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Sample records for dural venous sinus

  1. Dangerous Headache: A Case of Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis with Protein S Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Deepthi, D Angeline; Singh, Deepak Ningombam; Virupakshappa, Banu; Rahul, R

    2017-01-01

    Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis (DVST) is a sporadic cause of headache. DVST is a recherché complication of maxillary sinus infection. Maxillary sinusitis infection may spread directly to orbit via lamina papyracea and it is expedited by the presence veins of breschet. The authors present a clinical case of dural sinus thrombosis with protein S deficiency and also describe an effective management approach for DVST. PMID:28274079

  2. Dural Venous System in the Cavernous Sinus: A Literature Review and Embryological, Functional, and Endovascular Clinical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    MITSUHASHI, Yutaka; HAYASAKI, Koji; KAWAKAMI, Taichiro; NAGATA, Takashi; KANESHIRO, Yuta; UMABA, Ryoko; OHATA, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The cavernous sinus (CS) is one of the cranial dural venous sinuses. It differs from other dural sinuses due to its many afferent and efferent venous connections with adjacent structures. It is important to know well about its complex venous anatomy to conduct safe and effective endovascular interventions for the CS. Thus, we reviewed previous literatures concerning the morphological and functional venous anatomy and the embryology of the CS. The CS is a complex of venous channels from embryologically different origins. These venous channels have more or less retained their distinct original roles of venous drainage, even after alterations through the embryological developmental process, and can be categorized into three longitudinal venous axes based on their topological and functional features. Venous channels medial to the internal carotid artery “medial venous axis” carry venous drainage from the skull base, chondrocranium and the hypophysis, with no direct participation in cerebral drainage. Venous channels lateral to the cranial nerves “lateral venous axis” are exclusively for cerebral venous drainage. Venous channels between the internal carotid artery and cranial nerves “intermediate venous axis” contribute to all the venous drainage from adjacent structures, directly from the orbit and membranous skull, indirectly through medial and lateral venous axes from the chondrocranium, the hypophysis, and the brain. This concept of longitudinal venous axes in the CS may be useful during endovascular interventions for the CS considering our better understandings of its functions in venous drainage. PMID:27063146

  3. Unusual venous sinuses.

    PubMed

    Srijit, D; Shipra, P

    2007-01-01

    The dural venous sinuses lie in between the two layers of the dura mater. The dural venous sinuses are important, because they receive blood from the brain and the cranial bones. All sinuses are related to the inner surface of the skull, except for the inferior sagittal and the straight sinus. The sinuses related to the inner surface of the skull produce impressions on it. During routine ostelogical teaching for undergraduate medical students, we observed an unusual oblique sinus, which connected the right and the left transverse sinuses. This unusual oblique sinus measured 2 cm and had a course from the right to the left side. The superior sagittal sinus turned onto the right but at a much higher level than the left transverse sinus. Although these sinuses communicated with each other, the normal position of the confleunce of the sinus (meeting point of superior sagittal sinus, right and left transverse sinus and the occipital sinus) was not seen. The impression meant for the posterior lobe of the left cerebral hemisphere was distinctly greater than that of the right side. The presence of such an anomaly suggests a possible developmental defect or handedness of the individual. The knowledge of the anatomical variations of the dural venous sinuses may have great clinical implications during venography, shunt surgeries and also helpful for neurologists and radiologists in addition to academic interest (Fig. 2, Ref 10) Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  4. [Dural sinus thrombosis: case report].

    PubMed

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Pontalti, João Luis; Teles, Alisson Roberto

    2006-06-01

    We report the case of a 24 year-old pregnant woman, seen at the neurology service by presenting agitation, hallucinations, mental confusion, headache, vision loss, aphasia and seizures. The neuroradiologic exam was compatible with thrombosis in dural sinus and cortical veins. Treatment with abciximab was accomplished and the mechanical lysis of the thrombus was made obtaining restoration of cerebral vein flow. After the procedure, she presented frontal hematoma which was withdrawn surgically. We discuss this infrequent pathology in clinical picture, pathogenesis, image exams and therapeutics.

  5. New Developments in the Pathophysiology, Workup, and Diagnosis of Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis (DVST) and a Systematic Review of Endovascular Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Konakondla, Sanjay; Schirmer, Clemens M.; Li, Fengwu; Geng, Xiaogun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-01-01

    Dural venous sinus thrombosis (DVST) is a rare cause of stroke, which typically affects young women. The importance of identifying pre-disposing factors that lead to venous stasis lies in the foundation of understanding the etiology, pathophysiology and clinical presentation. The precise therapeutic role of interventional therapies is not fully understood though the current data do suggest potential applications. The aim of the study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the utility of and short-term 30-day survival after endovascular therapy for patients with DVST. Standard PRISMA guidelines were followed. Data sources included PubMed keywords and phrases, which were also incorporated into a MeSH search to yield articles indexed in Medline over a 5-year period. All RCTs, observational cohort studies, and administrative registries comparing or reporting DVST were included. Sixty-six studies met inclusion criteria. 35 articles investigating treatment in a summation of 10,285 patients were eligible for data extraction and included in the review of treatment modalities. A total of 312 patients were included for statistical analysis. All patients included received endovascular intervention with direct thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy or both. 133 (42.6%) patients were documented to have a neurologic decline, which prompted endovascular intervention. All patients who had endovascular interventions were those who were started on and failed systemic anticoagulation. 44 patients were reported to have intracranial hemorrhages after intervention. Regardless of systemic anticoagulation, patients were still reported to have complications of VTE and PE. Primary outcome at 3-6 month follow up revealed mRS<1 in 224 patients. DVST presents with many diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The utility of invasive interventions such as local thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy is not fully understood. It is exceedingly difficult to conduct large

  6. Cranial dural arteriovenous shunts. Part 4. Clinical presentation of the shunts with leptomeningeal venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Baltsavias, Gerasimos; Spiessberger, Alex; Hothorn, Torsten; Valavanis, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Cranial dural arteriovenous fistulae have been classified into high- and low-risk lesions mainly based on the pattern of venous drainage. Those with leptomeningeal venous drainage carry a higher risk of an aggressive clinical presentation. Recently, it has been proposed that the clinical presentation should be considered as an additional independent factor determining the clinical course of these lesions. However, dural shunts with leptomeningeal venous drainage include a very wide spectrum of inhomogeneous lesions. In the current study, we correlated the clinical presentation of 107 consecutive patients harboring cranial dural arteriovenous shunts with leptomeningeal venous drainage, with their distinct anatomic and angiographic features categorized into eight groups based on the "DES" (Directness and Exclusivity of leptomeningeal venous drainage and features of venous Strain) concept. We found that among these groups, there are significant angioarchitectural differences, which are reflected by considerable differences in clinical presentation. Leptomeningeal venous drainage of dural sinus shunts that is neither direct nor exclusive and without venous strain manifested only benign symptoms (aggressive presentation 0%). On the other end of the spectrum, the bridging vein shunts with direct and exclusive leptomeningeal venous drainage and venous strain are expected to present aggressive symptoms almost always and most likely with bleeding (aggressive presentation 91.5%). Important aspects of the above correlations are discussed. Therefore, the consideration of leptomeningeal venous drainage alone, for prediction of the clinical presentation of these shunts appears insufficient. Angiographic analysis based on the above concept, offers the possibility to distinguish the higher- from the lower-risk types of leptomeningeal venous drainage. In this context, consideration of the clinical presentation as an additional independent factor for the prediction of their clinical

  7. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  8. Endovascular treatment of sphenoid wing dural arteriovenous fistula with pure cortical venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Miyake, Kosuke; Kunieda, Takenobu; Murao, Kenichi

    2014-07-01

    Curative endovascular treatment of sphenoid wing dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) with pure cortical venous drainage is challenging because of its rarity, lack of accessible dural sinus for transvenous embolization (TVE), and proximity of skull base vital regions. Direct surgery to disconnect venous reflux has been favored. We report the curative endovascular treatment of two sphenoid wing dAVFs with pure cortical venous drainage. One patient revealed complete obliteration of dAVF by a single session of transarterial embolization (TAE). As part of strategic TAE for this complex dAVF, we used a novel approach to create a complete flow-arrest condition in which coils and an occlusion balloon were combined. A liquid agent was then injected across the pathological fistula and into the parent venous apparatus, thereby occluding the lesion. The other patient was treated with percutaneous TVE after TAE was unsuccessful. With a specific strategy and appropriate devices, the microcatheter was successfully introduced through sigmoid sinus, transverse sinus, superior sagittal sinus, and refluxing cortical vein by puncture of the jugular vein. Coils were deployed at the venous side of the fistula, resulting in successful obliteration of the dAVF. Sphenoid wing dAVF with pure cortical venous drainage could be curable by endovascular treatment with proper strategy and instruments when anatomical condition permits.

  9. Balloon protection of the Labbé vein during transarterial embolization of a dural arterio-venous fistula

    PubMed Central

    Manisor, Monica; Wolff, Valérie; Aloraini, Ziad; Tigan, Leonardo; Kehrli, Pierre; Marescaux, Christian; Beaujeux, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Endovascular treatment of type III dural arterio-venous fistulas can be challenging if the fistulous point is close to a functionally important cortical vein. Methods A technique is described for temporary balloon protection of the vein of Labbé during transarterial Onyx embolization of a type III dural arterio-venous fistula. One illustrative case is presented. Careful anatomic consideration of the concerned venous segment (at the insertion point into the lateral sinus) and the choice of balloon minimized the risk of venous rupture. Results Using this method, satisfactory progression of Onyx was obtained within the arterio-venous shunt while preserving the patency of the Labbé vein. Conclusion Temporary balloon protection of the Labbé vein is a feasible option to preserve its patency during embolization of dural arterio-venous fistulas. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report on the use of temporary balloon protection of a cortical vein. PMID:26438051

  10. Infantile Dural Arteriovenous Fistula of the Transverse Sinus Presenting with Ocular Symptoms, Case Reports and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) of the transverse sinus with ophthalmic manifestations in young children are rare. We reviewed two cases of direct AVF of the transverse sinus with ocular manifestations managed at our institution. The first, a 2.5 years old male child presented with left exophthalmos. Angiography revealed AVF between the occipital artery and the transverse sinus. The second, a 2 years old female child, complained of left exophthalmos. Imaging studies showed bilateral direct AVFs of the transverse sinus with bilateral dysmaturation of the sigmoid sinus. Transarterial embolization was done in both cases. Clinical and radiological follow up revealed complete cure.This report suggests that DAVF of the transverse sinus supplied by the external carotid branches can present with ophthalmic manifestations especially if there is distal venous stenosis or obliteration involving sigmoid sinus. Transarterial embolization using coils and liquid embolic agents could be safe and feasible to obliterate the fistula. PMID:27226864

  11. Stenting Procedure for Sinus Stenosis with Transverse-Sigmoid Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, S.; Ueda, T.; Igase, K.; Ohue, S.; Kumon, Y.; Ohnishi, T.

    2006-01-01

    Summary We reported the dural AVF case with sinus stenosis, that was entirely treated through the stenting procedure. 61-year-old male had been realizing the attack which causes bilateral visual problem. He would have suffered from the intracranial hypertension caused by dural AVF in the right transverse sinus and left transverse sinus stenosis. We performed TVE and sinus stenting, then used the antiplatelet and the anticoagulant. However, six months later, he suffered from SAH due to recurrence of dural AVF. We performed TVE again, denser packing than usual. Two years later, he have no symptom, angiographically, there was no recurrence of dural AVF and patency of stented sinus. We think denser embolizations should have performed in case of dural AVF with sinus stenting. PMID:20569627

  12. Surgical management of dural arteriovenous fistulas of the transverse-sigmoid sinus in 42 patients.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Behzad; Morgan, Michael Kerin

    2013-04-01

    A retrospective study was performed to analyse a prospectively collected database from a single surgeon (M.K.M.) of transverse-sigmoid sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVF) between 1991 and August 2011. During the study period, 144 patients with 160 DAVF were managed. Sixty-five of the DAVF were located in the transverse-sigmoid sinus and 42 were treated with surgery, or embolisation and surgery. All patients who underwent surgery were symptomatic with retrograde cortical venous drainage. The average follow-up period was 18months (range, 2-82months). Total elimination of the DAVF was achieved in all instances, including two patients (5%) who required further surgery after postoperative cerebral angiography showed that some venous drainage had persisted after the first operation. There was no new permanent neurological deficit or mortality attributable to surgery. Our institutional experience shows that in selected patients with transverse-sigmoid sinus DAVF, the involved sinus can be surgically resected with a high success rate and it is as safe as many alternative options. We suggest that this definitive treatment option should be offered to patients, and the outcome should be compared to other treatment modalities.

  13. Core curriculum illustration: dural venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Sibi; Pereira, Alex; Eckerd, Morgan; Pawley, Barbara

    2016-11-28

    This is the 25th installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as a part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online, please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for study online at http://www.aseronline.org/curriculum/toc.htm .

  14. Creating normograms of dural sinuses in healthy persons using computer-assisted detection for analysis and comparison of cross-section dural sinuses in the brain.

    PubMed

    Anconina, Reut; Zur, Dinah; Kesler, Anat; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Toledano, Ronen; Novack, Victor; Benkobich, Elya; Novoa, Rosa; Novic, Evelyne Farkash; Shelef, Ilan

    2017-03-09

    Dural sinuses vary in size and shape in many pathological conditions with abnormal intracranial pressure. Size and shape normograms of dural brain sinuses are not available. The creation of such normograms may enable computer-assisted comparison to pathologic exams and facilitate diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate normal magnetic resonance venography (MRV) studies in order to create normograms of dural sinuses using a computerized algorithm for vessel cross-sectional analysis. This was a retrospective analysis of MRV studies of 30 healthy persons. Data were analyzed using a specially developed Matlab algorithm for vessel cross-sectional analysis. The cross-sectional area and shape measurements were evaluated to create normograms. Mean cross-sectional size was 53.27±13.31 for the right transverse sinus (TS), 46.87+12.57 for the left TS (p=0.089) and 36.65+12.38 for the superior sagittal sinus. Normograms were created. The distribution of cross-sectional areas along the vessels showed distinct patterns and a parallel course for the median, 25th, 50th and 75th percentiles. In conclusion, using a novel computerized method for vessel cross-sectional analysis we were able to quantitatively characterize dural sinuses of healthy persons and create normograms.

  15. Endovascular treatment of a traumatic dural arteriovenous fistula of the superior sagittal sinus using dual lumen balloon microcatheter

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yihao; Niu, Yin; Zhu, Gang; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVFs) induced by trauma in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) are rare and difficult to treat because of their unique midline location, multiplicity of arterial feeders, and critical venous drainage. We report a case of an endovascular treatment using dual lumen balloon microcatheter on a patient with post-traumatic SSS DAVF. By the use of dual lumen Scepter balloon microcatheter, proximal Onyx reflux was prevented. In this case, complete embolization of the DAVFs was achieved and the outcome of the patient was fairly good. PMID:27094527

  16. Dural sinus obstruction following head injury: a diagnostic and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Benifla, Mony; Yoel, Uri; Melamed, Israel; Merkin, Vladimir; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with skull fracture adjacent to a dural venous sinus (DVS) and evaluate the role of CT venography (CTV) in the diagnosis of the effect of this fracture on the involved DVS. METHODS The study comprised patients with vault or skull base fracture adjacent to a DVS who were admitted to 1 medical center during a 2-year period. The medical records were reviewed for the clinical and radiographic characteristics. All patients had undergone CTV to evaluate potential DVS pathology. The clinical and radiological findings of the patients with DVS pathology were compared with those of the patients with normal DVS. The groups were compared using the chi-square and t-tests for categorical and continuous data, respectively. The potential risk for poor outcome among the patients with DVS pathology was also investigated. RESULTS Of 434 patients with skull fractures, 41 (9.4%) had fractures adjacent to a DVS. DVS pathology was detected in 51% of patients (21 of 41 patients). For 9 (43%) patients, obstruction was extraluminal without thrombosis, and 12 (57%) patients had dural sinus thrombosis (DST). In patients with a positive-CTV scan, the severity of injury according to the Glasgow Coma Scale score at presentation was correlated with the presence of DST (p = 0.007). The sensitivity of noncontrast CT (NCCT) for DVS involvement was 38% among the patients with positive-CTV scans. For patients with DVS pathology, poor outcome was correlated with DST (intraluminal), rather than extraluminal obstruction without thrombosis (p = 0.02), and superior sagittal sinus (SSS) involvement (p = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS NCCT is not sensitive enough to detect DVS obstruction in patients with skull fracture adjacent to a DVS, and CTV should be performed in order to rule it out. A correlation was found between the severity of injury and the presence of DST, rather than extraluminal obstruction. The authors' findings

  17. An unusual presentation of a dural arteriovenous fistula of the sphenoparietal sinus

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Andrew; Plaha, Puneet; Byrne, James

    2014-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVFs) are a rare form of intracranial arteriovenous malformation. We present the case of a patient who presented in a previously undescribed manner with facial swelling and bruising initially misdiagnosed as cellulitis. He was found subsequently to have DAVFs of the sphenoparietal sinus that had hemorrhaged. The rarity of DAVFs at this location may account for this unique presentation. Successful treatment was achieved by transarterial embolization. PMID:24632907

  18. Transvenous embolization of a dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula via the inferior ophthalmic vein.

    PubMed

    Michels, Kevin S; Ng, John D; Falardeau, Julie; Roberts, Warren G; Petersen, Bryan; Nesbit, Gary M; Barnwell, Stanley L

    2007-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman presented with an acute onset of right periocular pain, diplopia, ocular injection, progressive proptosis, and periocular swelling. She had an unremarkable past medical history, and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and complete blood count were normal. A carotid-cavernous sinus fistula was suspected, and an MRI demonstrated enlargement of the superior ophthalmic vein posterior to the globe and enlargement of the inferior ophthalmic vein throughout its entire course. Cerebral arteriography demonstrated a dural cavernous sinus fistula. The inferior ophthalmic vein was accessed via the inferonasal orbital space and was catheterized for delivery of multiple platinum coils to the cavernous sinus fistula. Follow-up venograms demonstrated occlusion of the fistula. At 2-month follow-up, there was a residual sixth nerve palsy and resolution of symptoms, including proptosis and periocular swelling.

  19. Spontaneous Aggressive Conversion of Venous Drainage Pattern in Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Treated with Onyx Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yeongu; Choi, Seok Keun; Lee, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) that showed spontaneous conversion of venous drainage pattern from Borden type II to type III within a four month period of follow-up. Upon admission, the patient presented with aggravated neurologic status and newly developed seizure. After admission, endovascular embolization was performed through the middle meningeal artery with Onyx®. Complete obliteration of dural arteriovenous shunt was confirmed by angiography, and the patient's clinical symptoms improved. Although most cases of DAVF show benign clinical course and conversion pattern, close follow-up is required to detect potential aggravation. PMID:28184352

  20. Transarterial Onyx Embolization for Patients with Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas Who Have Failed Transvenous Embolization.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Duan, Chuan-Zhi; Huang, Li-Jing; Zhang, Xin; He, Xu-Ying; Li, Xi-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Transvenous embolization is the treatment of choice for cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (csDAVFs) despite occasional difficulty in transvenous catheterization. We reported our experience in the treatment of csDAVFs by transarterial Onyx embolization in patients who had failed transvenous catheterization. We reviewed the clinical and radiographic records of csDAVFs patients receiving transarterial Onyx embolization after failed transvenous Onyx embolization at our institution over a period of 31 months. Success was defined as complete or near complete occlusion upon angiographic examination. In seven cases, the microcatheter failed to reach the cavernous sinus; in the remaining case, the internal jugular vein was occlusive. Eight sessions of the embolization and catheterization procedures via the arterial routes were conducted. Among them, five cases via the middle meningeal artery and the other three via the accessory meningeal artery. Angiography, immediately after embolization, revealed complete occlusion in seven cases (87.5 %) and partial occlusion in the remaining case. Angiographic follow-up (range, 6-10 months) showed that all patients achieved complete embolization. In cases where transvenous embolization of the cavernous sinus is difficult, transarterial embolization of the fistulas offers a safe and effective alternative.

  1. Endovascular management of sigmoid sinus dural arteriovenous fistula associated with sinus stenosis in an infant.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John M; Benifla, Moni; Itshayek, Eyal; Moscovici, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    A 4-month-old female presented with a dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF), which was successfully managed using endovascular techniques. There are very few case series reporting DAVF in infants younger than 12 months and, to our knowledge, only 60 pediatric patients with DAVF have been reported to date. Although most DAVF have a benign course, they can result in life-threatening hemorrhage. Endovascular therapies are usually indicated in the management of these neurosurgical vascular malformations. Endovascular therapy of DAVF in neonatal patients presents some major issues. Gaining arterial access may be problematic in femoral arteries too small for the introduction of a sizeable guiding catheter. The volumes of contrast and infused fluids must be carefully monitored to prevent fluid overload. Radiation exposure should be restricted as far as possible. This report contributes to the limited body of evidence on neonatal DAVF and its endovascular management.

  2. Embolization of a Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula with Onyx via Direct Puncture of the Cavernous Sinus through the Superior Orbital Fissure

    PubMed Central

    Amiridze, N.; Zoarski, G.; Darwish, R.; Obuchowski, A.; Soloveychic, N.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Treatment of cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (CSDAVF) may be challenging. We describe a patient who had presented with progressive ocular symptoms due to CSDAVF requiring urgent interventional therapy. Initial attempts to embolize the fistula utilizing a transvenous approach through the inferior petrosal sinus failed because of difficult anatomy. Successful occlusion of the fistula was subsequently achieved with injection of ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, Onyx (EV3 Neurovascular, Irvine, CA, USA), via direct percutaneous puncture of the cavernous sinus through the superior orbital fissure. A brief period of asystole during the initial injection of Onyx may be the result of the trigeminocardiac reflex. PMID:20465896

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Venous Sinus Stenosis in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: Complications, Neurological Outcomes, and Radiographic Results

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Robert M.; Wang, Tony; Ding, Dale; Durst, Christopher R.; Crowley, R. Webster; Chalouhi, Nohra; Hasan, David M.; Dumont, Aaron S.; Jabbour, Pascal; Liu, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) may result in a chronic debilitating disease. Dural venous sinus stenosis with a physiologic venous pressure gradient has been identified as a potential etiology in a number of IIH patients. Intracranial venous stenting has emerged as a potential treatment alternative. Methods. A systematic review was carried out to identify studies employing venous stenting for IIH. Results. From 2002 to 2014, 17 studies comprising 185 patients who underwent 221 stenting procedures were reported. Mean prestent pressure gradient was 20.1 mmHg (95% CI 19.4–20.7 mmHg) with a mean poststent gradient of 4.4 mmHg (95% CI 3.5–5.2 mmHg). Complications occurred in 10 patients (5.4%; 95% CI 4.7–5.4%) but were major in only 3 (1.6%). At a mean clinical follow-up of 22 months, clinical improvement was noted in 130 of 166 patients with headaches (78.3%; 95% CI 75.8–80.8%), 84 of 89 patients with papilledema (94.4%; 95% CI 92.1–96.6%), and 64 of 74 patients with visual symptoms (86.5%; 95% CI 83.0–89.9%). In-stent stenosis was noted in six patients (3.4%; 95% CI 2.5–4.3%) and stent-adjacent stenosis occurred in 19 patients (11.4%; 95% CI 10.4–12.4), resulting in restenting in 10 patients. Conclusion. In IIH patients with venous sinus stenosis and a physiologic pressure gradient, venous stenting appears to be a safe and effective therapeutic option. Further studies are necessary to determine the long-term outcomes and the optimal management of medically refractory IIH. PMID:26146651

  4. [Venous sinuses of the dura mater of the bird brain].

    PubMed

    Krasnikov, Iu A

    1988-04-01

    By means of corrosive, injection and tracheoscopy methods venous formations of the brain have been studied in 19 species of birds--endemical for Far East--from 12 orders. Four types of the venous sinuses structure have been distinguished in the dura mater: the first type of the structure is specific for birds that live an inactive and quiet life (blue rock pigeon, Ussuric pheasant, Tetrastes bonasia, domestic hen). The second type of the sinus structure occurs in birds, that sharply change the speed and height of their flight (Otus bakkamoena). The most manifested changes in the sinus structure are noted in waterfowl and diving birds, that spend much time in flight, in dendrocolaptidae and in day predaceous birds; in them the longitudinal sinus forms a rhombus.

  5. Embryological Consideration of Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    TANAKA, Michihiro

    2016-01-01

    The topographical distribution of dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) was analyzed based on the embryological anatomy of the dural membrane. Sixty-six consecutive cases of intracranial and spinal DAVFs were analyzed based on the angiography, and each shunt point was identified according to the embryological bony structures. The area of dural membranes was categorized into three different groups: a ventral group located on the endochondral bone (VE group), a dorsal group located on the membranous bone (DM group) and a falcotentorial group (FT group) located in the falx cerebri, tentorium cerebelli, falx cerebelli, and diaphragm sellae. The FT group was designated when the dural membrane was formed only with the dura propria (meningeal layer of the dura mater) and not from the endosteal dura. Cavernous sinus, sigmoid sinus, and anterior condylar confluence was categorized to VE group, which had a female predominance, more benign clinical presentations, and a lower rate of cortical and spinal venous reflux. Transverse sinus, confluence, and superior sagittal sinus belonged to the DM group. Olfactory groove, falx, tent of the cerebellum, and nerve sleeve of spinal cord were categorized to the FT group, which presented later in life and which had a male predominance, more aggressive clinical presentations, and significant cortical and spinal venous reflux. The DAVFs was associated with the layers of the dural membrane characterized by the two different embryological bony structures. The FT group was formed only with the dura propria as an independent risk factor for aggressive clinical course and hemorrhage of DAVFs. PMID:27250699

  6. Extreme clinical presentations of venous stasis: coronary sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kachalia, Amit; Sideras, Panagiotis; Javaid, Mian; Muralidharan, Sethu; Stevens-Cohen, Pilar

    2013-11-01

    Sixty six year old male with history of heart failure was admitted for dysphagia, weight loss. CT scan chest revealed diffuse oesophageal wall thickening. Upper endoscopy, oesophagogram confirmed diagnosis of achalasia. TTE revealed severely reduced biventricular systolic function with LVEF 10%; PASP 75-80 mmHg. Parasternal long views showed dilated coronary sinus with a visible, mobile 2.0 cm thrombus. Pro-thrombotic workup was negative. Coronary sinus thrombosis has been identified as a rare complication to invasive cardiac procedures causing damage to coronary sinus endothelium and in hypercoagulable states.Typically acute thrombosis presents with chest pain, dynamic ECG changes, but chronic development does not present with ischaemic signs due to formation of efficient collateral circulation. We present a case report of stable primary coronary sinus thrombus incidentally diagnosed, secondary to chronic venous stasis in coronary circulation. Currently, there are no guidelines to assist physicians in long term management of such patients and thus warrants further investigations.

  7. Local Intrasinus Thrombolysis for Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Karanam, Lakshmi sudha Prasanna; Baddam, Sridhar Reddy; Pamidimukkala, Vijaya; Vemuri, Ramatharaknath; Byrapaneni, Sravanthi; Polavarapu, Raghavasarma

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral venous strokes due to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) have varied presentation and clinical outcome. Despite aggressive medical treatment with optimal anticoagulation, some patients develop progressive neurologic deterioration causing significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of the present series is to analyze the safety and efficacy of in situ thrombolysis in patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in severe clinical grade and refractory to conventional medical management. Materials and methods Twenty-nine patients with cerebral venous thrombosis who received in situ thrombolysis during a 3-year period (April 2013 to April 2016) were included in the study. Tissue plasminogen activator (tpa) was used in all the patients. The lytic agent was infused into the sinus via the micro catheter. Data regarding demographic, clinical, and radiologic features were analyzed in all the patients. Results Recanalization of the affected sinuses was achieved in all the cases. Twenty-four patients had good outcome (mRs 0 or1) and three patients had mild deficits (mRs 2). One patient had moderate disability (mRs 3). One patient succumbed due to increased hematoma causing midline shift and transtentorial herniation. At 3 months follow–up, 26 patients were asymptomatic and two patients had minor symptoms. Conclusion Local intrasinus thrombolysis (LIST) is safe and effective method in patients with poor clinical grade and the present study highlights the benefit of thrombolysis, particularly in patients unresponsive to anticoagulation. The improved efficacy of this therapy depends on early recognition of worsening symptoms and timely intervention. PMID:27829970

  8. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with cerebral hemorrhage during early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Quanmin; Guo, Pin; Ge, Jianwei; Qiu, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) rarely induces cerebral hemorrhage, and CVST with cerebral hemorrhage during early pregnancy is extremely rare. Upon literature review, we are able to find only one case of CVST with cerebral hemorrhage in early pregnancy. In this paper, we report another case of a 27-year-old patient who developed CVST with cerebral hemorrhage in her fifth week of pregnancy. Although the optimal treatment for this infrequent condition remains controversial, we adopted anticoagulation as the first choice of treatment and obtained favorable results. PMID:25630781

  9. Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis during Everest Expedition: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, P.; Shrestha, A. M.; Bhattarai, S.; Sapkota, D.; Sharma, N.; Devkota, U. P.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare but serious disorder that is associated with a poor clinical outcome. We report a 35-year-old man who had a severe headache and diplopia while climbing Mount Everest. His MR venography showed right transverse and right sigmoid sinus thrombosis. He improved on anticoagulant and symptomatic measures. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis at high altitude is discussed. PMID:27872776

  10. Evolutionary History of Multiple Dural Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Burbano, Braulio; Correa Diaz, Edgar Patricio; Jácome Sánchez, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) are abnormal communications between arteries and veins or dural venous sinuses, which sit between the sheets of the dura. They represent 10% to 15% of intracranial vascular malformations. Clinical manifestations and prognosis depend on the pattern of venous drainage and location. The clinical presentation of DAVF may be mistaken for vascular or nonvascular brain pathologies. For that reason, within the differential diagnosis come a wide range of conditions, such as secondary headaches, encephalopathies, dementias including those with rapid progression, neurodegenerative diseases, inflammatory processes, or tumors typically at the orbital level or in the cavernous sinus. Diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion because of the multiplicity of symptoms and presentations, making this pathology an entity that provides a major challenge for clinicians, yet early and multidisciplinary treatment of high-grade fistulas improve the possibility of avoiding poor or unfavorable outcomes for the patient. PMID:28203571

  11. Delayed postoperative dural arteriovenous fistula presenting with progressive dementia.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro

    2015-12-09

    A 64-year-old woman underwent right suboccipital craniotomy to treat spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhoea. Although the CSF leak was cured, the patient developed pulsatile tinnitus, ambulatory disturbance and progressive dementia. Four years after the surgery, she presented with generalised seizure. Cerebral angiography showed a dural arteriovenous fistula at the right transverse-sigmoid sinus, which was associated with sinus occlusion, retrograde blood flow in the sinus and diffuse intracranial cortical venous reflux. A combination of endovascular transarterial embolisation and transvenous embolisation with direct sinus puncture was performed. After the procedure, the patient's mental status and cognitive function improved significantly.

  12. Influence of central venous pressure upon sinus node responses to arterial baroreflex stimulation in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, A. L.; Takeshita, A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Abboud, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements were made of sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation with phenylephrine injection or neck suction, before and during changes of central venous pressure provoked by lower body negative pressure or leg and lower truck elevation. Variations of central venous pressure between 1.1 and 9.0 mm Hg did not influence arterial baroreflex mediated bradycardia. Baroreflex sinus node responses were augmented by intravenous propranolol, but the level of responses after propranolol was comparable during the control state, lower body negative pressure, and leg and trunk elevation. Sinus node responses to very brief baroreceptor stimuli applied during the transitions of central venous pressure also were comparable in the three states. The authors conclude that physiological variations of central venous pressure do not influence sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation in man.

  13. Venous sinus thrombosis after Proteus vulgaris meningitis and concomitant Clostridium abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Bodur, Hürrem; Colpan, Aylin; Gozukucuk, Ramazan; Akinci, Esragul; Cevik, Mustafa Aydin; Balaban, Neriman

    2002-01-01

    A 19-y-old woman presented with Proteus vulgaris meningitis as a complication of chronic otitis media. Despite treatment with ceftazidime and amikacin no clinical improvement was observed. Cranial MRI revealed right-sided mastoiditis/otitis media and venous sinus thrombosis. After mastoidectomy, repeat cranial MRI demonstrated abscess formation in the venous sinuses. The abscess was drained. Clostridium spp. was isolated from the abscess culture.

  14. Contralateral Hypoplastic Venous Draining Sinuses Are Associated with Elevated Intracranial Pressure in Unilateral Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Farias-Moeller, R; Avery, R; Diab, Y; Carpenter, J; Murnick, J

    2016-12-01

    Variations in cerebral venous development can influence the ability to regulate drainage. In cerebral sinovenous thrombosis, these variations can be associated with elevated intracranial pressure. We present a series of pediatric patients with unilateral cerebral sinovenous thrombosis and investigate whether the contralateral venous sinus size increases the risk of developing elevated intracranial pressure. Patients diagnosed with a unilateral cerebral sinovenous thrombosis were identified by querying our institutional radiology data base. The difference in the occurrence of elevated intracranial pressure in patients with cerebral sinovenous thrombosis with and without hypoplastic venous sinuses was studied. Twelve cases of unilateral cerebral sinovenous thrombosis met the inclusion criteria and had sufficient images. Six patients had hypoplastic contralateral venous sinuses. The presence of hypoplastic contralateral venous sinus in the setting of thrombosis of a dominant sinus was associated with elevation of intracranial pressure (83% versus 0%, P = .015). Patients with cerebral sinovenous thrombosis and contralateral hypoplastic venous sinuses are at higher risk of developing elevated ICP and may benefit from screening with an ophthalmologic examination.

  15. Antiphospholipid syndrome presenting as cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: a case series and a review.

    PubMed

    Shlebak, Abdul

    2016-04-01

    The cerebral venous sinus system is a rare site for venous thrombosis except in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome. We describe three patients presenting with cerebral venous thrombosis in association with other thrombotic sites in two patients and as an only site in one patient. Antiphospholipid syndrome has varied clinical manifestations but the defining feature is the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. In this report we will review the clinical and laboratory diagnostic criteria and the management of patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

  16. Cranial dural arteriovenous shunts. Part 1. Anatomy and embryology of the bridging and emissary veins.

    PubMed

    Baltsavias, Gerasimos; Parthasarathi, Venkatraman; Aydin, Emre; Al Schameri, Rahman A; Roth, Peter; Valavanis, Anton

    2015-04-01

    We reviewed the anatomy and embryology of the bridging and emissary veins aiming to elucidate aspects related to the cranial dural arteriovenous fistulae. Data from relevant articles on the anatomy and embryology of the bridging and emissary veins were identified using one electronic database, supplemented by data from selected reference texts. Persisting fetal pial-arachnoidal veins correspond to the adult bridging veins. Relevant embryologic descriptions are based on the classic scheme of five divisions of the brain (telencephalon, diencephalon, mesencephalon, metencephalon, myelencephalon). Variation in their exact position and the number of bridging veins is the rule and certain locations, particularly that of the anterior cranial fossa and lower posterior cranial fossa are often neglected in prior descriptions. The distal segment of a bridging vein is part of the dural system and can be primarily involved in cranial dural arteriovenous lesions by constituting the actual site of the shunt. The veins in the lamina cribriformis exhibit a bridging-emissary vein pattern similar to the spinal configuration. The emissary veins connect the dural venous system with the extracranial venous system and are often involved in dural arteriovenous lesions. Cranial dural shunts may develop in three distinct areas of the cranial venous system: the dural sinuses and their interfaces with bridging veins and emissary veins. The exact site of the lesion may dictate the arterial feeders and original venous drainage pattern.

  17. Resolution of Pulsatile Tinnitus after Venous Sinus Stenting in Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dinkin, Marc; Suurna, Maria; Hannsgen, Kelly; Bui, Xem

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the role of venous sinus stenting in the treatment of pulsatile tinnitus among patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) and significant venous sinus stenosis. Subjects and Methods A written informed consent approved by the Weill Cornell institutional review board was signed and obtained from the study participants. Thirty-seven consecutive patients with IIH and venous sinus stenosis who were treated with venous sinus stenting between Jan.2012-Jan.2016 were prospectively evaluated. Patients without pulsatile tinnitus were excluded. Tinnitus severity was categorized based on “Tinnitus Handicap Inventory” (THI) at pre-stent, day-0, 1-month, 3-month, 6-month, 12-month, 18-month and 2-year follow-up. Demographics, body-mass index (BMI), pre and post VSS trans-stenotic pressure gradient were documented. Statistical analysis performed using Pearson’s correlation, Chi-square analysis and Fischer’s exact test. Results 29 patients with a mean age of 29.5±8.5 years M:F = 1:28. Median (mean) THI pre and post stenting were: 4 (3.7) and 1 (1) respectively. Median time of tinnitus resolution post VSS was 0-days. There was significant improvement of THI (Δ Mean: 2.7 THI [95% CI: 2.3–3.1 THI], p<0.001) and transverse-distal sigmoid sinus gradient (Δ Mean: -15.3 mm Hg [95% CI: 12.7–18 mm Hg], p<0.001) post-stenting. Mean follow-up duration of 26.4±9.8 months (3–44 months). VSS was feasible in 100% patients with no procedural complications. Three-patients (10%) had recurrent sinus stenosis and tinnitus at mean follow-up of 12 months (6–30 months). Conclusion Venous sinus stenting is an effective treatment for pulsatile tinnitus in patients with IIH and venous sinus stenosis. PMID:27768690

  18. Assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis using T2*-weighted gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bidar, Fatemeh; Faeghi, Fariborz; Ghorbani, Askar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the advantages of gradient echo (GRE) sequences in the detection and characterization of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis compared to conventional magnetic resonance sequences. Methods: A total of 17 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) were evaluated using different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. The MRI sequences included T1-weighted spin echo (SE) imaging, T*2-weighted turbo SE (TSE), fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), T*2-weighted conventional GRE, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). MR venography (MRV) images were obtained as the golden standard. Results: Venous sinus thrombosis was best detectable in T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences in all patients except in one case. Venous thrombosis was undetectable in DWI. T*2-weighted GRE sequences were superior to T*2-weighted TSE, T1-weighted SE, and FLAIR. Enhanced MRV was successful in displaying the location of thrombosis. Conclusion: T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences are probably the best method for the assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The mentioned method is non-invasive; therefore, it can be employed in the clinical evaluation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:27326365

  19. Concurrent Angioplasty Balloon Placement for Stent Delivery through Jugular Venous Bulb for Treating Cerebral Venous Sinus Stenosis. Technical Report

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Khan, Asif A.; Capistrant, Rachel; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Xie, Kevin; Suri, M. Fareed K.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To report upon technique of concurrent placement of angioplasty balloon at the internal jugular vein and sigmoid venous sinus junction to facilitate stent delivery in two patients in whom stent delivery past the jugular bulb was not possible. CLINICAL PRESENTATION A 21-year-old woman and a 41-year-old woman with worsening headaches, visual obscuration or diplopia were treated for pseudotumor cerebri associated with transverse venous stenosis. Both patients had undergone primary angioplasty, which resulted in improvement in clinical symptoms followed by the recurrence of symptoms with restenosis at the site of angioplasty. INTERVENTION After multiple attempts at stent delivery through jugular venous bulb were unsuccessful, a second guide catheter was placed in the ipsilateral internal jugular vein through contralateral femoral venous approach. A 6 mm × 20 mm (left) or 5 × 15 mm (right) angioplasty balloon was placed across the internal jugular vein and sigmoid sinus junction and partially inflated until the inflation and relative straightening of the junction was observed. In both patients, the internal jugular vein and sigmoid sinus junction was successfully traversed by the stent delivery system in a parallel alignment to inflated balloon. Balloon mounted stent was deployed at the site of restenosis with near complete resolution of lumen narrowing delivery and improvement in clinical symptoms. CONCLUSION We report a technique for realignment and diameter change with concurrent placement and partial inflation of angioplasty balloon at the jugular venous bulb to facilitate stent delivery into the sigmoid and transverse venous sinuses in circumstances where multiple attempts at stent delivery are unsuccessful. PMID:27829971

  20. An unusual cause of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: prothrombin G20210A gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Square, Jaime H; Storey, Raul; Rodriguez-Dunn, Simon; Mohamed-Aly, Mohamed S

    2007-09-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis represents less than 1% of all strokes, being an uncommon entity with a wide spectrum of clinical scenarios. We present a 45-year-old Hispanic female with a history of long-term oral contraceptive use who was diagnosed with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis due to a heterozygous carrier mutation in the prothrombin G20210A gene. The patient was successfully managed with intravenous heparin with favorable clinical results without adverse effects. The prevalence of inherited primary thrombophilia increases with additional risk factors such as the use of oral contraceptives that can trigger or prothrombotic events in any vascular bed. An increased prevalence in the prothrombin G20210 gene mutation has been demonstrated in the Mexican-Mestizo population. Controversy exists regarding therapy of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis; according to experts, heparin remains the cornerstone of therapy with acceptable outcomes. More clinical trials are required to evaluate long-term outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  1. Venous sinus thrombosis in a child with nephrotic syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ronaldo Afonso; Torres, Bruna Ribeiro; de Castilho, Alessandra Soares Rocha; Honorato, Ronaldo

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is associated with a hypercoagulable state and an increased risk of thromboembolic complications. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare complication of nephrotic syndrome, with few cases described in the literature, although the disease may be under-diagnosis. The true incidence of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be underestimated because many events are asymptomatic or are not diagnosed in time. Here, we describe the case of a male child, 2 years and 10 months old, with nephrotic syndrome presenting with headache, epileptic seizures and sensory inhibition who was diagnosed with superior sagittal and transverse sinuses thrombosis. An international literature review was performed with a defined search strategy in the PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases using the terms 'nephrotic syndrome' and 'cerebral sinovenous thrombosis'. The diagnosis of venous thrombosis should be considered in any patient with nephrotic syndrome who presents with neurological signs and symptoms, as early clinical diagnosis promotes favorable outcomes.

