clinical suspicion of dural venous sinus thrombosis indicated on imaging requisition. Routine MR images can suggest dural venous sinus thrombosis with high specificity in high-risk patients, even in cases without clinical suspicion. © 2016 American Society of Neuroradiology.

  5. In utero magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of dural venous sinus ectasia with thrombosis in the fetus.

    PubMed

    Fanou, Evgenia Maria; Reeves, Mike J; Howe, David T; Joy, Harriet; Morris, Susan; Russell, Sarah; Griffiths, Paul D

    2013-12-01

    Dural venous sinus ectasia with thrombosis (DVSET) in the fetus is a rare condition that can be diagnosed prenatally with the use of fetal MR imaging, yet with limited indication of long-term clinical significance. To describe and evaluate the diagnostic value of fetal MR imaging in the prenatal diagnosis of dural venous sinus ectasia with thrombosis and its clinical significance. We report a series of nine fetuses with dural venous sinus ectasia with thrombosis. The mothers, located in four feto-maternal centres, were referred for fetal MR imaging due to space occupying lesions identified on second-trimester antenatal ultrasound. In all but one case the dural venous sinus ectasia with thrombosis was in the vicinity of the venous confluence (VC) with various extension in the posterior dural sinuses. Antenatal follow-up imaging was performed in seven cases and showed progression in one, stable appearances in one and regression in five cases. Three pregnancies were terminated. In the remaining six cases there was no reported neurological deficit at up to 44 months of clinical follow-up. This is among the largest series of postnatal clinical follow-up in cases of prenatal diagnosis of dural venous sinus ectasia with thrombosis in the literature. Clinical follow-up suggests a good prognosis when antenatal follow-up shows partial or complete thrombus resolution.

  6. Dural Venous System in the Cavernous Sinus: A Literature Review and Embryological, Functional, and Endovascular Clinical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    MITSUHASHI, Yutaka; HAYASAKI, Koji; KAWAKAMI, Taichiro; NAGATA, Takashi; KANESHIRO, Yuta; UMABA, Ryoko; OHATA, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The cavernous sinus (CS) is one of the cranial dural venous sinuses. It differs from other dural sinuses due to its many afferent and efferent venous connections with adjacent structures. It is important to know well about its complex venous anatomy to conduct safe and effective endovascular interventions for the CS. Thus, we reviewed previous literatures concerning the morphological and functional venous anatomy and the embryology of the CS. The CS is a complex of venous channels from embryologically different origins. These venous channels have more or less retained their distinct original roles of venous drainage, even after alterations through the embryological developmental process, and can be categorized into three longitudinal venous axes based on their topological and functional features. Venous channels medial to the internal carotid artery “medial venous axis” carry venous drainage from the skull base, chondrocranium and the hypophysis, with no direct participation in cerebral drainage. Venous channels lateral to the cranial nerves “lateral venous axis” are exclusively for cerebral venous drainage. Venous channels between the internal carotid artery and cranial nerves “intermediate venous axis” contribute to all the venous drainage from adjacent structures, directly from the orbit and membranous skull, indirectly through medial and lateral venous axes from the chondrocranium, the hypophysis, and the brain. This concept of longitudinal venous axes in the CS may be useful during endovascular interventions for the CS considering our better understandings of its functions in venous drainage. PMID:27063146

  7. Development of an intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula after venous sinus stenting for idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Buell, Thomas J; Raper, Daniel M; Ding, Dale; Chen, Ching-Jen; Liu, Kenneth C

    2017-09-26

    We report a case in which an intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) developed after endovascular treatment of a patient with idiopathic intracranial hypertension with venous sinus stenting (VSS). The pathogenesis may involve hemodynamic alterations secondary to increased poststenting venous sinus pressure, which may cause new arterial ingrowth into the fistulous sinus wall without capillary interposition. Despite administration of dual antiplatelet therapy, there may also be subclinical cortical vein thrombosis that contributed to DAVF formation. In addition to the aforementioned mechanisms, increased inflammation induced by VSS may upregulate vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor expression and also promote DAVF pathogenesis. Since VSS has been used to obliterate DAVFs, DAVF formation after VSS may seem counterintuitive. Previous stents have generally been closed cell, stainless steel designs used to maximize radial compression of the fistulous sinus wall. In contrast, our patient's stent was an open cell, self-expandable nitinol design (Protégé Everflex). Neurointerventionalists should be aware of this potential, although rare complication of DAVF formation after VSS. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. New concept in cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula: correlation with presenting symptom and venous drainage patterns.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dae Chul; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Sang Joon; Chung, Sun Ju; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Chang Jin; Kook, Michael; Ahn, Hyo-Sook; Kwon, Sun Uck; Kim, Jong Sung

    2005-06-01

    An extradurally located cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (CSDAVF) exhibits different clinical behavior from other dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) located between 2 dural leaves. The aim of this study is to define angiographic types of CSDAVF associated with presenting symptom (Sx) and venous drainage patterns. CSDAVFs during a mean of 23-month follow-up period of 58 patients (17 to 73 years, male:female ratio=8:50) were retrospectively analyzed. The 3 types of CSDAF, ie, proliferative (PT), restrictive (RT), and late restrictive (LRT) types, were categorized by the degrees and patterns of prominent arteriovenous shunt as well as venous flow. The status of the venous connection with CS and the presenting Sx patterns classified as orbital (OrbSxP), ocular (OcuSxP), cavernous (CavSxP), and cerebral (CerSxP) were associated with angiographic types as well as symptom onset, age, and gender. Correlations of discrete and categorical variables were statistically analyzed using the chi2 or Fisher exact test. PT (n=23) and RT (n=23) of CSDAVF were more common than LRT (n=12) (P=0.016) in patients with younger than 65 years and were related to OrbSxP (P=0.015) and CavSxP (P=0.038) in contrast to LRT to OcuSxP (P=0.004). Early onset of Sxs was related to the OrbSxP (P=0.08) and CavSxP (P<0.001). CerSxP (5%) was noted in RT or LRT. OrbSxP was related to the superior ophthalmic venous drainage (P=0.026) and CavSxP to the inferior petrosal sinus (P=0.046) and posterior fossa venous drainages (P=0.014). Seven patients revealed chronological progression of CSDAVF from PT to LRT and even to complete healing. CSDAVF presents as 3 distinctive angiographic types and is associated with presenting Sxs and venous drainage patterns.

  9. [Long-term efficacies of sinus skeletonization plus abnormal venous reflux interruption in the treatment of parasinus dural arteriovenous fistula].

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Huang, Xiang; Gu, Yu-xiang; Xu, Bin; Song, Dong-lei; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-fu

    2013-03-05

    To retrospectively explore the long-term efficacies of sinus skeletonization plus abnormal venous reflux interruption in the treatment of dural arteriovenous fistula interfering major dural sinus. Among 15 consecutively treated patients, the lesions were located in superior sagittal sinus (n = 7), medial segment of transverse sinus (n = 3) and lateral transverse and sigmoid sinus (n = 5). And 40% of them clinically presented with intracranial hypertension and 13.3% with hemorrhage. Preoperatively, Gamma knife therapy and transarterial occlusion were used in 1 case each. All underwent sinus skeletonization plus abnormal venous reflux interruption if any. Interfered sinus was preserved in 12 cases. In another 3 cases, completely occluded segment of sinus was resected after skeletonization. Surgical mortality was none. At discharge, the symptoms were relieved or disappeared in 12 cases. Follow-up study was available in 11 cases over a mean period of 6 years. A Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score of 90 or more was achieved in 8 cases and a KPS score of 80, 60 or 40 was found in 1 case each. Digital subtract angiography was performed in 9 cases and computed tomographic angiography in 1 case after operation. Cure was achieved in 7 cases and 3 cases had minimal residue without recurrence. Sinus skeletonization may stably block most blood supply to fistula so as to offer cure or long-term control of dural arteriovenous fistula.

  10. Dural venous sinus stenting for medically and surgically refractory idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Satti, Sudhakar R; Leishangthem, Lakshmi; Spiotta, Alejandro; Chaudry, M Imran

    2017-04-01

    Background Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a syndrome defined by elevated intracranial hypertension without radiographic evidence of a mass lesion in the brain. Dural venous sinus stenosis has been increasingly recognized as a treatable cause, and dural venous sinus stenting (DVSS) is increasingly performed. Methods A 5 year single-center retrospective analysis of consecutive patients undergoing DVSS for medically refractory IIH. Results There were 43 patients with a mean imaging follow-up of 6.5 months and a mean clinical follow-up period of 13.5 months. DVSS was performed as the first procedure for medically refractory IIH in 81.4% of patients, whereas 18.6% of patients included had previously had a surgical procedure (ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt or optic nerve sheath fenestration (ONSF)). Headache was present in all patients and after DVSS improved or remained stable in 69.2% and 30.8%, respectively. Visual acuity changes and visual field changes were present in 88.4% and 37.2% of patients, respectively. Visual field improved or remained unchanged in 92%, but worsened in 8% after stenting. There was a stent patency rate of 81.8%, with an 18.2% re-stenosis rate. Of the 43 procedures performed, there was a 100% technical success rate with zero major or minor complications. Conclusion Based on this single-center retrospective analysis, DVSS can be performed with high technical success and low complication rates. A majority of patients presented primarily with headache, and these patients had excellent symptom relief with DVSS alone. Patients presenting with visual symptoms had lower success rates, and this population, if stented, should be carefully followed for progression of symptoms.

  11. Unusual venous sinuses.

    PubMed

    Srijit, D; Shipra, P

    2007-01-01

    The dural venous sinuses lie in between the two layers of the dura mater. The dural venous sinuses are important, because they receive blood from the brain and the cranial bones. All sinuses are related to the inner surface of the skull, except for the inferior sagittal and the straight sinus. The sinuses related to the inner surface of the skull produce impressions on it. During routine ostelogical teaching for undergraduate medical students, we observed an unusual oblique sinus, which connected the right and the left transverse sinuses. This unusual oblique sinus measured 2 cm and had a course from the right to the left side. The superior sagittal sinus turned onto the right but at a much higher level than the left transverse sinus. Although these sinuses communicated with each other, the normal position of the confleunce of the sinus (meeting point of superior sagittal sinus, right and left transverse sinus and the occipital sinus) was not seen. The impression meant for the posterior lobe of the left cerebral hemisphere was distinctly greater than that of the right side. The presence of such an anomaly suggests a possible developmental defect or handedness of the individual. The knowledge of the anatomical variations of the dural venous sinuses may have great clinical implications during venography, shunt surgeries and also helpful for neurologists and radiologists in addition to academic interest (Fig. 2, Ref 10) Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  12. A microcontroller-based simulation of dural venous sinus injury for neurosurgical training.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Daniel R; Siler, Dominic A; Whitney, Nathaniel; Selden, Nathan R

    2017-06-02

    OBJECTIVE Surgical simulation has the potential to supplement and enhance traditional resident training. However, the high cost of equipment and limited number of available scenarios have inhibited wider integration of simulation in neurosurgical education. In this study the authors provide initial validation of a novel, low-cost simulation platform that recreates the stress of surgery using a combination of hands-on, model-based, and computer elements. Trainee skill was quantified using multiple time and performance measures. The simulation was initially validated using trainees at the start of their intern year. METHODS The simulation recreates intraoperative superior sagittal sinus injury complicated by air embolism. The simulator model consists of 2 components: a reusable base and a disposable craniotomy pack. The simulator software is flexible and modular to allow adjustments in difficulty or the creation of entirely new clinical scenarios. The reusable simulator base incorporates a powerful microcomputer and multiple sensors and actuators to provide continuous feedback to the software controller, which in turn adjusts both the screen output and physical elements of the model. The disposable craniotomy pack incorporates 3D-printed sections of model skull and brain, as well as artificial dura that incorporates a model sagittal sinus. RESULTS Twelve participants at the 2015 Western Region Society of Neurological Surgeons postgraduate year 1 resident course ("boot camp") provided informed consent and enrolled in a study testing the prototype device. Each trainee was required to successfully create a bilateral parasagittal craniotomy, repair a dural sinus tear, and recognize and correct an air embolus. Participant stress was measured using a heart rate wrist monitor. After participation, each resident completed a 13-question categorical survey. CONCLUSIONS All trainee participants experienced tachycardia during the simulation, although the point in the simulation

  13. Angioplasty and stenting for intractable pulsatile tinnitus caused by dural venous sinus stenosis: a case series report.

    PubMed

    Baomin, Li; Yongbing, Shi; Xiangyu, Cao

    2014-02-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus caused by dural venous sinus (DVS) stenosis is a newly identified form of tinnitus. Its persistent nature can severely affect patients' sleep and quality of life, leading to depression in severe cases. The aim of this report is to investigate the efficacy and safety of angioplasty and stenting in treating this form of tinnitus. Retrospective review. Chinese PLA General Hospital. Clinical data of 46 cases of pulsatile tinnitus caused by DVS stenosis treated between December 2009 and October 2012 using angioplasty and stenting were reviewed. Diagnosis of DVS abnormality was confirmed in all cases using digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Among these cases, stenosis was located in the transverse-sigmoid sinuses junction area ipsilateral to tinnitus in 44 cases and on both sides in the remaining 2 cases. Stenosis was treated with angioplasty and stenting in all cases. Pulsatile tinnitus disappeared immediately after the procedure in all 46 cases. There was no procedure-related complication. During the 2 to 36 months' follow-up, there was no recurrence. These results indicate that DVS stenosis is the cause of pulsatile tinnitus in these cases and that angioplasty and stenting are an effective and safe treatment for intractable pulsatile tinnitus caused by DVS stenosis.

  14. Giant arachnoid granulation mimicking dural sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Ercan; Atalay, Basak; Baysal, Begumhan; Senturk, Senem; Aslan, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Arachnoid granulations (AG) are composed of dense, collagenous connective tissue that includes clusters of arachnoid cells. They tend to invaginate into the dural sinuses, through which cerebrospinal fluid enters the venous system. AG are most commonly seen at the junction between the middle and lateral thirds of the transverse sinuses near the entry sites of the superficial veins. Presently described is the case of a 21-year-old female who presented at the clinic with recurrent headaches. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a 3.5-cm lesion, which extended from confluens sinuum through the superior sagittal sinus. The lesion had created a scallop-shaped area of erosion in the neighboring occipital bone. To exclude sinus thrombosis, MR venography was performed, which displayed a maintained venous flow around the lesion. Headaches were treated symptomatically with medical therapy. Giant AG can be misdiagnosed as dural sinus thrombosis. MR imaging combined with MR venography is the most useful diagnostic tool to differentiate giant AG from dural sinus thrombosis. PMID:28971178

  15. Giant arachnoid granulation mimicking dural sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ayaz, Ercan; Atalay, Basak; Baysal, Begumhan; Senturk, Senem; Aslan, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Arachnoid granulations (AG) are composed of dense, collagenous connective tissue that includes clusters of arachnoid cells. They tend to invaginate into the dural sinuses, through which cerebrospinal fluid enters the venous system. AG are most commonly seen at the junction between the middle and lateral thirds of the transverse sinuses near the entry sites of the superficial veins. Presently described is the case of a 21-year-old female who presented at the clinic with recurrent headaches. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a 3.5-cm lesion, which extended from confluens sinuum through the superior sagittal sinus. The lesion had created a scallop-shaped area of erosion in the neighboring occipital bone. To exclude sinus thrombosis, MR venography was performed, which displayed a maintained venous flow around the lesion. Headaches were treated symptomatically with medical therapy. Giant AG can be misdiagnosed as dural sinus thrombosis. MR imaging combined with MR venography is the most useful diagnostic tool to differentiate giant AG from dural sinus thrombosis.

  16. The Addition of Endovascular Intervention for Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis: Single-Center Experience and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Eric M; Case, David; Nagae, Lidia M; Honce, Justin M; Reyenga, William; Seinfeld, Joshua; Poisson, Sharon; Leppert, Michelle H

    2017-10-01

    Dural venous sinus thrombosis (DVST) is a cause of infarction and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) that can lead to significant morbidity. Endovascular therapy has emerged as an adjunctive therapy in select cases but has been associated with increased hemorrhagic complications. We present our experience with a large single-center cohort of DVST cases treated with current-generation thrombectomy devices. In this retrospective cohort study, a chart review was performed to compare presentations and outcomes of patients treated with anticoagulation alone with those treated with additional interventional therapy, using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at discharge and at 90 days' follow-up. A total of 66 patients were included; 37 were treated with anticoagulation alone, and 29 underwent additional interventional therapy. Patients presenting with ICH or infarction had a significantly greater likelihood of disability at the time of discharge (odds ratio [OR] of 64.5 and 45.8, respectively; P < .0001) and at 90 days (OR of 28.4 and 22.8, respectively; P < .0001). Patients presenting with ICH or infarction were more likely to be selected for endovascular therapy (P < .05). Endovascular therapy was typically performed within 24 hours of admission; 9 patients (31%) had post-treatment hemorrhage, with 2 being (6.9%) symptomatic. There were fewer patients with slight disability (mRS score ≤1) in the endovascular group compared with the anticoagulation group at discharge (P = .05), but outcomes were not significantly different at 90 days (P = .19). Despite a higher rate of ICH or infarction at presentation in the endovascular group and an increased risk of postprocedural ICH, both treatment groups had similarly good functional outcomes at 90 days. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of tissue-glue-coated collagen sponge (TachoSil) to repair minor cerebral dural venous sinus lacerations: technical note.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Galarza, Marcelo; Fiore, Claudio; Callovini, Giorgio; Alfieri, Alex

    2015-03-01

    Significant hemorrhage may occur from the cerebral venous sinuses during the dural separation from the bone flap, particularly in elderly patients. It is important to achieve an urgent hemostatic control. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new fixed combination tissue sealant (TachoSil) in patients with bleeding from lacerations of cerebral venous sinuses. Between September 2012 and June 2014, 57 patients (39 female, 18 male) presenting with iatrogenic tears of the superior sagittal or transverse/sigmoid sinuses were treated with a topical fibrin sealant patch. Intraoperative source of bleeding, time to bleeding control, quantity of sealant sponge used, and postoperative complications were evaluated. Time to hemostasis was used as the primary end point. Effective hemostasis, defined as cessation of bleeding after application of topical hemostatic agent, was achieved no later than 4 minutes in all except 5 patients with persistent bleeding from the sinus. In these 5 cases, bleeding was finally stopped after application of a new larger layer of TachoSil Sponge (2 cases) or gelatin hemostatic matrix (2 cases) or fibrin glue (1 case) over the layer of TachoSil. We report our experience with a new hemostasis technique to manage bleeding from iatrogenic lacerations of cerebral venous sinuses.

  18. [Dural sinus thrombosis: case report].

    PubMed

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Pontalti, João Luis; Teles, Alisson Roberto

    2006-06-01

    We report the case of a 24 year-old pregnant woman, seen at the neurology service by presenting agitation, hallucinations, mental confusion, headache, vision loss, aphasia and seizures. The neuroradiologic exam was compatible with thrombosis in dural sinus and cortical veins. Treatment with abciximab was accomplished and the mechanical lysis of the thrombus was made obtaining restoration of cerebral vein flow. After the procedure, she presented frontal hematoma which was withdrawn surgically. We discuss this infrequent pathology in clinical picture, pathogenesis, image exams and therapeutics.

  19. New Developments in the Pathophysiology, Workup, and Diagnosis of Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis (DVST) and a Systematic Review of Endovascular Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Konakondla, Sanjay; Schirmer, Clemens M.; Li, Fengwu; Geng, Xiaogun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-01-01

    Dural venous sinus thrombosis (DVST) is a rare cause of stroke, which typically affects young women. The importance of identifying pre-disposing factors that lead to venous stasis lies in the foundation of understanding the etiology, pathophysiology and clinical presentation. The precise therapeutic role of interventional therapies is not fully understood though the current data do suggest potential applications. The aim of the study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the utility of and short-term 30-day survival after endovascular therapy for patients with DVST. Standard PRISMA guidelines were followed. Data sources included PubMed keywords and phrases, which were also incorporated into a MeSH search to yield articles indexed in Medline over a 5-year period. All RCTs, observational cohort studies, and administrative registries comparing or reporting DVST were included. Sixty-six studies met inclusion criteria. 35 articles investigating treatment in a summation of 10,285 patients were eligible for data extraction and included in the review of treatment modalities. A total of 312 patients were included for statistical analysis. All patients included received endovascular intervention with direct thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy or both. 133 (42.6%) patients were documented to have a neurologic decline, which prompted endovascular intervention. All patients who had endovascular interventions were those who were started on and failed systemic anticoagulation. 44 patients were reported to have intracranial hemorrhages after intervention. Regardless of systemic anticoagulation, patients were still reported to have complications of VTE and PE. Primary outcome at 3-6 month follow up revealed mRS<1 in 224 patients. DVST presents with many diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The utility of invasive interventions such as local thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy is not fully understood. It is exceedingly difficult to conduct large

  20. Superior Sagittal Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas Treated by Stent Placement for an Occluded Sinus and Transarterial Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, N.; Toyota, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Wakayama, A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We describe a case of dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) involving the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) successfully treated with stent placement for an occluded sinus and transarterial embolization. A 61-year-old man who had been treated with anticoagulation for a known SSS thrombosis presented with a sudden onset of headache. CT scan revealed an intraventricular hemorrhage and cerebral angiography revealed DAVFs involving the SSS which had severe venous congestion and sinus occlusion. We treated this case with a staged endovascular approach which consisted of stent placement for the occluded sinus and transarterial intravenous embolization resulting in complete eradication of DAVFs. Recanalization of an occluded sinus by stent placement can reduce venous congestion and transarterial intravenous embolization can obliterate dural arteriovenous shunts. This staged strategy is feasible and should be considered a first option of treatment, especially for DAVFs which presented with intracranial hemorrhage and aggressive venous hypertension. PMID:22958774

  1. Diffuse Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Secondary to Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian; Sabat, Shyamsunder; Agarwal, Amit; Thamburaj, Krishnamoorthy

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal rupture accounts for the majority of nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Increasingly recognized is the occurrence of nontraumatic convexity SAH unaccounted for by aneurysmal rupture. These presentations require consideration of rare but clinically significant sources of SAH. We report a patient presenting with prolonged mild headaches and acute onset of seizure like activity found to have diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage and extensive dural venous sinus thrombosis involving the superior sagittal sinus and right transverse-sigmoid sinuses. There are few reported cases of SAH secondary to dural sinus thrombosis; however most of these are convexity hemorrhage. Sinus thrombosis presenting as diffuse SAH is extremely rare, as is showcased in this report.

  2. [Morphometric characteristics of the asterion and the posterolateral surface of the skull: its relationship with dural venous sinuses and its neurosurgical importance].

    PubMed

    Galindo-de León, Salvador; Hernández-Rodríguez, Alejandra Nohemí; Morales-Ávalos, Rodolfo; Theriot-Girón, María Del Carmen; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo Enrique; Guzmán-López, Santos

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge of the location and morphometric of the lateral venous sinus (transverse and sigmoid), and their relationship with the asterion and other surface anatomical landmarks, it is imperative for posterolateral approaches to the posterior cranial fossa to avoid vascular structures injury and surgical complications. Determine an anatomical area security for a drill that allows entry into the posterior cranial fossa without damaging adjacent structures, and study the morphometric characteristics asterion, the lateral sinus and bony landmarks of the posterolateral surface of the skull. With a 1.3 mm drill drilled both sides of 88 dry skulls (176 hemicranias). The anatomical landmarks studied were the asterion, the apex of the mastoid process, spina suprameatal, the Frankfurt horizontal plane, the posterior root of the zygomatic arch, the external occipital protuberance and its relationship with the sinus transversus. The asterion type I prevails in 74.4% of the pieces. In 82.4% of the skulls asterion level is, sinus transversus in less than 12.5% and above this at 5.1%. With the data obtained from this and other research, the initial trephine should be placed below the 15 mm and 15 mm asterion post this to reduce the risk of injury from sinus transversus.

  3. Cranial dural arteriovenous shunts. Part 4. Clinical presentation of the shunts with leptomeningeal venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Baltsavias, Gerasimos; Spiessberger, Alex; Hothorn, Torsten; Valavanis, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Cranial dural arteriovenous fistulae have been classified into high- and low-risk lesions mainly based on the pattern of venous drainage. Those with leptomeningeal venous drainage carry a higher risk of an aggressive clinical presentation. Recently, it has been proposed that the clinical presentation should be considered as an additional independent factor determining the clinical course of these lesions. However, dural shunts with leptomeningeal venous drainage include a very wide spectrum of inhomogeneous lesions. In the current study, we correlated the clinical presentation of 107 consecutive patients harboring cranial dural arteriovenous shunts with leptomeningeal venous drainage, with their distinct anatomic and angiographic features categorized into eight groups based on the "DES" (Directness and Exclusivity of leptomeningeal venous drainage and features of venous Strain) concept. We found that among these groups, there are significant angioarchitectural differences, which are reflected by considerable differences in clinical presentation. Leptomeningeal venous drainage of dural sinus shunts that is neither direct nor exclusive and without venous strain manifested only benign symptoms (aggressive presentation 0%). On the other end of the spectrum, the bridging vein shunts with direct and exclusive leptomeningeal venous drainage and venous strain are expected to present aggressive symptoms almost always and most likely with bleeding (aggressive presentation 91.5%). Important aspects of the above correlations are discussed. Therefore, the consideration of leptomeningeal venous drainage alone, for prediction of the clinical presentation of these shunts appears insufficient. Angiographic analysis based on the above concept, offers the possibility to distinguish the higher- from the lower-risk types of leptomeningeal venous drainage. In this context, consideration of the clinical presentation as an additional independent factor for the prediction of their clinical

  4. Diffuse Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Secondary to Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian; Sabat, Shyamsunder; Agarwal, Amit; Thamburaj, Krishnamoorthy

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Aneurysmal rupture accounts for the majority of nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Increasingly recognized is the occurrence of nontraumatic convexity SAH unaccounted for by aneurysmal rupture. Case Report These presentations require consideration of rare but clinically significant sources of SAH. We report a patient presenting with prolonged mild headaches and acute onset of seizure like activity found to have diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage and extensive dural venous sinus thrombosis involving the superior sagittal sinus and right transverse-sigmoid sinuses. Conclusions There are few reported cases of SAH secondary to dural sinus thrombosis; however most of these are convexity hemorrhage. Sinus thrombosis presenting as diffuse SAH is extremely rare, as is showcased in this report. PMID:26097524

  5. Extensive dural sinus thrombosis and bilateral lateral rectus palsy as an uncommon complication of chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Anusha; Mohamad, Irfan; Sidek, Dinsuhaimi

    2013-01-25

    Dural venous sinus thrombosis, especially of the sigmoid sinus, is a known but uncommon intracranial extradural complication of chronic suppurative otitis media. Even rarer is the simultaneous occurrence of bilateral abducens palsy in the same patient. We report the case of an adolescent male who presented with signs of raised intracranial pressure, diplopia and bilateral lateral rectus palsy associated with a history of left ear discharge and neck swelling. Extensive dural sinus thrombosis extending right up to the left internal jugular vein was confirmed on CT imaging. The patient was successfully treated with thrombolytic agents and antibiotic therapy. The pathophysiology of the concurrent complications is discussed.

  6. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  7. Endovascular treatment of sphenoid wing dural arteriovenous fistula with pure cortical venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Miyake, Kosuke; Kunieda, Takenobu; Murao, Kenichi

    2014-07-01

    Curative endovascular treatment of sphenoid wing dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) with pure cortical venous drainage is challenging because of its rarity, lack of accessible dural sinus for transvenous embolization (TVE), and proximity of skull base vital regions. Direct surgery to disconnect venous reflux has been favored. We report the curative endovascular treatment of two sphenoid wing dAVFs with pure cortical venous drainage. One patient revealed complete obliteration of dAVF by a single session of transarterial embolization (TAE). As part of strategic TAE for this complex dAVF, we used a novel approach to create a complete flow-arrest condition in which coils and an occlusion balloon were combined. A liquid agent was then injected across the pathological fistula and into the parent venous apparatus, thereby occluding the lesion. The other patient was treated with percutaneous TVE after TAE was unsuccessful. With a specific strategy and appropriate devices, the microcatheter was successfully introduced through sigmoid sinus, transverse sinus, superior sagittal sinus, and refluxing cortical vein by puncture of the jugular vein. Coils were deployed at the venous side of the fistula, resulting in successful obliteration of the dAVF. Sphenoid wing dAVF with pure cortical venous drainage could be curable by endovascular treatment with proper strategy and instruments when anatomical condition permits.

  8. Balloon protection of the Labbé vein during transarterial embolization of a dural arterio-venous fistula

    PubMed Central

    Manisor, Monica; Wolff, Valérie; Aloraini, Ziad; Tigan, Leonardo; Kehrli, Pierre; Marescaux, Christian; Beaujeux, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Endovascular treatment of type III dural arterio-venous fistulas can be challenging if the fistulous point is close to a functionally important cortical vein. Methods A technique is described for temporary balloon protection of the vein of Labbé during transarterial Onyx embolization of a type III dural arterio-venous fistula. One illustrative case is presented. Careful anatomic consideration of the concerned venous segment (at the insertion point into the lateral sinus) and the choice of balloon minimized the risk of venous rupture. Results Using this method, satisfactory progression of Onyx was obtained within the arterio-venous shunt while preserving the patency of the Labbé vein. Conclusion Temporary balloon protection of the Labbé vein is a feasible option to preserve its patency during embolization of dural arterio-venous fistulas. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report on the use of temporary balloon protection of a cortical vein. PMID:26438051

  9. Transverse and Sigmoid Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Mimicking Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension and Carotid Cavernous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Spitze, Arielle; Gersztenkorn, David; Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Yalamanchili, Sushma; Diaz, Orlando; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) can produce a variety of symptoms depending on fistula location, size, and venous drainage. Although cavernous sinus fistulas (CCFs) classically present with symptoms of orbital venous congestion due to retrograde venous drainage into the superior ophthalmic vein (i.e. an arterialised "red eye") (Miller NR. Neurosurg Focus 2007;23:1--15), dAVFs not localised to the cavernous sinus rarely present with a "red eye" and instead produce increased intracranial pressure, which can mimic idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The authors present a unique case of an intracranial dAVF with clinical features suggestive of both CCF and IIH. Clinicians should be aware of this possibility to avoid delayed diagnosis of the intracranial dAVF.

  10. Infantile Dural Arteriovenous Fistula of the Transverse Sinus Presenting with Ocular Symptoms, Case Reports and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) of the transverse sinus with ophthalmic manifestations in young children are rare. We reviewed two cases of direct AVF of the transverse sinus with ocular manifestations managed at our institution. The first, a 2.5 years old male child presented with left exophthalmos. Angiography revealed AVF between the occipital artery and the transverse sinus. The second, a 2 years old female child, complained of left exophthalmos. Imaging studies showed bilateral direct AVFs of the transverse sinus with bilateral dysmaturation of the sigmoid sinus. Transarterial embolization was done in both cases. Clinical and radiological follow up revealed complete cure.This report suggests that DAVF of the transverse sinus supplied by the external carotid branches can present with ophthalmic manifestations especially if there is distal venous stenosis or obliteration involving sigmoid sinus. Transarterial embolization using coils and liquid embolic agents could be safe and feasible to obliterate the fistula. PMID:27226864

  11. Stenting Procedure for Sinus Stenosis with Transverse-Sigmoid Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, S.; Ueda, T.; Igase, K.; Ohue, S.; Kumon, Y.; Ohnishi, T.

    2006-01-01

    Summary We reported the dural AVF case with sinus stenosis, that was entirely treated through the stenting procedure. 61-year-old male had been realizing the attack which causes bilateral visual problem. He would have suffered from the intracranial hypertension caused by dural AVF in the right transverse sinus and left transverse sinus stenosis. We performed TVE and sinus stenting, then used the antiplatelet and the anticoagulant. However, six months later, he suffered from SAH due to recurrence of dural AVF. We performed TVE again, denser packing than usual. Two years later, he have no symptom, angiographically, there was no recurrence of dural AVF and patency of stented sinus. We think denser embolizations should have performed in case of dural AVF with sinus stenting. PMID:20569627

  12. [Evolution of angiographic signs of venous hypertension and clinical signs of intracranial hypertension in intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas].

    PubMed

    Biondi, A; Casasco, A; Houdart, E; Gioino, C; Sourour, N; Vivas, E; Dormont, D; Marsault, C

    1999-03-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) can cause cerebral venous hypertension (VHT). The most common mechanism is due to the fact that some dAVFs can drain retrogradelly in cortical (better defined as leptomeningeal) veins (directly or after drainage in a dural sinus) causing venous engorgement and consequently an impairment of the cerebral venous drainage. However, more rarely, dAVFs without a cortical venous drainage can also be responsible for VHT probably due to dAVF shunts causing insufficient antegrade cerebral venous drainage. In addition, dAVFs are often associated with stenosis and/or thrombosis of dural sinus(es) which can worsen the VHT. Raised pressure within the superior sagittal sinus causes impeded cerebrospinal reabsorption in the arachnoid villi allowing increased intracranial pressure. The venous engorgement in the cortical veins can cause a venous congestive encephalopathy analogous to the venous congestive myelopathy of the spinal dural AVFs. Clinically VHT can cause not only symptoms related to increased intracranial pressure but also seizures, neurological deficits, impairment of the cognitive functions and dementia. An important aspect is the risk of hemorrhage in dAVFs with a leptomeningeal venous drainage leading to VHT. Although the term VHT sensu strictu should be used if venous pressure measurements are performed, angiographic criteria for VHT such as delayed circulation time, venous engorgement and abnormal visualization of the cerebral veins are well established. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the angiographic signs of VHT in patients with dAVF and to study the course of the VHT and of the clinical signs of increased intracranial pressure before and after dAVF endovascular treatment. A retrospective chart analysis of 22 patients (13 males, 9 females) ranging in age from 20 to 87 years (mean: 53 ys.) with a dAVF associated with angiographic signs of VHT was performed. Ten dAVFs were located on the transverse/sigmoid sinus(es), 6

  13. Surgical management of dural arteriovenous fistulas of the transverse-sigmoid sinus in 42 patients.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Behzad; Morgan, Michael Kerin

    2013-04-01

    A retrospective study was performed to analyse a prospectively collected database from a single surgeon (M.K.M.) of transverse-sigmoid sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVF) between 1991 and August 2011. During the study period, 144 patients with 160 DAVF were managed. Sixty-five of the DAVF were located in the transverse-sigmoid sinus and 42 were treated with surgery, or embolisation and surgery. All patients who underwent surgery were symptomatic with retrograde cortical venous drainage. The average follow-up period was 18months (range, 2-82months). Total elimination of the DAVF was achieved in all instances, including two patients (5%) who required further surgery after postoperative cerebral angiography showed that some venous drainage had persisted after the first operation. There was no new permanent neurological deficit or mortality attributable to surgery. Our institutional experience shows that in selected patients with transverse-sigmoid sinus DAVF, the involved sinus can be surgically resected with a high success rate and it is as safe as many alternative options. We suggest that this definitive treatment option should be offered to patients, and the outcome should be compared to other treatment modalities.

  14. Core curriculum illustration: dural venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Sibi; Pereira, Alex; Eckerd, Morgan; Pawley, Barbara

    2016-11-28

    This is the 25th installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as a part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online, please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for study online at http://www.aseronline.org/curriculum/toc.htm .

  15. Dural arteriovenous fistulas as a cause of intracranial hypertension due to impairment of cranial venous outflow

    PubMed Central

    Cognard, C.; Casasco, A.; Toevi, M.; Houdart, E.; Chiras, J.; Merland, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—A retrospective study was carried out on 13 patients with intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) who presented with isolated or associated signs of intracranial hypertension.
METHODS—Nine patients presented with symptoms of intracranial hypertension at the time of diagnosis. Ocular fundoscopy available in 12 patients showed bilateral papilloedema in eight and optic disk atrophy in four. Clinical evolution was particularly noticeable in five patients because of chronic (two patients) or acute (after lumbar shunting or puncture: three patients, one death) tonsillar herniation.
RESULTS—Two patients had a type I fistula (drainage into a sinus, with a normal antegrade flow direction). The remaining 11 had type II fistulas (drainage into a sinus, with abnormal retrograde venous drainage into sinuses or cortical veins). Stenosis or thrombosis of the sinus(es) distal to the fistula was present in five patients. The cerebral venous drainage was abnormal in all patients.
CONCLUSION—Type II (and some type I) DAVFs may present as isolated intracranial hypertension mimicking benign intracranial hypertension. Normal cerebral angiography should be added as a fifth criterion of benign intracranial hypertension. The cerebral venous drainage pattern must be carefully studied by contralateral carotid and vertebral artery injections to correctly evaluate the impairment of the cerebral venous outflow. Lumbar CSF diversion (puncture or shunting) may induce acute tonsillar herniation and should be avoided absolutely. DAVF may induce intracranial hypertension, which has a poor long term prognosis and may lead to an important loss of visual acuity and chronic tonsillar herniation. Consequently, patients with intracranial hypertension must be treated, even agressively, to obliterate the fistula or at least to reduce the arterial flow and to restore a normal cerebral venous drainage. The endovascular treatment may associate arterial or transvenous

  16. Acute venous sinus thrombosis after chickenpox infection.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Vijay; Mittal, Lal Chand; Meena, S R; Sharma, Deepti; Khandelwal, Girish

    2014-08-01

    Chickenpox is one of the classic childhood diseases. Recently chicken pox has been reported in adults with more severe systemic and neurological complications. Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a life threatening disorder if not treated in time. We report a patient with post varicella CVT as a rare complication of primary Varicella zoster virus. Vasculitic arterial infarction is known while venous stroke has rarely been reported with Varicella-zoster virus infection. Here, we report an immunocompetent 30 yr old male who developed chickenpox after contact with his daughter two month back. He presented with acute neurological deficit, one week after onset of skin lesion. MR venography revealed non-visualisation of left transverse sinus and left sigmoid sinus suggestive of venous sinus thrombosis. Varicella infection is rarely associated with venous sinus thrombosis. Possibly hypercoagulable state produced by the infection or direct invasion of virus in venous endothelial wall with subsequent damage to endothelium leading to thrombosis could be the cause.

  17. Creating normograms of dural sinuses in healthy persons using computer-assisted detection for analysis and comparison of cross-section dural sinuses in the brain.

    PubMed

    Anconina, Reut; Zur, Dinah; Kesler, Anat; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Toledano, Ronen; Novack, Victor; Benkobich, Elya; Novoa, Rosa; Novic, Evelyne Farkash; Shelef, Ilan

    2017-06-01

    Dural sinuses vary in size and shape in many pathological conditions with abnormal intracranial pressure. Size and shape normograms of dural brain sinuses are not available. The creation of such normograms may enable computer-assisted comparison to pathologic exams and facilitate diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate normal magnetic resonance venography (MRV) studies in order to create normograms of dural sinuses using a computerized algorithm for vessel cross-sectional analysis. This was a retrospective analysis of MRV studies of 30 healthy persons. Data were analyzed using a specially developed Matlab algorithm for vessel cross-sectional analysis. The cross-sectional area and shape measurements were evaluated to create normograms. Mean cross-sectional size was 53.27±13.31 for the right transverse sinus (TS), 46.87+12.57 for the left TS (p=0.089) and 36.65+12.38 for the superior sagittal sinus. Normograms were created. The distribution of cross-sectional areas along the vessels showed distinct patterns and a parallel course for the median, 25th, 50th and 75th percentiles. In conclusion, using a novel computerized method for vessel cross-sectional analysis we were able to quantitatively characterize dural sinuses of healthy persons and create normograms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Risk score to predict the outcome of patients with cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ferro, José M; Bacelar-Nicolau, Helena; Rodrigues, Teresa; Bacelar-Nicolau, Leonor; Canhão, Patrícia; Crassard, Isabelle; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Dutra, Aurélio Pimenta; Massaro, Ayrton; Mackowiack-Cordiolani, Marie-Anne; Leys, Didier; Fontes, João; Stam, Jan; Barinagarrementeria, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Around 15% of patients die or become dependent after cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis (CVT). We used the International Study on Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus Thrombosis (ISCVT) sample (624 patients, with a median follow-up time of 478 days) to develop a Cox proportional hazards regression model to predict outcome, dichotomised by a modified Rankin Scale score >2. From the model hazard ratios, a risk score was derived and a cut-off point selected. The model and the score were tested in 2 validation samples: (1) the prospective Cerebral Venous Thrombosis Portuguese Collaborative Study Group (VENOPORT) sample with 91 patients; (2) a sample of 169 consecutive CVT patients admitted to 5 ISCVT centres after the end of the ISCVT recruitment period. Sensitivity, specificity, c statistics and overall efficiency to predict outcome at 6 months were calculated. The model (hazard ratios: malignancy 4.53; coma 4.19; thrombosis of the deep venous system 3.03; mental status disturbance 2.18; male gender 1.60; intracranial haemorrhage 1.42) had overall efficiencies of 85.1, 84.4 and 90.0%, in the derivation sample and validation samples 1 and 2, respectively. Using the risk score (range from 0 to 9) with a cut-off of >or=3 points, overall efficiency was 85.4, 84.4 and 90.1% in the derivation sample and validation samples 1 and 2, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity in the combined samples were 96.1 and 13.6%, respectively. The CVT risk score has a good estimated overall rate of correct classifications in both validation samples, but its specificity is low. It can be used to avoid unnecessary or dangerous interventions in low-risk patients, and may help to identify high-risk CVT patients. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Endovascular treatment of a traumatic dural arteriovenous fistula of the superior sagittal sinus using dual lumen balloon microcatheter

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yihao; Niu, Yin; Zhu, Gang; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVFs) induced by trauma in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) are rare and difficult to treat because of their unique midline location, multiplicity of arterial feeders, and critical venous drainage. We report a case of an endovascular treatment using dual lumen balloon microcatheter on a patient with post-traumatic SSS DAVF. By the use of dual lumen Scepter balloon microcatheter, proximal Onyx reflux was prevented. In this case, complete embolization of the DAVFs was achieved and the outcome of the patient was fairly good. PMID:27094527

  20. Single-Session Hematoma Removal and Transcranial Coil Embolization for a Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: A Technical Case Report.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Yosuke; Sato, Kenichi; Endo, Hidenori; Matsumoto, Yasushi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-08-01

    Patients with cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (CS dAVFs) with cortical venous varix are indicated for aggressive treatment because of the associated risk for intracranial hemorrhage. We present a case of surgical transvenous embolization in an 84-year-old woman with CS dAVF who presented with massive intracerebral hematoma. Cerebral angiograms revealed the dural AVF drained only into the superficial middle cerebral vein. Because an emergent mass reduction and prevention of rebleeding were necessary, single-session hematoma removal and transcranial embolization of a CS dAVF were performed in the neurosurgical operating room, using a mobile C-arm fluoroscopy. After the right frontotemporal craniotomy, intracerebral hematoma was removed and coil packing of the affected cavernous sinus was successfully performed via the dilated superficial middle cerebral vein. The transcortical vein approach enables occlusion of CS dAVF with isolated cortical venous drainage and may be a valuable alternative approach for some cases needed emergency craniotomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dural sinus thrombosis owing to polycythaemia vera in a 12-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Guo, H X; Chan, G C; Chiang, A K; Ho, M H; Chan, E Y T; Ha, S Y

    2012-08-01

    Because of the rarity of dural sinus thrombosis in children with polycythaemia vera (PV), the options for diagnosis and treatment remain elusive. A 12-year-old girl was admitted with dural sinus thrombosis associated with PV, diagnosed by magnetic resonance venography. She was managed with interventional endovascular thrombolectomy and venoplasty, phlebotomy, hydroxyurea, low molecular weight heparin, and aspirin followed by warfarin. She made a good recovery without residual neurological deficit. This case highlights the importance of diagnosis and appropriate intervention with multi-modality treatments in patients with PV and thrombosis.

  2. Dural sinus obstruction following head injury: a diagnostic and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Benifla, Mony; Yoel, Uri; Melamed, Israel; Merkin, Vladimir; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with skull fracture adjacent to a dural venous sinus (DVS) and evaluate the role of CT venography (CTV) in the diagnosis of the effect of this fracture on the involved DVS. METHODS The study comprised patients with vault or skull base fracture adjacent to a DVS who were admitted to 1 medical center during a 2-year period. The medical records were reviewed for the clinical and radiographic characteristics. All patients had undergone CTV to evaluate potential DVS pathology. The clinical and radiological findings of the patients with DVS pathology were compared with those of the patients with normal DVS. The groups were compared using the chi-square and t-tests for categorical and continuous data, respectively. The potential risk for poor outcome among the patients with DVS pathology was also investigated. RESULTS Of 434 patients with skull fractures, 41 (9.4%) had fractures adjacent to a DVS. DVS pathology was detected in 51% of patients (21 of 41 patients). For 9 (43%) patients, obstruction was extraluminal without thrombosis, and 12 (57%) patients had dural sinus thrombosis (DST). In patients with a positive-CTV scan, the severity of injury according to the Glasgow Coma Scale score at presentation was correlated with the presence of DST (p = 0.007). The sensitivity of noncontrast CT (NCCT) for DVS involvement was 38% among the patients with positive-CTV scans. For patients with DVS pathology, poor outcome was correlated with DST (intraluminal), rather than extraluminal obstruction without thrombosis (p = 0.02), and superior sagittal sinus (SSS) involvement (p = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS NCCT is not sensitive enough to detect DVS obstruction in patients with skull fracture adjacent to a DVS, and CTV should be performed in order to rule it out. A correlation was found between the severity of injury and the presence of DST, rather than extraluminal obstruction. The authors' findings

  3. Resolution of Trigeminal Neuralgia After Transvenous Embolization of a Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Fukutome, Kenji; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Park, Hun Soo; Wada, Takeshi; Motoyama, Yasushi; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) resulting from a dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) are rare. A case of cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (CSDAVF) in a patient with TN that resolved immediately after transvenous embolization (TVE) is described. A 75-year-old woman presented with continuous facial pain. On time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), a CSDAVF was suspected, and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) showed a CSDAVF. The TN completely resolved immediately after TVE, with no recurrence. Follow-up MRA showed complete obliteration of the fistula 13 months after TVE. The pulsatile flow at the posteromedial part of the cavernous sinus might have compressed the upper aspect of the Gasserian ganglion, causing TN. Disappearance of pulsatile flow after TVE might result in complete resolution of TN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An unusual presentation of a dural arteriovenous fistula of the sphenoparietal sinus

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Andrew; Plaha, Puneet; Byrne, James

    2014-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVFs) are a rare form of intracranial arteriovenous malformation. We present the case of a patient who presented in a previously undescribed manner with facial swelling and bruising initially misdiagnosed as cellulitis. He was found subsequently to have DAVFs of the sphenoparietal sinus that had hemorrhaged. The rarity of DAVFs at this location may account for this unique presentation. Successful treatment was achieved by transarterial embolization. PMID:24632907

  5. Focal stenosis of the sigmoid sinus causing intracranial venous hypertension: Case report, endovascular management, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Honarmand, Amir R; Hurley, Michael C; Ansari, Sameer A; Alden, Tord D; Kuhn, Ryan; Shaibani, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Regardless of the underlying pathology, elevated intracranial pressure is the endpoint of any impairment in either cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absorption (including arachnoid villi) or intracranial venous drainage. In all age groups, the predominant final common pathway for CSF drainage is the dural venous sinus system. Intracranial venous hypertension (ICVH) is an important vascular cause of intracranial hypertension (and its subsequent sequelae), which has often been ignored due to excessive attention to the arterial system and, specifically, arteriovenous shunts. Various anatomical and pathological entities have been described to cause ICVH. For the second time, we present a unique case of severe focal stenosis in the distal sigmoid sinus associated with concurrent hypoplasia of the contralateral transverse sinus causing a significant pressure gradient and intracranial hypertension, which was treated with endovascular stent placement and angioplasty.

  6. Baloon angioplasty for venous sinus stenosis in a idiopathic intracranial hypertension case.

    PubMed

    Bajrami, Arsida; Senadim, Songul; Cabalar, Murat; Azman, Filiz; Bozkurt, Dilek; Kara, Batuhan; Selcuk, Hakan; Yayla, Vildan

    2015-05-01

    The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) is a well characterised condition with intractable headaches, visual obscurations, and papilloedema as dominant features, mainly affecting obese women. With the advent of magnetic resonance (MR) venography and increased use of cerebral angiography, there has been recent emphasis on the significant number of patients with IIH found to have associated non-thrombotic dural venous sinus stenosis. This has led to a renewed interest in endovascular stenting and angioplasty as a treatment for IIH in patients non-responsive to medical treatment. We present a patient without known risk factors for IIH and non-responsive to treatment. The 19-year-old woman presented with headache and diplopia. She was diagnosed with IIH since she was five years of age and had been non-responsive to lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage and acetazolamide treatment. MR venography revealed thin calibration of transverse sinus. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) venous phase also revealed 50% stenosis of transverse sinus, 50% stenosis of left proximal sigmoid sinus and 90% stenosis of its distal part leading to obstruction of left transverse sinus outflow and forced directed drainage of left hemisphere to the anterior region.

  7. Spontaneous Aggressive Conversion of Venous Drainage Pattern in Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Treated with Onyx Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yeongu; Choi, Seok Keun; Lee, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) that showed spontaneous conversion of venous drainage pattern from Borden type II to type III within a four month period of follow-up. Upon admission, the patient presented with aggravated neurologic status and newly developed seizure. After admission, endovascular embolization was performed through the middle meningeal artery with Onyx®. Complete obliteration of dural arteriovenous shunt was confirmed by angiography, and the patient's clinical symptoms improved. Although most cases of DAVF show benign clinical course and conversion pattern, close follow-up is required to detect potential aggravation. PMID:28184352

  8. Transvenous embolization of a dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula via the inferior ophthalmic vein.

    PubMed

    Michels, Kevin S; Ng, John D; Falardeau, Julie; Roberts, Warren G; Petersen, Bryan; Nesbit, Gary M; Barnwell, Stanley L

    2007-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman presented with an acute onset of right periocular pain, diplopia, ocular injection, progressive proptosis, and periocular swelling. She had an unremarkable past medical history, and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and complete blood count were normal. A carotid-cavernous sinus fistula was suspected, and an MRI demonstrated enlargement of the superior ophthalmic vein posterior to the globe and enlargement of the inferior ophthalmic vein throughout its entire course. Cerebral arteriography demonstrated a dural cavernous sinus fistula. The inferior ophthalmic vein was accessed via the inferonasal orbital space and was catheterized for delivery of multiple platinum coils to the cavernous sinus fistula. Follow-up venograms demonstrated occlusion of the fistula. At 2-month follow-up, there was a residual sixth nerve palsy and resolution of symptoms, including proptosis and periocular swelling.

  9. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis presenting with auditory hallucinations and illusions.

    PubMed

    Wong, Victoria S S; Adamczyk, Peter; Dahlin, Brian; Richman, David P; Wheelock, Vicki

    2011-03-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may present with seizures or neuropsychiatric symptoms, but does not typically present with hallucinations. We present a case of venous thrombosis of the right sigmoid and transverse sinuses that presented with auditory hallucinations and illusions. We describe a 45-year-old woman with a history of myasthenia gravis, stable on oral prednisone and monthly intravenous immunoglobulin infusions, who started on a progesterone/estrogen combination contraceptive pill for menorrhagia 3 weeks before admission and presented with symptoms of headache, fever, and auditory hallucinations and illusions. The patient's cerebrospinal fluid showed lymphocytic pleocytosis. Two electroencephalograms showed significant right temporal lobe slowing. Magnetic resonance venogram of the brain showed venous sinus thrombosis of the right sigmoid and transverse sinuses. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a cortical venous infarct in the right middle temporal gyrus. The patient's auditory hallucinations and illusions resolved spontaneously weeks after presentation. This case suggests that auditory hallucinations and illusions should be added to the already broad spectrum of presenting features of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The nondominant right middle temporal gyrus may play a role in such auditory hallucinations.

  10. Neurobrucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ibrahimagić, Omer Ć; Smajlović, Dževdet; Dostović, Zikrija; Iljazović, Amra; Kojić, Biljana; Zonić, Lejla

    2017-10-01

    To present a case of co-occurrence of neurobrucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Case report.  We presented 49-year-old Caucasian domicile female-farmer with a history of headache, weakness, and vomiting for a period of three months. Also, she had significant papilledema. We diagnosed rare co-morbidity of neurobrucellosis (confirmed after ELISA-test in serum samples and CSF analysis of pleocytosis/increase in protein/decrease in glucose level) in the setting of cerebral venous thrombosis developed in left sigmoid/left transverse sinus (confirmed after MRV of brain). Favorable outcome was achieved by applying protracted polymicrobial antibiotic therapy and heparin. It may be challenging to diagnose neurobrucellosis, especially in patients with atypical presentation and abortive clinical forms. The co-morbidity of neurobrucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is uncommon. However, it provides a possibility of brucella-colonization in cerebral venous sinuses as a potential hidden link between them. Patients with severe and persistent headache, as well as other neurological symptoms/signs should be considered for neurobrucellosis in endemic, but also in brucella non-endemic regions due to migrations. According to literature survey, this co-occurrence of neurobrucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is third one reported from Europe.

  11. Endovascular Treatment of Venous Sinus Stenosis in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: Complications, Neurological Outcomes, and Radiographic Results

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Robert M.; Wang, Tony; Ding, Dale; Durst, Christopher R.; Crowley, R. Webster; Chalouhi, Nohra; Hasan, David M.; Dumont, Aaron S.; Jabbour, Pascal; Liu, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) may result in a chronic debilitating disease. Dural venous sinus stenosis with a physiologic venous pressure gradient has been identified as a potential etiology in a number of IIH patients. Intracranial venous stenting has emerged as a potential treatment alternative. Methods. A systematic review was carried out to identify studies employing venous stenting for IIH. Results. From 2002 to 2014, 17 studies comprising 185 patients who underwent 221 stenting procedures were reported. Mean prestent pressure gradient was 20.1 mmHg (95% CI 19.4–20.7 mmHg) with a mean poststent gradient of 4.4 mmHg (95% CI 3.5–5.2 mmHg). Complications occurred in 10 patients (5.4%; 95% CI 4.7–5.4%) but were major in only 3 (1.6%). At a mean clinical follow-up of 22 months, clinical improvement was noted in 130 of 166 patients with headaches (78.3%; 95% CI 75.8–80.8%), 84 of 89 patients with papilledema (94.4%; 95% CI 92.1–96.6%), and 64 of 74 patients with visual symptoms (86.5%; 95% CI 83.0–89.9%). In-stent stenosis was noted in six patients (3.4%; 95% CI 2.5–4.3%) and stent-adjacent stenosis occurred in 19 patients (11.4%; 95% CI 10.4–12.4), resulting in restenting in 10 patients. Conclusion. In IIH patients with venous sinus stenosis and a physiologic pressure gradient, venous stenting appears to be a safe and effective therapeutic option. Further studies are necessary to determine the long-term outcomes and the optimal management of medically refractory IIH. PMID:26146651

  12. Transarterial Onyx Embolization for Patients with Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas Who Have Failed Transvenous Embolization.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Duan, Chuan-Zhi; Huang, Li-Jing; Zhang, Xin; He, Xu-Ying; Li, Xi-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Transvenous embolization is the treatment of choice for cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (csDAVFs) despite occasional difficulty in transvenous catheterization. We reported our experience in the treatment of csDAVFs by transarterial Onyx embolization in patients who had failed transvenous catheterization. We reviewed the clinical and radiographic records of csDAVFs patients receiving transarterial Onyx embolization after failed transvenous Onyx embolization at our institution over a period of 31 months. Success was defined as complete or near complete occlusion upon angiographic examination. In seven cases, the microcatheter failed to reach the cavernous sinus; in the remaining case, the internal jugular vein was occlusive. Eight sessions of the embolization and catheterization procedures via the arterial routes were conducted. Among them, five cases via the middle meningeal artery and the other three via the accessory meningeal artery. Angiography, immediately after embolization, revealed complete occlusion in seven cases (87.5 %) and partial occlusion in the remaining case. Angiographic follow-up (range, 6-10 months) showed that all patients achieved complete embolization. In cases where transvenous embolization of the cavernous sinus is difficult, transarterial embolization of the fistulas offers a safe and effective alternative.

  13. [Transvenous Embolization by Direct Puncture of the Superior Sagittal Sinus Using Indocyanine Green(ICG)Videoangiography for Treatment of Dural Arteriovenous Fistula of the Transverse-Sigmoid Sinus:A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Jo; Kono, Kenichi; Umesaki, Arisa; Kashimura, Yojiro; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Terada, Tomoaki

    2017-07-01

    We report a case of dural arteriovenous fistula at the left transverse sinus and sigmoid sinus(TS-dAVF), which was treated with transvenous embolization(TVE)by direct puncture of the superior sagittal sinus(SSS)under indocyanine green(ICG)fluoroscopic guidance. A 71-year-old woman presented with pulsatile tinnitus and progressive dementia. A left TS-dAVF with retrograde SSS and cortical venous reflux(Cognard type IIb)was demonstrated on cerebral angiography. The left internal jugular vein and distal portion of the right transverse sinus were occluded. We considered that TVE via the femoral vein would be difficult for complete cure. We performed trepanation of the frontal portion of the SSS. The SSS was directly punctured with an 18-G needle under ICG fluoroscopic guidance. We inserted a 4-Fr sheath into the SSS. A microcatheter was navigated into the affected sinus. Coils were placed through the microcatheter. The dAVF was completely diminished. No complications occurred. The patient's pulsatile tinnitus disappeared and dementia improved. Transvenous approach with direct puncture of the SSS under ICG fluoroscopic guidance was a useful approach for the treatment of dAVF when other approaches were difficult.

  14. Embolization of a Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula with Onyx via Direct Puncture of the Cavernous Sinus through the Superior Orbital Fissure

    PubMed Central

    Amiridze, N.; Zoarski, G.; Darwish, R.; Obuchowski, A.; Soloveychic, N.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Treatment of cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (CSDAVF) may be challenging. We describe a patient who had presented with progressive ocular symptoms due to CSDAVF requiring urgent interventional therapy. Initial attempts to embolize the fistula utilizing a transvenous approach through the inferior petrosal sinus failed because of difficult anatomy. Successful occlusion of the fistula was subsequently achieved with injection of ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, Onyx (EV3 Neurovascular, Irvine, CA, USA), via direct percutaneous puncture of the cavernous sinus through the superior orbital fissure. A brief period of asystole during the initial injection of Onyx may be the result of the trigeminocardiac reflex. PMID:20465896

  15. Therapeutic management of intracranial dural arteriovenous shunts with leptomeningeal venous drainage: report of 53 consecutive patients with emphasis on transarterial embolization with acrylic glue.

    PubMed

    Guedin, Pierre; Gaillard, Stephan; Boulin, Anne; Condette-Auliac, Stephanie; Bourdain, Frederic; Guieu, Stephanie; Dupuy, Michel; Rodesch, Georges

    2010-03-01

    There is a strong correlation between the venous drainage pattern of intracranial dural arteriovenous shunts (ICDAVSs) and the affected patients' clinical presentation. The ICDAVSs that have cortical venous reflux (CVR) (retrograde leptomeningeal drainage: Borden Type 2 and 3 lesions) are very aggressive and have a poor natural history. Although the necessity of treatment remains debatable in ICDAVSs that drain exclusively into a sinus (Borden Type 1), lesions with CVR must be treated because of the negative effects of the retrograde venous drainage. Surgery, radiosurgery, and embolization have been proposed for management of these lesions, but endovascular therapy is considered the most appropriate therapeutic strategy in ICDAVSs. New embolic materials, such as Onyx, have been recently developed and are considered to represent a kind of "gold standard" for embolization of these lesions. The purpose of this study is to emphasize the importance of transarterial embolization using acrylic glue in the therapeutic management of ICDAVSs with CVR, and to compare the results the authors obtained using this treatment with those reported in the literature for Onyx treatment of the same type of dural shunts. The clinical and radiological records of 53 consecutive patients suffering from ICDAVSs with CVR (Borden Types 2 or 3) were reviewed. All cases were managed with the same angiographic and therapeutic protocol. Localization of the lesions, their clinical symptoms, their angioarchitecture, their therapeutic management, and the results were analyzed. Fourteen ICDAVSs were located at the superior sagittal sinus and/or convexity veins, 13 at the transverse and sigmoid sinuses, 10 at the tentorium, 5 in the anterior cranial fossa, 4 at the foramen magnum, 3 at the torcula, 2 at the straight sinus, and 1 at the vein of Galen. One patient presented with an infantile form of ICDAVS with multiple shunts. Hemorrhage had occurred in 36% of cases. Forty-three patients underwent

  16. Endovascular management of sigmoid sinus dural arteriovenous fistula associated with sinus stenosis in an infant.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John M; Benifla, Moni; Itshayek, Eyal; Moscovici, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    A 4-month-old female presented with a dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF), which was successfully managed using endovascular techniques. There are very few case series reporting DAVF in infants younger than 12 months and, to our knowledge, only 60 pediatric patients with DAVF have been reported to date. Although most DAVF have a benign course, they can result in life-threatening hemorrhage. Endovascular therapies are usually indicated in the management of these neurosurgical vascular malformations. Endovascular therapy of DAVF in neonatal patients presents some major issues. Gaining arterial access may be problematic in femoral arteries too small for the introduction of a sizeable guiding catheter. The volumes of contrast and infused fluids must be carefully monitored to prevent fluid overload. Radiation exposure should be restricted as far as possible. This report contributes to the limited body of evidence on neonatal DAVF and its endovascular management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Venous sinuses of the dura mater of the bird brain].

    PubMed

    Krasnikov, Iu A

    1988-04-01

    By means of corrosive, injection and tracheoscopy methods venous formations of the brain have been studied in 19 species of birds--endemical for Far East--from 12 orders. Four types of the venous sinuses structure have been distinguished in the dura mater: the first type of the structure is specific for birds that live an inactive and quiet life (blue rock pigeon, Ussuric pheasant, Tetrastes bonasia, domestic hen). The second type of the sinus structure occurs in birds, that sharply change the speed and height of their flight (Otus bakkamoena). The most manifested changes in the sinus structure are noted in waterfowl and diving birds, that spend much time in flight, in dendrocolaptidae and in day predaceous birds; in them the longitudinal sinus forms a rhombus.

  18. Lower motor neuron facial palsy in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Girish Baburao; Ravi, Yadav; Nagaraja, Dindigur; Veerendrakumar, Mustare

    2013-01-01

    With advances in the neuro-imaging modalities, diverse manifestations of the cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT) are being recognized. There are very few reports of isolated cranial nerve palsies in CVT. In this case report, we describe a patient of lower motor neuron facial palsy with CVT who was successfully treated with anticoagulation, highlighting the atypical manifestation of the disease. PMID:23914113

  19. A rare localization of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Case report

    PubMed Central

    CARANGELO, B.; LAVALLE, L.; TIEZZI, G.; BRANCO, D.; LIPPA, L.; MILEO, E.; COSTANTINO, G.; MARIOTTINI, A.; MUSCAS, G.; MATURO, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work the Authors report their experience on the treatment of a case of cavernous venous sinus thrombosis. The diagnosis is clinical and neuroradiological, CT, MRN, cerebral angiography and orbital venography have aided in establishing the diagnosis during life. Very interesting is the therapeutic approach. PMID:26017108

  20. Onyx is associated with poor venous penetration in the treatment of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Spiros L; Kadkhodayan, Yasha; Ray, Wilson Z; Zipfel, Gregory J; Cross, DeWitte T; Moran, Christopher J; Derdeyn, Colin P

    2014-09-01

    The use of Onyx has become the mainstream for the treatment of cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and arteriovenous malformations, but the reported success for type I spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (sDAVFs) remains limited. We review our experience with Onyx and report its limitations in the treatment of spinal AVFs. We retrospectively reviewed the Interventional Neuroradiology Procedure database at Washington University for cases of sDAVF embolization. Radiology reports were reviewed for fistula classification, treatment technique, and initial and follow-up results. Angiographic images were reviewed to confirm diagnosis, treatment, and penetration of embolisate into the draining vein. With the use of Onyx, sDAVFs were obliterated in six of seven patients at the time of treatment. Follow-up angiography confirmed sDAVF obliteration in two patients, and recurrence in two cases. Two patients had no follow-up. One patient not cured at the time of treatment was treated surgically. Of the nine total treatments, Onyx successfully crossed the nidus into the draining vein in only four cases. Successful venous embolization was facilitated with positioning of the microcatheter to less than 5 mm from the nidus in three of the four cases. The use of n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) resulted in venous penetration in eight of 10 cases, and short term follow-up cure in seven of 10 patients. Our experience with Onyx for type I sDAVF embolization has been tempered by difficulty in achieving venous penetration and, consequently, a high rate of recurrence. For management of these fistulas, we favor NBCA or surgical treatment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Extreme clinical presentations of venous stasis: coronary sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kachalia, Amit; Sideras, Panagiotis; Javaid, Mian; Muralidharan, Sethu; Stevens-Cohen, Pilar

    2013-11-01

    Sixty six year old male with history of heart failure was admitted for dysphagia, weight loss. CT scan chest revealed diffuse oesophageal wall thickening. Upper endoscopy, oesophagogram confirmed diagnosis of achalasia. TTE revealed severely reduced biventricular systolic function with LVEF 10%; PASP 75-80 mmHg. Parasternal long views showed dilated coronary sinus with a visible, mobile 2.0 cm thrombus. Pro-thrombotic workup was negative. Coronary sinus thrombosis has been identified as a rare complication to invasive cardiac procedures causing damage to coronary sinus endothelium and in hypercoagulable states.Typically acute thrombosis presents with chest pain, dynamic ECG changes, but chronic development does not present with ischaemic signs due to formation of efficient collateral circulation. We present a case report of stable primary coronary sinus thrombus incidentally diagnosed, secondary to chronic venous stasis in coronary circulation. Currently, there are no guidelines to assist physicians in long term management of such patients and thus warrants further investigations.