  2. Poor Prognostic Outcome in Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Associated with Dyskinesia and Elevated Platelet Volume.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shousen; Xu, Bingyang; Zhao, Qingshuang; Li, Jun; Hong, Jingfang; Wei, Liangfeng; Zhao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Although about 80% of patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis have a good prognosis, some patients develop severe complications and a small proportion do not survive. The study included patients who had been diagnosed with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in our hospital from May 2008 to February 2014. Based on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores at 3 months for outcome, the patients were divided into two groups: good prognosis (mRS score ≤ 2) and poor prognosis (mRS score > 2). Univariate and multivariate regression analysis were performed to identify significant prognostic factors for poor outcome. A total of 86 patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, 54 males and 32 females, average age 41.3 years (range, 3-83 years), were enrolled. Of these 86 patients, 64 (74.4%) had a good prognosis and 22 (25.6%) a poor prognosis. Univariate analysis revealed that dyskinesia was a significant risk factor (factor with odds ratio >1) for poor prognosis. In multivariate analysis, the risk of poor prognosis in patients with dyskinesia was 23 times higher than for those without dyskinesia (p < 0.001). Thrombosis of the sinus transervus was found to reduce the risk of poor prognosis in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Most patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis have a good prognosis but patients with dyskinesia have a poorer prognosis.

  3. A Rare Case of Transverse Sinus Venous Thrombosis Simulating Postdural Puncture Headache After Cervical Epidural Injection.

    PubMed

    Guirguis, Maged; Jusino, Eduardo; Tolba, Reda; Samuel, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) is a feared complication related to epidural steroid injections. We report a unique case in which all subjective and objective findings indicated the diagnosis of PDPH. However, the patient failed appropriate conservative and interventional management. Therapeutic failure prompted further investigation to establish the correct diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare, difficult to diagnose, but potentially lethal disorder with nonspecific and variable clinical presentations, including headache and focal neurological deficits. Performing magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venogram should be considered early, especially in patients who fail to respond to standard interventions for PDPH.

  4. [A case of total cavopulmonary connection by utilization of coronary sinus as a hepatic venous return].

    PubMed

    Koide, M; Sakai, A; Iwata, Y; Sanae, T; Kunii, Y; Moriki, N; Ayusawa, Y; Seguchi, M

    2000-10-01

    A 2-year-old boy with polysplenia, double outlet right ventricle after pulmonary banding and unilateral bidirectional shunt was operated on. A modified total cavopulmonary connection was done by utilization of coronary sinus as a retrograde route for the hepatic venous return. Left SVC was transected and its distal end was anastomosed to the left pulmonary artery after PA angioplasty. An equine pericardial patch was placed over the ostia of the hepatic vein and coronary sinus. Two ostia of the coronary veins were excluded from the created route. The proximal end of the left SVC was anastomosed to the inferior side of the left pulmonary artery. Postoperative course was uneventful. The postoperative angiogram showed smooth hepatic venous return through the coronary sinus and no pressure gradient was recorded between hepatic vein and pulmonary artery.

  5. Venous thrombosis in subclavian, axillary, brachial veins with extension to internal jugular vein, right sigmoid sinus and simultaneous pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Tamizifar, Babak; Beigi, Arash; Rismankarzadeh, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare case of Venous Thrombosis in Subclavian, Axillary, Brachial Veins with extension to Internal Jugular vein, right sigmoid sinus and simultaneous Pulmonary embolism during the treatment with low molecular weight heparin. PMID:23901341

  6. Reversible changes in diffusion- and perfusion-based imaging in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ning; Wong, Andrew K; Lipinski, Lindsay J; Mokin, Maxim; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2016-02-01

    Diffusion- and perfusion-based imaging studies are regularly used in patients with ischemic stroke. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare cause of stroke and is primarily treated by systemic anticoagulation. Endovascular intervention can be considered in cases of failed medical therapy, yet the prognostic value of diffusion- and perfusion-based imaging for CVST has not been clearly established. We present a patient with CVST whose abnormal findings on MRI and CT perfusion images were largely reversed after endovascular treatment.

  7. Venous sinus thrombosis in a child with nephrotic syndrome: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ronaldo Afonso; Torres, Bruna Ribeiro; de Castilho, Alessandra Soares Rocha; Honorato, Ronaldo

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is associated with a hypercoagulable state and an increased risk of thromboembolic complications. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare complication of nephrotic syndrome, with few cases described in the literature, although the disease may be under-diagnosis. The true incidence of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be underestimated because many events are asymptomatic or are not diagnosed in time. Here, we describe the case of a male child, 2 years and 10 months old, with nephrotic syndrome presenting with headache, epileptic seizures and sensory inhibition who was diagnosed with superior sagittal and transverse sinuses thrombosis. An international literature review was performed with a defined search strategy in the PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases using the terms ‘nephrotic syndrome’ and ‘cerebral sinovenous thrombosis’. The diagnosis of venous thrombosis should be considered in any patient with nephrotic syndrome who presents with neurological signs and symptoms, as early clinical diagnosis promotes favorable outcomes. PMID:25607275

  8. Bilateral Vertebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Causing Cervical Spinal Cord Compression in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Rhue, Kathryn E.; Taylor, Amanda R.; Cole, Robert C.; Winter, Randolph L.

    2017-01-01

    A 10-year-old male neutered mixed breed dog was evaluated for cervical hyperesthesia and tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and cervical spinal cord identified an extradural compressive lesion over the body of C2 caused by marked dilation of the vertebral venous sinuses. Following intravenous contrast administration both vertebral sinuses had heterogeneous contrast enhancement consistent with incomplete thrombi formation. An abdominal ultrasound also showed a distal aortic thrombus. A definitive cause for the thrombi formation was not identified, but the patient had several predisposing factors which may have contributed. The patient was treated with a combination of warfarin, clopidogrel, and enoxaparin as well as analgesics. Within 48 h of initiation of warfarin therapy, the tetraparesis and hyperesthesia were markedly improved. Repeat abdominal ultrasound 3 weeks after discharge showed reduction in size of aortic thrombus. Neurologic function remained normal for 6 weeks following initiation of treatment. Seventy-four days following initial diagnosis the patient rapidly declined and passed away at home. Necropsy was declined. This is the first report of vertebral venous sinus enlargement leading to spinal cord compression and tetraparesis in a dog. Additionally, warfarin in combination with clopidogrel and enoxaparin appeared to be a safe and effective treatment for the suspected thrombi reported in this case. Vertebral sinus enlargement secondary to thrombi should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with tetraparesis and cervical hyperesthesia. PMID:28229071

  9. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... my acute sinusitis is caused by viruses or bacteria? Acute viral sinusitis is likely if you have ... to tell if my sinusitis is caused by bacteria? Because sinusitis is treated differently based on cause. ...

  10. Non-contrast computed tomography in the diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Oblak, Janja Pretnar; Popovic, Katarina Surlan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) in the diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Methods. Screening our neurological department database, we identified 53 patients who were admitted to neurological emergency department with clinical signs of CVST. Two independent observers assessed the NCCT scans for the presence of CVST. CT venography and/or MR venography were used as a reference standard. Interobserver agreement between the two readers was assessed using Kappa statistic. Attenuation inside the cerebral venous sinuses was measured and compared between the patient and the control group. Results CVST was confirmed in 13 patients. Sensitivity and specificity of NCCT for overall presence of CVST were 100% and 83%, respectively, with Kappa value of 0.72 (a good agreement between observers). The attenuation values between CVST patients and control group were significantly different (73.4 ± 14.12 HU vs. 58.1 ± 7.58 HU; p = 0.000). The ROC analysis showed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.916 (95% CI, 0.827 – 1.00) and an optimal cutoff value of 64 HU, leading to a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 87%. Conclusions NCCT as a first-line investigation has a high value for diagnosis of CVST in the emergency setting. The additional measurement of the sinus attenuation may improve the diagnostic value of the examination. PMID:27679541

  11. Contralateral transvenous approach and embolization with 360° guglielmi detachable coils for the treatment of cavernous sinus dural fistula

    PubMed Central

    Zenteno, Marco; Jorge, Santos-Franco; Rafael, Moscote-Salazar Luis; Raphael, AlvisMiranda Hernando; Gabriel, Alcala-Cerra; Ángel, Lee

    2015-01-01

    carotid-cavernous fistulas are spontaneours acquired connections between the carotid artery and the cavernous cavernous sinus, being classified as direct or indirect; being usually diagnosed in postmenopausal women, but are also associated with other pathoogies such as pregnancy, sinusitis and cavernous sinus thrombosis. They are clinically characterized by ophthalmological symptoms and pulsatile tinnitus. A 51-year-old woman who started her current condition about 4 years ago with pulsatile tinnitus, to which were added progressively: Pain, conjunctival erythema, right eye proptosis and the occasional headache of moderate intensity. Caotid-cavernous fistula wes diagnosed, for the technical difficulty inherent in the case was made a contralateral transvenous approach and embolization with 360° GDG coils, with successful evolution of the patient. The endovascular management of these lesions is currently possible with excellent results. PMID:25767589

  12. A Case of Cerebral Sinus Venous Thrombosis Resulting in Mortality in Severe Preeclamptic Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Soydinc, Hatice Ender; Ozler, Ali; Evsen, Mehmet Sıddık; Sak, Muhammet Erdal; Basaranoglu, Serdar; Dusak, Abdurrahim; Cetincakmak, Mehmet Guli

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rarely encountered condition during pregnancy. A 21-year-old pregnant woman with labour pains was hospitalized in our clinic. Diagnosis of severe preeclampsia was made based on her clinical and laboratory findings. She suffered from convulsive episodes during postpartum period which lead to initiation of treatment for eclampsia. However neurological and radiological examinations were performed after emergence of additional neurological symptoms disclosed the diagnosis of CVST. In this paper, we aimed to present a case with CVST which diagnosis was confused with eclampsia and resulting in maternal mortality. PMID:23509646

  13. Improvement in venous outflow following superior sagittal sinus decompression after a gunshot wound to the head: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Birk, Daniel M; Tobin, Matthew K; Moss, Heather E.; Feinstein, Eric; Charbel, Fady T; Alaraj, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly described indications for surgical management of closed depressed skull fractures are hematoma evacuation and repair of extensive cosmetic deformity. Venous sinus injury, which occurs in a subset of depressed skull fractures is not typically listed as an indication for surgical treatment due to the potential for major venous hemorrhage associated with operation near these structures. However, if patients exhibit signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension and radiographic findings demonstrate sinus compromise, surgical elevation of the depressed skull fragments is indicated. The authors present the case of a 25-year-old woman with a depressed skull fracture secondary to a gunshot wound with symptomatic compromise in venous outflow of the posterior one-third of the superior sagittal sinus. The patient was treated with surgical decompression via bilateral craniectomy along with intracranial pressure lowering medical therapy and had almost full resolution of her presenting symptoms with documented improvement in flow through the superior sagittal sinus. While the use of surgical treatment for these types of injuries is highly debated we demonstrate here that safe, effective surgical management of these patients is possible and that surgical decompression should always be considered in the case of symptomatic venous sinus flow obstruction. PMID:25839927

  14. Whole-Brain Computed Tomographic Perfusion Imaging in Acute Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Ciambella, Chelsey C.; Masud, Muhammad W.; Levy, Elad I.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (VST) can be difficult to diagnose because of its diverse clinical presentation. The utility of perfusion imaging for diagnosing VST is not well understood. Summary We retrospectively reviewed cases of acute VST in patients who underwent whole-brain (320-detector-row) computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging in combination with craniocervical CT venography. Perfusion maps that were analyzed included cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time, and time to peak. Among the 10 patients with acute VST included in this study, 9 had perfusion abnormalities. All perfusion abnormalities were localized in areas adjacent to the occluded sinus and did not match typical anterior or posterior circulation arterial territories. Bilateral perfusion deficits were seen in 4 cases. In 2 cases, parenchymal hemorrhage was diagnosed on noncontrast CT imaging; in those cases, focal CBV and CBF were reduced. Key Messages Whole-brain CT perfusion imaging with 320-detector-row scanners can further assist in establishing the diagnosis of VST by detecting perfusion abnormalities corresponding to venous and not arterial territories. CT perfusion could assist in the differentiation between focal reversible changes, such as those caused by vasogenic edema, and irreversible changes due to infarction. PMID:27051406

  15. Degree of Sigmoid Sinus Compression and the Symptom Relief Using Magnetic Resonance Angiography in Venous Pulsating Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To show that mechanical compression of sigmoid sinus is effective for treatment of pulsatile tinnitus caused by sigmoid sinus enlargement, and to evaluate the relationship between the compression degree of sigmoid sinus and the tinnitus symptom relief using magnetic resonance angiography. Methods Medical records of twenty-four patients who were diagnosed with venous tinnitus caused by sigmoid sinus enlargement and underwent mechanical compression of sigmoid sinus were reviewed between April 2009 and May 2013. All these patients received computed tomography and magnetic resonance venography study before undergoing surgery and were followed for at least 4 months. Results Twenty-three patients felt relief from tinnitus three months after the surgery, and the cross-sectional area of the sigmoid sinus on the tinnitus side was compressed approximately by half (46%-69%) after the surgery. There were 4 patients whose tinnitus suddenly disappeared while lying on the operating table before operation, which may be a result of the patient's emotional tension or postural changes from standing. One of the four patients felt no relief from tinnitus after the surgery, with the cross-sectional area of the sigmoid sinus only compressed by 30%. And two patients of them had a recurrence of tinnitus about 6 months after the surgery. Seven patients had sigmoid sinus diverticula, and tinnitus would not disappear merely by eliminating the diverticulum until by compressing the sigmoid sinus to certain degree. There were 3 minor complications, including aural fullness, head fullness and hyperacusis. The preoperative low frequency conductive and sensorineural hearing loss of 7 subjects subsided. Conclusion Mechanical compression of sigmoid sinus is an effective treatment for pulsatile tinnitus caused by sigmoid sinus enlargement, even if it might be accompanied by sigmoid sinus diverticulum. A compression degree of sigmoid sinus about 54% is adequate for the relief of tinnitus

  16. Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Manifested as Rapid Progressive Dementia Successfully Treated by Endovascular Embolization Only

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Heewon; La, Yun Kyung; Baek, Min Seok; Baik, Kyoungwon; Suh, Sang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    A 43-year-old male presented with daytime sleepiness at work and indifferent behavior like never before. Two weeks prior to hospital admission, he had episodic memory loss with well preserved remote memory. Brain MRI showed a dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) in the right lateral transverse sinus with a bilateral thalamic venous infarction. Cerebral angiography confirmed a right transverse sigmoid dural arteriovenous fistula with a feeding artery of the right occipital artery and left posterior meningeal artery. The DAVF was completely eliminated through multiple endovascular interventions. Recently, endovascular treatment has become one of the main therapeutic options to obliterate a fistulous site, which has led to a rapid diagnostic approach and management of DAVFs with high curative rates. We report a rare case of posterior fossa located at a dural arteriovenous fistula that caused rapid progressive dementia and was successfully eliminated through only endovascular treatment. PMID:28316870

  17. [Thrombosis of the intracranial venous sinuses after ingestion of estroprogestative agents. 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, P; Bernard, M H; Scherpereel, B; Morel, M; Guyot, J F

    1977-06-04

    The authors report 4 cases of thrombosis of the superior longitudinal sinus (SLS) in women taking oestroprogestational agents. This complication is very rare, only 25 cases existing in the literature. The clinical picture consists of premonitory headaches associated with neurological signs suggesting lesions affecting both hemispheres in alternation. In the absence of treatment, sudden deterioration on about the tenth day is to be feared. This picture is similar to that of puerperal thrombosis of the SLS. The diagnosis should be confirmed by carotid arteriography, which demonstrates the presence of collateral varices and the thrombosed sinus giving a "negative" image on the AP view. Cerebral scintigraphy shows one or more areas of uptake in the form of adjacent rounded shapes, corresponding to cerebral infarctions of venous origin. As far as the responsibility of oestro-progenstational agents is concerned, the role is suggested by the analogy with puerperal thromboses and also by the absence of cases in men (with the exception of head injury, infections of the face and haematological malignancies). The prognosis is grave (19 deaths out of 29 cases), but surviving patients are completely cured. This prognosis would seem to be essentially dependent upon the possibilities of venous callateral circulation, which are variable in each individual patient. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic risk, in effective doses, to transform the venous thrombosis into a cerebral haemorrhage. Treatment consists rather of methods to reduce cerebral volume, aimed at maximal use of collateral varices and assisting the patient to overcome to acute phase of the first 2 weeks. Headache would seem to be the principal presenting symptom. In our opinion, no biological test gives a reliable indication as to those women most at risk and contraindictions are in fact of a clinical character.

  18. Lessons from surgical outcome for intracranial meningioma involving major venous sinus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Moon-Soo; Kim, Yeong-Jin; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Yang, Jung-In; Kang, Woo Dae; Lim, Sa-Hoe; Jang, Woo-Youl; Jung, Tae-Young; Kim, In-Young; Jung, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intracranial meningiomas involving the major venous sinus (MVS) pose several complication risks upon performing radical resection. Some surgeons consider MVS invasion a contraindication for a complete resection of meningioma, and others suggest total resection followed by venous reconstruction. The aim of the study was to analyze our surgical results and discuss management strategy for intracranial meningiomas involving the MVS. Between 1993 and 2011, 107 patients with intracranial meningiomas involving MVS underwent surgery in our institution. Clinicoradiological features including pathological features and operative findings were retrospectively analyzed. Median follow-up duration was 60.2 months (range, 6.2–218.2 months). Distributions of tumor cases according to the involved sinus were as follows: 86% parasagittal, 10.3% tentorial, and 3.7% peritorcular. Simpson Grade I/II removal was achieved in 93 of 107 patients (87%). Partially or totally occluded MVS by their meningiomas (Sindou classification IV and V) was found in 39 patients (36%). Progression rate was 12% (13/107) and progression-free survival rates were 89%, 86%, and 80% at 5, 7, and 10 years, respectively. Sindou classification (IV/V) and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score 6 month after the surgery (KPS < 90) were predictive factors for progression in our study (P = 0.044 and P = 0.001, respectively). The resection degree did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.484). Interestingly, there was no progression in patients that underwent radiation therapy or gamma knife radiosurgery for residual tumor. There were no perioperative deaths. Complication rate was 21% with brain swelling being the most common complication. There was no predictive factor for occurrence of postoperative complication in this study. In conclusion, complete tumor resection with sinus reconstruction did not significantly prevent tumor recurrence in intracranial meningioma involving MVS

  19. Anomalous PiB enhancement in the superior sagittal and transverse venous sinuses.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Scott B; Cohen, Ann D; Becker, Carl; Price, Julie; Klunk, William E

    2012-01-01

    Pittsburgh compound-B (PiB), an amyloid-binding positron emission tomography (PET) tracer, is widely used for imaging amyloid-β in those with and at risk for Alzheimer disease. Here, we report on an otherwise normal 68-year-old female with abnormally high and very focal PiB retention. Coregistered T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) images confirmed that the focal PiB enhancement was in the superior sagittal and transverse sinuses, outside of the adjacent cortex. Flow through the venous vasculature was normal as assessed by dynamic FDG PET imaging. These features supported the conclusion that PiB retention was not simply due to a hemodynamic abnormality, but may have represented PiB binding to fibrillar deposits of a β-sheet protein (ie, amyloid), whose nature is currently unclear.

  20. Dural ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Neha; Gupta, Veena; Kumar, Abhishake; Kumar, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    Dural ectasia is one of the likely causes of incomplete or failed spinal anaesthesia. Its association with diseases like Marfans syndrome, neurofibromatosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, vertebral fracture, postopertative adhesions, trauma etc., is often overlooked as a reason for inadequate spinal anaesthesia. Greater than normal volume of cerebrospinal fluid in the lumber theca in dural ectasia is postulated to restrict the spread of intrathecally injected Local anaesthetic. Here, we report a case of failed spinal anaesthesia but successful epidural anaesthesia in later setting in a patient with dural ectasia. PMID:24963189

  1. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in the Superior Sagittal Sinus as a Rare Cause of a Paroxysmal Kinetic Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Murao, Kei; Arakawa, Shuji; Furuta, Yoshihiko; Shijo, Masahiro; Ago, Tetsuro; Kitazono, Takanari

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has a broad spectrum of clinical presentation compared to arterial etiology. Seizure is one of the common symptoms and is more frequent than in other stroke types. Hence, transient neurological symptoms in CVT patients are usually due to epileptic seizures, while transient repetitive movement disorder is extremely rare except as a complication of epilepsy. We report a case of CVT in the superior sagittal sinus with a 1-year history of paroxysmal kinetic tremor without evident epilepsy. PMID:28203183

  2. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... will develop sinusitis: Allergic rhinitis or hay fever Cystic fibrosis Going to day care Diseases that prevent the ... Nasal culture Nasal cytology Sweat chloride tests for cystic fibrosis Treatment SELF-CARE Try the following steps to ...

  3. Morphological Variations in the Transverse Venous Sinus Anatomy of Dogs and its Relationship to Skull Landmarks.

    PubMed

    Carreira, L Miguel; Ferreira, A

    2016-08-01

    We characterized the anatomical morphology of the transverse venous sinus (TVS) of 69 canine adult cadavers belonging to three groups: brachycephalic (B), dolichocephalic (D) and mesaticephalic (M). In addition, we outlined its path over the skull using five classic human craniometric points (CPs): the asterion (ast), the bregma (b), the glabella (g), the stephanion (st) and the pterion (pt). The study aimed to establish anatomical differences in the TVS between groups and in the relationship between the TVS and skull. We found that TVS anatomy and its relationships to skull landmarks vary markedly between the groups, with similar anatomical arrangements in B and M. The TVS length can be ranked as M < B < D (with D being the biggest), whereas the width can be ranked as M < D < B (with B being the widest) with the right side being smaller than the left. In the B and M groups, the TVS assumes a craniocaudal trajectory that is closer to the lateral skull wall than in D, where the TVS presents a caudocranial direction. By documenting the morphological characteristics of the TVS, we can create a set of anatomical references allowing construction of a basic framework to greatly decrease the probability of TVS injury during neuronavigation procedures when supported by a good knowledge of the skull, brain anatomies and their relationships.

  4. A Flare of Ulcerative Colitis Accompanied With Cerebral Sinus Venous Thrombosis And Bilateral Thalamic Infarctus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dulger, Ahmet Cumhur; Begenik, Huseyin; Demirtas, Levent; Esen, Ramazan; Emre, Habib

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory and recurrent disorder that is characterized by bowel inflammation. Some patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) have acute, severe, and sometimes devastating intracranial complications that require immediate medical intervention. Cerebral sinus vein thrombosis is a rare but serious extraintestinal complication associated with ulcerative colitis. Herein we report a 30-year-old man with UC who presented with a flare of gastrointestinal symptoms with mental obtundation and apathy. Total colonoscopy revealed active colitis and cranial MRI showed extensive cerebral sinus venous thrombosis with thalamic infarcts. Because the patient was clinically unstable metilprednisolon with low molecular weight heparin were administered. Two days after treatment the patient was died despite all medical efforts. PMID:27785183

  5. Dural arteriovenous fistula masquerading as pulsatile tinnitus: radiologic assessment and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    An, Yong-Hwi; Han, Sungjun; Lee, Minhyung; Rhee, Jihye; Kwon, O-Ki; Hwang, Gyojun; Jung, Cheolkyu; Bae, Yun Jung; An, Gwang Seok; Lee, Kyogu; Koo, Ja-Won; Song, Jae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus (PT) is often an initial presenting symptom of dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF), but it may be overlooked or diagnosed late if not suspected on initial diagnostic work-up. Here, we assess anatomical features, treatment outcomes, and clinical implications of patients with PT due to dAVF. Of 220 patients who were diagnosed with dAVF between 2003 and 2014, 30 (13.6%) presented with only PT as their initial symptom. The transverse-sigmoid sinus (70.0%) was the most common site, followed by the hypoglossal canal (10.0%) and the middle cranial fossa (6.7%) on radiologic evaluation. Regarding venous drainage patterns, sinus or meningeal venous drainage pattern was the most common type (73.3%), followed by sinus drainage with a cortical venous reflux (26.7%). PT disappeared completely in 21 (80.8%) of 26 patients who underwent therapeutic intervention with transarterial embolization of the fistula, improved markedly in 3 (11.5%), and remained the same in 2 (7.7%). In conclusion, considering that PT may be the only initial symptom in more than 10% of dAVF, not only otolaryngologists but also neurologists and neurosurgeons should meticulously evaluate patients with PT. In most cases, PT originating from dAVF can be cured with transarterial embolization regardless of location and venous drainage pattern. PMID:27812001

  6. The post-occipital spinal venous sinus of the Nile crocodile Crocodylus niloticus: its anatomy and use for blood sample collection and intravenous infusions.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, Jan G; Kirberger, Robert M; Steyl, Johan C A; Soley, John T; Booyse, Dirk G; Huchzermeyer, Fritz W; Lowers, Russel H; Guillette, Louis J

    2014-05-05

    The post-occipital sinus of the spinal vein is often used for the collection of blood samples from crocodilians. Although this sampling method has been reported for several crocodilian species, the technique and associated anatomy has not been described in detail in any crocodilian, including the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus). The anatomy of the cranial neck region was investigated macroscopically, microscopically, radiographically and by means of computed tomography. Latex was injected into the spinal vein and spinal venous sinus of crocodiles to visualise the regional vasculature. The spinal vein ran within the vertebral canal, dorsal to and closely associated with the spinal cord and changed into a venous sinus cranially in the post-occipital region. For blood collection, the spinal venous sinus was accessed through the interarcuate space between the atlas and axis (C1 and C2) by inserting a needle angled just off the perpendicular in the midline through the craniodorsal cervical skin, just cranial to the cranial borders of the first cervical osteoderms. The most convenient method of blood collection was with a syringe and hypodermic needle. In addition, the suitability of the spinal venous sinus for intravenous injections and infusions in live crocodiles was evaluated. The internal diameter of the commercial human epidural catheters used during these investigations was relatively small, resulting in very slow infusion rates. Care should be taken not to puncture the spinal cord or to lacerate the blood vessel wall using this route for blood collection or intravenous infusions.

  7. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis concomitant with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, in a patient with epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Oda, Naohiro; Sakugawa, Makoto; Bessho, Akihiro; Horiuchi, Takeshi; Hosokawa, Shinobu; Toyota, Yosuke; Fukamatsu, Nobuaki; Nishii, Kazuya; Watanabe, Yoichi

    2014-12-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with dizziness, after two weeks of experiencing symptoms. Chest computed tomography revealed a peripheral nodule in her left upper lobe, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated the presence of multiple brain masses. The patient underwent whole-brain radiotherapy based on a tentative diagnosis of lung cancer with multiple brain metastases. The diagnosis was confirmed by endobronchial biopsy as T4N3M1b, stage IV lung adenocarcinoma with an epidermal growth factor receptor mutation. On the 31st day of hospitalization, the patient developed severe headache. Subsequent magnetic resonance venography revealed defects in the superior sagittal, right sigmoid, and right transverse venous sinuses and the right internal jugular vein. Anticoagulation therapy with unfractionated heparin and warfarin was immediately administered following diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Brain MRI demonstrated leptomeningeal gadolinium enhancement in front of the pons and medulla. Positive cerebrospinal fluid tumor cytology confirmed the diagnosis of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Following four weeks of antithrombotic therapy, complete thrombolysis was confirmed by magnetic resonance venography. Effective treatment with gefitinib was administered, and the patient survived for 10 months after the diagnosis of CVST and leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Adequate early diagnosis and treatment of CVST enabled an excellent survival rate for the patient, despite leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Following the development of headaches in patients with lung cancer, CVST, although rare, should be considered. Furthermore, following a diagnosis of CVST, leptomeningeal carcinomatosis should be investigated as an underlying cause.

  8. [Cerebral venous thrombosis imagiologic features in a pregnant woman].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria Madalena; Rios, Ana Cristina; Fragata, Isabel; Baptista, José Tiago; Manaças, Rui; Reis, João

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a relatively rare but serious condition potentially reversible upon accurate diagnosis and adequate therapy. The peri-partum state and pregnancy are predisposing factors and TVC accounts for about 6% of maternal deaths. Its clinical symptoms depend on the the thrombus site and extension, and also on the existing collateral vessels network. We present the case of a 33 year-old woman, 13 weeks pregnant, that complained of headaches and whose cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a subtotal oclusión of the superior sagittal sinus. We discuss the imaging features of dural venous thrombosis in the acute phase.

  9. Venous hemodynamics in neurological disorders: an analytical review with hydrodynamic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Venous abnormalities contribute to the pathophysiology of several neurological conditions. This paper reviews the literature regarding venous abnormalities in multiple sclerosis (MS), leukoaraiosis, and normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). The review is supplemented with hydrodynamic analysis to assess the effects on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics and cerebral blood flow (CBF) of venous hypertension in general, and chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) in particular. CCSVI-like venous anomalies seem unlikely to account for reduced CBF in patients with MS, thus other mechanisms must be at work, which increase the hydraulic resistance of the cerebral vascular bed in MS. Similarly, hydrodynamic changes appear to be responsible for reduced CBF in leukoaraiosis. The hydrodynamic properties of the periventricular veins make these vessels particularly vulnerable to ischemia and plaque formation. Venous hypertension in the dural sinuses can alter intracranial compliance. Consequently, venous hypertension may change the CSF dynamics, affecting the intracranial windkessel mechanism. MS and NPH appear to share some similar characteristics, with both conditions exhibiting increased CSF pulsatility in the aqueduct of Sylvius. CCSVI appears to be a real phenomenon associated with MS, which causes venous hypertension in the dural sinuses. However, the role of CCSVI in the pathophysiology of MS remains unclear. PMID:23724917

  10. [Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula draining into spinal cord veins: case report].

    PubMed

    Seda, Lauro Franco; Pieruccetti, Marco Antonio; Freitas, José Maria Modenesi; Listik, Sérgio; Pereira, Clemente Augusto Brito

    2002-09-01

    We present an usual case of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula with perimedullary and spinal cord venous plexus drainage and discuss its etiological, physiopathological, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

  11. An anatomical study of the laterotrigeminal venous system.

    PubMed

    Simões, S

    1993-04-01

    The middle cranial fossa of 100 cadavers were dissected under stereoscopic loupe in order to identify and systematize the venous vessels located along the lateral margin of the trigeminal cave. The author found that at the sensitive root and trigeminal ganglion level a dural venous canal was present in most individuals examined and that the upper side of this canal communicated with the superior petrosal sinus. However, at the level of the lateral border of the intracranial segment of the mandibular nerve, venous lacunae were found to prevail, and these lacunae communicated with several other venous formations in the peritrigeminal region. The author concludes that the venous vascularization of this area constitutes a major risk in surgical interventions made in the middle cranial fossa. In addition, it is a relevant factor in the hemodynamics of the intracranial circulation.

  12. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in Pregnancy-A Poignant Allegory of an Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Shailesh, Gaikwad Harsha; Gupta, Sumedha; Sharma, Manjula; Mittal, Pratima

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral Venous Thrombosis (CVT), also known as cortical venous, cerebral sinus, cerebral venous sinus, or dural sinus thrombosis, is an infrequent grave condition affecting pregnant females, resulting from clot formation in one of the many outflow tracts of the brain. Although pregnancy-associated stroke or CVT is uncommon, the risk of stroke is greatly increased above the low baseline rate in young patients during late pregnancy and, even more so, during the puerperium. Haemorrhagic infarction can occur in the acute stage of CVT. The article reports a case of CVT in puerperium in woman without any risk factors for thrombosis, highlighting the difficulties encountered in differentiating this rare cause from common diagnoses such as eclampsia. Also, clinical considerations and relevant literature review on prognostic factors affecting outcome have been addressed. CVT is an uncommon serious neurologic disorder in young gravidas requiring prudent assessment of the potential differential diagnoses and prompt management. PMID:28208950

  13. Central venous catheter placement: where is the tip?

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, George M

    2012-09-01

    The insertion of central venous catheters is a common bedside procedure performed in intensive care units. Here, we present a case of an 82-year-old man who underwent insertion of a central venous catheter in the internal jugular vein without perceived complications. Postprocedural radiographs showed rostral migration of the catheter, and computed tomography performed coincidentally showed cannulation of the jugular bulb at the level of the jugular foramen. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document migration of a central venous catheter from the internal jugular vein into the dural sinuses, as confirmed by computed tomography. The case highlights the importance of acquiring postprocedural radiographs for all insertions of central venous catheters to confirm catheter placement.

  14. Borderline Intracranial Hypertension Manifesting as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Treated by Venous Sinus Stenting.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Nicholas; Pickard, John; Lever, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome and cases of idiopathic intracranial hypertension without signs of raised intracranial pressure can be impossible to distinguish without direct measurement of intracranial pressure. Moreover, lumbar puncture, the usual method of measuring intracranial pressure, can produce a similar respite from symptoms in patients with chronic fatigue as it does in idiopathic intracranial hypertension. This suggests a connection between them, with chronic fatigue syndrome representing a forme fruste variant of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. If this were the case, then treatments available for idiopathic intracranial hypertension might be appropriate for chronic fatigue. We describe a 49-year-old woman with a long and debilitating history of chronic fatigue syndrome who was targeted for investigation of intracranial pressure because of headache, then diagnosed with borderline idiopathic intracranial hypertension after lumbar puncture and cerebrospinal fluid drainage. Further investigation showed narrowings at the anterior ends of the transverse sinuses, typical of those seen in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and associated with pressure gradients. Stenting of both transverse sinuses brought about a life-changing remission of symptoms with no regression in 2 years of follow-up. This result invites study of an alternative approach to the investigation and management of chronic fatigue.

  15. Modified three-dimensional skull base model with artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, and venous sinuses for training in skull base surgery: technical note.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuji; Oyama, Kazutaka; Ueno, Hideaki; Nakao, Yasuaki; Honma, Keiichirou

    2008-12-01

    Experience with dissection of the cavernous sinus and the temporal bone is essential for training in skull base surgery, but the opportunities for cadaver dissection are very limited. A modification of a commercially available prototype three-dimensional (3D) skull base model, made by a selective laser sintering method and incorporating surface details and inner bony structures such as the inner ear structures and air cells, is proposed to include artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, venous sinuses, and the internal carotid artery for such surgical training. The transpetrosal approach and epidural cavernous sinus surgery (Dolenc's technique) were performed on this modified model using a high speed drill or ultrasonic bone curette under an operating microscope. The model could be dissected in almost the same way as a real cadaver. The modified 3D skull base model provides a good educational tool for training in skull base surgery.

  16. Imaging diagnosis of dural and direct cavernous carotid fistulae*

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Daniela; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; Cruz, Antonio Augusto Velasco e; Colli, Benedicto Oscar; Abud, Daniel Giansante

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae of the cavernous sinus are rare and difficult to diagnose. They are classified into dural cavernous sinus fistulae or direct carotid-cavernous fistulae. Despite the similarity of symptoms between both types, a precise diagnosis is essential since the treatment is specific for each type of fistula. Imaging findings are remarkably similar in both dural cavernous sinus fistulae and carotid-cavernous fistulae, but it is possible to differentiate one type from the other. Amongst the available imaging methods (Doppler ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography), angiography is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae. The present essay is aimed at didactically presenting the classification and imaging findings of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae. PMID:25741093

  17. Single-session, transarterial complete embolization of Galenic dural AV fistula.

    PubMed

    Laviv, Yosef; Kasper, Ekkehard; Perlow, Eliyahu

    2016-02-01

    Galenic dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) represents a unique, hard to treat subgroup of tentorial DAVFs. We present an unusual case of hemorrhagic Galenic DAVF in a 54-year-old woman. The fistula drained directly to the vein of Galen through multiple feeders. Complete occlusion of the fistula was achieved through transarterial embolization. Deep venous drainage remained intact and the patient recovered well. To our knowledge, this is the first report on complete closure of hemorrhagic Galenic DAVF using transarterial embolization with complete obliteration of vein of Galen. The presence of nonfunctioning straight sinus may have contributed to the success of treatment and it may be considered as a predictive marker for endovascular embolization.

  18. Cerebral sinus venous thromboses in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia - a multicentre study from the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology.

    PubMed

    Ranta, Susanna; Tuckuviene, Ruta; Mäkipernaa, Anne; Albertsen, Birgitte K; Frisk, Tony; Tedgård, Ulf; Jónsson, Ólafur G; Pruunsild, Kaie; Gretenkort Andersson, Nadine; Winther Gunnes, Maria; Saulyte Trakymiene, Sonata; Frandsen, Thomas; Heyman, Mats; Ruud, Ellen; Helgestad, Jon

    2015-02-01

    We present a prospective multicentre cohort of 20 children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT). The study covers a period of 5 years and comprises 1038 children treated according to the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) ALL 2008 protocol. The cumulative incidence of CSVT was 2%. Sixteen of the thromboses were related to asparaginase and 16 to steroids. Most CSVTs occurred in the consolidation phase. Nearly all were treated with low molecular weight heparin without bleeding complications. Mortality related to CSVT directly or indirectly was 10%, emphasizing the importance of this complication.