  2. Embryological Consideration of Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    TANAKA, Michihiro

    2016-01-01

    The topographical distribution of dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) was analyzed based on the embryological anatomy of the dural membrane. Sixty-six consecutive cases of intracranial and spinal DAVFs were analyzed based on the angiography, and each shunt point was identified according to the embryological bony structures. The area of dural membranes was categorized into three different groups: a ventral group located on the endochondral bone (VE group), a dorsal group located on the membranous bone (DM group) and a falcotentorial group (FT group) located in the falx cerebri, tentorium cerebelli, falx cerebelli, and diaphragm sellae. The FT group was designated when the dural membrane was formed only with the dura propria (meningeal layer of the dura mater) and not from the endosteal dura. Cavernous sinus, sigmoid sinus, and anterior condylar confluence was categorized to VE group, which had a female predominance, more benign clinical presentations, and a lower rate of cortical and spinal venous reflux. Transverse sinus, confluence, and superior sagittal sinus belonged to the DM group. Olfactory groove, falx, tent of the cerebellum, and nerve sleeve of spinal cord were categorized to the FT group, which presented later in life and which had a male predominance, more aggressive clinical presentations, and significant cortical and spinal venous reflux. The DAVFs was associated with the layers of the dural membrane characterized by the two different embryological bony structures. The FT group was formed only with the dura propria as an independent risk factor for aggressive clinical course and hemorrhage of DAVFs. PMID:27250699

  3. Onyx 18 embolisation of dural arteriovenous fistula via arterial and venous pathways: preliminary experience and evaluation of the short-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Long, X-A; Karuna, T; Zhang, X; Luo, B; Duan, C-Z

    2012-01-01

    Objective This paper mainly focuses on our preliminary experience and short-term outcome evaluation of embolisation of non-cavernous dural arteriovenous fistulas (ncsDAVFs) and cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (csDAVFs) using Onyx 18 (ev3, Plymouth, MN), and in combination with coils, via arterial and venous approaches, respectively. Methods Between August 2008 and March 2010, 21 DAVFs (11 ncsDAVFs and 10 csDAVFs; age range: 28–68 years; 12 females and 9 males) were undertaken. Borden classification showed Type III in 1 and Type II in 10 ncsDAVFs, and Type II in 4 and Type I in 6 csDAVFs. Onyx 18 was used in 11 ncsDAVFs (10 via single feeder and 1 via 2 feeders). Onyx 18 or in combination with coils was used in 10 csDAVFs (9 via the inferior petrosal sinus and 1 via the superior ophthalmic vein). Results Total occlusion in immediate angiography was achieved in 18 cases (85.7%; 10 ncsDAVFs and 8 csDAVFs), and near-total occlusion in 1 ncsDAVF and 2 csDAVFs. Onyx 18 was migrated into normal vasculature in two ncsDAVFs without any sequelae. One csDAVF had VI cranial nerve palsy post-operatively, which completely recovered 2 weeks post-embolisation. Follow-up angiography at 3–12 months showed complete occlusion in 20 cases (95.2%; 10 ncsDAVFs and 10 csDAVFs). One ncsDAVF (4.8%) recurred after 3 months and was successfully re-embolised. Conclusion Preliminary results achieved after embolising 11 ncsDAVFs and 10 csDAVFs using Onyx 18 and in combination with coils via arterial and venous pathways, respectively, appeared to be safe, feasible and effective, as 95.2% of cases were totally occluded without any clinical sequelae. PMID:22374275

  4. Onyx removal after embolization of a superior sagittal sinus dural arteriovenous fistula involving scalp artery

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Jun; Maruya, Jun; Nishimaki, Keiichi; Ito, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) in superior sagittal sinus (SSS) requires multimodal treatment. Onyx embolization is useful for DAVF; however, scalp artery embolization has cast extrusion risk. Case Description: A 59-year-old male presented with involuntary movements of both legs and progressive dementia. Cerebral angiography demonstrated the DAVF in the SSS fed by bilateral superficial temporal, occipital, and middle meningeal arteries. The posterior SSS was thrombosed, and the main drainers were cortical veins. Combined treatment with transarterial embolization using Onyx and transvenous embolization using coils was performed. Although symptoms were improved, a small DAVF remained. Two months later, Onyx cast extrusion through the scalp was observed, requiring removal and debridement because of infection at the extrusion sites. Surgery for the residual DAVF would be difficult because of scalp condition; therefore, an additional endovascular treatment was conducted, completely occluding DAVF. Conclusion: Onyx embolization is useful for DAVF; however, scalp artery embolization has cast extrusion risk. Therefore, scalp infection should be considered because it may preclude additional surgical procedures. PMID:27313969

  5. Onyx removal after embolization of a superior sagittal sinus dural arteriovenous fistula involving scalp artery.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Jun; Maruya, Jun; Nishimaki, Keiichi; Ito, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Most dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) in superior sagittal sinus (SSS) requires multimodal treatment. Onyx embolization is useful for DAVF; however, scalp artery embolization has cast extrusion risk. A 59-year-old male presented with involuntary movements of both legs and progressive dementia. Cerebral angiography demonstrated the DAVF in the SSS fed by bilateral superficial temporal, occipital, and middle meningeal arteries. The posterior SSS was thrombosed, and the main drainers were cortical veins. Combined treatment with transarterial embolization using Onyx and transvenous embolization using coils was performed. Although symptoms were improved, a small DAVF remained. Two months later, Onyx cast extrusion through the scalp was observed, requiring removal and debridement because of infection at the extrusion sites. Surgery for the residual DAVF would be difficult because of scalp condition; therefore, an additional endovascular treatment was conducted, completely occluding DAVF. Onyx embolization is useful for DAVF; however, scalp artery embolization has cast extrusion risk. Therefore, scalp infection should be considered because it may preclude additional surgical procedures.

  6. Local Intrasinus Thrombolysis for Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Karanam, Lakshmi sudha Prasanna; Baddam, Sridhar Reddy; Pamidimukkala, Vijaya; Vemuri, Ramatharaknath; Byrapaneni, Sravanthi; Polavarapu, Raghavasarma

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral venous strokes due to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) have varied presentation and clinical outcome. Despite aggressive medical treatment with optimal anticoagulation, some patients develop progressive neurologic deterioration causing significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of the present series is to analyze the safety and efficacy of in situ thrombolysis in patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in severe clinical grade and refractory to conventional medical management. Materials and methods Twenty-nine patients with cerebral venous thrombosis who received in situ thrombolysis during a 3-year period (April 2013 to April 2016) were included in the study. Tissue plasminogen activator (tpa) was used in all the patients. The lytic agent was infused into the sinus via the micro catheter. Data regarding demographic, clinical, and radiologic features were analyzed in all the patients. Results Recanalization of the affected sinuses was achieved in all the cases. Twenty-four patients had good outcome (mRs 0 or1) and three patients had mild deficits (mRs 2). One patient had moderate disability (mRs 3). One patient succumbed due to increased hematoma causing midline shift and transtentorial herniation. At 3 months follow–up, 26 patients were asymptomatic and two patients had minor symptoms. Conclusion Local intrasinus thrombolysis (LIST) is safe and effective method in patients with poor clinical grade and the present study highlights the benefit of thrombolysis, particularly in patients unresponsive to anticoagulation. The improved efficacy of this therapy depends on early recognition of worsening symptoms and timely intervention. PMID:27829970

  7. Long-term prognosis of cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis. results of the VENOPORT study.

    PubMed

    Ferro, J M; Lopes, M G; Rosas, M J; Ferro, M A; Fontes, J

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the long-term mortality, functional recovery and long-term complications of cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis (CVDST) admitted to Portuguese hospitals. A follow-up of symptomatic CVDST admitted to Portuguese hospitals since 1980 was performed. Fifty-one patients (retrospective cases) were re-evaluated during 1996; 91 consecutively admitted patients from 6/1995 to 6/1998 were followed up to 1999. In 1996, 4 (8%) of the retrospective cases had died (3 patients died in the acute phase), 4 (8%) could not be reached, 33 (64%) had recovered completely (Rankin 0 or 1) and 3 (6%) were dependent. The prospective cases had a mean follow-up of 1 year: 6 (7%) patients died in the acute phase, one (1%) died during follow-up, 75 (82%) recovered completely, and only 1 (1%) was dependent. For the prospective cases, worsening after admission (OR = 18.2; 95% CI = 2.9-112.4) and encephalopathy as the presenting syndrome (OR = 7.1; 95% CI = 1.2-40.9) predicted death or dependency, while absence of aphasia (OR 6.7, 95% CI = 1.6-33) and no worsening after admission (OR = 5.9; 95% CI = 1.6-20) predicted total recovery. During follow-up of the prospective cases, 4 (5%) patients had thrombotic events, 8 (10%) patients experienced seizures, 9 (11%) complained of severe headaches and 1 patient suffered severe visual loss. The long-term functional prognosis of patients with CVDST was fairly good with complete recovery in the majority of cases. However, these patients had a moderate risk of further thrombotic events and seizures. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Sigmoid sinus cortical plate dehiscence induces pulsatile tinnitus through amplifying sigmoid sinus venous sound.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shan; Wang, Lizhen; Yang, Jiemeng; Mao, Rui; Liu, Zhaohui; Fan, Yubo

    2017-02-08

    Sigmoid sinus cortical plate dehiscence (SSCPD) is common in pulsatile tinnitus (PT) patients, and is treated through SSCPD resurfacing surgery in clinic, but the bio-mechanism is not clear as so far. This study aimed to clarify the bio-mechanism of PT sensation induced by SSCPD, and quantify the relationship of cortical plate (CP) thickness and PT sensation intensity. It was hypothesized that SSCPD would induce PT through significantly amplifying sigmoid sinus (SS) venous sound in this study. Finite element (FE) analysis based on radiology data of typical patient was used to verify this hypothesis, and was validated with clinical reports. In cases with different CP thickness, FE simulations of SS venous sound generation and propagation procedure were performed, involving SS venous flow field, vibration response of tissue overlying dehiscence area (including SS vessel wall and CP) and sound propagation in temporal bone air cells. It was shown in results that SS venous sound at tympanic membrane was 56.9dB in SSCPD case and -45.2dB in intact CP case, and was inaudible in all thin CP cases. It was concluded that SSCPD would directly induce PT through significantly amplifying SS venous sound, and thin CP would not be the only pathophysiology of PT. This conclusion would provide a theoretical basis for the design of SSCPD resurfacing surgery for PT patients with SSCPD or thin CP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The use of autologous venous blood for maxillary sinus floor augmentation in conjunction with sinus membrane elevation: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Rang; Choi, Byung-Ho; Xuan, Feng; Jeong, Seung-Mi

    2010-03-01

    There have been reports of successful bone formation with sinus floor elevation induced by simply elevating the maxillary sinus membrane and filling the sinus cavity with a blood clot. We investigated the feasibility of maxillary sinus floor augmentation using the patient's own venous blood in conjunction with a sinus membrane elevation procedure. An implant that protruded 8 mm into the maxillary sinus after sinus membrane elevation was placed in the maxillary sinus of six adult female mongrel dogs. The resulting space between the membrane and the sinus floor was filled with autologous venous blood retrieved from each dog. The implants were left in place for 6 months. During the experimental period, the created space collapsed and the sinus membrane fell down onto the implant. A small amount of new bone formation occurred in the space created by the collapsed membrane. The average height of newly formed bone around the implants in the sinus was 2.7+/-0.7 mm on the buccal side and 0.6+/-0.3 mm on the palatal side. The results of this pilot study indicate that blood clots do not have sufficient integrity to enable the sinus membrane to remain in an elevated position for therapeutically effective periods of time. Accordingly, it is recommended that this method be used only when a small amount of new bone formation is necessary around implants in the maxillary sinus cavity.

  10. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with cerebral hemorrhage during early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Quanmin; Guo, Pin; Ge, Jianwei; Qiu, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) rarely induces cerebral hemorrhage, and CVST with cerebral hemorrhage during early pregnancy is extremely rare. Upon literature review, we are able to find only one case of CVST with cerebral hemorrhage in early pregnancy. In this paper, we report another case of a 27-year-old patient who developed CVST with cerebral hemorrhage in her fifth week of pregnancy. Although the optimal treatment for this infrequent condition remains controversial, we adopted anticoagulation as the first choice of treatment and obtained favorable results. PMID:25630781

  11. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis associated with a combined contraceptive ring.

    PubMed

    Fugate, Jennifer E; Robinson, Maisha T; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2011-03-01

    Combined contraceptive vaginal rings are used as an alternative to oral contraceptives with a purported advantage of allowing lower hormonal doses, and thus potentially confer a lower venous thromboembolism risk. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) has not been previously described in association with use of a combined contraceptive ring. A 32-year-old white woman presented with severe headache progressively worsening over days and subsequently developed acute left sided hemiplegia and sensory loss. Brain imaging revealed acute right parietal cortical infarction and extensive CVST. Evaluation for primary thrombophilia was unrevealing. The sole hypercoagulable risk factor identified was use of a vaginal contraceptive ring. The patient was anticoagulated and demonstrated marked clinical improvement. We report the first described case of CVST associated with use of a vaginal contraceptive ring. CVST should be recognized as a potentially fatal complication related to this therapy.

  12. Delay in hospital admission of patients with cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ferro, José M; Lopes, M G; Rosas, M J; Fontes, J

    2005-01-01

    Factors influencing early hospital admission have been described for several stroke types but not for cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis (CVT). CVT is more difficult to diagnose than arterial stroke; delay in hospital admission may postpone CVT treatment. The purposes of this study were: (1) to describe the delay between the onset of symptoms and hospital admission of patients with CVT, and (2) to identify the variables that influence that delay. We registered the interval (days) between the onset of symptoms and hospital admission in 91 consecutive patients admitted to 20 Portuguese hospitals between June 1995 and June 1998. We also studied the impact of admission delay on treatments (prescription of anticoagulants and the number of days elapsed between the onset of symptoms and start of anticoagulation and admission). Median admission delay was 4 days. Twenty-two (25%) patients were admitted within 24 h. Two thirds of the patients were admitted within 7 days and 75% within 13 days. In multiple logistic regression analysis, admission within 24 h was positively associated with mental status disorder (delirium or abulia; OR = 4.59; 95% CI = 1.41-14.89) and negatively associated with headache (OR = 0.03; 95% CI = 0.00-0.32). Presentation as isolated intracranial hypertension was associated with admission delay of more than 4 days (OR = 2.63; 95% CI = 0.97-7.14). Papilloedema was associated with an admission delay of more than 13 days (OR = 4.69; 95% CI = 1.61-13.61). There was no association between admission delay and the proportion of anticoagulated patients. The interval between onset of symptoms and start of anticoagulation was shorter in patients admitted earlier (p = 0.0001, for either admission within 24 h, 4 or 13 days). There is a considerable delay until the clinical picture associated with CVT is recognised as justifying hospital admission, especially when patients present with symptoms identical to isolated intracranial hypertension syndrome

  13. Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis during Everest Expedition: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, P.; Shrestha, A. M.; Bhattarai, S.; Sapkota, D.; Sharma, N.; Devkota, U. P.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare but serious disorder that is associated with a poor clinical outcome. We report a 35-year-old man who had a severe headache and diplopia while climbing Mount Everest. His MR venography showed right transverse and right sigmoid sinus thrombosis. He improved on anticoagulant and symptomatic measures. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis at high altitude is discussed. PMID:27872776

  14. Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis during Everest Expedition: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Khanal, P; Thapa, L; Shrestha, A M; Bhattarai, S; Sapkota, D; Sharma, N; Devkota, U P

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare but serious disorder that is associated with a poor clinical outcome. We report a 35-year-old man who had a severe headache and diplopia while climbing Mount Everest. His MR venography showed right transverse and right sigmoid sinus thrombosis. He improved on anticoagulant and symptomatic measures. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis at high altitude is discussed.

  15. Longitudinal Volume Quantification of Deep Medullary Veins in Patients with Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis : Venous Volume Assessment in Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Using SWI.

    PubMed

    Dempfle, A K; Harloff, A; Schuchardt, F; Bäuerle, J; Yang, S; Urbach, H; Egger, K

    2017-06-06

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) visualizes small cerebral veins with high sensitivity and could, thus, enable quantification of hemodynamics of deep medullary veins. We aimed to evaluate volume changes of deep medullary veins in patients with acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) over time in comparison to healthy controls. All magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments were executed at 3 T using a 32-channel head coil. Based on SWI and semiautomatic postprocessing (statistical parametric mapping [SPM8] and ANTs), the volume of deep medullary veins was quantified in 14 patients with acute CVST at baseline and the 6‑month follow-up, as well as in 13 healthy controls undergoing repeated MRI examination with an interscan interval of at least 1 month. Deep medullary venous volume change over time was significantly different between healthy controls and patient groups (p < 0.001). Patients with superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST) showed a significant decline from baseline to follow-up measurements (9.8 ± 4.9 ml versus 7.5 ± 4.2 ml; p = 0.02), whereas in patients with transverse sinus thrombosis (TST) and healthy controls no significant volume changes were observable. Venous volume quantification was feasible and reproducible both in healthy volunteers and in patients. The decrease of venous volume in patients over time represents improvement of venous drainage, reduction of congestion, and normalization of microcirculation due to treatment. Thus, quantification of venous microcirculation could be valuable for estimation of prognosis and guidance of CVST therapy in the future.

  16. Sinus pericranii, petrosquamosal sinus and extracranial sigmoid sinus: Anatomical variations to consider during a retroauricular approach.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Juan Carlos; Lopes, Paula Tardim; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Tsuji, Robinson Koji

    2017-06-01

    Lateral and sigmoid sinus malformations are uncommon and dangerous anatomical variations that surgeons may encounter when performing a retroauricular approach. We report three cases of rare temporal bone venous sinus anomalies seen in patients who underwent cochlear implant surgery. The first patient had a diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome and presented a bilateral persistent petrosquamosal sinus with sigmoid sinus agenesis, which made mastoidectomy for cochlear implantation difficult. The second patient presented an anomalous venous lake in the occipital region, which communicated the left dural venous sinuses with a conglomerate of pericranial vessels in the left nuchal region, also consistent with left sinus pericranii. The third patient presented with an extracranial sigmoid sinus that produced a troublesome bleeding immediately after the muscular-periosteal flap incision was performed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evolutionary History of Multiple Dural Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Burbano, Braulio; Correa Diaz, Edgar Patricio; Jácome Sánchez, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) are abnormal communications between arteries and veins or dural venous sinuses, which sit between the sheets of the dura. They represent 10% to 15% of intracranial vascular malformations. Clinical manifestations and prognosis depend on the pattern of venous drainage and location. The clinical presentation of DAVF may be mistaken for vascular or nonvascular brain pathologies. For that reason, within the differential diagnosis come a wide range of conditions, such as secondary headaches, encephalopathies, dementias including those with rapid progression, neurodegenerative diseases, inflammatory processes, or tumors typically at the orbital level or in the cavernous sinus. Diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion because of the multiplicity of symptoms and presentations, making this pathology an entity that provides a major challenge for clinicians, yet early and multidisciplinary treatment of high-grade fistulas improve the possibility of avoiding poor or unfavorable outcomes for the patient. PMID:28203571

  18. Veno-venous bridges: the forerunners of the sinus venosus defect

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Ryan J.; Crean, Andrew M.; Hlavacek, Anthony M.; Spicer, Diane E.; Cook, Andrew C.; Oechslin, Erwin N.; Anderson, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Differentiation of the so-called sinus venosus defect from other defects permitting shunting between the atrial chambers remains problematic. The lesion is not a true septal defect, and current theories to explain the existence of the sinus venosus defect fall short. The presence of persistent systemic to pulmonary venous connections has been proposed to explain the existence of the sinus venosus defect. Methods Clinical histories and radiological findings of six patients are reviewed. Three patients have veno-venous bridges, two have partial anomalous pulmonary venous connections, and one patient has a sinus venosus defect. The clinical information is reviewed, along with current developmental and morphological considerations. Discussion We provide radiographic, developmental, and morphological evidence to support the theory that a so-called sinus venosus defect is the consequence of persistence of foetal systemic to pulmonary veno-venous bridges, rather than of deficiencies in atrial septation. PMID:21729517

  19. Veno-venous bridges: the forerunners of the sinus venosus defect.

    PubMed

    Butts, Ryan J; Crean, Andrew M; Hlavacek, Anthony M; Spicer, Diane E; Cook, Andrew C; Oechslin, Erwin N; Anderson, Robert H

    2011-12-01

    Differentiation of the so-called sinus venosus defect from other defects permitting shunting between the atrial chambers remains problematic. The lesion is not a true septal defect, and current theories to explain the existence of the sinus venosus defect fall short. The presence of persistent systemic to pulmonary venous connections has been proposed to explain the existence of the sinus venosus defect. Clinical histories and radiological findings of six patients are reviewed. Three patients have veno-venous bridges, two have partial anomalous pulmonary venous connections, and one patient has a sinus venosus defect. The clinical information is reviewed, along with current developmental and morphological considerations. We provide radiographic, developmental, and morphological evidence to support the theory that a so-called sinus venosus defect is the consequence of persistence of foetal systemic to pulmonary veno-venous bridges, rather than of deficiencies in atrial septation.

  20. Delayed postoperative dural arteriovenous fistula presenting with progressive dementia.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro

    2015-12-09

    A 64-year-old woman underwent right suboccipital craniotomy to treat spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhoea. Although the CSF leak was cured, the patient developed pulsatile tinnitus, ambulatory disturbance and progressive dementia. Four years after the surgery, she presented with generalised seizure. Cerebral angiography showed a dural arteriovenous fistula at the right transverse-sigmoid sinus, which was associated with sinus occlusion, retrograde blood flow in the sinus and diffuse intracranial cortical venous reflux. A combination of endovascular transarterial embolisation and transvenous embolisation with direct sinus puncture was performed. After the procedure, the patient's mental status and cognitive function improved significantly.

  1. Homocystinuria with Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis: Excellent Recovery with Intravenous Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Vykuntaraju K; Nanjundappa, Raghunath C; Pendharkar, Hima; Benakappa, Naveen

    2017-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia can cause cerebral venous thrombosis. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is one of the treatment options for cerebral venous thrombosis in selected cases. We present here a 7-year-old boy with homocysteinuria with stroke. MRI of brain showed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. We successfully treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. He recovered completely without any complications. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator can be considered one of the treatment options in cerebral venous thrombosis in homocystinura.

  2. Influence of central venous pressure upon sinus node responses to arterial baroreflex stimulation in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, A. L.; Takeshita, A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Abboud, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements were made of sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation with phenylephrine injection or neck suction, before and during changes of central venous pressure provoked by lower body negative pressure or leg and lower truck elevation. Variations of central venous pressure between 1.1 and 9.0 mm Hg did not influence arterial baroreflex mediated bradycardia. Baroreflex sinus node responses were augmented by intravenous propranolol, but the level of responses after propranolol was comparable during the control state, lower body negative pressure, and leg and trunk elevation. Sinus node responses to very brief baroreceptor stimuli applied during the transitions of central venous pressure also were comparable in the three states. The authors conclude that physiological variations of central venous pressure do not influence sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation in man.

  3. Venous sinus thrombosis after Proteus vulgaris meningitis and concomitant Clostridium abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Bodur, Hürrem; Colpan, Aylin; Gozukucuk, Ramazan; Akinci, Esragul; Cevik, Mustafa Aydin; Balaban, Neriman

    2002-01-01

    A 19-y-old woman presented with Proteus vulgaris meningitis as a complication of chronic otitis media. Despite treatment with ceftazidime and amikacin no clinical improvement was observed. Cranial MRI revealed right-sided mastoiditis/otitis media and venous sinus thrombosis. After mastoidectomy, repeat cranial MRI demonstrated abscess formation in the venous sinuses. The abscess was drained. Clostridium spp. was isolated from the abscess culture.

  4. Persistent valve of systemic venous sinus: a cause of neonatal cyanosis.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Ahmad U; Latiff, Haifa A; Sivalingam, Sivakumar

    2014-08-01

    Incomplete involution of valve of systemic venous sinus can present across a spectrum of anatomical lesions ranging from eustachian valve to division of right atrium (cor triatriatum dexter) with overlapping features. We present the case of a neonate presenting with cyanosis, having persistent valve of systemic venous sinus with anatomical details of the redundant tissue in right atrium suggesting an intermediate form between Chiari network and division of right atrium.

  5. Concurrent Angioplasty Balloon Placement for Stent Delivery through Jugular Venous Bulb for Treating Cerebral Venous Sinus Stenosis. Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Khan, Asif A; Capistrant, Rachel; Qureshi, Mushtaq H; Xie, Kevin; Suri, M Fareed K

    2016-10-01

    To report upon technique of concurrent placement of angioplasty balloon at the internal jugular vein and sigmoid venous sinus junction to facilitate stent delivery in two patients in whom stent delivery past the jugular bulb was not possible. A 21-year-old woman and a 41-year-old woman with worsening headaches, visual obscuration or diplopia were treated for pseudotumor cerebri associated with transverse venous stenosis. Both patients had undergone primary angioplasty, which resulted in improvement in clinical symptoms followed by the recurrence of symptoms with restenosis at the site of angioplasty. After multiple attempts at stent delivery through jugular venous bulb were unsuccessful, a second guide catheter was placed in the ipsilateral internal jugular vein through contralateral femoral venous approach. A 6 mm × 20 mm (left) or 5 × 15 mm (right) angioplasty balloon was placed across the internal jugular vein and sigmoid sinus junction and partially inflated until the inflation and relative straightening of the junction was observed. In both patients, the internal jugular vein and sigmoid sinus junction was successfully traversed by the stent delivery system in a parallel alignment to inflated balloon. Balloon mounted stent was deployed at the site of restenosis with near complete resolution of lumen narrowing delivery and improvement in clinical symptoms. We report a technique for realignment and diameter change with concurrent placement and partial inflation of angioplasty balloon at the jugular venous bulb to facilitate stent delivery into the sigmoid and transverse venous sinuses in circumstances where multiple attempts at stent delivery are unsuccessful.

  6. Dural arteriovenous fistula at the craniocervical junction with perimedullary venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Mascalchi, M; Scazzeri, F; Prosetti, D; Ferrito, G; Salvi, F; Quilici, N

    1996-01-01

    MR imaging showed swelling and diffuse signal changes in the spinal cord in two patients with progressive myelopathy. MR angiography revealed slow-flow perimedullary vessels extending to the skull base, which are consistent with drainage vessels of a dural arteriovenous fistula at the craniocervical junction. This fistula was subsequently seen in both patients on selective arteriograms of the ascending pharyngeal and vertebral arteries.

  7. Antiphospholipid syndrome presenting as cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: a case series and a review.

    PubMed

    Shlebak, Abdul

    2016-04-01

    The cerebral venous sinus system is a rare site for venous thrombosis except in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome. We describe three patients presenting with cerebral venous thrombosis in association with other thrombotic sites in two patients and as an only site in one patient. Antiphospholipid syndrome has varied clinical manifestations but the defining feature is the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. In this report we will review the clinical and laboratory diagnostic criteria and the management of patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

  8. Resolution of Pulsatile Tinnitus after Venous Sinus Stenting in Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dinkin, Marc; Suurna, Maria; Hannsgen, Kelly; Bui, Xem

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the role of venous sinus stenting in the treatment of pulsatile tinnitus among patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) and significant venous sinus stenosis. Subjects and Methods A written informed consent approved by the Weill Cornell institutional review board was signed and obtained from the study participants. Thirty-seven consecutive patients with IIH and venous sinus stenosis who were treated with venous sinus stenting between Jan.2012-Jan.2016 were prospectively evaluated. Patients without pulsatile tinnitus were excluded. Tinnitus severity was categorized based on “Tinnitus Handicap Inventory” (THI) at pre-stent, day-0, 1-month, 3-month, 6-month, 12-month, 18-month and 2-year follow-up. Demographics, body-mass index (BMI), pre and post VSS trans-stenotic pressure gradient were documented. Statistical analysis performed using Pearson’s correlation, Chi-square analysis and Fischer’s exact test. Results 29 patients with a mean age of 29.5±8.5 years M:F = 1:28. Median (mean) THI pre and post stenting were: 4 (3.7) and 1 (1) respectively. Median time of tinnitus resolution post VSS was 0-days. There was significant improvement of THI (Δ Mean: 2.7 THI [95% CI: 2.3–3.1 THI], p<0.001) and transverse-distal sigmoid sinus gradient (Δ Mean: -15.3 mm Hg [95% CI: 12.7–18 mm Hg], p<0.001) post-stenting. Mean follow-up duration of 26.4±9.8 months (3–44 months). VSS was feasible in 100% patients with no procedural complications. Three-patients (10%) had recurrent sinus stenosis and tinnitus at mean follow-up of 12 months (6–30 months). Conclusion Venous sinus stenting is an effective treatment for pulsatile tinnitus in patients with IIH and venous sinus stenosis. PMID:27768690

  9. A rare association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula with venous aneurysm and contralateral flow-related middle cerebral artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Onu, David O; Hunn, Andrew W; Harle, Robin A

    2013-01-01

    The association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) and ipsilateral flow related aneurysm has infrequently been reported. We describe a male patient who presented with an acute haemorrhagic stroke and was found to have a large right fronto-parietal intra-parenchymal haemorrhage from the ruptured Borden type II DAVF in addition to a large venous aneurysm and a flow related intraosseous aneurysm of the contralateral middle meningeal artery (MMA) all clearly delineated by CT and DSA. He underwent emergency stereotactic evacuation of the intraparenchymal haemorrhage and successful surgical treatment of all the vascular lesions at the same time with residual neurological deficit. To our knowledge, this is the first such reported case. We discuss the challenging surgical treatment, emphasising the role of CT/DSA in management, and provide a literature review. PMID:24051149

  10. A rare association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula with venous aneurysm and contralateral flow-related middle cerebral artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Onu, David O; Hunn, Andrew W; Harle, Robin A

    2013-09-19

    The association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) and ipsilateral flow related aneurysm has infrequently been reported. We describe a male patient who presented with an acute haemorrhagic stroke and was found to have a large right fronto-parietal intra-parenchymal haemorrhage from the ruptured Borden type II DAVF in addition to a large venous aneurysm and a flow related intraosseous aneurysm of the contralateral middle meningeal artery (MMA) all clearly delineated by CT and DSA. He underwent emergency stereotactic evacuation of the intraparenchymal haemorrhage and successful surgical treatment of all the vascular lesions at the same time with residual neurological deficit. To our knowledge, this is the first such reported case. We discuss the challenging surgical treatment, emphasising the role of CT/DSA in management, and provide a literature review.

  11. Flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (fair) imaging for retrograde cortical venous drainage related to intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Kyo; Kuwayama, Naoya; Kubo, Michiya; Kamisaki, Yuichi; Kameda, Keisuke; Tomizawa, Gakuto; Kawabe, Hideto; Seto, Hikaru

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis that flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can detect retrograde cortical venous drainage (RCVD) in patients with intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). Seven patients with angiographically confirmed DAVF with RCVD and two DAVF patients without RCVD underwent examinations with conventional MR imaging and FAIR, five of these seven patients with RCVD also underwent examination with dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MR imaging. The ability of FAIR to depict prominent cerebral veins was evaluated, and FAIR was compared with the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps created with DSC. In all DAVF patients with RCVD, FAIR clearly showed prominent veins on the surface of the brain in affected hemisphere, and FAIR corresponded well with the areas of increased rCBV. In all DAVF patients without RCVD, FAIR showed no prominent veins. FAIR can detect RCVD in patients with DAVF.

  12. Cranial dural arteriovenous shunts. Part 1. Anatomy and embryology of the bridging and emissary veins.

    PubMed

    Baltsavias, Gerasimos; Parthasarathi, Venkatraman; Aydin, Emre; Al Schameri, Rahman A; Roth, Peter; Valavanis, Anton

    2015-04-01

    We reviewed the anatomy and embryology of the bridging and emissary veins aiming to elucidate aspects related to the cranial dural arteriovenous fistulae. Data from relevant articles on the anatomy and embryology of the bridging and emissary veins were identified using one electronic database, supplemented by data from selected reference texts. Persisting fetal pial-arachnoidal veins correspond to the adult bridging veins. Relevant embryologic descriptions are based on the classic scheme of five divisions of the brain (telencephalon, diencephalon, mesencephalon, metencephalon, myelencephalon). Variation in their exact position and the number of bridging veins is the rule and certain locations, particularly that of the anterior cranial fossa and lower posterior cranial fossa are often neglected in prior descriptions. The distal segment of a bridging vein is part of the dural system and can be primarily involved in cranial dural arteriovenous lesions by constituting the actual site of the shunt. The veins in the lamina cribriformis exhibit a bridging-emissary vein pattern similar to the spinal configuration. The emissary veins connect the dural venous system with the extracranial venous system and are often involved in dural arteriovenous lesions. Cranial dural shunts may develop in three distinct areas of the cranial venous system: the dural sinuses and their interfaces with bridging veins and emissary veins. The exact site of the lesion may dictate the arterial feeders and original venous drainage pattern.

  13. Novel balloon-and-aspiration method for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: dental-floss technique.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Okada, Hideo; Chung, Joonho; Webster Crowley, R; Lopes, Demetrius K

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is sometimes fatal. The standard treatment for sinus thrombosis is anticoagulation, but endovascular intervention must be considered when medical treatment fails. Mechanical thrombectomy is usually required when a large clot burden exits. Unfortunately, in sinus thrombosis attributable to a clot burden larger than that in an intracranial artery, the conventional technique used for intraarterial acute stroke intervention with a stent retriever and/or aspiration is not very effective. The authors describe here their endovascular approach to mechanical thrombectomy for sinus thrombosis using aspiration combined with angioplasty balloon support.

  14. Dural Arteriovenous Fistula of the Sinus of the Lesser Sphenoid Wing Presenting with Pontine Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hideki; Ishiguro, Tomoya; Terada, Aiko; Komiyama, Masaki

    2017-02-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) of the sinus of the lesser sphenoid wing (SLSW) with leptomeningeal drainage are rare. We report a patient with a DAVF of the SLSW draining into the basal vein of Rosenthal (BVR) presenting with pontine hemorrhage. A 71-year-old man presented with sudden right hemisensory disturbance of the arm and leg. Brain computed tomography scan showed left pontine hemorrhage, and cerebral angiography revealed a DAVF of the left SLSW. The fistula drained solely into the left BVR, which had an anastomosis to the left lateral mesencephalic vein, which had a varix invaginated into the left pons. The diagnosis was a DAVF of the left SLSW drained into the lateral mesencephalic vein via the bridging vein of the left SLSW, the deep middle cerebral vein, and the BVR, and a varix of the lateral mesencephalic vein caused pontine hemorrhage. The fistula was occluded by clipping through frontotemporal craniotomy. The postoperative course was uneventful, and postoperative cerebral angiography confirmed disappearance of the fistula. A DAVF of the SLSW presenting with pontine hemorrhage is extremely rare, and DAVFs with deep leptomeningeal drainage should be included among a variety of etiologies of pontine hemorrhage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis using T2*-weighted gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bidar, Fatemeh; Faeghi, Fariborz; Ghorbani, Askar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the advantages of gradient echo (GRE) sequences in the detection and characterization of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis compared to conventional magnetic resonance sequences. Methods: A total of 17 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) were evaluated using different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. The MRI sequences included T1-weighted spin echo (SE) imaging, T*2-weighted turbo SE (TSE), fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), T*2-weighted conventional GRE, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). MR venography (MRV) images were obtained as the golden standard. Results: Venous sinus thrombosis was best detectable in T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences in all patients except in one case. Venous thrombosis was undetectable in DWI. T*2-weighted GRE sequences were superior to T*2-weighted TSE, T1-weighted SE, and FLAIR. Enhanced MRV was successful in displaying the location of thrombosis. Conclusion: T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences are probably the best method for the assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The mentioned method is non-invasive; therefore, it can be employed in the clinical evaluation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:27326365

  16. Concurrent Angioplasty Balloon Placement for Stent Delivery through Jugular Venous Bulb for Treating Cerebral Venous Sinus Stenosis. Technical Report

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Khan, Asif A.; Capistrant, Rachel; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Xie, Kevin; Suri, M. Fareed K.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To report upon technique of concurrent placement of angioplasty balloon at the internal jugular vein and sigmoid venous sinus junction to facilitate stent delivery in two patients in whom stent delivery past the jugular bulb was not possible. CLINICAL PRESENTATION A 21-year-old woman and a 41-year-old woman with worsening headaches, visual obscuration or diplopia were treated for pseudotumor cerebri associated with transverse venous stenosis. Both patients had undergone primary angioplasty, which resulted in improvement in clinical symptoms followed by the recurrence of symptoms with restenosis at the site of angioplasty. INTERVENTION After multiple attempts at stent delivery through jugular venous bulb were unsuccessful, a second guide catheter was placed in the ipsilateral internal jugular vein through contralateral femoral venous approach. A 6 mm × 20 mm (left) or 5 × 15 mm (right) angioplasty balloon was placed across the internal jugular vein and sigmoid sinus junction and partially inflated until the inflation and relative straightening of the junction was observed. In both patients, the internal jugular vein and sigmoid sinus junction was successfully traversed by the stent delivery system in a parallel alignment to inflated balloon. Balloon mounted stent was deployed at the site of restenosis with near complete resolution of lumen narrowing delivery and improvement in clinical symptoms. CONCLUSION We report a technique for realignment and diameter change with concurrent placement and partial inflation of angioplasty balloon at the jugular venous bulb to facilitate stent delivery into the sigmoid and transverse venous sinuses in circumstances where multiple attempts at stent delivery are unsuccessful. PMID:27829971

  17. Venous sinus thrombosis in a child with nephrotic syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ronaldo Afonso; Torres, Bruna Ribeiro; de Castilho, Alessandra Soares Rocha; Honorato, Ronaldo

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is associated with a hypercoagulable state and an increased risk of thromboembolic complications. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare complication of nephrotic syndrome, with few cases described in the literature, although the disease may be under-diagnosis. The true incidence of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be underestimated because many events are asymptomatic or are not diagnosed in time. Here, we describe the case of a male child, 2 years and 10 months old, with nephrotic syndrome presenting with headache, epileptic seizures and sensory inhibition who was diagnosed with superior sagittal and transverse sinuses thrombosis. An international literature review was performed with a defined search strategy in the PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases using the terms 'nephrotic syndrome' and 'cerebral sinovenous thrombosis'. The diagnosis of venous thrombosis should be considered in any patient with nephrotic syndrome who presents with neurological signs and symptoms, as early clinical diagnosis promotes favorable outcomes.

  18. An unusual cause of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: prothrombin G20210A gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Square, Jaime H; Storey, Raul; Rodriguez-Dunn, Simon; Mohamed-Aly, Mohamed S

    2007-09-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis represents less than 1% of all strokes, being an uncommon entity with a wide spectrum of clinical scenarios. We present a 45-year-old Hispanic female with a history of long-term oral contraceptive use who was diagnosed with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis due to a heterozygous carrier mutation in the prothrombin G20210A gene. The patient was successfully managed with intravenous heparin with favorable clinical results without adverse effects. The prevalence of inherited primary thrombophilia increases with additional risk factors such as the use of oral contraceptives that can trigger or prothrombotic events in any vascular bed. An increased prevalence in the prothrombin G20210 gene mutation has been demonstrated in the Mexican-Mestizo population. Controversy exists regarding therapy of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis; according to experts, heparin remains the cornerstone of therapy with acceptable outcomes. More clinical trials are required to evaluate long-term outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  19. Poor Prognostic Outcome in Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Associated with Dyskinesia and Elevated Platelet Volume.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shousen; Xu, Bingyang; Zhao, Qingshuang; Li, Jun; Hong, Jingfang; Wei, Liangfeng; Zhao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Although about 80% of patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis have a good prognosis, some patients develop severe complications and a small proportion do not survive. The study included patients who had been diagnosed with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in our hospital from May 2008 to February 2014. Based on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores at 3 months for outcome, the patients were divided into two groups: good prognosis (mRS score ≤ 2) and poor prognosis (mRS score > 2). Univariate and multivariate regression analysis were performed to identify significant prognostic factors for poor outcome. A total of 86 patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, 54 males and 32 females, average age 41.3 years (range, 3-83 years), were enrolled. Of these 86 patients, 64 (74.4%) had a good prognosis and 22 (25.6%) a poor prognosis. Univariate analysis revealed that dyskinesia was a significant risk factor (factor with odds ratio >1) for poor prognosis. In multivariate analysis, the risk of poor prognosis in patients with dyskinesia was 23 times higher than for those without dyskinesia (p < 0.001). Thrombosis of the sinus transervus was found to reduce the risk of poor prognosis in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Most patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis have a good prognosis but patients with dyskinesia have a poorer prognosis.

  20. A Rare Case of Transverse Sinus Venous Thrombosis Simulating Postdural Puncture Headache After Cervical Epidural Injection.

    PubMed

    Guirguis, Maged; Jusino, Eduardo; Tolba, Reda; Samuel, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) is a feared complication related to epidural steroid injections. We report a unique case in which all subjective and objective findings indicated the diagnosis of PDPH. However, the patient failed appropriate conservative and interventional management. Therapeutic failure prompted further investigation to establish the correct diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare, difficult to diagnose, but potentially lethal disorder with nonspecific and variable clinical presentations, including headache and focal neurological deficits. Performing magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venogram should be considered early, especially in patients who fail to respond to standard interventions for PDPH.

  1. Risk factors for remote seizure development in patients with cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Davoudi, Vahid; Keyhanian, Kiandokht; Saadatnia, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    We aimed to define the possible risk factors for acute and remote seizures in patients with cerebral vein and sinus thrombosis (CVST). Ninety-four patients were recruited prospectively at Al-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, between April 2007 and April 2012. To identify seizure predictors, we compared demographic, clinical and imaging factors between patients with or without acute and remote seizures. Of the 94 patients, 32 (34%) experienced at least one seizure after CVST development. Bivariate analysis showed a significant association of remote seizure with loss of consciousness at presentation (P=0.05, OR: 5.11, 95%CI: 1.07-24.30), supratentorial lesions (P=0.02, OR: 9.04, 95%CI: 1.04-78.55), lesions in the occipital lobe (P=0.00, OR: 12.75, 95%CI: 2.28-71.16), lesions in the temporal and parietal lobes, thrombophilia (P=0.03, OR: 5.87, 95%CI: 1.21-28.39), seizure in the acute phase (P=0.00, OR: 13.14, 95%CI: 2.54-201.2) and sigmoid sinus thrombosis (P=0.00, OR: 12.5, 95%CI: 2.23-69.79). Seizures in the acute phase were also more common in patients with paresis (P=0.00, OR: 4.88, 95%CI: 1.91-12.46), hemorrhagic lesions indicated by imaging (P=0.02, OR: 2.77, 95%CI: 1.08-7.10), supratentorial lesions, lesions in the frontal (P=0.01, OR: 3.81, 95%CI: 1.28-11.31) and parietal lobes (P=0.00, OR: 5.16, 95%CI: 2-13.29), thrombophilia and history of miscarriage (P=0.03, OR: 2.91, 95%CI: 1.07-7.91). No factor predicted acute or remote seizure in a multiple logistic regression analysis. Our results demonstrate that seizure development in the acute phase is the most significant factor for development of remote seizure. Parenchymal lesions in the supratentorial area were also found to be associated with both acute and remote seizures. However, no factor was predictive of acute or remote seizures in a multivariate analysis. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Progressive versus Nonprogressive Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas: Characteristics and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hetts, S W; Tsai, T; Cooke, D L; Amans, M R; Settecase, F; Moftakhar, P; Dowd, C F; Higashida, R T; Lawton, M T; Halbach, V V

    2015-10-01

    A minority of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas progress with time. We sought to determine features that predict progression and define outcomes of patients with progressive dural arteriovenous fistulas. We performed a retrospective imaging and clinical record review of patients with intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula evaluated at our hospital. Of 579 patients with intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas, 545 had 1 fistula (mean age, 45 ± 23 years) and 34 (5.9%) had enlarging, de novo, multiple, or recurrent fistulas (mean age, 53 ± 20 years; P = .11). Among these 34 patients, 19 had progressive dural arteriovenous fistulas with de novo fistulas or fistula enlargement with time (mean age, 36 ± 25 years; progressive group) and 15 had multiple or recurrent but nonprogressive fistulas (mean age, 57 ± 13 years; P = .0059, nonprogressive group). Whereas all 6 children had fistula progression, only 13/28 adults (P = .020) progressed. Angioarchitectural correlates to chronically elevated intracranial venous pressures, including venous sinus dilation (41% versus 7%, P = .045) and pseudophlebitic cortical venous pattern (P = .048), were more common in patients with progressive disease than in those without progression. Patients with progressive disease received more treatments than those without progression (median, 5 versus 3; P = .0068), but as a group, they did not demonstrate worse clinical outcomes (median mRS, 1 and 1; P = .39). However, 3 young patients died from intracranial venous hypertension and intracranial hemorrhage related to progression of their fistulas despite extensive endovascular, surgical, and radiosurgical treatments. Few patients with dural arteriovenous fistulas follow an aggressive, progressive clinical course despite treatment. Younger age at initial presentation and angioarchitectural correlates to venous hypertension may help identify these patients prospectively. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  3. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in homocystinuria: Dietary intervention in conjunction with anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Sufin; Annesley-Williams, Deborah; Hardiman, Orla

    2017-01-01

    The presentation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be acute or chronic with a progressive clinical course. The diagnosis can be challenging, and there are several clinical syndromes associated with the disease. It is also an uncommon but recognised complication of homocystinuria. We describe a case where early anticoagulation, together with dietary intervention, was associated with a favourable clinical outcome. PMID:28835823

  4. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in homocystinuria: Dietary intervention in conjunction with anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Yap, Sufin; Annesley-Williams, Deborah; Hardiman, Orla

    2017-01-01

    The presentation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be acute or chronic with a progressive clinical course. The diagnosis can be challenging, and there are several clinical syndromes associated with the disease. It is also an uncommon but recognised complication of homocystinuria. We describe a case where early anticoagulation, together with dietary intervention, was associated with a favourable clinical outcome.

  5. [A case of total cavopulmonary connection by utilization of coronary sinus as a hepatic venous return].

    PubMed

    Koide, M; Sakai, A; Iwata, Y; Sanae, T; Kunii, Y; Moriki, N; Ayusawa, Y; Seguchi, M

    2000-10-01

    A 2-year-old boy with polysplenia, double outlet right ventricle after pulmonary banding and unilateral bidirectional shunt was operated on. A modified total cavopulmonary connection was done by utilization of coronary sinus as a retrograde route for the hepatic venous return. Left SVC was transected and its distal end was anastomosed to the left pulmonary artery after PA angioplasty. An equine pericardial patch was placed over the ostia of the hepatic vein and coronary sinus. Two ostia of the coronary veins were excluded from the created route. The proximal end of the left SVC was anastomosed to the inferior side of the left pulmonary artery. Postoperative course was uneventful. The postoperative angiogram showed smooth hepatic venous return through the coronary sinus and no pressure gradient was recorded between hepatic vein and pulmonary artery.

  6. Evidence for novel structures (primo vessels and primo nodes) floating in the venous sinuses of rat brains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Sung; Park, Won-Hee; Je, A-Reum; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Lee, Byung-Cheon

    2012-08-01

    We for the first time report evidence for existence of novel structures, primo vessels (PVs) and primo nodes (PNs) floating inside the venous sinuses of rat brains. For this purpose, we applied a chromium-hematoxylin (Cr-Hx) solution to stain the PVs and the PNs floating inside the venous sinuses (superior sagittal sinus, strait sinus, and transverse sinus) of seven rats' brains preferentially compared to the blood clots that easily form during surgery. Cr-Hx-stained PVs and PNs were examined by light and transmission electron microscopies: (1) we were consistently able to visualize the PVs and the PNs in the venous sinuses of all seven rats' brains. (2) The PVs and PNs consisted of rod-shaped and some round-shaped cells, respectively, as demonstrated by using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). (3) Cross sections of the PVs showed that the sinuses contained loose fibrous materials and clusters of nano-sized granules enveloped by the cortex. The above data imply that thrombus of the venous sinuses may be related with these novel floating structures. However, the functions of the PVs and PNs floating in the venous sinuses remain to be investigated in terms of normal or thrombus-provoked diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Venous thrombosis in subclavian, axillary, brachial veins with extension to internal jugular vein, right sigmoid sinus and simultaneous pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Tamizifar, Babak; Beigi, Arash; Rismankarzadeh, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare case of Venous Thrombosis in Subclavian, Axillary, Brachial Veins with extension to Internal Jugular vein, right sigmoid sinus and simultaneous Pulmonary embolism during the treatment with low molecular weight heparin. PMID:23901341

  8. Reversible changes in diffusion- and perfusion-based imaging in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ning; Wong, Andrew K; Lipinski, Lindsay J; Mokin, Maxim; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2016-02-01

    Diffusion- and perfusion-based imaging studies are regularly used in patients with ischemic stroke. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare cause of stroke and is primarily treated by systemic anticoagulation. Endovascular intervention can be considered in cases of failed medical therapy, yet the prognostic value of diffusion- and perfusion-based imaging for CVST has not been clearly established. We present a patient with CVST whose abnormal findings on MRI and CT perfusion images were largely reversed after endovascular treatment.

  9. Venous sinus thrombosis in a child with nephrotic syndrome: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ronaldo Afonso; Torres, Bruna Ribeiro; de Castilho, Alessandra Soares Rocha; Honorato, Ronaldo

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is associated with a hypercoagulable state and an increased risk of thromboembolic complications. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare complication of nephrotic syndrome, with few cases described in the literature, although the disease may be under-diagnosis. The true incidence of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be underestimated because many events are asymptomatic or are not diagnosed in time. Here, we describe the case of a male child, 2 years and 10 months old, with nephrotic syndrome presenting with headache, epileptic seizures and sensory inhibition who was diagnosed with superior sagittal and transverse sinuses thrombosis. An international literature review was performed with a defined search strategy in the PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases using the terms ‘nephrotic syndrome’ and ‘cerebral sinovenous thrombosis’. The diagnosis of venous thrombosis should be considered in any patient with nephrotic syndrome who presents with neurological signs and symptoms, as early clinical diagnosis promotes favorable outcomes. PMID:25607275

  10. Bilateral Vertebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Causing Cervical Spinal Cord Compression in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Rhue, Kathryn E.; Taylor, Amanda R.; Cole, Robert C.; Winter, Randolph L.

    2017-01-01

    A 10-year-old male neutered mixed breed dog was evaluated for cervical hyperesthesia and tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and cervical spinal cord identified an extradural compressive lesion over the body of C2 caused by marked dilation of the vertebral venous sinuses. Following intravenous contrast administration both vertebral sinuses had heterogeneous contrast enhancement consistent with incomplete thrombi formation. An abdominal ultrasound also showed a distal aortic thrombus. A definitive cause for the thrombi formation was not identified, but the patient had several predisposing factors which may have contributed. The patient was treated with a combination of warfarin, clopidogrel, and enoxaparin as well as analgesics. Within 48 h of initiation of warfarin therapy, the tetraparesis and hyperesthesia were markedly improved. Repeat abdominal ultrasound 3 weeks after discharge showed reduction in size of aortic thrombus. Neurologic function remained normal for 6 weeks following initiation of treatment. Seventy-four days following initial diagnosis the patient rapidly declined and passed away at home. Necropsy was declined. This is the first report of vertebral venous sinus enlargement leading to spinal cord compression and tetraparesis in a dog. Additionally, warfarin in combination with clopidogrel and enoxaparin appeared to be a safe and effective treatment for the suspected thrombi reported in this case. Vertebral sinus enlargement secondary to thrombi should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with tetraparesis and cervical hyperesthesia. PMID:28229071

  11. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... my acute sinusitis is caused by viruses or bacteria? Acute viral sinusitis is likely if you have ... to tell if my sinusitis is caused by bacteria? Because sinusitis is treated differently based on cause. ...

  12. Non-contrast computed tomography in the diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Oblak, Janja Pretnar; Popovic, Katarina Surlan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) in the diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Methods. Screening our neurological department database, we identified 53 patients who were admitted to neurological emergency department with clinical signs of CVST. Two independent observers assessed the NCCT scans for the presence of CVST. CT venography and/or MR venography were used as a reference standard. Interobserver agreement between the two readers was assessed using Kappa statistic. Attenuation inside the cerebral venous sinuses was measured and compared between the patient and the control group. Results CVST was confirmed in 13 patients. Sensitivity and specificity of NCCT for overall presence of CVST were 100% and 83%, respectively, with Kappa value of 0.72 (a good agreement between observers). The attenuation values between CVST patients and control group were significantly different (73.4 ± 14.12 HU vs. 58.1 ± 7.58 HU; p = 0.000). The ROC analysis showed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.916 (95% CI, 0.827 – 1.00) and an optimal cutoff value of 64 HU, leading to a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 87%. Conclusions NCCT as a first-line investigation has a high value for diagnosis of CVST in the emergency setting. The additional measurement of the sinus attenuation may improve the diagnostic value of the examination. PMID:27679541

  13. Endovascular management of six simultaneous intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas in a single patient.

    PubMed

    Gist, Taylor L; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Krishna, Chandan; Roman, Gustavo C; Cech, David A; Diaz, Orlando

    2014-03-01

    A 64-year-old man with a history of traumatic brain injury 4 years previously presented with progressive cognitive decline and gait abnormality. MRI revealed diffusion restriction in the bilateral centrum semiovale and multiple serpiginous flow voids. Cerebral angiogram revealed a total of six intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas with separate fistulas of the right and left sphenoid bones, left clival plexus, right transverse sinus, right sigmoid sinus, and superior sagittal sinus. A diffuse pseudophlebitic pattern of venous drainage indicating severe venous hypertension was also observed. The patient underwent a series of endovascular treatments over the next 10 months to achieve resolution of all arteriovenous shunting. Repeat MRI showed resolution of the diffusion restriction and marked reduction in T2 vascular flow voids. The patient's clinical status improved significantly over the course of treatment, paralleling the improvement in venous hypertension.

  14. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in pregnancy and puerperium: A pooled, systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kashkoush, Ahmed I; Ma, Henry; Agarwal, Nitin; Panczykowski, David; Tonetti, Daniel; Weiner, Gregory M; Ares, William; Kenmuir, Cynthia; Jadhav, Ashutosh; Jovin, Tudor; Jankowitz, Brian T; Gross, Bradley A

    2017-05-01

    Pregnancy and puerperium are risk factors for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST); however studies describing diagnosis and management in this population are limited. The objective of this study was to amalgamate published case reports and series regarding diagnosis and management of CVST in pregnancy and puerperium. Searches of PubMed and the Cochrane library were performed using search terms "pregnancy"/"puerperium" and "sinus occlusion"/"sinus thrombosis". Studies were included in our pooled analysis if they included individual patient symptoms, management approach and follow-up condition. Multivariate regression was utilized to assess the effect of non-modifiable factors on excellent outcome (mRS 0). Sixty-six patients were included. Mean duration of symptom onset to diagnosis was 5.9days (95% CI 4.2-7.6). Clot involvement of the superior sagittal sinus was seen in 67% of cases, the transverse/sigmoid in 64% and of the deep venous system in 15% of cases. Management approaches included anticoagulation (91% of patients), IA (intra-arterial) thrombolysis alone (26%), and IA thrombectomy with IA thrombolysis (8%). Fifty-nine percent of patients were mRS 0 at follow-up; 94% were mRS 0-2. Presentation with headache alone was associated with excellent outcome on multivariate analysis (p=0.04); coma/obtundation predicted against excellent outcome (p=0.03). As compared to IA thrombolysis alone, patients undergoing IA thrombolysis with IA thrombectomy demonstrated a trend toward better outcome (p=0.10). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Onyx Migration in the Endovascular Management of Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H.; Lv, X.; Jiang, C.; Li, Y.; Wu, Z.; Xu, K.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Onyx migration in the endovascular treatment of dural arteriovenous fistulas (dural AVFs) is uncommon. We describe five cases of Onyx migration to the heart and draining vein and its avoidance. Between February 2007 and August 2008, Onyx migration was encountered in five patients with dural AVFs treated endovascularly at our institute. Procedures performed under general anesthesia consisted of two arterial approaches and three venous approaches. Two patients with dural AVFs involving the transverse-sigmoid sinus were treated by tran- sarterial embolization using Onyx-18 via the occipital artery and the posterior branch of the middle meningeal artery, respectively. A piece of Onyx was found in the right ventricle on post- embolization chest X-ray film in both patients, one developed tricuspid valve dysfunction requiring thoracic surgery and one was asymptomatic. The other three patients were treated with a combination of Onyx (34 or 18) and coils transvenously with venous Onyx migration leading to draining vein occlusion, one with dur- al AVF involving the tentorium died from venous rupture, two patients with bilateral dural AVFs of the cavernous sinus (one with deterioration of ocular symptoms and one without symptoms). Postoperative digital subtraction an- giography confirmed the elimination of dural AVF in one patient, and residual fistulae in three patients. The follow-up study ranging from two to nine months (average, 4.5 months). Three patients recovered to their full activities, while one had visual disturbance. Although Onyx has been considered a controllable embolic agent, its migration to other locations causing clinical deterioration can occur. This problem should be noted and prevented. PMID:20465913

  16. A Case of Cerebral Sinus Venous Thrombosis Resulting in Mortality in Severe Preeclamptic Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Soydinc, Hatice Ender; Ozler, Ali; Evsen, Mehmet Sıddık; Sak, Muhammet Erdal; Basaranoglu, Serdar; Dusak, Abdurrahim; Cetincakmak, Mehmet Guli

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rarely encountered condition during pregnancy. A 21-year-old pregnant woman with labour pains was hospitalized in our clinic. Diagnosis of severe preeclampsia was made based on her clinical and laboratory findings. She suffered from convulsive episodes during postpartum period which lead to initiation of treatment for eclampsia. However neurological and radiological examinations were performed after emergence of additional neurological symptoms disclosed the diagnosis of CVST. In this paper, we aimed to present a case with CVST which diagnosis was confused with eclampsia and resulting in maternal mortality. PMID:23509646

  17. Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in a Patient with Undiagnosed Factor VII Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Hira; Rashid, Anila; Adil, Salman Naseem

    2017-09-01

    Factor VII (FVII) deficiency is one of the rare inherited bleeding disorders. Thrombosis has been occasionally described in inherited FVII deficiency. Here, we report a young female with undiagnosed FVII deficiency who presented with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Oral contraceptive pill was found to be prothrombotic risk factor. The CVSToccurred in spite of the congenital FVII deficiency indicating that no definitive antithrombotic protection is assured by this defect. Low molecular weight heparin and anti-Xa assay were found to be safe choice of anticoagulation and monitoring, respectively, in this patient.

  18. Contralateral transvenous approach and embolization with 360° guglielmi detachable coils for the treatment of cavernous sinus dural fistula

    PubMed Central

    Zenteno, Marco; Jorge, Santos-Franco; Rafael, Moscote-Salazar Luis; Raphael, AlvisMiranda Hernando; Gabriel, Alcala-Cerra; Ángel, Lee

    2015-01-01

    carotid-cavernous fistulas are spontaneours acquired connections between the carotid artery and the cavernous cavernous sinus, being classified as direct or indirect; being usually diagnosed in postmenopausal women, but are also associated with other pathoogies such as pregnancy, sinusitis and cavernous sinus thrombosis. They are clinically characterized by ophthalmological symptoms and pulsatile tinnitus. A 51-year-old woman who started her current condition about 4 years ago with pulsatile tinnitus, to which were added progressively: Pain, conjunctival erythema, right eye proptosis and the occasional headache of moderate intensity. Caotid-cavernous fistula wes diagnosed, for the technical difficulty inherent in the case was made a contralateral transvenous approach and embolization with 360° GDG coils, with successful evolution of the patient. The endovascular management of these lesions is currently possible with excellent results. PMID:25767589

  19. Improvement in venous outflow following superior sagittal sinus decompression after a gunshot wound to the head: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Birk, Daniel M; Tobin, Matthew K; Moss, Heather E.; Feinstein, Eric; Charbel, Fady T; Alaraj, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly described indications for surgical management of closed depressed skull fractures are hematoma evacuation and repair of extensive cosmetic deformity. Venous sinus injury, which occurs in a subset of depressed skull fractures is not typically listed as an indication for surgical treatment due to the potential for major venous hemorrhage associated with operation near these structures. However, if patients exhibit signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension and radiographic findings demonstrate sinus compromise, surgical elevation of the depressed skull fragments is indicated. The authors present the case of a 25-year-old woman with a depressed skull fracture secondary to a gunshot wound with symptomatic compromise in venous outflow of the posterior one-third of the superior sagittal sinus. The patient was treated with surgical decompression via bilateral craniectomy along with intracranial pressure lowering medical therapy and had almost full resolution of her presenting symptoms with documented improvement in flow through the superior sagittal sinus. While the use of surgical treatment for these types of injuries is highly debated we demonstrate here that safe, effective surgical management of these patients is possible and that surgical decompression should always be considered in the case of symptomatic venous sinus flow obstruction. PMID:25839927

  20. Whole-Brain Computed Tomographic Perfusion Imaging in Acute Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Ciambella, Chelsey C.; Masud, Muhammad W.; Levy, Elad I.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (VST) can be difficult to diagnose because of its diverse clinical presentation. The utility of perfusion imaging for diagnosing VST is not well understood. Summary We retrospectively reviewed cases of acute VST in patients who underwent whole-brain (320-detector-row) computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging in combination with craniocervical CT venography. Perfusion maps that were analyzed included cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time, and time to peak. Among the 10 patients with acute VST included in this study, 9 had perfusion abnormalities. All perfusion abnormalities were localized in areas adjacent to the occluded sinus and did not match typical anterior or posterior circulation arterial territories. Bilateral perfusion deficits were seen in 4 cases. In 2 cases, parenchymal hemorrhage was diagnosed on noncontrast CT imaging; in those cases, focal CBV and CBF were reduced. Key Messages Whole-brain CT perfusion imaging with 320-detector-row scanners can further assist in establishing the diagnosis of VST by detecting perfusion abnormalities corresponding to venous and not arterial territories. CT perfusion could assist in the differentiation between focal reversible changes, such as those caused by vasogenic edema, and irreversible changes due to infarction. PMID:27051406

  1. Mechanical thrombectomy with Solitaire AB stents for the treatment of intracranial venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji; Shui, Shaofeng; Han, XinWei; Guo, Dong; Li, Teng-Fei; Yan, Lei

    2016-12-01

    Background Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare clinicopathological entity with substantial diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. The appropriate management of CVST remains to be defined. Purpose To evaluate the efficiency and safety of mechanical thrombectomy with Solitaire AB stents for the treatment of intracranial venous sinus thrombosis. Material and Methods Twenty-three consecutive patients with CVST who were treated with mechanical thrombectomy using Solitaire AB stents between January 2013 and October 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. The headache intensity was evaluated according to the visual analogue scale (VAS), and neurological function was assessed using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Follow-up data were available for all patients for 6-14 months. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance venography (MRV) were performed at 3 and 6 months after neurointervention, and telephone interviews were performed monthly thereafter. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the evaluation data (VAS and NIHSS) at admission and discharge. Results Twenty-six Solitaire AB stents were used. No neurointervention-related complications were noted. The symptoms were significantly improved after neurointervention in all patients. The comparisons between the VAS and NIHSS evaluations at admission and discharge were significantly different ( P < 0.05). No recurrence was observed during the follow-up period. Conclusion Mechanical thrombectomy with Solitaire AB stents is safe and effective for the treatment of CVST and can significantly improve clinical symptoms. The occurrence of complications is low, and the prognosis is favorable.

  2. Degree of Sigmoid Sinus Compression and the Symptom Relief Using Magnetic Resonance Angiography in Venous Pulsating Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To show that mechanical compression of sigmoid sinus is effective for treatment of pulsatile tinnitus caused by sigmoid sinus enlargement, and to evaluate the relationship between the compression degree of sigmoid sinus and the tinnitus symptom relief using magnetic resonance angiography. Methods Medical records of twenty-four patients who were diagnosed with venous tinnitus caused by sigmoid sinus enlargement and underwent mechanical compression of sigmoid sinus were reviewed between April 2009 and May 2013. All these patients received computed tomography and magnetic resonance venography study before undergoing surgery and were followed for at least 4 months. Results Twenty-three patients felt relief from tinnitus three months after the surgery, and the cross-sectional area of the sigmoid sinus on the tinnitus side was compressed approximately by half (46%-69%) after the surgery. There were 4 patients whose tinnitus suddenly disappeared while lying on the operating table before operation, which may be a result of the patient's emotional tension or postural changes from standing. One of the four patients felt no relief from tinnitus after the surgery, with the cross-sectional area of the sigmoid sinus only compressed by 30%. And two patients of them had a recurrence of tinnitus about 6 months after the surgery. Seven patients had sigmoid sinus diverticula, and tinnitus would not disappear merely by eliminating the diverticulum until by compressing the sigmoid sinus to certain degree. There were 3 minor complications, including aural fullness, head fullness and hyperacusis. The preoperative low frequency conductive and sensorineural hearing loss of 7 subjects subsided. Conclusion Mechanical compression of sigmoid sinus is an effective treatment for pulsatile tinnitus caused by sigmoid sinus enlargement, even if it might be accompanied by sigmoid sinus diverticulum. A compression degree of sigmoid sinus about 54% is adequate for the relief of tinnitus

  3. [Thrombosis of the intracranial venous sinuses after ingestion of estroprogestative agents. 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, P; Bernard, M H; Scherpereel, B; Morel, M; Guyot, J F

    1977-06-04

    The authors report 4 cases of thrombosis of the superior longitudinal sinus (SLS) in women taking oestroprogestational agents. This complication is very rare, only 25 cases existing in the literature. The clinical picture consists of premonitory headaches associated with neurological signs suggesting lesions affecting both hemispheres in alternation. In the absence of treatment, sudden deterioration on about the tenth day is to be feared. This picture is similar to that of puerperal thrombosis of the SLS. The diagnosis should be confirmed by carotid arteriography, which demonstrates the presence of collateral varices and the thrombosed sinus giving a "negative" image on the AP view. Cerebral scintigraphy shows one or more areas of uptake in the form of adjacent rounded shapes, corresponding to cerebral infarctions of venous origin. As far as the responsibility of oestro-progenstational agents is concerned, the role is suggested by the analogy with puerperal thromboses and also by the absence of cases in men (with the exception of head injury, infections of the face and haematological malignancies). The prognosis is grave (19 deaths out of 29 cases), but surviving patients are completely cured. This prognosis would seem to be essentially dependent upon the possibilities of venous callateral circulation, which are variable in each individual patient. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic risk, in effective doses, to transform the venous thrombosis into a cerebral haemorrhage. Treatment consists rather of methods to reduce cerebral volume, aimed at maximal use of collateral varices and assisting the patient to overcome to acute phase of the first 2 weeks. Headache would seem to be the principal presenting symptom. In our opinion, no biological test gives a reliable indication as to those women most at risk and contraindictions are in fact of a clinical character.

  4. Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Manifested as Rapid Progressive Dementia Successfully Treated by Endovascular Embolization Only

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Heewon; La, Yun Kyung; Baek, Min Seok; Baik, Kyoungwon; Suh, Sang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    A 43-year-old male presented with daytime sleepiness at work and indifferent behavior like never before. Two weeks prior to hospital admission, he had episodic memory loss with well preserved remote memory. Brain MRI showed a dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) in the right lateral transverse sinus with a bilateral thalamic venous infarction. Cerebral angiography confirmed a right transverse sigmoid dural arteriovenous fistula with a feeding artery of the right occipital artery and left posterior meningeal artery. The DAVF was completely eliminated through multiple endovascular interventions. Recently, endovascular treatment has become one of the main therapeutic options to obliterate a fistulous site, which has led to a rapid diagnostic approach and management of DAVFs with high curative rates. We report a rare case of posterior fossa located at a dural arteriovenous fistula that caused rapid progressive dementia and was successfully eliminated through only endovascular treatment. PMID:28316870

  5. Cerebral hemodynamic disturbance in dural arteriovenous fistula with retrograde leptomeningeal venous drainage: a prospective study using (123)I-iodoamphetamine single photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kanemaru, Kazuya; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Hideyuki; Yagi, Takashi; Wakai, Takuma; Hashimoto, Koji; Fukumoto, Yuichiro; Umeda, Takako; Onishi, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Yoshihisa; Horikoshi, Toru

    2015-07-01

    The severity of cerebral hemodynamic disturbance caused by retrograde leptomeningeal venous drainage (RLVD) of a dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) is related to neurological morbidity and unfavorable outcome. However, the cerebral hemodynamics of this disorder have not been elucidated well. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the cerebral venous congestive encephalopathy represented as a high-intensity area (HIA) on T2-weighted MR images and the cerebral hemodynamics examined by (123)I-iodoamphetamine (IMP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), as well as the predictive value of (123)I-IMP SPECT for the development and reversibility of venous congestion encephalopathy. Based on the pre- and posttreatment T2 HIAs associated with venous congestion encephalopathy, patients were divided into 3 groups: a normal group, an edema group, and an infarction group. The regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) at the region with RLVD was analyzed by (123)I-IMP SPECT, and the results were compared among the groups. There were 11, 6, and 3 patients in the normal, edema, and infarction groups, respectively. No patients in the normal group showed any symptoms related to venous congestion. In contrast, all patients in the edema and infarction groups developed neurological symptoms. The rCBF in the edema group was significantly lower than that in the normal group, and significantly higher than that in the infarction group. The cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR) of the infarction group was significantly lower than that of the normal and edema groups. After treatment, the neurological signs disappeared in the edema group, but only partial improvement was seen in the infarction group. The rCBF also significantly increased in the normal and edema groups, but not in the infarction group. Quantitative rCBF measurement is useful for evaluating hemodynamic disturbance in dAVF with RLVD. The reduction of rCBF was strongly correlated with the severity of

  6. Lessons from surgical outcome for intracranial meningioma involving major venous sinus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Moon-Soo; Kim, Yeong-Jin; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Yang, Jung-In; Kang, Woo Dae; Lim, Sa-Hoe; Jang, Woo-Youl; Jung, Tae-Young; Kim, In-Young; Jung, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intracranial meningiomas involving the major venous sinus (MVS) pose several complication risks upon performing radical resection. Some surgeons consider MVS invasion a contraindication for a complete resection of meningioma, and others suggest total resection followed by venous reconstruction. The aim of the study was to analyze our surgical results and discuss management strategy for intracranial meningiomas involving the MVS. Between 1993 and 2011, 107 patients with intracranial meningiomas involving MVS underwent surgery in our institution. Clinicoradiological features including pathological features and operative findings were retrospectively analyzed. Median follow-up duration was 60.2 months (range, 6.2–218.2 months). Distributions of tumor cases according to the involved sinus were as follows: 86% parasagittal, 10.3% tentorial, and 3.7% peritorcular. Simpson Grade I/II removal was achieved in 93 of 107 patients (87%). Partially or totally occluded MVS by their meningiomas (Sindou classification IV and V) was found in 39 patients (36%). Progression rate was 12% (13/107) and progression-free survival rates were 89%, 86%, and 80% at 5, 7, and 10 years, respectively. Sindou classification (IV/V) and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score 6 month after the surgery (KPS < 90) were predictive factors for progression in our study (P = 0.044 and P = 0.001, respectively). The resection degree did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.484). Interestingly, there was no progression in patients that underwent radiation therapy or gamma knife radiosurgery for residual tumor. There were no perioperative deaths. Complication rate was 21% with brain swelling being the most common complication. There was no predictive factor for occurrence of postoperative complication in this study. In conclusion, complete tumor resection with sinus reconstruction did not significantly prevent tumor recurrence in intracranial meningioma involving MVS

  7. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis secondary to typhoid fever: a case report and brief summary of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Maria Carissa; Lopinto-Khoury, Carla

    2012-07-01

    There have been few reports of typhoid fever (or salmonellosis) presenting with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. We present such a case to highlight the importance of recognizing an etiology for cerebral sinus thrombosis and to discuss the role of salmonella in thrombogenesis. A 19-year-old man with a history of migraine presented with headache, nausea, vomiting, and fever, and was found to have a cerebral venous sinus thrombosis on magnetic resonance venography. He later developed profuse watery diarrhea and cultures grew salmonella species, consistent with typhoid fever. Treatment with antibiotics and oral anticoagulation led to resolution of his symptoms within 2 days and recanalization of the thrombosis was proven on magnetic resonance venography 6 months later. The development of profuse diarrhea after thrombosis suggests a direct thrombogenic effect of salmonella independent of dehydration. Systemic infections should be considered in all patients with thrombosis to identify treatable causes.

  8. Anomalous PiB enhancement in the Superior Sagittal and Transverse Venous Sinuses

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Scott B.; Cohen, Ann D.; Becker, Carl; Price, Julie; Klunk, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Pittsburgh compound-B (PiB), an amyloid-binding positron emission tomography (PET) tracer, is widely used for imaging amyloid-β in those with and at risk for Alzheimer disease. Here, we report on an otherwise normal 68-year-old female with abnormally high and very focal PiB retention. Coregistered T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) images confirmed that the focal PiB enhancement was in the superior sagittal and transverse sinuses, outside of the adjacent cortex. Flow through the venous vasculature was normal as assessed by dynamic FDG PET imaging. These features supported the conclusion that PiB retention was not simply due to a hemodynamic abnormality, but may have represented PiB binding to fibrillar deposits of a β-sheet protein (ie, amyloid), whose nature is currently unclear. PMID:21909018

  9. Anomalous PiB enhancement in the superior sagittal and transverse venous sinuses.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Scott B; Cohen, Ann D; Becker, Carl; Price, Julie; Klunk, William E

    2012-01-01

    Pittsburgh compound-B (PiB), an amyloid-binding positron emission tomography (PET) tracer, is widely used for imaging amyloid-β in those with and at risk for Alzheimer disease. Here, we report on an otherwise normal 68-year-old female with abnormally high and very focal PiB retention. Coregistered T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) images confirmed that the focal PiB enhancement was in the superior sagittal and transverse sinuses, outside of the adjacent cortex. Flow through the venous vasculature was normal as assessed by dynamic FDG PET imaging. These features supported the conclusion that PiB retention was not simply due to a hemodynamic abnormality, but may have represented PiB binding to fibrillar deposits of a β-sheet protein (ie, amyloid), whose nature is currently unclear.

  10. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to decrease swelling, especially if there are nasal polyps or allergies Surgery to enlarge the sinus opening and drain the ... each year. Most fungal sinus infections need surgery. Surgery to repair ... or nasal polyps may prevent the condition from returning.

  11. Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Morcom, Samuel; Phillips, Nicholas; Pastuszek, Andrew; Timperley, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Acute and chronic sinusitis are common primary care presentations. They are caused by mucosal inflammation, which inhibits mucociliary function of the nose and paranasal sinuses. This article provides an overview of acute and chronic sinusitis, and a guide to workup and management in a primary care setting. Complications and other indications for referral are discussed. Sinusitis involves a wide spectrum of presentations, both acute and chronic. It is primarily a medical condition, and surgical management is reserved for complicated or refractory cases.

  12. Dural ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Neha; Gupta, Veena; Kumar, Abhishake; Kumar, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    Dural ectasia is one of the likely causes of incomplete or failed spinal anaesthesia. Its association with diseases like Marfans syndrome, neurofibromatosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, vertebral fracture, postopertative adhesions, trauma etc., is often overlooked as a reason for inadequate spinal anaesthesia. Greater than normal volume of cerebrospinal fluid in the lumber theca in dural ectasia is postulated to restrict the spread of intrathecally injected Local anaesthetic. Here, we report a case of failed spinal anaesthesia but successful epidural anaesthesia in later setting in a patient with dural ectasia. PMID:24963189

  13. VENOUS SAMPLING FOR CUSHING DISEASE: COMPARISON OF INTERNAL JUGULAR VEIN AND INFERIOR PETROSAL SINUS SAMPLING.

    PubMed

    Radvany, Martin G; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Gallia, Gary L; Wand, Gary S; Salvatori, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fails to detect many adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas, inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) is considered the gold standard to differentiate Cushing disease (CD) from ectopic ACTH secretion syndrome (EAS). Some authors have suggested internal jugular vein sampling (IJVS) as an alternative to IPSS. We simultaneously compared IJVS to IPSS in 30 consecutive patients referred for ACTH-dependent Cushing syndrome and equivocal MRI exams. Five sites were simultaneously sampled in each patient (right and left IPS, right and left IJV, and femoral vein) before and after the administration of corticotrophin-releasing hormone or desmopressin. The test was considered consistent with CD when the IPS to peripheral ratio was >2 at baseline or >3 after stimulus and the IJV to peripheral ratio was >1.7 at baseline or >2 after stimulus. In 27 of 30 patients, IPSS results were consistent with a central source of ACTH. Two of the other 3 patients had EAS (one lung carcinoid and one occult), and 1 patient had pathology-proven CD. The sensitivity of IPSS was 96.4%. Only 64.2% of these patients had results meeting criteria for a central source of ACTH by IJVS criteria. Twenty patients with centralizing IPPS have undergone pituitary surgery. Of these, the central origin of excessive ACTH was confirmed with certainty in 16 patients. Among these 16 patients, the IPSS sensitivity was 93.8%, whereas 5 patients had false-negative IJVS (68.7% sensitivity). These results do not support the routine use of IJVS in establishing if the pituitary is the source of excessive ACTH. ACTH = adrenocorticotropic hormone CD = Cushing disease CRH = corticotrophin-releasing hormone CS = Cushing syndrome DDAVP = desmopressin EAS = ectopic ACTH secretion IJVS = internal jugular vein sampling IPSS = inferior petrosal sinus sampling JVS = jugular venous sampling MRI = magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. [Cerebral venous sinuses thrombosis in an infant with supramitral obstructive membrane associated with partial anomalous pulmonary venous return].

    PubMed

    Smilari, P; Romeo, M G; Sciacca, P; Scalzo, G; Gallo, C; Mattia, C; Manfrè, L; Distefano, G

    2005-04-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is quite rare in newborn infants, but probably its incidence is not well evaluated because clinical signs and cerebral echocardiography are not specific. We report the case of an newborn infant with massive cerebral venous thrombosis associated with heart malformation: supramitral ring and partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection in the superior vena cava.

  15. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in the Superior Sagittal Sinus as a Rare Cause of a Paroxysmal Kinetic Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Murao, Kei; Arakawa, Shuji; Furuta, Yoshihiko; Shijo, Masahiro; Ago, Tetsuro; Kitazono, Takanari

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has a broad spectrum of clinical presentation compared to arterial etiology. Seizure is one of the common symptoms and is more frequent than in other stroke types. Hence, transient neurological symptoms in CVT patients are usually due to epileptic seizures, while transient repetitive movement disorder is extremely rare except as a complication of epilepsy. We report a case of CVT in the superior sagittal sinus with a 1-year history of paroxysmal kinetic tremor without evident epilepsy. PMID:28203183

  16. Morphological Variations in the Transverse Venous Sinus Anatomy of Dogs and its Relationship to Skull Landmarks.

    PubMed

    Carreira, L Miguel; Ferreira, A

    2016-08-01

    We characterized the anatomical morphology of the transverse venous sinus (TVS) of 69 canine adult cadavers belonging to three groups: brachycephalic (B), dolichocephalic (D) and mesaticephalic (M). In addition, we outlined its path over the skull using five classic human craniometric points (CPs): the asterion (ast), the bregma (b), the glabella (g), the stephanion (st) and the pterion (pt). The study aimed to establish anatomical differences in the TVS between groups and in the relationship between the TVS and skull. We found that TVS anatomy and its relationships to skull landmarks vary markedly between the groups, with similar anatomical arrangements in B and M. The TVS length can be ranked as M < B < D (with D being the biggest), whereas the width can be ranked as M < D < B (with B being the widest) with the right side being smaller than the left. In the B and M groups, the TVS assumes a craniocaudal trajectory that is closer to the lateral skull wall than in D, where the TVS presents a caudocranial direction. By documenting the morphological characteristics of the TVS, we can create a set of anatomical references allowing construction of a basic framework to greatly decrease the probability of TVS injury during neuronavigation procedures when supported by a good knowledge of the skull, brain anatomies and their relationships.

  17. Cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis and thrombophilic mutations in Western Iran: association with factor V Leiden.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Zohreh; Mozafari, Hadi; Bigvand, Amir Hossein Amiri; Doulabi, Reza Mohammad; Vaisi-Raygani, Asad; Afshari, Dariush; Razazian, Nazanin; Rezaei, Mansour

    2010-08-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the prevalence of factor V Leiden G1691A, prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T in cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis (CVST) patients and their possible association with CVST in Western Iran. A total of 24 CVST patients with the mean age of 37.1 +/- 11.7 years and 100 sex- and age-matched healthy individuals from Kermanshah Province of Iran with ethnic background of Kurd were studied for factor V Leiden G1691A, prothrombin G20210A and MTHFR C677T by PCR-RFLP method using Mnl I, Hind III, and Hinf I restriction enzymes, respectively. Prevalence of factor V Leiden was 16.7% in patients and 2% in control group. A significant association was found between factor V Leiden mutation and CVST with odds ratio (OR) of 9.8 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.68-57.2, P = .01). No prothrombin G20210A was found among patients. In patients, MTHFR C677T tended to be higher (58.3%) compared to control (44%), OR of 1.8 (95% CI 0.73-4.5, P = .2). Our study for the first time has determined the prevalence of inherited thrombophilia in a homogenous ethnic group of CVST patients and suggests that factor V Leiden, and not the prothrombin gene mutation is a risk factor for CVST in Western Iran.

  18. The Potentiality for Development of Multiple Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas after Ligation of the Internal Jugular Vein: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fudaba, Hirotaka; Kubo, Takeshi; Goda, Makoto; Sugita, Kenji; Morishige, Masaki; Onishi, Kouhei; Ishii, Keisuke; Anan, Mitsuhiro; Nagai, Yasuyuki; Fujiki, Minoru

    2017-01-01

    A 74-year-old male presented with an intracranial hemorrhage caused by multiple dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) in the left transverse sinus and right sigmoid sinus. Four months previously, the patient underwent tongue cancer removal with lymph node dissection and ligation of the right internal jugular vein. Endovascular embolization (transvenous and transarterial embolization) resulted in the complete disappearance of the fistulas. Follow-up angiography revealed new arteriovenous shunts at the superior sagittal sinus and right transverse sinus, and we treated the patient with staged transarterial embolization. Finally, venous congestion almost completely resolved and the DAVFs disappeared without any sign of recurrence. This case speculates the concept of DAVF as an acquired lesion caused by intravenous hypertension and alerts clinicians to take precautions against ligation of the internal jugular vein during a cervical operation. PMID:28840082

  19. A Flare of Ulcerative Colitis Accompanied With Cerebral Sinus Venous Thrombosis And Bilateral Thalamic Infarctus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dulger, Ahmet Cumhur; Begenik, Huseyin; Demirtas, Levent; Esen, Ramazan; Emre, Habib

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory and recurrent disorder that is characterized by bowel inflammation. Some patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) have acute, severe, and sometimes devastating intracranial complications that require immediate medical intervention. Cerebral sinus vein thrombosis is a rare but serious extraintestinal complication associated with ulcerative colitis. Herein we report a 30-year-old man with UC who presented with a flare of gastrointestinal symptoms with mental obtundation and apathy. Total colonoscopy revealed active colitis and cranial MRI showed extensive cerebral sinus venous thrombosis with thalamic infarcts. Because the patient was clinically unstable metilprednisolon with low molecular weight heparin were administered. Two days after treatment the patient was died despite all medical efforts. PMID:27785183

  20. Comparison of the lateral tail vein and the retro-orbital venous sinus as routes of intravenous drug delivery in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Steel, Christina D; Stephens, Amber L; Hahto, Suzanne M; Singletary, Sylvia J; Ciavarra, Richard P

    2008-01-01

    In mice, intravenous injections are commonly administered in the lateral tail vein. This technique is sometimes difficult to carry out and may cause stress to mice. Though injection through the retro-orbital venous sinus can provide certain advantages over lateral tail vein injection, this method is poorly defined and infrequently used. To compare the efficacy of these two routes of drug delivery, the authors injected MAFIA transgenic mice with the depletion agent AP20187, which selectively induces apoptosis in macrophages. Each mouse received five consecutive daily injections through either the lateral tail vein or the retro-orbital venous sinus. The authors then compared macrophage depletion in different tissues (lung, spleen, bone marrow and peritoneal exudate cells). Both routes of injection were similarly effective. A separate experiment using BALB/c mice indicated that retro-orbital venous sinus injection was the less stressful of the two methods.

  1. Dural arteriovenous fistula masquerading as pulsatile tinnitus: radiologic assessment and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    An, Yong-Hwi; Han, Sungjun; Lee, Minhyung; Rhee, Jihye; Kwon, O-Ki; Hwang, Gyojun; Jung, Cheolkyu; Bae, Yun Jung; An, Gwang Seok; Lee, Kyogu; Koo, Ja-Won; Song, Jae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus (PT) is often an initial presenting symptom of dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF), but it may be overlooked or diagnosed late if not suspected on initial diagnostic work-up. Here, we assess anatomical features, treatment outcomes, and clinical implications of patients with PT due to dAVF. Of 220 patients who were diagnosed with dAVF between 2003 and 2014, 30 (13.6%) presented with only PT as their initial symptom. The transverse-sigmoid sinus (70.0%) was the most common site, followed by the hypoglossal canal (10.0%) and the middle cranial fossa (6.7%) on radiologic evaluation. Regarding venous drainage patterns, sinus or meningeal venous drainage pattern was the most common type (73.3%), followed by sinus drainage with a cortical venous reflux (26.7%). PT disappeared completely in 21 (80.8%) of 26 patients who underwent therapeutic intervention with transarterial embolization of the fistula, improved markedly in 3 (11.5%), and remained the same in 2 (7.7%). In conclusion, considering that PT may be the only initial symptom in more than 10% of dAVF, not only otolaryngologists but also neurologists and neurosurgeons should meticulously evaluate patients with PT. In most cases, PT originating from dAVF can be cured with transarterial embolization regardless of location and venous drainage pattern. PMID:27812001

  2. The post-occipital spinal venous sinus of the Nile crocodile Crocodylus niloticus: its anatomy and use for blood sample collection and intravenous infusions.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, Jan G; Kirberger, Robert M; Steyl, Johan C A; Soley, John T; Booyse, Dirk G; Huchzermeyer, Fritz W; Lowers, Russel H; Guillette, Louis J

    2014-05-05

    The post-occipital sinus of the spinal vein is often used for the collection of blood samples from crocodilians. Although this sampling method has been reported for several crocodilian species, the technique and associated anatomy has not been described in detail in any crocodilian, including the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus). The anatomy of the cranial neck region was investigated macroscopically, microscopically, radiographically and by means of computed tomography. Latex was injected into the spinal vein and spinal venous sinus of crocodiles to visualise the regional vasculature. The spinal vein ran within the vertebral canal, dorsal to and closely associated with the spinal cord and changed into a venous sinus cranially in the post-occipital region. For blood collection, the spinal venous sinus was accessed through the interarcuate space between the atlas and axis (C1 and C2) by inserting a needle angled just off the perpendicular in the midline through the craniodorsal cervical skin, just cranial to the cranial borders of the first cervical osteoderms. The most convenient method of blood collection was with a syringe and hypodermic needle. In addition, the suitability of the spinal venous sinus for intravenous injections and infusions in live crocodiles was evaluated. The internal diameter of the commercial human epidural catheters used during these investigations was relatively small, resulting in very slow infusion rates. Care should be taken not to puncture the spinal cord or to lacerate the blood vessel wall using this route for blood collection or intravenous infusions.

  3. [Cerebral venous thrombosis imagiologic features in a pregnant woman].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria Madalena; Rios, Ana Cristina; Fragata, Isabel; Baptista, José Tiago; Manaças, Rui; Reis, João

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a relatively rare but serious condition potentially reversible upon accurate diagnosis and adequate therapy. The peri-partum state and pregnancy are predisposing factors and TVC accounts for about 6% of maternal deaths. Its clinical symptoms depend on the the thrombus site and extension, and also on the existing collateral vessels network. We present the case of a 33 year-old woman, 13 weeks pregnant, that complained of headaches and whose cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a subtotal oclusión of the superior sagittal sinus. We discuss the imaging features of dural venous thrombosis in the acute phase.

  4. Venous hemodynamics in neurological disorders: an analytical review with hydrodynamic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Venous abnormalities contribute to the pathophysiology of several neurological conditions. This paper reviews the literature regarding venous abnormalities in multiple sclerosis (MS), leukoaraiosis, and normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). The review is supplemented with hydrodynamic analysis to assess the effects on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics and cerebral blood flow (CBF) of venous hypertension in general, and chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) in particular. CCSVI-like venous anomalies seem unlikely to account for reduced CBF in patients with MS, thus other mechanisms must be at work, which increase the hydraulic resistance of the cerebral vascular bed in MS. Similarly, hydrodynamic changes appear to be responsible for reduced CBF in leukoaraiosis. The hydrodynamic properties of the periventricular veins make these vessels particularly vulnerable to ischemia and plaque formation. Venous hypertension in the dural sinuses can alter intracranial compliance. Consequently, venous hypertension may change the CSF dynamics, affecting the intracranial windkessel mechanism. MS and NPH appear to share some similar characteristics, with both conditions exhibiting increased CSF pulsatility in the aqueduct of Sylvius. CCSVI appears to be a real phenomenon associated with MS, which causes venous hypertension in the dural sinuses. However, the role of CCSVI in the pathophysiology of MS remains unclear. PMID:23724917

  5. Clinical Characteristics of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Single-Centre Experience in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Chen, Hua; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Wanli; Zheng, Wenjie; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Fengchun

    2015-01-01

    Clinical characteristics of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients complicated with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) between 2000 and 2013 were analyzed through this retrospective, single-centre study. Of 4747 hospitalized SLE patients, 17 (0.36%, 12 females, average age 30) had CVST. Headache (88.2%) was the most common neurological symptom followed by nausea or vomiting (47.1%), conscious disturbance (41.2%), edema of eyelids or conjunctiva (35.3%), blurred vision or diplopia (35.3%), and seizure (35.3%). Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) occurred in 13 cases (76.5%). Magnetic resonance venography (MRV) detected thrombosis in the transverse (82.4%), sigmoid (52.9%), and sagittal (35.3%) sinuses, with frequent (70.6%) multiple sinus occlusions. Compared to SLE patients without CVST, SLE patients with CVST had a higher prevalence of thrombocytopenia and positive antiphospholipid antibodies and a higher SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) score. 13 patients achieved improvement following glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants treatment, as well as anticoagulants, while 3 patients died at the hospital. CVST is relatively rare in SLE and tends to occur in active lupus patients. Intracranial hypertension is common but nonspecific clinical feature, so MRV evaluation is necessary to establish a diagnosis. Aggressive treatment for the rapid control of SLE activity combined with anticoagulants can improve the prognosis.

  6. [Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula draining into spinal cord veins: case report].

    PubMed

    Seda, Lauro Franco; Pieruccetti, Marco Antonio; Freitas, José Maria Modenesi; Listik, Sérgio; Pereira, Clemente Augusto Brito

    2002-09-01

    We present an usual case of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula with perimedullary and spinal cord venous plexus drainage and discuss its etiological, physiopathological, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

  7. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in Pregnancy-A Poignant Allegory of an Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Shailesh, Gaikwad Harsha; Gupta, Sumedha; Sharma, Manjula; Mittal, Pratima

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral Venous Thrombosis (CVT), also known as cortical venous, cerebral sinus, cerebral venous sinus, or dural sinus thrombosis, is an infrequent grave condition affecting pregnant females, resulting from clot formation in one of the many outflow tracts of the brain. Although pregnancy-associated stroke or CVT is uncommon, the risk of stroke is greatly increased above the low baseline rate in young patients during late pregnancy and, even more so, during the puerperium. Haemorrhagic infarction can occur in the acute stage of CVT. The article reports a case of CVT in puerperium in woman without any risk factors for thrombosis, highlighting the difficulties encountered in differentiating this rare cause from common diagnoses such as eclampsia. Also, clinical considerations and relevant literature review on prognostic factors affecting outcome have been addressed. CVT is an uncommon serious neurologic disorder in young gravidas requiring prudent assessment of the potential differential diagnoses and prompt management. PMID:28208950

  8. Successful treatment of extensive cerebral venous sinus thrombosis using a combined approach with Penumbra aspiration system and Solitaire FR retrieval device

    PubMed Central

    Raychev, Radoslav; Tateshima, Satoshi; Rastogi, Sachin; Balgude, Amit; Yafeh, Banafsheh; Saver, Jeffrey L; Vespa, Paul M; Buitrago, Manuel; Duckwiler, Gary

    2013-01-01

    We present a young woman with rapidly progressive neurologic decline in the setting of malignant cerebral edema due to extensive superior sagittal sinus thrombosis and cortical venous thrombosis despite intravenous heparin administration. Complete revascularization of the occluded sinus was achieved using suction thrombectomy with the 5 max Penumbra catheter in combination with the Solitaire FR clot retrieval device. The successful endovascular treatment halted the progression of her cerebral edema, and the patient eventually had an excellent recovery after prolonged intensive medical therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case describing such a combined mechanical approach for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The clot retrieval properties of the Solitaire device combined with direct aspiration via the newest generation Penumbra catheters may allow more rapid, safe and efficient revascularization than all previously reported endovascular treatments for this potentially devastating condition. PMID:24022899

  9. Predictive Factors for Response of Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas to Transarterial Onyx Embolization: Angiographic Subgroup Analysis of Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byungjun; Jeon, Pyoung; Kim, Keonha; Kim, Sungtae; Kim, Hyungjin; Byun, Hong Sik; Jo, Kyung-Il

    2016-04-01

    Endovascular treatment using Onyx has been increasingly used to treat intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs). This study evaluated predictive factors for favorable treatment outcome in patients with intracranial noncavernous DAVFs treated by transarterial Onyx embolization. Between August 2008 and August 2014, 55 patients who underwent transarterial Onyx embolization for noncavernous DAVFs were retrospectively reviewed. Patients' demographic, clinical, and procedural data were analyzed to find statistically significant predictive factors for favorable treatment outcomes after Onyx embolization. Fistulas were classified angiographically according to the relationship between fistulas and dural venous sinuses and the presence of leptomeningeal venous reflux. Sixty-eight Onyx embolizations were performed in 55 patients. Immediate angiographic cure was achieved in 28 patients, and 14 of 27 patients with residual shunts showed progressive occlusion at follow-up imaging studies. Therefore, the overall favorable treatment outcome was 76.4% (42/55). The remaining 13 patients (23.6%) showed persistent residual shunts, and 3 (5.5%) of them showed aggravation of residual lesion on follow-up studies. Of 25 patients with non-sinus fistulas, 23 patients (92%) showed favorable treatment outcomes, and 19 of 30 patients (63.3%) with sinus fistulas showed favorable outcomes. Among the evaluated variables, non-sinus DAVFs was a statistically significant predictive factor for favorable response to transarterial Onyx embolization (P < 0.05). Transarterial Onyx embolization is a highly effective treatment method for non-sinus DAVFs. Careful consideration of angiographic features and multimodal embolization strategies are required for treatment of sinus DAVFs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Endovascular correction of an infantile intracranial venous outflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Soltanolkotabi, Maryam; Rahimi, Shahram; Hurley, Michael C; Bowman, Robin M; Russell, Eric J; Ansari, Sameer A; Shaibani, Ali

    2013-12-01

    The authors report on the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with a reduced level of activity, macrocephaly, prominent scalp veins, and decreased left-sided visual acuity. Imaging workup demonstrated generalized cerebral volume loss, bilateral chronic subdural hematomas, absent left sigmoid sinus, hypoplastic left transverse sinus, and severe focal weblike stenosis of the right sigmoid sinus. Right sigmoid sinus angioplasty and stent insertion was performed, with an immediate reduction in the transduced intracranial venous pressure gradient across the stenosis (from 22 to 3 mm Hg). Postprocedural diminution of prominent scalp and forehead veins and spinal venous collateral vessels was followed by a progressive improvement in visual acuity and physical activity over a 1-year follow-up period, supporting the efficacy of angioplasty and stent insertion in intracranial venous outflow obstruction. There are multiple potential causes of intracranial venous hypertension in children. Development of dural sinus stenosis in infancy may be one such cause, mimicking the clinical presentation of other causes such as vein of Galen malformations. This condition can be ameliorated by early endovascular revascularization.

  11. The post-occipital spinal venous sinus of the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus): Its anatomy and use for blood sample collection and intravenous infusions.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, Jan G; Kirberger, Robert M; Steyl, Johan C A; Soley, John T; Booyse, Dirk G; Huchzermeyer, Fritz W; Lowers, Russel H; Guillette, Louis J

    2014-05-05

    The post-occipital sinus of the spinal vein is often used for the collection of blood samples from crocodilians. Although this sampling method has been reported for several crocodilian species, the technique and associated anatomy has not been described in detail in any crocodilian, including the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus). The anatomy of the cranial neck region was investigated macroscopically, microscopically, radiographically and by means of computed tomography. Latex was injected into the spinal vein and spinal venous sinus of crocodiles to visualise the regional vasculature. The spinal vein ran within the vertebral canal, dorsal to and closely associated with the spinal cord and changed into a venous sinus cranially in the post-occipital region. For blood collection, the spinal venous sinus was accessed through the interarcuate space between the atlas and axis (C1 and C2) by inserting a needle angled just off the perpendicular in the midline through the craniodorsal cervical skin, just cranial to the cranial borders of the first cervical osteoderms. The most convenient method of blood collection was with a syringe and hypodermic needle. In addition, the suitability of the spinal venous sinus for intravenous injections and infusions in live crocodiles was evaluated. The internal diameter of the commercial human epidural catheters used during these investigations was relatively small, resulting in very slow infusion rates. Care should be taken not to puncture the spinal cord or to lacerate the blood vessel wall using this route for blood collection or intravenous infusions.

  12. Central venous catheter placement: where is the tip?

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, George M

    2012-09-01

    The insertion of central venous catheters is a common bedside procedure performed in intensive care units. Here, we present a case of an 82-year-old man who underwent insertion of a central venous catheter in the internal jugular vein without perceived complications. Postprocedural radiographs showed rostral migration of the catheter, and computed tomography performed coincidentally showed cannulation of the jugular bulb at the level of the jugular foramen. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document migration of a central venous catheter from the internal jugular vein into the dural sinuses, as confirmed by computed tomography. The case highlights the importance of acquiring postprocedural radiographs for all insertions of central venous catheters to confirm catheter placement.

  13. Plasmodium vivax cerebral malaria complicated with venous sinus thrombosis in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Pinzón, Miguel A; Pineda, Juan C; Rosso, Fernando; Shinchi, Masaru; Bonilla-Abadía, Fabio

    2013-05-13

    Complicated malaria is usually due to Plasmodium falciparum. Nevertheless, Plasmodium vivax is infrequently related with life-threatening complications. Few cases have been reported of severe Plasmodium vivax infection, and most of them from Southeast Asia and India. We report the first case of cerebral malaria due to Plasmodium vivax in Latin America, complicated with sagittal sinus thrombosis and confirmed by a molecular method. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cardiac MRI and pulmonary MR angiography of sinus venosus defect and partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection in cause of right undiagnosed ventricular enlargement.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Henryk; Mohiaddin, Raad H

    2009-01-01

    Patients may be referred for cardiology assessment because of an enlarged right ventricle (RV) with no cause apparent on echocardiography. Cardiac MRI can contribute to the management of these patients by detecting sinus venosus defect or partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection (PAPVC). We sought to show how often sinus venosus defect or PAPVC was detected on MRI in patients with an enlarged RV without a previously established definite diagnosis. First cardiac MRI scans obtained over a 4-year period in adults with an undiagnosed cause of RV enlargement were searched for the MRI diagnosis of sinus venosus defect or PAPVC. Thirty-seven patients (25 female, 12 male) met the study criteria. Nineteen patients had a cardiac MRI diagnosis of sinus venosus defect, with PAPVC being present in 95% of those patients. All PAPVCs associated with sinus venosus defect were from the right side. Eleven of the 19 patients with sinus venosus defect underwent surgery at our institution. Sinus venosus defect was confirmed in all 11 cases. Of the 37 patients, 36 had PAPVC, which was right-sided in 27 patients (75%), left-sided in seven patients (19.4%), and bilateral in two patients (5.6%). Three patients had scimitar veins. The common defects associated with PAPVC were sinus venosus defect in 18 patients (50%) and secundum atrial septal defect in six patients (17%). This article about cardiac MRI in adults with sinus venosus defect and PAPVC shows that cardiac MRI can reliably detect and quantify these lesions when other methods have not provided a complete diagnosis for the cause of right heart enlargement.

  15. Quadruple coaxial catheter system on transvenous embolization for dural arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Horie, Nobutaka; Morofuji, Yoichi; Fukuda, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Susumu; Morikawa, Minoru

    2015-04-01

    Although transvenous embolization (TVE) is an effective method for treating dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF), directing the catheter to the lesion site is difficult. We report on the utility of a quadruple coaxial catheter system for TVE. The quadruple catheter system comprised a 6 Fr guiding sheath, 6 Fr guiding catheter, 4 Fr intermediate catheter, and a regular microcatheter. The system was utilized in 27 consecutive dural AVF cases treated with TVE. In this study, we reviewed our experience with this system, including the theory, method of use, and complications. Stenosis or obstruction of the vascular access was identified in 12 cases. The catheter could not reach to the lesion in three cases of cavernous sinus (7·4%); therefore, transarterial embolization was employed. Angiographic results revealed that the cases consist of total occlusion (n  =  16, 59·5%), subtotal (n  =  10, 37·0%), and partial occlusion (n  =  1, 3·7%). Complete resolution or improvement of symptoms was observed in 23 patients (85·2%), no improvement of symptoms was observed in three patients (7·4%), and deterioration of symptoms was observed in one patient (3·7%). Venous perforation occurred in one patient without any neurological deficit. The catheter system provided access to the lesion and provided stability during the mechanically demanding process navigating the catheter and placing the coils. We determined that the quadruple coaxial system was safe and efficient for TVE for dural AVF.

  16. Wavelet-Based Angiographic Reconstruction of Computed Tomography Perfusion Data: Diagnostic Value in Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Wolfgang G; Schuler, Felix; Sommer, Wieland H; Fabritius, Matthias P; Havla, Lukas; Meinel, Felix G; Reiser, Maximilian F; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Thierfelder, Kolja M

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to test the diagnostic value of wavelet-based angiographic reconstruction of CT perfusion data (waveletCTA) to detect cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) in patients who underwent whole-brain CT perfusion imaging (WB-CTP). Datasets were retrospectively selected from an initial cohort of 2863 consecutive patients who had undergone multiparametric CT including WB-CTP. WaveletCTA was reconstructed from WB-CTP: the angiographic signal was generated by voxel-based wavelet transform of time attenuation curves (TACs) from WB-CTP raw data. In a preliminary clinical evaluation, waveletCTA was analyzed by 2 readers with respect to presence and location of CVST. Venous CT and MR angiography (venCTA/venMRA) served as reference standard. Diagnostic confidence for CVST detection and the quality of depiction for venous sections were evaluated on 5-point Likert scales. Thrombus extent was assessed by length measurements. The mean CT attenuation and waveletCTA signal of the thrombus and of flowing blood were quantified. Sixteen patients were included: 10 patients with venCTA-/venMRA-confirmed CVST and 6 patients with arterial single-phase CT angiography (artCTA)-suspected but follow-up-excluded CVST. The reconstruction of waveletCTA was successful in all patients. Among the patients with confirmed CVST, waveletCTA correctly demonstrated presence, location, and extent of the thrombosis in 10/10 cases. In 6 patients with artCTA-suspected but follow-up-excluded CVST, waveletCTA correctly ruled out CVST in 5 patients. Reading waveletCTA in addition to artCTA significantly increased the diagnostic confidence concerning CVST compared with reading artCTA alone (4.4 vs 3.6, P = 0.044). The mean flowing blood-to-thrombus ratio was highest in waveletCTA, followed by venCTA and artCTA (146.2 vs 5.9 vs 2.6, each with P < 0.001). In waveletCTA, the venous sections were depicted better compared with artCTA (4.2 vs 2.6, P < 0.001), and equally well compared with ven

  17. Borderline Intracranial Hypertension Manifesting as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Treated by Venous Sinus Stenting.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Nicholas; Pickard, John; Lever, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome and cases of idiopathic intracranial hypertension without signs of raised intracranial pressure can be impossible to distinguish without direct measurement of intracranial pressure. Moreover, lumbar puncture, the usual method of measuring intracranial pressure, can produce a similar respite from symptoms in patients with chronic fatigue as it does in idiopathic intracranial hypertension. This suggests a connection between them, with chronic fatigue syndrome representing a forme fruste variant of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. If this were the case, then treatments available for idiopathic intracranial hypertension might be appropriate for chronic fatigue. We describe a 49-year-old woman with a long and debilitating history of chronic fatigue syndrome who was targeted for investigation of intracranial pressure because of headache, then diagnosed with borderline idiopathic intracranial hypertension after lumbar puncture and cerebrospinal fluid drainage. Further investigation showed narrowings at the anterior ends of the transverse sinuses, typical of those seen in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and associated with pressure gradients. Stenting of both transverse sinuses brought about a life-changing remission of symptoms with no regression in 2 years of follow-up. This result invites study of an alternative approach to the investigation and management of chronic fatigue.

  18. Modified three-dimensional skull base model with artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, and venous sinuses for training in skull base surgery: technical note.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuji; Oyama, Kazutaka; Ueno, Hideaki; Nakao, Yasuaki; Honma, Keiichirou

    2008-12-01

    Experience with dissection of the cavernous sinus and the temporal bone is essential for training in skull base surgery, but the opportunities for cadaver dissection are very limited. A modification of a commercially available prototype three-dimensional (3D) skull base model, made by a selective laser sintering method and incorporating surface details and inner bony structures such as the inner ear structures and air cells, is proposed to include artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, venous sinuses, and the internal carotid artery for such surgical training. The transpetrosal approach and epidural cavernous sinus surgery (Dolenc's technique) were performed on this modified model using a high speed drill or ultrasonic bone curette under an operating microscope. The model could be dissected in almost the same way as a real cadaver. The modified 3D skull base model provides a good educational tool for training in skull base surgery.

  19. Comparison of jugular and transverse facial venous sinus blood analytes in healthy and critically ill adult horses.

    PubMed

    Lascola, Kara M; Vander Werf, Karie; Freese, Stephanie; Morgera, Alison; Schaeffer, David J; Wilkins, Pamela

    2017-03-01

    To compare blood gas, electrolyte, and metabolic analysis results between blood obtained by jugular and transverse facial venous sinus (TFVS) venipuncture in healthy adult horses and sick adult horses presented for emergency evaluation. Prospective, experimental study, from June 2012 to October 2013. Large animal university teaching hospital. Ten healthy adult University-owned horses and 48 client-owned adult horses (≥2 years old) presenting to the large animal hospital emergency service for medical or surgical evaluation of systemic illness. Venipunctures (jugular vein [JV] and TFVS) were performed using preheparinized syringes and obtained prior to institution of medical therapy. Samples were analyzed in random order within a 10-minute interval using a point-of-care blood gas analyzer (NOVA Critical Care Xpress) that also reports electrolyte and metabolite results. Comparisons between venipuncture sites were analyzed using the Student's paired t-test for normally distributed data and the Wilcoxon paired test for nonnormally distributed data. Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess agreement between venipuncture sites. There were no statistically significant differences found between variables for JV and TFVS in healthy horses. In sick horses, JV measurements were greater than TFVS for ionized calcium (P = 0.002) and glucose (P = 0.001), and less than TFVS for hematocrit (P = 0.015). Bland-Altman plots demonstrated small biases but overall agreement between sites. The TFVS can be used interchangeably with JV for venous blood gas analysis in healthy horses. In sick horses, identified differences were small and likely not clinically important. The reliability of this point-of-care blood gas analyzer for measurement of hematocrit remains to be determined. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  20. Imaging diagnosis of dural and direct cavernous carotid fistulae*

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Daniela; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; Cruz, Antonio Augusto Velasco e; Colli, Benedicto Oscar; Abud, Daniel Giansante

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae of the cavernous sinus are rare and difficult to diagnose. They are classified into dural cavernous sinus fistulae or direct carotid-cavernous fistulae. Despite the similarity of symptoms between both types, a precise diagnosis is essential since the treatment is specific for each type of fistula. Imaging findings are remarkably similar in both dural cavernous sinus fistulae and carotid-cavernous fistulae, but it is possible to differentiate one type from the other. Amongst the available imaging methods (Doppler ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography), angiography is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae. The present essay is aimed at didactically presenting the classification and imaging findings of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae. PMID:25741093

  1. Single-session, transarterial complete embolization of Galenic dural AV fistula.

    PubMed

    Laviv, Yosef; Kasper, Ekkehard; Perlow, Eliyahu

    2016-02-01

    Galenic dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) represents a unique, hard to treat subgroup of tentorial DAVFs. We present an unusual case of hemorrhagic Galenic DAVF in a 54-year-old woman. The fistula drained directly to the vein of Galen through multiple feeders. Complete occlusion of the fistula was achieved through transarterial embolization. Deep venous drainage remained intact and the patient recovered well. To our knowledge, this is the first report on complete closure of hemorrhagic Galenic DAVF using transarterial embolization with complete obliteration of vein of Galen. The presence of nonfunctioning straight sinus may have contributed to the success of treatment and it may be considered as a predictive marker for endovascular embolization.

  2. Central venous sinus thrombosis in a young woman taking norethindrone acetate for dysfunctional uterine bleeding: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Rajesh; Dhuan, Joginder; Agarwal, Shalini; Gahlaut, P S

    2008-08-01

    The association between the progestin-only pill used for treatment of menstrual disorders and central venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) has rarely been reported in the literature. This report describes a case of central venous sinus thrombosis following intake of norethindrone acetate for dysfunctional uterine bleeding secondary to polycystic ovary syndrome in a young woman with undiagnosed underlying hyperhomocysteinemia. A 23-year-old woman presented with severe headache, followed by hemiparesis, seizures, and altered sensorium. She had been prescribed norethindrone acetate for the management of dysfunctional uterine bleeding secondary to polycystic ovary syndrome. Investigations revealed acquired hyperhomocysteinemia, presumably due to nutritional deficiencies, and evidence of CVST on MRI and magnetic resonance venography. Investigations showed no evidence of inherited thrombophilia. The patient was treated with low molecular weight heparin, followed by warfarin, vitamin B12, vitamin B6, and folic acid, and recovered successfully. Although venous thrombosis is usually linked to the ingestion of estrogen, rather than progestogen, this case illustrates that patients who are prescribed progestogen-only pills for gynaecological disorders may develop thrombosis, especially if they have predisposing metabolic disorders.

  3. Comparison of the sagittal sinus cross-sectional area between patients with multiple sclerosis, hydrocephalus, intracranial hypertension and spontaneous intracranial hypotension: a surrogate marker of venous transmural pressure?

    PubMed

    Bateman, Grant A; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Copping, Ross; Moeskops, Christopher; Yap, Swee Leong

    2017-07-06

    There is evidence that patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and hydrocephalus share some common pathophysiological mechanisms. Alterations in CSF pressure are known to affect cerebral venous sinus geometry. To further explore these mechanisms, we measured the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) cross-sectional area 3 cm above the torcular using T2 images in 20 MS, 10 spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH), 21 hydrocephalus and 20 idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) patients and compared with 20 matched controls. The SSS area was reduced by 25% in hydrocephalus (p = 0.0008), increased by 22% (p = 0.037) in SIH and unchanged in IIH compared to matched controls. In MS there was a 16% increase in SSS area (p = 0.01).The findings suggest that changes in SSS cross-sectional are common between MS and SIH patients, while in hydrocephalus and IIH these are different.

  4. Cerebral sinus venous thromboses in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia - a multicentre study from the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology.

    PubMed

    Ranta, Susanna; Tuckuviene, Ruta; Mäkipernaa, Anne; Albertsen, Birgitte K; Frisk, Tony; Tedgård, Ulf; Jónsson, Ólafur G; Pruunsild, Kaie; Gretenkort Andersson, Nadine; Winther Gunnes, Maria; Saulyte Trakymiene, Sonata; Frandsen, Thomas; Heyman, Mats; Ruud, Ellen; Helgestad, Jon

    2015-02-01

    We present a prospective multicentre cohort of 20 children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT). The study covers a period of 5 years and comprises 1038 children treated according to the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) ALL 2008 protocol. The cumulative incidence of CSVT was 2%. Sixteen of the thromboses were related to asparaginase and 16 to steroids. Most CSVTs occurred in the consolidation phase. Nearly all were treated with low molecular weight heparin without bleeding complications. Mortality related to CSVT directly or indirectly was 10%, emphasizing the importance of this complication.

  5. Cerebral Venous Congestion as Indication for Thrombolytic Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Fong Y. Kostanian, Varoujan; Rivera, Monica; Lee, Kwo-Whie; Chen, Clayton C.; Nguyen, Thong H.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To carry out a retrospective analysis of patients with acute dural sinus thrombosis, and the role of cerebral venous congestion in patient management. Methods. Twenty-five patients were identified with the clinical and imaging diagnosis of acute dural sinus thrombosis. The imaging diagnosis was by magnetic resonance (MR) and/or computed tomography (CT) venography. There was a female predominance with a female to male ratio of 1.5 to 1 (16 women, 9 men). The age range was from 19 to 64 years old with an average age of 37 years. The first 10 patients, who ranged in age from 21 to 64 years old (average 37 years), received only anticoagulation therapy with heparin and warfarin for periods ranging from 5 days to 2 months. The remaining 15 patients ranged in age from 19 to 57 years old (average 38 years). They either underwent subsequent thrombectomy after a trial of anticoagulation therapy, or went straight to thrombectomy. These latter 15 patients had initial evidence of cerebral venous congestion, either clinically by severe or worsening symptoms despite anticoagulation therapy, or on initial or subsequent CT or MR imaging. In our experience, the cerebral venous congestion imaging findings included intracranial hemorrhage, a hematoma, or edema. The thrombolytic treatment technique consisted of the advancement of a 6 Fr guiding catheter to the jugular bulb or sigmoid sinus from a transfemoral approach. A microcatheter was then advanced to the proximal portion of the thrombus and then either tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or urokinase was injected to prevent clot propagation. A balloon catheter was used to perform thrombectomy since the thrombolytic agents can be injected via the inner lumen with an inflated balloon. The inflated balloon helped to keep the venous flow from washing out the thrombolytic agent, thus facilitating the agent's effect. Results. The first 10 patients received only anticoagulation therapy with heparin and warfarin for periods

  6. Efficacy and Limitations of Transarterial Acrylic Glue Embolization for Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    MIYAMOTO, Naoko; NAITO, Isao; SHIMIZU, Tatsuya; YOSHIMOTO, Yuhei

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy and limitations of transarterial acrylic glue embolization for the treatment of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) were investigated. Thirty-four DAVFs treated by transarterial embolization using n-butyl cyanoacrylate were retrospectively reviewed. The locations of DAVFs were the transverse-sigmoid sinus in 11, tentorium in 10, cranial vault in 9, and superior sagittal sinus, jugular bulb, foramen magnum, and middle cranial fossa in 1 each. Borden classification was type I in 7, type II in 3, and type III in 24. Eight patients had undergone prior transvenous coil embolization. Complete obliteration rate was 56% immediately after embolization, 71% at follow-up angiography, and 85% after additional treatments (1 transvenous embolization and 4 direct surgery). Complications occurred in three patients, consisting of asymptomatic vessel perforations during cannulation in two patients and leakage of contrast medium resulting in medullary infarction in one patient. Transarterial glue embolization is highly effective for Borden type III DAVF with direct cortical venous drainage, but has limitations for Borden type I and II DAVFs in which the affected sinus is part of the normal venous circulation. Onyx is a new liquid embolic material and is becoming the treatment of choice for DAVF. The benefits of glue embolization compared to Onyx embolization are high thrombogenicity, and relatively low risks of cranial nerve palsies and of excessive migration into the draining veins of high flow fistula. Transarterial glue embolization continues to be useful for selected patients, and complete cure can be expected in most patients with fewer complications if combined with transvenous embolization or direct surgery. PMID:25746311

  7. Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas: clinical characteristics and management based on location and hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jung Tae; Chung, Seung Young; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Park, Ki Seok; Kim, Seong Min; Park, Moon Sun; Kim, Han Kyu

    2012-09-01

    A dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) generally refers to a vascular malformation of the wall of a major venous sinus. These lesions have diverse symptoms according to the location and venous drainage, and require multidisciplinary treatment. We report on our experience and analyze the treatment outcome of intracranial DAVFs for a nine-year period. Between January 2000 and December 2008, 95 patients with intracranial DAVFs were enrolled in this study. A retrospective review of clinical records and imaging studies of all patients was conducted. Endovascular embolization, surgical interruption, gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKS), or combinations of these treatments were performed based on clinical symptoms, lesion location, and venous drainage pattern. Borden type I, II, and III were 34, 48, and 13 patients, respectively. Aggressive presentation was reported in 6% of Borden type I, 31% of Borden type II, and 77% of Borden type III DAVFs, respectively, and DAVFs involving transverse, sigmoid, and superior sagittal sinus. Overall, the rate of complete obliteration was 68%. The complete occlusion rates with a combination treatment of endovascular embolization and surgery, surgery alone, and endovascular embolization were 89%, 86%, and 80%, respectively. When GKS was used with embolization, the obliteration rate was 83%, although it was only 54% in GKS alone. Spontaneous obliteration of the DAVF occurred in three patients. There were a few complications, including hemiparesis (in microsurgery), intracranial hemorrhage (in endovascular embolization), and facial palsy (in GKS). The hemorrhagic risk of DAVFs is dependent on the location and hemodynamics of the lesions. Strategies for treatment of intracranial DAVFs should be decided according to the characteristic of the DAVFs, based on the location and drainage pattern. GKS can be used as an optional treatment for intracranial DAVFs.

  8. Comparative study of alveolar bone height and implant survival rate between autogenous bone mixed with platelet rich plasma versus venous blood for maxillary sinus lift augmentation procedure.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Namineni Kiran; Shaik, Mahaboob; Nadella, Koteswara Rao; Chintapalli, Balakrishna Manohar

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in alveolar bone height by means of radiographic examination and Straumann implant survival rate following maxillary sinus lift augmentation using autogenous bone in combination with platelet rich plasma (PRP) versus venous blood (VB). Fifty patients requiring sinus lift augmentation procedure included in the study were divided into two groups (n = 25). During the procedure the sub antral sinus cavity was augmented using autogenous bone taken from mandibular ramus area and mixed with PRP in one group and autogenous bone mixed with VB in the other group. Orthopantomograms were taken preoperatively, immediate, at 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. Height of alveolar bone at the site of sinus augmentation was measured on the radiographs. One hundred and twenty-one Straumann dental implants were placed after healing period. Age of the patients in the study groups ranged from 36 to 69 years. Differences in mean values of bone height measurements recorded in the PRP series revealed significant differences among the three subgroups (P = 0.001). Significant differences were noted between immediate postop and 6 month (P < 0.01), immediate postop and year (P < 0.01). In the VB series also significant differences were revealed among the three subgroups (P = 0.0280). Significant differences were noted between immediate postop and 6 month (P < 0.05). Comparison of results of subgroups of the two series at the three intervals revealed significant differences at 'immediate postop' values (P = 0.0002) and 'sixmon' values (P = 0.0435). Differences between 'year' values were not significant. Two implants were lost in PRP group. The results of this limited study reveals that both groups recorded a good increase in the alveolar bone height after sinus augmentation and showed no significant differences between these groups when compared to each other at 1 year postoperatively. When both sub groups compared with

  9. Epidemiology of Dural Arteriovenous Fistula in Japan: Analysis of Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET2)

    PubMed Central

    HIRAMATSU, Masafumi; SUGIU, Kenji; HISHIKAWA, Tomohito; HARUMA, Jun; TOKUNAGA, Koji; DATE, Isao; KUWAYAMA, Naoya; SAKAI, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    We developed the Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy 2 (JR-NET2) database and used the information for a retrospective, nation-wide multicenter, observational study to clarify the clinical characteristics, current status of procedures, and outcome of patients treated by neuroendovascular therapy in Japan. In this report, we analyzed the clinical characteristics of dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) in the JR-NET2 database. All patients with dAVFs treated with endovascular therapy in 150 Japanese hospitals were included. Patient characteristics, clinical presentations, and imaging characteristics were analyzed. A total of 1,075 patients with dAVFs underwent 1,520 endovascular procedures. Of 1,075 patients, 45% were men and 55% were women. The mean age was 65 ± 13 years. The most frequent location of dAVFs was the cavernous sinus (43.6%), followed by the transverse-sigmoid sinus (TSS) (33.4%). Twelve percent of the patients had intracranial hemorrhage, 9% had venous infarction, and 3% had convulsion. The statistically significant independent risk factors of intracranial hemorrhage were TSS, superior sagittal sinus (SSS), tentorium, anterior cranial fossa, cranio-cervical junction, cortical venous reflux (CVR), and varix. Risk factors of venous infarction were age older than 60 years, male sex, TSS, SSS, and CVR. Risk factors of convulsion were male sex, SSS, and CVR. This is the largest nationwide report, to date, of the clinical characteristics of dAVFs treated by neuroendovascular therapy. CVR was a major risk factor of aggressive symptoms. PMID:24390192

  10. Frosted branch angiitis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as an initial onset of neuro-Behçet's disease: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Bruno Fortaleza de Aquino; Rodriguez, Ever Ernesto Caso; Prado, Leandro Lara do; Gonçalves, Celio Roberto; Hirata, Carlos Eduardo; Yamamoto, Joyce Hisae

    2017-04-15

    Frosted branch angiitis is a rare, severe condition. It can be either a primary or a secondary condition and is characterized by rapid deterioration of vision and fulminant retinal vasculitis that manifests as diffuse sheathing of retinal vessels, macular edema, papillitis, vitritis and anterior uveitis. We aimed to describe a case of frosted branch angiitis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as an initial neuro-Behçet's disease onset. Diagnosis of Behçet's disease was based on the current 2014 International Criteria for Behçet's Disease and the International consensus recommendation criteria for neuro-Behçet's disease. In addition, a literature review using search parameters of "frosted branch angiitis", "Behçet" and "neuro-Behçet" in the PubMed database is presented. A 28-year-old Brazilian pardo woman presented to our hospital with abrupt bilateral vision loss associated with recurrent aphthous oral ulcers 6 months before visual symptom onset. A fundus examination showed bilateral widespread retinal vasculitis with venous and arterial white sheathing, optic disc swelling, macular edema, and retinal hemorrhages, leading to the diagnosis of frosted branch angiitis. An extensive systemic workup for retinal vasculitis was uneventful, except for brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrating cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and lymphocytic aseptic meningitis. A diagnosis of neuro-Behçet's disease was made, and treatment was started with methylprednisolone therapy 1 g/day for 5 consecutive days, followed by oral mycophenolate mofetil and infliximab 5 mg/kg infusion. The patient's response was rapid, with improvement of visual acuity to hand movement and counting fingers by day 7 and final visual acuity of counting fingers and 20/130. Frosted branch angiitis may be associated with infectious, noninfectious, or idiopathic causes. An extensive workup should be done to exclude systemic vasculitis such as Behçet's disease. Treatment with systemic steroids must be

  11. Developmental outcomes for neonatal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jonathan N; Hartman, Tyler K; Barbaresi, William; Raffel, Corey; Colby, Christopher E

    2009-02-01

    Large dural arteriovenous malformations (DAVMs) accompanied by cardiac failure usually carry a poor prognosis with a high risk of morbidity and death. The authors report on the case of a male neonate with a massive DAVM who presented at birth with macrocephaly and high-output cardiac failure. The child initially underwent treatment with surgical clipping of the large main feeding artery. Hydrocephalus, thought to be due to venous hypertension, developed when the boy was 8 months old. The condition resolved after interventional embolization treatment. The patient did not require placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. At 21 months of age, the child had near normal development without any focal neurological deficits.

  12. [Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulae. Experience after 81 cases and literature review].

    PubMed

    Paredes, Igor; Martinez-Perez, Rafael; Munarriz, Pablo M; Castaño-Leon, Ana María; Campollo, Jorge; Alén, Jose F; Lobato, Ramiro D; Lagares, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    To analyse the clinical, radiological and therapeutic variables of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVF) treated at our institution, and to assess the validity of the Borden and Cognard classifications and their correlation with the presenting symptoms. The DAVF identified were retrospectively analysed. They were classified according to their location, drainage pattern and the Borden and Cognard classifications. We recorded the different treatments, their complications and efficacy. There were 81DAVF identified between 1975 and 2012. The cavernous sinus (CS) location was the most frequent one. The Borden and Cognard classifications showed an interobserver Kappa index of 0.72 and 0.76 respectively. The odds ratio of aggressive presentation in the presence of cortical venous drainage (CVD) was 19.3 (2.8-132.4). No location, once adjusted by venous drainage pattern, showed significant association with an aggressive presentation. Endovascular transarterial treatment of cavernous sinus DAVF achieved symptomatic improvement of 78%, with a complication rate of 5%. The DAVF of non-CS locations, with CVD, treated surgically were angiographically shown cured in 100% of the cases, with no treatment-related complications. The presence of CVD was significantly associated with aggressive presentations. The Borden and Cognard classifications showed little interobserver variability. Endovascular treatment for CS DAVF is safe and relatively effective. Surgical treatment of non-CS DAVF with CVD is safe, effective and the first choice treatment in our environment. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Lateral sinus thrombosis associated with zoster sine herpete.

    PubMed

    Chan, James; Bergstrom, Richard T; Lanza, Donald C; Oas, John G

    2004-01-01

    Herpes zoster results from reactivation of the varicella zoster virus (VZV). Zoster sine herpete (ZSH) is an uncommon manifestation of VZV infection and presents with similar symptoms but without the vesicular rash. We describe an unusual case of lateral sinus thrombosis (LST) that developed during the clinical course of ZSH in the C2 distribution. A 55-year-old woman presented with a 3-day history of left temporal and postauricular pain, nausea, vomiting, and mild photophobia. She denied otalgia, otorrhea, and hearing loss. Examination revealed hyperesthesia in the left C2 nerve root distribution without evidence of herpetic rash. A computed tomography scan showed minimal fluid in the left mastoid cavity (not mastoiditis) and thrombus within the left lateral and sigmoid dural sinus. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiogram confirmed these findings. Laboratory studies revealed elevated neurotrophic immunoglobulin G levels to VZV. Hypercoagulable studies were normal. She was subsequently treated with Neurontin, acyclovir, and anticoagulation. Her symptoms improved, and she was discharged 3 days later. LST is generally a complication of middle ear infection. Nonseptic LST, however, may result from dehydration, oral contraceptive use, coagulopathy, or thyroid disease. This unusual case raises the suspicion that thrombosis resulted from VZV associated thrombophlebitis in the ipsilateral cerebral venous sinuses along the second cervical nerve root distribution. A high index of suspicion is necessary in such cases so that a different treatment course can be identified and antiviral medication initiated promptly.

  14. Sagittal sinus thrombosis due to L-asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Nisar A.; Kosar, Tasleem; Pala, Nazir A.; Qureshi, Umar A.