  19. [Morphometric characteristics of the asterion and the posterolateral surface of the skull: its relationship with dural venous sinuses and its neurosurgical importance].

    PubMed

    Galindo-de León, Salvador; Hernández-Rodríguez, Alejandra Nohemí; Morales-Ávalos, Rodolfo; Theriot-Girón, María Del Carmen; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo Enrique; Guzmán-López, Santos

    2013-01-01

    antecedentes: el conocimiento de la ubicación y características morfométricas del seno venoso lateral (transverso y sigmoides), así como de su relación con este y otros puntos de referencia anatómicos superficiales, es imprescindible durante los abordajes posterolaterales de la fosa craneal posterior para evitar lesionar las estructuras vasculares y las complicaciones quirúrgicas. Objetivo: determinar un área anatómica de seguridad para realizar un trépano que permita ingresar en la fosa craneal posterior sin lesionar estructuras adyacentes, y estudiar las características morfométricas del asterion, el seno lateral y puntos de referencia óseos de la superficie posterolateral del cráneo. Material y métodos: estudio observacional, transversal y descriptivo efectuado en el Departamento de Anatomía Humana de las Facultad de Medicina y de Odontología de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León. Se analizaron 176 hemicráneos secos, estructuralmente íntegros y sin ninguna patología o anormalidad evidente. Se utilizó una broca de 1.3 mm de diámetro con la que se perforaron ambos lados de 88 cráneos secos (176 hemicráneos). Los puntos de referencia anatómicos estudiados fueron: asterion, vértice de la apófisis mastoides, espina suprameatal, plano horizontal de Frankfurt, raíz posterior del arco cigomático, protuberancia occipital externa y su relación con el seno venoso lateral. Resultados: el asterion tipo I prevalece en 74.4% de las piezas. En 82.4% de los cráneos el seno venoso lateral se encuentra a nivel del asterion inferior a éste en 12.5% y superior en 5.1%. Conclusiones: con los datos obtenidos de esta y otras investigaciones, el trépano inicial debe situarse 15 mm por debajo del asterion inferior y 15 mm posterior a éste para disminuir los riesgos de lesión del seno venoso lateral.

  20. Cerebral Venous Congestion as Indication for Thrombolytic Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Fong Y. Kostanian, Varoujan; Rivera, Monica; Lee, Kwo-Whie; Chen, Clayton C.; Nguyen, Thong H.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To carry out a retrospective analysis of patients with acute dural sinus thrombosis, and the role of cerebral venous congestion in patient management. Methods. Twenty-five patients were identified with the clinical and imaging diagnosis of acute dural sinus thrombosis. The imaging diagnosis was by magnetic resonance (MR) and/or computed tomography (CT) venography. There was a female predominance with a female to male ratio of 1.5 to 1 (16 women, 9 men). The age range was from 19 to 64 years old with an average age of 37 years. The first 10 patients, who ranged in age from 21 to 64 years old (average 37 years), received only anticoagulation therapy with heparin and warfarin for periods ranging from 5 days to 2 months. The remaining 15 patients ranged in age from 19 to 57 years old (average 38 years). They either underwent subsequent thrombectomy after a trial of anticoagulation therapy, or went straight to thrombectomy. These latter 15 patients had initial evidence of cerebral venous congestion, either clinically by severe or worsening symptoms despite anticoagulation therapy, or on initial or subsequent CT or MR imaging. In our experience, the cerebral venous congestion imaging findings included intracranial hemorrhage, a hematoma, or edema. The thrombolytic treatment technique consisted of the advancement of a 6 Fr guiding catheter to the jugular bulb or sigmoid sinus from a transfemoral approach. A microcatheter was then advanced to the proximal portion of the thrombus and then either tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or urokinase was injected to prevent clot propagation. A balloon catheter was used to perform thrombectomy since the thrombolytic agents can be injected via the inner lumen with an inflated balloon. The inflated balloon helped to keep the venous flow from washing out the thrombolytic agent, thus facilitating the agent's effect. Results. The first 10 patients received only anticoagulation therapy with heparin and warfarin for periods

  1. Epidemiology of Dural Arteriovenous Fistula in Japan: Analysis of Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET2)

    PubMed Central

    HIRAMATSU, Masafumi; SUGIU, Kenji; HISHIKAWA, Tomohito; HARUMA, Jun; TOKUNAGA, Koji; DATE, Isao; KUWAYAMA, Naoya; SAKAI, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    We developed the Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy 2 (JR-NET2) database and used the information for a retrospective, nation-wide multicenter, observational study to clarify the clinical characteristics, current status of procedures, and outcome of patients treated by neuroendovascular therapy in Japan. In this report, we analyzed the clinical characteristics of dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) in the JR-NET2 database. All patients with dAVFs treated with endovascular therapy in 150 Japanese hospitals were included. Patient characteristics, clinical presentations, and imaging characteristics were analyzed. A total of 1,075 patients with dAVFs underwent 1,520 endovascular procedures. Of 1,075 patients, 45% were men and 55% were women. The mean age was 65 ± 13 years. The most frequent location of dAVFs was the cavernous sinus (43.6%), followed by the transverse-sigmoid sinus (TSS) (33.4%). Twelve percent of the patients had intracranial hemorrhage, 9% had venous infarction, and 3% had convulsion. The statistically significant independent risk factors of intracranial hemorrhage were TSS, superior sagittal sinus (SSS), tentorium, anterior cranial fossa, cranio-cervical junction, cortical venous reflux (CVR), and varix. Risk factors of venous infarction were age older than 60 years, male sex, TSS, SSS, and CVR. Risk factors of convulsion were male sex, SSS, and CVR. This is the largest nationwide report, to date, of the clinical characteristics of dAVFs treated by neuroendovascular therapy. CVR was a major risk factor of aggressive symptoms. PMID:24390192

  2. Developmental outcomes for neonatal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jonathan N; Hartman, Tyler K; Barbaresi, William; Raffel, Corey; Colby, Christopher E

    2009-02-01

    Large dural arteriovenous malformations (DAVMs) accompanied by cardiac failure usually carry a poor prognosis with a high risk of morbidity and death. The authors report on the case of a male neonate with a massive DAVM who presented at birth with macrocephaly and high-output cardiac failure. The child initially underwent treatment with surgical clipping of the large main feeding artery. Hydrocephalus, thought to be due to venous hypertension, developed when the boy was 8 months old. The condition resolved after interventional embolization treatment. The patient did not require placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. At 21 months of age, the child had near normal development without any focal neurological deficits.

  3. Sagittal sinus thrombosis due to L-asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Nisar A.; Kosar, Tasleem; Pala, Nazir A.; Qureshi, Umar A.

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis (CSVT) is a serious complication of L-asparaginase chemotherapy for leukemia in children. Clinical features of headache, altered consciousness, focal neurological deficit, and seizures developing during or immediately after treatment with L-asparaginase should alert the treating physician to the possibility of CSVT. Immediate imaging of the brain should be done using CT and MRI and the veins should be visualized noninvasively by CT and MR venography. We report two children on induction therapy for acute leukemia who presented with seizures, headache, and altered consciousness. Venous infarcts with and without hemorrhage were seen on CT in one patient and the empty delta sign was seen after contrast injection; however, the early changes were missed by CT. MRI detected dural sinus thrombosis relatively earlier in another patient, while the CT findings were equivocal; in this patient, contrast-enhanced MRI showed the empty delta sign and MR venography confirmed absent flow in the superior sagittal sinus, which was diagnostic of sinus thrombosis. Rapid anticoagulation was started with heparin and maintained with warfarin. The child with a unilateral small nonhemorrhagic infarct made a complete recovery while the other, with bilateral hemorrhagic infarcts, did not survive. We stress the importance of early diagnosis of CSVT using CT and MRI in children with leukemia being treated with L-asparaginase; this will permit timely treatment. PMID:21042505

  4. Lateral sinus thrombosis associated with zoster sine herpete.

    PubMed

    Chan, James; Bergstrom, Richard T; Lanza, Donald C; Oas, John G

    2004-01-01

    Herpes zoster results from reactivation of the varicella zoster virus (VZV). Zoster sine herpete (ZSH) is an uncommon manifestation of VZV infection and presents with similar symptoms but without the vesicular rash. We describe an unusual case of lateral sinus thrombosis (LST) that developed during the clinical course of ZSH in the C2 distribution. A 55-year-old woman presented with a 3-day history of left temporal and postauricular pain, nausea, vomiting, and mild photophobia. She denied otalgia, otorrhea, and hearing loss. Examination revealed hyperesthesia in the left C2 nerve root distribution without evidence of herpetic rash. A computed tomography scan showed minimal fluid in the left mastoid cavity (not mastoiditis) and thrombus within the left lateral and sigmoid dural sinus. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiogram confirmed these findings. Laboratory studies revealed elevated neurotrophic immunoglobulin G levels to VZV. Hypercoagulable studies were normal. She was subsequently treated with Neurontin, acyclovir, and anticoagulation. Her symptoms improved, and she was discharged 3 days later. LST is generally a complication of middle ear infection. Nonseptic LST, however, may result from dehydration, oral contraceptive use, coagulopathy, or thyroid disease. This unusual case raises the suspicion that thrombosis resulted from VZV associated thrombophlebitis in the ipsilateral cerebral venous sinuses along the second cervical nerve root distribution. A high index of suspicion is necessary in such cases so that a different treatment course can be identified and antiviral medication initiated promptly.

  5. An unusual presentation of spinal dural arteriovenous fistula: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Payam; Adabi, Marzie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spinal dural AVF is the most common type of spinal vascular malformation. However, presenting symptoms differ according to site of spinal involvement. This study described a case of arteriovenous malformation with paraparesis and incontinence. Case Presentation: Diagnosis of patient was confirmed by clinical and imaging examination using magnetic resonance image and ruling out other possibilities Result: A definitive diagnosis of arterio venous fistula was confirmed by clinical and MRI examination and demonstrated abnormalities compatible with dural arteriovenous fistula. Conclusion: Dural arteriovenous fistula should be considered in patients with paresis in both lower extremities. PMID:27757211

  6. Intracranial dural based chondroma.

    PubMed

    Reinshagen, Clemens; Redjal, Navid; Sajed, Dipti P; Nahed, Brian V; Walcott, Brian P

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial chondromas are benign, slow-growing, cartilaginous tumors, which comprise only about 0.2% of all intracranial tumors. The majority of these lesions occur at the base of the skull, where they are thought to arise from residual embryonic chondrogenic cells along the basal synchondrosis. Very rarely, they may also originate from the convexity dura, falx cerebri, or the brain parenchyma. We present a patient with a dural based chondroma to highlight the technical considerations of surgical resection. The recent literature on intracranial chondromas regarding incidence, pathophysiologic origin, clinical symptoms, imaging, histopathology and prognosis is reviewed.

  7. Cortical blindness as a rare presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bonnie; Moon, Seong-Jin; Olivero, William C; Wang, Huan

    2013-05-09

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Manifesting in a remarkably wide spectrum of symptoms and signs, CVT often presents in a misleading fashion-if unrecognized or misdiagnosed, it carries potentially fatal consequences. Visual loss is quite rare as the initial presentation of CVT and is typically a finding more frequent in chronic cases with associated papilledema on funduscopy Ferro, Lopes, Rosas and Fontes (Delay in Hospital Admission of Patients with Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus Thrombosis. Cerebrovasc Dis 2005;19: :152-6). We report a rare case of acute cortical blindness as the initial presentation of CVT in an 18-year-old female patient and review the current literature.

  8. Risk Factors for Cerebral Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Silvis, Suzanne M; Middeldorp, Saskia; Zuurbier, Susanna M; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare thrombotic disorder involving the cerebral veins and dural sinuses. In contrast to more common sites of venous thromboembolism (VTE), such as the legs and lungs, CVT mainly affects young adults and children, and women are affected three times more often than men. Although presenting symptoms are variable, headache is usually the first symptom, often in combination with focal neurologic deficits and epileptic seizures. The primary therapy for CVT consists of heparin followed by oral anticoagulation for at least 3 to 6 months. The mortality in the acute phase is 5 to 10% and a substantial proportion of survivors suffer from long-term disabilities. A large number of risk factors have been linked to CVT, although the scientific evidence for an association varies considerably between risk factors. Some risk factors, such as hereditary thrombophilia, correspond with risk factors for more common sites of VTE, whereas others, such as head trauma, are specific to CVT. In most patients, at least one risk factor can be identified. In this review, we provide an overview of the risk factors for CVT.

  9. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ...

  10. Adult Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ...

  11. Posterior clinoidectomy: dural tailoring technique and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Youssef, A Samy; van Loveren, Harry R

    2009-05-01

    The posterior clinoid process, a bony prominence at the superolateral aspect of the dorsum sellae, has a strategic importance in a transcavernous approach to basilar tip aneurysms. To further optimize this microsurgical technique during posterior clinoidectomy, we performed a cadaveric study of this regional anatomy, describe a technique called dural tailoring, and report initial results in the surgical treatment of upper basilar artery (BA) aneurysm. After 10 adult cadaver heads (silicone-injected) were prepared for dissection, a posterior clinoidectomy with dural tailoring was performed. The dura overlying the upper clivus was coagulated with bipolar electrocoagulation and incised. Stripping dura off the clivus and lateral reflection then exposed the ipsilateral posterior clinoid process and dorsum sellae, thus creating a dural flap. Posterior clinoidectomy with dural tailoring was then used in seven patients with upper BA aneurysms. Our stepwise modification of the posterior clinoidectomy with dural tailoring created a flap that afforded protection of the cavernous sinus and oculomotor nerve. During surgery, there were no recorded intraoperative injuries to neurovascular structures. One patient died postoperatively from morbidity related to severe-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage. Postoperative oculomotor nerve palsy occurred in 3 patients (43%). In all cases, the nerve was anatomically preserved and partial to complete recovery was recorded during the first postoperative year. This technique effectively provided exposure of retrosellar upper basilar aneurysms in seven patients (basilar tip 43% and superior cerebellar artery aneurysms 57%). Outcomes and safety are at least equivalent to or better than basilar aneurysm surgery performed without surgical adjuncts, presumably a less complex subset.

  12. Endovascular Occlusion of Dural Cavernous Fistulas through a Superior Ophthalmic Vein Approach

    PubMed Central

    Briganti, Francesco; Caranci, Ferdinando; Leone, Giuseppe; Napoli, Manuela; Cicala, Domenico; Briganti, Giuseppe; Tranfa, Fausto; Bonavolontà, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dural cavernous fistulas are low-flow vascular malformations with usually benign clinical course and a high rate of spontaneous resolution. Cases with symptom progression must be treated with an endovascular approach by arterial or venous route. We report 30 patients with dural cavernous fistulas treated by coil embolization using surgical exposure and retrograde catheterization of the superior ophthalmic vein (SOV). The procedure resulted in closure of the fistula without other endovascular treatments in all 30 patients and clinical remission or improvement in 20 and eight patients, respectively. Embolization via a SOV approach is a safe and easy endovascular procedure, particularly indicated for dural cavernous fistulas with exclusive or prevalent internal carotid artery feeders and anterior venous drainage. PMID:24199817

  13. Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in the anterior ethmoid area, where the maxillary and frontal sinuses connect with the nose. This ... chronic sinusitis by improving the drainage of the maxillary sinus, one of the cavities beneath the eye. ...

  14. Sinus Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... ANATOMY > Sinus Anatomy Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ...

  15. Chronic Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic sinusitis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Chronic sinusitis is a common condition in which the cavities around nasal passages (sinuses) become inflamed and swollen for at least 12 weeks, despite treatment attempts. Also known as chronic rhinosinusitis, this condition ...

  16. Sinus Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... Achy feeling in your upper teeth Sinusitis or migraine? Migraines and headaches from sinusitis are easy to confuse ... types of headaches often overlap. Both sinusitis and migraine headache pain often gets worse when you bend ...

  17. Frontal Sinus Fractures: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Strong, E. Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Frontal sinus injuries may range from isolated anterior table fractures resulting in a simple aesthetic deformity to complex fractures involving the frontal recess, orbits, skull base, and intracranial contents. The risk of long-term morbidity can be significant. Optimal treatment strategies for the management of frontal sinus fractures remain controversial. However, it is critical to have a thorough understanding of frontal sinus anatomy as well as the current treatment strategies used to manage these injuries. A thorough physical exam and thin-cut, multiplanar (axial, coronal, and sagittal) computed tomography scan should be performed in all patients suspected of having a frontal sinus fracture. The most appropriate treatment strategy can be determined by assessing five anatomic parameters including the: frontal recess, anterior table integrity, posterior table integrity, dural integrity, and presence of a cerebrospinal fluid leak. A well thought out management strategy and meticulous surgical techniques are critical to success. The primary surgical goal is to provide a safe sinus while minimizing patient morbidity. This article offers an anatomically based treatment algorithm for the management of frontal sinus fractures and highlights the key steps to surgical repair. PMID:22110810

  18. Sinus Venosus Atrial Septal Defect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    chest CT was performed to evaluate for pulmonary embolism (figure 2). The chest radiograph (figure 1) demonstrates increased central pulmonary ...Fig. 5 Sinus venosus defect at birth . The shaded area in purple represents the sinus venosum. The anomalous right pulmonary venous anatomy...department (ED) with chest pain and an ankle fracture after being hit by a car while riding a horse. Chest imaging noted enlarged central pulmonary

  19. A Series of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thromboses Treated with Intra-Arterial tPA infused over Ten Hours with a 0.027-inch Catheter and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ziu, Endrit; Haley, O'Hara; Ibrahimi, Muhammad; Simon, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) can have devastating results, with mortality reported in 44% of cases. No randomized trials exist in order to define what qualifies as failure of conservative therapy, and there is no specific intervention to date which is considered safe and effective. Case series suggest that thrombolysis infusion is safer than thrombectomy, but methods of administration, dose, and duration of therapy tend to vary widely. We present three consecutive CVST patients treated with heparin who suffered both clinical and radiographic deterioration, and went on to have endovascular therapy. Each patient was successfully recanalized by placing a 0.027-inch microcatheter at the proximal portion of the thrombus and infusing 20 mg of alteplase dissolved in 1 liter of normal saline infused at 100 ml per hour for an infusion of 2 mg of alteplase per hour for ten hours.  PMID:27462480

  20. Dilated cerebral venous system observed in growth restricted fetuses.

    PubMed

    Baron, Joel; Mastrolia, Salvatore Andrea; Shelef, Ilan; Tirosh, Dan; Daniel-Spiegel, Etty; Hershkovitz, Reli

    2017-04-03

    The dilation of the fetal cerebral veins is a rare phenomena that may be associated to a bad obstetric outcome, and is usually connected to antenatal thrombosis of the posterior dural venous sinuses. There are several descriptions of cerebral vein distension on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but all of them are detected postnatally. We present herein two cases of fetal antenatal cerebral dilation of the venous system, without any association to any sign of vein thrombosis, and a systematic review of literature regarding pathogenesis, diagnosis and outcomes associated to the antenatal detection of this condition with the use of MRI. To identify potentially eligible studies, we searched PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library (all from inception to October 20(th), 2016) and applied no language restrictions. The electronic database search provided a total of 22843 results. After the exclusion of duplicates, manuscripts that resulted not relevant to the review based on title and abstract screening, and analysis of manuscripts eligible for full-text assessment, no papers were found related to the subject reported in the present manuscript.

  1. Countercurrent transfer of dopamine from venous blood in the cavernous sinus to the arterial blood supplying the brain - the perfused rabbit head as an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Muszak, J; Krzymowski, T; Gilun, P; Stefanczyk-Krzymowska, S

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the current study was to check whether countercurrent transfer of dopamine occurs in the cavernous sinus of the rabbit and whether the rabbit can be used as an animal model to study cavernous sinus function. After exsanguination of the animal, oxygenated and warmed (37°C) Hanseneleit-Krebs buffer with autologous or homologous blood (in a 3:1 or 1:1 ratio) was pumped through both common carotid arteries into the head (60 ml/min; 80-100 mm Hg) and radiolabeled dopamine (3(H)-DA, 10 μCi) was infused into the cavernous sinus through the angular oculi vein. Cerebral blood from the basilar artery was collected from the cannulated vertebral artery during 3(H)-DA infusion and for 10 minutes after completion of infusion. Selected brain tissue samples were collected after completion of the head perfusion. It was demonstrated that dopamine can penetrate from the rabbit's cavernous sinus to the internal carotid artery supplying the brain. Dopamine permeation was greater when the rabbit head was perfused with buffer and blood in a 3:1 ratio than with 1:1 (P<0.01). When the head was perfused with buffer and blood in a 3:1 ratio, significant radioactivity was found in samples collected from the brain basilar artery during and after 3(H)-DA infusion (P<0.001). The radioactivity was identified as 34.13 ± 2.7% unmetabolized 3(H)-DA and 65.9 ± 2.7% its metabolites. Significant radioactivity was also found in some brain tissue samples in both groups (P<0.05). The concentration of free radiolabeled dopamine particles in the dialysate of blood plasma and plasma diluted with buffer did not differ significantly. Because the structures of the cavernous sinus and cavernous fragment of the internal carotid artery of the rabbit are similar to those in humans, it suggests that rabbits can serve as a model for experimental physiological studies of cavernous sinus function and retrograde dopamine transfer in the cavernous sinus should be considered as an important link in

  2. CSF hydrodynamics in superior sagittal sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, B; Malm, J; Markgren, P; Ekstedt, J

    1992-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics were investigated with a constant pressure infusion method in patients with superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. Ten patients were studied with serial examinations up to 15 years after the onset of the disease. A total of 70 CSF hydrodynamic examinations were performed. A clear increase in intracranial pressure due to raised pressure in the major dural sinus was seen in all patients. A striking feature was the persistent intracranial pressure increase that declined only gradually. This had no obvious clinical impact. Change in CSF resorption facility played only a minor role in the intracranial pressure elevation. None of the patients developed hydrocephalus. PMID:1583513

  3. Pediatric Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your child’s sinuses are not fully developed until late in the teen years. Although small, the maxillary (behind the cheek) and ethmoid (between the eyes) sinuses are present at birth. Unlike in adults, pediatric sinusitis is difficult to ...

  4. Improvement of depression after treatment of dural arteriovenous fistula: a case report and a review.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Minoru; Sugiu, Kenji; Tokunaga, Koji; Sakamoto, Chihoko; Fujiwara, Kenjiro

    2012-01-01

    Patients with dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) in the transverse-sigmoid sinus suffer from several symptoms: bruit, headache, visual impairment, and so on. But depression is rare in patients with DAVF. The authors reported a rare case presenting the improvement of depression after the treatment of a dural arteriovenous fistula in the left transverse-sigmoid sinus. A 46-year-old male had suffered from depression and was treated with antidepressants at a local hospital for four years. The patient was temporarily laid off due to his depression. Afterwards, he had Gerstmann's syndrome and came to our hospital. A DAVF in the left transverse-sigmoid sinus was demonstrated on the angiogram. The DAVF was successfully treated with endovascular surgery, coil embolization of the isolated diseased sinus through the mastoid emissary vein which was a draining vein from the fistula. After this treatment, his depression as well as Gerstmann's syndrome was improved and the quantity of the antidepressants decreased. The patient returned to work without any antidepressant two years after the treatment. DAVFs might be one of the causes of depression. It may be necessary to evaluate cerebral vessels in patients suffering from depression by using MRA or 3D-CTA even if there are not any abnormal findings on plain CT scans.

  5. Improvement of Depression after Treatment of Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: A Case Report and a Review

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Minoru; Sugiu, Kenji; Tokunaga, Koji; Sakamoto, Chihoko; Fujiwara, Kenjiro

    2012-01-01

    Patients with dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) in the transverse-sigmoid sinus suffer from several symptoms: bruit, headache, visual impairment, and so on. But depression is rare in patients with DAVF. The authors reported a rare case presenting the improvement of depression after the treatment of a dural arteriovenous fistula in the left transverse-sigmoid sinus. A 46-year-old male had suffered from depression and was treated with antidepressants at a local hospital for four years. The patient was temporarily laid off due to his depression. Afterwards, he had Gerstmann's syndrome and came to our hospital. A DAVF in the left transverse-sigmoid sinus was demonstrated on the angiogram. The DAVF was successfully treated with endovascular surgery, coil embolization of the isolated diseased sinus through the mastoid emissary vein which was a draining vein from the fistula. After this treatment, his depression as well as Gerstmann's syndrome was improved and the quantity of the antidepressants decreased. The patient returned to work without any antidepressant two years after the treatment. DAVFs might be one of the causes of depression. It may be necessary to evaluate cerebral vessels in patients suffering from depression by using MRA or 3D-CTA even if there are not any abnormal findings on plain CT scans. PMID:23243544

  6. Diagnosis of Transverse Sinus Hypoplasia in Magnetic Resonance Venography: New Insights Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Combined Dataset of Venous Outflow Impairment Case-Control Studies: Post Hoc Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Han, Ke; Chao, A-Ching; Chang, Feng-Chi; Hsu, Hung-Yi; Chung, Chih-Ping; Sheng, Wen-Yung; Chan, Lung; Wu, Jiang; Hu, Han-Hwa

    2016-03-01

    In previous studies of transverse sinus (TS) hypoplasia, discrepancies between TS diameter measured by magnetic resonance venography (MRV) and contrast T1-weighted magnetic resonance (contrast T1) were observed. To investigate these discrepancies, and considering that TS hypoplasia is associated with neurological disorders, we performed a post hoc analysis of prospectively collected data from 3 case-control studies on transient global amnesia (TGA), transient monocular blindness (TMB), and panic disorders while retaining the original inclusion and exclusion criteria. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of 131 subjects was reviewed to evaluate TS diameter and the location and degree of venous flow stenosis and obstruction.MRV without contrast revealed that TS hypoplasia was observed in 69 subjects, whom we classified into 2 subgroups according to the concordance with contrast T1 observations: concordance indicated anatomically small TS (30 subjects), and discrepancy indicated that the MRV diagnosis is in fact flow-related and that TS is not anatomically small (39 subjects). The latter subgroup was associated with at least 1 site of venous compression/stenosis in the internal jugular vein (IJV) or the left brachiocephalic vein (BCV) (P < 0.001), which was significantly larger in patients than controls. Compensatory dilatation of contralateral TS diameter was only observed with MRV, not with contrast T1 imaging.The clinical implication of these results is that using MRV only, IJV/BCV compression/stenosis may be misdiagnosed as TS hypoplasia. And contralateral TS have no compensatory dilatation in its diameter in contrast T1 imaging, just compensatory increased flow volume.

  7. Multiple dural-based hemangiopericytomas

    PubMed Central

    Stroberg, Edana; Uhrbrock, David H.; Harris, Frank; Mutyala, Subhakar; DiPatre, Pier Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the case of a 57-year-old man who underwent resection of a dural-based hemangiopericytoma (HPC) in the left frontoparietal region. The patient was treated with radiation therapy and remained symptom-free for 10 years. At 67 years of age, he presented with a mass in the left frontal region near the same area as the first tumor, in addition to a separate smaller mass in the right middle cranial fossa. Resection of the larger left frontal mass revealed an HPC. Follow-up imaging 9 months later showed a significant increase in size of the right middle cranial fossa mass. This third mass was resected, and histological examination also demonstrated an HPC. PMID:27034566

  8. Fungal Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... presence of large granules that attract the reddish-orange eosin stain) to attack fungi, and the eosinophils irritate the membranes in the nose. As long as fungi remain, so will the irritation. Chronic Indolent Sinusitis is an invasive form of fungal sinusitis in ...

  9. Complications of Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ...

  10. Sinusitis Q and A

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ...

  11. Parasagittal meningiomas: Our surgical experience and the reconstruction technique of the superior sagittal sinus

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Alessandro; Di Vitantonio, Hambra; De Paulis, Danilo; Del Maestro, Mattia; Gallieni, Massimo; Dechcordi, Soheila Raysi; Marzi, Sara; Galzio, Renato Juan

    2017-01-01

    Background: The radical resection of parasagittal meningiomas without complications and recurrences is the goal of the neurosurgeon. Nowadays, different managements are proposed. This study describes our surgical technique during the lesional excision and the reconstruction of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). Methods: The total removal (Simpson I and II) of parasagittal meningiomas (WHO grade I and II) was obtained in 75 patients from September 2000 to January 2010. The indocyanine green videoangiography was used before the dural opening and, when necessary, to identify and preserve the cortical veins. The surgery of the SSS was performed in accordance with Sindou's classification, and its reconstruction was achieved through the use of a patch of galea capitis. Results: We had no cases of recurrence and thrombotic occlusion of the SSS in 5 years after the reconstruction. No complications were observed in 65 patients, and no cases of mortality were reported. Neurological focal deficits were observed in 5 patients. A brain swelling and a venous infarction were observed in 1 patient. Only one case of thrombotic occlusion was observed. A cerebrospinal fluid leak was observed in 2 patients, and a systemic complication was found in 1 patient. Conclusion: Several factors contribute to the success of the parasagittal meningioma surgery. We consider the preservation of the cortical veins to be important, and, when possible, we recommend the reconstruction of the anterior third of the SSS. Our experience has led us to believe that until now surgery is a winning choice if practiced by expert hands. PMID:28217380

  12. Dural arteriovenous fistula at the anterior clinoid process draining directly into the superficial middle cerebral vein.

    PubMed

    Ushikoshi, Satoshi; Honma, Toshimi; Uchida, Kazuki; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Ajiki, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    A 76-year-old man presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Selective angiography revealed a dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) at the right anterior clinoid process, draining into the superficial middle cerebral vein in a retrograde fashion. Two internal carotid artery aneurysms were also demonstrated at the origin of the posterior communicating artery and the anterior choroidal artery on the same side. The patient underwent craniotomy, and all lesions were treated simultaneously. Rupture of the anterior choroidal artery aneurysm was confirmed. DAVF draining directly into the superficial middle cerebral vein is extremely rare. The precise location of the shunt, the anatomical features, and venous drainage must be evaluated to consider treatment.

  13. Effect of echo contrast media on the visualization of transverse sinus thrombosis with transcranial 3-D duplex sonography.

    PubMed

    Delcker, A; Häussermann, P; Weimar, C

    1999-09-01

    Transcranial duplex sonography has the capacity of detecting venous flow as in the transverse sinus. During a 6-month period, 28 consecutive patients (mean age 55 y) with a clinically suspected diagnosis of cerebral sinus thrombosis were included in the study. All patients were examined using 3-D ultrasound equipment within 24 h of having undergone either venous computerized tomography (CT), venous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or cerebral angiography. A total of 22 healthy patients had a normal venous CT, venous MRI or cerebral angiography of both transverse sinuses. Before echo contrast enhancement, the transverse sinus could be visualized in only 2 of these 44 sinuses (22 patients). A total of 6 patients with an unilaterally missed transverse sinus in 3-D ultrasound suffered from sinus thrombosis (n = 3), hypoplasia (n = 2) or aplasia (n = 1) of the unilateral transverse sinus in neuroradiological tests. In none of the patients with an thrombosis of the transverse sinus did ultrasound contrast media application improve the visualization of the affected sinus. Our study confirms that the normal transverse sinus, insonated through the contralateral temporal bone, often cannot be visualized without the use of contrast agents. With transcranial 3-D duplex sonography, a differentiation between thrombosis, hypoplasia and aplasia of the sinus was not possible.

  14. Endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous sinus fistula: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Korkmazer, Bora; Kocak, Burak; Tureci, Ercan; Islak, Civan; Kocer, Naci; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Carotid cavernous sinus fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid system and the cavernous sinus. Several classification schemes have described carotid cavernous sinus fistulas according to etiology, hemodynamic features, or the angiographic arterial architecture. Increased pressure within the cavernous sinus appears to be the main factor in pathophysiology. The clinical features are related to size, exact location, and duration of the fistula, adequacy and route of venous drainage and the presence of arterial/venous collaterals. Noninvasive imaging (computed tomography, magnetic resonance, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, Doppler) is often used in the initial work-up of a possible carotid cavernous sinus fistulas. Cerebral angiography is the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis, classification, and planning of treatment for these lesions. The endovascular approach has evolved as the mainstay therapy for definitive treatment in situations including clinical emergencies. Conservative treatment, surgery and radiosurgery constitute other management options for these lesions. PMID:23671750

  15. Transarterial Embolization of a Cervical Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, S.A.; Lassig, J.P.; Nicol, E.; Thompson, B.G.; Gemmete, J.J.; Gandhi, D.

    2006-01-01

    Summary We describe a case of a 75-year-old man who presented with acute onset of headache and subarachnoid hemorrhage and initial cerebral angiography was deemed "negative". In retrospect, a faint contrast collection was present adjacent to the right vertebral artery at the C1 level suspicious for a small dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF). Follow-up angiography with selective microcatheter injections of the right vertebral artery and C1 radicular artery confirmed a complex dAVF with characteristically specific venous drainage patterns associated with a subarachnoid hemorrhage presentation. Subsequently, the cervical dAVF was treated with superselective glue embolization resulting in complete occlusion. Cervical dAVFs are extremely rare vascular causes of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Both diagnostic angiography and endovascular treatment of these lesions can be challenging, especially in an emergent setting, requiring selective evaluation of bilateral vertebral arteries and careful attention to their cervical segments. Although only a single prior case of a cervical dAVF presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage has been successfully treated with embolization, modern selective transarterial techniques may allow easier detection and treatment of subtle pathologic arteriovenous connections. PMID:20569588

  16. Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula as a cause for symptomatic superficial siderosis: A report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Griffin R.; Turan, Nefize; Buonanno, Ferdinando S.; Pradilla, Gustavo; Nogueira, Raul G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Superficial siderosis (SS) is the occult deposition of hemosiderin within the cerebral cortex due to repeat microhemorrhages within the central nervous system. The collection of hemosiderin within the pia and superficial cortical surface can lead to injury to the nervous tissue. The most common presentation is occult sensorineural hearing loss although many patients have been misdiagnosed with diseases such as multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis before being diagnosed with SS. Only one case report exists in the literature describing an intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) as the putative cause for SS. Case Description: We describe two cases of SS caused by a dAVF. Both patients had a supratentorial, cortical lesion supplied by the middle meningeal artery with venous drainage into the superior sagittal sinus. In both patients, symptoms improved after endovascular embolization. The similar anatomic relationship of both dAVFs reported presents an interesting question about the pathogenesis of SS. Similar to the pathologic changes seen in the formation of intracranial arterial aneurysms; it would be possible that changes in the blood vessel lining and wall might predispose a patient to chronic, microhemorrhage resulting in SS. Conclusions: We describe the second and third cases of a dAVF as the cause of SS, and the first cases of successful treatment of SS-associated dAVF with endovascular embolization. As noninvasive imaging techniques become more sensitive and easily obtained, one must consider their limitations in detecting occult intracranial vascular malformations such as dAVF as a possible etiology for SS. PMID:27127712

  17. Dural arteriovenous fistula as a treatable dementia

    PubMed Central

    Enofe, Ikponmwosa; Thacker, Ike

    2017-01-01

    Dementia is a chronic loss of neurocognitive function that is progressive and irreversible. Although rare, dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) could present with a rapid decline in neurocognitive function with or without Parkinson-like symptoms. DAVFs represent a potentially treatable and reversible cause of dementia. Here, we report the case of an elderly woman diagnosed with a DAVF after presenting with new-onset seizures, deteriorating neurocognitive function, and Parkinson-like symptoms.

  18. Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Following Translabyrinthine Resection of Cerebellopontine Angle Tumors: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peter M.M.C.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Do, Huy M.; Blevins, Nikolas H.

    2011-01-01

    We describe two cases of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) developing in a delayed fashion after translabyrinthine resection of cerebellopontine angle tumors. Two patients in an academic tertiary referral center, a 46-year-old woman and a 67-year-old man, underwent translabyrinthine resection of a 2-cm left vestibular schwannoma and a 4-cm left petrous meningioma, respectively. Both patients subsequently developed DAVF, and in each case the diagnosis was delayed despite serial imaging follow-up. In one patient, cerebrospinal fluid diversion before DAVF was identified as the cause of her intracranial hypertension; the other patient was essentially asymptomatic but with a high risk of hemorrhage due to progression of cortical venous drainage. Endovascular treatment was effective but required multiple sessions due to residual or recurrent fistulas. Dural arteriovenous fistula is a rare complication of translabyrinthine skull base surgery. Diagnosis requires a high index of clinical suspicion and an understanding of subtle imaging findings that may be present on follow-up studies performed for tumor surveillance. Failure to recognize this complication may lead to misguided interventions for treatment of hydrocephalus and other complications, as well as ongoing risks related to venous hypertension and intracranial hemorrhage. As this condition is generally curable with neurointerventional and/or surgical methods, timely diagnosis and treatment are essential. PMID:23984203

  19. Case of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis with Unusual Venous Infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Kamaraju, Susheel Kumar; Pasupaleti, Bhimeswarao; Juluri, Naganarasimharaju

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a relatively rare condition when compared with vascular accidents of arterial origin representing 0.5-1% of all strokes. Unlike arterial infarcts parenchymal changes are seldom present and when present most of the times are reversible. We present a case report of 28-year-old female with thrombosis of internal cerebral veins and straight sinus and hemorrhagic infarcts in bilateral basal ganglia and bilateral thalami .The findings of bilateral symmetrical hyper intensities in basal ganglia and thalami on MRI may be due to various causes of diverse etiology and cerebral venous thrombosis remains an important cause. Early recognition and prompt anticoagulation therapy helps to reduce the mortality to a great extent. The MRI imaging features of straight sinus thrombosis and other imaging differentials are discussed. PMID:26023623

  20. BAER suppression during posterior fossa dural opening

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Christopher B.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Jiang, Yi Dan; Yao, Tom; Zhang, Yi Ping; Sun, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative monitoring with brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAER) provides an early warning signal of potential neurological injury and may avert tissue damage to the auditory pathway or brainstem. Unexplained loss of the BAER signal in the operating room may present a dilemma to the neurosurgeon. Methods: This paper documents two patients who displayed a unique mechanism of suppression of the BAER apparent within minutes following dural opening for resection of a posterior fossa meningioma. Results: In two patients with anterior cerebellopontine angle and clival meningiomas, there was a significant deterioration of the BAER soon after durotomy but prior to cerebellar retraction and tumor removal. Intracranial structures in the posterior fossa lying between the tumor and dural opening were shifted posteriorly after durotomy. Conclusion: We hypothesized that the cochlear nerve and vessels entering the acoustic meatus were compressed or stretched when subjected to tissue shift. This movement caused cochlear nerve dysfunction that resulted in BAER suppression. BAER was partially restored after the tumor was decompressed, dura repaired, and bone replaced. BAER was not suppressed following durotomy for removal of a meningioma lying posterior to the cochlear complex. Insight into the mechanisms of durotomy-induced BAER inhibition would allay the neurosurgeon's anxiety during the operation. PMID:25883849

  1. [Case of transient cortical blindness due to thrombosis of the transverse sinus].

    PubMed

    Mitaki, Shingo; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kitani, Mitsuhiro

    2008-05-01

    An 62-year-old man presented visual impairment and generalized seizure. Brain CT performed on the day of admission showed thrombus in the right transverse sinus, and DWI showed high intensity areas in the bilateral occipital and parietal lobes. According to bilateral occipital lobe lesions, we considered his visual impairment as cortical blindness. He was diagnosed as venous sinus thrombosis and intravenous heparin, edaravone and osmotic diuretics were administered. MR venography performed after starting of intravenous treatment showed flow gap in the left transverse sinus but no abnormalities in the right transverse sinus. On the second day of hospitalization, his cortical blindness showed improvement and thrombus in the right transverse sinus were disappeared. This indicated that his left transverse sinus originally hypoplastic, thrombus and hemostatis in the right transverse sinus (his dominant side) caused his cortical blindness and generalized seizure. There was a recanalization in the right transverse sinus after heparin therapy.