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis (CSVT) is a serious complication of L-asparaginase chemotherapy for leukemia in children. Clinical features of headache, altered consciousness, focal neurological deficit, and seizures developing during or immediately after treatment with L-asparaginase should alert the treating physician to the possibility of CSVT. Immediate imaging of the brain should be done using CT and MRI and the veins should be visualized noninvasively by CT and MR venography. We report two children on induction therapy for acute leukemia who presented with seizures, headache, and altered consciousness. Venous infarcts with and without hemorrhage were seen on CT in one patient and the empty delta sign was seen after contrast injection; however, the early changes were missed by CT. MRI detected dural sinus thrombosis relatively earlier in another patient, while the CT findings were equivocal; in this patient, contrast-enhanced MRI showed the empty delta sign and MR venography confirmed absent flow in the superior sagittal sinus, which was diagnostic of sinus thrombosis. Rapid anticoagulation was started with heparin and maintained with warfarin. The child with a unilateral small nonhemorrhagic infarct made a complete recovery while the other, with bilateral hemorrhagic infarcts, did not survive. We stress the importance of early diagnosis of CSVT using CT and MRI in children with leukemia being treated with L-asparaginase; this will permit timely treatment. PMID:21042505

  15. An unusual presentation of spinal dural arteriovenous fistula: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Payam; Adabi, Marzie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spinal dural AVF is the most common type of spinal vascular malformation. However, presenting symptoms differ according to site of spinal involvement. This study described a case of arteriovenous malformation with paraparesis and incontinence. Case Presentation: Diagnosis of patient was confirmed by clinical and imaging examination using magnetic resonance image and ruling out other possibilities Result: A definitive diagnosis of arterio venous fistula was confirmed by clinical and MRI examination and demonstrated abnormalities compatible with dural arteriovenous fistula. Conclusion: Dural arteriovenous fistula should be considered in patients with paresis in both lower extremities. PMID:27757211

  16. Factor V Leiden, factor V Cambridge, factor II GA20210, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Saadatnia, Mohammad; Salehi, Mansour; Movahedian, Ahmad; Shariat, Seyed Ziaeddin Samsam; Salari, Mehri; Tajmirriahi, Marzieh; Asadimobarakeh, Elham; Salehi, Rasoul; Amini, Gilda; Ebrahimi, Homa; Kheradmand, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Factor V G1691A (FV Leiden), FII GA20210, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutations are the most common genetic risk factors for thromboembolism in the Western countries. However, there is rare data in Iran about cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis (CVST) patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of common genetic thrombophilic factors in CVST patients. Materials and Methods: Forty consequently CVST patients from two University Hospital in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences aged more than 15 years from January 2009 to January 2011 were recruited. In parallel, 51 healthy subjects with the same age and race from similar population selected as controls. FV Leiden, FII GA20210, MTHFR C677T, and FV Cambridge gene mutations by polymerase chain reaction technique were evaluated in case and control groups. Results: FV Leiden, FII GA20210, and FV Cambridge gene mutations had very low prevalence in both case (5%, 2%, 0%) and control (2.5%, 0%, 0%) and were not found any significant difference between groups. MTHFR C677T mutations was in 22 (55%) of patients in case group and 18 (35.5%) of control group (P = 0.09). Conclusion: This study showed that the prevalence of FV Leiden, FII GA20210, and FV Cambridge were low. Laboratory investigations of these mutations as a routine test for all patients with CVST may not be cost benefit. PMID:26600830

  17. Factor V Leiden, factor V Cambridge, factor II GA20210, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Saadatnia, Mohammad; Salehi, Mansour; Movahedian, Ahmad; Shariat, Seyed Ziaeddin Samsam; Salari, Mehri; Tajmirriahi, Marzieh; Asadimobarakeh, Elham; Salehi, Rasoul; Amini, Gilda; Ebrahimi, Homa; Kheradmand, Ehsan

    2015-06-01

    Factor V G1691A (FV Leiden), FII GA20210, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutations are the most common genetic risk factors for thromboembolism in the Western countries. However, there is rare data in Iran about cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis (CVST) patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of common genetic thrombophilic factors in CVST patients. Forty consequently CVST patients from two University Hospital in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences aged more than 15 years from January 2009 to January 2011 were recruited. In parallel, 51 healthy subjects with the same age and race from similar population selected as controls. FV Leiden, FII GA20210, MTHFR C677T, and FV Cambridge gene mutations by polymerase chain reaction technique were evaluated in case and control groups. FV Leiden, FII GA20210, and FV Cambridge gene mutations had very low prevalence in both case (5%, 2%, 0%) and control (2.5%, 0%, 0%) and were not found any significant difference between groups. MTHFR C677T mutations was in 22 (55%) of patients in case group and 18 (35.5%) of control group (P = 0.09). This study showed that the prevalence of FV Leiden, FII GA20210, and FV Cambridge were low. Laboratory investigations of these mutations as a routine test for all patients with CVST may not be cost benefit.

  18. Cortical blindness as a rare presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bonnie; Moon, Seong-Jin; Olivero, William C; Wang, Huan

    2013-05-09

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Manifesting in a remarkably wide spectrum of symptoms and signs, CVT often presents in a misleading fashion-if unrecognized or misdiagnosed, it carries potentially fatal consequences. Visual loss is quite rare as the initial presentation of CVT and is typically a finding more frequent in chronic cases with associated papilledema on funduscopy Ferro, Lopes, Rosas and Fontes (Delay in Hospital Admission of Patients with Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus Thrombosis. Cerebrovasc Dis 2005;19: :152-6). We report a rare case of acute cortical blindness as the initial presentation of CVT in an 18-year-old female patient and review the current literature. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2013.

  19. Cortical blindness as a rare presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bonnie; Moon, Seong-Jin; Olivero, William C.; Wang, Huan

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Manifesting in a remarkably wide spectrum of symptoms and signs, CVT often presents in a misleading fashion—if unrecognized or misdiagnosed, it carries potentially fatal consequences. Visual loss is quite rare as the initial presentation of CVT and is typically a finding more frequent in chronic cases with associated papilledema on funduscopy Ferro, Lopes, Rosas and Fontes (Delay in Hospital Admission of Patients with Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus Thrombosis. Cerebrovasc Dis 2005;19:152–6). We report a rare case of acute cortical blindness as the initial presentation of CVT in an 18-year-old female patient and review the current literature. PMID:24964444

  20. ONYX versus n-BCA for embolization of cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Rabinov, James David; Yoo, Albert J; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Carter, Bob S; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (Trufill n-BCA) versus ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (ONYX) for the embolization of cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVF). Fifty-three consecutive patients with cranial dural AVF were treated with liquid embolic agents from November, 2003 to November, 2008. These 53 patients had 56 lesions treated with arterial embolization. Patients embolized to completion underwent follow-up angiography at 3 months to assess for durable occlusion. Twenty-one lesions were treated with n-BCA. Seven patients treated with n-BCA had initial angiographic occlusion of their DAVF, which were durable at 3 months. Six patients had adjunctive treatment with coils and/or polyvinyl alcohol particles, but none of these were occluded by endovascular treatment alone. Eleven patients underwent post-embolization surgery for closure of their DAVF. There was one death related to intractable status epilepticus at presentation. One patient developed a major stroke from venous sinus thrombosis after embolization. Thirty-five lesions were treated with ONYX in 34 patients. Twenty-nine patients treated with ONYX had initial angiographic occlusion of their DAVF by embolization alone. One patient had recurrence at 3 months and was re-treated out of 27 total follow-ups. Four patients underwent post-embolization surgical obliteration of their lesions. No deaths or major strokes occurred in this cohort. Initial angiographic occlusion (p=0.0004) and durable angiographic occlusion (p=0.0018) rates for embolization of cranial DAVF show a statistically significant higher efficacy with ONYX compared with n-BCA. Patients embolized with ONYX underwent surgery less frequently compared with those treated with n-BCA (p=0.0015).

  1. History of the vertebral venous plexus and the significant contributions of Breschet and Batson.

    PubMed

    Nathoo, Narendra; Caris, Elizabeth C; Wiener, Judith A; Mendel, Ehud

    2011-11-01

    Before the 18th century, the vertebral venous plexus (VVP) received scant mention, had no clinical relevance, and was largely ignored by anatomists, most likely because of its location and nondistensible nature. Gilbert Breschet in 1819 provided the first detailed anatomic description of the VVP, describing it as a large plexiform valveless network of vertebral veins consisting of 3 interconnecting divisions and spanning the entire spinal column with connections to the cranial dural sinuses distributed in a longitudinal pattern, running parallel to and communicating with the venae cavae, and having multiple interconnections. More than a century passed before any work of significance on the VVP was noted. In 1940, Oscar V. Batson reported the true functionality of the VVP by proving the continuity of the prostatic venous plexus with the VVP and proposed this route as the most plausible explanation for the distribution of prostate metastatic disease. With his seminal work, Batson reclassified the human venous system to consist of the caval, pulmonary, portal, and vertebral divisions. Further advances in imaging technology confirmed Batson's results. Today, the VVP is considered part of the cerebrospinal venous system, which is regarded as a unique, large-capacitance, valveless plexiform venous network in which flow is bidirectional that plays an important role in the regulation of intracranial pressure with changes in posture and in venous outflow from the brain, whereas in disease states, it provides a potential route for the spread of tumor, infection, or emboli.

  2. Intracranial dural based chondroma.

    PubMed

    Reinshagen, Clemens; Redjal, Navid; Sajed, Dipti P; Nahed, Brian V; Walcott, Brian P

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial chondromas are benign, slow-growing, cartilaginous tumors, which comprise only about 0.2% of all intracranial tumors. The majority of these lesions occur at the base of the skull, where they are thought to arise from residual embryonic chondrogenic cells along the basal synchondrosis. Very rarely, they may also originate from the convexity dura, falx cerebri, or the brain parenchyma. We present a patient with a dural based chondroma to highlight the technical considerations of surgical resection. The recent literature on intracranial chondromas regarding incidence, pathophysiologic origin, clinical symptoms, imaging, histopathology and prognosis is reviewed.

  3. [Dural arteriovenous fistulas at the craniocervical junction fed by bilateral vertebral arteries with intracranial drainage: a case report].

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Tomonori; Hayashi, Kentaro; Kitagawa, Naoki; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Izumi

    2009-12-01

    We report a case of dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) at the craniocervical junction, which are supplied by the radicular arteries from bilateral vertebral arteries separately, and drainaged into intracranial sinuses. A 58-year-old man with intermittent neck pain visited our hospital. T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed flow voids on the dorsal surface of the medulla and upper cervical cord without any signal changes suggesting ischemia. Postcontrast MR digital subtraction angiography (MRDSA) showed early venous filling at the craniocervical junction. Angiography demonstrated bilateral fistulas near each vertebral artery penetration point of the dura matter, which were drainaged into the superior and inferior petrosal sinuses. The patient underwent suboccipital craniotomy and laminectomy of the C1, then disruption of the bilateral fistulas was performed by using micro Doppler sonography after intradural exposure of the shunt points. His symptom subsided post operatively, and MRDSA showed no abnormal vessels. Angiography performed 1 week after surgery confirmed complete obliteration of the fistulas. DAVFs at the craniocervical junction fed by bilateral vertebral arteries is extremely rare. Even in such a case, direct interruption of the fistulas using micro Doppler sonography is the most effective treatment. In addition. MRDSA could be useful for screening and perioperative studies.

  4. Risk Factors for Cerebral Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Silvis, Suzanne M; Middeldorp, Saskia; Zuurbier, Susanna M; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare thrombotic disorder involving the cerebral veins and dural sinuses. In contrast to more common sites of venous thromboembolism (VTE), such as the legs and lungs, CVT mainly affects young adults and children, and women are affected three times more often than men. Although presenting symptoms are variable, headache is usually the first symptom, often in combination with focal neurologic deficits and epileptic seizures. The primary therapy for CVT consists of heparin followed by oral anticoagulation for at least 3 to 6 months. The mortality in the acute phase is 5 to 10% and a substantial proportion of survivors suffer from long-term disabilities. A large number of risk factors have been linked to CVT, although the scientific evidence for an association varies considerably between risk factors. Some risk factors, such as hereditary thrombophilia, correspond with risk factors for more common sites of VTE, whereas others, such as head trauma, are specific to CVT. In most patients, at least one risk factor can be identified. In this review, we provide an overview of the risk factors for CVT.

  5. [Diagnostic and treatment standards for cerebral sinus venous thrombosis : Results of an online survey of German stroke units].

    PubMed

    Geisbüsch, C; Ringleb, P A; Busse, O; Hamann, G F; Nagel, S

    2017-07-10

    The aim of this survey was to characterize the current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for thrombosis of the cerebral sinus and veins (CVT) performed in German stroke units (SU). Between September 2015 and January 2016 all clinical heads of certified SUs in Germany were invited to participate in a standardized online survey. The survey concentrated on the basic characteristics of SUs, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and was made anonymous if so desired. Frequencies were expressed as percentages and differences between regional stroke units (RSU) and supraregional (i. e. comprehensive) SUs (SRSU) were compared with the χ(2)-test or Fisher's test RESULTS: A total of 107 SU heads participated (response rate 42.8%) and 55.1% of these were RSUs. In 77.2% the diagnosis is made by magnetic resonance imaging angiography (MR-A, RSU 81.1% vs. SRSU 72.3%; p = 0.29). Of the SUs 79.1% determined d‑dimer if CVT is suspected (79.3% vs. 78.7%; p = 0.94) and 88.5% carried out screening for thrombophilia (89.5% vs. 87.2%; p = 0.72). Intravenous unfractionated heparin (67.2% vs. 70.2%; p = 0.74) or subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin (32.8% vs. 29.8%; p = 0.74) are first line therapy in all SUs. Invasive procedures, such as hypothermia (3.7% vs. 10.6%; p = 0.25), hemicraniectomy (26% vs. 63.9%; p = 0.0001), endovascular techniques (11.1% vs. 40.4%; p = 0.0007) and systemic thrombolysis (5.5% vs. 10.6%; p = 0.47) are performed more frequently in SRSUs. Of the SUs 18.5% already use new oral anticoagulants (10.7% vs. 27.7%; p = 0.027). Most of the SUs organize a follow-up visit (70.9% vs. 76.6%; p = 0.52) with a MRI (94.2% vs. 91.1%; p = 0.7) within the first 6 months. The survey revealed substantial homogeneity between RSUs and SRSUs and standards are mostly in line with the guidelines. Non-established procedures, such as invasive therapeutic procedures and the administration of new oral anticoagulants were used significantly more often in SRSUs.

  6. MR selective flow-tracking cartography: a postprocessing procedure applied to four-dimensional flow MR imaging for complete characterization of cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Edjlali, Myriam; Roca, Pauline; Rabrait, Cécile; Trystram, Denis; Rodriguez-Régent, Christine; Johnson, Kevin M; Wieben, Oliver; Turski, Patrick; Meder, Jean-François; Naggara, Olivier; Oppenheim, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of a selective flow-tracking cartographic procedure applied to four-dimensional (4D) flow imaging and to demonstrate its usefulness in the characterization of dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs). Institutional review board approval was obtained, and all patients provided written informed consent. Eight patients (nine DAVFs) underwent 3.0-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Imaging examinations were performed within 24 hours of each other. 4D flow MR imaging was performed by using a 4D radial phase-contrast vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction pulse sequence with an isotropic spatial resolution of 0.86 mm (5 minutes 35 seconds). Two radiologists independently reviewed images from MR flow-tracking cartography and reported the location of arterial feeder vessels and the venous drainage type and classified DAVFs according to the risk of rupture (Cognard classification). These results were compared with those at DSA. Quadratic weighted κ statistics with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to test intermodality agreement in the identification of arterial feeder vessels, draining veins, and Cognard classification. Interreader agreement for shunt location on MR images was perfect (κ = 1), with good-to-excellent interreader agreement for arterial feeder vessel identification (κ = 0.97; 95% CI = 0.92, 1.0), and matched in all cases with shunt location defined at DSA. There was good-to-excellent agreement between MR cartography and DSA in the definition of the main feeding arteries (κ = 0.92; 95% CI = 0.83, 1.0), presence of retrograde flow in dural sinuses (κ = 1), presence of retrograde cortical venous drainage (κ = 1), presence of venous ectasia (κ = 1), and final Cognard classification of DAVFs (κ = 1, standard error = 0.35). MR selective flow-tracking cartography enabled the noninvasive characterization of cranial DAVFs. © RSNA, 2013.

  7. De novo formation of a large cavernoma associated with a congenital torcular dural arteriovenous fistula: case report.

    PubMed

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Flemming, Kelly D; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2017-05-01

    The authors report a case of a developmentally normal child with a congenital complex torcular dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) who later, in his teenage years, developed several vermian cavernomas within a large cerebellar developmental venous anomaly (DVA). The patient had initially presented with an abnormally large head circumference but no neurological deficits. He underwent several partial embolization procedures in an attempt to decrease the blood supply of the fistula over the course of 8 years. Nine years following initial presentation, he presented with a fourth ventricular hemorrhage, due to development of a new vermian cavernoma adjacent to a previously known vermian DVA and suffered subsequent mild left-sided hemiataxia from which he later recovered. CT angiographic images demonstrated that the vermian DVA drained into the left transverse sinus, which also drained the torcular arteriovenous fistula. A routine follow-up MRI examination 10 years following initial presentation demonstrated interval development of several large cavernomas in the cerebellum, all within the DVA. The patient had no new symptoms at that time and was neurologically intact. This case report highlights the de novo development of multiple cavernous malformations potentially secondary to DAVF-induced venous congestion in a preexisting DVA.

  8. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as a recurrent thrombotic event in a patient with heterozygous prothrombin G20210A genotype after discontinuation of oral anticoagulation therapy: how long should we treat these patients with warfarin?

    PubMed

    Jukic, Ivana; Titlic, Marina; Tonkic, Ante; Rosenzweig, Daniel

    2007-08-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is an uncommon condition with many clinical manifestations, and hereditary prothrombotic conditions such as factor Leiden V, deficiency of protein S, protein C and antithrombin III, as well as prothrombin gene mutation, may account for 10-15% of cases. To date, conflicting results have been reported for recurrent venous thrombosis in the patients with factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutation, since some studies have shown a higher risk for recurrent venous thrombosis in carriers of these two mutations than in non-carriers, and the last study showed higher risk only for carriers of double defect (homozygous or double heterozygous for this mutations). Case report is presented. We report a case of cerebral sinus thrombosis as a recurrent thrombotic event in a patient with heterozygous prothrombin G20210A genotype after discontinuation of oral anticoagulation therapy. Since many facts are controversial, the use of secondary prophylaxis for thrombosis in these patients is still a matter of debate without clear consensus recommendation. Data on the risk of recurrent thrombotic events in thrombophilic patient is insufficient. The main unclear question concerning these patients is: how long and whom should we treat with long-term anticoagulant therapy as secondary prophylaxis of DVT? The problem for practitioner is that we do not have guidelines and precise recommendations for secondary thromboprophylaxis in this or similar cases. This case is remarkable for its favorable and quick outcome and its rarity, because CSVT is an uncommon condition and heterozygous prothrombin G20210A genotype was only found predisposing factor for CSVT. Further studies of risk of recurrent venous thrombosis in patients with heterozygous prothrombin G20210A genotype with the larger sample size are required.

  9. Posterior clinoidectomy: dural tailoring technique and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Youssef, A Samy; van Loveren, Harry R

    2009-05-01

    The posterior clinoid process, a bony prominence at the superolateral aspect of the dorsum sellae, has a strategic importance in a transcavernous approach to basilar tip aneurysms. To further optimize this microsurgical technique during posterior clinoidectomy, we performed a cadaveric study of this regional anatomy, describe a technique called dural tailoring, and report initial results in the surgical treatment of upper basilar artery (BA) aneurysm. After 10 adult cadaver heads (silicone-injected) were prepared for dissection, a posterior clinoidectomy with dural tailoring was performed. The dura overlying the upper clivus was coagulated with bipolar electrocoagulation and incised. Stripping dura off the clivus and lateral reflection then exposed the ipsilateral posterior clinoid process and dorsum sellae, thus creating a dural flap. Posterior clinoidectomy with dural tailoring was then used in seven patients with upper BA aneurysms. Our stepwise modification of the posterior clinoidectomy with dural tailoring created a flap that afforded protection of the cavernous sinus and oculomotor nerve. During surgery, there were no recorded intraoperative injuries to neurovascular structures. One patient died postoperatively from morbidity related to severe-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage. Postoperative oculomotor nerve palsy occurred in 3 patients (43%). In all cases, the nerve was anatomically preserved and partial to complete recovery was recorded during the first postoperative year. This technique effectively provided exposure of retrosellar upper basilar aneurysms in seven patients (basilar tip 43% and superior cerebellar artery aneurysms 57%). Outcomes and safety are at least equivalent to or better than basilar aneurysm surgery performed without surgical adjuncts, presumably a less complex subset.

  10. Calvarial diploic venous channels: an anatomic study using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Nakamura, Masanobu; Tabuchi, Takashi; Yasumoto, Yukimasa; Ito, Masanori

    2013-12-01

    The calvarial diploic venous channels (CDVCs) are well-known intraosseous structures, but their distribution and anatomofunctional implications are not fully understood. To investigate the architecture of CDVCs using high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This prospective study enrolled 43 male and 37 female outpatients who underwent a 3.0-T MR imaging equipped by a 32-channel head coil. T1-weighted imaging covering the whole cranial vault was performed after gadolinium injection. In addition, one-piece orbitozygomatic craniotomy was performed in three cadaveric heads to observe the interruption of the CDVCs. The CDVCs showed irregular contours and peculiar branching patterns with four common major pathways: the pteriofrontparietal (PFP), frontoorbital (FO), occipitoparietal (OP), and occipitocervical (OC) routes. The proximal PFP coursed as a single trunk and divided into several branches at the level of the frontal eminence. The orbital part of the FO continued to the subcutaneous vein via the supraorbital rim. The PFP and the pterional part of the FO fused proximally with the sphenoparietal sinus and descended as the middle meningeal vein. The OP coursed in the superoinferior direction and connected the junction part of the transverse-sigmoid sinus to the parietal superior sagittal sinus. The OC occurred as a single trunk in the median occipital bone, drained extracranially, and joined the suboccipital venous channels. The CDVCs seem to be a relatively consistent network functioning not only as conduits connecting the intracranial dural sinuses but also as pathways to the extracranial venous systems. High-resolution MR imaging is useful for investigating the CDVCs.

  11. Endovascular Occlusion of Dural Cavernous Fistulas through a Superior Ophthalmic Vein Approach

    PubMed Central

    Briganti, Francesco; Caranci, Ferdinando; Leone, Giuseppe; Napoli, Manuela; Cicala, Domenico; Briganti, Giuseppe; Tranfa, Fausto; Bonavolontà, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dural cavernous fistulas are low-flow vascular malformations with usually benign clinical course and a high rate of spontaneous resolution. Cases with symptom progression must be treated with an endovascular approach by arterial or venous route. We report 30 patients with dural cavernous fistulas treated by coil embolization using surgical exposure and retrograde catheterization of the superior ophthalmic vein (SOV). The procedure resulted in closure of the fistula without other endovascular treatments in all 30 patients and clinical remission or improvement in 20 and eight patients, respectively. Embolization via a SOV approach is a safe and easy endovascular procedure, particularly indicated for dural cavernous fistulas with exclusive or prevalent internal carotid artery feeders and anterior venous drainage. PMID:24199817

  12. Non-contrast-enhanced 4D MR angiography with STAR spin labeling and variable flip angle sampling: a feasibility study for the assessment of Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jinhee; Schmitt, Peter; Kim, Bom-yi; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Kim, Inseong; Paek, Munyoung; Kim, Bum-soo

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of non-contrast-enhanced 4D magnetic resonance angiography (NCE 4D MRA) with signal targeting with alternative radiofrequency (STAR) spin labeling and variable flip angle (VFA) sampling in the assessment of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) in the transverse sinus. Nine patients underwent NCE 4D MRA for the evaluation of DAVF in the transverse sinus at 3 T. One patient was examined twice, once before and once after the interventional treatment. All patients also underwent digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and/or contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA). For the acquisition of NCE 4D MRA, a STAR spin tagging method was used, and a VFA sampling was applied in the data readout module instead of a constant flip angle. Two readers evaluated the NCE 4D MRA data for the diagnosis of DAVF and its type with consensus. The results were compared with those from DSA and/or CEMRA. All patients underwent NCE 4D MRA without any difficulty. Among seven patients with patent DAVFs, all cases showed an early visualization of the transverse sinus on NCE 4D MRA. Except for one case, the type of DAVF of NCE 4D MRA was agreed with that of reference standard study. Cortical venous reflux (CVR) was demonstrated in two cases out of three patients with CVR. NCE 4D MRA with STAR tagging and VFA sampling is technically and clinically feasible and represents a promising technique for assessment of DAVF in the transverse sinus. Further technical developments should aim at improvements of spatial and temporal coverage.

  13. Foramen magnum dural arteriovenous fistula presenting with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Manisor, Monica; Aloraini, Ziad; Chibarro, Salvatore; Proust, Francois; Quenardelle, Véronique; Wolff, Valérie; Beaujeux, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) with perimedullary drainage represent a rare subtype of intracranial dAVF. Patients usually experience slowly progressive ascending myelopathy and/or lower brainstem signs. We present a case of foramen magnum dural arteriovenous fistula with an atypical clinical presentation. The patient initially presented with a generalised tonic-clonic seizure and no signs of myelopathy, followed one month later by rapidly progressive tetraplegia and respiratory insufficiency. The venous drainage of the fistula was directed both to the left temporal lobe and to the perimedullary veins (type III + V), causing venous congestion and oedema in these areas and explaining this unusual combination of symptoms. Rotational angiography and overlays with magnetic resonance imaging volumes were helpful in delineating the complex anatomy of the fistula. After endovascular embolisation, there was complete remission of venous congestion on imaging and significant clinical improvement. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a craniocervical junction fistula presenting with epilepsy. PMID:26472637

  14. Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... use of an endoscope is linked to the theory that the best way to obtain normal healthy sinuses is to open the natural pathways to the sinuses. Once an improved drainage system is achieved, the diseased sinus mucosa has an ...

  15. Onyx embolization of anterior condylar confluence dural arteriovenous fistula

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Koichiro; Tateshima, Satoshi; Rastogi, Sachin; Gonzalez, Nestor; Jahan, Reza; Duckwiler, Gary; Vinuela, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The anterior condylar confluence (ACC) is a small complex venous structure located medial to the jugular vein and adjacent to the hypoglossal canal. To our knowledge, this is the first report of transvenous Onyx embolization for ACC dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). Three patients with ACC DAVF were treated using the Onyx liquid embolic agent with or without detachable coils. Complete angiographic obliteration of the fistulas was achieved in all cases without permanent lower cranial neuropathy. This report suggests that the controlled penetration of Onyx is advantageous in order to obliterate ACC DAVFs with a small amount of embolic material. PMID:23459160

  16. Dural arteriovenous fistula presenting as an acute subdural hemorrhage that subsequently progressed to a chronic subdural hemorrhage: case report.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, S; Ishihara, S; Yamane, F; Kanazawa, R; Ishihara, H

    2009-02-01

    Non-traumatic subdural hemorrhage (SDH) caused by dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) is rare and is usually accompanied by intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and/or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This report describes a very rare case of DAVF that caused non-traumatic acute SDH without ICH or SAH, which subsequently progressed into chronic SDH. The patient presented with a sudden-onset severe headache, and was diagnosed with acute SDH by computed tomography. Cerebral angiography showed a DAVF on the left convexity adjacent to the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). This DAVF drained to the SSS and to the pterygoid venous plexus via the left middle fossa without retrograde flow (Type I according to the Cognard classification). The SDH was thickest at the lower convexity, which suggested that the draining vein of the DAVF was responsible for the bleeding. The SDH slowly progressed for two weeks. The DAVF was successfully treated with transarterial embolization using N-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate. The SDH was resolved via burr-hole drainage surgery. This is the first reported case of DAVF that caused non-traumatic progression to SDH. As DAVF can be the cause of acute and chronic SDH, cerebral angiography is recommended for non-traumatic acute SDH as well as for intractable chronic SDH.

  17. Dilated cerebral venous system observed in growth restricted fetuses.

    PubMed

    Baron, Joel; Mastrolia, Salvatore Andrea; Shelef, Ilan; Tirosh, Dan; Daniel-Spiegel, Etty; Hershkovitz, Reli

    2017-04-03

    The dilation of the fetal cerebral veins is a rare phenomena that may be associated to a bad obstetric outcome, and is usually connected to antenatal thrombosis of the posterior dural venous sinuses. There are several descriptions of cerebral vein distension on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but all of them are detected postnatally. We present herein two cases of fetal antenatal cerebral dilation of the venous system, without any association to any sign of vein thrombosis, and a systematic review of literature regarding pathogenesis, diagnosis and outcomes associated to the antenatal detection of this condition with the use of MRI. To identify potentially eligible studies, we searched PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library (all from inception to October 20(th), 2016) and applied no language restrictions. The electronic database search provided a total of 22843 results. After the exclusion of duplicates, manuscripts that resulted not relevant to the review based on title and abstract screening, and analysis of manuscripts eligible for full-text assessment, no papers were found related to the subject reported in the present manuscript.

  18. Frontal Sinus Fractures: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Strong, E. Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Frontal sinus injuries may range from isolated anterior table fractures resulting in a simple aesthetic deformity to complex fractures involving the frontal recess, orbits, skull base, and intracranial contents. The risk of long-term morbidity can be significant. Optimal treatment strategies for the management of frontal sinus fractures remain controversial. However, it is critical to have a thorough understanding of frontal sinus anatomy as well as the current treatment strategies used to manage these injuries. A thorough physical exam and thin-cut, multiplanar (axial, coronal, and sagittal) computed tomography scan should be performed in all patients suspected of having a frontal sinus fracture. The most appropriate treatment strategy can be determined by assessing five anatomic parameters including the: frontal recess, anterior table integrity, posterior table integrity, dural integrity, and presence of a cerebrospinal fluid leak. A well thought out management strategy and meticulous surgical techniques are critical to success. The primary surgical goal is to provide a safe sinus while minimizing patient morbidity. This article offers an anatomically based treatment algorithm for the management of frontal sinus fractures and highlights the key steps to surgical repair. PMID:22110810

  19. A Series of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thromboses Treated with Intra-Arterial tPA infused over Ten Hours with a 0.027-inch Catheter and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ziu, Endrit; Haley, O'Hara; Ibrahimi, Muhammad; Simon, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) can have devastating results, with mortality reported in 44% of cases. No randomized trials exist in order to define what qualifies as failure of conservative therapy, and there is no specific intervention to date which is considered safe and effective. Case series suggest that thrombolysis infusion is safer than thrombectomy, but methods of administration, dose, and duration of therapy tend to vary widely. We present three consecutive CVST patients treated with heparin who suffered both clinical and radiographic deterioration, and went on to have endovascular therapy. Each patient was successfully recanalized by placing a 0.027-inch microcatheter at the proximal portion of the thrombus and infusing 20 mg of alteplase dissolved in 1 liter of normal saline infused at 100 ml per hour for an infusion of 2 mg of alteplase per hour for ten hours.  PMID:27462480

  20. Countercurrent transfer of dopamine from venous blood in the cavernous sinus to the arterial blood supplying the brain - the perfused rabbit head as an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Muszak, J; Krzymowski, T; Gilun, P; Stefanczyk-Krzymowska, S

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the current study was to check whether countercurrent transfer of dopamine occurs in the cavernous sinus of the rabbit and whether the rabbit can be used as an animal model to study cavernous sinus function. After exsanguination of the animal, oxygenated and warmed (37°C) Hanseneleit-Krebs buffer with autologous or homologous blood (in a 3:1 or 1:1 ratio) was pumped through both common carotid arteries into the head (60 ml/min; 80-100 mm Hg) and radiolabeled dopamine (3(H)-DA, 10 μCi) was infused into the cavernous sinus through the angular oculi vein. Cerebral blood from the basilar artery was collected from the cannulated vertebral artery during 3(H)-DA infusion and for 10 minutes after completion of infusion. Selected brain tissue samples were collected after completion of the head perfusion. It was demonstrated that dopamine can penetrate from the rabbit's cavernous sinus to the internal carotid artery supplying the brain. Dopamine permeation was greater when the rabbit head was perfused with buffer and blood in a 3:1 ratio than with 1:1 (P<0.01). When the head was perfused with buffer and blood in a 3:1 ratio, significant radioactivity was found in samples collected from the brain basilar artery during and after 3(H)-DA infusion (P<0.001). The radioactivity was identified as 34.13 ± 2.7% unmetabolized 3(H)-DA and 65.9 ± 2.7% its metabolites. Significant radioactivity was also found in some brain tissue samples in both groups (P<0.05). The concentration of free radiolabeled dopamine particles in the dialysate of blood plasma and plasma diluted with buffer did not differ significantly. Because the structures of the cavernous sinus and cavernous fragment of the internal carotid artery of the rabbit are similar to those in humans, it suggests that rabbits can serve as a model for experimental physiological studies of cavernous sinus function and retrograde dopamine transfer in the cavernous sinus should be considered as an important link in

  1. Sinus Venosus Atrial Septal Defect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    chest CT was performed to evaluate for pulmonary embolism (figure 2). The chest radiograph (figure 1) demonstrates increased central pulmonary ...Fig. 5 Sinus venosus defect at birth . The shaded area in purple represents the sinus venosum. The anomalous right pulmonary venous anatomy...department (ED) with chest pain and an ankle fracture after being hit by a car while riding a horse. Chest imaging noted enlarged central pulmonary

  2. Traumatic dural tears: CT diagnosis using metrizamide

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.E.; Hasso, A.N.; Thompson, J.R.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.; Vu, L.H.

    1984-08-01

    Computed tomography of the spine using intrathecal metrizamide was performed on six patients with spinal trauma. Dural tears with contrast material escaping outside the subarachnoid space were documented in five cases. The characteristics of dural tears are demonstrable by metrizamide and computed tomography, either in conjunction with myelography or as a separate procedure. Neurological deficits following spinal trauma may be aggravated by dural tears with entrapment of the spinal nerve roots.

  3. CSF hydrodynamics in superior sagittal sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, B; Malm, J; Markgren, P; Ekstedt, J

    1992-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics were investigated with a constant pressure infusion method in patients with superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. Ten patients were studied with serial examinations up to 15 years after the onset of the disease. A total of 70 CSF hydrodynamic examinations were performed. A clear increase in intracranial pressure due to raised pressure in the major dural sinus was seen in all patients. A striking feature was the persistent intracranial pressure increase that declined only gradually. This had no obvious clinical impact. Change in CSF resorption facility played only a minor role in the intracranial pressure elevation. None of the patients developed hydrocephalus. PMID:1583513

  4. Sinusitis: Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressuregrowths called polyps. These can block your sinus passages.When bacteria or a virus causes sinusitis, it’s ... nasal spray. This will clean out your nasal passages and help clear congestion. Your doctor may suggest ...

  5. Acute Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... headache. Acute sinusitis is mostly caused by the common cold. Unless a bacterial infection develops, most cases resolve ... Acute sinusitis is most often caused by the common cold, which is a viral infection. In some cases, ...

  6. Pediatric Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... requests or policy questions to our media and public relations staff at newsroom@entnet.org . Your child’s sinuses ... viral upper respiratory infections in children, and the role of such medications for treatment of sinusitis is ...

  7. Improvement of depression after treatment of dural arteriovenous fistula: a case report and a review.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Minoru; Sugiu, Kenji; Tokunaga, Koji; Sakamoto, Chihoko; Fujiwara, Kenjiro

    2012-01-01

    Patients with dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) in the transverse-sigmoid sinus suffer from several symptoms: bruit, headache, visual impairment, and so on. But depression is rare in patients with DAVF. The authors reported a rare case presenting the improvement of depression after the treatment of a dural arteriovenous fistula in the left transverse-sigmoid sinus. A 46-year-old male had suffered from depression and was treated with antidepressants at a local hospital for four years. The patient was temporarily laid off due to his depression. Afterwards, he had Gerstmann's syndrome and came to our hospital. A DAVF in the left transverse-sigmoid sinus was demonstrated on the angiogram. The DAVF was successfully treated with endovascular surgery, coil embolization of the isolated diseased sinus through the mastoid emissary vein which was a draining vein from the fistula. After this treatment, his depression as well as Gerstmann's syndrome was improved and the quantity of the antidepressants decreased. The patient returned to work without any antidepressant two years after the treatment. DAVFs might be one of the causes of depression. It may be necessary to evaluate cerebral vessels in patients suffering from depression by using MRA or 3D-CTA even if there are not any abnormal findings on plain CT scans.

  8. Improvement of Depression after Treatment of Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: A Case Report and a Review

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Minoru; Sugiu, Kenji; Tokunaga, Koji; Sakamoto, Chihoko; Fujiwara, Kenjiro

    2012-01-01

    Patients with dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) in the transverse-sigmoid sinus suffer from several symptoms: bruit, headache, visual impairment, and so on. But depression is rare in patients with DAVF. The authors reported a rare case presenting the improvement of depression after the treatment of a dural arteriovenous fistula in the left transverse-sigmoid sinus. A 46-year-old male had suffered from depression and was treated with antidepressants at a local hospital for four years. The patient was temporarily laid off due to his depression. Afterwards, he had Gerstmann's syndrome and came to our hospital. A DAVF in the left transverse-sigmoid sinus was demonstrated on the angiogram. The DAVF was successfully treated with endovascular surgery, coil embolization of the isolated diseased sinus through the mastoid emissary vein which was a draining vein from the fistula. After this treatment, his depression as well as Gerstmann's syndrome was improved and the quantity of the antidepressants decreased. The patient returned to work without any antidepressant two years after the treatment. DAVFs might be one of the causes of depression. It may be necessary to evaluate cerebral vessels in patients suffering from depression by using MRA or 3D-CTA even if there are not any abnormal findings on plain CT scans. PMID:23243544

  9. Diagnosis of Transverse Sinus Hypoplasia in Magnetic Resonance Venography: New Insights Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Combined Dataset of Venous Outflow Impairment Case-Control Studies: Post Hoc Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Han, Ke; Chao, A-Ching; Chang, Feng-Chi; Hsu, Hung-Yi; Chung, Chih-Ping; Sheng, Wen-Yung; Chan, Lung; Wu, Jiang; Hu, Han-Hwa

    2016-03-01

    In previous studies of transverse sinus (TS) hypoplasia, discrepancies between TS diameter measured by magnetic resonance venography (MRV) and contrast T1-weighted magnetic resonance (contrast T1) were observed. To investigate these discrepancies, and considering that TS hypoplasia is associated with neurological disorders, we performed a post hoc analysis of prospectively collected data from 3 case-control studies on transient global amnesia (TGA), transient monocular blindness (TMB), and panic disorders while retaining the original inclusion and exclusion criteria. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of 131 subjects was reviewed to evaluate TS diameter and the location and degree of venous flow stenosis and obstruction.MRV without contrast revealed that TS hypoplasia was observed in 69 subjects, whom we classified into 2 subgroups according to the concordance with contrast T1 observations: concordance indicated anatomically small TS (30 subjects), and discrepancy indicated that the MRV diagnosis is in fact flow-related and that TS is not anatomically small (39 subjects). The latter subgroup was associated with at least 1 site of venous compression/stenosis in the internal jugular vein (IJV) or the left brachiocephalic vein (BCV) (P < 0.001), which was significantly larger in patients than controls. Compensatory dilatation of contralateral TS diameter was only observed with MRV, not with contrast T1 imaging.The clinical implication of these results is that using MRV only, IJV/BCV compression/stenosis may be misdiagnosed as TS hypoplasia. And contralateral TS have no compensatory dilatation in its diameter in contrast T1 imaging, just compensatory increased flow volume.

  10. Endovascular Treatment of Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas: Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Oh, Hyuk-Jin; Shim, Jai-Joon; Bae, Hack-Gun; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective Treatment of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) remains a challenge. However, after introduction of Onyx, transarterial approach is the preferred treatment option in many centers. We report our experience of dAVFs embolization with special emphasis on transarterial approach. Methods Seventeen embolization procedures were performed in 13 patients with dAVFs between Jan 2009 and Oct 2014. Clinical symptoms, location and type of fistulas, embolization methods, complications, radiological and clinical outcomes were evaluated using charts and PACS images. Results All 13 patients had symptomatic lesions. The locations of fistulas were transverse-sigmoid sinus in 6, middle fossa dura in 4, cavernous sinus in 2, and superior sagittal sinus in 1 patient. Cognard types were as follows : I in 4, IIa in 2, IIa+IIb in 5, and IV in 2. Embolization procedures were performed ≥2 times in 3 patients. Nine patients were treated with transarterial Onyx embolization alone. One of these required direct surgical puncture of middle meningeal artery. Complete obliteration of fistulas was achieved in 11/13 (85%) patients. There were no complications except for 1 case of Onyx migration in cavernous dAVF. Modified Rankin scale score at post-operative 3 months were 0 in 11, and 3 in 2 patients. Conclusion Transarterial Onyx embolization can be a first line therapeutic option in patients with dAVFs. However, transvenous approach should be tried first in cavernous sinus dAVF because of the risk of intracranial migration of liquid embolic materials. Furthermore, combined surgical endovascular approach can be considered as a useful option in inaccessible route. PMID:26885282

  11. Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Raz, Eytan; Win, William; Hagiwara, Mari; Lui, Yvonne W; Cohen, Benjamin; Fatterpekar, Girish M

    2015-11-01

    Fungal sinusitis is characterized into invasive and noninvasive forms. The invasive variety is further classified into acute, chronic and granulomatous forms; and the noninvasive variety into fungus ball and allergic fungal sinusitis. Each of these different forms has a unique radiologic appearance. The clinicopathologic and corresponding radiologic spectrum and differences in treatment strategies of fungal sinusitis make it an important diagnosis for clinicians and radiologists to always consider. This is particularly true of invasive fungal sinusitis, which typically affects immuno compromised patients and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis allows initiation of appropriate treatment strategies resulting in favorable outcome. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Multiple dural-based hemangiopericytomas

    PubMed Central

    Stroberg, Edana; Uhrbrock, David H.; Harris, Frank; Mutyala, Subhakar; DiPatre, Pier Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the case of a 57-year-old man who underwent resection of a dural-based hemangiopericytoma (HPC) in the left frontoparietal region. The patient was treated with radiation therapy and remained symptom-free for 10 years. At 67 years of age, he presented with a mass in the left frontal region near the same area as the first tumor, in addition to a separate smaller mass in the right middle cranial fossa. Resection of the larger left frontal mass revealed an HPC. Follow-up imaging 9 months later showed a significant increase in size of the right middle cranial fossa mass. This third mass was resected, and histological examination also demonstrated an HPC. PMID:27034566

  13. Comparison of haematopoietic stem cell engraftment through the retro-orbital venous sinus and the lateral vein: alternative routes for bone marrow transplantation in mice.

    PubMed

    Leon-Rico, D; Fernández-García, M; Aldea, M; Sánchez, R; Peces-Barba, M; Martinez-Palacio, J; Yáñez, R M; Almarza, E

    2015-04-01

    Bone marrow transplantation in mice is performed by intravenous administration of haematopoietic repopulating cells, usually via the lateral tail vein. This technique can be technically challenging to carry out and may cause distress to the mice. The retro-orbital sinus is a large area where there is a confluence of several vessels that provides an alternative route for intravenous access. Retro-orbital injection, although aesthetically unpleasant, can be performed rapidly without requiring mechanical restriction or heat-induced vasodilation. In addition, this technique can be easily learned by novice manipulators. This route of administration has been reported for use in bone marrow transplantation but there is no comparison of retro-orbital and tail vein injections reported for this specific purpose, although both routes have been compared for many other applications. Here, we provide for the first time a comprehensive comparison between tail vein and retro-orbital injections for two different bone marrow transplant scenarios in P3B and B6D2F1 mice. In both cases, no significant differences regarding donor engraftment were observed between mice transplanted using each of the techniques. Haematological counts and leukocyte subpopulation distribution were practically identical between both animal groups. Moreover, donor engraftment levels were less homogenous when cells were transplanted by tail vein injection, probably due to a higher risk of failure associated with this technique. All these data suggest that retro-orbital injection is a compelling alternative to conventional tail vein injection for bone marrow transplant in mice, providing similar and more homogenous haematopoietic reconstitution. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Samia Ben; Touati, Nahla; Baccouche, Hela; Drissi, Cyrine; Romdhane, Neila Ben; Hentati, Fayçal

    2016-01-01

    Data regarding cerebral venous thrombosis in North Africa are scarce. This study aims to identify the clinical features, risk factors, outcome, and prognosis of cerebral venous thrombosis in Tunisia. Data of 160 patients with radiologically confirmed cerebral venous thrombosis, hospitalized in Mongi Ben Hmida National Institute of Neurology (Tunis, Tunisia), were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The mean age was 37.3 years with a female predominance (83.1%). The mode of onset was subacute in most cases (56.2%). Headache was the most common symptom (71.3%), and focal neurologic symptoms were the main clinical presentation (41.8%). The most common sites of thrombosis were the superior sagittal sinus (65%) and the lateral sinus (60.6%). More than 1 sinus was involved in 114 (71.2%) patients. Parenchymal lesions observed in 85 (53.1%) patients did not correlate with cerebral venous thrombosis extent. Major risk factors were obstetric causes (pregnancy and puerperium) found in 46 (38.6% of women aged <50 years) patients, followed by anemia (28.1%) and congenital or acquired thrombophilia (16.2%). Mortality rate was of 6.6%. Good outcome at 6 months (modified Rankin Scale ≤2) was observed in 105 (87.5%)of 120 patients available for follow-up. Predictors of poor outcome were altered consciousness and elevated plasma C-reactive protein levels. Clinical and radiologic presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis in Tunisia was quite similar to other parts of the world with, however, a particularly high frequency of obstetric causes. Plasma C-reactive protein level should be considered as a prognostic factor in CVT.

  15. The petrosquamosal sinus in humans

    PubMed Central

    San Millán Ruíz, Diego; Gailloud, Philippe; Yilmaz, Hasan; Perren, Fabienne; Rathgeb, Jean-Paul; Rüfenacht, Daniel A; Fasel, Jean H D

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive description of the morphology of the human petrosquamosal sinus (PSS) derived from original observations made on 13 corrosion casts of the cranial venous system combined with routine clinical imaging studies in two patients. The PSS is not a rare finding in the adult human. In particular, continuous developments in imaging techniques have made radiologists become increasingly aware of this anatomical entity in recent years. The role of the PSS as a major encephalic drainage pathway and its potential implication in pathological conditions such as intracranial venous hypertension are discussed. PMID:17118059

  16. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula: imaging features with endovascular management.

    PubMed

    Mondel, Prabath Kumar; Saraf, Rashmi; Limaye, Uday S

    2015-07-01

    A 43-year-old man presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. He was investigated and found to have a rare posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). DAVFs of the posterior condylar canal are rare. Venous drainage of the DAVF was through a long, tortuous, and aneurysmal bridging vein. We describe the clinical presentation, cross sectional imaging, angiographic features, and endovascular management of this patient. The patient was treated by transarterial embolization of the fistula through the ascending pharyngeal artery. This is the first report of an acutely bled posterior condylar canal DAVF treated by transarterial Onyx embolization with balloon protection in the vertebral artery. The patient recovered without any neurological deficit and had an excellent outcome. On 6 month follow-up angiogram, there was stable occlusion of the dural fistula. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... critical nerves and arteries in the area, 4) maintenance of the function of the nose, sinuses and any other involved structures, and 5) maintenance of separation between the intracranial (brain) and sinonasal ...

  18. Parasagittal meningiomas: Our surgical experience and the reconstruction technique of the superior sagittal sinus

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Alessandro; Di Vitantonio, Hambra; De Paulis, Danilo; Del Maestro, Mattia; Gallieni, Massimo; Dechcordi, Soheila Raysi; Marzi, Sara; Galzio, Renato Juan

    2017-01-01

    Background: The radical resection of parasagittal meningiomas without complications and recurrences is the goal of the neurosurgeon. Nowadays, different managements are proposed. This study describes our surgical technique during the lesional excision and the reconstruction of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). Methods: The total removal (Simpson I and II) of parasagittal meningiomas (WHO grade I and II) was obtained in 75 patients from September 2000 to January 2010. The indocyanine green videoangiography was used before the dural opening and, when necessary, to identify and preserve the cortical veins. The surgery of the SSS was performed in accordance with Sindou's classification, and its reconstruction was achieved through the use of a patch of galea capitis. Results: We had no cases of recurrence and thrombotic occlusion of the SSS in 5 years after the reconstruction. No complications were observed in 65 patients, and no cases of mortality were reported. Neurological focal deficits were observed in 5 patients. A brain swelling and a venous infarction were observed in 1 patient. Only one case of thrombotic occlusion was observed. A cerebrospinal fluid leak was observed in 2 patients, and a systemic complication was found in 1 patient. Conclusion: Several factors contribute to the success of the parasagittal meningioma surgery. We consider the preservation of the cortical veins to be important, and, when possible, we recommend the reconstruction of the anterior third of the SSS. Our experience has led us to believe that until now surgery is a winning choice if practiced by expert hands. PMID:28217380

  19. Dural ectasia of the optic nerve sheath

    PubMed Central

    Kacem, Hanane Hadj; Hammani, Lehcen; Ajana, Ali; Nassar, Itimad

    2014-01-01

    Optic nerve dural ectasia is a rare cause of optic nerve sheath enlargement due to the accumulation of CSF around the optic nerve with no associated pathology. It diagnosed by MRI studies and can follow benign or sometimes an unfavorable course. We describe the case of a 24-day-old female referred for a visual blurring, which we diagnosed as a dural ectasia of the optic nerve sheath by MRI and confirmed in surgical intervention. We present this case report to illustrate the classic imaging features of the disease. PMID:25374645

  20. Paraplegia in a chiropractic patient secondary to atraumatic dural arteriovenous fistula with perimedullary hypertension: case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas are abnormal communications between higher-pressure arterial circulation and lower-pressure venous circulation. This abnormal communication can result in important and frequently misdiagnosed neurological abnormalities. A case of rapid onset paraplegia following cervical chiropractic manipulation is reviewed. The patient’s generalized spinal cord edema, lower extremity paraplegia and upper extremity weakness, were initially believed to be a complication of the cervical spinal manipulation that had occurred earlier on the day of admission. Subsequent diagnostic testing determined the patient suffered from impaired circulation of the cervical spinal cord produced by a Type V intracranial arteriovenous fistula and resultant venous hypertension in the pontomesencephalic and anterior spinal veins. The clinical and imaging findings of an intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula with pontomesencephalic venous congestion and paraplegia are reviewed. This case report emphasizes the importance of thorough and serial diagnostic imaging in the presence of sudden onset paraplegia and the potential for error when concluding atypical neurological presentations are the result of therapeutic misadventure. PMID:23830411

  1. Paraplegia in a chiropractic patient secondary to atraumatic dural arteriovenous fistula with perimedullary hypertension: case report.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Stephen M; Stahl, Michael J; Schultz, Gary D

    2013-07-08

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas are abnormal communications between higher-pressure arterial circulation and lower-pressure venous circulation. This abnormal communication can result in important and frequently misdiagnosed neurological abnormalities.A case of rapid onset paraplegia following cervical chiropractic manipulation is reviewed. The patient's generalized spinal cord edema, lower extremity paraplegia and upper extremity weakness, were initially believed to be a complication of the cervical spinal manipulation that had occurred earlier on the day of admission. Subsequent diagnostic testing determined the patient suffered from impaired circulation of the cervical spinal cord produced by a Type V intracranial arteriovenous fistula and resultant venous hypertension in the pontomesencephalic and anterior spinal veins.The clinical and imaging findings of an intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula with pontomesencephalic venous congestion and paraplegia are reviewed.This case report emphasizes the importance of thorough and serial diagnostic imaging in the presence of sudden onset paraplegia and the potential for error when concluding atypical neurological presentations are the result of therapeutic misadventure.

  2. Dural arteriovenous fistula at the anterior clinoid process draining directly into the superficial middle cerebral vein.

    PubMed

    Ushikoshi, Satoshi; Honma, Toshimi; Uchida, Kazuki; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Ajiki, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    A 76-year-old man presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Selective angiography revealed a dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) at the right anterior clinoid process, draining into the superficial middle cerebral vein in a retrograde fashion. Two internal carotid artery aneurysms were also demonstrated at the origin of the posterior communicating artery and the anterior choroidal artery on the same side. The patient underwent craniotomy, and all lesions were treated simultaneously. Rupture of the anterior choroidal artery aneurysm was confirmed. DAVF draining directly into the superficial middle cerebral vein is extremely rare. The precise location of the shunt, the anatomical features, and venous drainage must be evaluated to consider treatment.

  3. Primary carcinoid tumor of the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Hood, Brian; Bray, Eric; Bregy, Amade; Norenberg, Michael; Weed, Donald; Morcos, Jacques J

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial carcinoid tumors belong to the class of neuroendocrine tumors and their incidence is extremely rare. The pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of carcinoid tumors of the skull base are outlined in this case report. A 61-year-old multimorbid woman presented with transient memory loss. Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain demonstrated a left cavernous sinus mass extending into the infratemporal fossa. The lesion was biopsied using the Caldwell-Luc approach, and histology showed a low-grade neuroendocrine tumor. The tumor was subtotally resected with a neurosurgery/head and neck combined preauricular infratemporal and subtemporal extradural approaches to the cavernous sinus. Further histologic evaluation revealed that the tumor was of carcinoid differentiation with no other primary or metastatic sites detectable. Primary intracranial carcinoid tumors, though rare, should be included in the differential diagnosis of extradural and dural-based lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Haemorrhage associated with silastic dural substitute.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, D; Taylor, W; Hayward, R

    1994-01-01

    Three cases of haemorrhage after the use of a silastic dural substitute are presented. In all cases the implant was removed and further haemorrhage has not occurred. Published work is reviewed and the implications for the continued use of silastic are discussed. Images PMID:8201348

  5. Sinus Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the nasal passage. The right and left nasal passages are separated in the middle by a vertical plate of cartilage and bone ... Most of the sinuses drain from underneath the middle turbinate, into a region ... through the nasal passage on each side, it streams through the crevices ...

  6. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  7. Effect of echo contrast media on the visualization of transverse sinus thrombosis with transcranial 3-D duplex sonography.

    PubMed

    Delcker, A; Häussermann, P; Weimar, C

    1999-09-01

    Transcranial duplex sonography has the capacity of detecting venous flow as in the transverse sinus. During a 6-month period, 28 consecutive patients (mean age 55 y) with a clinically suspected diagnosis of cerebral sinus thrombosis were included in the study. All patients were examined using 3-D ultrasound equipment within 24 h of having undergone either venous computerized tomography (CT), venous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or cerebral angiography. A total of 22 healthy patients had a normal venous CT, venous MRI or cerebral angiography of both transverse sinuses. Before echo contrast enhancement, the transverse sinus could be visualized in only 2 of these 44 sinuses (22 patients). A total of 6 patients with an unilaterally missed transverse sinus in 3-D ultrasound suffered from sinus thrombosis (n = 3), hypoplasia (n = 2) or aplasia (n = 1) of the unilateral transverse sinus in neuroradiological tests. In none of the patients with an thrombosis of the transverse sinus did ultrasound contrast media application improve the visualization of the affected sinus. Our study confirms that the normal transverse sinus, insonated through the contralateral temporal bone, often cannot be visualized without the use of contrast agents. With transcranial 3-D duplex sonography, a differentiation between thrombosis, hypoplasia and aplasia of the sinus was not possible.

  8. Endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous sinus fistula: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Korkmazer, Bora; Kocak, Burak; Tureci, Ercan; Islak, Civan; Kocer, Naci; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Carotid cavernous sinus fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid system and the cavernous sinus. Several classification schemes have described carotid cavernous sinus fistulas according to etiology, hemodynamic features, or the angiographic arterial architecture. Increased pressure within the cavernous sinus appears to be the main factor in pathophysiology. The clinical features are related to size, exact location, and duration of the fistula, adequacy and route of venous drainage and the presence of arterial/venous collaterals. Noninvasive imaging (computed tomography, magnetic resonance, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, Doppler) is often used in the initial work-up of a possible carotid cavernous sinus fistulas. Cerebral angiography is the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis, classification, and planning of treatment for these lesions. The endovascular approach has evolved as the mainstay therapy for definitive treatment in situations including clinical emergencies. Conservative treatment, surgery and radiosurgery constitute other management options for these lesions. PMID:23671750

  9. Tentorial dural arteriovenous fistula manifesting as contralateral trigeminal neuralgia: resolution after transarterial Onyx embolization

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaojian; Qin, Xuanfeng; Ni, Lanchun; Chen, Jian; Xu, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Tentorial dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) as a cause of trigeminal neuralgia is extremely rare. Although less than 10 cases have been reported in the literature, all cases presented with ipsilateral trigeminal neuralgia. Here we report a unique case of tentorial DAVF manifesting as contralateral trigeminal neuralgia. A 58-year-old man presented with right-sided trigeminal neuralgia. Cerebral angiography revealed a left tentorial DAVF and the MR imaging demonstrated a variceal venous dilatation occupying the left lateral pontine cistern and multiple venous flow voids adjacent to the right trigeminal nerve root entry zone. Transarterial Onyx embolization resulted in near complete obliteration of the fistula with immediate resolution of facial pain. The patient remains symptom free and without evidence of recurrence during 9 months of follow-up. Transarterial Onyx embolization may be an effective treatment modality for such an usual case. PMID:24285803

  10. Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula as a cause for symptomatic superficial siderosis: A report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Griffin R.; Turan, Nefize; Buonanno, Ferdinando S.; Pradilla, Gustavo; Nogueira, Raul G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Superficial siderosis (SS) is the occult deposition of hemosiderin within the cerebral cortex due to repeat microhemorrhages within the central nervous system. The collection of hemosiderin within the pia and superficial cortical surface can lead to injury to the nervous tissue. The most common presentation is occult sensorineural hearing loss although many patients have been misdiagnosed with diseases such as multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis before being diagnosed with SS. Only one case report exists in the literature describing an intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) as the putative cause for SS. Case Description: We describe two cases of SS caused by a dAVF. Both patients had a supratentorial, cortical lesion supplied by the middle meningeal artery with venous drainage into the superior sagittal sinus. In both patients, symptoms improved after endovascular embolization. The similar anatomic relationship of both dAVFs reported presents an interesting question about the pathogenesis of SS. Similar to the pathologic changes seen in the formation of intracranial arterial aneurysms; it would be possible that changes in the blood vessel lining and wall might predispose a patient to chronic, microhemorrhage resulting in SS. Conclusions: We describe the second and third cases of a dAVF as the cause of SS, and the first cases of successful treatment of SS-associated dAVF with endovascular embolization. As noninvasive imaging techniques become more sensitive and easily obtained, one must consider their limitations in detecting occult intracranial vascular malformations such as dAVF as a possible etiology for SS. PMID:27127712

  11. Transarterial Embolization of a Cervical Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, S.A.; Lassig, J.P.; Nicol, E.; Thompson, B.G.; Gemmete, J.J.; Gandhi, D.

    2006-01-01

    Summary We describe a case of a 75-year-old man who presented with acute onset of headache and subarachnoid hemorrhage and initial cerebral angiography was deemed "negative". In retrospect, a faint contrast collection was present adjacent to the right vertebral artery at the C1 level suspicious for a small dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF). Follow-up angiography with selective microcatheter injections of the right vertebral artery and C1 radicular artery confirmed a complex dAVF with characteristically specific venous drainage patterns associated with a subarachnoid hemorrhage presentation. Subsequently, the cervical dAVF was treated with superselective glue embolization resulting in complete occlusion. Cervical dAVFs are extremely rare vascular causes of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Both diagnostic angiography and endovascular treatment of these lesions can be challenging, especially in an emergent setting, requiring selective evaluation of bilateral vertebral arteries and careful attention to their cervical segments. Although only a single prior case of a cervical dAVF presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage has been successfully treated with embolization, modern selective transarterial techniques may allow easier detection and treatment of subtle pathologic arteriovenous connections. PMID:20569588

  12. Surgical treatment of tentorial dural arteriovenous fistulae located around the tentorial incisura.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Taketo; Bozinov, Oliver; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2013-07-01

    Tentorial dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVF) are relatively uncommon and are the most dangerous type of DAVF. Because of a high incidence of hemorrhage and subsequent neurological deficits, treatment is mandatory. A consecutive series of nine surgically treated patients with symptomatic tentorial DAVF were analyzed in this study. All lesions were located around the tentorial incisura and were treated microsurgically using a subtemporal approach in eight cases and a supracerebellar approach in one case. The dural bases of the lesions were located adjacent to the tentorial edge in six patients and the tentorial apex in three patients. Complete obliteration was achieved in all treated tentorial DAVF. In one patient, the torcular fistula remained untreated without cortical venous reflux. Postoperative asymptomatic temporal lobe hemorrhage was diagnosed in one patient with a tentorial apex DAVF; however, no new neurological symptoms were present after surgical treatment. The subtemporal approach for unilateral tentorial DAVF is a favorable and direct approach for the highly skilled surgeon. Perimesencephalic venous dilatation or varix is an important finding on MRI to help localize tentorial DAVF in the tentorial edge or apex.

  13. Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Following Translabyrinthine Resection of Cerebellopontine Angle Tumors: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peter M.M.C.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Do, Huy M.; Blevins, Nikolas H.

    2011-01-01

    We describe two cases of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) developing in a delayed fashion after translabyrinthine resection of cerebellopontine angle tumors. Two patients in an academic tertiary referral center, a 46-year-old woman and a 67-year-old man, underwent translabyrinthine resection of a 2-cm left vestibular schwannoma and a 4-cm left petrous meningioma, respectively. Both patients subsequently developed DAVF, and in each case the diagnosis was delayed despite serial imaging follow-up. In one patient, cerebrospinal fluid diversion before DAVF was identified as the cause of her intracranial hypertension; the other patient was essentially asymptomatic but with a high risk of hemorrhage due to progression of cortical venous drainage. Endovascular treatment was effective but required multiple sessions due to residual or recurrent fistulas. Dural arteriovenous fistula is a rare complication of translabyrinthine skull base surgery. Diagnosis requires a high index of clinical suspicion and an understanding of subtle imaging findings that may be present on follow-up studies performed for tumor surveillance. Failure to recognize this complication may lead to misguided interventions for treatment of hydrocephalus and other complications, as well as ongoing risks related to venous hypertension and intracranial hemorrhage. As this condition is generally curable with neurointerventional and/or surgical methods, timely diagnosis and treatment are essential. PMID:23984203

  14. Case of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis with Unusual Venous Infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Kamaraju, Susheel Kumar; Pasupaleti, Bhimeswarao; Juluri, Naganarasimharaju

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a relatively rare condition when compared with vascular accidents of arterial origin representing 0.5-1% of all strokes. Unlike arterial infarcts parenchymal changes are seldom present and when present most of the times are reversible. We present a case report of 28-year-old female with thrombosis of internal cerebral veins and straight sinus and hemorrhagic infarcts in bilateral basal ganglia and bilateral thalami .The findings of bilateral symmetrical hyper intensities in basal ganglia and thalami on MRI may be due to various causes of diverse etiology and cerebral venous thrombosis remains an important cause. Early recognition and prompt anticoagulation therapy helps to reduce the mortality to a great extent. The MRI imaging features of straight sinus thrombosis and other imaging differentials are discussed. PMID:26023623

  15. Dural arteriovenous fistula as a treatable dementia

    PubMed Central

    Enofe, Ikponmwosa; Thacker, Ike

    2017-01-01

    Dementia is a chronic loss of neurocognitive function that is progressive and irreversible. Although rare, dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) could present with a rapid decline in neurocognitive function with or without Parkinson-like symptoms. DAVFs represent a potentially treatable and reversible cause of dementia. Here, we report the case of an elderly woman diagnosed with a DAVF after presenting with new-onset seizures, deteriorating neurocognitive function, and Parkinson-like symptoms. PMID:28405088

  16. Chronic sinusitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and cartilage and lined with a mucous membrane. Sinusitis occurs when the membranes becomes inflamed and painful, ... a result of a blocked sinus opening. Chronic sinusitis is often caused by inflammation and blockage due ...

  17. Perimesencephalic nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by transverse sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Fang-Wang; Rao, Jie; Zheng, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Liang; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Qi-Hui; Yang, Jian-Guang; Ke, Jiang-Qiong; Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Perimesencephalic nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (PNSAH) is characterized by a pattern of extravasated blood restricted to the perimesencephalic cisterns, normal angiographic findings, and an excellent prognosis with an uneventful course and low risks of complication. The precise etiology of bleeding in patients with PNSAH has not yet been established. The most common hypothesis is that PNSAH is venous in origin. Intracranial venous hypertension has been considered as the pivotal factor in the pathogenesis of PNSAH. The underlying venous pathology such as straight sinus stenosis, jugular vein occlusion may contribute to PNSAH. We describe a patient in whom transverse sinus thrombosis preceded intracranial venous hypertension and PNSAH. These findings supported that the source of the subarachnoid hemorrhage is venous in origin. Patient concerns and diagnoses: A 45-year-old right-handed man was admitted to the hospital with a sudden onset of severe headache associated with nausea, vomiting, and mild photophobia for 6 hours. The patient was fully conscious and totally alert. An emergency brain computed tomography (CT) revealed an acute subarachnoid hemorrhage restricted to the perimesencephalic cisterns. CT angiography revealed no evidence of an intracranial aneurysm or underlying vascular malformation. Digital subtraction angiography of arterial and capillary phases confirmed the CT angiographic findings. Assessment of the venous phase demonstrated right transverse sinus thrombosis. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Lumbar puncture revealed an opening pressure of 360 mmH2O, suggestive of intracranial venous hypertension. Grave disease was diagnosed by endocrinological investigation. Interventions: Low-molecular-weight heparin, followed by oral warfarin, was initiated immediately as the treatment for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and PNSAH. Outcomes: The patient discharged

  18. Transarterial Onyx embolization of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chao-Bao; Chang, Feng-Chi; Mu-Huo Teng, Michael; Lin, Chung-Jung; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Cheng-Yen

    2014-04-01

    Transarterial embolization of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) is usually associated with inadequate embolization. The purpose of this study was to report our experience of transarterial Onyx embolization of intracranial DAVFs with an emphasis on treatment outcome with this new embolic agent in different types of DAVFs. In the past 3 years, a total of 14 intracranial DAVFs have been treated by transarterial Onyx embolization. Among these, there were nine males and five females, aged from 30 years to 82 years (mean = 62 years). We retrospectively analyzed the injection volume and time of Onyx embolization as well as outcomes in different types of DAVFs. The locations of the DAVFs were sigmoid sinus (n = 6), tentorium (n = 3), sinus confluence (n = 2), transverse-sigmoid sinus (n = 1), sigmoid sinus-jugular bulb (n = 1) and the superior petrous sinus (n = 1). The mean volume and time of Onyx injection were 3.4 mL and 28 minutes, respectively (Cognard type I: 4.9 mL, 40 minutes; type II: 4.5 mL, 34 minutes; type III: 2.2 mL, 21 minutes; type IV: 2 mL, 22 minutes). Total fistula occlusion was achieved in six out of seven patients of type III and type IV DAVFs, and in four out of seven patients of type I and type II DAVFs. Nine patients had total resolution of their symptoms, whereas partial regression occurred in five patients. No significant periprocedural complication was found. Mean clinical follow-up period was 16 months. Transarterial Onyx embolization of intracranial DAVFs is safe and effective. This technique is particularly useful in type III and type IV DAVFs with a high cure rate, and lower volume of Onyx as well as a short injection time. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Plain Language Summary: Adult Sinusitis (Sinus Infection).

    PubMed

    Caspersen, Leslie A; Walter, Lindsey M; Walsh, Sandra A; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Piccirillo, Jay F

    2015-08-01

    This plain language summary serves as an overview in explaining sinusitis (pronounced sign-you-side-tis). The purpose of this plain language summary is to provide patients with standard language explaining their condition in an easy-to-read format. This summary applies to those 18 years of age or older with sinusitis. The summary is featured as an FAQ (frequently asked question) format. The summary addresses how to manage and treat sinusitis symptoms. Adult sinusitis is often called a sinus infection. A healthcare provider may refer to a sinus infection as rhinosinusitis (pronounced rhi-no-sign-you-side-tis). This includes the nose as well as the sinuses in the name. A sinus infection is the swelling of the sinuses and nasal cavity.The summary is based on the published 2015 "Clinical Practice Guideline: Adult Sinusitis." The evidence-based guideline includes research to support more effective diagnosis and treatment of adult sinus infections. The guideline was developed as a quality improvement opportunity for managing sinus infections by creating clear recommendations to use in medical practice. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  20. Convexity dural cavernous haemangioma mimicking meningioma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Liu, Jian-Ping; You, Chao; Mao, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Dural cavernous haemangiomas are rare, and they do not display a classical ring of haemosiderin on MRI as parenchymal cavernous haemangiomas. Sometimes, they are misinterpreted as meningiomas with a dural tail sign. In this short report, a 37-year-old woman was diagnosed with a convexity cavernous haemangioma, and the tumour was totally resected.

  1. Dural ectasia in a child with Larsen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jain, Viral V; Anadio, Jennifer M; Chan, Gilbert; Sturm, Peter F; Crawford, Alvin H

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of an incidental finding of dural ectasia in a child diagnosed with Larsen syndrome. Larsen syndrome is a rare inherited disorder of connective tissue characterized by facial dysmorphism, congenital joint dislocations of the hips, knees and elbows, and deformities of the hands and feet. Dural ectasia is as an abnormal expansion of the dural sac surrounding the spinal cord and may result in spinal morphologic changes, instability, and spontaneous dislocation. To the best of our knowledge, the presence of dural ectasia in Larsen syndrome has not previously been reported. A 6-year-old boy diagnosed with Larsen syndrome presented with an upper thoracic curve measuring 74 degrees, a right thoracic curve measuring 65 degrees, and significant cervicothoracic kyphosis with 50% anterior subluxation of C6 on C7 and C7 on T1. Advanced imaging studies showed dural ectasia (evidenced by spinal canal and dural sac expansion), thinning of pedicles and lamina, and C4 and C6 pars defects with cervical foramen enlargement. The patient received growing rod instrumentation (attached to cervical spine fixation) by a combined anterior/posterior surgical approach using intraoperative halo. Complications included intraoperative medial breach (fully resolved), wound dehiscence, 2 instances of bilateral broken rods, and a broken cervical rod. Following 7 lengthening procedures, the patient underwent definitive fusion. Surgeons should be aware of the potential for dural ectasia in patients with Larsen syndrome. Its presence will cause difficulties in the surgical intervention for spinal deformity. Multiple factors must be considered, and surgical approach and technique will require modification to avoid complications. Although dural ectasia confounds surgical intervention in these patients, surgery still appears to outweigh the risks associated with delayed intervention. The presence of dural ectasia should not preclude surgical decompression and stabilization. This report

  2. [Iatrogenic dural lesions in lumbar neural decompressive surgery].

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Frederik; Amtoft, Ole; Andersen, Mikkel; Bøge-Rasmussen, Torben; Jensen, Tim Toftgaard; Jensen, Lars Emil; Jespersen, Stig; Kruse, Anders; Thomsen, Karsten

    2010-03-01

    Iatrogenic dural tear with cerebrospinal fluid leakage is a known complication of lumbar surgery of the columna. In the literature, the incidence is 3-16%. The study was a retrospective, consecutive review of electronic patient records after spinal surgery at the Private Hospital Hamlet. The study covers cases from the 10-month period from September 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008. Data was collected after this period and consists of surgeon-documented dural tears. At the time of surgery, the surgeon was unaware that there would be a subsequent registration. A total of 634 patients had lumbar neural decompressive surgery - 479 patients were treated for spinal stenosis and 155 for prolapsed disc. The incidence of dural tear was 3.9% (25 dural tears in 634 operations). The risk of a dural tear after secondary surgery was 7.9% versus 3.3% for primary (p = 0.02) and the mean age was 65.9 years for patients with dural tear compared with 58.1 years for patients without (p = 0.00). The difference in the mean duration of surgery was significant being 72 minutes in the group suffering a dural tear compared with 56 minutes (p = 0.03) among the remaining patients, and in the former group length of stay was increased by 1.1 day (p = 0.00). The incidence of iatrogenic dural tear was 3.9%. The incidence of dural tear was doubled in secondary surgery. The duration of surgery increased by 16 minutes and the patients with dural tear were also hospitalized one day longer.

  3. BAER suppression during posterior fossa dural opening

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Christopher B.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Jiang, Yi Dan; Yao, Tom; Zhang, Yi Ping; Sun, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative monitoring with brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAER) provides an early warning signal of potential neurological injury and may avert tissue damage to the auditory pathway or brainstem. Unexplained loss of the BAER signal in the operating room may present a dilemma to the neurosurgeon. Methods: This paper documents two patients who displayed a unique mechanism of suppression of the BAER apparent within minutes following dural opening for resection of a posterior fossa meningioma. Results: In two patients with anterior cerebellopontine angle and clival meningiomas, there was a significant deterioration of the BAER soon after durotomy but prior to cerebellar retraction and tumor removal. Intracranial structures in the posterior fossa lying between the tumor and dural opening were shifted posteriorly after durotomy. Conclusion: We hypothesized that the cochlear nerve and vessels entering the acoustic meatus were compressed or stretched when subjected to tissue shift. This movement caused cochlear nerve dysfunction that resulted in BAER suppression. BAER was partially restored after the tumor was decompressed, dura repaired, and bone replaced. BAER was not suppressed following durotomy for removal of a meningioma lying posterior to the cochlear complex. Insight into the mechanisms of durotomy-induced BAER inhibition would allay the neurosurgeon's anxiety during the operation. PMID:25883849

  4. Multimodality evaluation of dural arteriovenous fistula with CT angiography, MR with arterial spin labeling, and digital subtraction angiography: case report.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew; McTaggart, Ryan; Santarelli, Justin; Fischbein, Nancy; Marks, Michael; Zaharchuk, Greg; Do, Huy

    2014-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVF) are cerebrovascular lesions with pathologic shunting into the venous system from arterial feeders. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) has long been considered the gold standard for diagnosis, but advances in noninvasive imaging techniques now play a role in the diagnosis of these complex lesions. Herein, we describe the case of a patient with right-side pulsatile tinnitus and DAVF diagnosed using computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance with arterial spin labeling, and DSA. Implications for imaging analysis of DAVFs and further research are discussed.

  5. [A sudden C3-C4 tetraplegia revealing an intracranial dural arteriovenous draining into the spinal medullary veins].

    PubMed

    Meaudre, E; Kaiser, E; Boret, H; Cantais, E; Artéaga, C; Palmier, B

    2005-10-01

    We report a case of intracranial dural arteriovenous (DAVF) draining into the spinal medullary veins. A 49-year-old woman presented a rapidly progressive ascending myelopathy resulting in a C3-C4 tetraplegia associated with acute respiratory failure at the twelfth hour. MRI revealed swelling of the cervical spinal cord, hyperintensity on T2 and enhancement of enlarged veins on MR angiography. A conventional angiography showed the DAVF with venous drainage into the spinal vein extending to the conus medullaris. After embolization, neurological recovery occurred during the first week, allowing tracheal extubation on day 2. Clinical, radiological and therapeutic aspects of this uncommon pathology are presented.

  6. Petrosal sinus sampling: technique and rationale.

    PubMed

    Miller, D L; Doppman, J L

    1991-01-01

    Bilateral simultaneous sampling of the inferior petrosal sinuses is an extremely sensitive, specific, and accurate test for diagnosing Cushing disease and distinguishing between that entity and the ectopic ACTH syndrome. It is also valuable for lateralizing small hormone-producing adenomas within the pituitary gland. The inferior petrosal sinuses connect the cavernous sinuses with the ipsilateral internal jugular veins. The anatomy of the anastomoses between the inferior petrosal sinus, the internal jugular vein, and the venous plexuses at the base of the skull varies, but it is almost always possible to catheterize the inferior petrosal sinus. In addition, variations in size and anatomy are often present between the two inferior petrosal sinuses in a patient. Advance preparation is required for petrosal sinus sampling. Teamwork is a critical element, and each member of the staff should know what he or she will be doing during the procedure. The samples must be properly labeled, processed, and stored. Specific needles, guide wires, and catheters are recommended for this procedure. The procedure is performed with specific attention to the three areas of potential technical difficulty: catheterization of the common femoral veins, crossing the valve at the base of the left internal jugular vein, and selective catheterization of the inferior petrosal sinuses. There are specific methods for dealing with each of these areas. The sine qua non of correct catheter position in the inferior petrosal sinus is demonstration of reflux of contrast material into the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. Images must always be obtained to document correct catheter position. Special attention must be paid to two points to prevent potential complications: The patient must be given an adequate dose of heparin, and injection of contrast material into the inferior petrosal sinuses and surrounding veins must be done gently and carefully. When the procedure is performed as outlined, both inferior

  7. Interdural cavernous sinus dermoid cyst in a child: case report.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Flavio; Peri, Giacomo; Bacci, Giacomo M; Basile, Massimo; Guerra, Azzurra; Bergonzini, Patrizia; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Spacca, Barbara; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Donati, PierArturo; Genitori, Lorenzo

    2017-03-01

    Interdural dermoid cysts (DCs) of the cavernous sinus (CS), located between the outer (dural) and inner layer (membranous) of the CS lateral wall, are rare lesions in children. The authors report on a 5-year-old boy with third cranial nerve palsy and exophthalmos who underwent gross-total removal of an interdural DC of the right CS via a frontotemporal approach. The patient had a good outcome and no recurrence at the 12-month follow-up. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the second pediatric case of interdural DC described in the literature.

  8. Middle meningeal artery: Gateway for effective transarterial Onyx embolization of dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Griessenauer, Christoph J; He, Lucy; Salem, Mohamed; Chua, Michelle H; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Thomas, Ajith J

    2016-09-01

    Curative transarterial embolization of noncavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) is challenging. We sought to evaluate the role of the middle meningeal artery (MMA) in endovascular treatment of these lesions. We performed a retrospective cohort study on patients who underwent transarterial Onyx embolization of a noncavernous sinus dAVFs with contribution from the MMA at a major academic institution in the United States from January 2009 to January 2015. Twenty consecutive patients who underwent transarterial Onyx embolization of a noncavernous sinus dAVF were identified. One patient was excluded as there was no MMA contribution to the dAVF. All of the remaining 19 patients (61.3 ± 13.8 years of age) underwent transarterial embolization through the MMA. Six patients (31.6%) presented with intraparenchymal or subarachnoid hemorrhage from the dAVF. The overall angiographic cure rate was 73.7% upon last follow up. In 71.4% of successfully treated patients transarterial embolization of the MMA alone was sufficient to achieve angiographic cure. When robust MMA supply was present, MMA embolization resulted in angiographic cure even after embolization of other arterial feeders had failed in 92.9% of patients. A robust contribution of the MMA to the fistula was the single most important predictor for successful embolization (P = 0.00129). We attribute our findings to the fairly straight, non-tortuous course of the MMA that facilitates microcatheter access, navigation, and Onyx penetration. Noncavernous sinus dAVF can be successfully embolized with transarterial Onyx through the MMA, as long as supply is robust. A transvenous approach is rarely necessary. Clin. Anat. 29:718-728, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance. PMID:27695168

  10. Dural Tuberculoma Mimicking Meningioma: A Clinicoradiologic Review of Dural En-Plaque Lesions.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ashish; Patra, Devi Prasad; Gupta, Kirti; Sodhi, Harsimrat Bir

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis has long been a major health concern in developing countries and now has troubled developed world as well, owing to increase in patients with human immunodeficiency virus and immigration. Central nervous system tuberculosis accounts for approximately 1% of cases of tuberculosis. The pathologic presentation is varied, with intraparenchymal tuberculomas and pachymeningitis being the most common. Being a great mimicker, it simulates numerous diseases radiologically, and this is best realized when atypical forms are encountered. Here an atypical case of dural en-plaque tuberculoma is presented with comprehensive review of dural en-plaque lesions with their differentiating features. A 20-year-old man presented with features of increased intracranial pressure. On imaging, there was an enhancing dural-based lesion in the left frontoparietal region. In view of herniation syndrome, urgent surgical decompression of the lesion was performed. Histopathology showed features of tuberculosis. The patient is now asymptomatic with antitubercular therapy without any residual lesion at 6 months of follow-up. Tuberculoma en-plaque is an unusual entity characterized by a plaque-like meningitic process without exudation. It is easily confused with meningiomas as can other dural-based lesions comprising benign to malignant neoplastic, infectious, and granulomatous lesions. A preoperative diagnosis is imperative to differentiate it at least from neoplastic lesions, which are usually curable with surgical intervention in contrast to tuberculosis, which needs only optimal chemotherapy in most of the cases. Knowledge of differentiating imaging features, in corroboration with clinical history and high index of suspicion, helps in a proper preoperative diagnosis and optimal patient treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Percutaneous Transvenous Embolization of Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas with Detachable Coils and/or in Combination with Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Yang, Xinjian; Wu, Zhongxue

    2008-01-01

    Summary This study evaluated angiographic and clinical results in patients with a dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) who underwent percutaneous transvenous embolization. Retrospective chart analysis and radiographic studies were performed in 23 patients (aged 11-70 yrs) with a DAVF treated with percutaneous transvenous embolization in the past five years. Lesions were located in the anterior cranial fossa, cerebellar tentorium, transverse-sigmoid sinus and cavernous sinus. All procedures were analyzed with regard to presentation, delivery, angiographical and clinical outcome. Data for 23 patients (age range, 11-70 yrs, mean age 49.5yrs) with DAVFs (cavernous sinus[CS], n=17; transverse-sigmoid sinus, n=3; anterior cranial fossa, n=2; cerebellar tentorium, n=1) were retrospectively reviewed. The DAVFs were treated with coils or a combination with Onyx via different transvenous approaches, in 28 procedures. Cerebral angiography was performed to confirm the treatment. The mean clinical follow-up period was 22.1 months. Transvenous treatment of intracranial DAVFs can be safe and effective if various transvenous approaches are attempted. Percutaneous transvenous embolization with detachable platinum coils or a combination with Onyx is effective in the treatment of DAVFs. PMID:20557741

  12. Focal dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) presenting with progressive cognitive impairment including amnesia and alexia.

    PubMed

    Hasumi, Takashi; Fukushima, Takeshi; Haisa, Toshihiko; Yonemitsu, Tsutomu; Waragai, Masaaki

    2007-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman with a dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) presented with progressive cognitive impairment including amnesia and alexia. Neuroradiological studies showed a relatively confined DAVF lesion in the left temporal lobe. The patient did not have a history of trauma and did not complain of headache or tinnitus. Amnesia and alexia dramatically improved upon treatment of the DAVF, and this was associated with attenuation of an abnormal MRI signal in the left temporal lobe. The results suggest that gradually impaired cerebral circulation due to focal venous hypertensive encephalopathy localized to the left temporal lobe and resulting from a DAVF could be involved in slowly progressive amnesia and alexia. The case also shows that an intracranial DAVF may present as a variety of neurological symptoms, depending on its localization, size and clinical stage.

  13. The suprameatal dural flap for superior petrosal vein protection during the retrosigmoid intradural suprameatal approach.

    PubMed

    Mortini, Pietro; Gagliardi, Filippo; Boari, Nicola; Spina, Alfio; Bailo, Michele; Franzin, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The drilling of the suprameatal bone during the retrosigmoid intradural suprameatal approach (RISA) puts the superior petrosal vein complex at risk of heating and mechanical injury, which may lead to cerebellar swelling and infarction. We present a new technique to protect the superior petrosal venous complex during suprameatal bone drilling. A microanatomical laboratory investigation on cadaver was conducted. The surgical technique is described and intraoperative schematic pictures are provided. The surgical steps of this technique and the related intraoperative images are reported. One case illustration regarding the removal of a large petrous apex meningioma with Meckel cave extension is described to demonstrate the application of the technique in a clinical setting. Reflecting a dural flap onto the posterior trigeminal nerve root and the superior petrosal vein complex can be a simple way to protect the nerve and the vein during the suprameatal bone drilling during the RISA. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  15. [Origin of the common pulmonary vein, septation of the primary sinus venosus atrial situs and theory of the "sinus man"].

    PubMed

    Dor, X; Corone, P; Jonhson, E

    1987-04-01

    Situated at the entry to the heart, the sinus venosus regulates at an early stage the distribution of the veins. Originally symmetrical, it receives on either side an omphalomesenteric vein, a common cardinal vein (duct of Cuvieri, ductus cuvieri) and a common pulmonary vein. This symmetrical pattern disappears with the obliteration of the rough right pulmonary vein and the invagination of the left ductus cuvieri into the sinusal cavity. Thus, the pulmonary venous blood is kept on the left side and the systemic venous blood is transferred to the right side. This is the usual situs solitus arrangement. Situs inversus is the opposite arrangement. In situs ambiguus the original symmetry is preserved. A sufficiently early cauterization of the left wall of the sinus venosus prevents the left ductus cuvieri from invaginating and results in "absence of coronary sinus"; this arrangement, where part of the original symmetry is preserved, is in fact similar to situs ambiguus. The situs of the liver and stomach is thought not to be determined by these organs but imposed to them by the sinus venosus, more precisely by the invagination--or lack of invagination--of a ductus cuvieri. This would explain the concordance between their situs and that of the sinus venosus and atria. It would appear that two errors are frequently made: the common pulmonary vein is said to originate from the left atrium, whereas it originates from the sinus venosus and only belongs to the left atrium when the sinus is incorporated in the atrium; the transverse septation of the sinus is incorporated to a shift to the right of the left sinoatrial fold which separates the sinus from the primitive atrium. This fold is indeed displaced to the right, but it is more distal and corresponds, in fact, to the cephalic border of the left ductus cuvieri, and its shift is produced by the invagination of that duct.

  16. First impressions about Adherus, a new dural sealant.

    PubMed

    Zoia, Cesare; Bongetta, Daniele; Lombardi, Francesco; Custodi, Viola Marta; Pugliese, Raffaelino; Gaetani, Paolo

    2015-12-18

    The aim of the study is to report our first impressions about Adherus, a novel dural sealant, used in neurosurgical endoscopic transnasal procedures. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and surgical records of the first 11 patients with intraoperative high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak treated with the aid of Adherus at our center between February and October 2014. The healing at the level of the dural plasty was monitored and evaluated radiologically and with regular endoscopic inspections. With a median follow-up of 210 days, no postoperative CSF leak or surgical site infections were found in any of the cases. Based on our preliminary experience, this new dural sealant seems to provide an effective aid in dural plasty during endoscopic transphenoidal procedures.

  17. Dural arteriovenous malformation: a rare cause of epilepsy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Caksen, H; Unal, O; Tombul, T; Cesur, Y; Abuhandan, M

    2001-09-01

    A 3 year and 6 month old girl with epilepsy associated with dural arteriovenous malformation (DAVM), diagnosed on the MRI, is presented to emphasise the importance of DAVM in the aetiology of childhood epilepsy.

  18. Sinusitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and mucus can become trapped in the sinuses. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi can grow there and lead to ... cases of sinusitis thought to be caused by bacteria. Some doctors may recommend ... usually goes away without medical treatment. Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, ...

  19. Approaching chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Sarber, Kathleen M; Dion, Gregory Robert; Weitzel, Erik K; McMains, Kevin C

    2013-11-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a common disease that encompasses a number of syndromes that are characterized by sinonasal mucosal inflammation. Chronic sinusitis can be defined as two or more of the following symptoms lasting for more than 12 consecutive weeks: discolored rhinorrhea, postnasal drip, nasal obstruction, facial pressure or pain, or decreased sense of smell. Chronic sinusitis is further classified as chronic sinusitis with polyposis, chronic sinusitis without polyposis, or allergic fungal sinusitis using physical examination, and histologic and radiographic findings. Treatment methods for chronic sinusitis are based upon categorization of the disease and include oral and inhaled corticosteroids, nasal saline irrigations, and antibiotics in selected patients. Understanding the various forms of chronic sinusitis and managing and ruling out comorbidities are key to successful management of this common disorder.

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ... cavities. The paranasal sinuses are hollow, air-filled spaces located within the bones of the face and ...

  1. [Maxillary sinus hypoplasia].

    PubMed

    Plaza, G; Ferrando, J; Martel, J; Toledano, A; de los Santos, G

    2001-03-01

    Maxillary sinus hypoplasia is rare, with an estimated prevalence of 1-5%. Out of the CT scans performed in sinusal patients between March 1998 and June 1999, we report on 4 isolated maxillary sinus hypoplasia, 4 maxillary sinus hypoplasia associated to concha bullosa, and 10 isolated conchae bullosas. All cases were evaluated by nasosinusal endoscopy and CT scan. Size, location and uni/bilateral presentation of concha bullosa is correlated to maxillary sinus hypoplasia presence, specially with regards to uncinate process presence, medial or lateral retraction. The pathogenesis of maxillary sinus hypoplasia is reviewed, and its relation to concha bullosa, evaluating how this could explain some cases of the so called chronic maxillary sinus atelectasia, as an acquired and progressive variant of maxillary sinus hypoplasia in adults.

  2. Complications of Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ...

  3. Sinusitis in adults - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000563.htm Sinusitis in adults - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Your sinuses are chambers in ... They are filled with air. Sinusitis is an infection of these chambers, which causes ...

  4. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  5. Sinusitis (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by infection. Our sinuses are the moist air spaces within the bones of the face around the nose. The frontal sinuses are located in the area near the eyebrows; the ... our sinuses are filled with air, making our facial bones less dense and much ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

  7. The genetic landscape of dural marginal zone lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathi, Karthik A.; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Iwamoto, Fabio; Jain, Preti; Chen, Jinli; Cascione, Luciano; Nahum, Odelia; Levy, Brynn; Xie, Yi; Khattar, Pallavi; Hoehn, Daniela; Bertoni, Francesco; Murty, Vundavalli V.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Alobeid, Bachir

    2016-01-01

    The dura is a rare site of involvement by marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) and the biology of dural MZL is not well understood. We performed genome-wide DNA copy number and targeted mutational analysis of 14 dural MZL to determine the genetic landscape of this entity. Monoallelic and biallelic inactivation of TNFAIP3 by mutation (n=5) or loss (n=1) was observed in 6/9 (67%) dural MZL exhibiting plasmacytic differentiation, including 3 IgG4+ cases. In contrast, activating NOTCH2 mutations were detected in 4/5 (80%) dural MZL displaying variable monocytoid morphology. Inactivating TBL1XR1 mutations were identified in all NOTCH2 mutated cases. Recurrent mutations in KLHL6 (n=2) and MLL2 (n=2) were also detected. Gains at 6p25.3 (n=2) and losses at 1p36.32 (n=3) were common chromosomal imbalances, with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of these loci observed in a subset of cases. Translocations involving the IGH or MALT1 genes were not identified. Our results indicate genetic similarities between dural MZL and other MZL subtypes. However, recurrent and mutually exclusive genetic alterations of TNFAIP3 and NOTCH2 appear to be associated with distinct disease phenotypes in dural MZL. PMID:27248180

  8. Mixed total anomalous pulmonary venous connection: Case report with bilateral venous collectors.

    PubMed

    Cayre, Raul O; Civetta, Julio D; Roldan, Alberto O; Rousseau, Juan J; Knudson, Ole A; Valdes-Cruz, Lilliam M

    2003-01-01

    We present a case report of a 3-month-old boy with a mixed total anomalous pulmonary venous connection. The patient had situs solitus, small atrial septal defect, and 2 separate venous collectors. The right pulmonary veins drained through a right-sided venous collector into the coronary sinus. The left-sided pulmonary veins drained through the left-sided venous collector directly into the right superior vena cava. The use of the echocardiogram and Doppler color flow mapping to establish a detailed morphologic analysis, the sites of connection, and the presence of pulmonary venous obstructions as well as the value of this information to facilitate a successful surgical repair are discussed.

  9. Absence of the superior petrosal veins and sinus: Surgical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Ken; Ribas, Eduardo Santamaria Carvalhal; Kiyosue, Hiro; Komune, Noritaka; Miki, Koichi; Rhoton, Albert L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The superior petrosal vein, one of the most constant and largest drainage pathways in the posterior fossa, may result in complications if occluded. This study calls attention to a unique variant in which the superior petrosal veins and sinus were absent unilaterally, and the venous drainage was through the galenic and tentorial drainage groups. Methods: This study examines one venogram and another anatomic specimen in which the superior petrosal vein and sinus were absent. Results: The superior petrosal veins, described as 1–3 bridging veins, emptying into the superior petrosal sinus, are the major drainage pathways of the petrosal group of posterior fossa veins. In the cases presented, the superior petrosal vein and sinus were absent and venous drainage was through the galenic and tentorial groups, including the lateral mesencephalic or bridging vein on the tentorial cerebellar surface. Conclusions: In cases in which the superior petrosal sinus and veins are absent, care should be directed to preserving the collateral drainage through the galenic and tentorial tributaries. Although surgical strategies for intraoperative management and preservation of venous structures are still controversial, knowledge of the possible anatomical variations is considered to be essential to improve surgical outcomes. PMID:25745589

  10. Complex Partial Epilepsy Associated with Temporal Lobe Developmental Venous Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Amna; Xiong, Zhengming; Qureshi, Mushtaq H; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2015-05-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVA) are found incidentally but sometimes patients with these anomalies present with varying degrees of neurologic manifestations. We report a patient with early onset complex partial epilepsy and associated DVA and discuss the natural history, neuroimaging and clinical characteristics, and management. A 21-year-old man presented with a history of complex partial epilepsy with secondary generalization which started at the age of 4 years. An electroencephalogram (EEG) was performed which demonstrated spike and wave discharges predominantly in the left frontotemporal region. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed which demonstrated a linear flow void suggestive of a DVA. The angiogram demonstrated DVA that connected with the left transverse venous sinus and an anastomotic vein between the straight sinus and the transverse venous sinus traversing the brain parenchyma. He was started on carbamezipine for the treatment of complex partial seizures. Temporal lobe DVA may be associated with complex partial seizures and can be diagnosed by MRI and angiographic findings.

  11. Allergic Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Correll, Daniel P; Luzi, Scott A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2015-12-01

    A 42 year old male presents with worsening pain and an increase in thick chronic drainage of the left sinus. Image studies show complete opacification of the left frontal sinus, left sphenoid sinus, and the left maxillary sinus. The patient was taken to the operating room and tissue for microscopic evaluation was obtained. The microscopic findings were classic for allergic fungal sinusitis: areas of alternating mucinous material and inflammatory cell debris and abundant Charcot-Leyden crystals. Cultures were performed and the patient began steroid therapy and desensitization therapy.

  12. Bilateral Maxillary Sinus Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Khanduri, Sachin; Agrawal, Sumit; Goyal, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinus hypoplasia (MSH) is an uncommon abnormality of paranasal sinuses noted in clinical practice. Computed tomography (CT) scan helps in diagnosing the anomaly along with any anatomical variation that may be associated with it. MSH is usually associated with other anomalies like uncinate process hypoplasia. Three types of MSH have been described. Type 1 MSH shows mild maxillary sinus hypoplasia, type 2 shows significant sinus hypoplasia with narrowed infundibular passage and hypoplastic or absent uncinate process, and type 3 is cleft like maxillary sinus hypoplasia with absent uncinate process. CT and endoscopic examination usually complement each other in diagnosing MSH. PMID:25548709

  13. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling

    PubMed Central

    Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing’s syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88–100% and 67–100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50–70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres. PMID:27352844

  14. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling.

    PubMed

    Zampetti, Benedetta; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo; Loli, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing's syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88-100% and 67-100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50-70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres.

  15. Surgical management of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Chibbaro, Salvatore; Gory, Benjamin; Marsella, Marco; Tigan, Leonardo; Herbrecht, Anne; Orabi, Mikael; Bresson, Damien; Baumann, Fabian; Saint-Maurice, Jean Pierre; George, Bernard; Kehrli, Pierre; Houdart, Emmanuel; Manisor, Monica; Pop, Raoul

    2015-01-01

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas are the most common type of spinal arteriovenous malformations. Treatment options consist of microsurgical exclusion and/or endovascular embolization. We retrospectively identified all patients who benefited from surgical treatment at our tertiary center between January 2001 and December 2008. Clinical and imaging data were collected from patient files, including pre- and post-operative formal neurological examination, complete spine MRI and spinal digital subtraction angiography. Of our 30 patients, 25 were men and five were women with a median age of 62 years (range 24-76). The average delay between symptom onset and clinical diagnosis was 27 months (range 1-90). Complete cure of the fistula was obtained in all patients in a single surgical session with no procedural complications and no surgical morbidity. After a mean follow-up period of 32 months (range 14-128), 25 patients (83%) had improved, four were stable and one worsened. Despite recent advances in endovascular techniques and materials, there is a subgroup of patients for which surgery remains the best treatment option. Careful patient selection, a multidisciplinary approach and standardized surgical techniques can lead to excellent results with virtually no complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Repair of spinal dural defects with vicryl (polyglactin 910) mesh.

    PubMed

    Keller, J T; Weil, S M; Ongkiko, C M; Tew, J M; Mayfield, F H; Dunsker, S B

    1989-06-01

    This study examined and compared the effectiveness of woven vicryl (polyglactin 910) mesh and lyophilized cadaver dura (Lyodura) for the repair of spinal dural defects. A woven vicryl mesh was used to repair spinal dural defects in 16 mongrel dogs. As an internal control, all animals had a separate dural incision that was closed with 9-0 vicryl suture. Animals were killed, and results were evaluated at 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks. The repair of dural defects was achieved in all animals, and there were no cases of pseudo-meningocele formation, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, or postoperative infection. The vicryl mesh served as a latticework for formation of a neodural membrane. Inflammatory or reactive response to vicryl mesh was minimal, and no adhesion to underlying neural structures was noted. The neodural membrane formed in the animals in which lyophilized dura was employed was usually thicker than those in which vicryl mesh was used and was associated with thick arachnoid-neural adhesions in two of eight animals. We believe vicryl mesh is a suitable dural substitute and offers promise for use in clinical situations.

  17. Spinal dural ossification causing neurological signs in a cat.

    PubMed

    Antila, Johanna M; Jeserevics, Janis; Rakauskas, Mindaugas; Anttila, Marjukka; Cizinauskas, Sigitas

    2013-06-19

    A six-year-old Ragdoll cat underwent examination due to a six-month history of slowly progressive gait abnormalities. The cat presented with an ambulatory tetraparesis with a neurological examination indicating a C1-T2 myelopathy. Radiographs of the spine showed a radiopaque irregular line ventrally in the vertebral canal dorsal to vertebral bodies C3-C5. In this area, magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural extramedullary/extradural lesion compressing the spinal cord. The spinal cord was surgically decompressed. The cause of the spinal cord compression was dural ossification, a diagnosis confirmed by histopathological examination of the surgically dissected sample of dura mater. The cat gradually improved after the procedure and was ambulating better than prior to the surgery. The cat's locomotion later worsened again due to ossified plaques in the dura causing spinal cord compression on the same cervical area as before. Oral prednisolone treatment provided temporary remission. Ten months after surgery, the cat was euthanized due to severe worsening of gait abnormalities, non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Necropsy confirmed spinal cord compression and secondary degenerative changes in the spinal cord on cervical and lumbar areas caused by dural ossification. To our knowledge, this is the first report of spinal dural ossification in a cat. The reported cat showed neurological signs associated with these dural changes. Dural ossification should be considered in the differential diagnosis of compressive spinal cord disorders in cats.

  18. Transvenous Approach to Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula (Cognard V): a Treatment Option

    PubMed Central

    Aiuxut Lorenzo, S.; Tomasello Weitz, A.; Blasco Andaluz, J.; Sanroman Manzanera, L.; Macho Fernández, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The endovascular technique is the gold standard treatment in dural arteriovenous fistulas. Due to the limited number of series published it is difficult to create rigid guidelines in terms of the best endovascular treatment approach. Treatment must be tailored to each particular case, but it is important to keep in mind that the possibility of treating a type V dAVF by the transvenous approach should not be discarded. In selected cases the transvenous approach may be helpful to increase the chance of success in the endovascular treatment of type V dAVF. We describe a patient in whom the first arterial treatment failed to achieve occlusion of the fistulous point with the glue. Clinical symptoms improved due to the diminished flow at the fistula after the first embolization but as soon as collateral arteries were recruited by the fistula, spinal cord venous drainage impairment led to symptoms recurrence. Transvenous access allowed us to close the fistula completely in one only session with a complete disappearance of the pathologically inverted perimedullary venous flow. PMID:21561567

  19. Cognard Type V intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula presenting in a pediatric patient with rapid, progressive myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Jermakowicz, Walter J; Weil, Alexander G; Vlasenko, Artyom; Bhatia, Sanjiv; Niazi, Toba N

    2017-08-01

    Cognard Type V dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) are a unique type of cranial vascular malformation characterized by congestion of the perimedullary venous system that may lead to devastating spinal cord pathology if left untreated. The authors present the first known case of a pediatric patient diagnosed with a Type V dAVF. A 14-year-old girl presented with a 3-week history of slowly progressive unilateral leg weakness that quickly progressed to bilateral leg paralysis, sphincter dysfunction, and complete sensory loss the day of her presentation. MRI revealed an extensive T2 signal change in the cervical spine and tortuous perimedullary veins along the entire length of the cord. An emergency cranial angiogram showed a Type V dAVF fed by the posterior meningeal artery with drainage into the perimedullary veins of the cervical spine. The fistula was not amenable to embolization because vascular access was difficult; therefore, the patient underwent urgent suboccipital craniotomy and ligation of the arterialized venous drainage from the fistula. The patient's clinical course immediately reversed; she had a complete recovery over the course of a year, and she remains asymptomatic at the 2-year follow-up. This report adds to a growing body of evidence that describes the diverse and unpredictable nature of Type V dAVFs and highlights the need to obtain a cranial angiogram in pediatric patients with unexplained myelopathy and cervical cord T2 signal change on MRI.

  20. Microbiology of sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2011-03-01

    Most sinus infections are viral, and only a small proportion develops a secondary bacterial infection. Rhinoviruses, influenza viruses, and parainfluenza viruses are the most common causes of sinusitis. The most common bacteria isolated from pediatric and adult patients with community-acquired acute purulent sinusitis are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pyogenes. Staphylococcus aureus and anaerobic bacteria (Prevotella and Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium and Peptostreptococcus spp.) are the main isolates in chronic sinusitis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other aerobic and facultative gram-negative rods are commonly isolated from patients with nosocomial sinusitis, the immunocompromised host, those with HIV infection, and in cystic fibrosis. Fungi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most common isolates in neutropenic patients. The microbiology of sinusitis is influenced by the previous antimicrobial therapy, vaccinations, and the presence of normal flora capable of interfering with the growth of pathogens.

  1. Human paranasal sinuses and selective brain cooling: a ventilation system activated by yawning?

    PubMed

    Gallup, Andrew C; Hack, Gary D

    2011-12-01

    The function of the paranasal sinuses has been a controversial subject since the time of Galen, with many different theories advanced about their biological significance. For one, the paranasal sinuses have been regarded as warmers of respiratory air, when in actuality these structures appear to function in cooling the blood. In fact, human paranasal sinuses have been shown to have higher volumes in individuals living in warmer climates, and thus may be considered radiators of the brain. The literature suggests that the transfer of cool venous blood from the paranasal sinuses to the dura mater may provide a mechanism for the convection process of cooling produced by the evaporation of mucus within human sinuses. In turn, the dura mater may transmit these temperature changes, initiated by the cool venous blood from the heat-dissipating surfaces of the sinuses, to the cerebrospinal fluid compartments. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated in cadaveric dissections that the thin bony posterior wall of the maxillary sinus serves as an origin for both medial and lateral pterygoid muscle segments, an anatomic finding that had been previously underappreciated in the literature. The present authors hypothesize that the thin posterior wall of the maxillary sinus may flex during yawning, operating like a bellows pump, actively ventilating the sinus system, and thus facilitating brain cooling. Such a powered ventilation system has not previously been described in humans, although an analogous system has been reported in birds.

  2. Dural repair using porcine ADM: two cases and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Skovsted Yde, Simon; Brunbjerg, Mette Eline; Gudmundsdottir, Gudrun; Bazys, Mindaugas; Heje, Martin; Engberg Damsgaard, Tine

    2017-01-01

    The use of acellular dermal matrices (ADM) for dural repair is very scantily described in the literature. We report two cases of dural repair using porcine ADM and a literature review. ADM and especially Strattice(TM) pliable may be a useful alternative to other dural substitutes. Further evaluation would be favorable.

  3. Dural repair using porcine ADM: two cases and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Skovsted Yde, Simon; Brunbjerg, Mette Eline; Gudmundsdottir, Gudrun; Bazys, Mindaugas; Heje, Martin; Engberg Damsgaard, Tine

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The use of acellular dermal matrices (ADM) for dural repair is very scantily described in the literature. We report two cases of dural repair using porcine ADM and a literature review. ADM and especially StratticeTM pliable may be a useful alternative to other dural substitutes. Further evaluation would be favorable. PMID:28164146

  4. Biocompatible bacterial cellulose membrane in dural defect repair of rat.

    PubMed

    Lima, Frederico de Melo Tavares de; Pinto, Flávia Cristina Morone; Andrade-da-Costa, Belmira Lara da Silveira; Silva, Jaiurte Gomes Martins da; Campos Júnior, Olávio; Aguiar, José Lamartine de Andrade

    2017-03-01

    Duraplasty is necessary in nearly 30% of all neurological surgeries. Different tissues and materials have been evaluated in dura mater repair or as dural substitutes in neurosurgery. The aim was to evaluate the biocompatibility of the bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes, produced from sugarcane molasses, for dural defect repair in rats. Forty adults males Wistar rats divided into two groups: a control (ePTFE) and an experimental (BC). Bilateral frontoparietal craniectomy was performed, and a dural defect was created. The arachnoid underlying defect was disrupted with a narrow hook. The animals were observed for 120 days. There were no cases of infection, cerebrospinal fluid fistulae, delayed hemorrhages, behavior disturbances, seizures and palsies. The BC membrane showed to have suitable biocompatibility properties, was not induced immune reaction, nor chronic inflammatory response and absence of neurotoxicity signals.

  5. Lower extremity venous reflux

    PubMed Central

    Baliyan, Vinit; Tajmir, Shahein; Ganguli, Suvranu; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Venous incompetence in the lower extremity is a common clinical problem. Basic understanding of venous anatomy, pathophysiologic mechanisms of venous reflux is essential for choosing the appropriate treatment strategy. The complex interplay of venous pressure, abdominal pressure, venous valvular function and gravitational force determine the venous incompetence. This review is intended to provide a succinct review of the pathophysiology of venous incompetence and the current role of imaging in its management. PMID:28123974

  6. Ventral Dural Injury After Oblique Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chang, JaeChil; Kim, Jin-Sung; Jo, Hyunjin

    2017-02-01

    Oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF) through the oblique corridor between the aorta and anterior border of psoas muscle is favored among spinal surgeons who employ minimally invasive techniques. We report a case of ventral dural tear after OLIF that was associated with the inaccurate trajectory direction of endplate preparation. This is the first report to our knowledge of ventral dural tear associated with OLIF. A 72-year-old woman presented with right leg pain and numbness. X-rays showed degenerative spondylolisthesis and loss of disc height at L4-L5 and L5-S1 levels. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed right-sided paracentral disc herniation at the L3-L4 level and foraminal disc herniation at L4-L5. The initial surgical plan was OLIF of L3-L4 and L4-L5 after percutaneous screw fixation without laminectomy. With the patient in the lateral position, discectomy and endplate preparation were done successfully at the L3-L4 level, and the same procedure was done at the L4-L5 level for OLIF. A sharp Cobbs elevator for endplate preparation triggered a ventral dural defect at the L4-L5 level. We changed the patient's position to attempt dural repair. The ventral dural defect could not be repaired because it was too large. After the herniated rootlets were repositioned, TachoComb was patched over the defect site. Postoperatively, the patient has no definite neurologic deficits. When a surgeon performs OLIF, ventral dural injury should be avoided during the procedure of endplate preparation and contralateral annular release. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Abducens nerve palsy due to inferior petrosal sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Siddiqui, Junaid; Katirji, Bashar

    2017-02-24

    Isolated unilateral abducens nerve palsy is usually due to ischemia, trauma or neoplasm. Dorello's canal is the space between the petrous apex and superolateral portion of the clivus, bound superiorly by Gruber's ligament. The abducens nerve travels with inferior petrosal sinus (IPS) though the Dorello's canal before entering the cavernous sinus. A 31-year-old man presented with neck pain, and binocular horizontal diplopia, worse looking towards left and at distance. He had a history of intravenous drug abuse but no history of hypertension or diabetes. On examination, he had complete left 6th nerve palsy with normal fundi, pupils, and other cranial nerves. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia was detected with naïve tricuspid valve endocarditis and multiple septic emboli to lungs with infarcts. His cerebrospinal fluid was normal. MRI of the brain was normal. MRV of head and neck showed thrombosis of the left internal jugular vein, left sigmoid sinus and left inferior petrosal sinus with normal cavernous sinus and no evidence of mastoiditis. He was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics. He was not anticoagulated for fear of pulmonary hemorrhage from pulmonary infarcts. Although cerebral venous sinus thrombosis commonly presents with elevated intracranial pressure, isolated ipsilateral 6th nerve palsy from its compression in Dorello's canal due to thrombosis of the ipsilateral inferior petrosal sinus is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only two patients have been reported with isolated abducens palsy due to IPS thrombosis; one caused by septic emboli and the other developed it during IPS cortisol level sampling.

  8. Dural tear post mastoidectomy repaired with Dura Gen.

    PubMed

    Wong, C Y; Khairi, M D M; Mohamed, S A; Irfan, M

    2010-12-01

    Dural exposure may occur during the course of thinning the tegmen tympani and tegmen mastoideum in mastoid procedure. If large area of dura is exposed or lacerated, cerebrospinal fluid and brain herniation may enter the mastoid cavity. We report a case of a patient with injured dura mater and tegmen mastoideum during mastoidectomy for chronic suppurative otitis media with cholesteatoma managed by using DuraGen. The dura mater and tegmen defect healed totally showing the success of the procedure. A collagen matrix like DuraGen is an option for repairing dural tear in mastoid region.

  9. Midterm Follow-Up of 20 Consecutive Patients with Nonaneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage of Unknown Origin in a Single-Center: Two Cases of De Novo Development of Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Tomotaka; Tamari, Yosuke; Yamamoto, Taiki; Goto, Shunsaku; Ishikawa, Kojiro

    2017-08-10

    The mechanisms and prognosis of underlying subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown origin remain unclear. Previous investigators have suggested a relationship between nonaneurysmal perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and venous abnormalities like a primitive venous drainage of the basal vein of Rosenthal. We report the outcome of a midterm follow-up of 20 consecutive patients with nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown origin, and 2 patients in whom the development of new dural arteriovenous fistulas after subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown origin were detected during follow-up. All patients who were admitted to our hospital for nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage between April 2008 and March 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. Of 705 patients included in the study, 20 (2.8%) were diagnosed with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown origin. During the follow-up periods, there was no rebleeding. Although 18 patients did not show any vascular abnormalities, the other 2 patients were diagnosed with dural arteriovenous fistula. Both fistulas were successfully treated with endovascular embolization. Subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown origin had a low incidence rate, and its clinical course was excellent without rebleeding. Although no vascular abnormalities were observed during the patients' initial admission, venous lesions might have been involved in both subarachnoid hemorrhages and delayed dural arteriovenous fistulas. Here, the possible pathogenesis is discussed with a review of the literature. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Relief of postural post dural puncture headache by an epidural blood patch 12 months after dural puncture.

    PubMed

    Klepstad, P

    1999-10-01

    A 20-year-old previously healthy male presented at the pain clinic with chronic headache of about one year duration. Clinical examination revealed no pathological manifestations. During the consultation the patient was drinking Coca-Cola. On direct questioning he told that drinking Coca-Cola gave partial relief from the headache, and that the headache started after he had received two spinal anaesthetics for treatment of a lower leg fracture. Postural post dural puncture headache was now suspected and an epidural blood patch performed. Despite an interval of nearly 12 months since the dural punctures, a single epidural blood patch completely relieved the headache. This case history demonstrates that an epidural blood patch should be tried if a chronic post dural puncture headache is suspected.

  11. Biological effects of cobalt-chromium nanoparticles and ions on dural fibroblasts and dural epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Behl, Bharat; Papageorgiou, Iraklis; Brown, Christopher; Hall, Richard; Tipper, Joanne L; Fisher, John; Ingham, Eileen

    2013-05-01

    The introduction of metal-on-metal total disc replacements motivated studies to evaluate the effects of cobalt-chromium (CoCr) nanoparticles on cells of the dura mater. Porcine fibroblasts and epithelial cells isolated from the dura mater were cultured with clinically-relevant CoCr nanoparticles and the ions, generated by the particles over 24 h, at doses up to 121 μm(3)per cell. Cell viability and production of proinflammatory cytokines was assessed over 4 days. The capacity of the particles to induce oxidative stress in the cells was evaluated at 24 h. The CoCr particles and their ions significantly reduced the viability of the dural epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner but not the fibroblasts. Both cell types secreted IL-8 in response to particle exposure at doses of 60.5 μm(3) (epithelial cells) and 121 μm(3) (fibroblasts, epithelial cells) per cell. No significant release of IL-6 was observed in both cell types at any dose. Reactive oxygen species were induced in both cell types at 50 μm(3) per cell after 24 h exposure. The data suggested novel differences in the resistance of the dural epithelial cells and fibroblasts to CoCr nanoparticle/ion toxicity and demonstrated the inflammatory potential of the particles. The data contributes to a greater understanding of the potential biological consequences of the use of metal-on-metal total disc prostheses.

  12. Management of accidental dural puncture and post-dural puncture headache after labour: a Nordic survey.

    PubMed

    Darvish, B; Gupta, A; Alahuhta, S; Dahl, V; Helbo-Hansen, S; Thorsteinsson, A; Irestedt, L; Dahlgren, G

    2011-01-01

    a major risk with epidural analgesia is accidental dural puncture (ADP), which may result in post-dural puncture headache (PDPH). This survey was conducted to explore the incidence of ADP, the policy for management of PDPH and the educational practices in epidural analgesia during labour in the Nordic countries. a postal questionnaire was sent to the anaesthesiologist responsible for Obstetric anaesthesia service in all maternity units (n=153) with questions relating to the year 2008. the overall response rate was 93%. About 32% (22-47%) of parturients received epidural analgesia for labour. There were databases for registering obstetric epidural complications in 13% of Danish, 24% of Norwegian and Swedish, 43% of Finnish and 100% of hospitals in Iceland. The estimated incidence of ADP was 1% (n approximately 900). Epidural blood patch (EBP) was performed in 86% (n≈780) of the parturients. The most common time interval from diagnosis to performing EBP was 24-48 h. The success rate for EBP was >75% in 67% (62-79%) of hospitals. The use of diagnostic CT/MRI before the first or the second EBP was exceptional. No major complication was reported. Teaching of epidurals was commonest (86%) in the non-obstetric population and 53% hospitals desired a formal training programme in obstetric analgesia. we found the incidence of ADP to be approximately 1%. EBP was the commonest method used for its management, and the success rate was high in most hospitals. Formal training in epidural analgesia was absent in most countries and trainees first performed it in the non-obstetric population. 2010 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  13. [Dental foreign body sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Thévoz, F; Arza, A; Jaques, B

    2000-01-01

    Unilateral chronic maxillary sinusitis is frequently attributed to dental origin. The goal of this retrospective study is to determine the frequency of maxillary sinusitis due to a foreign body of dental origin and its characteristics. Review of 197 sinusitis cases with maxillary sinus involvement operated in our department from 1991 to 1999. Selection of the 17 cases preoperatively suspect to be due to a foreign body of dental origin. 9% of the 197 maxillary sinusitis were classified "odontogenic". Intra-sinusal foreign bodies were identified in 5%: 2% of dental origin, 1% dental or radicular remnants, 2% of "pseudo" foreign bodies of mycotic origin. Chronic maxillary sinusitis attributable to a dental foreign body is rare and overestimated. There exists an important disproportion between the number of intra-sinusal dental foreign bodies and the number of patients who are symptomatic. Treatment is surgical by oral antrotomy and/or endonasal meatotomy. Only a prospective study could give a real estimation of the proportion of symptomatic cases and determine the predisposing factors.

  14. Clinical tests of noninvasive optoacoustic cerebral venous oxygenation monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Y. Y.; Petrova, I. Y.; Esenaliev, R. O.; Prough, D. S.

    2009-02-01

    Monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation is critically important for management of patients with traumatic brain injury and cardiac surgery patients. At present, there is no technique for noninvasive, accurate monitoring of this important physiologic parameter. We built a compact optoacoustic system for noninvasive, accurate cerebral venous oxygenation monitoring using a novel optoacoustic probe and algorithm that allow for direct probing of sagittal sinus blood with minimal signal contamination from other tissues. We tested the system in large animal and clinical studies and identified wavelengths for accurate measurement of cerebral blood oxygenation. The studies demonstrated that the system may be used for noninvasive, continuous, and accurate monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation.

  15. Facial vein thrombophlebitis: an uncommon complication of sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Cotes, Claudia; Riascos, Roy; Swischuk, Leonard E

    2015-07-01

    Facial vein thrombophlebitis is an uncommon complication of sinusitis. In cases where periorbital swelling complicating sinusitis is diagnosed, clinical findings of swelling and erythema extending beyond the orbital region into the cheek should alert the physician about this unusual complication and the need for further contrast-enhanced imaging and venography. The radiologist must be particularly careful in the evaluation of vascular structures of the face and neck in these children. CT and MRI with contrast material and MR venography are studies that clearly demonstrate the vascular anatomy and possible complications. However, MR venography confirms flow abnormalities within the venous system with the advantage of avoiding radiation exposure to the pediatric patient.

  16. Computed tomographic observations pertinent to intracranial venous thrombotic and occulsive disease in childhood: state of the art, some new data, and hypotheses

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, H.D.; Ahmadi, J.; McComb, J.G.; Zee, C.S.; Becker, T.S.; Han, J.S.

    1982-05-01

    Selected topics are discussed and new observations recorded regarding computed tomographic (CT) evaluation of intracranial venous thrombotic and occlusive disease in childhood. High density of the vein of Galen and adjacent venous sinuses (relative to brain) can be seen normally in children. A number of potential pitfalls in the diagnosis of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis are also disclosed. A case of cavernous sinus thrombosis with abnormal CT changes is included. In addition, the normal CT appearance of the cavernous sinus is described. In some cases, filling defects occur which appear to correlate with normal cranial nerves. An unusual case of venous sinus occlusion by neoplasm (sarcoma) is presented. Finally, new findings in the Sturge-Weber syndrome are analyzed. Enhancement of the brain in this condition may have its basis in altered circulation resulting from fundamental venous abnormalities.

  17. 18-year-old woman with a dural mass.

    PubMed

    Somerset, Hilary; Wilkinson, C Corbett; Kleinschmidt-Demasters, B K

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a dural-based chondroma in the right frontal extra-axial region. Chondromas are benign cartilaginous tumors which are uncommon intracranially. Their diagnosis should be predicated on the exclusion of a chondrosarcoma and clinical studies should be performed to rule out any underlying tumor predisposition syndromes.

  18. Dural adhesion to porous cranioplastic implant: A potential safety concern.

    PubMed

    Sayama, Christina M; Sorour, Mohammad; Schmidt, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Patient-specific implants are used for cranioplastic skull reconstruction when large bone flaps must be replaced or where there are complex or critical contours, especially near the face. These implants have a low complication rate, with poor fit and postoperative infection being the most common complications. We report here a potentially serious hazard that may arise from the use of porous implants. A 45-year-old woman sustained severe head trauma in a motor vehicle accident that required urgent surgical intervention. Because of progressive resorption of her native bone flap, she underwent replacement of her native flap with a hard tissue replacement/patient-matched implant cranioplasty. Eight years later, she sustained a traumatic laceration over her vertex that necessitated removal of her cranioplastic implant because of persistent local infection. Intraoperatively, the dural flap was ingrowing and firmly adherent to the inside surface of the porous cranioplasty. After several failed attempts to remove the whole implant piecemeal, we attempted to dissect the dural flap from the brain surface to remove it together with the cranioplastic implant but exposure of the extensive cortical adhesions between the brain surface and the dural flap was compromised by the hard overlying cranioplastic implant. Despite our meticulous attempts to cut off these cortical adhesions, a perisylvian blood vessel was avulsed, resulting in intraparenchymal hemorrhage. In this case, dural adhesion and ingrowth to the underside of the cranioplasty implant led to disastrous bleeding when the implant needed to be removed years after initial implantation.

  19. Congenital osteolytic dural fibrosarcoma presenting as a scalp swelling.

    PubMed

    Brohi, Shams Raza; Dilber, Muzamil

    2012-08-01

    An extremely rare case of congenital dural fibrosarcoma is reported in a 2 months old child who presented with scalp swelling since birth. CT scan revealed an osteolytic lesion compressing the underlying atrophic brain. Tumour was completely excised and duroplasty was done with a patch graft. Postoperative CSF leak was managed with aspirations and lumbar puncture.

  20. Puerperal seizures associated with post dural puncture headache.

    PubMed

    Rice, I; Mountfield, J; Radhakrishnan, D; Nelson-Piercy, C

    2003-04-01

    We present a case of tonic-clonic seizure occurring on day four post partum and associated with severe post dural puncture headache. The possible underlying aetiologies of this and two other cases we have managed and the difficulty distinguishing such seizures from eclampsia are discussed.

  1. Thyroid carcinoma presenting as a dural metastasis mimicking a meningioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, El Mehdi; Essadi, Ismail; Errihani, Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Context: Follicular thyroid cancer rarely manifests itself as a distant metastatic lesion. Case Report: We report a case of a 41-year old man presented with a solid mass located in the left temporo-occipital region. The 3D computed tomography showed a large solid mass with high vascularity, skull erosion and supra-infratentorial epidural mass effect. After magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) a suspect diagnosis of meningioma was made. The patient underwent surgery where a soft mass with transverse sinus invasion was encountered; the tumour was successfully resected employing microsurgical techniques. Histological examination revealed a thyroid follicular neoplasm with positive staining for follicular carcinoma in immunohistochemical analysis. Postoperatively levels of thyroid hormones were normal. Treatment was planned for the thyroid gland, patient receiving 6 courses of chemotherapy including paclitaxel. Conclusions: The present case emphasizes that although they are uncommon, dural metastasis can be mistaken for meningiomas. The definitive diagnosis of a meningioma should be established only after the histopathological analysis. Thyroid follicular carcinoma should be included in the differential diagnosis in cases of extrinsic tumoral lesions. PMID:22540062

  2. [Diagnosing venous and venous/arterial ulcers].

    PubMed

    Perceau, Géraldine

    2012-01-01

    A venous ulcer can be diagnosed on the basis of elements arising from the questioning and the clinical examination of the patient. A venous Doppler ultrasound can specify the type of reverse flow (superficial and/or deep). Measuring the ankle brachial pressure index helps to eliminate or confirm any arterial involvement. Depending on the systolic pressure index, the ulcer will be considered as purely venous, mixed (arterial-venous) or predominantly arterial.

  3. Three-dimensional printing of a sinus pericranii model: technical note.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Alexandre; Martinerie, Sébastien; Levivier, Marc; Daniel, Roy Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Sinus pericranii (SP) is a rare venous malformation consisting of a single or multiple abnormal emissary veins communicating between intracranial sinuses and dilated epicranial veins. There is no consensus concerning diagnosis, management, and treatment of SP. We report the case of a 4-month-old infant with a SP for whom we used a three-dimensional printed model in order to define the angioarchitecture, improve management, and help parents' understanding of this uncommon condition.

  4. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... information in the popular media may not reflect reality. Although useful, balloon sinuplasty is not for everyone. In many cases standard endoscopic sinus surgery or medical therapy may be the best treatment. However, in some ...

  5. Expectations of Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor at a clinic appointment after surgery. Irrigations – The most important thing you can do to ... regularly irrigate your nose and sinuses with saline irrigations after surgery. Your doctor will show you how ...

  6. Sinusitis Q and A

    MedlinePlus

    ... to find multiple bacteria present in a single culture sample. In addition, these organisms may demonstrate drug ... are often based on the results of sinus cultures and are prescribed for 3-4 weeks time. ...

  7. Complications of Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... further intracranial surgeries. Impaired sense of taste or smell : The sense of smell usually improves after the procedure because airflow is ... in their voice after sinus surgery. Impairment of smell or taste: (see above) Infection: The most common ...

  8. Sinus MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... sinuses. The test is noninvasive. MRI uses powerful magnets and radio waves instead of radiation. Signals from ... in the eyes. Because the MRI contains a magnet, metal-containing objects such as pens, pocketknives, and ...

  9. Fibrin Glue Injection for Cavernous Sinus Hemostasis Associated with Cranial Nerve Deficit: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tavanaiepour, Daryoush; Jernigan, Sarah; Abolfotoh, Mohamad; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin glue injection has been used to control intraoperative cavernous sinus (CS) venous bleeding. There have been no reported complications related to this maneuver. We present a case where a patient developed a sensory trigeminal nerve deficit after injection of fibrin glue into the posterior CS during resection of a petrosal meningioma. We believe that this deficit was due to the compression of the trigeminal ganglion similar to balloon compression procedures. Although fibrin glue injection may achieve satisfactory cavernous sinus homeostasis, the volume and rate of injection should be kept in mind to avoid a compressive lesion on traversing cranial nerves and surrounding structures, or retrograde filling of the venous tributaries. PMID:26251815

  10. Rhinitis and sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Dykewicz, Mark S; Hamilos, Daniel L

    2010-02-01

    Rhinitis and sinusitis are among the most common medical conditions and are frequently associated. In Western societies an estimated 10% to 25% of the population have allergic rhinitis, with 30 to 60 million persons being affected annually in the United States. It is estimated that sinusitis affects 31 million patients annually in the United States. Both rhinitis and sinusitis can significantly decrease quality of life, aggravate comorbid conditions, and require significant direct medical expenditures. Both conditions also create even greater indirect costs to society by causing lost work and school days and reduced workplace productivity and school learning. Management of allergic rhinitis involves avoidance, many pharmacologic options, and, in appropriately selected patients, allergen immunotherapy. Various types of nonallergic rhinitis are treated with avoidance measures and a more limited repertoire of medications. For purposes of this review, sinusitis and rhinosinusitis are synonymous terms. An acute upper respiratory illness of less than approximately 7 days' duration is most commonly caused by viral illness (viral rhinosinusitis), whereas acute bacterial sinusitis becomes more likely beyond 7 to 10 days. Although the mainstay of management of acute bacterial sinusitis is antibiotics, treatment of chronic sinusitis is less straightforward because only some chronic sinusitis cases have an infectious basis. Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has been subdivided into 3 types, namely CRS without nasal polyps, CRS with nasal polyps, and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis. Depending on the type of CRS present, a variety of medical and surgical approaches might be required. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    Calderon, E; O'Neal, M L; Fox, R W; Calderon-Moncloa, J

    1996-01-01

    Chronic sinusitis is now recognized as a common clinical syndrome in adults and children. An astute physician can diagnose chronic sinusitis during the physical exam, but fiber-optic rhinoscopy and x-rays (plain films and computerized tomography) are required to confirm this diagnosis, evaluate the severity of the sinusitis and determine follow-up treatment. Appropriate treatment plans are prescribed for an adequate duration to eliminate infection and inflammatory components of the pathologic process of the sinuses involved. Antibiotics, decongestants, and inhaled or systemic corticosteroids are required in the treatment of patients with chronic sinusitis. When combined with close clinical follow-up, successful resolution is expected. Surgical intervention is needed in the medically refractory and symptomatic cases, or when complications develop. The frequent diagnosis of chronic sinusitis in the past 1-2 decades is, in part, due to the enhanced awareness and clinical skills of the treating physicians, but other concerns about environmental influences such as frequent respiratory tract infections in childhood and air quality issues are considered potentially important.

  12. [Endovascular thrombolysis for massive cerebral venous thrombosis in a teenager with nephrotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costa, Paula; Biscoito, Luísa; Vieira, Marisa; Marçal, Mónica; Camilo, Cristina; Neto, Lia; Abecasis, Francisco; Almeida, Margarida; Correia, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare but potentially severe condition in children. We present the case of a teenager with corticodependent nephrotic syndrome diagnosed at five months of age and treated with cyclosporine A. In the context of recurrence of nephrotic syndrome he presented with headache, vomiting and severe intracranial hypertension. While the raised intracranial pressure and the status epilepticus were controlled, the brain imaging revealed venous thrombosis of all venous sinus, with absence of venous drainage. He was submitted to local thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, with recanalization of the venous sinuses. The outcome was favourable, without neurological deficits. In this case, the early radiologic intervention was crucial, enabling a full neurological recovery, in a teenager whose initial prognosis was very poor.

  13. Morphological and positional relationships between the sigmoid sinus and the jugular bulb.

    PubMed

    Dai, Pei-Dong; Zhang, Hong-Qi; Wang, Zheng-Min; Sha, Yan; Wang, Ke-Qiang; Zhang, Tian-Yu

    2007-12-01

    cranial base, the temporal bone pneumatization and non-synchronous dural venous development between the right and left sides are considered to contribute to the morphological and positional changes of the SS and JB.

  14. Neurologic Decline After Spinal Angiography for Dural Arteriovenous Fistula and Improvement with Emergent Surgical Ligation.