  2. [A sudden C3-C4 tetraplegia revealing an intracranial dural arteriovenous draining into the spinal medullary veins].

    PubMed

    Meaudre, E; Kaiser, E; Boret, H; Cantais, E; Artéaga, C; Palmier, B

    2005-10-01

    We report a case of intracranial dural arteriovenous (DAVF) draining into the spinal medullary veins. A 49-year-old woman presented a rapidly progressive ascending myelopathy resulting in a C3-C4 tetraplegia associated with acute respiratory failure at the twelfth hour. MRI revealed swelling of the cervical spinal cord, hyperintensity on T2 and enhancement of enlarged veins on MR angiography. A conventional angiography showed the DAVF with venous drainage into the spinal vein extending to the conus medullaris. After embolization, neurological recovery occurred during the first week, allowing tracheal extubation on day 2. Clinical, radiological and therapeutic aspects of this uncommon pathology are presented.

  3. Multimodality evaluation of dural arteriovenous fistula with CT angiography, MR with arterial spin labeling, and digital subtraction angiography: case report.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew; McTaggart, Ryan; Santarelli, Justin; Fischbein, Nancy; Marks, Michael; Zaharchuk, Greg; Do, Huy

    2014-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVF) are cerebrovascular lesions with pathologic shunting into the venous system from arterial feeders. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) has long been considered the gold standard for diagnosis, but advances in noninvasive imaging techniques now play a role in the diagnosis of these complex lesions. Herein, we describe the case of a patient with right-side pulsatile tinnitus and DAVF diagnosed using computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance with arterial spin labeling, and DSA. Implications for imaging analysis of DAVFs and further research are discussed.

  4. Petrosal sinus sampling: technique and rationale.

    PubMed

    Miller, D L; Doppman, J L

    1991-01-01

    Bilateral simultaneous sampling of the inferior petrosal sinuses is an extremely sensitive, specific, and accurate test for diagnosing Cushing disease and distinguishing between that entity and the ectopic ACTH syndrome. It is also valuable for lateralizing small hormone-producing adenomas within the pituitary gland. The inferior petrosal sinuses connect the cavernous sinuses with the ipsilateral internal jugular veins. The anatomy of the anastomoses between the inferior petrosal sinus, the internal jugular vein, and the venous plexuses at the base of the skull varies, but it is almost always possible to catheterize the inferior petrosal sinus. In addition, variations in size and anatomy are often present between the two inferior petrosal sinuses in a patient. Advance preparation is required for petrosal sinus sampling. Teamwork is a critical element, and each member of the staff should know what he or she will be doing during the procedure. The samples must be properly labeled, processed, and stored. Specific needles, guide wires, and catheters are recommended for this procedure. The procedure is performed with specific attention to the three areas of potential technical difficulty: catheterization of the common femoral veins, crossing the valve at the base of the left internal jugular vein, and selective catheterization of the inferior petrosal sinuses. There are specific methods for dealing with each of these areas. The sine qua non of correct catheter position in the inferior petrosal sinus is demonstration of reflux of contrast material into the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. Images must always be obtained to document correct catheter position. Special attention must be paid to two points to prevent potential complications: The patient must be given an adequate dose of heparin, and injection of contrast material into the inferior petrosal sinuses and surrounding veins must be done gently and carefully. When the procedure is performed as outlined, both inferior

  5. Middle meningeal artery: Gateway for effective transarterial Onyx embolization of dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Griessenauer, Christoph J; He, Lucy; Salem, Mohamed; Chua, Michelle H; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Thomas, Ajith J

    2016-09-01

    Curative transarterial embolization of noncavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) is challenging. We sought to evaluate the role of the middle meningeal artery (MMA) in endovascular treatment of these lesions. We performed a retrospective cohort study on patients who underwent transarterial Onyx embolization of a noncavernous sinus dAVFs with contribution from the MMA at a major academic institution in the United States from January 2009 to January 2015. Twenty consecutive patients who underwent transarterial Onyx embolization of a noncavernous sinus dAVF were identified. One patient was excluded as there was no MMA contribution to the dAVF. All of the remaining 19 patients (61.3 ± 13.8 years of age) underwent transarterial embolization through the MMA. Six patients (31.6%) presented with intraparenchymal or subarachnoid hemorrhage from the dAVF. The overall angiographic cure rate was 73.7% upon last follow up. In 71.4% of successfully treated patients transarterial embolization of the MMA alone was sufficient to achieve angiographic cure. When robust MMA supply was present, MMA embolization resulted in angiographic cure even after embolization of other arterial feeders had failed in 92.9% of patients. A robust contribution of the MMA to the fistula was the single most important predictor for successful embolization (P = 0.00129). We attribute our findings to the fairly straight, non-tortuous course of the MMA that facilitates microcatheter access, navigation, and Onyx penetration. Noncavernous sinus dAVF can be successfully embolized with transarterial Onyx through the MMA, as long as supply is robust. A transvenous approach is rarely necessary. Clin. Anat. 29:718-728, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance. PMID:27695168

  7. Percutaneous Transvenous Embolization of Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas with Detachable Coils and/or in Combination with Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Yang, Xinjian; Wu, Zhongxue

    2008-01-01

    Summary This study evaluated angiographic and clinical results in patients with a dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) who underwent percutaneous transvenous embolization. Retrospective chart analysis and radiographic studies were performed in 23 patients (aged 11-70 yrs) with a DAVF treated with percutaneous transvenous embolization in the past five years. Lesions were located in the anterior cranial fossa, cerebellar tentorium, transverse-sigmoid sinus and cavernous sinus. All procedures were analyzed with regard to presentation, delivery, angiographical and clinical outcome. Data for 23 patients (age range, 11-70 yrs, mean age 49.5yrs) with DAVFs (cavernous sinus[CS], n=17; transverse-sigmoid sinus, n=3; anterior cranial fossa, n=2; cerebellar tentorium, n=1) were retrospectively reviewed. The DAVFs were treated with coils or a combination with Onyx via different transvenous approaches, in 28 procedures. Cerebral angiography was performed to confirm the treatment. The mean clinical follow-up period was 22.1 months. Transvenous treatment of intracranial DAVFs can be safe and effective if various transvenous approaches are attempted. Percutaneous transvenous embolization with detachable platinum coils or a combination with Onyx is effective in the treatment of DAVFs. PMID:20557741

  8. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure Statement CONDITIONS Adult Sinusitis Pediatric Sinusitis ... information in the popular media may not reflect reality. Although useful, balloon sinuplasty is not for everyone. ...

  9. Sinusitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and mucus can become trapped in the sinuses. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi can grow there and lead to ... cases of sinusitis thought to be caused by bacteria. Some doctors may recommend ... usually goes away without medical treatment. Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, ...

  10. Dural arteriovenous malformation: a rare cause of epilepsy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Caksen, H; Unal, O; Tombul, T; Cesur, Y; Abuhandan, M

    2001-09-01

    A 3 year and 6 month old girl with epilepsy associated with dural arteriovenous malformation (DAVM), diagnosed on the MRI, is presented to emphasise the importance of DAVM in the aetiology of childhood epilepsy.

  11. [Origin of the common pulmonary vein, septation of the primary sinus venosus atrial situs and theory of the "sinus man"].

    PubMed

    Dor, X; Corone, P; Jonhson, E

    1987-04-01

    Situated at the entry to the heart, the sinus venosus regulates at an early stage the distribution of the veins. Originally symmetrical, it receives on either side an omphalomesenteric vein, a common cardinal vein (duct of Cuvieri, ductus cuvieri) and a common pulmonary vein. This symmetrical pattern disappears with the obliteration of the rough right pulmonary vein and the invagination of the left ductus cuvieri into the sinusal cavity. Thus, the pulmonary venous blood is kept on the left side and the systemic venous blood is transferred to the right side. This is the usual situs solitus arrangement. Situs inversus is the opposite arrangement. In situs ambiguus the original symmetry is preserved. A sufficiently early cauterization of the left wall of the sinus venosus prevents the left ductus cuvieri from invaginating and results in "absence of coronary sinus"; this arrangement, where part of the original symmetry is preserved, is in fact similar to situs ambiguus. The situs of the liver and stomach is thought not to be determined by these organs but imposed to them by the sinus venosus, more precisely by the invagination--or lack of invagination--of a ductus cuvieri. This would explain the concordance between their situs and that of the sinus venosus and atria. It would appear that two errors are frequently made: the common pulmonary vein is said to originate from the left atrium, whereas it originates from the sinus venosus and only belongs to the left atrium when the sinus is incorporated in the atrium; the transverse septation of the sinus is incorporated to a shift to the right of the left sinoatrial fold which separates the sinus from the primitive atrium. This fold is indeed displaced to the right, but it is more distal and corresponds, in fact, to the cephalic border of the left ductus cuvieri, and its shift is produced by the invagination of that duct.

  12. Sinusitis (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by infection. Our sinuses are the moist air spaces within the bones of the face around the nose. The frontal sinuses are located in the area near the eyebrows; the ... our sinuses are filled with air, making our facial bones less dense and much ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

  14. Sinusitis in adults - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000563.htm Sinusitis in adults - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Your sinuses are chambers in ... They are filled with air. Sinusitis is an infection of these chambers, which causes ...

  15. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  16. The genetic landscape of dural marginal zone lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathi, Karthik A.; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Iwamoto, Fabio; Jain, Preti; Chen, Jinli; Cascione, Luciano; Nahum, Odelia; Levy, Brynn; Xie, Yi; Khattar, Pallavi; Hoehn, Daniela; Bertoni, Francesco; Murty, Vundavalli V.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Alobeid, Bachir

    2016-01-01

    The dura is a rare site of involvement by marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) and the biology of dural MZL is not well understood. We performed genome-wide DNA copy number and targeted mutational analysis of 14 dural MZL to determine the genetic landscape of this entity. Monoallelic and biallelic inactivation of TNFAIP3 by mutation (n=5) or loss (n=1) was observed in 6/9 (67%) dural MZL exhibiting plasmacytic differentiation, including 3 IgG4+ cases. In contrast, activating NOTCH2 mutations were detected in 4/5 (80%) dural MZL displaying variable monocytoid morphology. Inactivating TBL1XR1 mutations were identified in all NOTCH2 mutated cases. Recurrent mutations in KLHL6 (n=2) and MLL2 (n=2) were also detected. Gains at 6p25.3 (n=2) and losses at 1p36.32 (n=3) were common chromosomal imbalances, with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of these loci observed in a subset of cases. Translocations involving the IGH or MALT1 genes were not identified. Our results indicate genetic similarities between dural MZL and other MZL subtypes. However, recurrent and mutually exclusive genetic alterations of TNFAIP3 and NOTCH2 appear to be associated with distinct disease phenotypes in dural MZL. PMID:27248180

  17. Absence of the superior petrosal veins and sinus: Surgical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Ken; Ribas, Eduardo Santamaria Carvalhal; Kiyosue, Hiro; Komune, Noritaka; Miki, Koichi; Rhoton, Albert L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The superior petrosal vein, one of the most constant and largest drainage pathways in the posterior fossa, may result in complications if occluded. This study calls attention to a unique variant in which the superior petrosal veins and sinus were absent unilaterally, and the venous drainage was through the galenic and tentorial drainage groups. Methods: This study examines one venogram and another anatomic specimen in which the superior petrosal vein and sinus were absent. Results: The superior petrosal veins, described as 1–3 bridging veins, emptying into the superior petrosal sinus, are the major drainage pathways of the petrosal group of posterior fossa veins. In the cases presented, the superior petrosal vein and sinus were absent and venous drainage was through the galenic and tentorial groups, including the lateral mesencephalic or bridging vein on the tentorial cerebellar surface. Conclusions: In cases in which the superior petrosal sinus and veins are absent, care should be directed to preserving the collateral drainage through the galenic and tentorial tributaries. Although surgical strategies for intraoperative management and preservation of venous structures are still controversial, knowledge of the possible anatomical variations is considered to be essential to improve surgical outcomes. PMID:25745589

  18. Bilateral Maxillary Sinus Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Khanduri, Sachin; Agrawal, Sumit; Goyal, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinus hypoplasia (MSH) is an uncommon abnormality of paranasal sinuses noted in clinical practice. Computed tomography (CT) scan helps in diagnosing the anomaly along with any anatomical variation that may be associated with it. MSH is usually associated with other anomalies like uncinate process hypoplasia. Three types of MSH have been described. Type 1 MSH shows mild maxillary sinus hypoplasia, type 2 shows significant sinus hypoplasia with narrowed infundibular passage and hypoplastic or absent uncinate process, and type 3 is cleft like maxillary sinus hypoplasia with absent uncinate process. CT and endoscopic examination usually complement each other in diagnosing MSH. PMID:25548709

  19. Allergic Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Correll, Daniel P; Luzi, Scott A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2015-12-01

    A 42 year old male presents with worsening pain and an increase in thick chronic drainage of the left sinus. Image studies show complete opacification of the left frontal sinus, left sphenoid sinus, and the left maxillary sinus. The patient was taken to the operating room and tissue for microscopic evaluation was obtained. The microscopic findings were classic for allergic fungal sinusitis: areas of alternating mucinous material and inflammatory cell debris and abundant Charcot-Leyden crystals. Cultures were performed and the patient began steroid therapy and desensitization therapy.

  20. Venous Sampling

    MedlinePlus

    ... parts of the body, including: Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) , in which blood samples are taken from the ... for a few days before the procedure. For AVS, you will be asked to stop taking certain ...

  1. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  2. Mixed total anomalous pulmonary venous connection: Case report with bilateral venous collectors.

    PubMed

    Cayre, Raul O; Civetta, Julio D; Roldan, Alberto O; Rousseau, Juan J; Knudson, Ole A; Valdes-Cruz, Lilliam M

    2003-01-01

    We present a case report of a 3-month-old boy with a mixed total anomalous pulmonary venous connection. The patient had situs solitus, small atrial septal defect, and 2 separate venous collectors. The right pulmonary veins drained through a right-sided venous collector into the coronary sinus. The left-sided pulmonary veins drained through the left-sided venous collector directly into the right superior vena cava. The use of the echocardiogram and Doppler color flow mapping to establish a detailed morphologic analysis, the sites of connection, and the presence of pulmonary venous obstructions as well as the value of this information to facilitate a successful surgical repair are discussed.

  3. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling.

    PubMed

    Zampetti, Benedetta; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo; Loli, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing's syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88-100% and 67-100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50-70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres.

  4. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling

    PubMed Central

    Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing’s syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88–100% and 67–100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50–70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres. PMID:27352844

  5. Repair of spinal dural defects with vicryl (polyglactin 910) mesh.

    PubMed

    Keller, J T; Weil, S M; Ongkiko, C M; Tew, J M; Mayfield, F H; Dunsker, S B

    1989-06-01

    This study examined and compared the effectiveness of woven vicryl (polyglactin 910) mesh and lyophilized cadaver dura (Lyodura) for the repair of spinal dural defects. A woven vicryl mesh was used to repair spinal dural defects in 16 mongrel dogs. As an internal control, all animals had a separate dural incision that was closed with 9-0 vicryl suture. Animals were killed, and results were evaluated at 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks. The repair of dural defects was achieved in all animals, and there were no cases of pseudo-meningocele formation, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, or postoperative infection. The vicryl mesh served as a latticework for formation of a neodural membrane. Inflammatory or reactive response to vicryl mesh was minimal, and no adhesion to underlying neural structures was noted. The neodural membrane formed in the animals in which lyophilized dura was employed was usually thicker than those in which vicryl mesh was used and was associated with thick arachnoid-neural adhesions in two of eight animals. We believe vicryl mesh is a suitable dural substitute and offers promise for use in clinical situations.

  6. Transvenous Approach to Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula (Cognard V): a Treatment Option

    PubMed Central

    Aiuxut Lorenzo, S.; Tomasello Weitz, A.; Blasco Andaluz, J.; Sanroman Manzanera, L.; Macho Fernández, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The endovascular technique is the gold standard treatment in dural arteriovenous fistulas. Due to the limited number of series published it is difficult to create rigid guidelines in terms of the best endovascular treatment approach. Treatment must be tailored to each particular case, but it is important to keep in mind that the possibility of treating a type V dAVF by the transvenous approach should not be discarded. In selected cases the transvenous approach may be helpful to increase the chance of success in the endovascular treatment of type V dAVF. We describe a patient in whom the first arterial treatment failed to achieve occlusion of the fistulous point with the glue. Clinical symptoms improved due to the diminished flow at the fistula after the first embolization but as soon as collateral arteries were recruited by the fistula, spinal cord venous drainage impairment led to symptoms recurrence. Transvenous access allowed us to close the fistula completely in one only session with a complete disappearance of the pathologically inverted perimedullary venous flow. PMID:21561567

  7. Microbiology of sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2011-03-01

    Most sinus infections are viral, and only a small proportion develops a secondary bacterial infection. Rhinoviruses, influenza viruses, and parainfluenza viruses are the most common causes of sinusitis. The most common bacteria isolated from pediatric and adult patients with community-acquired acute purulent sinusitis are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pyogenes. Staphylococcus aureus and anaerobic bacteria (Prevotella and Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium and Peptostreptococcus spp.) are the main isolates in chronic sinusitis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other aerobic and facultative gram-negative rods are commonly isolated from patients with nosocomial sinusitis, the immunocompromised host, those with HIV infection, and in cystic fibrosis. Fungi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most common isolates in neutropenic patients. The microbiology of sinusitis is influenced by the previous antimicrobial therapy, vaccinations, and the presence of normal flora capable of interfering with the growth of pathogens.

  8. Human paranasal sinuses and selective brain cooling: a ventilation system activated by yawning?

    PubMed

    Gallup, Andrew C; Hack, Gary D

    2011-12-01

    The function of the paranasal sinuses has been a controversial subject since the time of Galen, with many different theories advanced about their biological significance. For one, the paranasal sinuses have been regarded as warmers of respiratory air, when in actuality these structures appear to function in cooling the blood. In fact, human paranasal sinuses have been shown to have higher volumes in individuals living in warmer climates, and thus may be considered radiators of the brain. The literature suggests that the transfer of cool venous blood from the paranasal sinuses to the dura mater may provide a mechanism for the convection process of cooling produced by the evaporation of mucus within human sinuses. In turn, the dura mater may transmit these temperature changes, initiated by the cool venous blood from the heat-dissipating surfaces of the sinuses, to the cerebrospinal fluid compartments. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated in cadaveric dissections that the thin bony posterior wall of the maxillary sinus serves as an origin for both medial and lateral pterygoid muscle segments, an anatomic finding that had been previously underappreciated in the literature. The present authors hypothesize that the thin posterior wall of the maxillary sinus may flex during yawning, operating like a bellows pump, actively ventilating the sinus system, and thus facilitating brain cooling. Such a powered ventilation system has not previously been described in humans, although an analogous system has been reported in birds.

  9. Dural repair using porcine ADM: two cases and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Skovsted Yde, Simon; Brunbjerg, Mette Eline; Gudmundsdottir, Gudrun; Bazys, Mindaugas; Heje, Martin; Engberg Damsgaard, Tine

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The use of acellular dermal matrices (ADM) for dural repair is very scantily described in the literature. We report two cases of dural repair using porcine ADM and a literature review. ADM and especially StratticeTM pliable may be a useful alternative to other dural substitutes. Further evaluation would be favorable. PMID:28164146

  10. Abducens nerve palsy due to inferior petrosal sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Siddiqui, Junaid; Katirji, Bashar

    2017-02-24

    Isolated unilateral abducens nerve palsy is usually due to ischemia, trauma or neoplasm. Dorello's canal is the space between the petrous apex and superolateral portion of the clivus, bound superiorly by Gruber's ligament. The abducens nerve travels with inferior petrosal sinus (IPS) though the Dorello's canal before entering the cavernous sinus. A 31-year-old man presented with neck pain, and binocular horizontal diplopia, worse looking towards left and at distance. He had a history of intravenous drug abuse but no history of hypertension or diabetes. On examination, he had complete left 6th nerve palsy with normal fundi, pupils, and other cranial nerves. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia was detected with naïve tricuspid valve endocarditis and multiple septic emboli to lungs with infarcts. His cerebrospinal fluid was normal. MRI of the brain was normal. MRV of head and neck showed thrombosis of the left internal jugular vein, left sigmoid sinus and left inferior petrosal sinus with normal cavernous sinus and no evidence of mastoiditis. He was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics. He was not anticoagulated for fear of pulmonary hemorrhage from pulmonary infarcts. Although cerebral venous sinus thrombosis commonly presents with elevated intracranial pressure, isolated ipsilateral 6th nerve palsy from its compression in Dorello's canal due to thrombosis of the ipsilateral inferior petrosal sinus is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only two patients have been reported with isolated abducens palsy due to IPS thrombosis; one caused by septic emboli and the other developed it during IPS cortisol level sampling.

  11. Relief of postural post dural puncture headache by an epidural blood patch 12 months after dural puncture.

    PubMed

    Klepstad, P

    1999-10-01

    A 20-year-old previously healthy male presented at the pain clinic with chronic headache of about one year duration. Clinical examination revealed no pathological manifestations. During the consultation the patient was drinking Coca-Cola. On direct questioning he told that drinking Coca-Cola gave partial relief from the headache, and that the headache started after he had received two spinal anaesthetics for treatment of a lower leg fracture. Postural post dural puncture headache was now suspected and an epidural blood patch performed. Despite an interval of nearly 12 months since the dural punctures, a single epidural blood patch completely relieved the headache. This case history demonstrates that an epidural blood patch should be tried if a chronic post dural puncture headache is suspected.

  12. Biological effects of cobalt-chromium nanoparticles and ions on dural fibroblasts and dural epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Behl, Bharat; Papageorgiou, Iraklis; Brown, Christopher; Hall, Richard; Tipper, Joanne L; Fisher, John; Ingham, Eileen

    2013-05-01

    The introduction of metal-on-metal total disc replacements motivated studies to evaluate the effects of cobalt-chromium (CoCr) nanoparticles on cells of the dura mater. Porcine fibroblasts and epithelial cells isolated from the dura mater were cultured with clinically-relevant CoCr nanoparticles and the ions, generated by the particles over 24 h, at doses up to 121 μm(3)per cell. Cell viability and production of proinflammatory cytokines was assessed over 4 days. The capacity of the particles to induce oxidative stress in the cells was evaluated at 24 h. The CoCr particles and their ions significantly reduced the viability of the dural epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner but not the fibroblasts. Both cell types secreted IL-8 in response to particle exposure at doses of 60.5 μm(3) (epithelial cells) and 121 μm(3) (fibroblasts, epithelial cells) per cell. No significant release of IL-6 was observed in both cell types at any dose. Reactive oxygen species were induced in both cell types at 50 μm(3) per cell after 24 h exposure. The data suggested novel differences in the resistance of the dural epithelial cells and fibroblasts to CoCr nanoparticle/ion toxicity and demonstrated the inflammatory potential of the particles. The data contributes to a greater understanding of the potential biological consequences of the use of metal-on-metal total disc prostheses.

  13. Facial vein thrombophlebitis: an uncommon complication of sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Cotes, Claudia; Riascos, Roy; Swischuk, Leonard E

    2015-07-01

    Facial vein thrombophlebitis is an uncommon complication of sinusitis. In cases where periorbital swelling complicating sinusitis is diagnosed, clinical findings of swelling and erythema extending beyond the orbital region into the cheek should alert the physician about this unusual complication and the need for further contrast-enhanced imaging and venography. The radiologist must be particularly careful in the evaluation of vascular structures of the face and neck in these children. CT and MRI with contrast material and MR venography are studies that clearly demonstrate the vascular anatomy and possible complications. However, MR venography confirms flow abnormalities within the venous system with the advantage of avoiding radiation exposure to the pediatric patient.

  14. Lower extremity venous reflux

    PubMed Central

    Baliyan, Vinit; Tajmir, Shahein; Ganguli, Suvranu; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Venous incompetence in the lower extremity is a common clinical problem. Basic understanding of venous anatomy, pathophysiologic mechanisms of venous reflux is essential for choosing the appropriate treatment strategy. The complex interplay of venous pressure, abdominal pressure, venous valvular function and gravitational force determine the venous incompetence. This review is intended to provide a succinct review of the pathophysiology of venous incompetence and the current role of imaging in its management. PMID:28123974

  15. Congenital osteolytic dural fibrosarcoma presenting as a scalp swelling.

    PubMed

    Brohi, Shams Raza; Dilber, Muzamil

    2012-08-01

    An extremely rare case of congenital dural fibrosarcoma is reported in a 2 months old child who presented with scalp swelling since birth. CT scan revealed an osteolytic lesion compressing the underlying atrophic brain. Tumour was completely excised and duroplasty was done with a patch graft. Postoperative CSF leak was managed with aspirations and lumbar puncture.

  16. 18-year-old woman with a dural mass.

    PubMed

    Somerset, Hilary; Wilkinson, C Corbett; Kleinschmidt-Demasters, B K

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a dural-based chondroma in the right frontal extra-axial region. Chondromas are benign cartilaginous tumors which are uncommon intracranially. Their diagnosis should be predicated on the exclusion of a chondrosarcoma and clinical studies should be performed to rule out any underlying tumor predisposition syndromes.

  17. Puerperal seizures associated with post dural puncture headache.

    PubMed

    Rice, I; Mountfield, J; Radhakrishnan, D; Nelson-Piercy, C

    2003-04-01

    We present a case of tonic-clonic seizure occurring on day four post partum and associated with severe post dural puncture headache. The possible underlying aetiologies of this and two other cases we have managed and the difficulty distinguishing such seizures from eclampsia are discussed.

  18. Thyroid carcinoma presenting as a dural metastasis mimicking a meningioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, El Mehdi; Essadi, Ismail; Errihani, Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Context: Follicular thyroid cancer rarely manifests itself as a distant metastatic lesion. Case Report: We report a case of a 41-year old man presented with a solid mass located in the left temporo-occipital region. The 3D computed tomography showed a large solid mass with high vascularity, skull erosion and supra-infratentorial epidural mass effect. After magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) a suspect diagnosis of meningioma was made. The patient underwent surgery where a soft mass with transverse sinus invasion was encountered; the tumour was successfully resected employing microsurgical techniques. Histological examination revealed a thyroid follicular neoplasm with positive staining for follicular carcinoma in immunohistochemical analysis. Postoperatively levels of thyroid hormones were normal. Treatment was planned for the thyroid gland, patient receiving 6 courses of chemotherapy including paclitaxel. Conclusions: The present case emphasizes that although they are uncommon, dural metastasis can be mistaken for meningiomas. The definitive diagnosis of a meningioma should be established only after the histopathological analysis. Thyroid follicular carcinoma should be included in the differential diagnosis in cases of extrinsic tumoral lesions. PMID:22540062

  19. Computed tomographic observations pertinent to intracranial venous thrombotic and occulsive disease in childhood: state of the art, some new data, and hypotheses

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, H.D.; Ahmadi, J.; McComb, J.G.; Zee, C.S.; Becker, T.S.; Han, J.S.

    1982-05-01

    Selected topics are discussed and new observations recorded regarding computed tomographic (CT) evaluation of intracranial venous thrombotic and occlusive disease in childhood. High density of the vein of Galen and adjacent venous sinuses (relative to brain) can be seen normally in children. A number of potential pitfalls in the diagnosis of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis are also disclosed. A case of cavernous sinus thrombosis with abnormal CT changes is included. In addition, the normal CT appearance of the cavernous sinus is described. In some cases, filling defects occur which appear to correlate with normal cranial nerves. An unusual case of venous sinus occlusion by neoplasm (sarcoma) is presented. Finally, new findings in the Sturge-Weber syndrome are analyzed. Enhancement of the brain in this condition may have its basis in altered circulation resulting from fundamental venous abnormalities.

  20. Clinical tests of noninvasive optoacoustic cerebral venous oxygenation monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Y. Y.; Petrova, I. Y.; Esenaliev, R. O.; Prough, D. S.

    2009-02-01

    Monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation is critically important for management of patients with traumatic brain injury and cardiac surgery patients. At present, there is no technique for noninvasive, accurate monitoring of this important physiologic parameter. We built a compact optoacoustic system for noninvasive, accurate cerebral venous oxygenation monitoring using a novel optoacoustic probe and algorithm that allow for direct probing of sagittal sinus blood with minimal signal contamination from other tissues. We tested the system in large animal and clinical studies and identified wavelengths for accurate measurement of cerebral blood oxygenation. The studies demonstrated that the system may be used for noninvasive, continuous, and accurate monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation.

  1. Complications of Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... further intracranial surgeries. Impaired sense of taste or smell : The sense of smell usually improves after the procedure because airflow is ... in their voice after sinus surgery. Impairment of smell or taste: (see above) Infection: The most common ...

  2. Sinus MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... sinuses. The test is noninvasive. MRI uses powerful magnets and radio waves instead of radiation. Signals from ... in the eyes. Because the MRI contains a magnet, metal-containing objects such as pens, pocketknives, and ...

  3. Fibrin Glue Injection for Cavernous Sinus Hemostasis Associated with Cranial Nerve Deficit: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tavanaiepour, Daryoush; Jernigan, Sarah; Abolfotoh, Mohamad; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin glue injection has been used to control intraoperative cavernous sinus (CS) venous bleeding. There have been no reported complications related to this maneuver. We present a case where a patient developed a sensory trigeminal nerve deficit after injection of fibrin glue into the posterior CS during resection of a petrosal meningioma. We believe that this deficit was due to the compression of the trigeminal ganglion similar to balloon compression procedures. Although fibrin glue injection may achieve satisfactory cavernous sinus homeostasis, the volume and rate of injection should be kept in mind to avoid a compressive lesion on traversing cranial nerves and surrounding structures, or retrograde filling of the venous tributaries. PMID:26251815

  4. [Diagnosing venous and venous/arterial ulcers].

    PubMed

    Perceau, Géraldine

    2012-01-01

    A venous ulcer can be diagnosed on the basis of elements arising from the questioning and the clinical examination of the patient. A venous Doppler ultrasound can specify the type of reverse flow (superficial and/or deep). Measuring the ankle brachial pressure index helps to eliminate or confirm any arterial involvement. Depending on the systolic pressure index, the ulcer will be considered as purely venous, mixed (arterial-venous) or predominantly arterial.

  5. Sinus preservation management for frontal sinus fractures in the endoscopic sinus surgery era: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Carter, Kenny B; Poetker, David M; Rhee, John S

    2010-09-01

    We systematically reviewed the existing literature supporting the efficacy and safety of sinus preservation management for frontal sinus fractures in the modern era of endoscopic frontal sinus surgery. A systematic review of the English literature for the targeted objective was conducted using the PubMed database between January 1995 and August 2008. The PubMed database was queried using two major search terms of frontal sinus fracture or frontal sinus injury along with manual review of citations within bibliographies. Citations acquired from the primary search were filtered and relevant abstracts were identified that merited full review. Articles were identified that included any cohort of patients with frontal sinus fractures involving the frontal sinus outflow tract or posterior wall with sinus preservation management. A total of 231 citations were generated, and 56 abstracts were identified as potentially relevant articles. Sixteen articles merited full review, with seven articles meeting inclusion criteria for sinus preservation. There were 515 total patients in the studies with 350 patients managed with frontal sinus preservation. Similar short-term complications and effectiveness were found between fractures managed with sinus preservation and those with traditional management. Sinus preservation appears to be a safe and effective management strategy for select frontal sinus fractures. More transparent reporting of management strategies for individual cases or cohorts is needed. A standardized algorithm and categorization framework for future studies are proposed. Longer-term follow-up and larger prospective studies are necessary to assess the safety and efficacy of sinus preservation protocols.

  6. [Endovascular thrombolysis for massive cerebral venous thrombosis in a teenager with nephrotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costa, Paula; Biscoito, Luísa; Vieira, Marisa; Marçal, Mónica; Camilo, Cristina; Neto, Lia; Abecasis, Francisco; Almeida, Margarida; Correia, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare but potentially severe condition in children. We present the case of a teenager with corticodependent nephrotic syndrome diagnosed at five months of age and treated with cyclosporine A. In the context of recurrence of nephrotic syndrome he presented with headache, vomiting and severe intracranial hypertension. While the raised intracranial pressure and the status epilepticus were controlled, the brain imaging revealed venous thrombosis of all venous sinus, with absence of venous drainage. He was submitted to local thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, with recanalization of the venous sinuses. The outcome was favourable, without neurological deficits. In this case, the early radiologic intervention was crucial, enabling a full neurological recovery, in a teenager whose initial prognosis was very poor.

  7. Headaches and sinus disease.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, H J

    2001-10-01

    Modern diagnostic tools like fiberoptic nasal endoscopy and CT imaging of the sinuses are very sensitive in helping clinicians diagnose sinus disease; we may now reevaluate the symptoms and signs most useful in making a clinical diagnosis of rhinosinusitis. Two major systems of classification and diagnostic criteria relating headaches and sinus disease have achieved currency-that of the International Headache Society (IHS) (1988) and the more recent task force recommendations of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) (1997). This report compares and contrasts the different starting points, certain assumptions, and conflicting conclusions of these two classification systems and recommends a cooperative alliance of the IHS and AAO-HNS when these diagnostic criteria are revised.

  8. Mucopyocele of the maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kshar, Avinash; Patil, Abhijeet; Umarji, Hemant; Kadam, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    Mucoceles are defined as chronic, cystic lesions in the paranasal sinuses. When the mucocele content becomes infected, the lesion is defined as mucopyocele. Most mucoceles are located in the frontal and anterior ethmoid sinuses and normally they involve the frontal-ethmoid complex, expanding to the superior-medial region of the orbit, leading to ocular disorders; maxillary sinus presentation is rare. In the present article, the authors described a rare case of mucopyocele in the maxillary sinus. PMID:24688571

  9. Standing equine sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Barakzai, Safia Z; Dixon, Padraic M

    2014-04-01

    Trephination of the equine sinuses is a common surgical procedure in sedated standing horses. Standing sinus flap surgery has become increasingly popular in equine referral hospitals and offers several advantages over sinusotomy performed under general anesthesia, including reduced patient-associated risks and costs; less intraoperative hemorrhage, allowing better visualization of the operative site; and allows surgeons to take their time. Other minimally invasive surgical procedures include sinoscopic surgery, balloon sinuplasty, and transnasal laser sinonasal fenestration. Despite the procedure used, appropriate indications for surgery, good patient selection, and familiarity with regional anatomy and surgical techniques are imperative for good results.

  10. [Histopathologic study of chronic sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Wayoff, M; Parache, R M; Bodelet, B; Gazel, P

    1983-01-01

    The conventional histopathology of the sinus is a criterium for the therapeutic indication, since it is possible to distinguish between granulomatous chronic sinusitis, chronic sinusitis with oedema and nasal polyposis. Each one of these clinical pictures has his own etiology and requires a specific therapeutic approach.

  11. The effect of vancomycin powder on human dural fibroblast culture and its implications for dural repair during spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Ezequiel; Rasmussen, Jorge; Chabot, Joseph D; Gandhoke, Gurpreet; Luzzi, Emilia; Merlotti, Lina; Proni, Romina; Loresi, Mónica; Hamilton, D Kojo; Okonkwo, David O; Kanter, Adam S; Gerszten, Peter C

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a major source of morbidity after spinal surgery. Several recent studies have described the finding that applying vancomycin powder to the surgical bed may reduce the incidence of SSI. However, applying vancomycin in high concentrations has been shown in vitro to inhibit osteoblast proliferation and to induce cell death. Vancomycin may have a deleterious effect on dural healing after repair of an intentional or unintentional durotomy. This study was therefore undertaken to assess the effect of different concentrations of vancomycin on a human dura mater cell culture. METHODS Human dura intended for disposal after decompressive craniectomy was harvested. Explant primary cultures and subcultures were subsequently performed. Cells were characterized through common staining and immunohistochemistry. A growth curve was performed to assess the effect of different concentrations of vancomycin (40, 400, and 4000 μg/ml) on cell count. The effect of vancomycin on cellular shape, intercellular arrangement, and viability was also evaluated. RESULTS All dural tissue samples successfully developed into fusiform cells, demonstrating pseudopod projections and spindle formation. The cells demonstrated vimentin positivity and also had typical features of fibroblasts. When applied to the cultures, the highest dose of vancomycin induced generalized cell death within 24 hours. The mean (± SD) cell counts for control, 40, 400, and 4000 μg/ml were 38.72 ± 15.93, 36.28 ± 22.87, 19.48 ± 6.53, and 4.07 ± 9.66, respectively (p < 0.0001, ANOVA). Compared with controls, vancomycin-exposed cells histologically demonstrated a smaller cytoplasm and decreased pseudopodia formation resulting in the inhibition of normal spindle intercellular arrangement. CONCLUSIONS When vancomycin powder is applied locally, dural cells are exposed to a concentration several times greater than when delivered systemically. In this in vitro model, vancomycin induced

  12. Paraclinoid and cavernous sinus regions: measurement of critical structures relevant for surgical procedure.

    PubMed

    Collignon, Frederic; Link, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Determination of the safest distance the falciform ligament can be incised from its origin to the orbital apex. Measurement of the distance between the oculomotor foramen and the IV nerve in the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus. Evaluation of the optic strut as an accurate landmark between the intradural (subarachnoid) and extradural segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA). Ten fixed human cadaver heads were examined for a total of 20 sides. A frontotemporal craniotomy, an orbito-optic osteotomy, and extradural anterior clinoidectomy were carried out followed by opening the falciform ligament, circumferentially releasing the distal dural ring and dissection of the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus under the operating microscope. We measured: 1) the distance between the entry of the III nerve and the point where the IV nerve crosses over it into the cavernous sinus; 2) the distance the falciform ligament can be incised along the optic nerve laterally until the IV nerve is encountered at the orbital apex; 3) the distance between the optic strut and the lateral part of the distal dural ring; and 4) the distance between the optic strut and the ophthalmic artery. All measurements were made in millimeters, using small calipers. The distance between the optic strut and the lateral part of the distal dural ring ranges from 3-7.5 mm (mean=5.47 mm). In all our specimens, the ophthalmic artery was found distally from the optic strut in the intradural space at a distance ranging from 0.5-7 mm (mean=3.35 mm). The distance between the entry of the third nerve and the IV nerve into the cavernous sinus ranged from 7-15 mm (mean=10.9 mm). The distance between the origin of the falciform ligament and the IV nerve at the level of the orbital apex ranged from 9-15 mm (mean=10.75 mm). The falciform ligament and the optic sheath should not be opened longer than 9 mm along the lateral optic nerve or injury to the IV nerve can occur. Starting at the oculomotor foramen, the

  13. Chronic odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ugincius, Paulius; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gervickas, Albinas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate average age of the patients in both sexes treated for MS, distribution by sex, amount of dexter and sinister MS with and without the fistulas into the maxillary sinus, with and without the foreign-bodies, length of stay in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine during the period from 1999 till 2004. The retrospective data analysis of the patients' treated from chronic MS was made. 346 patients (213 females and 133 males) were treated for chronic MS. 55 cases of chronic dexter MS with a fistula into maxillary sinus, 98 cases of chronic dexter MS without a fistula, 45 cases of chronic sinister MS with a fistula, 112 cases chronic sinister MS without a fistula, 16 cases of foreign-bodies in dexter maxillary sinus, 20 cases of foreign-bodies in sinister maxillary sinus have been detected. The main age of the female was 46.6+/-15.0, the main age of the men was 42.1+/-14.4. Statictically significant difference in the age difference of the women and the men was found (p=0.0024). It was determined, that females diagnosed and treated with chronic MS were 1.6 times more than males during the period from 1999 till 2004 in Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine. Females treated for chronic MS were 4.5 years older than males.

  14. Efficacy and safety of small intestinal submucosa in dural defect repair in a canine model.

    PubMed

    He, Shu-Kun; Guo, Jin-Hai; Wang, Zhu-le; Zhang, Yi; Tu, Yun-Hu; Wu, Shi-Zhou; Huang, Fu-Guo; Xie, Hui-Qi

    2017-04-01

    Dural defects are a common problem, and inadequate dural closure can lead to complications. Several types of dural substitute materials have recently been discarded or modified owing to poor biocompatibility or mechanical properties and adverse reactions. The small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a promising material used in a variety of applications. Based on the limitations of previous studies, we conducted an animal study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the SIS in preclinical trials. Twenty-four male beagle dogs were subjected to surgical resection to produce dural defects. SIS or autologous dural mater was patched on the dural defect. Gross and histological evaluations were carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the therapy. Our findings demonstrated that the SIS, which stimulated connective and epithelial tissue responses for dural regeneration and functional recovery without immunological rejection, could provide prolonged defect repair and prevent complications. The mechanical properties of the SIS could be adjusted by application of multiple layers, and the biocompatibility of the material was appropriate. Thus, our data suggested that this material may represent an alternative option for clinical treatment of dural defects.

  15. Light and scanning electron microscopical study of the cavernous sinus of the monkey, Macaca fascicularis.

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, K; Ling, E A

    1985-01-01

    The cavernous sinus of Macaca fascicularis is in many respects similar to the human sinus. It consists predominantly of one main venous channel that, together with the internal carotid artery, occupies a meningo-endocranial compartment lateral to the pituitary gland. Trabeculae are few and do not in any way cause the sinus to appear cavernous. They are mostly flattened in the direction of the main venous channel. Cranial nerves three, four, six and the ophthalmic division of five are all located in the lateral wall of the meningo-endocranial compartment with cranial nerve six located most medially adjacent to the internal carotid artery. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:4077687

  16. Novalis Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kyoung-Su; Song, Young-Jin; Kim, Ki-Uk

    2016-07-01

    The spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is rare, presenting with progressive, insidious symptoms, and inducing spinal cord ischemia and myelopathy, resulting in severe neurological deficits. If physicians have accurate and enough information about vascular anatomy and hemodynamics, they achieve the good results though the surgery or endovascular embolization. However, when selective spinal angiography is unsuccessful due to neurological deficits, surgery and endovascular embolization might be failed because of inadequate information. We describe a patient with a history of vasospasm during spinal angiography, who was successfully treated by spinal stereotactic radiosurgery using Novalis system.

  17. Novalis Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyoung-Su; Song, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is rare, presenting with progressive, insidious symptoms, and inducing spinal cord ischemia and myelopathy, resulting in severe neurological deficits. If physicians have accurate and enough information about vascular anatomy and hemodynamics, they achieve the good results though the surgery or endovascular embolization. However, when selective spinal angiography is unsuccessful due to neurological deficits, surgery and endovascular embolization might be failed because of inadequate information. We describe a patient with a history of vasospasm during spinal angiography, who was successfully treated by spinal stereotactic radiosurgery using Novalis system. PMID:27446527

  18. Cauda equina syndrome and dural ectasia: rare manifestations in chronic ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C-C; Lin, Y-C; Lo, C-P; Chang, T-P

    2011-01-01

    Cauda equina syndrome (CES) is a rare manifestation in patients with long-standing ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We report a 57-year-old male patient with a 30-year history of AS who developed CES in the past 4 years. The CT and MRI examinations showed unique appearances of dural ectasia, multiple dorsal dural diverticula, erosion of the vertebral posterior elements, tethering of the conus medullaris to the dorsal aspect of the spinal canal and adhesion of the nerve roots of the cauda equina to the wall of the dural sac. A large dural defect was found at surgery. De-adhesion of the tethered conus medullaris was performed but without significant clinical improvement. The possible aetiologies of CES and dural ectasia in patients with chronic AS are discussed and the literature is reviewed. PMID:21606066

  19. Dural ectasia and FBN1 mutation screening of 40 patients with Marfan syndrome and related disorders: role of dural ectasia for the diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Attanasio, Monica; Pratelli, Elisa; Porciani, Maria Cristina; Evangelisti, Lucia; Torricelli, Elena; Pellicanò, Giannantonio; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Pepe, Guglielmina

    2013-07-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1), a matrix component of microfibrils. Dural ectasia, i.e. enlargement of the neural canal mainly located in the lower lumbar and sacral region, frequently occurs in Marfan patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of dural ectasia in raising the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and its association with FBN1 mutations. We studied 40 unrelated patients suspected for MFS, who underwent magnetic resonance imaging searching for dural ectasia. In all of them FBN1 gene analysis was also performed. Thirty-seven patients resulted affected by Marfan syndrome according to the '96 Ghent criteria; in 30 of them the diagnosis was confirmed when revaluated by the recently revised criteria (2010). Thirty-six patients resulted positive for dural ectasia. The degree of dural ectasia was grade 1 in 19 patients, grade 2 in 11 patients, and grade 3 in 6 patients. In 7 (24%) patients, the presence of dural ectasia allowed to reach a positive score for systemic feature criterion. Twenty-four patients carried an FBN1 mutation, that were represented by 13 missense (54%), and 11 (46%) mutations generating a premature termination codon (PTC, frameshifts and stop codons). No mutation was detected in the remaining 16 (6 patients with MFS and 10 with related disorders according to revised Ghent criteria). The prevalence of severe (grade 2 and grade 3) involvement of dura mater was higher in patients harbouring premature termination codon (PTC) mutations than those carrying missense-mutations (8/11 vs 2/13, P = 0.0111). Our data emphasizes the importance of dural ectasia screening to reach the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome especially when it is uncertain and indicates an association between PTC mutations and severe dural ectasia in Marfan patients.

  20. Carotid-cavernous fistula after functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Emin; Isildak, Huseyin; Haciyev, Yusuf; Kaytaz, Asim; Enver, Ozgun

    2009-03-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are anomalous communications between the carotid arterial system and the venous cavernous sinus. They can arise because of spontaneous or trauma causes. Most caroticocavernous fistulas are of spontaneous origin and unknown etiology. Spontaneous CCF may also be associated with cavernous sinus pathology such as arteriosclerotic changes of the arterial wall, fibromuscular dysplasia, or Ehler-Danlos syndrome. Traumatic CCFs may occur after either blunt or penetrating head trauma. Their clinical presentation is related to their size and to the type of venous drainage, which can lead to a variety of symptoms, such as visual loss, proptosis, bruit, chemosis, cranial nerve impairment, intracranial hemorrhage (rare), and so on. Treatment by endovascular transarterial embolization with electrolytically detachable coils is a very effective method for CCF with good outcomes. Carotid-cavernous fistulas have been rarely reported after craniofacial surgery and are uncommon pathologies in otolaryngology practice. In this study, we report a 40-year-old woman with CCF secondary to blunt trauma of functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

  1. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  2. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis of odontogenic origin is a well-known condition in both the dental and otolaryngology communities. It occurs when the Schneiderian membrane is violated by conditions arising from dentoalveolar unit. This type of sinusitis differs in its pathophysiology, microbiology, diagnostics and management from sinusitis of other causes, therefore, failure to accurately identify a dental cause in these patients usually lead to persistent symptomatology and failure of medical and surgical therapies directed toward sinusitis. Unilateral recalcitrant disease associated with foul smelling drainage is a most common feature of odontogenic sinusitis. Also, high-resolution CT scans and cone-beam volumetric computed tomography can assist in identifying dental disease. Sometimes dental treatment alone is adequate to resolve the odontogenic sinusitis and sometimes concomitant or subsequent functional endoscopic sinus surgery or Caldwell-Luc operation is required. The aim of this article is to give a review of the most common causes, symptoms, diagnostic and treatment methods of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Search on Cochrane Library, PubMed and Science Direct data bases by key words resulted in 35 articles which met our criteria. It can be concluded that the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis is likely underreported in the available literature.

  3. Difference between Sinusitis and a Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted ... is an inflammation of the lining of the nose and sinuses. It is a very common infection in children. Viral sinusitis usually accompanies a cold. Allergic sinusitis may ...

  4. [Pott's puffy tumor: a rare complication of frontal sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Aínsa Laguna, D; Pons Morales, S; Muñoz Tormo-Figueres, A; Vega Senra, M I; Otero Reigada, M C

    2014-05-01

    Pott's puffy tumor is a rare complication of frontal sinusitis characterized by swelling and edema in the brow due to a subperiosteal abscess associated with frontal osteomyelitis. Added complications are cellulitis by extension to the orbit and intracranial infection by posterior extension, with high risk of meningitis, intracranial abscess, and venous sinus thrombosis. Early diagnosis and aggressive medical or surgical treatment are essential for optimal recovery of affected patients. In the antibiotic age it is extremely rare, with very few cases described in the recent literature. A case is presented of a Pott inflammatory tumor in a 7 year-old boy, as a complication of acute pansinusitis who presented with front preseptal swelling and intracranial involvement with thrombosis of ophthalmic and superior orbital veins and frontal epidural abscess extending to the subarachnoid space.

  5. Intraoperative image updating for brain shift following dural opening.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W; Schaewe, Timothy J; Ji, Songbai; Holton, Leslie H; Simon, David A; Paulsen, Keith D

    2016-09-09

    OBJECTIVE Preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR) are typically coregistered to provide intraoperative navigation, the accuracy of which can be significantly compromised by brain deformation. In this study, the authors generated updated MR images (uMR) in the operating room (OR) to compensate for brain shift due to dural opening, and evaluated the accuracy and computational efficiency of the process. METHODS In 20 open cranial neurosurgical cases, a pair of intraoperative stereovision (iSV) images was acquired after dural opening to reconstruct a 3D profile of the exposed cortical surface. The iSV surface was registered with pMR to detect cortical displacements that were assimilated by a biomechanical model to estimate whole-brain nonrigid deformation and produce uMR in the OR. The uMR views were displayed on a commercial navigation system and compared side by side with the corresponding coregistered pMR. A tracked stylus was used to acquire coordinate locations of features on the cortical surface that served as independent positions for calculating target registration errors (TREs) for the coregistered uMR and pMR image volumes. RESULTS The uMR views were visually more accurate and well aligned with the iSV surface in terms of both geometry and texture compared with pMR where misalignment was evident. The average misfit between model estimates and measured displacements was 1.80 ± 0.35 mm, compared with the average initial misfit of 7.10 ± 2.78 mm between iSV and pMR, and the average TRE was 1.60 ± 0.43 mm across the 20 patients in the uMR image volume, compared with 7.31 ± 2.82 mm on average in the pMR cases. The iSV also proved to be accurate with an average error of 1.20 ± 0.37 mm. The overall computational time required to generate the uMR views was 7-8 minutes. CONCLUSIONS This study compensated for brain deformation caused by intraoperative dural opening using computational model-based assimilation of iSV cortical surface displacements. The u

  6. Microsurgical anatomy of the ophthalmic artery and the distal dural ring for the juxta-dural ring aneurysms via the pterional approach.

    PubMed

    Hokama, M; Hongo, K; Gibo, H; Kyoshima, K; Kobayashi, S

    2001-06-01

    Microsurgical anatomy for the pterional approach was studied regarding the origin and the course of the ophthalmic artery and the distal dural ring using human cadaveric specimens, with special reference to the surrounding bony structures. In 50 human adult formalin-fixed cadaveric cerebral hemispheres and 10 block specimens of the skull base region including the ophthalmic artery and the carotid dural ring were examined under magnification using an operating microscope. The ophthalmic artery originated from the intradural portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA), except in 5% where the ophthalmic artery originated extradurally. The extradural origin had two patterns: one was that the ophthalmic artery penetrated the bony optic strut (trans-optic strut pattern) and the other was that it coursed into the optic canal proximally to the optic strut without bone penetration (supra-optic strut pattern). The origin of the intradural ophthalmic artery was commonly located at the medial third of the superior wall of the ICA (78%). The ophthalmic artery was commonly taking an S-shaped course in the intradural portion and entered the optic canal over the optic strut. The distal dural ring was tightly adherent to the internal carotid artery; circumferential sectioning of the dural ring is required to mobilize the internal carotid artery. When approaching juxtadural ring ICA aneurysms via the pterional route, it is important to recognize the extradural origin, especially the trans-optic strut type, and to precisely understand the microsurgical anatomy around the dural ring.

  7. Noncavernous arteriovenous shunts mimicking carotid cavernous fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Kobkitsuksakul, Chai; Jiarakongmun, Pakorn; Chanthanaphak, Ekachat; Singhara Na Ayudya, Sirintara (Pongpech)

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The classic symptoms and signs of carotid cavernous sinus fistula or cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) consist of eye redness, exophthalmos, and gaze abnormality. The angiography findings typically consist of arteriovenous shunt at cavernous sinus with ophthalmic venous drainage with or without cortical venous reflux. In rare circumstances, the shunts are localized outside the cavernous sinus, but mimic symptoms and radiography of the cavernous shunt. We would like to present the other locations of the arteriovenous shunt, which mimic the clinical presentation of carotid cavernous fistulae, and analyze venous drainages. METHODS We retrospectively examined the records of 350 patients who were given provisional diagnoses of carotid cavernous sinus fistulae or cavernous sinus dural AVF in the division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok between 2008 and 2014. Any patient with cavernous arteriovenous shunt was excluded. RESULTS Of those 350 patients, 10 patients (2.85%) were identified as having noncavernous sinus AVF. The angiographic diagnoses consisted of three anterior condylar (hypoglossal) dural AVF, two traumatic middle meningeal AVF, one lesser sphenoid wing dural AVF, one vertebro-vertebral fistula (VVF), one intraorbital AVF, one direct dural artery to cortical vein dural AVF, and one transverse-sigmoid dural AVF. Six cases (60%) were found to have venous efferent obstruction. CONCLUSION Arteriovenous shunts mimicking the cavernous AVF are rare, with a prevalence of only 2.85% in this series. The clinical presentation mainly depends on venous outflow. The venous outlet of the arteriovenous shunts is influenced by venous afferent-efferent patterns according to the venous anatomy of the central nervous system and the skull base, as well as by architectural disturbance, specifically, obstruction of the venous outflow. PMID:27767958

  8. Acute bacterial sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    DeMuri, Gregory; Wald, Ellen R

    2013-10-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, the pathogenesis of sinusitis involves 3 key factors: sinusostia obstruction, ciliary dysfunction, and thickening of sinus secretions. On the basis of studies of the microbiology of otitis media, H influenzae is playing an increasingly important role in the etiology of sinusitis, exceeding that of S pneumoniae in some areas, and b-lactamase production by H influenzae is increasing in respiratory isolates in the United States. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,the presentation of acute bacterial sinusitis conforms to 1 of 3 predicable patterns; persistent, severe, and worsening symptoms. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,the diagnosis of sinusitis should be made by applying strict clinical criteria. This approach will select children with upper respiratory infection symptoms who are most likely to benefit from an antibiotic. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,imaging is not indicated routinely in the diagnosis of sinusitis. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging provides useful information when complications of sinusitis are suspected. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,amoxicillin-clavulanate should be considered asa first-line agent for the treatment of sinusitis.

  9. Multilayer scaffold of electrospun PLA-PCL-collagen nanofibers as a dural substitute.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-fei; Guo, Hong-feng; Ying, Da-jun

    2013-11-01

    Dural closure after the neurosurgery can prevent postoperative complications. Although many types of dural substitute have been developed, most of them lack functional and structural characteristics compared with the natural dura mater. In this study, we used electrospinning method to fabricate a multilayer scaffold to promote dural repair. The inner layer of the scaffold that faces the brain tissue is composed of poly-lactic acid (PLA) to reduce tissue adhesion. The middle layer of the scaffold is composed of poly-ɛ-caprolactone and PLA, which provides a watertight seal. The outer layer of the scaffold contains a large amount of collagen to promote cell attachment and proliferation. The results from in vitro study and an animal model have shown that this multilayer fibrous scaffold has sufficient mechanic strength and biochemical properties to enhance dural repair. Therefore, fabrication of scaffold with multiple functional and structural layers may provide a novel approach for tissue engineering.

  10. Routine preoperative cardiac catheterization necessary before repair of secundum and sinus venosus atrial septal defects

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, M.D.; Nadas, A.S.; Norwood, W.I.; Castaneda, A.R.

    1984-08-01

    Between January 1976 and July 1983, 217 patients with atrial septal defect underwent surgical repair at Children's Hospital. Thirty with a primum atrial septal defect and 26 who underwent cardiac catheterization elsewhere before being seen were excluded from analysis. Of the 161 remaining patients, 52 (31%) underwent preoperative cardiac catheterization, 38 because the physical examination was considered atypical for a secundum atrial septal defect and 14 because of a preexisting routine indication. One hundred nine (69%) underwent surgery without catheterization, with the attending cardiologist relying on clinical examination alone in 5, additional technetium radionuclide angiocardiography in 5, M-mode echocardiography in 13 and two-dimensional echocardiography in 43; both M-mode echocardiography and radionuclide angiography were performed in 24 and two-dimensional echocardiography and radionuclide angiography in 19. Since 1976, there has been a trend toward a reduction in the use of catheterization and use of one rather than two noninvasive or semiinvasive techniques for the detection of atrial defects. Of the 52 patients who underwent catheterization, the correct anatomic diagnosis was made before catheterization in 47 (90%). Two patients with a sinus venosus defect and one each with a sinus venosus defect plus partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection, partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection without an atrial septal defect and a sinoseptal defect were missed. Of 109 patients without catheterization, a correct morphologic diagnosis was made before surgery in 92 (84%). Nine patients with a sinus venosus defect, three with sinus venous defect and partial anomolous pulmonary venous connection, four with partial anomalous pulmonary venous return without an atrial septal defect and one with a secundum defect were incorrectly diagnosed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Adhesive arachnoiditis causing cauda equina syndrome in ankylosing spondylitis: CT and MRI demonstration of dural calcification and a dorsal dural diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, I G; Yunten, N; Ustun, E E; Oksel, F; Gumusdis, G

    1999-07-01

    We present the radiological features of a 42-year-old man with long-standing inactive ankylosing spondylitis (AS), demonstrating that arachnoiditis is a cause of a cauda equina syndrome (CES) in this disease. CT showed a dorsal arachnoid diverticulum causing scalloped erosion of the laminae, and punctate and curvilinear dural calcification. MRI revealed adhesion and convergence of the cauda equina dorsally into the arachnoid pouch, causing the dural sac to appear empty canal. To the best of our knowledge, dural calcification on CT is a new finding in AS, which may be related to the CES. Our findings support the hypothesis that chronic adhesive arachnoiditis with subsequent loss of meningeal elasticity may be the main cause of CES in AS.

  12. Extra-abdominal venous thromboses at unusual sites.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Ida; De Stefano, Valerio

    2012-09-01

    Venous thrombosis typically involves the lower extremities. Rarely, it can occur in cerebral, splanchnic, or renal veins, with a frightening clinical impact. Other rare manifestations are upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis, that can complicate with pulmonary embolism and post-thrombotic syndrome, and retinal vein occlusion, significantly affecting the quality of life. This review is focused on venous thromboses at unusual extra-abdominal sites. Local infections or cancer are frequent in cerebral sinus-venous thrombosis. Upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis is mostly due to catheters or effort-related factors. Common risk factors are inherited thrombophilia and oral contraceptive use. Acute treatment is based on heparin; in cerebral sinus-venous thrombosis, local or systemic fibrinolysis should be considered in case of clinical deterioration. Vitamin-K antagonists are recommended for 3-6 months; indefinite anticoagulation is suggested for recurrent thrombosis or unprovoked thrombosis and permanent risk factors. However, such recommendations mainly derive from observational studies; there are no data about long-term treatment of retinal vein occlusion.

  13. Cerebral Venous Air Embolism due to a Hidden Skull Fracture Secondary to Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Hosaka, Ai; Yamaguchi, Tetsuto; Yamamoto, Fumiko; Shibagaki, Yasuro

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous air embolism is sometimes caused by head trauma. One of the paths of air entry is considered a skull fracture. We report a case of cerebral venous air embolism following head trauma. The patient was a 55-year-old man who fell and hit his head. A head computed tomography (CT) scan showed the air in the superior sagittal sinus; however, no skull fractures were detected. Follow-up CT revealed a fracture line in the right temporal bone. Cerebral venous air embolism following head trauma might have occult skull fractures even if CT could not show the skull fractures. PMID:26693366

  14. Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula and Cecal Arteriovenous Malformation in a Boy

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Vimlesh; Vaidya, Pankaj C; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Yadav, Mukesh

    2017-01-01

    Concurrent spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and cecal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) are very rare. A 6-year old boy presented with lower limb paresis after trauma. On imaging work-up spinal dural AVF was found. It was managed with endovascular glue embolization. After two years, the boy presented with severe anemia and occult gastrointestinal tract (GIT) bleed. Cecal AVM was diagnosed and managed with embolization. PMID:28164000

  15. Cerebral arterial occlusion and intracranial venous thrombosis in a woman taking oral contraceptives.

    PubMed Central

    Montón, F.; Rebollo, M.; Quintana, F.; Berciano, J.

    1984-01-01

    Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus are reported in a 30-year-old woman taking oral contraceptives (OC). The coexistence of arterial and venous cerebral pathology as a complication of OC use has only been previously reported in one case. The pathogenesis of this rare association is briefly discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6462985

  16. New insights into the mechanisms of venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mackman, Nigel

    2012-07-01

    Venous thrombosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries, especially in the elderly. Many risk factors have been identified for venous thrombosis that alter blood flow, activate the endothelium, and increase blood coagulation. However, the precise mechanisms that trigger clotting in large veins have not been fully elucidated. The most common site for initiation of the thrombus appears to be the valve pocket sinus, due to its tendency to become hypoxic. Activation of endothelial cells by hypoxia or possibly inflammatory stimuli would lead to surface expression of adhesion receptors that facilitate the binding of circulating leukocytes and microvesicles. Subsequent activation of the leukocytes induces expression of the potent procoagulant protein tissue factor that triggers thrombosis. Understanding the mechanisms of venous thrombosis may lead to the development of new treatments.

  17. Partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection (including scimitar syndrome).

    PubMed

    van de Woestijne, Pieter C; Verberkmoes, Niels; Bogers, Ad J J C

    2013-01-01

    Partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection (PAPVC) is defined to exist when some but not all venous drainage enters the left atrium, while the remaining veins connect to the right-sided circulation. Scimitar syndrome is a specialized example, in which an anomalous pulmonary vein descends from the right lung and drains into the inferior caval vein. PAPVC is associated with sinus venosus-type atrial septal defect (ASD). Diagnosis was, in the past, based on echocardiographic imaging and could be difficult. Multislice spiral computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging improved the imaging quality. The surgical correction is dependent on the type of anomalous connection and the presence of an ASD. Outcome is good but obstructed venous return is an important issue.

  18. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding

    PubMed Central

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-01-01

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic–clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully. PMID:23389726

  19. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding.

    PubMed

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-02-05

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic-clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully.

  20. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed Central

    Coon, W W

    1977-01-01

    This review of the epidemiology of venous thromboembolism includes estimates of incidence and prevalence of venous thrombosis and its sequelae, a discussion geographical, annual and seasonal variations and data concerning possible risk factors. Selection of patients at increased risk for development of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism for specific diagnostic screening or for prophylactic therapy with low-dose heparin may be a more effective approach to lowering morbidity and mortality from this disease. PMID:329779

  1. Effects of Voluntary Locomotion and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide on the Dynamics of Single Dural Vessels in Awake Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The dura mater is a vascularized membrane surrounding the brain and is heavily innervated by sensory nerves. Our knowledge of the dural vasculature has been limited to pathological conditions, such as headaches, but little is known about the dural blood flow regulation during behavior. To better understand the dynamics of dural vessels during behavior, we used two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) to measure the diameter changes of single dural and pial vessels in the awake mouse during voluntary locomotion. Surprisingly, we found that voluntary locomotion drove the constriction of dural vessels, and the dynamics of these constrictions could be captured with a linear convolution model. Dural vessel constrictions did not mirror the large increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) during locomotion, indicating that dural vessel constriction was not caused passively by compression. To study how behaviorally driven dynamics of dural vessels might be altered in pathological states, we injected the vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which induces headache in humans. CGRP dilated dural, but not pial, vessels and significantly reduced spontaneous locomotion but did not block locomotion-induced constrictions in dural vessels. Sumatriptan, a drug commonly used to treat headaches, blocked the vascular and behavioral the effects of CGRP. These findings suggest that, in the awake animal, the diameters of dural vessels are regulated dynamically during behavior and during drug-induced pathological states. SIGNIFICANT STATEMENT The vasculature of the dura has been implicated in the pathophysiology of headaches, but how individual dural vessels respond during behavior, both under normal conditions and after treatment with the headache-inducing peptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is poorly understood. To address these issues, we imaged individual dural vessels in awake mice and found that dural vessels constricted during voluntary locomotion, and

  2. Northern Sinus Meridiani Stereo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-341, 25 April 2003

    This is a stereo (3-d anaglyph) composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle images of northern Sinus Meridiani near 2oN, 0oW. The light-toned materials at the south (bottom) end of the picture are considered to be thick (100-200 meters; 300-600 ft) exposures of sedimentary rock. Several ancient meteor impact craters are being exhumed from within these layered materials. To view in stereo, use '3-d' glasses with red over the left eye, and blue over the right. The picture covers an area approximately 113 km (70 mi) wide; north is up.

  3. Management of Frontal Sinus Tumors.

    PubMed

    Selleck, Anne Morgan; Desai, Dipan; Thorp, Brian D; Ebert, Charles S; Zanation, Adam M

    2016-08-01

    The most common primary tumors of the frontal sinus are osteomas and inverted papillomas, although a variety of other tumors involving this space have been reported. With the advent of new surgical techniques and instrumentation, an endoscopic approach to this region has become feasible. The preoperative assessment and decision making must take into account the complexity of frontal sinus anatomy, tumor type, tumor location, and associated attachments. These procedures allow adequate visualization, tumor removal, and postoperative monitoring, and preserve fairly normal sinus function. Open techniques may also be required and should be in the surgeon's armamentarium.

  4. Paranasal sinus obliteration in Wegener granulomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Roberts, R.L.; Fauci, A.S.

    1982-08-01

    The authors report 14 cases of Wegener granulomatosis in which one or more paranasal sinuses were obliterated by bone. The maxillary antra were involved in all cases, with the other sinuses being affected less frequently. These changes are thought to result from chronic bacterial sinusitis superimposed on the granulomatous vasculitic process. Computed tomography dramatically demonstrated the bone changes, consisting of a combination of sinus wall thickening and trabeculated new bone formation within the sinuses.

  5. Cavernous sinus meningiomas: imaging and surgical strategy.

    PubMed

    Sindou, Marc; Nebbal, Mustapha; Guclu, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous sinus (CS) meningiomas which are by definition those meningiomas which originate from the parasellar region are difficult skull base tumors to deal with. For deciding the most appropriate surgical strategy, surgeons need detailed preoperative neuroimaging. The vicinity of the tumor with the vital and highly functional neurovascular structures, tumor extensions into the basal cisterns and skull base structures, and the arterial vascularization and venous drainage pathways, as they shape operative strategy, are important preoperative data to take into account. Thin section CT scan with bone windows, 3D spiral CT reconstruction, MRI, MR angiography, and DSA performed with selective arteriography including late venous phases give those required detailed informations about the tumor and its relation with neurovascular and bony structures. The type of craniotomy and complementary osteotomy and the usefulness of an extradural anterior clinoidectomy with unroofing the optic canal can be decided from preoperative neuroimaging. Data collected also help in determining whether extensive exposure of the middle cranial fossa is necessary to ensure substantial devascularization of the tumor and whether proximal control of the internal carotid artery (ICA) at its intrapetrosal portion might be useful. Study of the capacity of blood supply of the Willis circle is wise for deciding the need and way of performing an extra-intracranial bypass together with tumor removal. Currently the concept of operating only the tumors with extracavernous extensions and to limit resection to only their extracavernous portions is the most accepted way of treating these tumors. It was that strategy that was adopted in the senior author's 220-patient series.Radiosurgery or stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy may complement surgery or can be only reserved for growing remnants.

  6. Sinus Rinsing and Neti Pots

    MedlinePlus

    ... D, Van Dyke R, Stern H, Xiao L, Beach MJ. The first association of a primary amebic ... B, Kahler AM, Schneeberger C, da Silva AJ, Beach MJ. Deaths from Naegleria fowleri associated with sinus ...

  7. [Surgical dilemmas. Sinus floor elevation].

    PubMed

    ten Bruggenkate, C M; Schulten, E A J M; Zijderveld, S A

    2008-12-01

    Limited alveolar bone height prevents the placement of dental implants. Sinus floor elevation is an internal augmentation of the maxillary sinus that allows implants to be placed. The principle of this surgical procedure is the preparation of a 'top hinge door', that is raised together with the Schneiderian membrane in the cranial direction. The space which created under this lid is filled with a bone transplant. Autogenous bone is the standard transplant material, despite the fact that a second surgery site is necessary. Under certain circumstances bone substitutes can be used, with a longer healing phase. If sufficient alveolar bone height is available to secure implant stability, simultaneous implantation and sinus floor elevation are possible. Considering the significant anatomical variation in the region of the maxillary sinus, a sound knowledge of the anatomy is of great importance.

  8. Evaluating Complications of Chronic Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Phillip; Pereyra, Charles A.; Breslin, Adam; Melville, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a relatively common diagnosis throughout the US. In patients with an otherwise unremarkable medical history the treatment is typically supportive, requiring only clinical evaluation. We present the case of a 25-year-old male with a history of chronic sinusitis that was brought to our emergency department with new-onset seizure. Three days before he had presented to his usual care facility with two days of headache and fever and was discharged stating headache, subjective fever, and neck stiffness. After further investigation he was diagnosed with a mixed anaerobic epidural abscess. The evaluation and management of chronic sinusitis are based on the presence of symptoms concerning for complication. Prompt investigation of complicated sinusitis is essential in preventing debilitating and fatal sequelae. Our case study underscores the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:28163938

  9. [Bacteriological study of maxillary sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Renon, P; Casanova, M; Verdier, M; Asperge, A; Le Mouel, C

    1984-01-01

    Suppurated maxillary sinusitis are frequent diseases. Diameatic puncture allows bacteriological investigations. Our results are positive in two thirds of cases. The bacterial flora is very varied, whose identification and antibiograms involve efficient treatment with daily washing and in situ antibiotherapy.

  10. [Sinusitis--judicious antibiotic treatment].

    PubMed

    Niedzielska, Grazyna

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents different forms of sinusitis in children and adults as well as the patomechanism of sinusitis of infective and non-infective origin. The role of bacterial infection has been discussed. Participation of major pathogens of URTI such as S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis has been highlighted and the factors influencing growth of their antibiotic-resistant stains. Guidelines concerning antibiotic therapy in children and adults, depending on disease course, age and factors influencing growth of resistant stains have been presented. Causes of failure in treatment of sinusitis have been analysed eg. in case of bacterial biofilm growth or non-neutrophilic inflammation forms. Antimicrobial treatment concerns mainly acute and aggravated infections. In case of chronic sinusitis, antibiotic therapy is complementary to surgical treatment.

  11. Delayed cerebrospinal fluid leak after watertight dural closure with a polyethylene glycol hydrogel dural sealant in posterior fossa surgery: case report.

    PubMed

    Jito, Junya; Nitta, Naoki; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    A polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel sealant recently has been approved as an adjunct to sutured dural closure in Japan. We treated consecutive six patients with PEG hydrogel sealant in posterior fossa operation. Three of six cases suffered delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak after watertight dural closure with the PEG hydrogel sealant, although there was no leak case which was treated with fibrin glue, before 2 years until the adoption of the new material. These patients underwent posterior fossa craniotomy and discharged without remarkable CSF leak. The pseudomeningocele under the occipital wound caused the CSF leak occurr from 5th to 7th week postoperatively. All CSF leak cases needed surgical repair. At the repair, the PEG hydrogel was liquefied and almost absorbed. A fistula on the closure line and a dead space after the absorption of the PEG hydrogel was observed. When the absorbable PEG hydrogel sealant plugs in small gaps of sutured dura, its properties to prevent adhesion might suppress healing process of dural closure, so that CSF could leak through the gaps and collect as a pseudomeningocele in the dead space after absorption of the PEG hydrogel. In posterior fossa surgery a PEG hydrogel sealant should be applied when dural edges are closed tightly without any gaps.

  12. Sinus thrombosis-do animal models really cover the clinical syndrome?

    PubMed

    Yenigün, Mesut; Jünemann, Martin; Gerriets, Tibo; Stolz, Erwin

    2015-06-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is an important cause of stroke in young patients. CVST represents with 0.5-3% of stroke cases a relatively rare disease. CVST affects 3-4 cases per 1 million overall and 7 cases per 1 million children and neonates. Typical clinical symptoms include headache, visual deficits and seizures. Beside the main condition associated with CVST in women in pregnancy and puerperium, the most frequently identified risk factors are oral hormonal contraceptives in combination with coagulation disorders. The initial treatment contains heparin and its efficacy is based on two randomized placebo-controlled trials including 79 patients together. A lack of understanding of the pathophysiology of CSVT makes animal models of this disease indispensable. Previously developed animal models of sinus sagittalis superior contributes to further clarify the pathophysiologic mechanisms and surrounding circumstances in the topic of cerebral venous thrombosis.

  13. MC-19 Margaritifer Sinus Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mars digital-image mosaic merged with color of the MC-19 quadrangle, Margaritifer Sinus region of Mars. Heavily cratered highlands, which dominate the Margaritifer Sinus quadrangle, are marked by large expanses of chaotic terrain. In the northwestern part, the major rift zone of Valles Marineris connects with a broad canyon filled with chaotic terrain. Latitude range -30 to 0, longitude range 0 to 45 degrees.

  14. MC-20 Sinus Sabeus Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mars digital-image mosaic merged with color of the MC-20 quadrangle, Sinus Sabeus region of Mars. Heavily cratered highlands dominate the Sinus Sabeus quadrangle. The northern part is marked by a large impact crater, Schiaparelli. Schiaparelli is an ancient remnant of the many large impact events that occurred during the period of heavy bombardment. Latitude range -30 to 0 degrees, longitude range -45 to 0.

  15. STUDIES ON THE VENOUS PULSE. I : A STUDY OF THE DIASTOLIC WAVES OF THE VENOUS PULSE, WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE POSSIBILITY OF A WAVE DUE TO THE CONTRACTION OF THE VENOUS REGION OF THE MAMMALIAN HEART.

    PubMed

    Eyster, J A

    1910-05-01

    A wave is described occurring in the venous pulse of man late in the diastolic period. This wave is a diastolic wave, since in an increase in length of the cardiac cycle it follows the h wave at its regular interval and becomes separated from the a wave of the next cardiac cycle. There is no wave on the venous pulse in man which can be referred to a contraction of the region of the great veins or sinus region of the heart. The h wave is a normal occurrence in the venous pulse curve from man and the dog. It occurs, according to the experience in this work, in all normal individuals in which the heart rate is sufficiently slow to prevent its obliteration by the a wave. The x wave, while not infrequent, is not always present in man even when the cardiac cycle is of sufficient length to prevent its obliteration by the a wave. This wave has not been observed in the dog. There is no wave on the venous pulse curve of the dog that can be referred to a contraction of the sinus region of the heart. Extra-systoles from stimulation of the venous region of the dog's heart produce no contraction of this region sufficiently pronounced to be recorded on a venous pulse tracing. After an interval of from 0.07 to 0.I second, representing the interval of veno-auricular conduction plus the latent period of the auricle, the auricle contracts. Extrasystoles from stimulation of the right auricle show, after an interval following the stimulus much shorter than that noted above and representing the latent period of the auricle, an a wave followed by ventricular systole after the usual a-c interval. It would seem probable that the sinus region of the heart, while capable of irritability, conductivity and rhythmicity (Erlanger and Blackman (I6)), does not normally manifest contractility.

  16. Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava Draining into the Coronary Sinus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kurtoglu, Ertugrul; Cakin, Ozlem; Akcay, Selahaddin; Akturk, Erdal; Korkmaz, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) is a congenital anomaly of the thoracic venous system resulting from the abnormal persistence of an embryological vessel that normally regresses during early fetal life. This anomaly is often discovered incidentally during surgery, cardiovascular imaging or invasive cardiovascular procedures. In most cases, a PLSVC drains into the right atrium through the coronary sinus. In the remainder of cases, it enters directly or through the pulmonary veins into the left atrium. A dilated coronary sinus on echocardiography should always raise the suspicion of a PLSVC as it has important clinical implications. The diagnosis should be confirmed by saline contrast echocardiography. We report a patient with persistent left superior vena cava with an enlarged coronary sinus and normal right superior vena cava.

  17. Transorbital superior ophthalmic vein sacrifice to preserve vision in ocular hypertension from aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Davis, Brandon J; He, Lucy; Mawn, Louise A; Mocco, J

    2015-12-01

    Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is rare and may clinically masquerade as a carotid cavernous fistula. Conventional management includes oral anticoagulation, but cases of ocular hypertension affecting vision may require more aggressive intervention. We report a case of a woman with spontaneous bilaterally occluded cavernous sinuses with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), which resolved immediately following unilateral superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) sacrifice. She was subsequently placed on oral anticoagulants. By 4 months postoperatively her IOP was normalized and her vision had improved. Repeat angiography demonstrated stable venous filling, with some mild improvement of flow through the cavernous sinus. Coil-mediated sacrifice of the SOV might be an effective means to relieve ocular hypertension and preserve vision in the setting of aseptic CST.

  18. Transorbital superior ophthalmic vein sacrifice to preserve vision in ocular hypertension from aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Davis, Brandon J; He, Lucy; Mawn, Louise A; Mocco, J

    2014-10-29

    Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is rare and may clinically masquerade as a carotid cavernous fistula. Conventional management includes oral anticoagulation, but cases of ocular hypertension affecting vision may require more aggressive intervention. We report a case of a woman with spontaneous bilaterally occluded cavernous sinuses with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), which resolved immediately following unilateral superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) sacrifice. She was subsequently placed on oral anticoagulants. By 4 months postoperatively her IOP was normalized and her vision had improved. Repeat angiography demonstrated stable venous filling, with some mild improvement of flow through the cavernous sinus. Coil-mediated sacrifice of the SOV might be an effective means to relieve ocular hypertension and preserve vision in the setting of aseptic CST.