    PubMed

    Abdelazim, Abdelrahman; Hartman, Cory; Hooten, Kristopher; Cutler, Andrew; Blackburn, Spiros

    2016-08-01

    Although angiography does not generally lead to increased clinically significant neurologic deficits, it has been reported that angiography for spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (SDAVFs) can lead to acute neurologic decline. This has been rarely reported, and outcome after decline and the subsequent intervention performed have not been clarified. We describe a patient with SDAVF who experienced acute neurologic decline shortly after spinal angiography. Acute surgical treatment resulted in improvement of symptoms. A 70-year-old woman presented following 5 months of progressive numbness and weakness in her lower extremities. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed thoracic spinal cord edema. Spinal angiography revealed a type 1 SDAVF. Several hours after spinal angiography, the patient's lower extremity motor strength declined significantly. This neurologic change led to emergent surgical intervention and ligation of the SDAVF. The patient's neurologic decline subsequently improved and ultimately resolved completely. Although acute worsening of neurologic deficits is a rare complication following angiography of SDAVFs, the reversibility of these deficits by emergent intervention argues for careful surveillance after angiography with protocols in place to rapidly intervene if needed. Warming and diluting the contrast agent should be considered to reduce contrast viscosity, a potential aggravating factor to the venous congestion of spinal fistulas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Solitary spinal dural syphilis granuloma mimicking a spinal meningioma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heng-Jun; Zhan, Ren-Ya; Chen, Man-Tao; Cao, Fei; Zheng, Xiu-Jue

    2014-01-01

    Dural granuloma is extremely rare. To our knowledge, there has no case reported solitary spinal dural syphilis granuloma worldwide so far. Here we report our findings in a 49-year-old woman, who presented with 10-year progressive left lower-limb numbness and two weeks of right lower-limb numbness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested a homogeneous enhanced spindle-shaped lesion, 2.9 × 1.5 cm in size, occupying the spinal intradural extramedullary space, at the level of Thoracic (T)-2/3, which mimicked the appearance of spinal meningioma. The Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) test titer of 1:8, and the venereal diseases research laboratory of cerebral spinal fluid (VDRL-CSF) was reactive, so confirmed neurosyphilis was considered. After formal anti-syphilis treatment, posterior laminectomy surgery was performed, and the lesion was completely separated and extirpated. Final histopathologic diagnosis of the lesion was confirmed as chronic granulomatous inflammation, combined with the neurosyphilis history, spinal dural syphilis granuloma was finally diagnosed. Postoperatively, the patient recovered without any further treatment.

  16. Sinus preservation management for frontal sinus fractures in the endoscopic sinus surgery era: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Carter, Kenny B; Poetker, David M; Rhee, John S

    2010-09-01

    We systematically reviewed the existing literature supporting the efficacy and safety of sinus preservation management for frontal sinus fractures in the modern era of endoscopic frontal sinus surgery. A systematic review of the English literature for the targeted objective was conducted using the PubMed database between January 1995 and August 2008. The PubMed database was queried using two major search terms of frontal sinus fracture or frontal sinus injury along with manual review of citations within bibliographies. Citations acquired from the primary search were filtered and relevant abstracts were identified that merited full review. Articles were identified that included any cohort of patients with frontal sinus fractures involving the frontal sinus outflow tract or posterior wall with sinus preservation management. A total of 231 citations were generated, and 56 abstracts were identified as potentially relevant articles. Sixteen articles merited full review, with seven articles meeting inclusion criteria for sinus preservation. There were 515 total patients in the studies with 350 patients managed with frontal sinus preservation. Similar short-term complications and effectiveness were found between fractures managed with sinus preservation and those with traditional management. Sinus preservation appears to be a safe and effective management strategy for select frontal sinus fractures. More transparent reporting of management strategies for individual cases or cohorts is needed. A standardized algorithm and categorization framework for future studies are proposed. Longer-term follow-up and larger prospective studies are necessary to assess the safety and efficacy of sinus preservation protocols.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid absorption block at the vertex in chronic hydrocephalus: obstructed arachnoid granulations or elevated venous pressure?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The lack of absorption of CSF at the vertex in chronic hydrocephalus has been ascribed to an elevation in the arachnoid granulation outflow resistance (Rout). The CSF infusion studies measuring Rout are dependent on venous sinus pressure but little is known about the changes in pressure which occur throughout life or with the development of hydrocephalus. Methods Twenty patients with chronic hydrocephalus underwent MR venography and MR flow quantification techniques. The venous outflow pressure was estimated from the sinus blood flow and the cross-sectional area of the transverse sinuses. Adult controls as well as a normal young cohort were selected to estimate the change in sinus pressure which occurs throughout life and following the development of hydrocephalus. Significance was tested with a Student’s t-test. Results The size of the transverse sinuses was unchanged from the 1st to the 5th decade of life, indicating a stable outflow resistance. However, the blood flow was reduced by 42%, indicating a likely similar reduction in pressure gradient across the sinuses. The sinuses of hydrocephalus patients were 38% smaller than matched controls, indicating a 2.5 times increase in resistance. Despite the 24% reduction in blood flow, a significant increase in sinus pressure is suggested. Conclusions The size of the venous sinuses normally does not change over the age range investigated but sinus pressure is reduced proportional to an age-related blood flow reduction. Hydrocephalus is associated with much smaller sinuses than normal and an elevation in venous pressure may explain the lack of CSF absorption into the arachnoid granulations in chronic hydrocephalus. PMID:24955236

  18. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Sinus Infection (Sinusitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glossary For Patients Common Illnesses Bronchitis (Chest Cold) Common Cold & Runny Nose Ear Infection Influenza (Flu) Sinus Infection ( ... A previous respiratory tract infection, such as the common cold Structural problems within the sinuses A weak immune ...

  19. Headaches and sinus disease.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, H J

    2001-10-01

    Modern diagnostic tools like fiberoptic nasal endoscopy and CT imaging of the sinuses are very sensitive in helping clinicians diagnose sinus disease; we may now reevaluate the symptoms and signs most useful in making a clinical diagnosis of rhinosinusitis. Two major systems of classification and diagnostic criteria relating headaches and sinus disease have achieved currency-that of the International Headache Society (IHS) (1988) and the more recent task force recommendations of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) (1997). This report compares and contrasts the different starting points, certain assumptions, and conflicting conclusions of these two classification systems and recommends a cooperative alliance of the IHS and AAO-HNS when these diagnostic criteria are revised.

  20. Mucopyocele of the maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kshar, Avinash; Patil, Abhijeet; Umarji, Hemant; Kadam, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    Mucoceles are defined as chronic, cystic lesions in the paranasal sinuses. When the mucocele content becomes infected, the lesion is defined as mucopyocele. Most mucoceles are located in the frontal and anterior ethmoid sinuses and normally they involve the frontal-ethmoid complex, expanding to the superior-medial region of the orbit, leading to ocular disorders; maxillary sinus presentation is rare. In the present article, the authors described a rare case of mucopyocele in the maxillary sinus. PMID:24688571

  1. [Percussional auscultation of frontal sinuses].

    PubMed

    Akopian, R G

    2000-01-01

    Percussional auscultation of the frontal sinuses is used for diagnosis of frontal sinusitides. Phonendoscope placed by the sinus walls auscultates sounds forming as a result of comparative percussion of the anterior sinus walls. Three main percussional tones are singled out. This method was employed for diagnosis in 48 patients with frontal sinusitis. The technique is easy to perform, safe and precise (90%). The trend in frontal sinusitides development can be followed up.

  2. Paraclinoid and cavernous sinus regions: measurement of critical structures relevant for surgical procedure.

    PubMed

    Collignon, Frederic; Link, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Determination of the safest distance the falciform ligament can be incised from its origin to the orbital apex. Measurement of the distance between the oculomotor foramen and the IV nerve in the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus. Evaluation of the optic strut as an accurate landmark between the intradural (subarachnoid) and extradural segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA). Ten fixed human cadaver heads were examined for a total of 20 sides. A frontotemporal craniotomy, an orbito-optic osteotomy, and extradural anterior clinoidectomy were carried out followed by opening the falciform ligament, circumferentially releasing the distal dural ring and dissection of the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus under the operating microscope. We measured: 1) the distance between the entry of the III nerve and the point where the IV nerve crosses over it into the cavernous sinus; 2) the distance the falciform ligament can be incised along the optic nerve laterally until the IV nerve is encountered at the orbital apex; 3) the distance between the optic strut and the lateral part of the distal dural ring; and 4) the distance between the optic strut and the ophthalmic artery. All measurements were made in millimeters, using small calipers. The distance between the optic strut and the lateral part of the distal dural ring ranges from 3-7.5 mm (mean=5.47 mm). In all our specimens, the ophthalmic artery was found distally from the optic strut in the intradural space at a distance ranging from 0.5-7 mm (mean=3.35 mm). The distance between the entry of the third nerve and the IV nerve into the cavernous sinus ranged from 7-15 mm (mean=10.9 mm). The distance between the origin of the falciform ligament and the IV nerve at the level of the orbital apex ranged from 9-15 mm (mean=10.75 mm). The falciform ligament and the optic sheath should not be opened longer than 9 mm along the lateral optic nerve or injury to the IV nerve can occur. Starting at the oculomotor foramen, the

  3. [Mucormycosis in paranasal sinuses].

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, S; Unkel, C; Neumann, A; Sudhoff, H; Dermoumi, H; Jahnke, K; Dazert, S

    2009-08-01

    Three patients with mucormycosis of the paranasal sinuses were treated in the University ENT departments in Bochum and Essen in recent years. All patients were immunocompromised for different reasons and had reduced resistance against microorganism infection. They presented with symptoms of orbital complications of sinusitis. The further progress of these life-threatening fungal infections with a mortality rate between 35 and 70% depends on early and definitive diagnosis and radical surgical therapy to reduce the amount of infectious agent. The difficulties of early diagnosis by imaging, histology, microbiology, or molecular biology and postoperative therapeutic options especially with amphotericin B, liposomal amphotericin B, and posaconazole are illustrated and discussed.

  4. Standing equine sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Barakzai, Safia Z; Dixon, Padraic M

    2014-04-01

    Trephination of the equine sinuses is a common surgical procedure in sedated standing horses. Standing sinus flap surgery has become increasingly popular in equine referral hospitals and offers several advantages over sinusotomy performed under general anesthesia, including reduced patient-associated risks and costs; less intraoperative hemorrhage, allowing better visualization of the operative site; and allows surgeons to take their time. Other minimally invasive surgical procedures include sinoscopic surgery, balloon sinuplasty, and transnasal laser sinonasal fenestration. Despite the procedure used, appropriate indications for surgery, good patient selection, and familiarity with regional anatomy and surgical techniques are imperative for good results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Histopathologic study of chronic sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Wayoff, M; Parache, R M; Bodelet, B; Gazel, P

    1983-01-01

    The conventional histopathology of the sinus is a criterium for the therapeutic indication, since it is possible to distinguish between granulomatous chronic sinusitis, chronic sinusitis with oedema and nasal polyposis. Each one of these clinical pictures has his own etiology and requires a specific therapeutic approach.

  6. The effect of vancomycin powder on human dural fibroblast culture and its implications for dural repair during spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Ezequiel; Rasmussen, Jorge; Chabot, Joseph D; Gandhoke, Gurpreet; Luzzi, Emilia; Merlotti, Lina; Proni, Romina; Loresi, Mónica; Hamilton, D Kojo; Okonkwo, David O; Kanter, Adam S; Gerszten, Peter C

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a major source of morbidity after spinal surgery. Several recent studies have described the finding that applying vancomycin powder to the surgical bed may reduce the incidence of SSI. However, applying vancomycin in high concentrations has been shown in vitro to inhibit osteoblast proliferation and to induce cell death. Vancomycin may have a deleterious effect on dural healing after repair of an intentional or unintentional durotomy. This study was therefore undertaken to assess the effect of different concentrations of vancomycin on a human dura mater cell culture. METHODS Human dura intended for disposal after decompressive craniectomy was harvested. Explant primary cultures and subcultures were subsequently performed. Cells were characterized through common staining and immunohistochemistry. A growth curve was performed to assess the effect of different concentrations of vancomycin (40, 400, and 4000 μg/ml) on cell count. The effect of vancomycin on cellular shape, intercellular arrangement, and viability was also evaluated. RESULTS All dural tissue samples successfully developed into fusiform cells, demonstrating pseudopod projections and spindle formation. The cells demonstrated vimentin positivity and also had typical features of fibroblasts. When applied to the cultures, the highest dose of vancomycin induced generalized cell death within 24 hours. The mean (± SD) cell counts for control, 40, 400, and 4000 μg/ml were 38.72 ± 15.93, 36.28 ± 22.87, 19.48 ± 6.53, and 4.07 ± 9.66, respectively (p < 0.0001, ANOVA). Compared with controls, vancomycin-exposed cells histologically demonstrated a smaller cytoplasm and decreased pseudopodia formation resulting in the inhibition of normal spindle intercellular arrangement. CONCLUSIONS When vancomycin powder is applied locally, dural cells are exposed to a concentration several times greater than when delivered systemically. In this in vitro model, vancomycin induced

  7. Complementary echo and CCTA findings with superior sinus venosus atrial septal defect.

    PubMed

    Turner, Jason; Turner, Michael C; Kerut, Edmund K

    2016-10-01

    A young female developed progressive dyspnea on minimal exertion. Echocardiography demonstrated a large right heart with severe pulmonary hypertension. Cardiac computed tomographic angiography then demonstrated a superior sinus venosus atrial septal defect with an anomalous right upper pulmonary venous drainage. Echo and CCTA were complementary in making a proper diagnosis. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Chronic odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ugincius, Paulius; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gervickas, Albinas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate average age of the patients in both sexes treated for MS, distribution by sex, amount of dexter and sinister MS with and without the fistulas into the maxillary sinus, with and without the foreign-bodies, length of stay in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine during the period from 1999 till 2004. The retrospective data analysis of the patients' treated from chronic MS was made. 346 patients (213 females and 133 males) were treated for chronic MS. 55 cases of chronic dexter MS with a fistula into maxillary sinus, 98 cases of chronic dexter MS without a fistula, 45 cases of chronic sinister MS with a fistula, 112 cases chronic sinister MS without a fistula, 16 cases of foreign-bodies in dexter maxillary sinus, 20 cases of foreign-bodies in sinister maxillary sinus have been detected. The main age of the female was 46.6+/-15.0, the main age of the men was 42.1+/-14.4. Statictically significant difference in the age difference of the women and the men was found (p=0.0024). It was determined, that females diagnosed and treated with chronic MS were 1.6 times more than males during the period from 1999 till 2004 in Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine. Females treated for chronic MS were 4.5 years older than males.

  9. Nasal dermoid sinus cyst.

    PubMed

    Cauchois, R; Laccourreye, O; Bremond, D; Testud, R; Küffer, R; Monteil, J P

    1994-08-01

    Nasal dermoid sinus cyst is one of the diagnoses of midline nasal masses in children. This retrospective study analyzes the various theories regarding the origin of this congenital abnormality, the differential diagnosis, and the value of magnetic resonance imaging, as well as the various surgical options available.

  10. Efficacy and safety of small intestinal submucosa in dural defect repair in a canine model.

    PubMed

    He, Shu-Kun; Guo, Jin-Hai; Wang, Zhu-le; Zhang, Yi; Tu, Yun-Hu; Wu, Shi-Zhou; Huang, Fu-Guo; Xie, Hui-Qi

    2017-04-01

    Dural defects are a common problem, and inadequate dural closure can lead to complications. Several types of dural substitute materials have recently been discarded or modified owing to poor biocompatibility or mechanical properties and adverse reactions. The small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a promising material used in a variety of applications. Based on the limitations of previous studies, we conducted an animal study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the SIS in preclinical trials. Twenty-four male beagle dogs were subjected to surgical resection to produce dural defects. SIS or autologous dural mater was patched on the dural defect. Gross and histological evaluations were carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the therapy. Our findings demonstrated that the SIS, which stimulated connective and epithelial tissue responses for dural regeneration and functional recovery without immunological rejection, could provide prolonged defect repair and prevent complications. The mechanical properties of the SIS could be adjusted by application of multiple layers, and the biocompatibility of the material was appropriate. Thus, our data suggested that this material may represent an alternative option for clinical treatment of dural defects.

  11. Influence of sex, estrous cycle and estrogen on intracranial dural mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Boes, Tanner; Levy, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Background The frequency of migraine headaches is higher in women than in men and in susceptible women attacks are related to changes in ovarian hormone levels. Intracranial mast cells (MCs) are likely to play a role in migraine headache genesis, and changes in the dural MC population might influence headache susceptibility. The present study thus tested the hypothesis that sex and ovarian hormones influence the density and phenotypic makeup of dural MCs. Methods Histochemistry combined with quantitative analyses was employed to investigate sex differences, estrous cycle and ovarian hormone influences on dural MCs density, phenotype and degranulation level in males and females rats. Results Our data show that in female rats, dural MC density fluctuates during the estrous cycle and is overall higher than in males. In ovariectomized rats, estradiol, but not progesterone, promoted an increase in dural MCs density. This effect was abolished by a splenectomy, suggesting estrogen-related recruitment of MCs from the spleen. Finally, our data suggest that the phenotypic make up of dural MCs, which represents the level of cellular maturity, is also governed by changes in estrogen levels. Conclusions Given the potential role of dural MCs in triggering headache, our data suggest that estrogen-related modulation of dural MC density and phenotypic makeup could play a role in mediating the higher frequency and severity of headaches, such as migraine, in women. PMID:22833613

  12. Light and scanning electron microscopical study of the cavernous sinus of the monkey, Macaca fascicularis.

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, K; Ling, E A

    1985-01-01

    The cavernous sinus of Macaca fascicularis is in many respects similar to the human sinus. It consists predominantly of one main venous channel that, together with the internal carotid artery, occupies a meningo-endocranial compartment lateral to the pituitary gland. Trabeculae are few and do not in any way cause the sinus to appear cavernous. They are mostly flattened in the direction of the main venous channel. Cranial nerves three, four, six and the ophthalmic division of five are all located in the lateral wall of the meningo-endocranial compartment with cranial nerve six located most medially adjacent to the internal carotid artery. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:4077687

  13. Personal Computer System for Automatic Coronary Venous Flow Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Dew, Robert B.

    1985-01-01

    We developed an automated system based on an IBM PC/XT Personal computer to measure coronary venous blood flow during cardiac catheterization. Flow is determined by a thermodilution technique in which a cold saline solution is infused through a catheter into the coronary venous system. Regional temperature fluctuations sensed by the catheter are used to determine great cardiac vein and coronary sinus blood flow. The computer system replaces manual methods of acquiring and analyzing temperature data related to flow measurement, thereby increasing the speed and accuracy with which repetitive flow determinations can be made.

  14. A rare cause of cerebral venous thrombosis: cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Senadim, Songul; Alpaydin Baslo, Sezin; Tekin Güveli, Betül; Dedei Daryan, Metin; Kantaroglu, Elif; Ozturk, Oya; Atakli, Dilek

    2016-07-01

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM) is a serious central nervous system infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, seen mostly in immunocompromised hosts and less in immunocompetent patients. The vast majority of cryptococcosis cases are seen as human immunodeficiency virus infections with advanced immunosuppression. Meningitis and meningoencephalitis are the most common clinical manifestations. Nevertheless, immunocompetent patients with CM are rarely reported. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare complication of CM. Here, we report an immunocompetent patient with CM from a non-endemic area, who presented with an acute onset and atypical symptoms associated with cerebral venous thrombosis.

  15. Cauda equina syndrome and dural ectasia: rare manifestations in chronic ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C-C; Lin, Y-C; Lo, C-P; Chang, T-P

    2011-01-01

    Cauda equina syndrome (CES) is a rare manifestation in patients with long-standing ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We report a 57-year-old male patient with a 30-year history of AS who developed CES in the past 4 years. The CT and MRI examinations showed unique appearances of dural ectasia, multiple dorsal dural diverticula, erosion of the vertebral posterior elements, tethering of the conus medullaris to the dorsal aspect of the spinal canal and adhesion of the nerve roots of the cauda equina to the wall of the dural sac. A large dural defect was found at surgery. De-adhesion of the tethered conus medullaris was performed but without significant clinical improvement. The possible aetiologies of CES and dural ectasia in patients with chronic AS are discussed and the literature is reviewed. PMID:21606066

  16. Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Presenting with Status Epilepticus Treated Successfully with Endovascular Intervention.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Yu; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Tsai, Li-Kai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-06-01

    Status epilepticus was rarely reported as the initial manifestation of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas. Successful treatment with endovascular intervention has not been reported in the literature. We report three cases of dural arteriovenous fistulas initially presenting with various types of status epilepticus, including generalized tonic-clonic status epilepticus, complex partial status epilepticus, and nonconvulsive status epilepticus. The status epilepticus of these patients was successfully terminated through aggressive endovascular intervention in conjunction with antiepileptic drugs. These cases highlight the importance of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas in diagnosing patients with status epilepticus. Moreover, directly treating dural arteriovenous fistulas plays a crucial role in addition to anti-epileptic drugs therapy in controlling seizures in patients with dural arteriovenous fistulas related status epilepticus.

  17. Dural ectasia and FBN1 mutation screening of 40 patients with Marfan syndrome and related disorders: role of dural ectasia for the diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Attanasio, Monica; Pratelli, Elisa; Porciani, Maria Cristina; Evangelisti, Lucia; Torricelli, Elena; Pellicanò, Giannantonio; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Pepe, Guglielmina

    2013-07-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1), a matrix component of microfibrils. Dural ectasia, i.e. enlargement of the neural canal mainly located in the lower lumbar and sacral region, frequently occurs in Marfan patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of dural ectasia in raising the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and its association with FBN1 mutations. We studied 40 unrelated patients suspected for MFS, who underwent magnetic resonance imaging searching for dural ectasia. In all of them FBN1 gene analysis was also performed. Thirty-seven patients resulted affected by Marfan syndrome according to the '96 Ghent criteria; in 30 of them the diagnosis was confirmed when revaluated by the recently revised criteria (2010). Thirty-six patients resulted positive for dural ectasia. The degree of dural ectasia was grade 1 in 19 patients, grade 2 in 11 patients, and grade 3 in 6 patients. In 7 (24%) patients, the presence of dural ectasia allowed to reach a positive score for systemic feature criterion. Twenty-four patients carried an FBN1 mutation, that were represented by 13 missense (54%), and 11 (46%) mutations generating a premature termination codon (PTC, frameshifts and stop codons). No mutation was detected in the remaining 16 (6 patients with MFS and 10 with related disorders according to revised Ghent criteria). The prevalence of severe (grade 2 and grade 3) involvement of dura mater was higher in patients harbouring premature termination codon (PTC) mutations than those carrying missense-mutations (8/11 vs 2/13, P = 0.0111). Our data emphasizes the importance of dural ectasia screening to reach the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome especially when it is uncertain and indicates an association between PTC mutations and severe dural ectasia in Marfan patients.

  18. Novalis Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kyoung-Su; Song, Young-Jin; Kim, Ki-Uk

    2016-07-01

    The spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is rare, presenting with progressive, insidious symptoms, and inducing spinal cord ischemia and myelopathy, resulting in severe neurological deficits. If physicians have accurate and enough information about vascular anatomy and hemodynamics, they achieve the good results though the surgery or endovascular embolization. However, when selective spinal angiography is unsuccessful due to neurological deficits, surgery and endovascular embolization might be failed because of inadequate information. We describe a patient with a history of vasospasm during spinal angiography, who was successfully treated by spinal stereotactic radiosurgery using Novalis system.

  19. Novalis Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyoung-Su; Song, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is rare, presenting with progressive, insidious symptoms, and inducing spinal cord ischemia and myelopathy, resulting in severe neurological deficits. If physicians have accurate and enough information about vascular anatomy and hemodynamics, they achieve the good results though the surgery or endovascular embolization. However, when selective spinal angiography is unsuccessful due to neurological deficits, surgery and endovascular embolization might be failed because of inadequate information. We describe a patient with a history of vasospasm during spinal angiography, who was successfully treated by spinal stereotactic radiosurgery using Novalis system. PMID:27446527

  20. [Progressive Intracranial Hypertension due to Superior Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis Following Mild Head Trauma: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Suto, Yuta; Maruya, Jun; Watanabe, Jun; Nishimaki, Keiichi

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis after mild head trauma without skull fracture or intracranial hematoma is exceptionally rare. We describe an unusual case of progressive intracranial hypertension due to superior sagittal sinus thrombosis following mild head trauma. A 17-year-old boy presented with nape pain a day after a head blow during a gymnastics competition (backward double somersault). On admission, he showed no neurological deficit. CT scans revealed no skull fractures, and there were no abnormalities in the brain parenchyma. However, his headache worsened day-by-day and he had begun to vomit. Lumbar puncture was performed on Day 6, and the opening pressure was 40 cm of water. After tapping 20 mL, he felt better and the headache diminished for a few hours. MR venography performed on Day 8 revealed severe flow disturbance in the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus with multiple venous collaterals. Because of the beneficial effects of lumbar puncture, we decided to manage his symptoms of intracranial hypertension conservatively with repeated lumbar puncture and administration of glycerol. After 7 days of conservative treatment, his symptoms resolved completely, and he was discharged from the hospital. Follow-up MR venography performed on Day 55 showed complete recanalization of the superior sagittal sinus. The exact mechanism of sinus thrombosis in this case is not clear, but we speculate that endothelial damage caused by shearing stress because of strong rotational acceleration or direct impact to the superior sagittal sinus wall may have initiated thrombus formation.

  1. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome in the context of recent cerebral venous thrombosis: Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Bourvis, Nadège; Franc, Julie; Szatmary, Zoltan; Chabriat, Hugues; Crassard, Isabelle; Ducros, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Reversible cerebral constriction syndrome and cerebral venous thrombosis are two rare conditions. Reversible cerebral constriction syndrome affects the cerebral arteries and the pathology is still largely unknown. To date, no physiological link with cerebral venous thrombosis has been reported. We report here the case of a 24-year-old woman who presented a reversible cerebral constriction syndrome in the setting of a cerebral venous thrombosis. Cerebral venous thrombosis had developed in her left lateral venous sinus, within the stent placed one year before, in order to treat an idiopathic intracranial hypertension. The co-occurrence of cerebral venous thrombosis and reversible cerebral constriction syndrome in the same patient raises the issue of a potential link between them. We discuss the potential common trigger factors in this case: recent hormonal therapy; intracranial hypotension iatrogenically induced by lumbar puncture. © International Headache Society 2015.

  2. Carotid-cavernous fistula after functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Emin; Isildak, Huseyin; Haciyev, Yusuf; Kaytaz, Asim; Enver, Ozgun

    2009-03-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are anomalous communications between the carotid arterial system and the venous cavernous sinus. They can arise because of spontaneous or trauma causes. Most caroticocavernous fistulas are of spontaneous origin and unknown etiology. Spontaneous CCF may also be associated with cavernous sinus pathology such as arteriosclerotic changes of the arterial wall, fibromuscular dysplasia, or Ehler-Danlos syndrome. Traumatic CCFs may occur after either blunt or penetrating head trauma. Their clinical presentation is related to their size and to the type of venous drainage, which can lead to a variety of symptoms, such as visual loss, proptosis, bruit, chemosis, cranial nerve impairment, intracranial hemorrhage (rare), and so on. Treatment by endovascular transarterial embolization with electrolytically detachable coils is a very effective method for CCF with good outcomes. Carotid-cavernous fistulas have been rarely reported after craniofacial surgery and are uncommon pathologies in otolaryngology practice. In this study, we report a 40-year-old woman with CCF secondary to blunt trauma of functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

  3. A novel fish collagen scaffold as dural substitute.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Mu, Lanlan; Zhang, Fenghua; Sun, Yue; Chen, Quan; Xie, Cuicui; Wang, Hongmei

    2017-11-01

    The novel fish collagen scaffolds were prepared by lyophilization. The collagen sponges and chitosan were chemically cross-linked with the 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) as a cross-linking agent by pressing in one special mould. The collagen scaffolds were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mechanical property, and the in vitro collagenase degradation was tested. The results revealed that the scaffold has a suitable porosity, elasticity and prevent fluid leakage, suggesting potential applications in the tissue-engineered. In vitro collagenase degradation demonstrated that the collagen cross-linking with EDC by pressing played an important role in their resistance to biodegradation. Moreover, the scaffold proved excellent biocompatibility for the activity and proliferation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts cells (MEFs) in vitro. The rabbit dural defect model demonstrated that the scaffolds could prevent brain tissue adhesion, which reduce the opportunity of inflammation, facilitate the growth of fibroblasts and enhance the tissue regeneration and healing. The novel fish collagen scaffold as dural substitute, demonstrate a capability for using in the field of tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Intraoperative brain shift compensation: accounting for dural septa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ishita; Coffey, Aaron M; Ding, Siyi; Dumpuri, Prashanth; Dawant, Benoit M; Thompson, Reid C; Miga, Michael I

    2011-03-01

    Biomechanical models that describe soft tissue deformation provide a relatively inexpensive way to correct registration errors in image-guided neurosurgical systems caused by nonrigid brain shift. Quantifying the factors that cause this deformation to sufficient precision is a challenging task. To circumvent this difficulty, atlas-based methods have been developed recently that allow for uncertainty, yet still capture the first-order effects associated with deformation. The inverse solution is driven by sparse intraoperative surface measurements, which could bias the reconstruction and affect the subsurface accuracy of the model prediction. Studies using intraoperative MR have shown that the deformation in the midline, tentorium, and contralateral hemisphere is relatively small. The dural septa act as rigid membranes supporting the brain parenchyma and compartmentalizing the brain. Accounting for these structures in models may be an important key to improving subsurface shift accuracy. A novel method to segment the tentorium cerebelli will be described, along with the procedure for modeling the dural septa. Results in seven clinical cases show a qualitative improvement in subsurface shift accuracy making the predicted deformation more congruous with previous observations in the literature. The results also suggest a considerably more important role for hyperosmotic drug modeling for the intraoperative shift correction environment.

  5. Onyx versus nBCA and coils in the treatment of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Choo, Douglas M; Shankar, Jai Jai Shiva

    2016-04-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) with cortical venous drainage have significant morbidity and mortality. Complete closure of these lesions is necessary to reduce these risks. The purpose of our study was to compare the outcome of DAVFs treated with Onyx versus those treated with n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate (nBCA) and coil embolization in a case-control study. Compared with nBCA and coil embolization, we hypothesized that Onyx embolization for DAVF is safer and has a higher chance of complete obliteration, with no need for post-embolization surgery for the DAVF. From 1998 to 2015, 29 patients who had DAVFs were treated with endovascular embolization. Of these, 24 patients had imaging available for analysis. Successful closure rates, complications, and procedure time were compared between the embolization techniques. The chance of not requiring post-embolization surgery with Onyx (81.8%) was significantly higher (p = 0.005) than with nBCA (22.22%). The complication rate with Onyx (9.1%) tended to be lower compared with that of nBCA (22.22%; p = 0.37). Procedural time was not significantly different between Onyx (mean 267 minutes) and nBCA (mean 288 minutes) (p = 0.59). The odds ratio of a DAVF being treated with Onyx and then requiring no follow-up surgery was 17.5 (95% CI 1.97-155.4). Our case-control study suggests that Onyx embolization is superior to nBCA and coil embolization in completely obliterating DAVFs, with higher odds of no post-embolization surgery. We also found that Onyx is safe for embolization of DAVFs, with no associated neurological mortality and morbidity. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Flow control techniques for Onyx embolization of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulae.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhong-Song; Loh, Yince; Gonzalez, Nestor; Tateshima, Satoshi; Feng, Lei; Jahan, Reza; Duckwiler, Gary; Viñuela, Fernando

    2013-07-01

    Experience of flow control techniques during endovascular treatment of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) using the Onyx liquid embolic system is reported, with an emphasis on high flow shunts. Data were evaluated in patients with DAVFs treated endovascularly with Onyx. Adjunctive techniques with coils, acrylics and balloon assistance were utilized to reduce the rate of flow with transarterial and transvenous approaches. The following types of adjunctive techniques were used in 58 patients who underwent a total of 84 embolization sessions with Onyx: transvenous coiling with transvenous or transarterial Onyx embolization in 36 patients, transarterial coiling with transarterial Onyx embolization in eight patients, arterial or venous balloon assisted technique with transarterial or transvenous Onyx embolization in 11 patients, transarterial high concentration acrylics with transarterial Onyx embolization in one patient and staged transarterial or transvenous coiling and Onyx embolization in two patients. Complete obliteration of the fistulae was achieved in 41 patients (70.7%) and 27 patients (65.9%) with high flow fistulae after endovascular treatment alone. Periprocedural complications were encountered in 16 patients, and 13 complications were associated with the adjunctive techniques. There were four neurologic and two non-neurologic clinical sequelae. Distal Onyx migration occurred in four, microcatheter retention in three and cranial neuropathy in three patients. There was one instance each of cerebellar hemorrhage, thromboembolism, coil stretching and retention, and dissection. 56 survivors experienced complete resolution or significant improvement of their symptoms on follow-up. Flow control techniques are safe and effective adjunctive methods in primary endovascular Onyx embolization of high flow DAVFs.

  7. Onyx versus nBCA and coils in the treatment of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Douglas M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) with cortical venous drainage have significant morbidity and mortality. Complete closure of these lesions is necessary to reduce these risks. The purpose of our study was to compare the outcome of DAVFs treated with Onyx versus those treated with n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate (nBCA) and coil embolization in a case-control study. Compared with nBCA and coil embolization, we hypothesized that Onyx embolization for DAVF is safer and has a higher chance of complete obliteration, with no need for post-embolization surgery for the DAVF. Materials and methods From 1998 to 2015, 29 patients who had DAVFs were treated with endovascular embolization. Of these, 24 patients had imaging available for analysis. Successful closure rates, complications, and procedure time were compared between the embolization techniques. Results The chance of not requiring post-embolization surgery with Onyx (81.8%) was significantly higher (p = 0.005) than with nBCA (22.22%). The complication rate with Onyx (9.1%) tended to be lower compared with that of nBCA (22.22%; p = 0.37). Procedural time was not significantly different between Onyx (mean 267 minutes) and nBCA (mean 288 minutes) (p = 0.59). The odds ratio of a DAVF being treated with Onyx and then requiring no follow-up surgery was 17.5 (95% CI 1.97–155.4). Conclusion Our case-control study suggests that Onyx embolization is superior to nBCA and coil embolization in completely obliterating DAVFs, with higher odds of no post-embolization surgery. We also found that Onyx is safe for embolization of DAVFs, with no associated neurological mortality and morbidity. PMID:26748082

  8. Gamma Knife surgery for clival epidural-osseous dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Chia; Chen, Ching-Jen; Chen, Shao-Ching; Yang, Huai-Che; Lin, Chung Jung; Wu, Chih-Chun; Chung, Wen-Yuh; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Hung-Chi Pan, David; Shiau, Cheng-Ying; Wu, Hsiu-Mei

    2017-06-16

    OBJECTIVE Clival epidural-osseous dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) is often associated with a large nidus, multiple arterial feeders, and complex venous drainage. In this study the authors report the outcomes of clival epidural-osseous DAVFs treated using Gamma Knife surgery (GKS). METHODS Thirteen patients with 13 clival epidural-osseous DAVFs were treated with GKS at the authors' institution between 1993 and 2015. Patient age at the time of GKS ranged from 38 to 76 years (median 55 years). Eight DAVFs were classified as Cognard Type I, 4 as Type IIa, and 1 as Type IIa+b. The median treatment volume was 17.6 cm(3) (range 6.2-40.3 cm(3)). The median prescribed margin dose was 16.5 Gy (range 15-18 Gy). Clinical and radiological follow-ups were performed at 6-month intervals. Patient outcomes after GKS were categorized as 1) complete improvement, 2) partial improvement, 3) stationary, and 4) progression. RESULTS All 13 patients demonstrated symptomatic improvement, and on catheter angiography 12 of the 13 patients had complete obliteration and 1 patient had partial obliteration. The median follow-up period was 26 months (range 14-186 months). The median latency period from GKS to obliteration was 21 months (range 8-186 months). There was no intracranial hemorrhage during the follow-up period, and no deaths occurred. Two adverse events were observed following treatment, and 2 patients required repeat GKS treatment with eventual complete obliteration. CONCLUSIONS Gamma Knife surgery offers a safe and effective primary or adjuvant treatment modality for complex clival epidural-osseous DAVFs. All patients in this case series demonstrated symptomatic improvement, and almost all patients attained complete obliteration.

  9. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  10. Microvascular anatomy of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas: arteriovenous connections and their relationships with the dura mater.

    PubMed

    Takai, Keisuke; Komori, Takashi; Taniguchi, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT The microvascular anatomy of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), especially the relationships of the vessels with the dura mater, has yet to be angiographically demonstrated in detail and proven histologically. METHODS From January 2012 through April 2014, a total of 7 patients with spinal dural AVFs in the thoracic region underwent open microsurgical obliteration at Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital. The microvascular anatomy of spinal dural AVFs was comprehensively assessed by using advanced microangiography, including 3D computer graphics and intraoperative indocyanine green video angiography, and by histological findings. RESULTS The 2 microangiography techniques revealed the spatial course and in vivo blood flow of the meningeal vessels and their relationships with the dura mater in sufficient detail. The meningeal branch of the intercostal artery split into multiple meningeal vessels on the outer dural surface adjacent to the root sleeve. After crossing the dura mater to the inner dural surface, these vessels gathered and joined a single intradural draining vessel. On the inner dural surface, the single draining vessel was fed by the surrounding multiple meningeal vessels, which appeared to be caput medusae. Histological findings revealed that the structure of the meningeal branch of the intercostal artery corresponded to that of a normal artery. The structure of intradural draining vessels corresponded to that of a vein modified by retrograde arterial inflow. On the inner dural surface, more than 1 meningeal artery gathered and joined with the proximal radiculomedullary vein. CONCLUSIONS Spinal dural AVFs are located on the inner dural surface, where multiple direct AV connections between more than 1 meningeal feeding artery and a single proximal radiculomedullary vein occur at the site where the vein connects to the dura mater.

  11. Prevalence of dural ectasia in Loeys-Dietz syndrome: comparison with Marfan syndrome and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Kono, Atsushi K; Higashi, Masahiro; Morisaki, Hiroko; Morisaki, Takayuki; Naito, Hiroaki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-01-01

    Dural ectasia is well recognized in Marfan syndrome (MFS) as one of the major diagnostic criteria, but the exact prevalence of dural ectasia is still unknown in Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), which is a recently discovered connective tissue disease. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of dural ectasia in LDS according by using qualitative and quantitative methods and compared our findings with those for with MFS and normal controls. We retrospectively studied 10 LDS (6 males, 4 females, mean age 36.3 years) and 20 MFS cases (12 males, 8 females, mean age 37.1 years) and 20 controls (12 males, 8 females, mean age 36.1 years) both qualitatively and quantitatively using axial CT images and sagittal multi-planar reconstruction images of the lumbosacral region. For quantitative examination, we adopted two methods: method-1 (anteroposterior dural diameter of S1> L4) and method-2 (ratio of anteroposterior dural diameter/vertebral body diameter>cutoff values). The prevalence of dural ectasia among groups was compared by using Fisher's exact test and the Tukey-Kramer test. In LDS patients, the qualitative method showed 40% of dural ectasia, the quantitative method-1 50%, and the method-2 70%. In MFS patients, the corresponding prevalences were 50%, 75%, and 85%, and in controls, 0%, 0%, and 5%. Both LDS and MFS had a significantly wider dura than controls. While the prevalence of dural ectasia varied depending on differences in qualitative and quantitative methods, LDS as well as MFS, showed, regardless of method, a higher prevalence of dural ectasia than controls. This finding should help the differentiation of LDS from controls.

  12. Prevalence of Dural Ectasia in Loeys-Dietz Syndrome: Comparison with Marfan Syndrome and Normal Controls

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Atsushi K.; Higashi, Masahiro; Morisaki, Hiroko; Morisaki, Takayuki; Naito, Hiroaki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Dural ectasia is well recognized in Marfan syndrome (MFS) as one of the major diagnostic criteria, but the exact prevalence of dural ectasia is still unknown in Loeys−Dietz syndrome (LDS), which is a recently discovered connective tissue disease. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of dural ectasia in LDS according by using qualitative and quantitative methods and compared our findings with those for with MFS and normal controls. Material and Methods We retrospectively studied 10 LDS (6 males, 4 females, mean age 36.3 years) and 20 MFS cases (12 males, 8 females, mean age 37.1 years) and 20 controls (12 males, 8 females, mean age 36.1 years) both qualitatively and quantitatively using axial CT images and sagittal multi-planar reconstruction images of the lumbosacral region. For quantitative examination, we adopted two methods: method-1 (anteroposterior dural diameter of S1> L4) and method-2 (ratio of anteroposterior dural diameter/vertebral body diameter>cutoff values). The prevalence of dural ectasia among groups was compared by using Fisher’s exact test and the Tukey−Kramer test. Results In LDS patients, the qualitative method showed 40% of dural ectasia, the quantitative method-1 50%, and the method-2 70%. In MFS patients, the corresponding prevalences were 50%, 75%, and 85%, and in controls, 0%, 0%, and 5%. Both LDS and MFS had a significantly wider dura than controls. Conclusions While the prevalence of dural ectasia varied depending on differences in qualitative and quantitative methods, LDS as well as MFS, showed, regardless of method, a higher prevalence of dural ectasia than controls. This finding should help the differentiation of LDS from controls. PMID:24086486

  13. Mini-invasive Implant Placement in Combination with Maxillary Sinus Membrane Perforation During Transcrestal Sinus Floor Elevation: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Paolo; Toscano, Calogero; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to report preliminary outcomes of a modified technique for transcrestal sinus floor elevation with simultaneous implant placement. A total of 165 implants were placed in 110 patients using a modified Summers technique. During implant site preparation, after fracturing the sinus floor, a small perforation of the membrane was made using the first osteotome. After grafting with anorganic bovine bone mixed with venous blood, standard-length implants were inserted. The prosthetic phase occurred after 4 to 5 months. Patients were followed for at least 2 years after loading. During the follow-up, sinus condition was assessed by cone beam computed tomography. Periapical radiographs were taken to assess graft height and peri-implant bone levels. Three implants failed within 2 months of placement, yielding an overall implant survival of 98.2%. The mean follow-up was 38.3 months (range: 28 to 60 months) from placement. All other implants were stable and peri-implant soft tissues were healthy throughout the observation period. Peri-implant bone loss averaged 0.62 ± 0.26 mm after 1 year of function. No biologic or biomechanical complications occurred. No evidence of graft material dispersion into the sinus space was detected, except for two cases that resolved spontaneously. After 1 year of loading the graft height averaged 4.8 ± 1.3 mm above the sinus floor level. In the presence of sinus membrane perforation, the proposed modified osteotome technique may allow a predictable rehabilitation of the atrophic posterior maxilla by means of standard length implants without the occurrence of adverse events.

  14. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis of odontogenic origin is a well-known condition in both the dental and otolaryngology communities. It occurs when the Schneiderian membrane is violated by conditions arising from dentoalveolar unit. This type of sinusitis differs in its pathophysiology, microbiology, diagnostics and management from sinusitis of other causes, therefore, failure to accurately identify a dental cause in these patients usually lead to persistent symptomatology and failure of medical and surgical therapies directed toward sinusitis. Unilateral recalcitrant disease associated with foul smelling drainage is a most common feature of odontogenic sinusitis. Also, high-resolution CT scans and cone-beam volumetric computed tomography can assist in identifying dental disease. Sometimes dental treatment alone is adequate to resolve the odontogenic sinusitis and sometimes concomitant or subsequent functional endoscopic sinus surgery or Caldwell-Luc operation is required. The aim of this article is to give a review of the most common causes, symptoms, diagnostic and treatment methods of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Search on Cochrane Library, PubMed and Science Direct data bases by key words resulted in 35 articles which met our criteria. It can be concluded that the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis is likely underreported in the available literature.

  15. Clinical significance of unilateral sinusitis.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    In general, the etiologic factors of chronic paranasal sinusitis are systemic conditions such as nutrition, predisposition, allergy, and local factors such as nasal anatomic conditions. Among these factors, the development of unilateral sinusitis is a model case verifying the influence of local factors. In my study of 640 cases over a certain period of time, a comparison was made between 161 cases of unilateral sinusitis and 479 cases of bilateral sinusitis in order to verify the effects of local factors in the development of this disease. Patients with a history of previous sinus surgery or tumors were eliminated from the cases. 1. The male-female incidence rate, and the age distribution of the patients at the initial visit showed no prominent differences between unilateral and bilateral cases. 2. It was found that a larger number of cases of unilateral sinusitis had a duration of less than one year as compared to bilateral sinusitis which were longer than and year. Therefore it can be said that the duration of unilateral sinusitis is usually shorter than that of bilateral sinusitis. 3. In unilateral cases the patients with moderate to severe nasal septal deviation, one number of patients with septal deviation towards the diseased side was twice as high as that on the non-affected side. 4. The incidence rate of polyps occurring in the middle meatus was shown to be about twice as high in bilateral cases as in unilateral cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2856589

  16. Understanding Biofilms in Chronic Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Tajudeen, Bobby A; Schwartz, Joseph S; Palmer, James N

    2016-02-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a burdensome disease that has substantial individual and societal impact. Although great advances in medical and surgical therapies have been made, some patients continue to have recalcitrant infections. Microbial biofilms have been implicated as a cause of recalcitrant chronic sinusitis, and recent studies have tried to better understand the pathogenesis of chronic sinusitis as it relates to microbial biofilms. Here, we provide an overview of biofilms in chronic sinusitis with emphasis on pathogenesis, treatment, and future directions. In addition, recent evidence is presented, elucidating the role of bitter taste receptors as a possible key factor leading to biofilm formation.

  17. Noncavernous arteriovenous shunts mimicking carotid cavernous fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Kobkitsuksakul, Chai; Jiarakongmun, Pakorn; Chanthanaphak, Ekachat; Singhara Na Ayudya, Sirintara (Pongpech)

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The classic symptoms and signs of carotid cavernous sinus fistula or cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) consist of eye redness, exophthalmos, and gaze abnormality. The angiography findings typically consist of arteriovenous shunt at cavernous sinus with ophthalmic venous drainage with or without cortical venous reflux. In rare circumstances, the shunts are localized outside the cavernous sinus, but mimic symptoms and radiography of the cavernous shunt. We would like to present the other locations of the arteriovenous shunt, which mimic the clinical presentation of carotid cavernous fistulae, and analyze venous drainages. METHODS We retrospectively examined the records of 350 patients who were given provisional diagnoses of carotid cavernous sinus fistulae or cavernous sinus dural AVF in the division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok between 2008 and 2014. Any patient with cavernous arteriovenous shunt was excluded. RESULTS Of those 350 patients, 10 patients (2.85%) were identified as having noncavernous sinus AVF. The angiographic diagnoses consisted of three anterior condylar (hypoglossal) dural AVF, two traumatic middle meningeal AVF, one lesser sphenoid wing dural AVF, one vertebro-vertebral fistula (VVF), one intraorbital AVF, one direct dural artery to cortical vein dural AVF, and one transverse-sigmoid dural AVF. Six cases (60%) were found to have venous efferent obstruction. CONCLUSION Arteriovenous shunts mimicking the cavernous AVF are rare, with a prevalence of only 2.85% in this series. The clinical presentation mainly depends on venous outflow. The venous outlet of the arteriovenous shunts is influenced by venous afferent-efferent patterns according to the venous anatomy of the central nervous system and the skull base, as well as by architectural disturbance, specifically, obstruction of the venous outflow. PMID:27767958

  18. [Pott's puffy tumor: a rare complication of frontal sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Aínsa Laguna, D; Pons Morales, S; Muñoz Tormo-Figueres, A; Vega Senra, M I; Otero Reigada, M C

    2014-05-01

    Pott's puffy tumor is a rare complication of frontal sinusitis characterized by swelling and edema in the brow due to a subperiosteal abscess associated with frontal osteomyelitis. Added complications are cellulitis by extension to the orbit and intracranial infection by posterior extension, with high risk of meningitis, intracranial abscess, and venous sinus thrombosis. Early diagnosis and aggressive medical or surgical treatment are essential for optimal recovery of affected patients. In the antibiotic age it is extremely rare, with very few cases described in the recent literature. A case is presented of a Pott inflammatory tumor in a 7 year-old boy, as a complication of acute pansinusitis who presented with front preseptal swelling and intracranial involvement with thrombosis of ophthalmic and superior orbital veins and frontal epidural abscess extending to the subarachnoid space. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Embolization of dural arteriovenous fistula of the anterior cranial fossa through the middle meningeal artery with Onyx.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jian-Ping; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Tao; Yu, Jia; Zhao, Zhen-Wei; Gao, Guo-Dong

    2014-02-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) of the anterior cranial fossa is usually treated by surgical disconnection or endovascular embolization via the ophthalmic artery. The middle meningeal artery is a rarely used approach. This study investigated the safety and efficacy of embolization of DAVF of the anterior cranial fossa with Onyx through the middle meningeal artery. A retrospective review of a prospective cerebral vascular disease database was performed. Patients with DAVF of the anterior cranial fossa managed with embolization through the middle meningeal artery with Onyx were selected. Information on demography, symptoms and signs, angiographic examinations, interventional treatments, angiographic and clinical results, and follow-up was collected and analyzed. Five patients were included in this study, four of whom had hemorrhage. All fistulas were fed by the bilateral ethmoidal arteries arising from the ophthalmic artery and by the anterior branch of the middle meningeal artery. The abnormal shunt unilaterally drained into the superior sagittal sinus with interposition of the cortical veins all five patients. All endovascular treatments were successful with evidence of an angiographic cure. No complications occurred, and all patients recovered uneventfully without neurologic deficits. There were nearly no symptoms among the patients during follow-up. Embolization of DAVF of the anterior cranial fossa via the middle meningeal artery with Onyx is safe, effective, and a good choice for management of DAVF. More cases are needed to verify these findings. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Difference between Sinusitis and a Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted ... is an inflammation of the lining of the nose and sinuses. It is a very common infection in children. Viral sinusitis usually accompanies a cold. Allergic sinusitis may ...

  1. Intraoperative image updating for brain shift following dural opening.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W; Schaewe, Timothy J; Ji, Songbai; Holton, Leslie H; Simon, David A; Paulsen, Keith D

    2016-09-09

    OBJECTIVE Preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR) are typically coregistered to provide intraoperative navigation, the accuracy of which can be significantly compromised by brain deformation. In this study, the authors generated updated MR images (uMR) in the operating room (OR) to compensate for brain shift due to dural opening, and evaluated the accuracy and computational efficiency of the process. METHODS In 20 open cranial neurosurgical cases, a pair of intraoperative stereovision (iSV) images was acquired after dural opening to reconstruct a 3D profile of the exposed cortical surface. The iSV surface was registered with pMR to detect cortical displacements that were assimilated by a biomechanical model to estimate whole-brain nonrigid deformation and produce uMR in the OR. The uMR views were displayed on a commercial navigation system and compared side by side with the corresponding coregistered pMR. A tracked stylus was used to acquire coordinate locations of features on the cortical surface that served as independent positions for calculating target registration errors (TREs) for the coregistered uMR and pMR image volumes. RESULTS The uMR views were visually more accurate and well aligned with the iSV surface in terms of both geometry and texture compared with pMR where misalignment was evident. The average misfit between model estimates and measured displacements was 1.80 ± 0.35 mm, compared with the average initial misfit of 7.10 ± 2.78 mm between iSV and pMR, and the average TRE was 1.60 ± 0.43 mm across the 20 patients in the uMR image volume, compared with 7.31 ± 2.82 mm on average in the pMR cases. The iSV also proved to be accurate with an average error of 1.20 ± 0.37 mm. The overall computational time required to generate the uMR views was 7-8 minutes. CONCLUSIONS This study compensated for brain deformation caused by intraoperative dural opening using computational model-based assimilation of iSV cortical surface displacements. The u

  2. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed Central

    Coon, W W

    1977-01-01

    This review of the epidemiology of venous thromboembolism includes estimates of incidence and prevalence of venous thrombosis and its sequelae, a discussion geographical, annual and seasonal variations and data concerning possible risk factors. Selection of patients at increased risk for development of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism for specific diagnostic screening or for prophylactic therapy with low-dose heparin may be a more effective approach to lowering morbidity and mortality from this disease. PMID:329779

  3. Extra-abdominal venous thromboses at unusual sites.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Ida; De Stefano, Valerio

    2012-09-01

    Venous thrombosis typically involves the lower extremities. Rarely, it can occur in cerebral, splanchnic, or renal veins, with a frightening clinical impact. Other rare manifestations are upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis, that can complicate with pulmonary embolism and post-thrombotic syndrome, and retinal vein occlusion, significantly affecting the quality of life. This review is focused on venous thromboses at unusual extra-abdominal sites. Local infections or cancer are frequent in cerebral sinus-venous thrombosis. Upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis is mostly due to catheters or effort-related factors. Common risk factors are inherited thrombophilia and oral contraceptive use. Acute treatment is based on heparin; in cerebral sinus-venous thrombosis, local or systemic fibrinolysis should be considered in case of clinical deterioration. Vitamin-K antagonists are recommended for 3-6 months; indefinite anticoagulation is suggested for recurrent thrombosis or unprovoked thrombosis and permanent risk factors. However, such recommendations mainly derive from observational studies; there are no data about long-term treatment of retinal vein occlusion.

  4. Cerebral Venous Air Embolism due to a Hidden Skull Fracture Secondary to Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Hosaka, Ai; Yamaguchi, Tetsuto; Yamamoto, Fumiko; Shibagaki, Yasuro

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous air embolism is sometimes caused by head trauma. One of the paths of air entry is considered a skull fracture. We report a case of cerebral venous air embolism following head trauma. The patient was a 55-year-old man who fell and hit his head. A head computed tomography (CT) scan showed the air in the superior sagittal sinus; however, no skull fractures were detected. Follow-up CT revealed a fracture line in the right temporal bone. Cerebral venous air embolism following head trauma might have occult skull fractures even if CT could not show the skull fractures. PMID:26693366

  5. Microsurgical anatomy of the ophthalmic artery and the distal dural ring for the juxta-dural ring aneurysms via the pterional approach.

    PubMed

    Hokama, M; Hongo, K; Gibo, H; Kyoshima, K; Kobayashi, S

    2001-06-01

    Microsurgical anatomy for the pterional approach was studied regarding the origin and the course of the ophthalmic artery and the distal dural ring using human cadaveric specimens, with special reference to the surrounding bony structures. In 50 human adult formalin-fixed cadaveric cerebral hemispheres and 10 block specimens of the skull base region including the ophthalmic artery and the carotid dural ring were examined under magnification using an operating microscope. The ophthalmic artery originated from the intradural portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA), except in 5% where the ophthalmic artery originated extradurally. The extradural origin had two patterns: one was that the ophthalmic artery penetrated the bony optic strut (trans-optic strut pattern) and the other was that it coursed into the optic canal proximally to the optic strut without bone penetration (supra-optic strut pattern). The origin of the intradural ophthalmic artery was commonly located at the medial third of the superior wall of the ICA (78%). The ophthalmic artery was commonly taking an S-shaped course in the intradural portion and entered the optic canal over the optic strut. The distal dural ring was tightly adherent to the internal carotid artery; circumferential sectioning of the dural ring is required to mobilize the internal carotid artery. When approaching juxtadural ring ICA aneurysms via the pterional route, it is important to recognize the extradural origin, especially the trans-optic strut type, and to precisely understand the microsurgical anatomy around the dural ring.

  6. Partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection (including scimitar syndrome).

    PubMed

    van de Woestijne, Pieter C; Verberkmoes, Niels; Bogers, Ad J J C

    2013-01-01

    Partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection (PAPVC) is defined to exist when some but not all venous drainage enters the left atrium, while the remaining veins connect to the right-sided circulation. Scimitar syndrome is a specialized example, in which an anomalous pulmonary vein descends from the right lung and drains into the inferior caval vein. PAPVC is associated with sinus venosus-type atrial septal defect (ASD). Diagnosis was, in the past, based on echocardiographic imaging and could be difficult. Multislice spiral computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging improved the imaging quality. The surgical correction is dependent on the type of anomalous connection and the presence of an ASD. Outcome is good but obstructed venous return is an important issue.

  7. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding.

    PubMed

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-02-05

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic-clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully.

  8. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding

    PubMed Central

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-01-01

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic–clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully. PMID:23389726

  9. New insights into the mechanisms of venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mackman, Nigel

    2012-07-01

    Venous thrombosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries, especially in the elderly. Many risk factors have been identified for venous thrombosis that alter blood flow, activate the endothelium, and increase blood coagulation. However, the precise mechanisms that trigger clotting in large veins have not been fully elucidated. The most common site for initiation of the thrombus appears to be the valve pocket sinus, due to its tendency to become hypoxic. Activation of endothelial cells by hypoxia or possibly inflammatory stimuli would lead to surface expression of adhesion receptors that facilitate the binding of circulating leukocytes and microvesicles. Subsequent activation of the leukocytes induces expression of the potent procoagulant protein tissue factor that triggers thrombosis. Understanding the mechanisms of venous thrombosis may lead to the development of new treatments.

  10. Cerebral arterial occlusion and intracranial venous thrombosis in a woman taking oral contraceptives.

    PubMed Central

    Montón, F.; Rebollo, M.; Quintana, F.; Berciano, J.

    1984-01-01

    Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus are reported in a 30-year-old woman taking oral contraceptives (OC). The coexistence of arterial and venous cerebral pathology as a complication of OC use has only been previously reported in one case. The pathogenesis of this rare association is briefly discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6462985

  11. Acute bacterial sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    DeMuri, Gregory; Wald, Ellen R

    2013-10-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, the pathogenesis of sinusitis involves 3 key factors: sinusostia obstruction, ciliary dysfunction, and thickening of sinus secretions. On the basis of studies of the microbiology of otitis media, H influenzae is playing an increasingly important role in the etiology of sinusitis, exceeding that of S pneumoniae in some areas, and b-lactamase production by H influenzae is increasing in respiratory isolates in the United States. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,the presentation of acute bacterial sinusitis conforms to 1 of 3 predicable patterns; persistent, severe, and worsening symptoms. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,the diagnosis of sinusitis should be made by applying strict clinical criteria. This approach will select children with upper respiratory infection symptoms who are most likely to benefit from an antibiotic. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,imaging is not indicated routinely in the diagnosis of sinusitis. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging provides useful information when complications of sinusitis are suspected. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,amoxicillin-clavulanate should be considered asa first-line agent for the treatment of sinusitis.

  12. Managing acute invasive fungal sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Dwyhalo, Kristina M; Donald, Carrlene; Mendez, Anthony; Hoxworth, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Acute invasive fungal sinusitis is the most aggressive form of fungal sinusitis and can be fatal, especially in patients who are immunosuppressed. Early diagnosis and intervention are crucial and potentially lifesaving, so primary care providers must maintain a high index of suspicion for this disease. Patients may need to be admitted to the hospital for IV antifungal therapy and surgical debridement.

  13. Multilayer scaffold of electrospun PLA-PCL-collagen nanofibers as a dural substitute.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-fei; Guo, Hong-feng; Ying, Da-jun

    2013-11-01

    Dural closure after the neurosurgery can prevent postoperative complications. Although many types of dural substitute have been developed, most of them lack functional and structural characteristics compared with the natural dura mater. In this study, we used electrospinning method to fabricate a multilayer scaffold to promote dural repair. The inner layer of the scaffold that faces the brain tissue is composed of poly-lactic acid (PLA) to reduce tissue adhesion. The middle layer of the scaffold is composed of poly-ɛ-caprolactone and PLA, which provides a watertight seal. The outer layer of the scaffold contains a large amount of collagen to promote cell attachment and proliferation. The results from in vitro study and an animal model have shown that this multilayer fibrous scaffold has sufficient mechanic strength and biochemical properties to enhance dural repair. Therefore, fabrication of scaffold with multiple functional and structural layers may provide a novel approach for tissue engineering.

  14. Routine preoperative cardiac catheterization necessary before repair of secundum and sinus venosus atrial septal defects

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, M.D.; Nadas, A.S.; Norwood, W.I.; Castaneda, A.R.

    1984-08-01

    Between January 1976 and July 1983, 217 patients with atrial septal defect underwent surgical repair at Children's Hospital. Thirty with a primum atrial septal defect and 26 who underwent cardiac catheterization elsewhere before being seen were excluded from analysis. Of the 161 remaining patients, 52 (31%) underwent preoperative cardiac catheterization, 38 because the physical examination was considered atypical for a secundum atrial septal defect and 14 because of a preexisting routine indication. One hundred nine (69%) underwent surgery without catheterization, with the attending cardiologist relying on clinical examination alone in 5, additional technetium radionuclide angiocardiography in 5, M-mode echocardiography in 13 and two-dimensional echocardiography in 43; both M-mode echocardiography and radionuclide angiography were performed in 24 and two-dimensional echocardiography and radionuclide angiography in 19. Since 1976, there has been a trend toward a reduction in the use of catheterization and use of one rather than two noninvasive or semiinvasive techniques for the detection of atrial defects. Of the 52 patients who underwent catheterization, the correct anatomic diagnosis was made before catheterization in 47 (90%). Two patients with a sinus venosus defect and one each with a sinus venosus defect plus partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection, partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection without an atrial septal defect and a sinoseptal defect were missed. Of 109 patients without catheterization, a correct morphologic diagnosis was made before surgery in 92 (84%). Nine patients with a sinus venosus defect, three with sinus venous defect and partial anomolous pulmonary venous connection, four with partial anomalous pulmonary venous return without an atrial septal defect and one with a secundum defect were incorrectly diagnosed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Adhesive arachnoiditis causing cauda equina syndrome in ankylosing spondylitis: CT and MRI demonstration of dural calcification and a dorsal dural diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, I G; Yunten, N; Ustun, E E; Oksel, F; Gumusdis, G

    1999-07-01

    We present the radiological features of a 42-year-old man with long-standing inactive ankylosing spondylitis (AS), demonstrating that arachnoiditis is a cause of a cauda equina syndrome (CES) in this disease. CT showed a dorsal arachnoid diverticulum causing scalloped erosion of the laminae, and punctate and curvilinear dural calcification. MRI revealed adhesion and convergence of the cauda equina dorsally into the arachnoid pouch, causing the dural sac to appear empty canal. To the best of our knowledge, dural calcification on CT is a new finding in AS, which may be related to the CES. Our findings support the hypothesis that chronic adhesive arachnoiditis with subsequent loss of meningeal elasticity may be the main cause of CES in AS.

  16. Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula and Cecal Arteriovenous Malformation in a Boy

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Vimlesh; Vaidya, Pankaj C; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Yadav, Mukesh

    2017-01-01

    Concurrent spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and cecal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) are very rare. A 6-year old boy presented with lower limb paresis after trauma. On imaging work-up spinal dural AVF was found. It was managed with endovascular glue embolization. After two years, the boy presented with severe anemia and occult gastrointestinal tract (GIT) bleed. Cecal AVM was diagnosed and managed with embolization. PMID:28164000

  17. Effects of Voluntary Locomotion and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide on the Dynamics of Single Dural Vessels in Awake Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The dura mater is a vascularized membrane surrounding the brain and is heavily innervated by sensory nerves. Our knowledge of the dural vasculature has been limited to pathological conditions, such as headaches, but little is known about the dural blood flow regulation during behavior. To better understand the dynamics of dural vessels during behavior, we used two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) to measure the diameter changes of single dural and pial vessels in the awake mouse during voluntary locomotion. Surprisingly, we found that voluntary locomotion drove the constriction of dural vessels, and the dynamics of these constrictions could be captured with a linear convolution model. Dural vessel constrictions did not mirror the large increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) during locomotion, indicating that dural vessel constriction was not caused passively by compression. To study how behaviorally driven dynamics of dural vessels might be altered in pathological states, we injected the vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which induces headache in humans. CGRP dilated dural, but not pial, vessels and significantly reduced spontaneous locomotion but did not block locomotion-induced constrictions in dural vessels. Sumatriptan, a drug commonly used to treat headaches, blocked the vascular and behavioral the effects of CGRP. These findings suggest that, in the awake animal, the diameters of dural vessels are regulated dynamically during behavior and during drug-induced pathological states. SIGNIFICANT STATEMENT The vasculature of the dura has been implicated in the pathophysiology of headaches, but how individual dural vessels respond during behavior, both under normal conditions and after treatment with the headache-inducing peptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is poorly understood. To address these issues, we imaged individual dural vessels in awake mice and found that dural vessels constricted during voluntary locomotion, and

  18. Intrathecal Catheterization by Epidural Catheter: Management of Accidental Dural Puncture and Prophylaxis of PDPH.

    PubMed

    Jadon, Ashok; Chakraborty, Swastika; Sinha, Neelam; Agrawal, Rajiv

    2009-02-01

    Accidental or inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anaesthesia results in high incidence of post dural puncture headache (PDPH). Spinal or intrathecal catheter in such a situation, provides a conduit for administration of appropriate local anaesthetic for rapid onset of intraoperative surgical anaesthesia and postoperative pain relief. This procedure prevents PDPH if catheter left in situ for > 24 hrs and also avoids the associated risks with a repeat attempts at epidural analgesia. Primary aim of this study was to observe the effect of spinal catheter on incidence of PDPH, and to assess early and delayed complications of spinal catheterization by epidural catheter. In prospective clinical study 34 patients who had accidental dural puncture during epidural anaesthesia were included. The catheter meant for epidural use was inserted in spinal space and used for spinal anaesthesia and postoperative analgesia. Catheter was removed between 24-36hrs after surgery. The incidence of accidental dural puncture was 4%(34/846). Two patients 5.88% (2/34) had transient paresthesia during spinal catheter insertion. Post dural puncture headache occurred in 11.76% (4/34) patients. Two patients required epidural blood patch and two patients were managed with conservative treatment. No patient had any serious intraoperative or postoperative side effects. Epidural catheter can be used as spinal catheter to manage accidental dural puncture without serious complications, and it also prevents PDPH.

  19. Meningeal norepinephrine produces headache behaviors in rats via actions both on dural afferents and fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaomei; Yan, Jin; Tillu, Dipti; Asiedu, Marina; Weinstein, Nicole; Melemedjian, Ohannes; Price, Theodore; Dussor, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Background Stress is commonly reported to contribute to migraine although mechanisms by which this may occur are not fully known. The purpose of these studies was to examine whether norepinephrine (NE), the primary sympathetic efferent transmitter, acts on processes in the meninges that may contribute to the pain of migraine. Methods NE was applied to rat dura using a behavioral model of headache. Primary cultures of rat trigeminal ganglia retrogradely labeled from the dura mater and of rat dural fibroblasts were prepared. Patch-clamp electrophysiology, Western blot, and ELISA were performed to examine the effects of NE. Conditioned media from NE-treated fibroblast cultures was applied to the dura using the behavioral headache model. Results Dural injection both of NE and media from NE-stimulated fibroblasts caused cutaneous facial and hindpaw allodynia in awake rats. NE application to cultured dural afferents increased action potential firing in response to current injections. Application of NE to dural fibroblasts increased phosphorylation of ERK and caused the release of interleukin- 6 (IL-6). Conclusions These data demonstrate that NE can contribute to pro-nociceptive signaling from the meninges via actions on dural afferents and dural fibroblasts. Together, these actions of NE may contribute to the headache phase of migraine. PMID:25601915

  20. Spatial distribution of flow and oxygenation in the cerebral venous drainage system.

    PubMed

    De Vis, Jill B; Lu, Hanzhang; Ravi, Harshan; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Liu, Peiying

    2017-08-09

    To investigate the venous oxygenation and flow in the brain, and determine how they might change under challenged states. Eight healthy human subjects (24-37 years) were studied. T2 -relaxation under spin tagging (TRUST) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and phase-contrast MRI were performed to measure venous oxygenation and venous blood flow, respectively, in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), the straight sinus (SS), and the internal jugular veins (IJVs). Venous oxygenation was assessed at room air (0.03%CO2 , 21%O2 ) and under hyperoxia (O%CO2 , 95%O2 , and 5%N2 ) conditions. Venous blood flow was assessed at room air and under hypercapnia (5%CO2 , 21%O2 , and 74%N2 ) conditions. Whole-brain blood flow was also measured at the four feeding arteries of the brain using phase-contrast MRI. The changes in venous oxygenation and blood flow from room air to hyperoxia or hypercapnia conditions were tested using paired t-tests. Venous oxygenation in the SSS, the SS, and the IJVs was 61 ± 4%, 64 ± 4%, and 62 ± 4%, respectively, at room air, and increased to 70 ± 3% (P < 0.01 compared to room air), 71 ± 5% (P = 0.59), and 68 ± 5% (P < 0.05) under hyperoxic condition. The SSS, SS, and IJV drained 46 ± 9%, 16 ± 4%, and 79 ± 1% of whole-brain blood flow, respectively, and this flow distribution did not change under hypercapnic condition (P > 0.5). The results found in this study provide insight into the venous oxygenation and venous flow distribution and its heterogeneity among different venous structures. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. Northern Sinus Meridiani Stereo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-341, 25 April 2003

    This is a stereo (3-d anaglyph) composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle images of northern Sinus Meridiani near 2oN, 0oW. The light-toned materials at the south (bottom) end of the picture are considered to be thick (100-200 meters; 300-600 ft) exposures of sedimentary rock. Several ancient meteor impact craters are being exhumed from within these layered materials. To view in stereo, use '3-d' glasses with red over the left eye, and blue over the right. The picture covers an area approximately 113 km (70 mi) wide; north is up.

  2. Northern Sinus Meridiani Stereo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-341, 25 April 2003

    This is a stereo (3-d anaglyph) composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle images of northern Sinus Meridiani near 2oN, 0oW. The light-toned materials at the south (bottom) end of the picture are considered to be thick (100-200 meters; 300-600 ft) exposures of sedimentary rock. Several ancient meteor impact craters are being exhumed from within these layered materials. To view in stereo, use '3-d' glasses with red over the left eye, and blue over the right. The picture covers an area approximately 113 km (70 mi) wide; north is up.

  3. Management of Frontal Sinus Tumors.

    PubMed

    Selleck, Anne Morgan; Desai, Dipan; Thorp, Brian D; Ebert, Charles S; Zanation, Adam M

    2016-08-01

    The most common primary tumors of the frontal sinus are osteomas and inverted papillomas, although a variety of other tumors involving this space have been reported. With the advent of new surgical techniques and instrumentation, an endoscopic approach to this region has become feasible. The preoperative assessment and decision making must take into account the complexity of frontal sinus anatomy, tumor type, tumor location, and associated attachments. These procedures allow adequate visualization, tumor removal, and postoperative monitoring, and preserve fairly normal sinus function. Open techniques may also be required and should be in the surgeon's armamentarium.

  4. [Ostium of maxillary sinus in endoscopic sinus surgery].

    PubMed

    Tan, G; Sun, H; Chen, J

    1998-06-01

    To determine the clinical significance and operative method of maxillary sinus ostium in the treatment of chronic sinusitis and nasal polyps. Fifty-six patients (112 sides) undergone endoscopic sinus surgery were studied. The patency rates of the maxillary ostia in patients with enlarged and unchanged maxillary ostia were 92.9% and 80.4% respectively. Fifty-one patients (64 sides) undergone Caldwell-Luc operations were retrospectively studied. The patency rate of inferior antrostomy was 40.6%. CT scans of the sinuses of 38 cases with unilateral sinisitis or nasal polyps were reviewed. The scaled values of the maxillary hiatus on CT images showed no difference between the normal group and the diseased group. Pneumatization and proliferation of middle turbinate and bent uncinate process were the most common anatomic variation in the diseased group. The results suggest that management of anatomic variations surrounding the ostia is very important in the treatment of maxillary ostium.

  5. [Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI)].

    PubMed

    Renner, R; Simon, J

    2009-10-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is an important and frequent disease for dermatologists, phlebologists and general practitioners. There are various hypotheses for the ethiopathology in CVI, e. g. hormone receptors and impairments concerning the venous contraction or relaxation of the vessel wall and the venous valves might play an important role. At the moment, colour doppler-duplex sonography seems to be the diagnostic method of choice. Modern therapeutic options include compression systems alone or in combination with topical or systemic treatment including minimal invasive methods like endovenous laser or radiofrequency obliteration or foam sclerotherapy.

  6. Dealing with the venous congestion of free flaps: venous catheterization.

    PubMed

    Gürsoy, Koray; Kankaya, Yüksel; Uysal, Afşin; Koçer, Uğur

    2008-11-01

    For head and neck reconstruction after tumor ablation surgery, free flaps are mostly the chosen treatment modality for most of the centers. Coping with venous insufficiency and increasing venous outflow of the flap during this process increases the success rate. To increase venous outflow, triple-lumen central venous catheter is inserted to one of the donor veins of the flap that has venous insufficiency and one intact vein anastomosis.

  7. Craniotomy of the Fused Sagittal Suture Over the Superior Sagittal Sinus Is a Safe Procedure.

    PubMed

    Kölby, David; Fischer, Sara; Arab, Khalid; Maltese, Giovanni; Olsson, Robert; Paganini, Anna; Tarnow, Peter; Kölby, Lars

    2017-05-01

    Spring-assisted cranioplasty to correct sagittal synostosis is based on midline craniotomy through the closed sagittal suture, over the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the perioperative safety of this technique. This is a retrospective study of all patients operated with median craniotomy and springs from 1998 to the end of 2015. For comparison, all Pi-plasties performed during the same time interval were also evaluated. The safety measures were evaluated based on incidence of damage to SSS, incidence of dural tears, perioperative blood loss, operative time, and hospital stay. In the group that had undergone midline craniotomy combined with springs (n = 225), 4 perioperative damages to SSS and 1 dural tear were seen. The perioperative blood loss was 62.8 ± 65.3 mL (mean ± standard deviation). The operative time was 67.9 ± 21.5 minutes and the hospital stay was 4.8 ± 1.1 days. In the group that had undergone pi-plasty (n = 105), no damages to SSS but 3 dural tears were seen. The perioperative blood loss was 352.8 ± 174.4 mL. The operative time was 126.0 ± 31.7 minutes and the hospital stay was 7.1 ± 1.4 days. Craniotomy SSS in sagittal synostosis is a safe procedure with low morbidity in terms of damage to the SSS. Midline craniotomy combined with springs has significantly lower preoperative blood loss, operative time, and hospital stay (P < 0.001 for all) compared to pi-plasty.

  8. STUDIES ON THE VENOUS PULSE. I : A STUDY OF THE DIASTOLIC WAVES OF THE VENOUS PULSE, WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE POSSIBILITY OF A WAVE DUE TO THE CONTRACTION OF THE VENOUS REGION OF THE MAMMALIAN HEART.

    PubMed

    Eyster, J A

    1910-05-01

    A wave is described occurring in the venous pulse of man late in the diastolic period. This wave is a diastolic wave, since in an increase in length of the cardiac cycle it follows the h wave at its regular interval and becomes separated from the a wave of the next cardiac cycle. There is no wave on the venous pulse in man which can be referred to a contraction of the region of the great veins or sinus region of the heart. The h wave is a normal occurrence in the venous pulse curve from man and the dog. It occurs, according to the experience in this work, in all normal individuals in which the heart rate is sufficiently slow to prevent its obliteration by the a wave. The x wave, while not infrequent, is not always present in man even when the cardiac cycle is of sufficient length to prevent its obliteration by the a wave. This wave has not been observed in the dog. There is no wave on the venous pulse curve of the dog that can be referred to a contraction of the sinus region of the heart. Extra-systoles from stimulation of the venous region of the dog's heart produce no contraction of this region sufficiently pronounced to be recorded on a venous pulse tracing. After an interval of from 0.07 to 0.I second, representing the interval of veno-auricular conduction plus the latent period of the auricle, the auricle contracts. Extrasystoles from stimulation of the right auricle show, after an interval following the stimulus much shorter than that noted above and representing the latent period of the auricle, an a wave followed by ventricular systole after the usual a-c interval. It would seem probable that the sinus region of the heart, while capable of irritability, conductivity and rhythmicity (Erlanger and Blackman (I6)), does not normally manifest contractility.

  9. Pseudomastoiditis in lateral sinus thrombosis: a rare presentation with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Thota, Ramadass; Narayanan, Nithya; Mathuram, Dhanraj

    2011-07-01

    Lateral sinus thrombosis due to mastoiditis, is now a relic of the past. Gone are the days when septic lateral sinus thrombosis was a common complication of unsafe suppurative otitis media. In the present era, the neurologists more commonly see cortical venous thrombosis with lateral sinus thrombosis. This entity has been termed as non-septic lateral sinus thrombosis in literature. The incidence is found to be more in females due to the use of oral contraceptives (Rosen and Scher in Laryngoscope 107(5):680-683, 1). In this manuscript, we report a series of three cases of non-septic lateral sinus thrombosis with mastoiditis, seen in a span of 1 month, which is uncommon. All the patients presented to the neurologist with intractable headache and lateral sinus thrombosis with mastoiditis, was detected by magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venogram. All the three patients were males and had involvement of the right mastoid in magnetic resonance imaging pictures. We have reviewed the literature and discussed about the etiopathogenesis, diagnostic criteria and management.

  10. Clinical Aspects of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis: Experiences in Two Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Hyun Taek; Jun, Hyo Sub; Ahn, Jun Hyong; Kim, Ji Hee; Oh, Jae Keun; Song, Joon Ho; Cho, Byung Moon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare condition for which few clinical reviews have been conducted in Korea. Our aim was to investigate, risk factors, clinical presentations/courses, and outcomes of 22 patients treated for CVT at two centers. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted, selecting 22 patients diagnosed with and treated for CVT at two patient care centers over a 10-year period (January 1, 2004 to August 31, 2015). Patient data, pathogenetic concerns (laboratory findings), risk factors, locations, symptoms, treatments, and clinical outcomes were reviewed. Results Mean patient age at diagnosis was 54.41 ± 16.19. Patients most often presented with headache (40%), followed by seizure (27%) and altered mental status (18%). Focal motor deficits (5%), visual symptoms (5%), and dysarthria (5%) were less common. Important predisposing factors in CVT included prothrombotic conditions (35%), infections (14%), hyperthyroidism (18%), trauma (14%), and malignancy (4%). By location, 9 patients (40%) experienced thrombosis of superior sagittal sinus predominantly, with involvement of transverse sinus in 20 (90%), sigmoid sinus in 12 (40%), and the deep venous system in 5 (23%). Treatment generally consisted of anticoagulants (63%) or antiplatelet (23%) drugs, but surgical decompression was considered if warranted (14%). Medical therapy in CVT yields good functional outcomes. Conclusion Mean age of patients with CVT in our study exceeded that reported in Europe or in America and had difference in risk factors. Functional outcomes are good with use of antithrombotic medication, whether or not hemorrhagic infarction is evident. PMID:27847760

  11. Intercavernous Venous Communications in the Human Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Aquini, Mauro Guidotti; Marrone, Antonio Carlos Huf; Schneider, Felipe Luis

    1994-01-01

    The intercavernous communications of the skull base were studied in 32 sphenoid blocks using electrolytic decalcification techniques, vascular filling, x-rays, and serial anatomical sections. In this study four intercavernous connections were found: anterior intercavernous sinus (AIS), posterior intercavernous sinus (PIS), inferior intercavernous sinus (IIS), and basilar plexus (BP). The AIS was present in 100% of the cases, with diameters ranging from 0.57 mm to 5.43 mm; in 17 cases (53.12%) it took up the whole anterior wall of the hypophyseal fossa. The PIS was also detected in 100% of the cases, and its diameters ranged from 0.71 mm to 4.14 mm. The IIS was identified in 31 cases (96.9%), assuming three different forms: plexuslike, venous lake, and mixed. The BP was found in 100% of the material analyzed; in 23 cases (71.9%) it proved to be the widest intercavernous communication. In 12 cases of this series the hypophysis was completely enveloped by venous structures, except at the level of the sellar diaphragm. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:17171164

  12. Paranasal sinus obliteration in Wegener granulomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Roberts, R.L.; Fauci, A.S.

    1982-08-01

    The authors report 14 cases of Wegener granulomatosis in which one or more paranasal sinuses were obliterated by bone. The maxillary antra were involved in all cases, with the other sinuses being affected less frequently. These changes are thought to result from chronic bacterial sinusitis superimposed on the granulomatous vasculitic process. Computed tomography dramatically demonstrated the bone changes, consisting of a combination of sinus wall thickening and trabeculated new bone formation within the sinuses.

  13. Cavernous sinus meningiomas: imaging and surgical strategy.

    PubMed

    Sindou, Marc; Nebbal, Mustapha; Guclu, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous sinus (CS) meningiomas which are by definition those meningiomas which originate from the parasellar region are difficult skull base tumors to deal with. For deciding the most appropriate surgical strategy, surgeons need detailed preoperative neuroimaging. The vicinity of the tumor with the vital and highly functional neurovascular structures, tumor extensions into the basal cisterns and skull base structures, and the arterial vascularization and venous drainage pathways, as they shape operative strategy, are important preoperative data to take into account. Thin section CT scan with bone windows, 3D spiral CT reconstruction, MRI, MR angiography, and DSA performed with selective arteriography including late venous phases give those required detailed informations about the tumor and its relation with neurovascular and bony structures. The type of craniotomy and complementary osteotomy and the usefulness of an extradural anterior clinoidectomy with unroofing the optic canal can be decided from preoperative neuroimaging. Data collected also help in determining whether extensive exposure of the middle cranial fossa is necessary to ensure substantial devascularization of the tumor and whether proximal control of the internal carotid artery (ICA) at its intrapetrosal portion might be useful. Study of the capacity of blood supply of the Willis circle is wise for deciding the need and way of performing an extra-intracranial bypass together with tumor removal. Currently the concept of operating only the tumors with extracavernous extensions and to limit resection to only their extracavernous portions is the most accepted way of treating these tumors. It was that strategy that was adopted in the senior author's 220-patient series.Radiosurgery or stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy may complement surgery or can be only reserved for growing remnants.

  14. Sinus thrombosis-do animal models really cover the clinical syndrome?

    PubMed

    Yenigün, Mesut; Jünemann, Martin; Gerriets, Tibo; Stolz, Erwin

    2015-06-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is an important cause of stroke in young patients. CVST represents with 0.5-3% of stroke cases a relatively rare disease. CVST affects 3-4 cases per 1 million overall and 7 cases per 1 million children and neonates. Typical clinical symptoms include headache, visual deficits and seizures. Beside the main condition associated with CVST in women in pregnancy and puerperium, the most frequently identified risk factors are oral hormonal contraceptives in combination with coagulation disorders. The initial treatment contains heparin and its efficacy is based on two randomized placebo-controlled trials including 79 patients together. A lack of understanding of the pathophysiology of CSVT makes animal models of this disease indispensable. Previously developed animal models of sinus sagittalis superior contributes to further clarify the pathophysiologic mechanisms and surrounding circumstances in the topic of cerebral venous thrombosis.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Mouse Dural Afferent Neurons Expressing TRPM8, VGLUT3, and NF200.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lynn; Chang, Michelle Jaehee; Zhang, Zhiyu; Dhaka, Ajay; Guo, Zhaohua; Cao, Yu-Qing

    2017-09-19

    To quantify the abundance of dural afferent neurons expressing transient receptor potential channel melastatin 8 (TRPM8), vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3), and neurofilament 200 (NF200) in adult mice. With the increasing use of mice as a model system to study headache mechanisms, it is important to understand the composition of dural afferent neurons in mice. In a previous study, we have measured the abundance of mouse dural afferent neurons that express neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide as well as two TRP channels TRPV1 and TRPA1, respectively. Here, we conducted quantitative analysis of three other dural afferent subpopulations in adult mice. We used the fluorescent tracer Fluoro-Gold to retrogradely label dural afferent neurons in adult mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein in discrete subpopulations of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. Mechanoreceptors with myelinated fibers were identified by NF200 immunoreactivity. We also conducted Ca(2+) -imaging experiments to test the overlap between TRPM8 and VGLUT3 expression in mouse primary afferent neurons (PANs). The abundance of TRPM8-expressing neurons in dural afferent neurons was significantly lower than that in total TG neurons. The percentages of dural afferent neurons expressing VGLUT3 and NF200 were comparable to those of total TG neurons, respectively. TRPM8 agonist menthol evoked Ca(2+) influx in less than 7% VGLUT3-expressing PANs in adult mice. TG neurons expressing TRPM8, VGLUT3, and NF200 all innervate adult mouse dura. TRPM8 and VGLUT3 are expressed in distinct subpopulations of PANs in adult mice. These results provide an anatomical basis to investigate headache mechanisms in mouse models. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  16. Dural ectasia in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: quantitative assessment on magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Overgaard, Angelica; Ohlin, Acke

    2010-01-01

    To our knowledge, the assessment of dural sac diameters in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is not reported in the literature. The aim of this study was to find out if, dural ectasia occurs more frequently among patients with AIS, to define cut-off values for dural sac ratio and test the validity of such values. A total of 126 spine MRIs (79 patients with AIS and 47 control subjects) were included in this retrospective analysis (age range 7–25 years, 62% were females). Dural sac diameter (DSD) and vertebral body diameter (VBD) were estimated and dural sac ratio (DSR = DSD/VBD) was calculated at T5 and L3. DSR at T5 and L3 were 0.69 ± 0.12, and 0.52 ± 0.10, respectively, in patients with AIS compared with 0.62 ± 0.11, and 0.44 ± 0.07, respectively, in controls (P = 0.001 at T5 and <0.001 at L3). Our estimated cut-off values for DSR were 0.84 and 0.58 at T5 and L3, respectively. This resulted in 100% sensitivity compared with 74% when using the cut-off values proposed by Oosterhof et al. No statistically significant association was found between the occurrence of dural sac enlargement in patients with AIS and the severity of scoliotic deformity, the apical vertebral rotation, epidural fat thickness, occurrence of pain, neurological deficit, atypical scoliosis or rapid curve progression. Females were affected more frequently than males. As dural sac enlargement means thinning of the pedicles, we believe that the findings of this study have important clinical implications on the preoperative workup of AIS. PMID:20217153

  17. Delayed cerebrospinal fluid leak after watertight dural closure with a polyethylene glycol hydrogel dural sealant in posterior fossa surgery: case report.

    PubMed

    Jito, Junya; Nitta, Naoki; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    A polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel sealant recently has been approved as an adjunct to sutured dural closure in Japan. We treated consecutive six patients with PEG hydrogel sealant in posterior fossa operation. Three of six cases suffered delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak after watertight dural closure with the PEG hydrogel sealant, although there was no leak case which was treated with fibrin glue, before 2 years until the adoption of the new material. These patients underwent posterior fossa craniotomy and discharged without remarkable CSF leak. The pseudomeningocele under the occipital wound caused the CSF leak occurr from 5th to 7th week postoperatively. All CSF leak cases needed surgical repair. At the repair, the PEG hydrogel was liquefied and almost absorbed. A fistula on the closure line and a dead space after the absorption of the PEG hydrogel was observed. When the absorbable PEG hydrogel sealant plugs in small gaps of sutured dura, its properties to prevent adhesion might suppress healing process of dural closure, so that CSF could leak through the gaps and collect as a pseudomeningocele in the dead space after absorption of the PEG hydrogel. In posterior fossa surgery a PEG hydrogel sealant should be applied when dural edges are closed tightly without any gaps.

  18. [Bacteriological study of maxillary sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Renon, P; Casanova, M; Verdier, M; Asperge, A; Le Mouel, C

    1984-01-01

    Suppurated maxillary sinusitis are frequent diseases. Diameatic puncture allows bacteriological investigations. Our results are positive in two thirds of cases. The bacterial flora is very varied, whose identification and antibiograms involve efficient treatment with daily washing and in situ antibiotherapy.

  19. [Sinusitis--judicious antibiotic treatment].

    PubMed

    Niedzielska, Grazyna

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents different forms of sinusitis in children and adults as well as the patomechanism of sinusitis of infective and non-infective origin. The role of bacterial infection has been discussed. Participation of major pathogens of URTI such as S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis has been highlighted and the factors influencing growth of their antibiotic-resistant stains. Guidelines concerning antibiotic therapy in children and adults, depending on disease course, age and factors influencing growth of resistant stains have been presented. Causes of failure in treatment of sinusitis have been analysed eg. in case of bacterial biofilm growth or non-neutrophilic inflammation forms. Antimicrobial treatment concerns mainly acute and aggravated infections. In case of chronic sinusitis, antibiotic therapy is complementary to surgical treatment.

  20. Radiography of the Paranasal Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... your back or over your lap. This head. Radiography of the paranasal sinuses apron will protect your ... face, especially when lowering his or her head. Radiography of sitting and others while you are standing. ...

  1. Evaluating Complications of Chronic Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Phillip; Pereyra, Charles A.; Breslin, Adam; Melville, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a relatively common diagnosis throughout the US. In patients with an otherwise unremarkable medical history the treatment is typically supportive, requiring only clinical evaluation. We present the case of a 25-year-old male with a history of chronic sinusitis that was brought to our emergency department with new-onset seizure. Three days before he had presented to his usual care facility with two days of headache and fever and was discharged stating headache, subjective fever, and neck stiffness. After further investigation he was diagnosed with a mixed anaerobic epidural abscess. The evaluation and management of chronic sinusitis are based on the presence of symptoms concerning for complication. Prompt investigation of complicated sinusitis is essential in preventing debilitating and fatal sequelae. Our case study underscores the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:28163938

  2. [Surgical dilemmas. Sinus floor elevation].

    PubMed

    ten Bruggenkate, C M; Schulten, E A J M; Zijderveld, S A

    2008-12-01

    Limited alveolar bone height prevents the placement of dental implants. Sinus floor elevation is an internal augmentation of the maxillary sinus that allows implants to be placed. The principle of this surgical procedure is the preparation of a 'top hinge door', that is raised together with the Schneiderian membrane in the cranial direction. The space which created under this lid is filled with a bone transplant. Autogenous bone is the standard transplant material, despite the fact that a second surgery site is necessary. Under certain circumstances bone substitutes can be used, with a longer healing phase. If sufficient alveolar bone height is available to secure implant stability, simultaneous implantation and sinus floor elevation are possible. Considering the significant anatomical variation in the region of the maxillary sinus, a sound knowledge of the anatomy is of great importance.

  3. [Developmental venous anomaly (DVA)].

    PubMed

    Zimmer, A; Hagen, T; Ahlhelm, F; Viera, J; Reith, W; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G

    2007-10-01

    As congenital anatomic variants of venous drainage, developmental venous anomalies (DVA) represent up to 60% of all cerebral vascular malformations. The prior term "venous angioma" is a misnomer implicating an abnormal vascular structure with an increased bleeding risk. They are often found incidentally and are hardly ever symptomatic. Their morphologic characteristics are dilated vessels in the white matter, which converge on a greater collector vein, forming the typical caput medusae. They drain into the superficial or deep venous system. The frequent association with other, potentially bleeding-prone vascular malformations is clinically relevant, in particular cavernous angioma, which might require therapeutic action. Therefore, coincident vascular lesions need to be actively sought by appropriate additional imaging techniques.

  4. Venous thrombosis: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.W.

    1986-07-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease contributes to morbidity and mortality in certain groups of hospitalized patients, particularly those who have undergone surgery. Although principles of treatment have changed relatively little during the past 20 years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Venography, once the only reliable diagnostic technique, has been largely replaced by noninvasive tests: impedance plethysmography, venous Doppler, /sup 125/I-radiofibrinogen-uptake test, and phleborheography. Virchow's triad of stasis, vessel injury, and hypercoagulability remains a valid explanation of the pathogenesis of thrombus formation, but laboratory and clinical data have refined our knowledge of how these factors interact to result in clinically significant disease. Knowledge of the natural history of venous thrombosis, plus heightened awareness of the long-term morbidity and expense associated with the postphlebitic syndrome, have led to increased interest in preventing DVT. Clinically and economically, venous thrombosis is best managed by prevention. 61 references.

  5. MC-19 Margaritifer Sinus Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mars digital-image mosaic merged with color of the MC-19 quadrangle, Margaritifer Sinus region of Mars. Heavily cratered highlands, which dominate the Margaritifer Sinus quadrangle, are marked by large expanses of chaotic terrain. In the northwestern part, the major rift zone of Valles Marineris connects with a broad canyon filled with chaotic terrain. Latitude range -30 to 0, longitude range 0 to 45 degrees.

  6. MC-20 Sinus Sabeus Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mars digital-image mosaic merged with color of the MC-20 quadrangle, Sinus Sabeus region of Mars. Heavily cratered highlands dominate the Sinus Sabeus quadrangle. The northern part is marked by a large impact crater, Schiaparelli. Schiaparelli is an ancient remnant of the many large impact events that occurred during the period of heavy bombardment. Latitude range -30 to 0 degrees, longitude range -45 to 0.

  7. Venous ulcer review

    PubMed Central

    Bevis, Paul; Earnshaw, Jonothan

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What is the best treatment for venous ulcers? Results: Compression aids ulcer healing. Pentoxifylline can aid ulcer healing. Artificial skin grafts are more effective than other skin grafts in helping ulcer healing. Correction of underlying venous incompetence reduces ulcer recurrence. Implementation: Potential pitfalls to avoid are: Failure to exclude underlying arterial disease before application of compression.Unusual-looking ulcers or those slow to heal should be biopsied to exclude malignant transformation. PMID:21673869

  8. Diagnosing Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, D. Lynn

    1992-01-01

    Patients often present with unexplained lower limb pain and swelling. It is important to exclude deep venous thrombosis in the diagnosis because of the threat of sudden death. Simple clinical diagnosis is unacceptable, and noninvasive tests should be used initially. Serial testing detects proximal extension of isolated calf thrombi. Multiple diagnostic modalities are employed to diagnose a new deep venous thrombosis in patients with postphlebitic syndrome. PMID:21221369

  9. Adult Mouse Venous Hypertension Model: Common Carotid Artery to External Jugular Vein Anastomosis.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shun-Tai; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Ana; Walker, Espen J.; Young, William L.; Su, Hua; Lawton, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the pathophysiology of brain arteriovenous malformations and arteriovenous fistulas has improved thanks to animal models. A rat model creating an artificial fistula between the common carotid artery (CCA) and the external jugular vein (EJV) has been widely described and proved technically feasible. This construct provokes a consistent cerebral venous hypertension (CVH), and therefore has helped studying the contribution of venous hypertension to formation, clinical symptoms, and prognosis of brain AVMs and dural AVFs. Equivalent mice models have been only scarcely described and have shown trouble with stenosis of the fistula. An established murine model would allow the study of not only pathophysiology but also potential genetic therapies for these cerebrovascular diseases. We present a model of arteriovenous fistula that produces a durable intracranial venous hypertension in the mouse. Microsurgical anastomosis of the murine CCA and EJV can be difficult due to diminutive anatomy and frequently result in a non-patent fistula. In this step-by-step protocol we address all the important challenges encountered during this procedure. Avoiding excessive retraction of the vein during the exposure, using 11-0 sutures instead of 10-0, and making a carefully planned end-to-side anastomosis are some of the critical steps. Although this method requires advanced microsurgical skills and a longer learning curve that the equivalent in the rat, it can be consistently developed. This novel model has been designed to integrate transgenic mouse techniques with a previously well-established experimental system that has proved useful to study brain AVMs and dural AVFs. By opening the possibility of using transgenic mice, a broader spectrum of valid models can be achieved and genetic treatments can also be tested. The experimental construct could also be further adapted to the study of other cerebrovascular diseases related with venous hypertension such as migraine

  10. Transorbital superior ophthalmic vein sacrifice to preserve vision in ocular hypertension from aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Davis, Brandon J; He, Lucy; Mawn, Louise A; Mocco, J

    2014-10-29

    Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is rare and may clinically masquerade as a carotid cavernous fistula. Conventional management includes oral anticoagulation, but cases of ocular hypertension affecting vision may require more aggressive intervention. We report a case of a woman with spontaneous bilaterally occluded cavernous sinuses with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), which resolved immediately following unilateral superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) sacrifice. She was subsequently placed on oral anticoagulants. By 4 months postoperatively her IOP was normalized and her vision had improved. Repeat angiography demonstrated stable venous filling, with some mild improvement of flow through the cavernous sinus. Coil-mediated sacrifice of the SOV might be an effective means to relieve ocular hypertension and preserve vision in the setting of aseptic CST. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  11. Transorbital superior ophthalmic vein sacrifice to preserve vision in ocular hypertension from aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Davis, Brandon J; He, Lucy; Mawn, Louise A; Mocco, J

    2015-12-01

    Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is rare and may clinically masquerade as a carotid cavernous fistula. Conventional management includes oral anticoagulation, but cases of ocular hypertension affecting vision may require more aggressive intervention. We report a case of a woman with spontaneous bilaterally occluded cavernous sinuses with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), which resolved immediately following unilateral superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) sacrifice. She was subsequently placed on oral anticoagulants. By 4 months postoperatively her IOP was normalized and her vision had improved. Repeat angiography demonstrated stable venous filling, with some mild improvement of flow through the cavernous sinus. Coil-mediated sacrifice of the SOV might be an effective means to relieve ocular hypertension and preserve vision in the setting of aseptic CST. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava Draining into the Coronary Sinus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kurtoglu, Ertugrul; Cakin, Ozlem; Akcay, Selahaddin; Akturk, Erdal; Korkmaz, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) is a congenital anomaly of the thoracic venous system resulting from the abnormal persistence of an embryological vessel that normally regresses during early fetal life. This anomaly is often discovered incidentally during surgery, cardiovascular imaging or invasive cardiovascular procedures. In most cases, a PLSVC drains into the right atrium through the coronary sinus. In the remainder of cases, it enters directly or through the pulmonary veins into the left atrium. A dilated coronary sinus on echocardiography should always raise the suspicion of a PLSVC as it has important clinical implications. The diagnosis should be confirmed by saline contrast echocardiography. We report a patient with persistent left superior vena cava with an enlarged coronary sinus and normal right superior vena cava.

  13. Blood sinuses in the submucosa of the large airways of the sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, P; Goulding, D; Webber, S E; Widdicombe, J G

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the airway vasculature in sheep using light and transmission electron microscopy, as well as arterial and venous (retrograde) injections of anatomical corrosion compound and latex. Vascular casts were viewed by scanning electron microscopy. There is a complex network of blood sinuses of large diameter (up to 500 microns) in the submucosa of the large airways. The vessels have thin walls formed by a single layer of flattened endothelium with tight junctions and without pericytes or smooth muscle cells. Characteristically the sinuses lie between the cartilage and lamina propria of the trachea or between cartilage and smooth muscle in the bronchi. Sinuses of greater than 50 microns transverse diameter are not found in airways less than 1.0 mm across. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:2808119

  14. Ossification of the Posterior Petroclinoid Dural Fold: A Cadaveric Study with Neurosurgical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, David; Kimball, Heather; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R. Shane; Loukas, Marios; Cohen-Gadol, A. Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The roof of the porus trigeminus, composed of the posterior petroclinoid dural fold, is an important landmark to the skull base surgeon. Ossification of the posterior petroclinoid dural fold is an anatomical variation rarely mentioned in the literature. Such ossification results in the trigeminal nerve traversing a bony foramen as it enters Meckel cave. The authors performed this study to better elucidate this anatomical variation. Design Fifteen adult cadaveric head halves were subjected to dissection of the middle cranial fossa. Microdissection techniques were used to examine the posterior petroclinoid dural folds. Skull base osteology was also studied in 71 dry human skulls with attention paid to the attachment point of the posterior petroclinoid dural folds at the trigeminal protuberances. Setting Cadaver laboratory Main Outcome Measures Measurements were made using a microcaliper. Digital images were made of the dissections. Results Completely ossified posterior petroclinoid folds were present in 20% of the specimens. Of the 142 dry skull sides examined, 9% had large trigeminal protuberances. Conclusions Based on this study, the posterior petroclinoid dural fold may completely ossify in adults that may lead to narrowing of the porus trigeminus and potential compression of the trigeminal nerve at the entrance to Meckel cave. PMID:26225315

  15. Surgical "Fat Patch" improves secondary intracranial hypotension orthostatic headache associated with lumbosacral dural ectasia. Case report.

    PubMed

    Elena, Beretta; Andrea, Franzini; Roberto, Cordella; Vittoria, Nazzi; Grazia, Valentini Laura; Angelo, Franzini

    2017-08-30

    Secondary intracranial hypotension is a clinical syndrome associated with the reduction of the cerebrospinal fluid volume and dural continuity violation. The main symptoms are orthostatic headache associated with nausea, vomiting, diplopia, dizziness and tinnitus. The treatment is usually non-specific. The authors describe the case of a 37-years-old woman who developed secondary intracranial hypotension caused by lumbosacral iatrogenic dural ectasia following de-tethering surgery. An orthostatic headache was the mainstay of her clinical picture and it was confirmed by intracranial pressure monitoring. Conservative treatment including spinal blood patch improved symptoms for a limited amount of time (less than 1 month). Altered compliance of the dural spinal sac was suspected. Therefore thecal sac remodeling by placing autologous fat at the level of the dural ectasia was performed improving the symptoms for 2 years. Volumetric reduction of the epidural space may be considered as a valuable therapeutic option in case of intracranial hypotension that is unresponsive to medical treatments and spinal blood patch, and when an altered compliance of the dural sac is hypothesized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bacterial cellulose membranes used as artificial substitutes for dural defection in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Ma, Xia; Chen, Shiwen; Tao, Meifeng; Yuan, Lutao; Jing, Yao

    2014-06-16

    To improve the efficacy and safety of dural repair in neurosurgical procedures, a new dural material derived from bacterial cellulose (BC) was evaluated in a rabbit model with dural defects. We prepared artificial dura mater using bacterial cellulose which was incubated and fermented from Acetobacter xylinum. The dural defects of the rabbit model were repaired with BC membranes. All surgeries were performed under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia, and all efforts were made to minimize suffering. All animals were humanely euthanized by intravenous injection of phenobarbitone, at each time point, after the operation. Then, the histocompatibility and inflammatory effects of BC were examined by histological examination, real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western Blot. BC membranes evenly covered the surface of brain without adhesion. There were seldom inflammatory cells surrounding the membrane during the early postoperative period. The expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α as well as iNOS and COX-2 were lower in the BC group compared to the control group at 7, 14 and 21 days after implantation. BC can repair dural defects in rabbit and has a decreased inflammatory response compared to traditional materials. However, the long-term effects need to be validated in larger animals.

  17. Bacterial Cellulose Membranes Used as Artificial Substitutes for Dural Defection in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chen; Ma, Xia; Chen, Shiwen; Tao, Meifeng; Yuan, Lutao; Jing, Yao

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy and safety of dural repair in neurosurgical procedures, a new dural material derived from bacterial cellulose (BC) was evaluated in a rabbit model with dural defects. We prepared artificial dura mater using bacterial cellulose which was incubated and fermented from Acetobacter xylinum. The dural defects of the rabbit model were repaired with BC membranes. All surgeries were performed under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia, and all efforts were made to minimize suffering. All animals were humanely euthanized by intravenous injection of phenobarbitone, at each time point, after the operation. Then, the histocompatibility and inflammatory effects of BC were examined by histological examination, real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western Blot. BC membranes evenly covered the surface of brain without adhesion. There were seldom inflammatory cells surrounding the membrane during the early postoperative period. The expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α as well as iNOS and COX-2 were lower in the BC group compared to the control group at 7, 14 and 21 days after implantation. BC can repair dural defects in rabbit and has a decreased inflammatory response compared to traditional materials. However, the long-term effects need to be validated in larger animals. PMID:24937688

  18. Surgical management of dural arteriovenous fistulas with transosseous arterial feeders involving the jugular bulb

    PubMed Central

    Benes, L.; Kappus, C.; Sure, U.; Farhoud, A.; Bien, S.; Bertalanffy, H.

    2006-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas located in the vicinity of the jugular foramen are complex vascular malformations and belong to the most challenging skull base lesions to treat. The authors comprehensively analyze multiple features in a series of dural arteriovenous fistulas with transosseous arterial feeders involving the jugular bulb. Four patients who underwent surgery via the transcondylar approach to treat dural arteriovenous fistulas around the jugular foramen were retrospectively reviewed. Previously, endovascular treatment was attempted in all patients. The success of the surgical treatment was examined with postoperative angiography. Complete obliteration of the dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) was achieved in three patients, and significant flow reduction in one individual. All patients had a good postoperative outcome, and only one experienced mild hypoglossal nerve palsy. Despite extensive bone drilling, an occipitocervical fusion was necessary in only one patient with bilateral lesions. The use of an individually tailored transcondylar approach to treat dural arteriovenous fistulas at the region of the jugular foramen is most effective. This approach allows for complete obliteration of the connecting arterial feeders, and removal of bony structures containing pathological vessels. PMID:17109181

  19. Delayed intracranial hypertension and cerebellar tonsillar necrosis associated with a depressed occipital skull fracture compressing the superior sagittal sinus. Case report.

    PubMed

    Vender, John R; Bierbrauer, Karin

    2005-11-01

    Depressed skull fractures overlying the major venous sinus are often managed nonoperatively because of the high associated risks of surgery in these locations. In the presence of clinical and radiographic evidence of sinus occlusion, however, surgical therapy may be necessary. The authors present the case of a 9-year-old boy with a depressed skull fracture overlying the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus. After initial conservative treatment, delayed signs of intracranial hypertension and a symptomatic tonsillar herniation with tonsillar necrosis developed. Possible causes as well as diagnostic and treatment options are reviewed.

  20. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever-Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Vairamon, Pradhosh M; Gowtham, Thiruvengadam; Das, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection can present as febrile illness with thrombocytopenia, dengue shock syndrome and dengue haemorrhagic fever. Neurological manifestation of dengue infection is more predominant in endemic region. Here, we report a case with unusual neurological presentation of dengue infection. A 16-year-old boy presented with fever for two week duration, headache and double vision involving left eye for two days. He had multiple erythematous rashes all over the body on 3rd day and treated conservatively. On examination he had bilateral papilloedema, left eye restricted abduction. His investigation revealed thrombocytopenia and positive dengue serology. His MRI brain with venogram showed bilateral transverse sinus thrombosis. Hence he was diagnosed as cerebral venous thrombosis due to dehydration with underlying dengue infection. He was hydrated and managed conservatively. On 3rd day his double vision started improving. His repeat MR Venogram was done after two week duration, which revealed recanalisation of bilateral transverse sinus. PMID:26266153

  1. Thai venous stroke prognostic score: TV-SPSS.

    PubMed

    Poungvarin, Niphon; Prayoonwiwat, Naraporn; Ratanakorn, Disya; Towanabut, Somchai; Tantirittisak, Tassanee; Suwanwela, Nijasri; Phanthumchinda, Kamman; Tiamkoa, Somsak; Chankrachang, Siwaporn; Nidhinandana, Samart; Laptikultham, Somsak; Limsoontarakul, Sansern; Udomphanthuruk, Suthipol

    2009-11-01

    Prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) has never been studied in Thailand. A simple prognostic score to predict poor prognosis of CVST has also never been reported. The authors are aiming to establish a simple and reliable prognostic score for this condition. The medical records of CVST patients from eight neurological training centers in Thailand who received between April 1993 and September 2005 were reviewed as part of this retrospective study. Clinical features included headache, seizure, stroke risk factors, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), blood pressure on arrival, papilledema, hemiparesis, meningeal irritation sign, location of occluded venous sinuses, hemorrhagic infarction, cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure, treatment options, length of stay, and other complications were analyzed to determine the outcome using modified Rankin scale (mRS). Poor prognosis (defined as mRS of 3-6) was determined on the discharge date. One hundred ninety four patients' records, 127 females (65.5%) and mean age of 36.6 +/- 14.4 years, were analyzed Fifty-one patients (26.3%) were in the poor outcome group (mRS 3-6). Overall mortality was 8.4%. Univariate analysis and then multivariate analysis using SPSS version 11.5 revealed only four statistically significant predictors influencing outcome of CVST They were underlying malignancy, low GCS, presence of hemorrhagic infarction (for poor outcome), and involvement of lateral sinus (for good outcome). Thai venous stroke prognostic score (TV-SPSS) was derived from these four factors using a multiple logistic model. A simple and pragmatic prognostic score for CVST outcome has been developed with high sensitivity (93%), yet low specificity (33%). The next study should focus on the validation of this score in other prospective populations.

  2. A novel multipurpose mini-endoscope for frontal sinus endoscopy "sinus view".

    PubMed

    Al Kadah, Basel; Bozzato, Victoria; Bozzato, Alessandro; Papaspyrou, George; Schick, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    Endoscopic frontal sinus surgery has been proven to enable the treatment of most frontal sinus pathologies but may be challenging for the surgeon in regard to the variable frontal sinus anatomy. Frontal sinus drainage identification and frontal sinus visualization are an essential part of successful frontal sinus surgery. We demonstrate a novel modular mini-endoscopic system for frontal sinus surgery. Fifty-two patients (37 male, 15 female) with a chronic rhino-sinusitis were enrolled. In this study, all patients were subjected to standard endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery with use of the fibre optic endoscope "Sinus View" (1.1 mm diameter, 10,000 pixels, irrigation channel and additional working channel) accessing the frontal sinus. A frontal sinus drainage type I in 38 cases, a frontal sinus drainage type IIa in 9 cases and a frontal sinus drainage type IIb in 5 cases according to Draf were performed. The modular mini-endoscopic system "Sinus view" was used to identify frontal sinus drainage in ten patients before ethmoidectomy and in the remaining patients (N = 42) after ethmoidectomy. Visualization of the frontal sinus drainage or the frontal sinus itself was easily carried out after irrigation. A clear identification of the frontal sinus by illumination was achieved in all cases. In addition the working channel of the endoscope was successfully used to perform visualized balloon dilatation at the frontal sinus drainage or for biopsy. The endonasal visualization of the frontal sinus drainage and frontal sinus itself is facilitated by also using a modular mini-endoscope with the option to use the working channel of the endoscope for biopsy or balloon dilatation.

  3. Epidural Anesthesia for Cesarean Section in a Pregnant Woman with Marfan Syndrome and Dural Ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Pepe, Franco; De Luca, Francesco; Privitera, Agata; Sanalitro, Elisabetta; Scarpinati, Puccio

    2017-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a genetic disorder of connective tissue, characterized by variable clinical features and multisystem complications. The anesthetic management during delivery is debated. Regional anesthesia has been used with success during cesarean delivery, but in some MFS patients there is a probability of erratic and inadequate spread of intrathecal local anesthetics as a result of dural ectasia. In these cases, epidural anesthesia may be a particularly useful technique during cesarean delivery because it allows an adequate spread and action of local anesthetic with a controlled onset of anesthesia, analgesia, and sympathetic block and a low risk of perioperative complications. We report the perioperative management of a patient with MFS and dural ectasia who successfully underwent cesarean section using epidural technique anesthesia. The previous pregnancy of this woman ended with cesarean section with a failed spinal anesthesia that was converted to general anesthesia due to unknown dural ectasia at that time. PMID:28611929

  4. Spontaneous acute subdural hematoma: A rare presentation of a dural intracranial fistula.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Guilherme Brasileiro; Veiga, José Carlos Esteves; Silva, João Miguel de Almeida; Conti, Mario Luiz Marques

    2016-03-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas are acquired lesions between the meningeal arteries and their associated draining veins. They may have highly variable clinical presentations and evolution, from severe neurological deficit to no or trivial symptoms. Intracranial hemorrhage occurs in less than 24% of all dural fistulas, and the bleeding is usually subarachnoid, more infrequently intracerebral, and rarely in the subdural space. Here, we present a rare case of a patient who presented with a subdural spontaneous hemorrhage. After investigation by cerebral angiography, the diagnosis of a dural arteriovenous fistula was made. The patient underwent uneventful endovascular treatment. As there are with only a few reports in the literature of such a presentation, we present this patient and perform a brief review of the literature.

  5. Epidural Anesthesia for Cesarean Section in a Pregnant Woman with Marfan Syndrome and Dural Ectasia.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Franco; Stracquadanio, Mariagrazia; De Luca, Francesco; Privitera, Agata; Sanalitro, Elisabetta; Scarpinati, Puccio

    2017-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a genetic disorder of connective tissue, characterized by variable clinical features and multisystem complications. The anesthetic management during delivery is debated. Regional anesthesia has been used with success during cesarean delivery, but in some MFS patients there is a probability of erratic and inadequate spread of intrathecal local anesthetics as a result of dural ectasia. In these cases, epidural anesthesia may be a particularly useful technique during cesarean delivery because it allows an adequate spread and action of local anesthetic with a controlled onset of anesthesia, analgesia, and sympathetic block and a low risk of perioperative complications. We report the perioperative management of a patient with MFS and dural ectasia who successfully underwent cesarean section using epidural technique anesthesia. The previous pregnancy of this woman ended with cesarean section with a failed spinal anesthesia that was converted to general anesthesia due to unknown dural ectasia at that time.

  6. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after a spinal surgery complicated by dural tear: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Karaeminogullari, Oguz; Atalay, Basar; Sahin, Orcun; Ozalay, Metin; Demirors, Huseyin; Tuncay, Cengiz; Ozen, Ozlem; Tandogan, Reha

    2005-07-01

    This report presents a case in which cerebellar hemorrhage occurred after lumbar decompression surgery that was complicated by dural tear and prolonged cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after spinal surgery is extremely rare. Our objective is to describe this unusual complication, discuss the possible mechanisms of remote cerebellar hemorrhage, and review the literature. A 73-year-old woman underwent surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis. A dural tear occurred during decompression, and the patient developed remote cerebellar hemorrhage on postoperative Day 2. The cerebellar hemorrhage was treated surgically, and a biopsy of hemorrhagic brain parenchyma revealed an arteriovenous malformation. Although it is an extremely rare complication, remote cerebellar hemorrhage should be kept in mind as a possible complication of spinal surgery, especially in operations complicated by dural tears.

  7. Preclinical characterization and safety of a novel hydrogel for augmenting dural repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Michael J.; Carnahan, Michael A.; D'Alessio, Keith; Butlin, Jared D. G.; Butt, Mark T.; Asher, Anthony L.

    2015-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is a potentially serious complication in surgical procedures involving opening of the dura mater. Although several materials have been developed to help achieve watertight dural closures, CSF leakages persist. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of a novel hydrogel designed to provide augmentation to standard methods of dural repair. Performance measures such as polymerization time, dimensional swelling, burst strength, and elasticity were examined in laboratory situations. Additionally, biocompatibility in an in vivo rat model was examined. The results demonstrate that this novel hydrogel has superior mechanical strength and tissue adherence with enhanced flexibility, reduced swelling, and quicker set time compared with existing hydrogel dural sealants approved for intra-cranial use. Furthermore, biocompatibility studies demonstrate that this compound is both non-toxic and non-immunogenic.

  8. [Rapidly progressive dementia and parkinsonism associated to multiple dural arteriovenous fistulas].

    PubMed

    Mejia, P; Piedra, L M; Merchan-Del Hierro, X

    2017-03-01

    Introduccion. Las demencias rapidamente progresivas son un grupo poco frecuente de enfermedades caracterizadas por un deterioro cognitivo y otras alteraciones neurologicas que evolucionan en el transcurso de semanas a meses. Su etiologia es diversa e incluye un gran numero de condiciones neurodegenerativas, toxicas, metabolicas, autoinmunes, infecciosas y vasculares. Caso clinico. Varon de 69 años, que ingreso por demencia rapidamente progresiva y parkinsonismo causado por multiples fistulas arteriovenosas durales tratadas exitosamente mediante terapia endovascular. Conclusion. Las fistulas arteriovenosas durales son conexiones anomalas entre las arterias durales y los senos venosos o venas corticales que constituyen una causa inusual de demencia rapidamente progresiva, pero que debe considerarse, dada la disponibilidad de un tratamiento especifico con reversion de los sintomas.

  9. Single center experience with treatment of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Neriman; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Goerike, Sophia Luise; Wrede, Karsten Henning; Kleist, Bernadette; Stein, Klaus-Peter; Gembruch, Oliver; Sandalcioglu, Ibrahim Erol; Wanke, Isabel; Sure, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (SDAVFs) are rare pathologies with a yearly incidence of 5-10 new cases/million, constituting 60-80 % of spinal arteriovenous malformations. Clinical symptoms include progressive paraparesis, paresthesias, bladder, and bowel disturbances. The pathophysiology of SDAVFs is not well elucidated. Microneurosurgery and endovascular techniques are established treatment modalities for permanent fistula occlusion, which are oftentimes accompanied by an amelioration of neurological deficits in the long run. Here, we report our interdisciplinary neurosurgical/neuroradiological management strategy of SDAVFs in 32 patients who were evaluated retrospectively. We focused on clinical presentation, microneurosurgical and interventional technique, early, and late neurological results. Quality of life (QoL) was additionally assessed in 12 patients at last follow-up. We discuss the results against the background of the current literature. Our series and the literature indicate that clinical outcome after treatment of SDAVF is favorable in general. Both neurosurgical and neurointerventional therapies appear to be safe and effective, but short-term neurological deterioration after the intervention constitutes an as-of-yet unsolved problem. Beyond age and preoperative neurological state, presence of comorbidities had a significant influence on neurological outcome in our study sample. Self-assessed physical and mental QoL at long-term follow-up was reduced in quite a number of patients and was associated with a poorer neurological result as well as presence of comorbidities. The patients' perspective in terms of QoL was first investigated in this study, but further research on QoL and psychosocial impairment of SDAVF patients is needed to enable individualized counseling and rehabilitation strategies.

  10. Posterior Trans-Dural Repair of Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Herniation after Resection of Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Ki; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic spinal cord herniation is a rare complication following spinal surgery. We introduce a posterior trans-dural repair technique used in a case of thoracic spinal cord herniation through a ventral dural defect following resection of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in the cervicothoracic spine. A 51-year-old female was suffering from paraplegia after laminectomy alone for cervicothoracic OPLL. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a severely compressed spinal cord with pseudomeningocele identified postoperatively. Cerebrospinal fluid leak and iatrogenic spinal cord herniation persisted despite several operations with duroplasty and sealing agent. Finally, the problems were treated by repair of the ventral dural defect with posterior trans-dural duroplasty. Several months after surgery, the patient could walk independently. This surgical technique can be applied to treat ventral dural defect and spinal cord herniation. PMID:27114779

  11. Spinal bone defects in neurofibromatosis type I with dural ectasia: stress fractures or dysplastic? A case series.

    PubMed

    Khoo Bao, Jenn Nee; Ogunwale, Bamikole; Huson, Susan M; Ealing, John; Whitehouse, Richard W

    2013-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) is a multisystem neurocutaneous disorder with varied musculoskeletal manifestations. Dural ectasia is a known association, whilst pedicular anomalies have been described, although not as frequently as other skeletal manifestations. However, reports of pedicular and other spinal clefts or fractures in combination with dural ectasia in NF1 are scarce. We aimed to identify osseous defects in the posterior elements of NF1 patients with dural ectasia. Images of patients with NF1 and back pain were reviewed for osseous defects in the posterior elements. Four patients were identified with NF1, back pain, dural ectasia and bone defects. The imaging appearances of the defects are illustrated. Defects in the spinal posterior elements of patients with NF1, back pain and dural ectasia may be dysplastic, stress fractures or, most probably, multifactorial in origin. Computed tomography demonstrates these defects most clearly.

  12. Posterior Trans-Dural Repair of Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Herniation after Resection of Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Hong-Ki; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2016-04-01

    Iatrogenic spinal cord herniation is a rare complication following spinal surgery. We introduce a posterior trans-dural repair technique used in a case of thoracic spinal cord herniation through a ventral dural defect following resection of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in the cervicothoracic spine. A 51-year-old female was suffering from paraplegia after laminectomy alone for cervicothoracic OPLL. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a severely compressed spinal cord with pseudomeningocele identified postoperatively. Cerebrospinal fluid leak and iatrogenic spinal cord herniation persisted despite several operations with duroplasty and sealing agent. Finally, the problems were treated by repair of the ventral dural defect with posterior trans-dural duroplasty. Several months after surgery, the patient could walk independently. This surgical technique can be applied to treat ventral dural defect and spinal cord herniation.

  13. [Homocysteine and venous thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Monnerat, C; Hayoz, D

    1997-09-06

    Congenital homocysteinuria is a rare inherited metabolic disorder with early onset atherosclerosis and arterial and venous trombosis. Moderate hyperhomocysteinemia is more frequently encountered and is recognized as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Several case-control studies demonstrate an association between venous thromboembolism and moderate hyperhomocysteinemia. A patient with moderate hyperhomocysteinemia has a 2-3 relative risk of developing an episode of venous thromboembolism. The occurrence of mild hyperhomocysteinemia in heterozygotes for the mutation of Leiden factor V involves a 10-fold increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism. The biochemical mechanism by which homocysteine may promote thrombosis is not fully recognized. Homocysteine inhibits the expression of thrombomodulin, the thrombin cofactor responsible for protein C activation, and inhibits antithrombin-III binding. Treatment with folic acid reduces the plasma level of homocysteinemia, but no study has demonstrated its efficacy in reducing the incidence of venous thromboembolism or atherosclerosis. Hyperhomocysteinemia should be included in the screening of abnormalities of hemostasis and thrombosis in patients with idiopathic thromboembolism, and mild hyperhomocysteinemia may justify a trial of folic acid.

  14. Bolstering the Nasoseptal Flap Using Sphenoid Sinus Fat Packing: A Technical Case Report.

    PubMed

    Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Zaidi, Hasan A; Cote, David J; Laws, Edward R

    2017-03-01

    Resection of extensive skull base lesions often necessitates relatively large dural openings and arachnoid, resulting in skull base defects with the potential for a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak. A nasoseptal flap (NSF) is a vascularized graft that has greatly diminished the incidence of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Annealing of flaps against the ventral skull base can be tenuous within the first few days after surgery. We report the use of sphenoid sinus fat packing as a buttress to support the nasoseptal flap during skull base reconstruction. A 37-year-old man presented with pan-hypopituitarism, bitemporal hemianopsia, and imaging consistent with a craniopharyngioma. He underwent an endoscopic endonasal approach with resection of the planum and tuberculum sphenoidale for resection of this mass. An NSF was harvested, and a combination of suprasellar fat packing, tensor fasciae lata graft, and Porex plate along with the flap were used to reconstruct the skull base. Postoperatively, he precipitously experienced copious rhinorrhea necessitating surgical re-exploration. A redundant segment of the NSF had retracted into the sphenoid sinus, and was no longer supported against the ventral skull base. We repositioned the NSF and used sphenoid sinus fat packing to help support the graft against the ventral skull base. A postoperative computed tomographic scan demonstrated a clear delineation between the vascularized graft and the fat packing, confirming proper positioning of the flap. Sphenoid sinus fat packing can be an important technical adjunct in bolstering the nasoseptal flap against the ventral skull base in the tenuous early perioperative period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Activation of TRPA1 on dural afferents: a potential mechanism of headache pain.

    PubMed

    Edelmayer, Rebecca M; Le, Larry N; Yan, Jin; Wei, Xiaomei; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Preti, Delia; Appendino, Giovanni; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Dodick, David W; Vanderah, Todd W; Porreca, Frank; Dussor, Gregory

    2012-09-01

    Activation of transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) on meningeal nerve endings has been suggested to contribute to environmental irritant-induced headache, but this channel may also contribute to other forms of headache, such as migraine. The preclinical studies described here examined functional expression of TRPA1 on dural afferents and investigated whether activation of TRPA1 contributes to headache-like behaviors. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in vitro with 2 TRPA1 agonists, mustard oil (MO), and the environmental irritant umbellulone (UMB) on dural-projecting trigeminal ganglion neurons. Application of MO and UMB to dural afferents produced TRPA1-like currents in approximately 42% and 38% of cells, respectively. By means of an established in vivo behavioral model of migraine-related allodynia, dural application of MO and UMB produced robust time-related tactile facial and hind paw allodynia that was attenuated by pretreatment with the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Additionally, MO or UMB were applied to the dura, and exploratory activity was monitored for 30min with an automated open-field activity chamber. Dural MO and UMB decreased the number of vertical rearing episodes and the time spent rearing in comparison to vehicle-treated animals. This change in activity was prevented in rats pretreated with HC-030031 as well as sumatriptan, a clinically effective antimigraine agent. These data indicate that TRPA1 is expressed on a substantial fraction of dural afferents, and activation of meningeal TRPA1 produces behaviors consistent with those observed in patients during migraine attacks. Further, they suggest that activation of meningeal TRPA1 via endogenous or exogenous mechanisms can lead to afferent signaling and headache.

  16. Unusual presentation of total anomalous systemic venous connection.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan; Kothandam, Sivakumar; Kumar, Rajesh; Pradhan, Priya M; Agarwal, Ravi

    2017-07-01

    A 9-year-old girl who presented with dyspnea on exertion was diagnosed with total anomalous systemic venous connection to the left atrium (both venae cavae), no left superior vena cava, and a moderate-sized atrial septal defect with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension and ectopic atrial rhythm. She underwent septation of the common atrium using autologous pericardium, thereby rerouting the superior vena cava, inferior vena cava, and coronary sinus to the right atrium. Her postoperative course was uneventful. This case is reported for its rarity of presentation with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension and ectopic atrial rhythm.

  17. Cyanosis in a 9-month-old child after repair of total anomalous pulmonary venous return.

    PubMed

    Latus, Heiner; Hussain, Tarique; Krasemann, Thomas; Greil, Gerald F

    2012-06-01

    A 9-month-old girl presented with cyanosis after correction of total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) to the coronary sinus in the neonatal period. During corrective surgery, the right superior vena cava (RSVC) was damaged and re-anastomosed to the right atrium. Echocardiography showed increased flow velocity in the pulmonary venous confluence. Therefore, pulmonary venous obstruction was suspected. However, subsequent cardiac MRI revealed a stenosed RSVC as well as a dilated left superior vena cava (LSVC) draining from the left innominate vein into the pulmonary venous confluence. The re-recruited LSVC drained deoxygenated blood into the systemic circulation, causing cyanosis. After uncomplicated placement of a stent in the narrowed RSVC and occlusion of the LSVC, transcutaneous saturations normalised immediately.

  18. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis Complicated by Hemorrhagic Infarction Secondary to Ventriculoperitoneal Shunting

    PubMed Central

    Son, Won-Soo

    2010-01-01

    While a delayed intracerebral hemorrhage at the site of a ventricular catheter has occasionally been reported in literature, a delayed hemorrhage caused by venous infarction secondary to ventriculoperitoneal shunting has not been previously reported. In the present case, a 68-year-old woman underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunting through a frontal burr hole, and developed a hemorrhagic transformation of venous infarction on the second postoperative day. This massive venous infarction was caused by bipolar coagulation and occlusion of a large paramedian cortical vein in association with atresia of the rostral superior sagittal sinus. Thus, to eliminate the risk of postoperative venous infarction, technical precautions to avoid damaging surface vessels in a burr hole are required under loupe magnification in ventriculoperitoneal shunting. PMID:21113365

  19. Venous Oxygenation Mapping using Velocity-Selective Excitation and Arterial Nulling (VSEAN)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Wong, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    A new MRI technique to map the oxygenation of venous blood is presented. The method uses velocity-selective excitation and arterial nulling pulses, combined with phase sensitive signal detection to isolate the venous blood signal. The T2 of this signal along with a T2-Y calibration curve yields estimates of venous oxygenation in situ. Results from phantoms and healthy human subjects under normoxic and hypoxic conditions are shown, and venous saturation levels estimated from both sagittal sinus and grey matter based ROIs are compared to the related techniques TRUST and QUIXOTIC. In addition, combined with an additional scan without arterial nulling pulses, the oxygen saturation level on arterial side can also be estimated. PMID:22294414

  20. Sex determination using maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kanthem, Ranjith Kumar; Guttikonda, Venkateswara Rao; Yeluri, Sivaranjani; Kumari, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Individual identification is a subtle concept and often one of the most important priorities in mass disasters, road accidents, air crashes, fires, and even in the investigation of criminal cases. Matching specific features detected on the cadaver with data recorded during the life of an individual is an important aspect in forensics, and can be performed by fingerprint analysis, deoxyribonucleic acid matching, anthropological methods, radiological methods and other techniques which can facilitate age and sex identification. Sinus radiography is one such method that has been used for determination of the sex of an individual. Hence, an attempt is being made to use the different dimensions of the maxillary sinus in the determination of sex using coronal and axial sections of plain computed tomography (CT) scan. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients including 17 male and 13 female, visiting the Outpatient Department of the Mamata General Hospital were included as the study subjects. The dimensions of right and left maxillary sinuses of 30 subjects from plain CT were measured using SYNGO software and statistical analysis was done. Results: Sex determination using height, length, width, and volume of the maxillary sinus on both sides showed statistically significant results with a higher percentage of sexual dimorphism in the case of volume. Conclusion: Volume of the right maxillary sinus can be used as accurate diagnostic parameter for sex determination. PMID:26005308

  1. Spinal anaesthesia in a patient with post-spine surgery dural ectasia.

    PubMed

    Errando, C L; Del Moral, A; Cobo, I; García-Gregorio, N; Pallardó-López, M A

    2014-01-01

    Dural sac ectasia is a very infrequent anatomical abnormality, usually caused by connective tissue diseases, as Marfan syndrome. Very few cases have been described being a consequence of a previous spine surgical procedure. We describe the case of an elderly patient who should be operated on twice due to sub-occlusive colon disease. Surgery was performed under spinal anaesthesia. A dural sac ectasia was suspected after the first procedure and the abdominal X-ray was reviewed. The characteristics of the anatomical alteration and the course of both anaesthetic procedures were described. X-ray and CT images were provided.

  2. Dural Reduction Surgery: A Treatment Option for Frontotemporal Brain Sagging Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mostofi, Emily; Schievink, Wouter I; Sim, Valerie L

    2016-07-01

    Frontotemporal brain sagging syndrome is a dementia associated with hypersomnolence, personality changes, and features of intracranial hypotension on magnetic resonance imaging. The literature is sparse with respect to treatment options; many patients simply worsen. We present a case in which this syndrome responded to lumbar dural reduction surgery. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging indicated normalization of brain sagging and lumbar intrathecal pressure. Although no evidence of cerebrospinal leak was found, extremely thin dura was noted intraoperatively, suggesting that a thin and incompetent dura could result in this low-pressure syndrome. Clinicians who encounter this syndrome should consider dural reduction surgery as a treatment strategy.