  19. Clinical Aspects of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis: Experiences in Two Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Hyun Taek; Jun, Hyo Sub; Ahn, Jun Hyong; Kim, Ji Hee; Oh, Jae Keun; Song, Joon Ho; Cho, Byung Moon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare condition for which few clinical reviews have been conducted in Korea. Our aim was to investigate, risk factors, clinical presentations/courses, and outcomes of 22 patients treated for CVT at two centers. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted, selecting 22 patients diagnosed with and treated for CVT at two patient care centers over a 10-year period (January 1, 2004 to August 31, 2015). Patient data, pathogenetic concerns (laboratory findings), risk factors, locations, symptoms, treatments, and clinical outcomes were reviewed. Results Mean patient age at diagnosis was 54.41 ± 16.19. Patients most often presented with headache (40%), followed by seizure (27%) and altered mental status (18%). Focal motor deficits (5%), visual symptoms (5%), and dysarthria (5%) were less common. Important predisposing factors in CVT included prothrombotic conditions (35%), infections (14%), hyperthyroidism (18%), trauma (14%), and malignancy (4%). By location, 9 patients (40%) experienced thrombosis of superior sagittal sinus predominantly, with involvement of transverse sinus in 20 (90%), sigmoid sinus in 12 (40%), and the deep venous system in 5 (23%). Treatment generally consisted of anticoagulants (63%) or antiplatelet (23%) drugs, but surgical decompression was considered if warranted (14%). Medical therapy in CVT yields good functional outcomes. Conclusion Mean age of patients with CVT in our study exceeded that reported in Europe or in America and had difference in risk factors. Functional outcomes are good with use of antithrombotic medication, whether or not hemorrhagic infarction is evident. PMID:27847760

  20. Intercavernous Venous Communications in the Human Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Aquini, Mauro Guidotti; Marrone, Antonio Carlos Huf; Schneider, Felipe Luis

    1994-01-01

    The intercavernous communications of the skull base were studied in 32 sphenoid blocks using electrolytic decalcification techniques, vascular filling, x-rays, and serial anatomical sections. In this study four intercavernous connections were found: anterior intercavernous sinus (AIS), posterior intercavernous sinus (PIS), inferior intercavernous sinus (IIS), and basilar plexus (BP). The AIS was present in 100% of the cases, with diameters ranging from 0.57 mm to 5.43 mm; in 17 cases (53.12%) it took up the whole anterior wall of the hypophyseal fossa. The PIS was also detected in 100% of the cases, and its diameters ranged from 0.71 mm to 4.14 mm. The IIS was identified in 31 cases (96.9%), assuming three different forms: plexuslike, venous lake, and mixed. The BP was found in 100% of the material analyzed; in 23 cases (71.9%) it proved to be the widest intercavernous communication. In 12 cases of this series the hypophysis was completely enveloped by venous structures, except at the level of the sellar diaphragm. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:17171164

  1. Bacterial cellulose membranes used as artificial substitutes for dural defection in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Ma, Xia; Chen, Shiwen; Tao, Meifeng; Yuan, Lutao; Jing, Yao

    2014-06-16

    To improve the efficacy and safety of dural repair in neurosurgical procedures, a new dural material derived from bacterial cellulose (BC) was evaluated in a rabbit model with dural defects. We prepared artificial dura mater using bacterial cellulose which was incubated and fermented from Acetobacter xylinum. The dural defects of the rabbit model were repaired with BC membranes. All surgeries were performed under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia, and all efforts were made to minimize suffering. All animals were humanely euthanized by intravenous injection of phenobarbitone, at each time point, after the operation. Then, the histocompatibility and inflammatory effects of BC were examined by histological examination, real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western Blot. BC membranes evenly covered the surface of brain without adhesion. There were seldom inflammatory cells surrounding the membrane during the early postoperative period. The expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α as well as iNOS and COX-2 were lower in the BC group compared to the control group at 7, 14 and 21 days after implantation. BC can repair dural defects in rabbit and has a decreased inflammatory response compared to traditional materials. However, the long-term effects need to be validated in larger animals.

  2. Ossification of the Posterior Petroclinoid Dural Fold: A Cadaveric Study with Neurosurgical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, David; Kimball, Heather; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R. Shane; Loukas, Marios; Cohen-Gadol, A. Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The roof of the porus trigeminus, composed of the posterior petroclinoid dural fold, is an important landmark to the skull base surgeon. Ossification of the posterior petroclinoid dural fold is an anatomical variation rarely mentioned in the literature. Such ossification results in the trigeminal nerve traversing a bony foramen as it enters Meckel cave. The authors performed this study to better elucidate this anatomical variation. Design Fifteen adult cadaveric head halves were subjected to dissection of the middle cranial fossa. Microdissection techniques were used to examine the posterior petroclinoid dural folds. Skull base osteology was also studied in 71 dry human skulls with attention paid to the attachment point of the posterior petroclinoid dural folds at the trigeminal protuberances. Setting Cadaver laboratory Main Outcome Measures Measurements were made using a microcaliper. Digital images were made of the dissections. Results Completely ossified posterior petroclinoid folds were present in 20% of the specimens. Of the 142 dry skull sides examined, 9% had large trigeminal protuberances. Conclusions Based on this study, the posterior petroclinoid dural fold may completely ossify in adults that may lead to narrowing of the porus trigeminus and potential compression of the trigeminal nerve at the entrance to Meckel cave. PMID:26225315

  3. Dealing with the venous congestion of free flaps: venous catheterization.

    PubMed

    Gürsoy, Koray; Kankaya, Yüksel; Uysal, Afşin; Koçer, Uğur

    2008-11-01

    For head and neck reconstruction after tumor ablation surgery, free flaps are mostly the chosen treatment modality for most of the centers. Coping with venous insufficiency and increasing venous outflow of the flap during this process increases the success rate. To increase venous outflow, triple-lumen central venous catheter is inserted to one of the donor veins of the flap that has venous insufficiency and one intact vein anastomosis.

  4. [Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI)].

    PubMed

    Renner, R; Simon, J

    2009-10-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is an important and frequent disease for dermatologists, phlebologists and general practitioners. There are various hypotheses for the ethiopathology in CVI, e. g. hormone receptors and impairments concerning the venous contraction or relaxation of the vessel wall and the venous valves might play an important role. At the moment, colour doppler-duplex sonography seems to be the diagnostic method of choice. Modern therapeutic options include compression systems alone or in combination with topical or systemic treatment including minimal invasive methods like endovenous laser or radiofrequency obliteration or foam sclerotherapy.

  5. Delayed intracranial hypertension and cerebellar tonsillar necrosis associated with a depressed occipital skull fracture compressing the superior sagittal sinus. Case report.

    PubMed

    Vender, John R; Bierbrauer, Karin

    2005-11-01

    Depressed skull fractures overlying the major venous sinus are often managed nonoperatively because of the high associated risks of surgery in these locations. In the presence of clinical and radiographic evidence of sinus occlusion, however, surgical therapy may be necessary. The authors present the case of a 9-year-old boy with a depressed skull fracture overlying the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus. After initial conservative treatment, delayed signs of intracranial hypertension and a symptomatic tonsillar herniation with tonsillar necrosis developed. Possible causes as well as diagnostic and treatment options are reviewed.

  6. A novel multipurpose mini-endoscope for frontal sinus endoscopy "sinus view".

    PubMed

    Al Kadah, Basel; Bozzato, Victoria; Bozzato, Alessandro; Papaspyrou, George; Schick, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    Endoscopic frontal sinus surgery has been proven to enable the treatment of most frontal sinus pathologies but may be challenging for the surgeon in regard to the variable frontal sinus anatomy. Frontal sinus drainage identification and frontal sinus visualization are an essential part of successful frontal sinus surgery. We demonstrate a novel modular mini-endoscopic system for frontal sinus surgery. Fifty-two patients (37 male, 15 female) with a chronic rhino-sinusitis were enrolled. In this study, all patients were subjected to standard endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery with use of the fibre optic endoscope "Sinus View" (1.1 mm diameter, 10,000 pixels, irrigation channel and additional working channel) accessing the frontal sinus. A frontal sinus drainage type I in 38 cases, a frontal sinus drainage type IIa in 9 cases and a frontal sinus drainage type IIb in 5 cases according to Draf were performed. The modular mini-endoscopic system "Sinus view" was used to identify frontal sinus drainage in ten patients before ethmoidectomy and in the remaining patients (N = 42) after ethmoidectomy. Visualization of the frontal sinus drainage or the frontal sinus itself was easily carried out after irrigation. A clear identification of the frontal sinus by illumination was achieved in all cases. In addition the working channel of the endoscope was successfully used to perform visualized balloon dilatation at the frontal sinus drainage or for biopsy. The endonasal visualization of the frontal sinus drainage and frontal sinus itself is facilitated by also using a modular mini-endoscope with the option to use the working channel of the endoscope for biopsy or balloon dilatation.

  7. Preclinical characterization and safety of a novel hydrogel for augmenting dural repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Michael J.; Carnahan, Michael A.; D'Alessio, Keith; Butlin, Jared D. G.; Butt, Mark T.; Asher, Anthony L.

    2015-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is a potentially serious complication in surgical procedures involving opening of the dura mater. Although several materials have been developed to help achieve watertight dural closures, CSF leakages persist. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of a novel hydrogel designed to provide augmentation to standard methods of dural repair. Performance measures such as polymerization time, dimensional swelling, burst strength, and elasticity were examined in laboratory situations. Additionally, biocompatibility in an in vivo rat model was examined. The results demonstrate that this novel hydrogel has superior mechanical strength and tissue adherence with enhanced flexibility, reduced swelling, and quicker set time compared with existing hydrogel dural sealants approved for intra-cranial use. Furthermore, biocompatibility studies demonstrate that this compound is both non-toxic and non-immunogenic.

  8. [Rapidly progressive dementia and parkinsonism associated to multiple dural arteriovenous fistulas].

    PubMed

    Mejia, P; Piedra, L M; Merchan-Del Hierro, X

    2017-03-01

    Introduccion. Las demencias rapidamente progresivas son un grupo poco frecuente de enfermedades caracterizadas por un deterioro cognitivo y otras alteraciones neurologicas que evolucionan en el transcurso de semanas a meses. Su etiologia es diversa e incluye un gran numero de condiciones neurodegenerativas, toxicas, metabolicas, autoinmunes, infecciosas y vasculares. Caso clinico. Varon de 69 años, que ingreso por demencia rapidamente progresiva y parkinsonismo causado por multiples fistulas arteriovenosas durales tratadas exitosamente mediante terapia endovascular. Conclusion. Las fistulas arteriovenosas durales son conexiones anomalas entre las arterias durales y los senos venosos o venas corticales que constituyen una causa inusual de demencia rapidamente progresiva, pero que debe considerarse, dada la disponibilidad de un tratamiento especifico con reversion de los sintomas.

  9. Spontaneous acute subdural hematoma: A rare presentation of a dural intracranial fistula.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Guilherme Brasileiro; Veiga, José Carlos Esteves; Silva, João Miguel de Almeida; Conti, Mario Luiz Marques

    2016-03-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas are acquired lesions between the meningeal arteries and their associated draining veins. They may have highly variable clinical presentations and evolution, from severe neurological deficit to no or trivial symptoms. Intracranial hemorrhage occurs in less than 24% of all dural fistulas, and the bleeding is usually subarachnoid, more infrequently intracerebral, and rarely in the subdural space. Here, we present a rare case of a patient who presented with a subdural spontaneous hemorrhage. After investigation by cerebral angiography, the diagnosis of a dural arteriovenous fistula was made. The patient underwent uneventful endovascular treatment. As there are with only a few reports in the literature of such a presentation, we present this patient and perform a brief review of the literature.

  10. Venous thrombosis: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.W.

    1986-07-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease contributes to morbidity and mortality in certain groups of hospitalized patients, particularly those who have undergone surgery. Although principles of treatment have changed relatively little during the past 20 years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Venography, once the only reliable diagnostic technique, has been largely replaced by noninvasive tests: impedance plethysmography, venous Doppler, /sup 125/I-radiofibrinogen-uptake test, and phleborheography. Virchow's triad of stasis, vessel injury, and hypercoagulability remains a valid explanation of the pathogenesis of thrombus formation, but laboratory and clinical data have refined our knowledge of how these factors interact to result in clinically significant disease. Knowledge of the natural history of venous thrombosis, plus heightened awareness of the long-term morbidity and expense associated with the postphlebitic syndrome, have led to increased interest in preventing DVT. Clinically and economically, venous thrombosis is best managed by prevention. 61 references.

  11. Chronic Venous Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... with your doctor. Do not ignore these symptoms. Risk Factors The most important factors leading to the development of chronic venous insufficiency and varicose veins include: • Family history • Increasing ...

  12. Sex determination using maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kanthem, Ranjith Kumar; Guttikonda, Venkateswara Rao; Yeluri, Sivaranjani; Kumari, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Individual identification is a subtle concept and often one of the most important priorities in mass disasters, road accidents, air crashes, fires, and even in the investigation of criminal cases. Matching specific features detected on the cadaver with data recorded during the life of an individual is an important aspect in forensics, and can be performed by fingerprint analysis, deoxyribonucleic acid matching, anthropological methods, radiological methods and other techniques which can facilitate age and sex identification. Sinus radiography is one such method that has been used for determination of the sex of an individual. Hence, an attempt is being made to use the different dimensions of the maxillary sinus in the determination of sex using coronal and axial sections of plain computed tomography (CT) scan. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients including 17 male and 13 female, visiting the Outpatient Department of the Mamata General Hospital were included as the study subjects. The dimensions of right and left maxillary sinuses of 30 subjects from plain CT were measured using SYNGO software and statistical analysis was done. Results: Sex determination using height, length, width, and volume of the maxillary sinus on both sides showed statistically significant results with a higher percentage of sexual dimorphism in the case of volume. Conclusion: Volume of the right maxillary sinus can be used as accurate diagnostic parameter for sex determination. PMID:26005308

  13. Diagnosing Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, D. Lynn

    1992-01-01

    Patients often present with unexplained lower limb pain and swelling. It is important to exclude deep venous thrombosis in the diagnosis because of the threat of sudden death. Simple clinical diagnosis is unacceptable, and noninvasive tests should be used initially. Serial testing detects proximal extension of isolated calf thrombi. Multiple diagnostic modalities are employed to diagnose a new deep venous thrombosis in patients with postphlebitic syndrome. PMID:21221369

  14. Venous ulcer review

    PubMed Central

    Bevis, Paul; Earnshaw, Jonothan

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What is the best treatment for venous ulcers? Results: Compression aids ulcer healing. Pentoxifylline can aid ulcer healing. Artificial skin grafts are more effective than other skin grafts in helping ulcer healing. Correction of underlying venous incompetence reduces ulcer recurrence. Implementation: Potential pitfalls to avoid are: Failure to exclude underlying arterial disease before application of compression.Unusual-looking ulcers or those slow to heal should be biopsied to exclude malignant transformation. PMID:21673869

  15. ACTIVATION OF TRPA1 ON DURAL AFFERENTS: A POTENTIAL MECHANISM OF HEADACHE PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Edelmayer, Rebecca M.; Le, Larry N.; Yan, Jin; Wei, Xiaomei; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Preti, Delia; Appendino, Giovanni; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Dodick, David W.; Vanderah, Todd W.; Porreca, Frank; Dussor, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Activation of transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) on meningeal nerve endings has been suggested to contribute to environmental irritant-induced headache but this channel may also contribute to other forms of headache such as migraine. The preclinical studies described here examined functional expression of TRPA1 on dural afferents and investigated whether activation of TRPA1 contributes to headache-like behaviors. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in vitro using two TRPA1 agonists, mustard oil (MO) and the environmental irritant umbellulone (UMB), on dural-projecting trigeminal ganglion neurons. Application of MO and UMB to dural afferents produced TRPA1-like currents in approximately 42% and 38% of cells, respectively. Using an established in vivo behavioral model of migraine-related allodynia, dural application of MO and UMB produced robust time-related tactile facial and hindpaw allodynia that was attenuated by pretreatment with the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Additionally, MO or UMB were applied to the dura and exploratory activity was monitored for 30 minutes using an automated open-field activity chamber. Dural MO and UMB decreased the number of vertical rearing episodes and the time spent rearing in comparison to vehicle treated animals. This change in activity was prevented in rats pretreated with HC-030031 as well as sumatriptan, a clinically effective anti-migraine agent. These data indicate that TRPA1 is expressed on a substantial fraction of dural afferents and activation of meningeal TRPA1 produces behaviors consistent with those seen in patients during migraine attacks. Further, they suggest that activation of meningeal TRPA1 via endogenous or exogenous mechanisms can lead to afferent signaling and headache. PMID:22809691

  16. Activation of TRPA1 on dural afferents: a potential mechanism of headache pain.

    PubMed

    Edelmayer, Rebecca M; Le, Larry N; Yan, Jin; Wei, Xiaomei; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Preti, Delia; Appendino, Giovanni; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Dodick, David W; Vanderah, Todd W; Porreca, Frank; Dussor, Gregory

    2012-09-01

    Activation of transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) on meningeal nerve endings has been suggested to contribute to environmental irritant-induced headache, but this channel may also contribute to other forms of headache, such as migraine. The preclinical studies described here examined functional expression of TRPA1 on dural afferents and investigated whether activation of TRPA1 contributes to headache-like behaviors. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in vitro with 2 TRPA1 agonists, mustard oil (MO), and the environmental irritant umbellulone (UMB) on dural-projecting trigeminal ganglion neurons. Application of MO and UMB to dural afferents produced TRPA1-like currents in approximately 42% and 38% of cells, respectively. By means of an established in vivo behavioral model of migraine-related allodynia, dural application of MO and UMB produced robust time-related tactile facial and hind paw allodynia that was attenuated by pretreatment with the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Additionally, MO or UMB were applied to the dura, and exploratory activity was monitored for 30min with an automated open-field activity chamber. Dural MO and UMB decreased the number of vertical rearing episodes and the time spent rearing in comparison to vehicle-treated animals. This change in activity was prevented in rats pretreated with HC-030031 as well as sumatriptan, a clinically effective antimigraine agent. These data indicate that TRPA1 is expressed on a substantial fraction of dural afferents, and activation of meningeal TRPA1 produces behaviors consistent with those observed in patients during migraine attacks. Further, they suggest that activation of meningeal TRPA1 via endogenous or exogenous mechanisms can lead to afferent signaling and headache.

  17. Posterior Trans-Dural Repair of Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Herniation after Resection of Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Ki; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic spinal cord herniation is a rare complication following spinal surgery. We introduce a posterior trans-dural repair technique used in a case of thoracic spinal cord herniation through a ventral dural defect following resection of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in the cervicothoracic spine. A 51-year-old female was suffering from paraplegia after laminectomy alone for cervicothoracic OPLL. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a severely compressed spinal cord with pseudomeningocele identified postoperatively. Cerebrospinal fluid leak and iatrogenic spinal cord herniation persisted despite several operations with duroplasty and sealing agent. Finally, the problems were treated by repair of the ventral dural defect with posterior trans-dural duroplasty. Several months after surgery, the patient could walk independently. This surgical technique can be applied to treat ventral dural defect and spinal cord herniation. PMID:27114779

  18. Dural Reduction Surgery: A Treatment Option for Frontotemporal Brain Sagging Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mostofi, Emily; Schievink, Wouter I; Sim, Valerie L

    2016-07-01

    Frontotemporal brain sagging syndrome is a dementia associated with hypersomnolence, personality changes, and features of intracranial hypotension on magnetic resonance imaging. The literature is sparse with respect to treatment options; many patients simply worsen. We present a case in which this syndrome responded to lumbar dural reduction surgery. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging indicated normalization of brain sagging and lumbar intrathecal pressure. Although no evidence of cerebrospinal leak was found, extremely thin dura was noted intraoperatively, suggesting that a thin and incompetent dura could result in this low-pressure syndrome. Clinicians who encounter this syndrome should consider dural reduction surgery as a treatment strategy.

  19. Spinal anaesthesia in a patient with post-spine surgery dural ectasia.

    PubMed

    Errando, C L; Del Moral, A; Cobo, I; García-Gregorio, N; Pallardó-López, M A

    2014-01-01

    Dural sac ectasia is a very infrequent anatomical abnormality, usually caused by connective tissue diseases, as Marfan syndrome. Very few cases have been described being a consequence of a previous spine surgical procedure. We describe the case of an elderly patient who should be operated on twice due to sub-occlusive colon disease. Surgery was performed under spinal anaesthesia. A dural sac ectasia was suspected after the first procedure and the abdominal X-ray was reviewed. The characteristics of the anatomical alteration and the course of both anaesthetic procedures were described. X-ray and CT images were provided.

  20. Sinusitis: Special Considerations for Aging Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... ENT Doctor Near You Sinusitis: Special Considerations for Aging Patients Sinusitis: Special Considerations for Aging Patients Patient ... for evaluation and possible surgical management. Sources For Aging Patients: Administration on Aging (AoA), U.S. Department of ...

  1. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever-Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Vairamon, Pradhosh M; Gowtham, Thiruvengadam; Das, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection can present as febrile illness with thrombocytopenia, dengue shock syndrome and dengue haemorrhagic fever. Neurological manifestation of dengue infection is more predominant in endemic region. Here, we report a case with unusual neurological presentation of dengue infection. A 16-year-old boy presented with fever for two week duration, headache and double vision involving left eye for two days. He had multiple erythematous rashes all over the body on 3rd day and treated conservatively. On examination he had bilateral papilloedema, left eye restricted abduction. His investigation revealed thrombocytopenia and positive dengue serology. His MRI brain with venogram showed bilateral transverse sinus thrombosis. Hence he was diagnosed as cerebral venous thrombosis due to dehydration with underlying dengue infection. He was hydrated and managed conservatively. On 3rd day his double vision started improving. His repeat MR Venogram was done after two week duration, which revealed recanalisation of bilateral transverse sinus. PMID:26266153

  2. Unexpected location of pilonidal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Sion-Vardy, N; Osyntsov, L; Cagnano, E; Osyntsov, A; Vardy, D; Benharroch, D

    2009-12-01

    Pilonidal sinuses usually occur in the sacrococcygeal area in young men, and occasionally can be found in other ectopic sites. We present a retrospective case review on unusual locations of pilonidal sinuses in the past 4 years. The lesion sites were as follows: one on the penis, two on the scalp, two on the abdomen, one on the neck, two in the groin and two in the axilla. Abdominal and penile lesions are uncommon, but the other locations reported are unusually rare. To our knowledge, the groin has not been reported previously as a site of a pilonidal sinus, although the histological appearance of hidradenitis suppurativa may well resemble it. When trying to clarify the pathogenesis of these occurrences, we found that recurrent hair removal was a common characteristic of the patients we contacted, and this may have been the initiating trauma.

  3. Modeling the Carotid Sinus Baroreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramachandra; Nudelman, Harvey B.

    1972-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes the relationship between sinus pressure and nerve discharge frequency of the carotid sinus baroreceptor is presented. It is partly based upon the single-fiber data obtained by Clarke from the sinus nerve of a dog. The model takes into account what is currently known about the physiology of the baroreceptor. It consists of two nonlinear ordinary differential equations and eight free parameters. With one set of values for these eight parameters, the model reproduces well the experimental results reported by Clarke for positive ramp pressure inputs. Only three parameters needed to be adjusted in order to fit the dynamic data. The remaining five were obtained from static and steady-state data. PMID:5056961

  4. Venous Oxygenation Mapping using Velocity-Selective Excitation and Arterial Nulling (VSEAN)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Wong, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    A new MRI technique to map the oxygenation of venous blood is presented. The method uses velocity-selective excitation and arterial nulling pulses, combined with phase sensitive signal detection to isolate the venous blood signal. The T2 of this signal along with a T2-Y calibration curve yields estimates of venous oxygenation in situ. Results from phantoms and healthy human subjects under normoxic and hypoxic conditions are shown, and venous saturation levels estimated from both sagittal sinus and grey matter based ROIs are compared to the related techniques TRUST and QUIXOTIC. In addition, combined with an additional scan without arterial nulling pulses, the oxygen saturation level on arterial side can also be estimated. PMID:22294414

  5. Bacterial colonization or infection in chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Pandak, Nenad; Pajić-Penavić, Ivana; Sekelj, Alen; Tomić-Paradžik, Maja; Cabraja, Ivica; Miklaušić, Božana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was the determination of bacteria present in maxillary and ethmoid cavities in patients with chronic sinusitis and to correlate these findings with bacteria simultaneously present in their nasopharynx. The purpose of this correlation was to establish the role of bacteria found in chronically inflamed sinuses and to evaluate if the bacteria present colonized or infected sinus mucosa. Nasopharyngeal and sinus swabs of 65 patients that underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery were cultivated and at the same time the presence of leukocytes were determined in each swab. The most frequently found bacteria in nasopharynx were Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus spp., Streptococcus viridans and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Maxillary or ethmoidal sinus swabs yielded bacterial growth in 47 (72.31%) patients. The most frequently found bacteria in sinuses were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp. and Streptococci (pneumoniae, viridans and spp.). The insignificant number of leukocytes was present in each sinus and nasopharyngeal swab. Every published microbiology study of chronic sinusitis proved that sinus mucosa were colonized with bacteria and not infected, yet antibiotic therapy was discussed making no difference between infection and colonization. Chronic sinusitis should be considered a chronic inflammatory condition rather than bacterial infection, so routine antibiotic therapy should be avoided. Empiric antibiotic therapy should be prescribed only in cases when the acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis occurs and the antibiotics prescribed should aim the usual bacteria causing acute sinusitis. In case of therapy failure, antibiotics should be changed having in mind that under certain circumstances any bacteria colonizing sinus mucosa can cause acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis.

  6. [Homocysteine and venous thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Monnerat, C; Hayoz, D

    1997-09-06

    Congenital homocysteinuria is a rare inherited metabolic disorder with early onset atherosclerosis and arterial and venous trombosis. Moderate hyperhomocysteinemia is more frequently encountered and is recognized as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Several case-control studies demonstrate an association between venous thromboembolism and moderate hyperhomocysteinemia. A patient with moderate hyperhomocysteinemia has a 2-3 relative risk of developing an episode of venous thromboembolism. The occurrence of mild hyperhomocysteinemia in heterozygotes for the mutation of Leiden factor V involves a 10-fold increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism. The biochemical mechanism by which homocysteine may promote thrombosis is not fully recognized. Homocysteine inhibits the expression of thrombomodulin, the thrombin cofactor responsible for protein C activation, and inhibits antithrombin-III binding. Treatment with folic acid reduces the plasma level of homocysteinemia, but no study has demonstrated its efficacy in reducing the incidence of venous thromboembolism or atherosclerosis. Hyperhomocysteinemia should be included in the screening of abnormalities of hemostasis and thrombosis in patients with idiopathic thromboembolism, and mild hyperhomocysteinemia may justify a trial of folic acid.

  7. When Sinuses Attack! (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have a cold? continue When Good Sinuses Go Bad What about that cold that won't go away? A cold virus can: damage the delicate ... if you are feeling well enough, you can go to school or go outside and play. In ...

  8. Pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus.

    PubMed

    Terra, E R; Guedes, F R; Manzi, F R; Bóscolo, F N

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a case of pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus in the pterygoid process and greater wing of the sphenoid bone, observed on a panoramic radiograph. Conventional radiographs and computerized tomography in axial and coronal sections confirmed the presence of the pneumatization of these structures.

  9. A dural lymphatic vascular system that drains brain interstitial fluid and macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Aspelund, Aleksanteri; Antila, Salli; Proulx, Steven T.; Karlsen, Tine Veronica; Karaman, Sinem; Detmar, Michael; Wiig, Helge

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is considered an organ devoid of lymphatic vasculature. Yet, part of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains into the cervical lymph nodes (LNs). The mechanism of CSF entry into the LNs has been unclear. Here we report the surprising finding of a lymphatic vessel network in the dura mater of the mouse brain. We show that dural lymphatic vessels absorb CSF from the adjacent subarachnoid space and brain interstitial fluid (ISF) via the glymphatic system. Dural lymphatic vessels transport fluid into deep cervical LNs (dcLNs) via foramina at the base of the skull. In a transgenic mouse model expressing a VEGF-C/D trap and displaying complete aplasia of the dural lymphatic vessels, macromolecule clearance from the brain was attenuated and transport from the subarachnoid space into dcLNs was abrogated. Surprisingly, brain ISF pressure and water content were unaffected. Overall, these findings indicate that the mechanism of CSF flow into the dcLNs is directly via an adjacent dural lymphatic network, which may be important for the clearance of macromolecules from the brain. Importantly, these results call for a reexamination of the role of the lymphatic system in CNS physiology and disease. PMID:26077718

  10. Dural Defect Repair in Translabyrinthine Acoustic Neuroma Surgery and Its Implications in Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Aloysio Augusto Tahan de Campos; Colafêmina, José Fernando; Centeno, Ricardo Silva

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a complication that may occur after translabyrinthine (translab) acoustic neuroma (AN) removal. The aim of this study is to verify the incidence of CSF leak using two techniques for dural defect closure in translab AN surgery and present a new technique for dural repair. A retrospective study was held, reviewing charts of 34 patients in a tertiary neurotologic referral center. Out of these 34 patients that underwent translab AN excision in a 1-year period, 18 had their dural defect repaired using only abdominal fat graft and 16 using synthetic dura substitute (SDS) plus abdominal fat tissue. One patient (5.5%) in the first group had CSF leak and 1 (6.2%) in the second group had CSF leak postoperatively. Our data suggest that there are no significant differences in CSF leak rates using both techniques, although studies in a larger series must be undertaken to conclude it. We believe that the development of some points in the new technique for dural repair can achieve better results and reduce the CSF leak incidence in the translabyrinthine acoustic neuroma surgery in the near future. PMID:24083124

  11. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Laryea, Jonathan; Champagne, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) can occur after major general surgery. Pulmonary embolism is recognized as the most common identifiable cause of death in hospitalized patients in the United States. The risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is higher in colorectal surgical procedures compared with general surgical procedures. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in this population is estimated to be 0.2 to 0.3%. Prevention of VTE is considered a patient-safety measure in most mandated quality initiatives. The measures for prevention of VTE include mechanical methods (graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices) and pharmacologic agents. A combination of mechanical and pharmacologic methods produces the best results. Patients undergoing surgery should be stratified according to their risk of VTE based on patient risk factors, disease-related risk factors, and procedure-related risk factors. The type of prophylaxis should be commensurate with the risk of VTE based on the composite risk profile. PMID:24436666

  12. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Laryea, Jonathan; Champagne, Bradley

    2013-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) can occur after major general surgery. Pulmonary embolism is recognized as the most common identifiable cause of death in hospitalized patients in the United States. The risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is higher in colorectal surgical procedures compared with general surgical procedures. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in this population is estimated to be 0.2 to 0.3%. Prevention of VTE is considered a patient-safety measure in most mandated quality initiatives. The measures for prevention of VTE include mechanical methods (graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices) and pharmacologic agents. A combination of mechanical and pharmacologic methods produces the best results. Patients undergoing surgery should be stratified according to their risk of VTE based on patient risk factors, disease-related risk factors, and procedure-related risk factors. The type of prophylaxis should be commensurate with the risk of VTE based on the composite risk profile.

  13. Endovascular treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis: Contemporary multicenter experience

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Lopes, Demetrius K; Binning, Mandy J; Veznedaroglu, Erol; Liebman, Kenneth M; Arthur, Adam S; Doss, Vinodh T; Levy, Elad I

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular therapy of cerebral venous thrombosis using modern approaches to intracranial recanalization, such as stent retrievers and aspiration thrombectomy, is not well described. We performed a retrospective review of data for consecutive patients with venous sinus thrombosis who underwent endovascular treatment between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2013 at participating institutions. We identified a total of 13 patients with a diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis. The most frequently utilized type of endovascular intervention was the Penumbra aspiration system (Penumbra Inc., Alameda, California, USA) (nine cases), followed by local infusion of tissue plasminogen activator (bolus and/or drip in six cases) and stent retrievers (Solitaire FR (Covidien, Irvine, California, USA) in three cases and Trevo (Stryker, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA) in one case). Overall, multimodality treatment (two or more different types of devices or approaches) was performed in 62% of cases. Follow-up data were available for 11 patients; of those, five had a favorable clinical outcome (defined as modified Rankin Scale score of 0–2) and three patients died. Various endovascular approaches are utilized in current clinical practice. A multimodal approach to endovascular therapy for the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis resulted in partial or complete restoration of flow in all cases, yet the mortality rate of 27% indicates the need for improvement in recanalization strategies for this disorder. PMID:26055685

  14. Cavopulmonary window: an extreme form of sinus venosus defect.

    PubMed

    Aramendi, José I; Cubero, Alain; Hamzeh, Gadah; Rey, Estibaliz

    2014-02-01

    We present an unusual variant of the sinus venosus defect in which an obvious window is formed between a single pulmonary vein and the superior vena cava, the pulmonary vein retaining its connection to the left atrium. Two patients were operated on via right anterior minithoracotomy. A large single right pulmonary vein was found connecting to the left atrium. There was a large side-to-side communication between the superior vena cava and the pulmonary vein resulting in partially anomalous pulmonary venous drainage. A side-biting clamp was applied in the superior vena cava and the pulmonary vein at both sides of the communication, and the vein was divided. The incision in both veins was closed with a running suture.

  15. Central venous access.

    PubMed

    Ganeshan, Arul; Warakaulle, Dinuke R; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-01-01

    Central venous access plays an important role in the management of an ever-increasing population of patients ranging from those that are critically ill to patients with difficult clinical access. Interventional radiologists are key in delivering this service and should be familiar with the wide range of techniques and catheters now available to them. A comprehensive description of these catheters with regard to indications, technical aspects of catheterization, success rates, and associated early and late complications, as well as a review of various published guidelines on central venous catheter insertion are given in this article.

  16. Outcomes after suboccipital decompression without dural opening in children with Chiari malformation Type I

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Benjamin C.; Kelly, Kathleen M.; Phan, Michelle Q.; Bruce, Samuel S.; McDowell, Michael M.; Anderson, Richard C. E.; Feldstein, Neil A.

    2015-01-01

    Object Symptomatic pediatric Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) is most often treated with posterior fossa decompression (PFD), but controversy exists over whether the dura needs to be opened during PFD. While dural opening as a part of PFD has been suggested to result in a higher rate of resolution of CM symptoms, it has also been shown to lead to more frequent complications. In this paper, the authors present the largest reported series of outcomes after PFD without dural opening surgery, as well as identify risk factors for recurrence. Methods The authors performed a retrospective review of 156 consecutive pediatric patients in whom the senior authors performed PFD without dural opening from 2003 to 2013. Patient demographics, clinical symptoms and signs, radiographic findings, intraoperative ultrasound results, and neuromonitoring findings were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to determine risk factors for recurrence of symptoms and the need for reoperation. Results Over 90% of patients had a good clinical outcome, with improvement or resolution of their symptoms at last follow-up (mean 32 months). There were no major complications. The mean length of hospital stay was 2.0 days. In a multivariate regression model, partial C-2 laminectomy was an independent risk factor associated with reoperation (p = 0.037). Motor weakness on presentation was also associated with reoperation but only with trend-level significance (p = 0.075). No patient with < 8 mm of tonsillar herniation required reoperation. Conclusions The vast majority (> 90%) of children with symptomatic CM-I will have improvement or resolution of symptoms after a PFD without dural opening. A non–dural opening approach avoids major complications. While no patient with tonsillar herniation < 8 mm required reoperation, children with tonsillar herniation at or below C-2 have a higher risk for failure when this approach is used. PMID:25932779

  17. The jugular venous pressure revisited

    PubMed Central

    CHIACO, JOHN MICHAEL S. CHUA; PARIKH, NISHA I.; FERGUSSON, DAVID J.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of the jugular venous pressure is often inadequately performed and undervalued. Here, we review the physiologic and anatomic basis for the jugular venous pressure, including the discrepancy between right atrial and central venous pressures. We also describe the correct method of evaluating this clinical finding and review the clinical relevance of the jugular venous pressure, especially its value in assessing the severity and response to treatment of congestive heart failure. Waveforms reflective of specific conditions are also discussed. PMID:24085809

  18. Anatomical aspects of sinus floor elevations.

    PubMed

    van den Bergh, J P; ten Bruggenkate, C M; Disch, F J; Tuinzing, D B

    2000-06-01

    Inadequate bone height in the lateral part of the maxilla forms a contra-indication for implant surgery. This condition can be treated with an internal augmentation of the maxillary sinus floor. This sinus floor elevation, formerly called sinus lifting, consists of a surgical procedure in which a top hinge door in the lateral maxillary sinus wall is prepared and internally rotated to a horizontal position. The new elevated sinus floor, together with the inner maxillary mucosa, will create a space that can be filled with graft material. Sinus lift procedures depend greatly on fragile structures and anatomical variations. The variety of anatomical modalities in shape of the inner aspect of the maxillary sinus defines the surgical approach. Conditions such as sinus floor convolutions, sinus septum, transient mucosa swelling and narrow sinus may form a (usually relative) contra-indication for sinus floor elevation. Absolute contra-indications are maxillary sinus diseases (tumors) and destructive former sinus surgery (like the Caldwell-Luc operation). The lateral sinus wall is usually a thin bone plate, which is easily penetrated with rotating or sharp instruments. The fragile Schneiderian membrane plays an important role for the containment of the bonegraft. The surgical procedure of preparing the trap door and luxating it, together with the preparation of the sinus mucosa, may cause a mucosa tear. Usually, when these perforations are not too large, they will fold together when turning the trap door inward and upward, or they can be glued with a fibrin sealant, or they can be covered with a resorbable membrane. If the perforation is too large, a cortico-spongious block graft can be considered. However, in most cases the sinus floor elevation will be deleted. Perforations may also occur due to irregularities in the sinus floor or even due to immediate contact of sinus mucosa with oral mucosa. Obstruction of the antro-nasal foramen is, due to its high location, not a

  19. Venous Congestive Myelopathy due to Chronic Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis Treated with Endovascular Stenting: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Diego Z.; Hughes, Joshua D.; Liebo, Greta B.; Bendel, Emily C.; Bjarnason, Haraldur; Klaas, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Impaired inferior vena cava (IVC) outflow can lead to collateralization of blood to the valveless epidural venous plexus, causing epidural venous engorgement and venous congestion. Herein we describe a case of chronic IVC thrombosis presenting as venous congestive myelopathy treated with angioplasty and endovascular stenting. The pathophysiological mechanisms of cord injury are hypothesized, and IVC stenting application is evaluated. Methods Case report and review of the literature. Results IVC outflow obstruction has only rarely been associated with neurologic dysfunction, with reports of lumbosacral nerve root compression in the cases of IVC agenesis, compression, or occlusion. Although endovascular angioplasty with stenting is emerging as a leading treatment option for chronic IVC thrombosis, its use to treat neurologic complications is limited to one case report for intractable sciatica. Our case is the first description of IVC thrombosis presenting with venous congestive myelopathy, and treated successfully with IVC stenting. Conclusion Venous congestive myelopathy should be seen as a broader clinical condition, including not only typical dural arteriovenous fistulas, but also disorders of venous outflow. Therefore, identifying a rare, but potentially treatable, etiology is important to avoid permanent neurologic deficits. IVC stenting is proposed as a novel and effective treatment approach. PMID:25825633

  20. Post-mortem imaging of the infant and perinatal dura mater and superior sagittal sinus using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, Emma C; Malcomson, Roger D G; Joseph, Shiju; Adnan, Asif; Adlam, David; Rutty, Guy N

    2017-04-07

    Infants and young children are likely to present with subdural haemorrhage (SDH) if they are the victims of abusive head trauma. In these cases, the most accepted theory for the source of bleeding is the bridging veins traversing from the surface of the brain to the dura mater. However, some have suggested that SDH may result from leakage of blood from a dural vascular plexus. As post-mortem examination of the bridging veins and dura is challenging, and imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance and computed tomography do not have the resolution capabilities to image small blood vessels, we have trialled the use of intravascular and benchtop optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems for imaging from within the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) and through the dura during five infant/perinatal autopsies. Numerous vessel-like structures were identified using both OCT systems. Measurements taken with the intravascular rotational system indicate that the approximate median diameters of blood vessels entering anterior and posterior segments of the SSS were 110 μm (range 70 to 670 μm, n = 21) and 125 μm (range 70 to 740 μm, n = 23), respectively. For blood vessels close to the wall of the SSS, the median diameters for anterior and posterior segments of the SSS were 80 μm (range 40 to 170 μm, n = 25) and 90 μm (range 30 to 150 μm), respectively. Detailed characterisation of the dural vasculature is important to aid understanding of the source of SDH. High resolution 3-dimensional reconstructions of the infant dural vasculature may be possible with further development of OCT systems.