  3. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Laryea, Jonathan; Champagne, Bradley

    2013-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) can occur after major general surgery. Pulmonary embolism is recognized as the most common identifiable cause of death in hospitalized patients in the United States. The risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is higher in colorectal surgical procedures compared with general surgical procedures. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in this population is estimated to be 0.2 to 0.3%. Prevention of VTE is considered a patient-safety measure in most mandated quality initiatives. The measures for prevention of VTE include mechanical methods (graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices) and pharmacologic agents. A combination of mechanical and pharmacologic methods produces the best results. Patients undergoing surgery should be stratified according to their risk of VTE based on patient risk factors, disease-related risk factors, and procedure-related risk factors. The type of prophylaxis should be commensurate with the risk of VTE based on the composite risk profile.

  4. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Laryea, Jonathan; Champagne, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) can occur after major general surgery. Pulmonary embolism is recognized as the most common identifiable cause of death in hospitalized patients in the United States. The risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is higher in colorectal surgical procedures compared with general surgical procedures. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in this population is estimated to be 0.2 to 0.3%. Prevention of VTE is considered a patient-safety measure in most mandated quality initiatives. The measures for prevention of VTE include mechanical methods (graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices) and pharmacologic agents. A combination of mechanical and pharmacologic methods produces the best results. Patients undergoing surgery should be stratified according to their risk of VTE based on patient risk factors, disease-related risk factors, and procedure-related risk factors. The type of prophylaxis should be commensurate with the risk of VTE based on the composite risk profile. PMID:24436666

  5. Central venous access.

    PubMed

    Ganeshan, Arul; Warakaulle, Dinuke R; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-01-01

    Central venous access plays an important role in the management of an ever-increasing population of patients ranging from those that are critically ill to patients with difficult clinical access. Interventional radiologists are key in delivering this service and should be familiar with the wide range of techniques and catheters now available to them. A comprehensive description of these catheters with regard to indications, technical aspects of catheterization, success rates, and associated early and late complications, as well as a review of various published guidelines on central venous catheter insertion are given in this article.

  6. Unexpected location of pilonidal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Sion-Vardy, N; Osyntsov, L; Cagnano, E; Osyntsov, A; Vardy, D; Benharroch, D

    2009-12-01

    Pilonidal sinuses usually occur in the sacrococcygeal area in young men, and occasionally can be found in other ectopic sites. We present a retrospective case review on unusual locations of pilonidal sinuses in the past 4 years. The lesion sites were as follows: one on the penis, two on the scalp, two on the abdomen, one on the neck, two in the groin and two in the axilla. Abdominal and penile lesions are uncommon, but the other locations reported are unusually rare. To our knowledge, the groin has not been reported previously as a site of a pilonidal sinus, although the histological appearance of hidradenitis suppurativa may well resemble it. When trying to clarify the pathogenesis of these occurrences, we found that recurrent hair removal was a common characteristic of the patients we contacted, and this may have been the initiating trauma.

  7. Modeling the Carotid Sinus Baroreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramachandra; Nudelman, Harvey B.

    1972-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes the relationship between sinus pressure and nerve discharge frequency of the carotid sinus baroreceptor is presented. It is partly based upon the single-fiber data obtained by Clarke from the sinus nerve of a dog. The model takes into account what is currently known about the physiology of the baroreceptor. It consists of two nonlinear ordinary differential equations and eight free parameters. With one set of values for these eight parameters, the model reproduces well the experimental results reported by Clarke for positive ramp pressure inputs. Only three parameters needed to be adjusted in order to fit the dynamic data. The remaining five were obtained from static and steady-state data. PMID:5056961

  8. An innovative technique for detecting the caudal end of occluded inferior petrosal sinus in cavernous arteriovenous fistula using intravascular ultrasonography--technical note.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Shigeru; Nishio, Akimasa; Takahashi, Yoshinobu; Kondo, Kimito; Kawakami, Taichiro; Terakawa, Yuzo; Mitsuhashi, Yutaka; Ohata, Kenji

    2015-08-01

    Although cavernous sinus (CS) dural arteriovenous fistulas (d-AVFs) are usually treated with transvenous embolization (TVE) via the inferior petrosal sinus (IPS), IPSs are sometimes thrombosed and angiographically invisible. In such cases, the first obstacle to TVE is detecting the entry to the IPS. We report a new technique for TVE via IPS using intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS). Three consecutive cases of CS d-AVF with ipsilateral or bilateral IPS occlusion were involved in this study. On TVE, the orifice of the IPS was investigated with IVUS placed in the jugular vein or jugular bulb. This technique has been successfully adapted in all three cases. In two of these cases, IPS was well visualized with the help of IVUS, and TVE was successfully performed. To our knowledge, this is the first report to mention the usefulness of IVUS for detecting angiographically occult IPS.

  9. Protective effect of coronary sinus obstruction from primary ischemia-induced ventricular fibrillation in the dog.

    PubMed

    Kralios, A C; Anderson, F L; Kralios, F A

    1993-04-01

    We examined whether partial coronary sinus obstruction affects the latency of the early ventricular fibrillation (VF) of acute ischemia. During baseline trials 15 of 19 open-chest dogs fibrillated repeatedly and predictably within 2 to 5 minutes (251.6 +/- 64 seconds) after reversible, double coronary artery occlusion without developing profound hemodynamic deterioration. The effect of partial coronary sinus obstruction sufficient to increase coronary sinus pressure to 40 mm Hg could be adequately tested in 11 dogs. Coronary sinus obstruction consistently prevented VF in five dogs, significantly prolonged the VF latency in three (p < 0.01 to p < 0.001), and had no clear effect in another three. The overall effect was significant at the p < 0.01 level. VF latency prolongation/prevention was also positively correlated to the residual coronary sinus pressure at the time of VF (r = 0.76; p < 0.008), as well as the baseline VF latency (r = 0.75; (p < 0.008). The protective effect of coronary venous hypertension most likely reflects preservation of adequate extracellular fluid in the ischemic region after the perfusion arrest. This extracellular fluid may constitute a key component in the prevention of early ischemic arrhythmias by preserving interstitial hydraulic continuity and tissue homogeneity through enhanced dilution and diffusion of solutes.

  10. The jugular venous pressure revisited

    PubMed Central

    CHIACO, JOHN MICHAEL S. CHUA; PARIKH, NISHA I.; FERGUSSON, DAVID J.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of the jugular venous pressure is often inadequately performed and undervalued. Here, we review the physiologic and anatomic basis for the jugular venous pressure, including the discrepancy between right atrial and central venous pressures. We also describe the correct method of evaluating this clinical finding and review the clinical relevance of the jugular venous pressure, especially its value in assessing the severity and response to treatment of congestive heart failure. Waveforms reflective of specific conditions are also discussed. PMID:24085809

  11. Treatment for Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Salazar Adum, Juan Pablo; Arora, Rohit

    Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia (IST) is a chronic medical condition with a wide variety of clinical presentations making it, sometimes, very insidious at the time of the diagnosis. Several therapeutic options, including, pharmacotherapy, cardiac rehabilitation, and modification or ablation of the sinus node, have been proposed for the management of IST, but because of the complexity and lack of understanding of pathophysiology, it can be difficult to manage, despite the numerous treatment options currently available. The purpose of this review is to analyze the treatment for IST, focusing on the role of newer therapy and the potential benefits in the management of this cardiac rhythm disturbance.

  12. Comparison of deep wound infection rates using a synthetic dural substitute (neuro-patch) or pericranium graft for dural closure: a clinical review of 1 year.

    PubMed

    Malliti, Miriam; Page, Philippe; Gury, Charles; Chomette, Eric; Nataf, François; Roux, François-Xavier

    2004-03-01

    The need to repair dural defects has prompted the use of dura mater substitutes. Many synthetic materials have been used for dural closure. Neuro-Patch (B. Braun Médical S.A., Boulogne, France) is a nonabsorbable microporous fleece composed of polyester urethane that has been approved for human use by the European Union since 1995. To the best of our knowledge, no clinical series with Neuro-Patch have been published thus far, particularly with regard to septic complications. The aim of our study was to compare the safety of Neuro-Patch with that of pericranium graft with regard to postoperative wound infections. This is a retrospective study of 1 year's experience including all patients who underwent dural plasty with a Neuro-Patch (n = 61) or pericranium graft (n = 63). The follow-up period was at least 12 months after surgery. Before wound infection rates in the two groups were compared, factors suspected of being risks for neurosurgical site infection were evaluated. Patient characteristics (mean age, neurological diagnosis), surgical procedures, prophylactic antibiotics, and risk factors for surgical infections (including duration of surgery, emergency, contaminated operations, and external cerebrospinal fluid drainage) were similar in the Neuro-Patch and pericranium groups. Deep wound infection rates in the Neuro-Patch and pericranium groups were 15 and 5%, respectively (P = 0.06), and cerebrospinal fluid leaks were significantly more frequent in the Neuro-Patch group (13 versus 1.6%, P < 0.05). The results of our investigations show that Neuro-Patch raised the risk of wound infection, as do foreign materials implanted in the body. Synthetic dural grafts should be reserved for when autologous grafts are not sufficient or possible. An extensive prospective multicenter randomized trial is needed to confirm our results.

  13. Endovascular treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis: Contemporary multicenter experience

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Lopes, Demetrius K; Binning, Mandy J; Veznedaroglu, Erol; Liebman, Kenneth M; Arthur, Adam S; Doss, Vinodh T; Levy, Elad I

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular therapy of cerebral venous thrombosis using modern approaches to intracranial recanalization, such as stent retrievers and aspiration thrombectomy, is not well described. We performed a retrospective review of data for consecutive patients with venous sinus thrombosis who underwent endovascular treatment between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2013 at participating institutions. We identified a total of 13 patients with a diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis. The most frequently utilized type of endovascular intervention was the Penumbra aspiration system (Penumbra Inc., Alameda, California, USA) (nine cases), followed by local infusion of tissue plasminogen activator (bolus and/or drip in six cases) and stent retrievers (Solitaire FR (Covidien, Irvine, California, USA) in three cases and Trevo (Stryker, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA) in one case). Overall, multimodality treatment (two or more different types of devices or approaches) was performed in 62% of cases. Follow-up data were available for 11 patients; of those, five had a favorable clinical outcome (defined as modified Rankin Scale score of 0–2) and three patients died. Various endovascular approaches are utilized in current clinical practice. A multimodal approach to endovascular therapy for the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis resulted in partial or complete restoration of flow in all cases, yet the mortality rate of 27% indicates the need for improvement in recanalization strategies for this disorder. PMID:26055685

  14. Obstruction of Venous Drainage Linked to Transient Global Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ke; Chao, A-Ching; Chang, Feng-Chi; Chung, Chih-Ping; Hsu, Hung-Yi; Sheng, Wen-Yung; Wu, Jiang; Hu, Han-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal extracranial venous drainage modality has been considered an etiology of transient global amnesia (TGA). Evidence suggests that the transmission of the intrathoracic/intraabdominal pressure during a Valsalva maneuver (VM) is mainly through the vertebral venous system, and patency of internal jugular vein (IJV) is essential for venous drainage and pressure releasing. We hypothesize that obstruction of IJV venous drainage is a contributing factor in TGA pathogenesis. A magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol was used in 45 TGA patients and 45 age- and sex-matched controls to assess the morphologies of IJV, brachiocephalic vein (BCV) and asymmetry of transverse sinus (TS). The IJV was divided into the upper- and middle-IJV segments. Compared to the controls, TGA patients had significantly higher rates of moderate and severe compression/stenosis at the bilateral upper-IJV segment (left: 37.8% vs. 17.8%, P = 0.0393; right: 57.8% vs.15.6%, P<0.0012), in left BCV (60% vs. 8.9%, P<0.0004), and in TS hypoplasia (53.3%% vs. 31.1%, P = 0.0405). The prevalence of at least one site of venous compression/stenosis in IJV or BCV was significantly higher in patients than in controls (91.1% vs. 33.3%, P<0.0004). The diameter of the left TS in MRV, but not in T1 contrast imaging, was significantly smaller in TGA patients than in controls (0.31±0.21 vs. 0.41±0.19, P = 0.0290), which was compatible with downstream venous stenosis/obstruction. TGA patients have a higher prevalence of compression/stenosis of the bilateral IJV and the left BCV and TS hypoplasia, which is new evidence that supports the role of extracranial veins in TGA pathogenesis. PMID:26173146

  15. Mid and long term outcomes of dural arteriovenous fistula endovascular management with Onyx. Experience of a single tertiary center.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Barber, Sean M; Klucznik, Richard; Diaz, Orlando

    2014-10-01

    The natural history of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) with cortical venous drainage is unfavorable, and treatment is recommended in most cases. Early reports have documented excellent initial clinical and radiographic outcomes after Onyx embolization of DAVFs but little evidence is available regarding the long term durability of this technique. We retrospectively reviewed a database of 63 DAVFs in 53 consecutive patients who underwent Onyx embolization of a DAVF between 2001 and 2012 at our institution. Cognard types I and III were seen most commonly. A total of 72 Onyx embolization procedures were successfully completed during the study period, resulting in complete or near complete occlusion by the end of the study period in 58 (92.1%) DAVFs. For DAVFs in which complete or near complete obliteration was attained, stability of obliteration at 6, 12, 24, and 46 months was 100%, 95.4%, 93.8%, and 92.3%, respectively. DAVF recanalization/regrowth was discovered on delayed follow-up angiography in only five instances in which immediate post-embolization angiography revealed complete obliteration. Complications were seen in seven embolization procedures and included cranial nerve palsies (n=3), embolic infarcts (n=2), intraparenchymal hemorrhage (n=1), and unintentional stent deployment (n=1). Early evidence has indicated that endovascular Onyx embolization is safe and effective at achieving an initial angiographic cure. Results of our series suggest that angiographic and clinical outcomes of Onyx embolization remain relatively stable at mid and long term follow-up. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Compression and venous surgery for venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mosti, Giovanni

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews published data on the effects of surgery and compression in the treatment of venous ulcers and the best options for compression therapy. Randomized controlled studies reveal that surgery and compression have similar effectiveness in healing ulcers but surgery is more effective in preventing recurrence. Most leg ulcers have a venous pathophysiology and occur because of venous ambulatory hypertension caused by venous reflux and impairment of the venous pumping function. Proposed surgical interventions range from crossectomy and stripping to perforator vein interruption and endovascular procedures (laser, radiofrequency). More conservative procedures (foam sclerotherapy, conservative hemodynamic treatment) have also been proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Venous oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Christiane; Bloos, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Early detection and rapid treatment of tissue hypoxia are important goals. Venous oxygen saturation is an indirect index of global oxygen supply-to-demand ratio. Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) measurement has become a surrogate for mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). ScvO2 is measured by a catheter placed in the superior vena cava. After results from a single-center study suggested that maintaining ScvO2 values >70% might improve survival rates in septic patients, international practice guidelines included this target in a bundle strategy to treat early sepsis. However, a recent multicenter study with >1500 patients found that the use of central hemodynamic and ScvO2 monitoring did not improve long-term survival when compared to the clinical assessment of the adequacy of circulation. It seems that if sepsis is recognized early, a rapid initiation of antibiotics and adequate fluid resuscitation are more important than measuring venous oxygen saturation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Venous access in oncology].

    PubMed

    Lesimple, T; Béguec, J F; Levêque, J M

    1998-10-31

    Many treatments administered to cancer patients require venous access either via a peripheral vein or a larger central vein at the risk of local or systemic infection, thrombus formation or venous occlusion and dysfunction. Insertion of a central catheter is an invasive procedure which must be conducted under conditions of rigorous asepsia. Strict rules based on well-defined protocols must be applied throughout its use. Local or systemic infectious complications account for 18 to 25% of all nosocomial infections and are often related to colonisation of the puncture site by a Gram positive germ. In case of infection, ablation of the central catheter is not mandatory for diagnosis or antibiotic treatment. Reported at varying frequencies in the literature from 4 to 42%, thrombus formation is unpredictable and often difficult to diagnose. Anticoagulants or fibrolytic agents are indicated but it may also be necessary to withdraw the catheter. Displacement, rupture, obstruction and extravasation are frequent complications. Back flow must be checked in all venous accesses and free flow carefully verified. The access must remain patent throughout the period of use, guaranteed by a standard heparinization and rinsing protocol. This complications must not mask the important progress achieved with the use of central venous access for specific and symptomatic treatment in cancer patients.

  19. Bacterial colonization or infection in chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Pandak, Nenad; Pajić-Penavić, Ivana; Sekelj, Alen; Tomić-Paradžik, Maja; Cabraja, Ivica; Miklaušić, Božana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was the determination of bacteria present in maxillary and ethmoid cavities in patients with chronic sinusitis and to correlate these findings with bacteria simultaneously present in their nasopharynx. The purpose of this correlation was to establish the role of bacteria found in chronically inflamed sinuses and to evaluate if the bacteria present colonized or infected sinus mucosa. Nasopharyngeal and sinus swabs of 65 patients that underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery were cultivated and at the same time the presence of leukocytes were determined in each swab. The most frequently found bacteria in nasopharynx were Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus spp., Streptococcus viridans and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Maxillary or ethmoidal sinus swabs yielded bacterial growth in 47 (72.31%) patients. The most frequently found bacteria in sinuses were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp. and Streptococci (pneumoniae, viridans and spp.). The insignificant number of leukocytes was present in each sinus and nasopharyngeal swab. Every published microbiology study of chronic sinusitis proved that sinus mucosa were colonized with bacteria and not infected, yet antibiotic therapy was discussed making no difference between infection and colonization. Chronic sinusitis should be considered a chronic inflammatory condition rather than bacterial infection, so routine antibiotic therapy should be avoided. Empiric antibiotic therapy should be prescribed only in cases when the acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis occurs and the antibiotics prescribed should aim the usual bacteria causing acute sinusitis. In case of therapy failure, antibiotics should be changed having in mind that under certain circumstances any bacteria colonizing sinus mucosa can cause acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis.

  20. Minimally invasive approach for the treatment of lumbar epidural arteriovenous fistulas with intradural venous reflux.

    PubMed

    Najjar, A; Zairi, F; Sunna, T; Weil, A; Estrade, L; Weill, A; Shedid, D

    2016-10-01

    Vascular lesions of the spinal cord are increasingly recognized. The most common types of these lesions are dural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) whereas, extradural AVFs are a very rare type of spinal AVF and can be associated with either extradural or intradural venous reflux. This results in neurological deficits through congestive or compressive myeloradiculopathy. These lesions must be treated to allow stabilization or improvement of neurologic status, either by endovascular therapy or microsurgical interruption. However, because some patients are not amenable to endovascular treatment, surgery is often warranted, which usually involves hemi- or bilateral laminectomy following a midline approach with bilateral muscle stripping. The main drawback of this procedure is directly related to the morbidity of the approach. Although, minimally invasive approaches are likely to overcome this drawback, there is a lack of reported experience supporting their use for treating spinal dural AVFs. Two patients, aged 62 and 79 years old, presented with rapidly progressive myelopathy characterized by paraparesis and sphincter disturbance. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal cord oedema with perimedullary flow voids in both cases. Digital subtraction angiography revealed extradural AVFs associated with perimedullary venous reflux. Endovascular therapy was not feasible. Both patients were treated with microsurgical interruption of the intradural vein through a non-expendable retractor. Complete exclusion was confirmed on postoperative angiography, resulting in resolution of spinal cord edema and improved neurological functional status at 2-year follow-up. The minimally invasive surgical treatment of spinal AVFs with epidural venous reflux is safe and effective. This approach is a valuable alternative to endovascular therapy and the standard open microsurgical approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Floating dural sac sign is a sensitive magnetic resonance imaging finding of spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Takaaki; Hatazawa, Jun; Sato, Shinya; Kanoto, Masafumi; Fukao, Akira; Kayama, Takamasa

    2013-01-01

    We would like to propose floating dural sac sign, which is observed as a hyperintense band or rim around the spinal dural sac on axial T2-weighted images, as a sensitive sign to identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. One hundred patients with orthostatic headache were prospectively registered in 11 hospitals. These patients were examined by brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (n = 89), radioisotope cisternography (n = 89), MR myelography (n = 86), axial T2-weighted imaging of the spine (n = 70), and computed tomography myelography (n = 2). In this study, we separately evaluated the imaging findings of intracranial hypotension and spinal CSF leakage. Among 100 patients, 16 patients were diagnosed as having spinal CSF leaks. Of 70 patients examined with axial T2-weighted imaging, 14 patients were diagnosed with spinal CSF leaks, and floating dural sac sign was observed in 17 patients, 13 patients with spinal CSF leaks and 4 without CSF leaks (sensitivity 92.9%, specificity 92.9%). Of 86 patients examined by MR myelography, extradural fluid was observed in only 3 patients (sensitivity 21.4%, specificity 100%). The floating dural sac sign was a sensitive sign that can be used to identify CSF leakage. Spinal axial T2-weighted imaging might be a good screening method for spinal CSF leakage that can help to avoid the need for lumbar puncture.

  2. Surgical resection without dural reconstruction of a lumbar meningioma in an elderly woman

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Jun; Kato, Hiroyuki; Ebara, Sohei; Takahashi, Hideto

    2009-01-01

    Meningiomas of the spine occur in the thoracic spine in approximately 80%, followed in frequency by the cervical and lumbar regions. The treatment of spinal meningiomas is complete surgical resection. As intraspinal meningiomas are almost always adherent to the dura, extensive dural resection or diathermic treatment of the dural attachment is usually performed to prevent tumor recurrence. The authors present the case of lumbar spinal meningioma in 82-year-old woman. Successful resection with preservation of the dura mater using the technique of Saito et al. (Spine 26:1805-1808, 2001) is described: After lumbar laminectomy a small incision was made in the surface of the spinal dura. The dura mater was separated into its inner and outer layers, and the tumor was resected with inner layer alone, preserving the outer layer. The outer layer is simply closed to achieve a watertight seal. The pathologic diagnosis was metaplastic (osseous) meningioma. Almost full recovery of the neurologic deficit was attained. Neither complication nor tumor recurrence has occurred in the 5 years since surgery. Dural preservation during surgical resection of spinal meningioma obviates the need for dural reconstruction and should reduce surgical morbidity. However, the patient should be followed long-term to watch for recurrence. PMID:19219468

  3. A dural lymphatic vascular system that drains brain interstitial fluid and macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Aspelund, Aleksanteri; Antila, Salli; Proulx, Steven T.; Karlsen, Tine Veronica; Karaman, Sinem; Detmar, Michael; Wiig, Helge

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is considered an organ devoid of lymphatic vasculature. Yet, part of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains into the cervical lymph nodes (LNs). The mechanism of CSF entry into the LNs has been unclear. Here we report the surprising finding of a lymphatic vessel network in the dura mater of the mouse brain. We show that dural lymphatic vessels absorb CSF from the adjacent subarachnoid space and brain interstitial fluid (ISF) via the glymphatic system. Dural lymphatic vessels transport fluid into deep cervical LNs (dcLNs) via foramina at the base of the skull. In a transgenic mouse model expressing a VEGF-C/D trap and displaying complete aplasia of the dural lymphatic vessels, macromolecule clearance from the brain was attenuated and transport from the subarachnoid space into dcLNs was abrogated. Surprisingly, brain ISF pressure and water content were unaffected. Overall, these findings indicate that the mechanism of CSF flow into the dcLNs is directly via an adjacent dural lymphatic network, which may be important for the clearance of macromolecules from the brain. Importantly, these results call for a reexamination of the role of the lymphatic system in CNS physiology and disease. PMID:26077718

  4. Dural tear and myelomalacia caused by an airgun pellet in a cat

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Cristian; Ródenas, Sergio; Pumarola, Martí; Añor, Sònia

    2013-01-01

    An 8-year-old cat was presented with severe neurological deficits secondary to a traumatic cervical spinal cord injury caused by an airgun pellet. This report describes, for the first time, the myelographic findings of a dural rupture in a cat and also describes a bilateral Horner’s syndrome in a cat. PMID:24155462

  5. Dural tear and myelomalacia caused by an airgun pellet in a cat.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cristian; Ródenas, Sergio; Pumarola, Martí; Añor, Sònia

    2013-07-01

    An 8-year-old cat was presented with severe neurological deficits secondary to a traumatic cervical spinal cord injury caused by an airgun pellet. This report describes, for the first time, the myelographic findings of a dural rupture in a cat and also describes a bilateral Horner's syndrome in a cat.

  6. Surgical resection without dural reconstruction of a lumbar meningioma in an elderly woman.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Hiroki; Takahashi, Jun; Kato, Hiroyuki; Ebara, Sohei; Takahashi, Hideto

    2009-07-01

    Meningiomas of the spine occur in the thoracic spine in approximately 80%, followed in frequency by the cervical and lumbar regions. The treatment of spinal meningiomas is complete surgical resection. As intraspinal meningiomas are almost always adherent to the dura, extensive dural resection or diathermic treatment of the dural attachment is usually performed to prevent tumor recurrence. The authors present the case of lumbar spinal meningioma in 82-year-old woman. Successful resection with preservation of the dura mater using the technique of Saito et al. (Spine 26:1805-1808, 2001) is described: After lumbar laminectomy a small incision was made in the surface of the spinal dura. The dura mater was separated into its inner and outer layers, and the tumor was resected with inner layer alone, preserving the outer layer. The outer layer is simply closed to achieve a watertight seal. The pathologic diagnosis was metaplastic (osseous) meningioma. Almost full recovery of the neurologic deficit was attained. Neither complication nor tumor recurrence has occurred in the 5 years since surgery. Dural preservation during surgical resection of spinal meningioma obviates the need for dural reconstruction and should reduce surgical morbidity. However, the patient should be followed long-term to watch for recurrence.

  7. A dural lymphatic vascular system that drains brain interstitial fluid and macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Aspelund, Aleksanteri; Antila, Salli; Proulx, Steven T; Karlsen, Tine Veronica; Karaman, Sinem; Detmar, Michael; Wiig, Helge; Alitalo, Kari

    2015-06-29

    The central nervous system (CNS) is considered an organ devoid of lymphatic vasculature. Yet, part of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains into the cervical lymph nodes (LNs). The mechanism of CSF entry into the LNs has been unclear. Here we report the surprising finding of a lymphatic vessel network in the dura mater of the mouse brain. We show that dural lymphatic vessels absorb CSF from the adjacent subarachnoid space and brain interstitial fluid (ISF) via the glymphatic system. Dural lymphatic vessels transport fluid into deep cervical LNs (dcLNs) via foramina at the base of the skull. In a transgenic mouse model expressing a VEGF-C/D trap and displaying complete aplasia of the dural lymphatic vessels, macromolecule clearance from the brain was attenuated and transport from the subarachnoid space into dcLNs was abrogated. Surprisingly, brain ISF pressure and water content were unaffected. Overall, these findings indicate that the mechanism of CSF flow into the dcLNs is directly via an adjacent dural lymphatic network, which may be important for the clearance of macromolecules from the brain. Importantly, these results call for a reexamination of the role of the lymphatic system in CNS physiology and disease. © 2015 Aspelund et al.

  8. Dural Defect Repair in Translabyrinthine Acoustic Neuroma Surgery and Its Implications in Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Aloysio Augusto Tahan de Campos; Colafêmina, José Fernando; Centeno, Ricardo Silva

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a complication that may occur after translabyrinthine (translab) acoustic neuroma (AN) removal. The aim of this study is to verify the incidence of CSF leak using two techniques for dural defect closure in translab AN surgery and present a new technique for dural repair. A retrospective study was held, reviewing charts of 34 patients in a tertiary neurotologic referral center. Out of these 34 patients that underwent translab AN excision in a 1-year period, 18 had their dural defect repaired using only abdominal fat graft and 16 using synthetic dura substitute (SDS) plus abdominal fat tissue. One patient (5.5%) in the first group had CSF leak and 1 (6.2%) in the second group had CSF leak postoperatively. Our data suggest that there are no significant differences in CSF leak rates using both techniques, although studies in a larger series must be undertaken to conclude it. We believe that the development of some points in the new technique for dural repair can achieve better results and reduce the CSF leak incidence in the translabyrinthine acoustic neuroma surgery in the near future. PMID:24083124

  9. Drug therapy for treating post-dural puncture headache.

    PubMed

    Basurto Ona, Xavier; Osorio, Dimelza; Bonfill Cosp, Xavier

    2015-07-15

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 8, 2011, on 'Drug therapy for treating post-dural puncture headache'.Post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) is the most common complication of lumbar puncture, an invasive procedure frequently performed in the emergency room. Numerous pharmaceutical drugs have been proposed to treat PDPH but there are still some uncertainties about their clinical effectiveness. To assess the effectiveness and safety of drugs for treating PDPH in adults and children. The searches included the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE and MEDLINE in Process (from 1950 to 29 July 2014), EMBASE (from 1980 to 29 July 2014) and CINAHL (from 1982 to July 2014). There were no language restrictions. We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effectiveness of any pharmacological drug used for treating PDPH. Outcome measures considered for this review were: PDPH persistence of any severity at follow-up (primary outcome), daily activity limited by headache, conservative supplementary therapeutic option offered, epidural blood patch performed, change in pain severity scores, improvements in pain severity scores, number of days participants stay in hospital, any possible adverse events and missing data. Review authors independently selected studies, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We estimated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous data and mean differences (MD) for continuous outcomes. We calculated a 95% confidence interval (CI) for each RR and MD. We did not undertake meta-analysis because the included studies assessed different sorts of drugs or different outcomes. We performed an intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis. We included 13 small RCTs (479 participants) in this review (at least 274 participants were women, with 118 parturients after a lumbar puncture for regional anaesthesia). In the original version of this Cochrane review, only seven small RCTs

  10. Predicted burden of venous disease.

    PubMed

    Onida, Sarah; Davies, Alun Huw

    2016-03-01

    Chronic venous disease is a common condition with clinical signs and symptoms ranging from spider veins, to varicose veins, to active venous ulceration. Both superficial and deep venous dysfunction may be implicated in the development of this disease. Socio-economic factors are shaping our population, with increasing age and body mass index resulting in significant pressure on healthcare systems worldwide. These risk factors also lead to an increased risk of developing superficial and/or deep venous insufficiency, increasing disease prevalence and morbidity. In this chapter, the authors review the current and future burden of chronic venous disease from an epidemiological, quality of life and economic perspective.

  11. Oncocytic Schneiderian papilloma of frontal sinus.

    PubMed

    Kalfert, David; Laco, Jan; Celakovský, Petr; Smatanová, Katarína; Ludvíková, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Oncocytic Schneiderian papilloma (OSP) is one of the three morphologically distinct tumors that arise from Schneiderian membrane (the others include exophytic papilloma and inverted papilloma). OSP almost always occurs unilaterally in the paranasal sinuses, usually in the maxillary sinus, ethmoid cells or sphenoid sinus. We report a case of a 64-year-old woman with OSP arising from the left frontal sinus. In the report herein, we describe an OSP originating in the region of frontal sinus, which, to the best of our knowledge, represents the first documented example in English literature of OSP developing in this anatomical site.

  12. Overview of Frontal Sinus Pathology and Management.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Alejandro; Baredes, Soly; Setzen, Michael; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2016-08-01

    The frontal sinus is the most complex of all paranasal sinuses. Given its proximity to the cranial vault and orbit, frontal sinus pathology can progress to involve these structures and lead to significant morbidity, or even mortality. Surgical management of the frontal sinus is technically challenging. Various open and endoscopic surgical techniques are available to the otolaryngologist. This article presents an overview of the major disease entities that affect the frontal sinus, with a special emphasis on treatment principles and surgical management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. When Sinuses Attack! (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have a cold? continue When Good Sinuses Go Bad What about that cold that won't go away? A cold virus can: damage the delicate ... if you are feeling well enough, you can go to school or go outside and play. In ...

  14. Pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus.

    PubMed

    Terra, E R; Guedes, F R; Manzi, F R; Bóscolo, F N

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a case of pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus in the pterygoid process and greater wing of the sphenoid bone, observed on a panoramic radiograph. Conventional radiographs and computerized tomography in axial and coronal sections confirmed the presence of the pneumatization of these structures.

  15. The Ovine Cerebral Venous System: Comparative Anatomy, Visualization, and Implications for Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Nitzsche, Björn; Lobsien, Donald; Seeger, Johannes; Schneider, Holm; Boltze, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are significant causes of death and disability in humans. Improvements in diagnostic and therapeutic approaches strongly rely on adequate gyrencephalic, large animal models being demanded for translational research. Ovine stroke models may represent a promising approach but are currently limited by insufficient knowledge regarding the venous system of the cerebral angioarchitecture. The present study was intended to provide a comprehensive anatomical analysis of the intracranial venous system in sheep as a reliable basis for the interpretation of experimental results in such ovine models. We used corrosion casts as well as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography to scrutinize blood drainage from the brain. This combined approach yielded detailed and, to some extent, novel findings. In particular, we provide evidence for chordae Willisii and lateral venous lacunae, and report on connections between the dorsal and ventral sinuses in this species. For the first time, we also describe venous confluences in the deep cerebral venous system and an ‘anterior condylar confluent’ as seen in humans. This report provides a detailed reference for the interpretation of venous diagnostic imaging findings in sheep, including an assessment of structure detectability by in vivo (imaging) versus ex vivo (corrosion cast) visualization methods. Moreover, it features a comprehensive interspecies-comparison of the venous cerebral angioarchitecture in man, rodents, canines and sheep as a relevant large animal model species, and describes possible implications for translational cerebrovascular research. PMID:24736654

  16. The ovine cerebral venous system: comparative anatomy, visualization, and implications for translational research.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Anke; Stoffel, Michael H; Nitzsche, Björn; Lobsien, Donald; Seeger, Johannes; Schneider, Holm; Boltze, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are significant causes of death and disability in humans. Improvements in diagnostic and therapeutic approaches strongly rely on adequate gyrencephalic, large animal models being demanded for translational research. Ovine stroke models may represent a promising approach but are currently limited by insufficient knowledge regarding the venous system of the cerebral angioarchitecture. The present study was intended to provide a comprehensive anatomical analysis of the intracranial venous system in sheep as a reliable basis for the interpretation of experimental results in such ovine models. We used corrosion casts as well as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography to scrutinize blood drainage from the brain. This combined approach yielded detailed and, to some extent, novel findings. In particular, we provide evidence for chordae Willisii and lateral venous lacunae, and report on connections between the dorsal and ventral sinuses in this species. For the first time, we also describe venous confluences in the deep cerebral venous system and an 'anterior condylar confluent' as seen in humans. This report provides a detailed reference for the interpretation of venous diagnostic imaging findings in sheep, including an assessment of structure detectability by in vivo (imaging) versus ex vivo (corrosion cast) visualization methods. Moreover, it features a comprehensive interspecies-comparison of the venous cerebral angioarchitecture in man, rodents, canines and sheep as a relevant large animal model species, and describes possible implications for translational cerebrovascular research.

  17. Venous Congestive Myelopathy due to Chronic Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis Treated with Endovascular Stenting: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Diego Z.; Hughes, Joshua D.; Liebo, Greta B.; Bendel, Emily C.; Bjarnason, Haraldur; Klaas, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Impaired inferior vena cava (IVC) outflow can lead to collateralization of blood to the valveless epidural venous plexus, causing epidural venous engorgement and venous congestion. Herein we describe a case of chronic IVC thrombosis presenting as venous congestive myelopathy treated with angioplasty and endovascular stenting. The pathophysiological mechanisms of cord injury are hypothesized, and IVC stenting application is evaluated. Methods Case report and review of the literature. Results IVC outflow obstruction has only rarely been associated with neurologic dysfunction, with reports of lumbosacral nerve root compression in the cases of IVC agenesis, compression, or occlusion. Although endovascular angioplasty with stenting is emerging as a leading treatment option for chronic IVC thrombosis, its use to treat neurologic complications is limited to one case report for intractable sciatica. Our case is the first description of IVC thrombosis presenting with venous congestive myelopathy, and treated successfully with IVC stenting. Conclusion Venous congestive myelopathy should be seen as a broader clinical condition, including not only typical dural arteriovenous fistulas, but also disorders of venous outflow. Therefore, identifying a rare, but potentially treatable, etiology is important to avoid permanent neurologic deficits. IVC stenting is proposed as a novel and effective treatment approach. PMID:25825633

  18. Allergic fungal sinusitis causing nasolacrimal duct obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Charles; Kacker, Ashutosh; Chee, Ru-Ik; Lelli, Gary J

    2013-04-01

    Allergic fungal sinusitis is thought to represent a chronic autoimmune reaction directed against fungal elements within the sinuses, and is commonly seen in individuals with a history of chronic sinusitis that is refractory to medical therapy. The authors present a case of allergic fungal sinusitis involving the lacrimal drainage system. A 54-year-old woman initially presented with recurrent erythema and induration of the left nasolacrimal sac due to dacryocystitis, which was unresponsive to treatment with topical and systemic antibiotics. Radiological evaluation demonstrated the presence of multiple soft tissue masses along the medial canthi. During subsequent endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy, significant amounts of allergic mucin were found within the sinuses and marked eosinophilia was present within tissue obtained from the lacrimal sac, findings highly suggestive of allergic fungal sinusitis. A diagnosis of allergic fungal sinusitis should be considered in patients presenting with epiphora in the appropriate clinical context. However, involvement of the lacrimal drainage system is an exceedingly unusual presentation.

  19. Cavopulmonary window: an extreme form of sinus venosus defect.

    PubMed

    Aramendi, José I; Cubero, Alain; Hamzeh, Gadah; Rey, Estibaliz

    2014-02-01

    We present an unusual variant of the sinus venosus defect in which an obvious window is formed between a single pulmonary vein and the superior vena cava, the pulmonary vein retaining its connection to the left atrium. Two patients were operated on via right anterior minithoracotomy. A large single right pulmonary vein was found connecting to the left atrium. There was a large side-to-side communication between the superior vena cava and the pulmonary vein resulting in partially anomalous pulmonary venous drainage. A side-biting clamp was applied in the superior vena cava and the pulmonary vein at both sides of the communication, and the vein was divided. The incision in both veins was closed with a running suture.

  20. Outcomes after suboccipital decompression without dural opening in children with Chiari malformation Type I

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Benjamin C.; Kelly, Kathleen M.; Phan, Michelle Q.; Bruce, Samuel S.; McDowell, Michael M.; Anderson, Richard C. E.; Feldstein, Neil A.

    2015-01-01

    Object Symptomatic pediatric Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) is most often treated with posterior fossa decompression (PFD), but controversy exists over whether the dura needs to be opened during PFD. While dural opening as a part of PFD has been suggested to result in a higher rate of resolution of CM symptoms, it has also been shown to lead to more frequent complications. In this paper, the authors present the largest reported series of outcomes after PFD without dural opening surgery, as well as identify risk factors for recurrence. Methods The authors performed a retrospective review of 156 consecutive pediatric patients in whom the senior authors performed PFD without dural opening from 2003 to 2013. Patient demographics, clinical symptoms and signs, radiographic findings, intraoperative ultrasound results, and neuromonitoring findings were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to determine risk factors for recurrence of symptoms and the need for reoperation. Results Over 90% of patients had a good clinical outcome, with improvement or resolution of their symptoms at last follow-up (mean 32 months). There were no major complications. The mean length of hospital stay was 2.0 days. In a multivariate regression model, partial C-2 laminectomy was an independent risk factor associated with reoperation (p = 0.037). Motor weakness on presentation was also associated with reoperation but only with trend-level significance (p = 0.075). No patient with < 8 mm of tonsillar herniation required reoperation. Conclusions The vast majority (> 90%) of children with symptomatic CM-I will have improvement or resolution of symptoms after a PFD without dural opening. A non–dural opening approach avoids major complications. While no patient with tonsillar herniation < 8 mm required reoperation, children with tonsillar herniation at or below C-2 have a higher risk for failure when this approach is used. PMID:25932779

  1. Ten-year clinical and imaging follow-up of dural ectasia in adults with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mesfin, Addisu; Ahn, Nicholas U; Carrino, John A; Sponseller, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    Dural ectasia in the lumbosacral spine is a common feature of Marfan syndrome and is associated with low back pain and surgical complications, but its natural history is unknown. To evaluate the natural history of dural ectasia in adults with Marfan syndrome by determining if, over time, symptoms associated with dural ectasia worsen, dural ectasia imaging findings worsen, or spondylolisthesis/spondylolysis develops or worsens. Prospective cohort study. For our prospective follow-up study, we enrolled 20 patients with Marfan syndrome and dural ectasia who, from 1998 through 1999, had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) of the lumbosacral spine and had completed the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire. Of the 20, five did not meet the inclusion criterion of a completed 2009 ODI questionnaire and were excluded. The remaining 15 patients (mean age, 49.6 years; mean follow-up, 10.5 years) formed our study group. The ODI, MRI-based qualitative and quantitative measurements, CT-based quantitative measurements. We performed matched-pair analyses via Student t test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test of the ODI scores (15 pairs), dural volume of L5-S2 (eight pairs), dural sac ratio (DSR) of L4-S2 (nine pairs), development/progression of spondolysthesis/spondylolysis (11 pairs), and Fattori qualitative grading of dural ectasia size (10 pairs). Significance was set at p<.05. We found no statistical differences in the 1998/1999 and 2009 ODI scores (25.8 vs. 22.2 points), dural volume (70.4 vs. 73.9 cm(3)), or DSR (0.68, 0.78, 2.04, and 58.1 vs. 0.69, 0.83, 2.30, and 70.20). There was also no development or progression of spondylolisthesis/spondylolysis and no increase in dural ectasia size. During this 10-year period, the natural history of dural ectasia in adults with Marfan syndrome was not associated with a significant increase in ODI scores, dural ectasia size, or with the development/progression of spondylolisthesis or spondylolysis

  2. Differentiation of transverse sinus thrombosis from congenitally atretic cerebral transverse sinus with CT.

    PubMed

    Chik, Yolanda; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Zeiler, Steven R; Rosenberg, Jason; Llinas, Rafael H

    2012-07-01

    Transverse sinus thrombosis can have nonspecific clinical and radiographic signs. We hypothesized that the novel "sigmoid notch sign" (on head CT) can help differentiate transverse sinus thrombosis from a congenitally atretic sinus among individuals with absent signal in 1 transverse sinus by MR venography. We retrospectively evaluated 53 subjects with a unilaterally absent transverse sinus signal on MR venography. Eleven had true transverse sinus thrombosis and 42 had an atretic transverse sinus. Reviewers were trained in the sigmoid notch sign: "positive" if 1 of the sigmoid notches was asymmetrically smaller than the other, consistent with a congenitally absent transverse sinus on that side. This sign was scored on CT scans by 2 blinded reviewers to determine if signal dropout was clot or atretic sinus. A consensus rating was reached when the reviewers disagreed. Characteristics of the sigmoid notch sign as a diagnostic test were compared with a gold standard of full chart review by an independent reviewer. Each reviewer had a sensitivity of 91% (detecting 10 of 11 clots based on a negative sigmoid notch sign) and specificity of 71% to 81%; consensus specificity increased to 86% (36 of 42 individuals with an atretic sinus had a positive notch sign, detecting atretic sinuses based on presence of the sign). Asymmetries of the sigmoid notches on noncontrast brain CT is a very sensitive and specific measure of differentiating transverse sinus thrombosis from an atretic transverse sinus when absence of transverse sinus flow is visualized on MR venography.

  3. Ex vivo comparative study on three sinus lift tools for transcrestal detaching maxillary sinus mucosa.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanfeng; Hu, Pin; Han, Yishi; Fan, Jiadong; Dong, Xinming; Ren, Huan; Yang, Chunhao; Shi, Tingting; Xia, Dong

    2017-07-04

    The objective of this study was to comparatively evaluate 3 different sinus lift tools, namely umbrella-shaped sinus lift curette YSL-04, our recently designed probe-improved sinus lift curettes, and our newly invented elevator 014, using our previous developed goat ex vivo models for direct visualizing the effectiveness of detaching sinus mucosa in real time. Goat ex vivo models for direct visualizing the effectiveness of detaching sinus mucosa in real time were generated according to our previously developed protocol. The effectiveness for each tool was evaluated through the length of sinus mucosa detached in mesial and distal directions or buccal and palatal directions, and the space volume created by detaching maxillary sinus mucosa in mesial, distal, buccal and palatal directions. The results showed that all 3 sinus lift tools could transcrestally detach the maxillary sinus mucosa and create extra space under the elevated sinus floor on the goat ex vivo sinus models. Moreover, our newly invented elevator 014 had advantages over the other 2 in term of the capability to detach the sinus mucosa. Our newly invented elevator 014 might be a promising tool for detaching maxillary sinus mucosa in transcrestal maxillary sinus floor elevation.

  4. Relationship between prognosis of dental implants and maxillary sinusitis associated with the sinus elevation procedure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kyun; Hwang, Jin-Young; Yun, Pil-Young

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the incidence of maxillary sinusitis associated with the sinus elevation procedure and to analyze the influence of maxillary sinusitis on the prognosis of dental implants. Data were collected from medical records and dental radiographic findings of patients who received dental implant therapy along with a sinus elevation procedure at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from June 2003 to December 2008. A total of 338 sinus elevation cases (643 implants) were included in this study, out of which maxillary sinusitis was reported in 33 cases (9.8%). The type of surgical approach used and the occurrence of sinus membrane perforation could be considered factors affecting maxillary sinusitis associated with the sinus elevation procedure. The implants at the site of the maxillary sinusitis associated with the sinus elevation procedure showed lower survival rates in male patients. Better clinical outcomes were achieved in the group receiving combined medical and surgical therapy for sinusitis associated with the sinus elevation procedure. Postoperative maxillary sinusitis decreased the survival rates of implants, whereas early diagnosis and combined medical and surgical therapy had the opposite effect.

  5. Evaluating the safety of frontal sinus trephination.

    PubMed

    Lee, Annie S; Schaitkin, Barry M; Gillman, Grant S

    2010-03-01

    The depth of the frontal sinus was measured using axial computed tomography (CT) images to examine the safety of frontal sinus trephination at selected distances from the midline. Review of 200 sinus CT scans. Two hundred sinus CT scans (400 frontal sinuses) were reviewed to measure the frontal sinus depth at 5 mm, 10 mm, and 15 mm from midline. Males had a significantly deeper frontal sinus than females at all measurements points (P < .001). The measurements revealed a considerable number of small but nonhypoplastic frontal sinuses, which were shallower than the length of standard frontal trephine instruments (7 mm) and would risk penetration of the posterior table of the sinus. Of all frontal sinuses studied, 9.54% were <7 mm deep at 5 mm from the midline, 10.12% at 10 mm, and 8.96% at 15 mm from the midline. Overall, 15.3% of all frontal sinuses studied had at least one point where the measured depth was <7 mm. Although the majority of patients have frontal sinuses deep enough to accommodate standard trephine instruments, surgeons should recognize that up to 15% of nonhypoplastic frontal sinuses may not be sufficiently deep at a given point to allow safe trephination without risking unintentional transgression of the posterior table. This study suggests that trephination routinely carried out at a given predetermined distance from the midline may be an unsafe practice. Careful evaluation of the imaging is essential in every case to avoid inadvertent injury and to help select the safest distance from the midline for frontal sinus trephination.

  6. Anatomical aspects of sinus floor elevations.

    PubMed

    van den Bergh, J P; ten Bruggenkate, C M; Disch, F J; Tuinzing, D B

    2000-06-01

    Inadequate bone height in the lateral part of the maxilla forms a contra-indication for implant surgery. This condition can be treated with an internal augmentation of the maxillary sinus floor. This sinus floor elevation, formerly called sinus lifting, consists of a surgical procedure in which a top hinge door in the lateral maxillary sinus wall is prepared and internally rotated to a horizontal position. The new elevated sinus floor, together with the inner maxillary mucosa, will create a space that can be filled with graft material. Sinus lift procedures depend greatly on fragile structures and anatomical variations. The variety of anatomical modalities in shape of the inner aspect of the maxillary sinus defines the surgical approach. Conditions such as sinus floor convolutions, sinus septum, transient mucosa swelling and narrow sinus may form a (usually relative) contra-indication for sinus floor elevation. Absolute contra-indications are maxillary sinus diseases (tumors) and destructive former sinus surgery (like the Caldwell-Luc operation). The lateral sinus wall is usually a thin bone plate, which is easily penetrated with rotating or sharp instruments. The fragile Schneiderian membrane plays an important role for the containment of the bonegraft. The surgical procedure of preparing the trap door and luxating it, together with the preparation of the sinus mucosa, may cause a mucosa tear. Usually, when these perforations are not too large, they will fold together when turning the trap door inward and upward, or they can be glued with a fibrin sealant, or they can be covered with a resorbable membrane. If the perforation is too large, a cortico-spongious block graft can be considered. However, in most cases the sinus floor elevation will be deleted. Perforations may also occur due to irregularities in the sinus floor or even due to immediate contact of sinus mucosa with oral mucosa. Obstruction of the antro-nasal foramen is, due to its high location, not a

  7. Post-mortem imaging of the infant and perinatal dura mater and superior sagittal sinus using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, Emma C; Malcomson, Roger D G; Joseph, Shiju; Adnan, Asif; Adlam, David; Rutty, Guy N

    2017-04-07

    Infants and young children are likely to present with subdural haemorrhage (SDH) if they are the victims of abusive head trauma. In these cases, the most accepted theory for the source of bleeding is the bridging veins traversing from the surface of the brain to the dura mater. However, some have suggested that SDH may result from leakage of blood from a dural vascular plexus. As post-mortem examination of the bridging veins and dura is challenging, and imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance and computed tomography do not have the resolution capabilities to image small blood vessels, we have trialled the use of intravascular and benchtop optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems for imaging from within the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) and through the dura during five infant/perinatal autopsies. Numerous vessel-like structures were identified using both OCT systems. Measurements taken with the intravascular rotational system indicate that the approximate median diameters of blood vessels entering anterior and posterior segments of the SSS were 110 μm (range 70 to 670 μm, n = 21) and 125 μm (range 70 to 740 μm, n = 23), respectively. For blood vessels close to the wall of the SSS, the median diameters for anterior and posterior segments of the SSS were 80 μm (range 40 to 170 μm, n = 25) and 90 μm (range 30 to 150 μm), respectively. Detailed characterisation of the dural vasculature is important to aid understanding of the source of SDH. High resolution 3-dimensional reconstructions of the infant dural vasculature may be possible with further development of OCT systems.

  8. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Heit, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis can affect any venous circulation. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes deep-vein thrombosis of the leg or pelvis, and its complication, pulmonary embolism. VTE is a fairly common disease, particularly in older age, and is associated with reduced survival, substantial health-care costs, and a high rate of recurrence. VTE is a complex (multifactorial) disease, involving interactions between acquired or inherited predispositions to thrombosis and various risk factors. Major risk factors for incident VTE include hospitalization for surgery or acute illness, active cancer, neurological disease with leg paresis, nursing-home confinement, trauma or fracture, superficial vein thrombosis, and—in women—pregnancy and puerperium, oral contraception, and hormone therapy. Although independent risk factors for incident VTE and predictors of VTE recurrence have been identified, and effective primary and secondary prophylaxis is available, the occurrence of VTE seems to be fairly constant, or even increasing. PMID:26076949

  9. Frontal sinus mini-trephination for acute sinusitis complicated by intracranial infection.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, D L; Mahadevan, M

    2007-10-01

    Acute bacterial sinusitis is common in the pediatric population. Intracranial spread of infection is a rare but life-threatening complication of acute sinusitis. Due to the infrequent presentation of this complication, there are no well-defined management protocols for the acute sinusitis. We present three pediatric cases where children presented with intracranial sepsis, and the underlying source of infection was from the paranasal sinuses. In all cases, endoscopic sinus surgery was performed in the acute setting, with the use of frontal sinus mini-trephines playing a significant role. We describe our experience and review the available literature.

  10. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis and Headache--A Case-Series.

    PubMed

    Sparaco, Marco; Feleppa, Michele; Bigal, Marcelo E

    2015-06-01

    Headache happens in the majority of patients with Cerebral Venous Thrombosis (CVT) being sometimes the sole manifestation of the disease. Herein we report a case-series of CVT, focusing on headache characteristics. Etiological, clinical, and radiological features of 25 consecutive adult patients with CVT were compiled from August 2005 to December 2013. Diagnosis of CVT was confirmed by brain magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography. All patients underwent extensive systematic etiological and genetic work-up at admission. A structured questionnaire about the characteristics of headache was responded by all participants. Headache was reported by 23 out of 25 (92%) of participants, being by far the most frequent symptom. It was the sole manifestation in nearly one third of the patients (8/25, 32.0%). Headache was typically severe (19/23, 82.6%) and throbbing (16/23, 69.5%), with sudden onset (13/23, 56.5%) and non-remitting (20/23, 86.9%) characteristics. The sinus most frequently involved was the transverse sinus (24/25, 96.0%), either alone or in association with other sinuses. Headache is the most frequent symptom and sometimes the sole presentation of CVT. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  11. Silent sinus syndrome and maxillary sinus atelectasis in children.

    PubMed

    Farneti, Paolo; Sciarretta, Vittorio; Macrì, Giovanni; Piccin, Ottavio; Pasquini, Ernesto

    2017-07-01

    Silent sinus syndrome (SSS) and chronic maxillary atelectasis (CMA) are unusual conditions having subtle symptoms with a possible progressive evolution. They are particularly infrequent in the pediatric population. Our objective was to review our experience with pediatric patients having SSS or CMA, and to review all cases involving patients under 14 years of age reported in the literature. A retrospective review of 6 patients diagnosed with SSS or CMA surgically treated from 2001 to 2014 was carried out. All cases reported in literature were reviewed. All patients underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery with an improvement in symptoms after surgery. Diplopia disappeared in two patients who presented with it and enophthalmos improved in all five patients presenting with it. Only one patient out of four presenting with headache had a persistence of the symptoms which were, however, milder than they had been preoperatively. Endoscopic examination demonstrated a reventilated maxillary sinus in all cases. A radiological examination at follow-up was performed in 5 cases and demonstrated a reexpansion of the maxillary sinus as compared to the contralateral side in all patients except one. None of the patients required an orbital floor reconstruction. Eleven similar cases reported in the literature were analyzed and compared. Endoscopic uncinectomy and middle meatal antrostomy should be the treatment of choice for these conditions in patients presenting with enophthalmos and/or hypoglobus and symptoms related to it. Orbital floor reconstruction should be performed as a delayed procedure only in selected cases. Chronic maxillary atelectasis or SSS should be considered as a possible cause of persistent headache of unknown origin in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Otero Candelera, Remedios; Grau Segura, Enric; Jiménez Castro, David; Uresandi Romero, Fernando; López Villalobos, José Luis; Calderón Sandubete, Enrique; Medrano Ortega, Francisco Javier; Cayuela Domínguez, Aurelio

    2008-03-01

    The recommendations on venous thromboprophylaxis have been updated on the basis of current evidence reviewed by a multidisciplinary team. The problem has been approached with regard to its relevance in both surgical and nonsurgical patients. It should be noted that these recommendations were drawn up for use in Spain and, therefore, should be implemented with the drugs and therapeutic practices authorized and generally accepted in this country.

  13. Venous Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Alejandra; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-08-02

    This issue provides a clinical overview of venous leg ulcers, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  14. Reconsidering the back door approach by targeting the coronary sinus in ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    De Maria, Giovanni Luigi; Kassimis, George; Raina, Tushar; Banning, Adrian P

    2016-08-15

    Coronary sinus interventions (CSI) are a class of invasive techniques (surgical and percutaneous) originally proposed in the first half of the 20th century, aiming to treat ischaemic heart disease by acting on the venous coronary system. Three main classes of CSI have been proposed and tested: (1) retroperfusion technique, (2) retroinfusion technique and (3) coronary sinus occlusion techniques. They all share the principle that a controlled increased pressure within the coronary sinus may promote a retrograde perfusion of the ischaemic myocardium with consequent cardioprotection. Development of arterial treatments including coronary aortic bypass grafting and then percutaneous coronary intervention deflected interest from interventions on the coronary venous system. However, CSI may still have a possible niche role today in specific and selected clinical contexts in which existing therapies are insufficient. In this review paper, we aim to revise the rationale for CSI, describing the details and the evidence collected so far about these techniques and to provide insights about the main clinical scenarios in which these strategies may find a contemporary application in combination or as an alternative to existing approaches. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Intranasal steroids for acute sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Zalmanovici Trestioreanu, Anca; Yaphe, John

    2013-12-02

    Acute sinusitis is a common reason for primary care visits. It causes significant symptoms and often results in time off work and school. We examined whether intranasal corticosteroids (INCS) are effective in relieving symptoms of acute sinusitis in adults and children. We searched CENTRAL 2013, Issue 4, MEDLINE (January 1966 to May week 2, 2013), EMBASE (1990 to May 2013) and bibliographies of included studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing INCS treatment to placebo or no intervention in adults and children with acute sinusitis. Acute sinusitis was defined by clinical diagnosis and confirmed by radiological evidence or by nasal endoscopy. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants with either resolution or improvement of symptoms. Secondary outcomes were any adverse events that required discontinuation of treatment, drop-outs before the end of the study, rates of relapse, complications and return to school or work. Two review authors independently extracted data, assessed trial quality and resolved discrepancies by consensus. No new trials were found for inclusion in this update. Four studies involving 1943 participants with acute sinusitis met our inclusion criteria. The trials were well-designed and double-blind and studied INCS versus placebo or no intervention for 15 or 21 days. The rates of loss to follow-up were 7%, 11%, 41% and 10%. When we combined the results from the three trials included in the meta-analysis, participants receiving INCS were more likely to experience resolution or improvement in symptoms than those receiving placebo (73% versus 66.4%; risk ratio (RR) 1.11; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04 to 1.18). Higher doses of INCS had a stronger effect on improvement of symptoms or complete relief: for mometasone furoate 400 µg versus 200 µg (RR 1.10; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.18 versus RR 1.04; 95% CI 0.98 to 1.11). No significant adverse events were reported and there was no significant difference in the drop-out and

  16. Operative management of tumors involving the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, L N; Møller, A R

    1986-06-01

    In the past, neurosurgeons have been reluctant to operate on tumors involving the cavernous sinus because of the possibility of bleeding from the venous plexus or injury to the internal carotid artery (ICA) or the third, fourth, or sixth cranial nerves. The authors describe techniques for a more aggressive surgical approach to neoplasms in this area that are either benign or locally confined malignant lesions. During the last 2 years, seven tumors involving the cavernous sinus have been resected: six totally and one subtotally. The preoperative evaluation included axial and coronal computerized tomography, cerebral angiography, and a balloon-occlusion test of the ICA. Intraoperative monitoring of the third, fourth, sixth, and seventh cranial nerves was used to assist in locating the nerves and in avoiding injury to them. The first major step in the operative procedure was to obtain proximal control of the ICA at the petrous apex and distal control in the supraclinoid segment. The cavernous sinus was then opened by a lateral, superior, or inferior approach for tumor resection. Temporary clipping and suture of the ICA was necessary in one patient. None of the patients died or suffered a stroke postoperatively. Permanent trigeminal nerve injury occurred in three patients; in two, this was the result of tumor invasion. One patient suffered temporary paralysis of the third, fourth, and sixth cranial nerves, and in another the sixth cranial nerve was temporarily paralyzed. Preoperative cranial nerve deficits were improved postoperatively in three patients. Radiation therapy was administered postoperatively to four patients. These seven patients have been followed for 6 to 18 months to date and none has shown evidence of recurrence of the intracavernous tumor.

  17. Cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Oda, Shinri; Shimoda, Masami; Hoshikawa, Kaori; Osada, Takahiro; Yoshiyama, Michitsura; Matsumae, Mitsunori

    2011-01-01

    Patients with non-traumatic, non-aneurysmal, and non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) tend to have clots circumscribed along the cortical convexity, a condition referred to as acute cortical SAH. Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a potential cause of cortical SAH. The study tried to establish the diagnosis and management of cortical SAH caused by CVT. Retrospective review of 145 patients with non-traumatic SAH identified 15 patients with no ruptured aneurysm. Clinical features were investigated with a specific focus on patients with SAH caused by CVT. Eight of the 15 patients had perimesencephalic SAH, and 7 had cortical SAH. SAH caused by CVT was diagnosed in 4 of the 7 patients with cortical SAH. The cortical SAH involved the unilateral convexity or sylvian cistern and spared the basal cistern on computed tomography in all 4 patients. CVT occurred in the transverse sinus and cortical vein (1 patient), insular vein (1 patient), and cortical vein (2 patients). Identification of thrombosed veins or sinuses was established directly by T(2)*-weighted and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the acute stage and diffusion-weighted and T(1)-weighted MR imaging in the subacute stage. All patients had cortical swelling without findings of venous hemorrhagic infarction on T(2)*-weighted MR imaging. None of the 4 patients received active treatment, and all had favorable outcomes. CVT in patients with non-traumatic cortical SAH should be first excluded as a potential hemorrhagic cause by MR imaging for thrombosed veins or sinuses before initiating antifibrinolytic therapy.

  18. Challenges associated with reentry maxillary sinus augmentation.

    PubMed

    Mardinger, Ofer; Moses, Ofer; Chaushu, Gavriel; Manor, Yifat; Tulchinsky, Ze'ev; Nissan, Joseph

    2010-09-01

    This study was a retrospective assessment of reentry sinus augmentation compared with sinus augmentation performed for the first time. There were 38 subjects who required sinus augmentation. The study group (17 patients, 21 sinuses) included subjects following failure of a previous sinus augmentation procedure that required reentry augmentation. The control group (21 patients, 21 sinuses) included subjects in which sinus augmentation was performed for the first time. Patients' medical files were reviewed. A preformed questionnaire was used to collect data regarding demographic parameters, medical and dental health history, habits, and intra- and postoperative data. Operative challenges in the study group included adhesions of the buccal flap to the Schneiderian membrane (62%, 13/21, P<.001), bony fenestration of the lateral wall with adhesions (71%, 15/21, P<.001), limited mobility of a clinical fibrotic Schneiderian membrane (71%, 15/21, P<.001), and increased incidence of membrane perforations (47%, 10/21, versus 9.5%, 2/21, P=.03). In the control group the Schneiderian membrane was thin and flexible. Sinus augmentation succeeded in all cases of both groups. Implant failure was significantly higher in the study group (11% versus 0%, P<.001). Clinical success of reentry sinus augmentation is predictable despite its complexity. Clinicians should be aware of anatomical changes caused by previous failure of this procedure. Patients should be informed about the lower success rate of implants when reentry sinus augmentation is required. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Beyond the sniffer: frontal sinuses in Carnivora.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Abigail A; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2014-11-01

    Paranasal sinuses are some of the most poorly understood features of mammalian cranial anatomy. They are highly variable in presence and form among species, but their function is not well understood. The best-supported explanations for the function of sinuses is that they opportunistically fill mechanically unnecessary space, but that in some cases, sinuses in combination with the configuration of the frontal bone may improve skull performance by increasing skull strength and dissipating stresses more evenly. We used CT technology to investigate patterns in frontal sinus size and shape disparity among three families of carnivores: Canidae, Felidae, and Hyaenidae. We provide some of the first quantitative data on sinus morphology for these three families, and employ a novel method to quantify the relationship between three-dimensional sinus shape and skull shape. As expected, frontal sinus size and shape were more strongly correlated with frontal bone size and shape than with the morphology of the skull as a whole. However, sinus morphology was also related to allometric differences among families that are linked to biomechanical function. Our results support the hypothesis that frontal sinuses most often opportunistically fill space that is mechanically unnecessary, and they can facilitate cranial shape changes that reduce stress during feeding. Moreover, we suggest that the ability to form frontal sinuses allows species to modify skull function without compromising the performance of more functionally constrained regions such as the nasal chamber (heat/water conservation, olfaction), and braincase (housing the brain and sensory structures).

  20. Inferior petrosal sinus route microcatheterization study and embolization for primary orbital varix

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vivek; Udiya, Alok; Shetty, Gurucharan S; Sharma, Kumudini; Kanaujia, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Primary orbital varix is a rare lesion but difficult to treat. Our main aim was to demonstrate the varices and their central venous communication and to explore the feasibility of embolization of these lesions. Method In four patients with clinical suspicion of varix, in whom MRI showed retro-global vascular channels, microcatheter digital subtraction angiography (DSA) of the varices was performed using femoral venous access. Embolization was carried out in two patients. Results In all four patients orbital varices could be accessed with a microcatheter through inferior petrosal sinus and ophthalmic vein (superior or inferior) route. Microcatheter angiography showed opacification of varices and demonstrated their central venous communication. Two patients were treated with coil embolization. Complete resolution of symptoms was seen in one patient and partial relief in the other. Conclusion The study presents microcatheterization of orbital varices via the inferior petrosal sinus–cavernous sinus–ophthalmic vein route with injections into distal ophthalmic veins for demonstration of these variceal sacs and their central venous connection. Coiling to disconnect the venous communication should be the primary goal of embolization. PMID:26628456