  1. Venous oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Christiane; Bloos, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Early detection and rapid treatment of tissue hypoxia are important goals. Venous oxygen saturation is an indirect index of global oxygen supply-to-demand ratio. Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) measurement has become a surrogate for mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). ScvO2 is measured by a catheter placed in the superior vena cava. After results from a single-center study suggested that maintaining ScvO2 values >70% might improve survival rates in septic patients, international practice guidelines included this target in a bundle strategy to treat early sepsis. However, a recent multicenter study with >1500 patients found that the use of central hemodynamic and ScvO2 monitoring did not improve long-term survival when compared to the clinical assessment of the adequacy of circulation. It seems that if sepsis is recognized early, a rapid initiation of antibiotics and adequate fluid resuscitation are more important than measuring venous oxygen saturation.

  2. Central venous line - infants

    MedlinePlus

    A central venous line (CVL) is a long, soft, plastic tube that is put into a large vein in the chest. WHY IS A CVL USED? A CVL is often put in when a baby cannot get a ... (MCC). A CVL can be used to give nutrients or medicines to a ...

  3. Operative management of tumors involving the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, L N; Møller, A R

    1986-06-01

    In the past, neurosurgeons have been reluctant to operate on tumors involving the cavernous sinus because of the possibility of bleeding from the venous plexus or injury to the internal carotid artery (ICA) or the third, fourth, or sixth cranial nerves. The authors describe techniques for a more aggressive surgical approach to neoplasms in this area that are either benign or locally confined malignant lesions. During the last 2 years, seven tumors involving the cavernous sinus have been resected: six totally and one subtotally. The preoperative evaluation included axial and coronal computerized tomography, cerebral angiography, and a balloon-occlusion test of the ICA. Intraoperative monitoring of the third, fourth, sixth, and seventh cranial nerves was used to assist in locating the nerves and in avoiding injury to them. The first major step in the operative procedure was to obtain proximal control of the ICA at the petrous apex and distal control in the supraclinoid segment. The cavernous sinus was then opened by a lateral, superior, or inferior approach for tumor resection. Temporary clipping and suture of the ICA was necessary in one patient. None of the patients died or suffered a stroke postoperatively. Permanent trigeminal nerve injury occurred in three patients; in two, this was the result of tumor invasion. One patient suffered temporary paralysis of the third, fourth, and sixth cranial nerves, and in another the sixth cranial nerve was temporarily paralyzed. Preoperative cranial nerve deficits were improved postoperatively in three patients. Radiation therapy was administered postoperatively to four patients. These seven patients have been followed for 6 to 18 months to date and none has shown evidence of recurrence of the intracavernous tumor.

  4. Reconsidering the back door approach by targeting the coronary sinus in ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    De Maria, Giovanni Luigi; Kassimis, George; Raina, Tushar; Banning, Adrian P

    2016-08-15

    Coronary sinus interventions (CSI) are a class of invasive techniques (surgical and percutaneous) originally proposed in the first half of the 20th century, aiming to treat ischaemic heart disease by acting on the venous coronary system. Three main classes of CSI have been proposed and tested: (1) retroperfusion technique, (2) retroinfusion technique and (3) coronary sinus occlusion techniques. They all share the principle that a controlled increased pressure within the coronary sinus may promote a retrograde perfusion of the ischaemic myocardium with consequent cardioprotection. Development of arterial treatments including coronary aortic bypass grafting and then percutaneous coronary intervention deflected interest from interventions on the coronary venous system. However, CSI may still have a possible niche role today in specific and selected clinical contexts in which existing therapies are insufficient. In this review paper, we aim to revise the rationale for CSI, describing the details and the evidence collected so far about these techniques and to provide insights about the main clinical scenarios in which these strategies may find a contemporary application in combination or as an alternative to existing approaches.

  5. Beyond the sniffer: frontal sinuses in Carnivora.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Abigail A; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2014-11-01

    Paranasal sinuses are some of the most poorly understood features of mammalian cranial anatomy. They are highly variable in presence and form among species, but their function is not well understood. The best-supported explanations for the function of sinuses is that they opportunistically fill mechanically unnecessary space, but that in some cases, sinuses in combination with the configuration of the frontal bone may improve skull performance by increasing skull strength and dissipating stresses more evenly. We used CT technology to investigate patterns in frontal sinus size and shape disparity among three families of carnivores: Canidae, Felidae, and Hyaenidae. We provide some of the first quantitative data on sinus morphology for these three families, and employ a novel method to quantify the relationship between three-dimensional sinus shape and skull shape. As expected, frontal sinus size and shape were more strongly correlated with frontal bone size and shape than with the morphology of the skull as a whole. However, sinus morphology was also related to allometric differences among families that are linked to biomechanical function. Our results support the hypothesis that frontal sinuses most often opportunistically fill space that is mechanically unnecessary, and they can facilitate cranial shape changes that reduce stress during feeding. Moreover, we suggest that the ability to form frontal sinuses allows species to modify skull function without compromising the performance of more functionally constrained regions such as the nasal chamber (heat/water conservation, olfaction), and braincase (housing the brain and sensory structures).

  6. Predicted burden of venous disease.

    PubMed

    Onida, Sarah; Davies, Alun Huw

    2016-03-01

    Chronic venous disease is a common condition with clinical signs and symptoms ranging from spider veins, to varicose veins, to active venous ulceration. Both superficial and deep venous dysfunction may be implicated in the development of this disease. Socio-economic factors are shaping our population, with increasing age and body mass index resulting in significant pressure on healthcare systems worldwide. These risk factors also lead to an increased risk of developing superficial and/or deep venous insufficiency, increasing disease prevalence and morbidity. In this chapter, the authors review the current and future burden of chronic venous disease from an epidemiological, quality of life and economic perspective.

  7. Inferior petrosal sinus route microcatheterization study and embolization for primary orbital varix

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vivek; Udiya, Alok; Shetty, Gurucharan S; Sharma, Kumudini; Kanaujia, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Primary orbital varix is a rare lesion but difficult to treat. Our main aim was to demonstrate the varices and their central venous communication and to explore the feasibility of embolization of these lesions. Method In four patients with clinical suspicion of varix, in whom MRI showed retro-global vascular channels, microcatheter digital subtraction angiography (DSA) of the varices was performed using femoral venous access. Embolization was carried out in two patients. Results In all four patients orbital varices could be accessed with a microcatheter through inferior petrosal sinus and ophthalmic vein (superior or inferior) route. Microcatheter angiography showed opacification of varices and demonstrated their central venous communication. Two patients were treated with coil embolization. Complete resolution of symptoms was seen in one patient and partial relief in the other. Conclusion The study presents microcatheterization of orbital varices via the inferior petrosal sinus–cavernous sinus–ophthalmic vein route with injections into distal ophthalmic veins for demonstration of these variceal sacs and their central venous connection. Coiling to disconnect the venous communication should be the primary goal of embolization. PMID:26628456

  8. Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bruce E. . E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L.

    2005-08-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods: Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. The mean patient age was 55.5 years. The mean tumor volume was 10.2 mL; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.9 Gy. The mean follow-up was 58 months (range, 16-144 months). Results: No tumor enlarged after radiosurgery. Twelve of 38 patients (26%) with preexisting diplopia or facial numbness/pain had improvement in cranial nerve function. Five patients (10%) had new (n = 3) or worsened (n = 2) trigeminal dysfunction; 2 of these patients (4%) underwent surgery at 20 and 25 months after radiosurgery despite no evidence of tumor progression. Neither patient improved after partial tumor resection. One patient (2%) developed an oculomotor nerve injury. One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. Event-free survival was 98%, 85%, and 80% at 1, 3, and 7 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Univariate analysis of patient and dosimetric factors found no analyzed factor correlated with postradiosurgical morbidity. Conclusions: Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. Except in situations of symptomatic mass effect, unusual clinical presentation, or atypical imaging features, surgery to confirm the histologic diagnosis is unlikely to provide clinical benefit.

  9. Comprehensive review on endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.; Hosemann, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery is the standard procedure for surgery of most paranasal sinus diseases. Appropriate frame conditions provided, the respective procedures are safe and successful. These prerequisites encompass appropriate technical equipment, anatomical oriented surgical technique, proper patient selection, and individually adapted extent of surgery. The range of endonasal sinus operations has dramatically increased during the last 20 years and reaches from partial uncinectomy to pansinus surgery with extended surgery of the frontal (Draf type III), maxillary (grade 3–4, medial maxillectomy, prelacrimal approach) and sphenoid sinus. In addition there are operations outside and beyond the paranasal sinuses. The development of surgical technique is still constantly evolving. This article gives a comprehensive review on the most recent state of the art in endoscopic sinus surgery according to the literature with the following aspects: principles and fundamentals, surgical techniques, indications, outcome, postoperative care, nasal packing and stents, technical equipment. PMID:26770282

  10. Sphenoid sinus barotrauma after scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Hyeok; Kim, Kuk; Cho, Seok Hyun; Kim, Kyung Rae

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of an 18-year-old male patient operated on for sphenoid sinus barotrauma after scuba diving. The patient attended our emergency department because of intractable headache but did not improve with conservative treatment. After computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examination, he was diagnosed with sphenoid sinusitis that extended to the nasal septum. He therefore underwent surgery for sinus ventilation and abscess drainage.

  11. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis obscured by midfacial trauma.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Ryškienė, Silvija; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis whose sinonasal symptomatology was thought to be the consequence of a previous midfacial trauma. The patient was admitted to the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery after more than 10 years of exacerbations of sinonasal symptoms, which began to plague soon after a facial contusion. We decided to perform CT of paranasal sinuses, and despite the absence dental symptomatology, the dental origin of sinusitis was discovered. The majority of sinonasal symptoms resolved after appropriate dental treatment, and there was no need for nasal or sinus surgery.

  12. Treatment of chronic sinusitis in a horse with systemic and intra-sinus antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Danielle L; Radtke, Catherine L

    2017-03-01

    A 12-year-old Norwegian Fjord gelding was diagnosed with paranasal sinusitis as a post-operative complication of tooth repulsion surgery. The infection with inspissated purulent material persisted despite sinus trephination and lavage, and systemic antimicrobial therapy. Resolution occurred following infusion of a gelatin/penicillin mixture into the right rostral and caudal maxillary sinus.

  13. Dural arteriovenous fistula in the falx cerebri treated with transarterial embolization using n-butyl cyanoacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Masaomi; Kobayashi, Tamaki; Oda, Masashi; Narumi, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Background: A dural arteriovenous fistula in the falx cerebri is a relatively rare lesion, with only two cases reported till date. One was treated with direct surgery, and the other was followed-up conservatively. Advances in catheter design and embolic materials have made safe and curative transarterial embolization of dural arteriovenous fistulas possible in the current era. Case Description: We describe a 67-year-old man with left putaminal hemorrhage who was diagnosed with an arteriovenous fistula in the anterior part of the falx cerebri that was treated with curative transarterial glue embolization through the middle meningeal artery by using n-butyl cyanoacrylate. Conclusion: Although the procedure was safely performed, understanding the potential risks of the migration of embolic materials into the ophthalmic and anterior cerebral artery system is mandatory. PMID:28144483

  14. [Unknown intracerebral tumour presenting as brainstem compression following unintentional dural puncture].

    PubMed

    Castro-Castro, J; Figueiredo-González, O; Río-Gómez, A; Carballo-Loureiro, N; Castro-Bouzas, D

    2014-01-01

    A 36-year old primigravid of 41 weeks gestation was admitted to the labour ward. Her past medical history included hyperemesis gravidarum and migraine. An accidental dural puncture occurred during labour epidural analgesia. In the postpartum period she presented with continuous headache, and was treated with oral analgesics, oral caffeine, fluid therapy, and tetracosactide. She refused an epidural blood patch. On the seventh day postpartum, the patient was re-admitted to the Emergency Department with decreased level of consciousness and signs of brainstem compression. Cranial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a posterior fossa tumour. An emergency craniotomy was performed with complete neurological recovery. This case emphasises the need to consider the differential diagnoses of post-dural puncture headache and to highlight the warning signs in patients who do not respond despite treatment with conventional therapy.

  15. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Heit, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis can affect any venous circulation. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes deep-vein thrombosis of the leg or pelvis, and its complication, pulmonary embolism. VTE is a fairly common disease, particularly in older age, and is associated with reduced survival, substantial health-care costs, and a high rate of recurrence. VTE is a complex (multifactorial) disease, involving interactions between acquired or inherited predispositions to thrombosis and various risk factors. Major risk factors for incident VTE include hospitalization for surgery or acute illness, active cancer, neurological disease with leg paresis, nursing-home confinement, trauma or fracture, superficial vein thrombosis, and—in women—pregnancy and puerperium, oral contraception, and hormone therapy. Although independent risk factors for incident VTE and predictors of VTE recurrence have been identified, and effective primary and secondary prophylaxis is available, the occurrence of VTE seems to be fairly constant, or even increasing. PMID:26076949

  16. Doppler ultrasound study and venous mapping in chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    García Carriazo, M; Gómez de las Heras, C; Mármol Vázquez, P; Ramos Solís, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency of the lower limbs is very prevalent. In recent decades, Doppler ultrasound has become the method of choice to study this condition, and it is considered essential when surgery is indicated. This article aims to establish a method for the examination, including venous mapping and preoperative marking. To this end, we review the venous anatomy of the lower limbs and the pathophysiology of chronic venous insufficiency and explain the basic hemodynamic concepts and the terminology required to elaborate a radiological report that will enable appropriate treatment planning and communication with other specialists. We briefly explain the CHIVA (the acronym for the French term "cure conservatrice et hémodynamique de l'insuffisance veineuse en ambulatoire"=conservative hemodynamic treatment for chronic venous insufficiency) strategy, a minimally invasive surgical strategy that aims to restore correct venous hemodynamics without resecting the saphenous vein.

  17. Venous Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Alejandra; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-08-02

    This issue provides a clinical overview of venous leg ulcers, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  18. Treating Sinusitis: Don't Rush to Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... AAAAI) Treating Sinusitis (AAAAI) Don’t rush to antibiotics DOWNLOAD PDF The sinuses are small, hollow spaces ... or teeth. Each year, millions of people use antibiotic drugs to treat sinus problems. However, they usually ...

  19. How Are Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nasal cavity or ethmoid sinuses. T categories for maxillary sinus cancer TX: Primary (main) tumor cannot be ... the nose from the brain), and/or the maxillary sinus. T4a: Tumor has grown into other structures ...

  20. Sinus Pain: Can Over-the-Counter Medications Help?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Near You Sinus Pain: Can Over-the-Counter Medications Help? Sinus Pain: Can Over-the-Counter Medications ... OTC) medications. What Is The Role Of OTC Medication For Sinus Pain? There are many different OTC ...

  1. A novel equine-derived pericardium membrane for dural repair: A preliminary, short-term investigation

    PubMed Central

    Centonze, Roberto; Agostini, Emiliano; Massaccesi, Samantha; Toninelli, Stefano; Morabito, Letterio

    2016-01-01

    Background: A large variety of biological and artificial materials are employed in dural repair, each of them with major limitations. Autologous grafts have limited availability and require an additional incision and surgical time. Cadaveric preparations and heterologous materials entail the risk of iatrogenic transmission of prions, whereas synthetic substitutes have been reported to cause inflammatory reactions and graft rejection. An equine-derived pericardium membrane has been developed (Heart®, Bioteck, Vicenza, Italy) with mechanical and safety-related features that could make it suitable for neurosurgical application. Aims: This preliminary study aimed to evaluate the short-term safety and efficacy of the Heart® membrane in dural repair procedures following meningioma surgeries. Subjects and Methods: Medical records of patients who were surgically treated for an intracranial meningioma and underwent duraplasty with the Heart® membrane were reviewed retrospectively. The occurrence of any graft-related complications such as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, postoperative hematoma, wound infection, meningitis, and neurological symptoms was analyzed. Results: Eight patients were identified as meeting the inclusion criteria. A watertight closure was achieved in all of them. Postoperatively, no patients exhibited CSF leak, cerebral contusion, hemorrhage, or wound infection. The 1-month radiological follow-up revealed no evidence of pseudomeningocele, wound breakdown, or meningitis. Neurologic complications were observed in three patients but not directly imputable to the dural substitute or its application. Conclusions: In all the patients, the pericardium membrane enabled achievement of a watertight dural closure without graft-related adverse events. Further investigations should be performed to assess medium- and long-term clinical outcomes in a larger set of patients. PMID:27366245

  2. Persistent post-dural-puncture headache treated with epidural infusion of dextran.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A

    1994-05-01

    A retrospective review was done on medical records of 13 patients with persistent post-dural-puncture headaches after one or more epidural blood patches. Headache occurred in nine patients with post-laminectomy syndrome after "wet taps" while performing epidural blocks. In two patients post-dural-puncture headache appeared after long term implanted intrathecal catheters were removed. In two other cases headache developed after spinal anesthesia. Treatment included bed rest, intravenous hydration and at least one epidural blood patch; three patients were given 60 milliliters of epidural saline, without success. Eight epidural catheters were inserted through the lumbar access and five through the caudal approach. Initially, a bolus of 20 milliliters of dextran-40 was given followed by an infusion of 3 mL/hr, until 12 hours after the head pain and any other related symptoms subsided. In all patients the headache disappeared within 20 hours after initiating therapy (9.55 mean hours, SD +/- 0.79). In five patients headache ceased in less than five hours. Nausea and photo-phobia subsided earlier. Patients with post-dural-puncture headache resistant to other treatments, including at least one epidural blood patch, were successfully treated by a bolus followed by continuous epidural infusion of dextran-40.

  3. A New Absorbable Synthetic Substitute With Biomimetic Design for Dural Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhidong; Xu, Tao; Yuan, Yuyu; Deng, Kunxue; Liu, Man; Ke, Yiquan; Luo, Chengyi; Yuan, Tun; Ayyad, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Dural repair products are evolving from animal tissue-derived materials to synthetic materials as well as from inert to absorbable features; most of them lack functional and structural characteristics compared with the natural dura mater. In the present study, we evaluated the properties and tissue repair performance of a new dural repair product with biomimetic design. The biomimetic patch exhibits unique three-dimensional nonwoven microfiber structure with good mechanical strength and biocompatibility. The animal study showed that the biomimetic patch and commercially synthetic material group presented new subdural regeneration at 90 days, with low level inflammatory response and minimal to no adhesion formation detected at each stage. In the biological material group, no new subdural regeneration was observed and severe adhesion between the implant and the cortex occurred at each stage. In clinical case study, there was no cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and all the postoperation observations were normal. The biomimetic structure and proper rate of degradation of the new absorbable dura substitute can guide the meaningful reconstruction of the dura mater, which may provide a novel approach for dural defect repair.

  4. Dural repair using autologous fat: Our experience and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Di Vitantonio, Hambra; De Paulis, Danilo; Del Maestro, Mattia; Ricci, Alessandro; Dechordi, Soheila Raysi; Marzi, Sara; Millimaggi, Daniele F.; Galzio, Renato J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various materials have been proposed to obliterate dead spaces and to reconstruct dural defects during a neurosurgical approach. This study describes our technique of using the abdominal autologous fat graft and evaluates the complications and characteristics related to the use of this tissue during cranial procedures. Methods: Autologous fat grafts were used in 296 patients with basicranial and convexity extraaxial tumors from April 2005 to January 2015. The adipose tissue was removed from the paraumbilical abdominal region and was transformed into a thin foil. When possible, a watertight suture was made between the dural or bone edge with a fat graft. We always used fibrin glue to reinforce the dural closure. Results: Complications occurred between 2 days and 1 year following procedure. Cerebrospinal fluid leaks were found in 11 cases. No case of mortality, pseudomeningoceles, fistula, infections, bacterial meningitides, or lipoid meningitides was reported. No patient required removal of the graft. No adhesion was observed between the brain and the autologous fat. Other fat-related complications observed were 2 cases of fat necrosis in the abdomen and 2 cases of abdominal hemorrhage. Conclusion: The technique of harvesting and applying fat grafts is fairly simple, although it must be performed meticulously to be effective. Our experience has led us to believe that the use of fat grafts presents low morbidity and mortality. However, a neurosurgeon should never forget the possible late or early complications related to the use of fat grafts. PMID:27500007

  5. Radially aligned, electrospun nanofibers as dural substitutes for wound closure and tissue regeneration applications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingwei; Macewan, Matthew R; Ray, Wilson Z; Liu, Wenying; Siewe, Daku Y; Xia, Younan

    2010-09-28

    This paper reports the fabrication of scaffolds consisting of radially aligned poly(ε-caprolactone) nanofibers by utilizing a collector composed of a central point electrode and a peripheral ring electrode. This novel class of scaffolds was able to present nanoscale topographic cues to cultured cells, directing and enhancing their migration from the periphery to the center. We also established that such scaffolds could induce faster cellular migration and population than nonwoven mats consisting of random nanofibers. Dural fibroblast cells cultured on these two types of scaffolds were found to express type I collagen, the main extracellular matrix component in dural mater. The type I collagen exhibited a high degree of organization on the scaffolds of radially aligned fibers and a haphazard distribution on the scaffolds of random fibers. Taken together, the scaffolds based on radially aligned, electrospun nanofibers show great potential as artificial dural substitutes and may be particularly useful as biomedical patches or grafts to induce wound closure and/or tissue regeneration.

  6. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids

  7. Pseudomeningoceles of the sphenoid sinus masquerading as sinus pathology

    PubMed Central

    Vaezi, Alec; Snyderman, Carl H.; Saleh, Hesham A.; Carrau R., Ricardo L.; Zanation, Adam; Gardner, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical presentation, pathophysiology and treatment of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks of the sphenoid bone, with an emphasis on a previously undescribed form in this location, in which CSF is trapped under the mucosa of the sinonasal cavity or in the soft tissue of the skull base. Study design Case series and literature review. Level of evidence 4. Methods Analysis of cases through medical records and literature review. Results Four examples of unusual spontaneous CSF leaks of the skull base are presented. In each case, a CSF collection was contained behind the sinonasal mucosa of the sphenoid sinus, resembling a nasal polyp or mucocele on exam or imaging. In one case, the fluid collection was also associated with significant bone resorption and extravasation into the soft tissue of the infratemporal fossa. In each case, small defects of the ventral skull base (sphenoid bone) were the source of the CSF leaks. Successful treatment was achieved after transnasal endoscopic repair of the skull base defects using a combination of free abdominal fat grafts, free fascial grafts and pedicled nasoseptal flaps. Postoperatively, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was placed if the intracranial pressure was elevated. Conclusions Spontaneous CSF leaks arising in the sphenoid sinus may not always present with overt CSF rhinorrhea but with a submucosal fluid collection (pseudomeningocele) that may mimic a mucocoele or nasal polyp. These bona fide pseudomeningoceles of the skull base may be associated with elevated intracranial pressure and can be managed using endoscopic endonasal surgery. PMID:22052361

  8. Cavernous sinus thrombosis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    López, Fernando; Santamarta, Elena; Martínez, Patricia; Sáiz-Ayala, Antonio; Llorente, José L

    2017-04-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) represents a rare but devastating disease process that may be associated with significant long-term patient morbidity or mortality. Rapid diagnosis and aggressive medical and surgical management are imperative for patients with CST. We present the case of a 24-year-old pregnant woman with intraorbital abscess and CST secondary to Streptococcus milleri. Surgical intervention included orbital abscess drainage and dental extraction, medical therapy included intravenous antibiotic, heparin, and methylprednisolone and an elective cesarean section was performed. The latter was the key point to resolution the disease.

  9. Allergic fungal sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    Thorp, Brian D; McKinney, Kibwei A; Rose, Austin S; Ebert, Charles S

    2012-06-01

    Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) is a subtype of eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) characterized by type I hypersensitivity, nasal polyposis, characteristic computed tomography scan findings, eosinophilic mucus, and the presence of fungus on surgical specimens without evidence of tissue invasion. This refractory subtype of CRS is of the great interest in the pediatric population, given the relatively early age of onset and the difficulty in managing AFS through commercially available medical regimens. Almost universally, a diagnosis of AFS requires operative intervention. Postoperative adjuvant medical therapy is a mainstay in the treatment paradigm of pediatric AFS.

  10. Isolated lateral sinus thrombosis presenting as cerebellar infarction in a patient with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Park, Kyung-Jae; Chung, Yong-Gu; Kang, Shin-Hyuk

    2013-07-01

    As a rare cerebrovascular disease, cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is caused by various conditions including trauma, infection, oral contraceptive, cancer and hematologic disorders. However, iron deficiency anemia is not a common cause for CVT in adult. Posterior fossa infarction following CVT is not well demonstrated because posterior fossa has abundant collateral vessels. Here, we report a case of a 55-year-old man who was admitted with complaints of headache, nausea, and mild dizziness. The patient was diagnosed with isolated lateral sinus thrombosis presenting as cerebellar infarction. Laboratory findings revealed normocytic normochromic anemia due to iron deficiency, and the patient's symptoms were improved after iron supplementation.

  11. Compression therapy for venous disease.

    PubMed

    Attaran, Robert R; Ochoa Chaar, Cassius I

    2017-03-01

    For centuries, compression therapy has been utilized to treat venous disease. To date it remains the mainstay of therapy, particularly in more severe forms such as venous ulceration. In addition to mechanisms of benefit, we discuss the evidence behind compression therapy, particularly hosiery, in various forms of venous disease of the lower extremities. We review compression data for stand-alone therapy, post-intervention, as DVT prevention, post-thrombotic syndrome and venous ulcer disease. We also review the data comparing compression modalities as well as the use of compression in mixed arteriovenous disease.

  12. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration.

  13. The venous drainage of the heart in porcupines (Hystrix cristata).

    PubMed

    Atalar, O; Yilmaz, S; Dinç, G; Ozdemir, D

    2004-08-01

    The venous drainage of the heart in porcupines (Hystrix cristata) was investigated. Each of the five adult porcupines (three males, two females) was injected with a coloured latex mixture via the V. cava caudalis for the demonstration of the cardiac veins. The dissection of the specimens revealed that the venous drainage of the heart in porcupines was made by the V. cordis magna, V. distalis ventriculi sinistri, V. proximalis ventriculi sinistri, V. cordis caudalis (the left marginal vein), V. cordis media and Vv. cordis dextrae. The cardiac veins were observed in a subepicardial course on the heart except for the R. interventricularis paraconalis. The R. interventricularis paraconalis showed an intramyocardial course until the middle of the sulcus interventricularis paraconalis, and a subepicardial course after this point. The V. cordis magna and V. distalis ventriculi sinistri opened to the sinus coronarius. The V. cordis caudalis and the V. cordis media drained into the V. cava caudalis. The venous drainage of the conus arteriosus was made by the left V. coni arteriosi opening to the R. interventricularis paraconalis, and by the right V. coni arteriosi which continued to the Vv. cordis dextrae.

  14. Maxillary sinus hemangioma: MR and CT studies.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, M V; Bonner, F M; Abdo, G J

    1989-01-01

    A maxillary sinus hemangioma was detected as an incidental finding during magnetic resonance imaging of the head. The CT findings are more characteristic for the diagnosis of this lesion. Preoperative diagnosis of maxillary sinus hemangioma is important since these lesions can frequently cause a large amount of hemorrhage during surgery.

  15. Paranasal sinus mucoceles: our clinical experiments

    PubMed Central

    Topdag, Murat; Iseri, Mete; Sari, Fatih; Erdogan, Selvet; Keskin, I Gurkan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We present the clinical and radiological features, treatment protocols, and medium-long-term results of our patients following surgery for paranasal sinus mucocele, along with a review of the relevant literature. Materials and methods: A total of 18 patients (11 women and 7 men) who underwent surgery for paranasal sinus mucocele at Kocaeli University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, between 2006 and 2013 were examined retrospectively. The mean patient age was 41 (range 4-73). Demographic and radiological features, symptoms, treatment protocols, and postoperative outcomes were recorded. Results: The most frequently affected sinus was the maxillary sinus (n=9, 50%) followed by the frontal sinus (n=6, 33%) and sphenoidal sinus (n=3, 16%). The main symptom was headache. Endoscopic marsupialization of the mucocele was applied in all 18 patients, while frontal sinus exploration with the osteoplastic flap procedure was performed in one patient and the Caldwell-Luc operation was performed in another patient. The Caldwell-Luc procedure was subsequently required in one patient (6%) and endoscopic revision surgery was required in another patient (6%). Conclusion: Sinus mucocele that enlarges, eroding the surrounding bone tissue, and induces various clinical symptoms due to the impression of the expansile mass, is treated surgically, and must be planned carefully to prevent serious complications. PMID:26770462

  16. Cholesterol granuloma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ting-Kuang

    2006-06-01

    Cholesterol granuloma (CG) of the maxillary sinus is very rare. In this study, the searching of the literature was performed with the keywords of cholesterol granuloma and maxillary sinus. All retrieved literature were reviewed throughout to identify and analyze all individual characteristics. Two additional cases in our hospital were also included. The result showed that, in the overall 37 cases, the ratio of male to female was about 3:1. Caucasian (14/37) and Turkish (10/37) were reported more frequently. CG of maxillary sinus had an opposite sex predilection compared with the fungus balls of the maxillary sinus. In addition, the comorbidity of these two diseases was found only in one patient in the literature. These results suggested that the different mechanisms other than poor aeration of the maxillary sinus played a role in the formation of CG of maxillary sinus. The diagnosis for CG of the maxillary sinus before operation is difficult, but the clear golden yellow rhinorrhea and hemorrhagic signs may provide a good diagnostic evidence. The symptoms were vague and about half of the patients presented with non-specific symptoms. Therefore, it seemed reasonable that CG of the maxillary sinus was under diagnosed in the clinical practice. Treatment consists of complete excision via Caldwell-Luc or endoscopic approach and provides a good prognosis. Bilateral involvements are rare but possible in this disease entity.

  17. [Travel and venous thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Hallundbæk Mikkelsen, Kristian; Knudsen, Stine Ulrik; Nannestad Jørgensen, Lars

    2013-10-28

    A literature study on the association between travel and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is conducted. Studies examining the risk of travel-associated VTE, predisposing factors and prophylactic measures are presented. It is concluded that the absolute risk of travel-associated VTE is low and holds a 2-4 fold increase after travel. The risk increases with duration, presence of other risk factors for VTE and extremes of height. Stockings reduces the risk of asymptomatic VTE. Heparin is presumed to constitute protection whereas there is no evidence of a prophylactic effect of acetylsalicylic acid.

  18. Venous thromboembolism and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    D’Uva, Maristella; Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Strina, Ida; De Placido, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, the association between a hypercoagulable state and its causes and adverse pregnancy outcome, in particular recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) has been studied extensively. Although the first studies were focused only on the association between thrombophilia and RPL, subsequent studies underlined also a potential role of antithrombotic treatment to prevent vascular complication such as venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy. Thromboprophylaxis should be considered also for pregnant subjects carriers of molecular thrombophilia or that previously experienced VTE, in order to prevent VTE during pregnancy, while antithrombotic treatment for VTE should be performed during all pregnant periods. PMID:22282678

  19. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and face. You may also need imaging tests. Treatments include antibiotics, decongestants, and pain relievers. Using heat pads on the inflamed area, saline nasal sprays, and vaporizers can also help. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  20. Presentation of Preauricular Sinus and Preauricular Sinus Abscess in Southwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adegbiji, W. A.; Alabi, B. S.; Olajuyin, O. A.; Nwawolo, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Preauricular sinus abscess is a common congenital external ear disease. This abscess is usually misdiagnosed because it is commonly overlooked during physical examination. In Nigeria, the prevalence was 9.3% in Ilorin, north central Nigeria This study is to determine the distribution and clinical presentation of the preauricular sinus abscess in Ekiti, south west Nigeria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a prospective hospital based study of all patients with diagnosis of preauricular sinus abscess seen in our clinic carried out between April 2008 to March 2010. Detailed clinical history, administered interviewer’s assisted questionnaires full examination and. Data obtained were collated and analysed. RESULTS: Preauricular sinus were noticed in 184 (4.4%) out of 4170 patients seen during the study period. Preauricular sinus abscess were noticed in 21 (11.4%) of the preauricular sinuses especially in children. Unilateral preauricular sinus abscess accounted for 90.5%. Common presenting complaints were preauricular swelling (81.0%), 90.5% with recurrent earaches, 76.2% with ear discharges. All patients had antibiotic / analgesic while 17 out of 21 (81.0%) had surgical excisions. CONCLUSION: Preauricular sinus abscess were noticed among 11.4% of the preauricular sinuses especially in children, unilateral preauricular sinus abscess accounted for 90.5%. Common complaints were otorrhoea, earaches, and swelling and they were mostly managed surgically. PMID:24711764

  1. Correlations between anatomic variations of maxillary sinus ostium and postoperative complication after sinus lifting

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The maxillary sinus mucosa is reported to recover to preoperative sterility after sinus floor elevation. However, when drainage of maxillary sinus is impaired, recovery can be delayed and maxillary sinusitis can occur. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the correlations between anatomic variants that can interrupt the ostium of the maxillary sinus and incidence of complication after sinus lifting. Materials and Methods The subjects are 81 patients who underwent sinus lifting in Wonkwang University Dental Hospital (Iksan, Korea). Computed tomography (CT) images of the subjects were reviewed for presence of nasal septum deviation, anatomic variants of the middle turbinate, and Haller cells. Correlations between anatomic variations and occurrence of maxillary sinusitis were statistically analyzed. Results Patients with anatomic variants of ostio-meatal units, such as deviated nasal septum, concha bullosa or paradoxical curvature of the middle turbinate, or Haller cells, showed a higher rate of complication. However, only presence of Haller cell showed statistically significant. Conclusion Before sinus lifting, CT images are recommended to detect anatomic variants of the ostio-meatal complex. If disadvantageous anatomic variants are detected, the use of nasal decongestants should be considered to reduce the risk of postoperative sinusitis. PMID:27847736

  2. Pathophysiology of chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Raffetto, J D; Mannello, F

    2014-06-01

    Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a debilitating condition with a prevalence between 60-70%. The disease pathophysiology is complex and involves genetic susceptibility and environmental factors, with individuals developing visible telengiectasias, reticular veins, and varicose veins. Patient with significant lower extremity symptoms have pain, dermal irritation, swelling, skin changes, and are at risk of developing debilitating venous ulceration. The signature of CVD is an increase in venous pressure referred to as venous hypertension. The various symptoms presenting in CVD and the clinical signs that are observed indicate that there is inflammation, secondary to venous hypertension, and it leads to a number of inflammatory pathways that become activated. The endothelium and glycocalyx via specialized receptors are critical at sensing changes in shear stress, and expression of adhesion molecules allows the activation of leukocytes leading to endothelial attachment, diapedisis, and transmigration into the venous wall/valves resulting in venous wall injury and inflammatory cells in the interstitial tissues. There is a complex of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, proteases and proteinases, produced by activated leukocytes, that are expressed and unbalanced resulting in an environment of persistent inflammation with the clinical changes that are commonly seen, consisting of varicose veins to more advanced presentations of skin changes and venous ulceration. The structural integrity of protein and the extracellular matrix is altered, enhancing the progressive events of CVD. Work focusing on metabolic changes, miRNA regulation, inflammatory modulation and the glycocalyx will further our knowledge in the pathophysiology of CVD, and provide answers critical to treatment and prevention.

  3. Transcutaneous Drainage of Gel-Like Substance after Application of Hydrogel Dural Sealant: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Siman, Homayoun; Techy, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Incidental durotomy (IDT) is a common complication of spinal surgery. The use of collagen matrix graft along with hydrogel dural sealant is a common method of IDT repair. With this method, there have been several reported cases of detrimental dural sealant expansion in the literature. One case study reported an expansion rate greater than 300%; many report neurologic damage. This article reports the clinical course of two patients who developed postoperative transcutaneous drainage of a gel-like substance after the use of a dural sealant, which is a previously unreported complication. Methods The clinical course and treatment outcome of two patients is presented. Results Both patients experienced postoperative transcutaneous drainage of a gel-like substance at the surgical site. Case one began draining this substance on postoperative day 14. This patient required no further intervention, and the drainage ended after 3 mL of a gel-like substance was expressed from his incision while in the clinic. Case two began draining the gel on postoperative day 16. This patient underwent two washout procedures and resolution of the drainage. No infection was ever detected. Conclusions To our knowledge, our patients are the first reported cases of transcutaneous drainage of expanded dural sealant. It is important to take into consideration the unexpected expansion of a dural sealant when using it for the repair of IDT. PMID:26835216

  4. Imaging of venous compression syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ganguli, Suvranu; Ghoshhajra, Brian B.; Gupta, Rajiv; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Venous compression syndromes are a unique group of disorders characterized by anatomical extrinsic venous compression, typically in young and otherwise healthy individuals. While uncommon, they may cause serious complications including pain, swelling, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism, and post-thrombotic syndrome. The major disease entities are May-Thurner syndrome (MTS), variant iliac vein compression syndrome (IVCS), venous thoracic outlet syndrome (VTOS)/Paget-Schroetter syndrome, nutcracker syndrome (NCS), and popliteal venous compression (PVC). In this article, we review the key clinical features, multimodality imaging findings, and treatment options of these disorders. Emphasis is placed on the growing role of noninvasive imaging options such as magnetic resonance venography (MRV) in facilitating early and accurate diagnosis and tailored intervention. PMID:28123973

  5. [Compound odontoma as a cause of chronic maxillary sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Crespo Del Hierro, Jorge; Ruiz González, Manuel; Delgado Portela, Margarita; García Del Castillo, Eduardo; Crespo Serrano, Juan

    2008-01-01

    Sinusitis of dental origin is a relatively frequent entity, but the presence of an odontoma in the sinus as a source of this pathology is exceptional. Here we present a case of a young patient who presented chronic maxillary sinusitis over 2 years, originating in an odontoma located in the sinus drainage area.

  6. Exostoses and cavernous venous formation in the external auditory canal of the hooded seal as a functional physiological organ.

    PubMed

    Stenfors, L E; Sade, J; Hellström, S; Anniko, M; Folkow, L

    2000-10-01

    Exostoses of the external auditory canal (EAC) develop after protracted mechanical, chemical or thermal irritation in particular. This is a common disorder among aquatic sportsmen and has been considered unique to Man. We dissected and photodocumented the EACs of 5 newborn and 3 adult Hooded Seals (Cystophora cristata). Serial sections of the EACs were prepared for light microscopic evaluation after staining with haematoxylin-eosin or toluidine blue. All EACs exhibited a firm, broad-based. mountain peak-shaped exostosis on the floor of the meatus, lateral to the eardrum. In addition, the meatal skin of the bony EAC harboured large venous sinuses. The exostosis and venous sinuses of the seal EAC participate in the protection of the sensitive hearing apparatus, particularly the pars tensa portion of the drum, during divine.

  7. Isolated sphenoid sinus lesion: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Alazzawi, Sarmad; Shahrizal, Tengku; Prepageran, Narayanan; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Isolated sphenoid sinus lesions are an uncommon entity and present with non-specific symptoms. In this case report, the patient presented with a history of headaches for a duration of one month without sinonasal symptoms. A computed tomography scan showed a soft tissue mass occupying the sphenoid sinus. An endoscopic biopsy revealed fungal infection. Endoscopic wide sphenoidotomy with excision of the sphenoid sinus lesion was then performed however, the microbiological examination post-surgery did not show any fungal elements. Instead, Citrobacter species was implicated to be the cause of infection. PMID:25320694

  8. Chronic Cutaneous Draining Sinus of Dental Origin

    PubMed Central

    Sisodia, N; Manjunath, MK

    2014-01-01

    Extra oral sinus of odontogenic origin occurs when the purulent by-products of dental pulp necrosis spread along the path of least resistance from the root apex to the skin on the face. Patients presenting with cutaneous sinus usually visit a general physician or dermatologist first, as the lesion can mimic various dermatologic pathologies, ranging from an infected sebaceous cysts to a basal cell carcinoma. Despite systemic antibiotics, symptoms often persist causing further confusion, and at times leading to unnecessary surgical interventions. The location of this sinus in the head and neck region should lead the physician to seek a dental opinion in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:25506495

  9. A Rational Approach to Sinus Augmentation: The Low Window Sinus Lift

    PubMed Central

    Zaniol, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Sinus augmentation is a well-known approach to treating alveolar bone ridge atrophy in the posterior maxilla. The preparation of the lateral window is crucial. Its size, design, and position in the vestibular sinus wall may affect the intra- and postsurgical complication rates and affect the intrasurgical activity of both surgeons and assistants. The present paper describes a rational technique that also exploits the guided surgery approach for design and preparation of a lateral window for sinus augmentation, the Low Window Sinus Lift. To illustrate the use of this approach, a case is presented in which the 50-year-old patient had the left maxillary first molar extracted, followed two months later by sinus augmentation and placement of three implants. One year after delivery of the definitive prosthesis, all three implants were successful, and the prosthesis was fully functional. Controlled studies should be undertaken to assess whether this technique provides significant advantages compared to other sinus augmentation approaches. PMID:28337349

  10. Cardiac resynchronization therapy with special focus on patency of coronary sinus and its branches: conceptual viewpoint and semi-theoretical considerations on lead-induced obstruction.

    PubMed

    Stirbys, Petras

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy appears to be useful for patients with severe chronic congestive heart failure. However, many questions still arise concerning the effectiveness of this kind of therapy since hemodynamic improvement is not observed in all patients. Heterogeneity of conclusions reported by several multicenter clinical trials and prominent experts demonstrates that many uncertainties related to cardiac resynchronization therapy still exist. We tried to reveal some inadequacies in clinical results by focusing on cardiac venous blood return which is likely complicated by the presence of lead inside the coronary sinus and its branches. Downstream traversing lead may occlude (partially or completely) the ostia of minor tributaries and target vein of lead final positioning. Thrombosis may also be incited within the coronary sinus itself. Remaining lumen predetermined by the lead body and subsequent thrombosis may be insufficient to provide adequate blood flow. Resulting detrimental venous return presumably may slightly depress myocardial contractility which may be significant in very sensitive group of patients assigned to the New York Heart Association class III or IV. Cardiac venous blood pumping conditions (or venous drainage) are likely also complicated by abnormal activation of left ventricle. The contributory role of these two subtle causes unfavorably influencing venous drainage is still unknown. It may be treated as a hypothetical attempt to find the clue and needs future studies for verification.

  11. Effects of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists on rat dural artery diameter in an intravital microscopy model

    PubMed Central

    Chan, KY; Gupta, S; de Vries, R; Danser, AHJ; Villalón, CM; Muñoz-Islas, E; Maassen Van Den Brink, A

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: During migraine, trigeminal nerves may release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), inducing cranial vasodilatation and central nociception; hence, trigeminal inhibition or blockade of craniovascular CGRP receptors may prevent this vasodilatation and abort migraine headache. Several preclinical studies have shown that glutamate receptor antagonists affect the pathophysiology of migraine. This study investigated whether antagonists of NMDA (ketamine and MK801), AMPA (GYKI52466) and kainate (LY466195) glutamate receptors affected dural vasodilatation induced by α-CGRP, capsaicin and periarterial electrical stimulation in rats, using intravital microscopy. Experimental approach: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized and the overlying bone was thinned to visualize the dural artery. Then, vasodilator responses to exogenous (i.v. α-CGRP) and endogenous (released by i.v. capsaicin and periarterial electrical stimulation) CGRP were elicited in the absence or presence of the above antagonists. Key results: α-CGRP, capsaicin and periarterial electrical stimulation increased dural artery diameter. Ketamine and MK801 inhibited the vasodilator responses to capsaicin and electrical stimulation, while only ketamine attenuated those to α-CGRP. In contrast, GYKI52466 only attenuated the vasodilatation to exogenous α-CGRP, while LY466195 did not affect the vasodilator responses to endogenous or exogenous CGRP. Conclusions and implications: Although GYKI52466 has not been tested clinically, our data suggest that it would not inhibit migraine via vascular mechanisms. Similarly, the antimigraine efficacy of LY466195 seems unrelated to vascular CGRP-mediated pathways and/or receptors. In contrast, the cranial vascular effects of ketamine and MK801 may represent a therapeutic mechanism, although the same mechanism might contribute, peripherally, to cardiovascular side effects. PMID:20590623

  12. In situ precise electrospinning of medical glue fibers as nonsuture dural repair with high sealing capability and flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Fu-Yan; Dong, Rui-Hua; Li, Zhao-Jian; Qin, Chong-Chong; Yan, Xu; He, Xiao-Xiao; Zhou, Yu; Yan, Shi-Ying; Long, Yun-Ze

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In this work, we propose an in situ precise electrospinning of medical glue fibers onto dural wound for improving sealing capability, avoiding tissue adhesion, and saving time in dural repair. Methods N-octyl-2-cyanoacrylate, a commercial tissue adhesive (medical glue), can be electrospun into ultrathin fibrous film with precise and homogeneous deposition by a gas-assisted electrospinning device. Results The self-assembled N-octyl-2-cyanoacrylate film shows high compactness and flexibility owing to its fibrous structure. Simulation experiments on egg membranes and goat meninges demonstrated that this technology can repair small membrane defects quickly and efficiently. Conclusion This method may have potential application in dural repair, for example, working as an effective supplementary technique for conventional dura suture. PMID:27621616

  13. Anesthesia considerations and intraoperative monitoring during surgery for arteriovenous malformations and dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christina; Mirski, Marek

    2012-01-01

    The anesthetic considerations for surgical resection of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) incorporate many principles that are common to craniotomies for other indications. However, a high-flow, low-resistance shunt results in chronic hypoperfusion of adjacent brain tissue that is vulnerable to ischemia and at high risk for hyperemia and hemorrhage as resection of the lesion redirects blood flow. A comprehensive understanding of AVM pathophysiology and rapidly titratable anesthetic and vasoactive agents allow the anesthesiologist to alter blood pressure targets as resection evolves for optimal patient outcome. Intensive management is continued post-operatively as the brain acclimatizes to new parameters.

  14. A Case of Arterial and Venous Tear during Single Lead Extraction.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael S; Wu, Daniel; Patel, Vishal; Tariq, Rayhan

    2016-01-01

    Transcutaneous lead extraction can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The risk of causing concomitant arterial and venous injury is rare. We report a case of marginal artery rupture with coronary sinus rupture after a CS lead extraction. A 71-year-old male was admitted for extraction of a 6-year-old implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead due to fracture from insulation break. During the lead extraction, blood pressure fell precipitously and echocardiographic findings were consistent with pericardial effusion. After unsuccessful pericardiocentesis, open chest sternotomy and evacuation of hematoma was performed. Subsequent surgical repair of several injuries was completed including the distal coronary sinus, a large degloving injury of posterior portion of the heart, and first obtuse marginal branch bleed. This case demonstrates that when performing transcutaneous lead extraction (TLE) with laser sheath, a degloving injury can cause arterial rupture with concomitant coronary sinus injury. A multidisciplinary team-based approach can ensure patient safety. Learning Objective. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator leads will falter over time. With the advancement of new technology for extraction more frequent and serious complications will occur. Active fixation CS leads present unique challenges. In the presence of hemodynamic changes during extraction the occurrence of both an arterial and venous injury must be considered.

  15. Hyperhomocysteinaemia and chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Stefano; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Longo, Paola; Buffone, Gianluca; Molinari, Vincenzo; Stillitano, Domenico M; Gallelli, Luca; Serra, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Chronic venous ulceration (CVU) is the major cause of chronic wounds of lower extremities, and is a part of the complex of chronic venous disease. Previous studies have hypothesised that several thrombophilic factors, such as hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy), may be associated with chronic venous ulcers. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of HHcy in patients with venous leg ulcers and the effect of folic acid therapy on wound healing. Eighty-seven patients with venous leg ulcers were enrolled in this study to calculate the prevalence of HHcy in this population. All patients underwent basic treatment for venous ulcer (compression therapy ± surgical procedures). Patients with HHcy (group A) received basic treatment and administered folic acid (1·2 mg/day for 12 months) and patients without HHcy (group B) received only basic treatment. Healing was assessed by means of computerised planimetry analysis. The prevalence of HHcy among patients with chronic venous ulcer enrolled in this study was 62·06%. Healing rate was significantly higher (P < 0·05) in group A patients (78·75%) compared with group B patients (63·33%). This study suggests a close association, statistically significant, between HHcy and CVU. Homocysteine-lowering therapy with folic acid seems to expedite wound healing. Despite these aspects, the exact molecular mechanisms between homocysteine and CVU have not been clearly defined and further studies are needed.

  16. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS--MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF DIFFUSE LEPTOMENINGEAL OLIGODENDROGLIOMATOSIS IN A DOG WITH "DURAL TAIL SIGN".

    PubMed

    Lobacz, Monika Anna; Serra, Fabienne; Hammond, Gawain; Oevermann, Anna; Haley, Allison C

    2016-11-04

    A case of diffuse leptomeningeal oligodendrogliomatosis affecting the brain and spinal cord of a dog is presented. A 7.5-year old, male neutered Staffordshire bull terrier presented for evaluation of a chronic history of tetraparesis and seizures, with a multifocal neuroanatomical localization was determined. Extra-axial intradural lesions with an atypical presentation of a dural tail sign were seen on MRI. Histologically, the lesions were consistent with leptomeningeal oligodendrogliomatosis. To the authors' knowledge, a dural tail sign has not previously been reported as an MRI characteristic of diffuse leptomeningeal oligodendrogliomatosis in dogs.

  17. Sympathoinhibition and hypotension in carotid sinus hypersensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity is a known cause of syncope in humans. The condition is characterized by cardioinhibition and vasodepression, each to varying degrees. The extent and importance of sympathoinhibition has not been determined in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity. This study reports on the extent of sympathoinhibition measured directly directly during carotid massage with and without atrioventricular sequential pacing, in a patient with symptomatic carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity. Carotid massage elicited asystole, hypotension and complete inhibition of muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Carotid massage during atrioventricular pacing produced similar sympathoinhibition, but with minimal hypotension. Therefore, sympathoinhibition did not contribute importantly to the hypotension during carotid massage in the supine position in this patient. Further investigations are required to elucidate the relation of sympathoinhibition to hypotension in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity in the upright position.

  18. Palatal sinus elevation revisited: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Rudolf; Wagner, Florian; Ewers, Rolf; Ulm, Christian

    2013-08-01

    The palatal sinus lift is a good choice for patients with scarred buccal soft tissue and those with poor wound healing such as smokers or diabetics or when visual side effects such as swelling must be concealed. We provide a surgical protocol for palatal sinus lifting without a vertical release incision. The incision is started in a slightly palatal aspect, at the distal end of the dental arch, and describes a curve laterally on the alveolar crest while running in a mesial direction. As a marginal incision, it can continue to the central incisor. Submucosal exposure will lift the gum and the greater palatine artery. After insertion of a tongue depressor, the sinus is opened on the palatal side, opposite the zygomaticoalveolar crest, using a rose bur or a piezotome. After sinus augmentation, the incision is easy to close, and the wound will heal smoothly.

  19. Frontal sinus recognition for human identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falguera, Juan Rogelio; Falguera, Fernanda Pereira Sartori; Marana, Aparecido Nilceu

    2008-03-01

    Many methods based on biometrics such as fingerprint, face, iris, and retina have been proposed for person identification. However, for deceased individuals, such biometric measurements are not available. In such cases, parts of the human skeleton can be used for identification, such as dental records, thorax, vertebrae, shoulder, and frontal sinus. It has been established in prior investigations that the radiographic pattern of frontal sinus is highly variable and unique for every individual. This has stimulated the proposition of measurements of the frontal sinus pattern, obtained from x-ray films, for skeletal identification. This paper presents a frontal sinus recognition method for human identification based on Image Foresting Transform and shape context. Experimental results (ERR = 5,82%) have shown the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. The forensic importance of frontal sinus radiographs.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rhonan Ferreira; Prado, Felippe Bevilacqua; Caputo, Isamara Geandra Cavalcanti; Devito, Karina Lopes; Botelho, Tessa de Luscena; Daruge Júnior, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The identification of unidentified human remains through the comparison of antemortem and postmortem radiographs has found wide acceptance in recent years. Reported here is the forensic case of an unidentified adult male who had died as the result of a traffic accident, after which the body was identified by matching images of ante- and postmortem radiographs of the frontal sinus. A general discussion on identification using frontal sinus radiographs is presented, highlighting the reliability of this method, in reference to the uniqueness of the frontal sinus in humans. However, it also notes a few difficulties, especially in reference to the X-ray technique in cases where antemortem radiographs are available and a potentially larger number of anatomical, pathological or traumatic features are present. The comparison of frontal sinus outlines is recommended when it may become necessary to provide quantitative substantiation for forensic identification based on these structures.

  1. Major orbital complications of endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rene, C; Rose, G; Lenthall, R; Moseley, I

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The paranasal sinuses are intimately related to the orbit and consequently sinus disease or surgery may cause severe orbital complications. Complications are rare but can result in serious morbidity, the most devastating of which is severe visual loss.
METHODS—A retrospective review was undertaken of four cases of severe orbital trauma during endoscopic sinus surgery.
RESULTS—All the cases suffered medial rectus damage, one had additional injury to the inferior rectus and oblique, and two patients were blinded as a result of direct damage to the optic nerve or its blood supply.
CONCLUSION—Some ophthalmic complications of endoscopic sinus surgery are highlighted, the mechanisms responsible are discussed, and recommendations for prevention, early recognition, and management are proposed. 

 PMID:11316724

  2. Novel optoacoustic system for noninvasive continuous monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury are a major cause of death for individuals under 50 years of age. In the USA alone, 150,000 patients per year suffer moderate or severe TBI. Moreover, TBI is a major cause of combatrelated death. Monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation is critically important for management of TBI patients because cerebral venous blood oxygenation below 50% results in death or severe neurologic complications. At present, there is no technique for noninvasive, accurate monitoring of this clinically important variable. We proposed to use optoacoustic technique for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation by probing cerebral veins such as the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) and validated it in animal studies. In this work, we developed a novel, medical grade optoacoustic system for continuous, real-time cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring and tested it in human subjects at normal conditions and during hyperventilation to simulate changes that may occur in patients with TBI. We designed and built a highly-sensitive optoacoustic probe for SSS signal detection. Continuous measurements were performed in the near infrared spectral range and the SSS oxygenation absolute values were automatically calculated in real time using a special algorithm developed by our group. Continuous measurements performed at normal conditions and during hyperventilation demonstrated that hyperventilation resulted in approximately 12% decrease of cerebral venous blood oxygenation.

  3. Is Prolactin Measurement of Value during Inferior Petrosal Sinus Sampling in Patients with ACTH-dependent Cushing’s Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S. T.; Nieman, L. K.

    2014-01-01

    Inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) is considered the gold standard test to distinguish between Cushing’s disease (CD) and ectopic ACTH syndrome (EAS). Anomalous venous drainage, abnormal venous anatomy and lack of expertise can lead to false-negative IPSS results and thereby misclassification of patients with ACTH-dependent Cushing’s syndrome. Prolactin measurement during IPSS can improve diagnostic accuracy and decrease false negative results. A baseline prolactin inferior petrosal sinus to peripheral (IPS/P) ratio (ipsilateral to the dominant post-CRH ACTH IPS/P ratio) of 1.8 or more suggests successful catheterization during IPSS. Prolactin-normalized ACTH IPS/P ratios can then be used to differentiate between a pituitary and ectopic source of ACTH. Values ≤ 0.7 are suggestive of EAS and those ≥ 1.3 are indicative of CD but the implication of values between 0.7 and 1.3 remains unclear and needs further investigation. Larger prospective studies are also needed for further evaluation of the role of contralateral prolactin IPS/P ratios, post-CRH prolactin values and prolactin-adjusted ACTH inter-sinus ratios for tumor localization in CD. PMID:23887034

  4. Subpubic sinus: a remnant of cloaca.

    PubMed

    Chou, T D; Chu, C C; Diau, G Y; Chiang, J H

    1995-05-01

    A 14-month-old girl had purulent discharge from a sinus over the subpubic region for 2 weeks. Radiography and voiding cystourethrography revealed a 4.5 cm. long fistula extending to the retropubic region without any connection to the lower urinary tract. The fistula was excised. Histological findings revealed that the fistula had 3 different types of epithelium: stratified squamous, transitional and columnar. Clinical and pathological findings indicated that the sinus was most likely a remnant of the cloaca.

  5. Sinus Venosus Atrial Septal Defect Complicated by Eisenmenger Syndrome and the Role of Vasodilator Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anuwatworn, Amornpol; Bendaly, Edgard; Prescott-Focht, Julia A.; Clark, Richard; Jonsson, Orvar

    2016-01-01

    Sinus venosus atrial septal defect is a rare congenital, interatrial communication defect at the junction of the right atrium and the vena cava. It accounts for 5–10% of cases of all atrial septal defects. Due to the rare prevalence and anatomical complexity, diagnosing sinus venous atrial septal defects poses clinical challenges which may delay diagnosis and treatment. Advanced cardiac imaging studies are useful tools to diagnose this clinical entity and to delineate the anatomy and any associated communications. Surgical correction of the anomaly is the primary treatment. We discuss a 43-year-old Hispanic female patient who presented with dyspnea and hypoxia following a laparoscopic myomectomy. She had been diagnosed with peripartum cardiomyopathy nine years ago at another hospital. Transesophageal echocardiography and computed tomographic angiography of the chest confirmed a diagnosis of sinus venosus atrial septal defect. She was also found to have pulmonary arterial hypertension and Eisenmenger syndrome. During a hemodynamic study, she responded to vasodilator and she was treated with Ambrisentan and Tadalafil. After six months, her symptoms improved and her pulmonary arterial hypertension decreased. We also observed progressive reversal of the right-to-left shunt. This case illustrates the potential benefit of vasodilator therapy in reversing Eisenmenger physiology, which may lead to surgical repair of the atrial septal defect as the primary treatment. PMID:27974976

  6. Venous ulcer: epidemiology, physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Abbade, Luciana P Fernandes; Lastória, Sidnei

    2005-06-01

    This review discusses the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and current therapeutic options for venous ulcer. Venous ulcer is a severe clinical manifestation of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). It is responsible for about 70% of chronic ulcers of the lower limbs. The high prevalence of venous ulcer has a significant socioeconomic impact in terms of medical care, days off work and reduced quality of life. Long-term therapeutics are needed to heal venous ulcers and recurrence is quite common, ranging from 54 to 78%. Thrombophlebitis and trauma with long-term immobilization predisposing to deep venous thrombosis are important risk factors for CVI and venous ulcer. The most recent theories about pathogenesis of venous ulcer have associated it with microcirculatory abnormalities and generation of an inflammatory response. Management of venous leg ulcers is based on understanding the pathogenesis. In recent years novel therapeutic approaches for venous ulcers have offered valuable tools for the management of patients with this disorder.

  7. [A case of cavernous sinus aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Hase, Tomomi; Kurita, Hideharu; Matsumoto, Eiji; Kuroda, Hajime; Hashimoto, Masaaki; Shinoda, Souji

    2013-10-01

    We reported a case of cavernous sinus aspergillosis. A 62-year-old man complained of trigeminal neuralgia in the right V1 region. Neurological examination on admission showed ptosis, loss of light reflex and ophthalmoplegia externa in the right side. MRI enhanced with gadolinium demonstrated sphenoid sinusitis and mass lesion in the right cavernous sinus. MRA revealed right internal carotid artery occlusion. An open biopsy using the extradural temporopolar approach was performed. Pus discharge was observed from the cavernous sinus and histological examination showed hypha of Aspergillus. With early voriconazole treatment, the patient had improvement in headache, ptosis and ophthalmoplegia externa. Cavernous sinus aspergillosis is often found after sphenoiditis. It results in invasion to an internal carotid artery and worsens the patient's prognosis by cerebral infarction, so early diagnosis and treatment are important. We should consider aspergillosis as one of the differential diagnoses of a mass in the cavernous sinus. The epidural approach to this lesion was available to obviate aspergillus dissemination into the medullary cavity.

  8. Configuration of frontal sinuses: A forensic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Jhansi Lakshmi; Jaisanghar, Nallusamy; Elangovan, Somasundaram; Mahaboob, Nazargi; Senthilkumar, Balasubramaniyan; Yoithapprabhunath, Thukanayakanpalayam Ragunathan; Srichinthu, Kenniyan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Identification of an individual whether living or deceased is of paramount importance in maintaining the integrity of the society. A simple, reliable, and efficacious method always finds a way for easier acceptance and inclusion in any discipline. Likewise, identification of an individual using the radiographic frontal sinus patterns is a simple technique which emphasized to conduct the study with a proven result. Objective: The objective of the study is to evaluate the radiographic configurations of frontal sinuses for their uniqueness based on different parameters. Study Group and Methods: Study group consisted of thirty individuals (15 males and 15 females) of age between 20 and 30. Individuals with the history of sinusitis, surgery, or any trauma were not included in the study. Paranasal sinus views were taken using standard exposure parameters, and the radiographs were assessed for their uniqueness. Results: The radiographs were assessed for area size, area asymmetry, superiority of the upper border, outline of the upper border, presence or absence of partial septa and supraorbital cells, and based on these results, a unique code number was assigned to each individual to prove the uniqueness. Conclusion: A frontal sinus comparison is particularly useful when no other means of an individual identification are available. Caution must be taken regarding the physiological and pathological changes (trauma, infection, old age, surgery, etc.) and postmortem changes and about the technical issues while taking a radiograph (distance, angle, orientation of the skull). In spite of all these issues, the configuration of frontal sinus is an excellent individualizing feature. PMID:27829755

  9. Venous complications of pancreatitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Aswani, Yashant; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-31

    Pancreatitis is notorious to cause vascular complications. While arterial complications include pseudoaneurysm formation with a propensity to bleed, venous complications can be quite myriad. Venous involvement in pancreatitis often presents with thrombosis. From time to time case reports and series of unusual venous complications associated with pancreatitis have, however, been described. In this article, we review multitudinous venous complications in the setting of pancreatitis and propose a system to classify pancreatitis associated venous complications.

  10. A potential mechanism of dural ossification in ossification of ligamentum flavum.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Guo, Shigong; Qiu, Guixing; Li, Wenjing; Liu, Yongsheng; Zhao, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) mostly occurs in the thoracic spine, leading to thoracic spinal stenosis. Surgical treatment is considered as the best option for OLF patients. When the dura mater ossifies, the difficulty of surgery and the risk of complications significantly increase. The cause of dural ossification (DO) is still unknown. Based on the existing research and clinical studies, we propose a potential mechanism of DO in OLF. Firstly, with the progression of OLF, it will compress the dura mater and even the spinal cord. Then, with flexion and extension of spine, relative movement (friction) between the ossified ligamentum flavum and compressed dura mater will lead to local inflammation, subsequently causing dural adhesion. Finally, the adhesion tissue can serve as a pathway for the transportation of osteogenic cytokines (BMP for example) from the ossified ligamentum flavum to the compressed dura mater. Dura will ossify under exposure of these osteogenic cytokines. If this hypothesis is confirmed, it will contribute to the prevention and management of DO. For progressive OLF patients, early surgical treatment before DO should be recommended.

  11. Usefulness of a new gelatin glue sealant system for dural closure in a rat durotomy model.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shuko; Ikada, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    Watertight dural closure is imperative after neurosurgical procedures, because inadequately treated leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can have serious consequences. We used a rat durotomy model to test the usefulness of a new gelatin glue as a dural sealant in a rat model of transdural CSF leakage. All rats were randomly divided into one of the following three treatment groups: no application (control group: N = 18), application of fibrin glue (fibrin glue group: N = 18), and application of the new gelatin glue (new gelatin glue group: N = 18). The craniotomy side was re-opened, and CSF leakage was checked and recorded at 1, 7, and 28 days postoperatively. The new gelatin glue was adequate for stopping CSF leakage; no leakage was observed at postoperative days 1 or 7, and leakage was observed in only one rat at postoperative day 28. This result was statistically significant when compared to the control group (P = 0.002, P = 0.015, P = 0.015, respectively). The pathologic score of the new gelatin group was not different from that of the control or fibrin glue groups. We conclude that our new gelatin glue provides effective watertight closure 1, 7, and 28 days after operation in the rat durotomy model.

  12. Inflammation in chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raffetto, J D

    2013-03-01

    Chronic venous ulcers (CVUs) occur in approximately 1% of the general population. Risk factors for chronic venous disease (CVD) include heredity, age, female sex and obesity. Although not restricted to the elderly, the prevalence of CVD, especially leg ulcers, increases with age. CVD has a considerable impact on health-care resources. It has been estimated that venous ulcers cause the loss of approximately two million working days and incur treatment costs of approximately $3 billion per year in the USA. Overall, CVD has been estimated to account for 1-3% of the total health-care budgets in countries with developed health-care systems. The pathophysiology of dermal abnormalities in CVU is reflective of a complex interplay that involves sustained venous hypertension, inflammation, changes in microcirculation, cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation, resulting in altered cellular function and delayed wound healing.

  13. Involvement of nitric oxide in the modulation of dural arterial blood flow in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Messlinger, K; Suzuki, A; Pawlak, M; Zehnter, A; Schmidt, R F

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to be a key molecule in the pathogenesis of migraine pain and other headaches that are linked to vascular disorders. Several lines of evidence indicate that the meningeal vascularization is crucially involved in the generation of these headaches. In an experimental model in the rat a dominating role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in causing neurogenic vasodilatation and increased blood flow has been shown. The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of NO in this model with regard to the meningeal blood flow.The blood flow in and around the medial meningeal artery (dural arterial flow) was recorded in the exposed parietal dura mater encephali of barbiturate anaesthetized rats using laser Doppler flowmetry. Local electrical stimulation of the dura mater (pulses of 0.5 ms delivered at 7.5–17.5 V and 5 or 10 Hz for 30 s) caused temporary increases in dural arterial flow for about 1 min that reached peaks of 1.6–2.6 times the basal flow. The effects of NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors on the basal flow and the electrically evoked increases in flow were examined.Systemic (i.v.) administration of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) at cumulative doses of 10 and 50 mg kg−1 lowered the basal flow to 87 and 72%, respectively, of the control and reduced the evoked increases in blood flow to 82 and 44% on an average. Both these effects could partly be reversed by 300 mg kg−1 L-arginine. The systemic arterial pressure was increased by L-NAME at both doses. Injection of the stereoisomer D-NAME at same doses did not change basal flow and evoked increases in flow.Topical application of L-NAME (10−4–10−2 M) was effective only at the highest concentration, which caused lowering of the basal blood flow to 78% of the control; the evoked increases in flow were not changed. Topical application of 2-amino-5,6-dihydro-6-methyl-4H-1,3-thiazine (AMT), a specific inhibitor of the inducible NOS, at

  14. Absence of pulmonary aspiration of sinus contents in patients with asthma and sinusitis

    SciTech Connect

    Bardin, P.G.; Van Heerden, B.B.; Joubert, J.R. )

    1990-07-01

    The frequent association of asthma and paranasal sinusitis has been ascribed to a nasobronchial reflex, aspiration of sinus secretions, or enhanced beta-adrenergic blockade. We investigated possible pulmonary aspiration in a pilot study (eight patients) and follow-up study (13 patients) by means of a radionuclide technique. In the pilot study, the aim was to demonstrate aspiration as well as visibility of the radionuclide in the thorax during a period of 24 hours. The radionuclide was initially placed bronchoscopically in the bronchial tree in four patients and was still clearly visible in the same position after 24 hours in three patients. Aspiration from the nasopharynx was unequivocally demonstrated in two of four patients with depressed consciousness. The follow-up study population consisted of four patients with maxillary sinusitis only and nine patients with sinusitis and asthma. The radionuclide was placed in a maxillary sinus during therapeutic puncture. In the patients with only sinusitis as well as patients with asthma and sinusitis the radionuclide could be demonstrated in the maxillary sinus, nasopharynx, esophagus, and lower gastrointestinal tract during a 24-hour period. However, no pulmonary aspiration of radionuclide could be demonstrated in any patient. We conclude that seeding of the lower airways by mucopurulent secretions is unlikely to account for coexistent pulmonary disease. The association is probably related to generalized mucosal disease affecting both upper and lower airways.

  15. Closure of the sigmoid sinus in lateral skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Zanoletti, E; Cazzador, D; Faccioli, C; Martini, A; Mazzoni, A

    2014-06-01

    Closure of the sigmoid-jugular complex is generally planned during various surgical procedures on the skull base, either to repair a jugular foramen lesion or as the oncological boundary of the resection. A series of 218 cases of skull base tumour surgeries was analysed in which closure of the sigmoid-jugular complex was systematically planned (bilaterally in one case) in patients treated for jugular foramen paragangliomas, squamous cell carcinomas and other temporal bone tumours. Surgery was performed via a petro-occipital trans-sigmoid approach in 61 cases, an infratemporal A in 128, en bloc subtotal temporal bone resections in 10 and other approaches in 20. In our experience, planned unilateral (and, in one case, bilateral) closure of the sigmoid-jugular complex had no clinical consequences. The vicarious drainage of the skull base was always assessed preoperatively, revealing no contraindications to intraoperative sinus closure. Given the scarcity of literature on this subject, the present report shows that the procedure is associated with low morbidity and helps to improve our understanding of cerebral venous discharge.

  16. Sisters of the sinuses: cetacean air sacs.

    PubMed

    Reidenberg, Joy S; Laitman, Jeffrey T

    2008-11-01

    This overview assesses some distinguishing features of the cetacean (whale, dolphin, porpoise) air sac system that may relate to the anatomy and function of the paranasal sinuses in terrestrial mammals. The cetacean respiratory tract has been modified through evolution to accommodate living in water. Lack of paranasal sinuses in modern cetaceans may be a diving adaptation. Bone-enclosed air chambers are detrimental, as their rigid walls may fracture during descent/ascent due to contracting/re-expanding air volumes. Flexible-walled "sinuses" (extracranial diverticula) are a logical adaptation to diving. Odontocetes (toothed whales) exhibit several pairs of paranasal air sacs. Although fossil evidence indicates that paranasal sinuses occur in archaeocetes (ancestors/relatives of living cetaceans), it is not known whether the paranasal sacs derive from these sinuses. Sac pigmentation indicates that they derived from invaginations of the integument. Unlike sinuses, paranasal sacs are not circumferentially enclosed in bone, and therefore can accommodate air volume changes that accompany diving pressure changes. Paired pterygoid sacs, located ventrally along the cetacean skull, connect the pharynx and middle ear cavities. Mysticetes (baleen whales) have a large midline laryngeal sac. Although cetacean air sacs do not appear to be homologous to paranasal sinuses, they may serve some analogous respiratory, vocal, or structural functions. For example, these sacs may participate in gas exchange, thermoregulation, resonance, and skeletal pneumatization. In addition, they may subserve unique aquatic functions, such as increasing inspiratory volume, mitigating pressure-induced volume change, air shunting to reduce respiratory dead space, and facilitating underwater sound production and transmission.

  17. Autologous Vascularized Dural Wrapping for Temporalis Muscle Preservation and Reconstruction After Decompressive Craniectomy: Report of Twenty-five Cases

    PubMed Central

    Di Rienzo, Alessandro; Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Colasanti, Roberto; Nocchi, Niccolo; Di Somma, Lucia Giovanna Maria; Scerrati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Temporalis muscle reconstruction is a necessary step during frontotemporal cranioplasty ensuing decompressive craniectomy (DC). During this procedure, scarring between the temporalis muscle and the dural layer may lead to complicated muscle dissection, which carries an increased risk of dura and muscle damage. At time of DC, temporalis muscle wrapping by an autologous vascularized dural flap can later on facilitate dissection and rebuilding during the subsequent cranioplasty. In a span of 2 years, we performed 57 DCs for different etiologies. In 30 cases, the temporalis muscle was isolated by wrapping its inner surface using the autologous dura. At cranioplasty, the muscle could easily be dissected from the duraplasty. The inner surface was easily freed from the autologous dural envelope, and reconstruction achieved in an almost physiological position. Follow-up examinations were held at regular intervals to disclose signs of temporalis muscle depletion. Twenty-five patients survived to undergo cranioplasty. Muscle dissection could always be performed with no injury to the dural layer. No complications related to temporalis muscle wrapping were recorded. Face asymmetry developed in four cases but it was always with bone resorption. None of the patients with a good neurological recovery reported functional or aesthetic complaints. In our experience, temporalis muscle wrapping by vascularized autologous dura proved to be effective in preserving its bulk and reducing its adhesion to duraplasty, thereby improving muscle dissection and reconstruction during cranioplasty. Functional and aesthetic results were satisfying, except in cases of bone resorption. PMID:24067769

  18. What's New in Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer What’s New in Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Research ... About Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers? What’s New in Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Research ...

  19. Effectiveness of 2-methoxyestradiol in alleviating angiogenesis induced by intracranial venous hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiang; Zhou, Liangfu; Zhu, Wei; Mao, Ying; Chen, Liang

    2016-09-01

    OBJECT Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) are complex intracranial vascular malformations that can lead to hemorrhage. The authors recently found that chronic local hypoperfusion seems to be the main cause of angiogenesis in the dura mater, which leads to the formation of DAVFs. As a natural derivative of estradiol, 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME) has an antiangiogenic effect and can be used safely in patients with advanced carcinoid tumors. This study was conducted to examine the antiangiogenic effects of 2-ME on a rat DAVF model. METHODS Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 72) were used in the experiments. Intracranial venous hypertension was induced for modeling, and 2-ME was used in the early or late stage for treatment. The effects were examined by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. RESULTS 2-Methoxyestradiol significantly reduced angiogenesis in the dura in early- and late-intervention treatment groups, as proven by the results of immunohistochemical staining, Western blotting, real-time polymerase chain reaction assays, and microvessel density counts. The antiangiogenic effect even lasted for up to 2 weeks after 2-ME cessation. CONCLUSIONS These data collectively suggest that 2-ME can reduce the angiogenic effect caused by venous hypertension in a rat DAVF model, mainly by suppressing the inhibitor of differentiation 1 (ID-1) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) pathways.

  20. A review article on the diagnosis and treatment of cerebrospinal fluid fistulas and dural tears occurring during spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In spinal surgery, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas attributed to deliberate dural opening (e.g., for tumors, shunts, marsupialization of cysts) or inadvertent/traumatic dural tears (DTs) need to be readily recognized, and appropriately treated. Methods: During spinal surgery, the dura may be deliberately opened to resect intradural lesions/tumors, to perform shunts, or to open/marsupialize cysts. DTs, however, may inadvertently occur during primary, but are seen more frequently during revision spinal surgery often attributed to epidural scarring. Other etiologies of CSF fistulas/DTs include; epidural steroid injections, and resection of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) or ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL). Whatever the etiology of CSF fistulas or DTs, they must be diagnosed utilizing radioisotope cisternography (RIC), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed axial tomography (CT) studies, and expeditiously repaired. Results: DTs should be repaired utilizing interrupted 7-0 Gore-Tex (W.L. Gore and Associates Inc., Elkton, MD, USA) sutures, as the suture itself is larger than the needle; the larger suture occludes the dural puncture site. Closure may also include muscle patch grafts, dural patches/substitutes (bovine pericardium), microfibrillar collagen (Duragen: Integra Life Sciences Holdings Corporation, Plainsboro, NJ), and fibrin glues or dural sealants (Tisseel: Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Deerfield, IL, USA). Only rarely are lumbar drains and wound-peritoneal and/or lumboperitoneal shunts warranted. Conclusion: DTs or CSF fistulas attributed to primary/secondary spinal surgery, trauma, epidural injections, OPLL, OYL, and other factors, require timely diagnosis (MRI/CT/Cisternography), and appropriate reconstruction. PMID:24163783

  1. Rheoreceptors in the carotid sinus of dog.

    PubMed Central

    Hajduczok, G; Chapleau, M W; Abboud, F M

    1988-01-01

    The arterial baroreceptors are known to be sensitive to changes in pressure but there are no known sensors in the cardiovascular system for changes in flow. We tested the hypothesis that changes in flow at constant pressure alter carotid sinus multi-unit nerve activity. In anesthetized dogs with vascularly isolated carotid sinuses, increases in flow at constant pressure resulted in increases in carotid sinus nerve activity in relation to the increase in flow. The increased activity during flow was not caused by an increase in strain of the sinus wall but was directly related to the increase in shear stress (36.6 +/- 11.7% increase in activity per dyne/cm2; 1 dyne = 0.1 MN). The pressure threshold of single baroreceptor units was determined during a slow pressure ramp with and without flow. Flow caused a significant decrease in pressure threshold from 81.1 +/- 6.1 mmHg (1 mmHg = 1.333 x 10(2) Pa) in the absence of flow to 69.3 +/- 5.7 mmHg with flow. We conclude that there are arterial "rheoreceptors" in the carotid sinus that respond to flow at constant pressure and strain. The results with single baroreceptor units indicate also that baroreceptors may be sensitized by increases in flow. Thus, changes in flow per se in addition to changes in arterial pressure may be important determinants of reflex circulatory adjustments. PMID:3174642

  2. Management of Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Finks, Shannon W.; Trujillo, Toby C.; Dobesh, Paul P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review clinical data on direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) used in the acute treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) as well as practical considerations when using these products. Data Sources: Searches of PubMed and Google Scholar for VTE, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and relevant drug international nonproprietary names were conducted. Additional online searches were conducted for prescribing information. Study Selection and Data Extraction: Relevant articles on dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban for the management of VTE compared with oral vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; published between 1966 and December 2015) were reviewed and summarized, together with information on dosing, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interactions. Data Synthesis: The DOACs have the potential to circumvent many of the disadvantages of VKAs. At a minimum, they greatly increase the available therapeutic options, thus providing a greater opportunity for clinicians to select a management option that best fits the needs of individual patients. Despite the significant advance that DOACs represent, they are not without risk and require careful consideration of a number of clinical issues to optimize safety and efficacy. Conclusions: The emergence of DOACs for the management of thromboembolic disorders represents a paradigm shift from oral VKAs. The DOACs provide similar efficacy and improved safety in selected patients as compared with VKAs. Clinicians treating VTE need to be familiar with the intricacies involved in using these agents, including the appropriate dose selection for the relevant indication, avoidance of drug-drug and drug-disease interactions, and consideration of dose adjustments in specific clinical situations, such as organ dysfunction. PMID:26917821

  3. Thrombus formation in a dilated torcula following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Haynes, H R; Visca, A; Renowden, S; Malcolm, G

    2013-08-01

    A case of thrombus formation occurring within a dilation of the dural venous sinuses following aneurysmal sub-arachnoid haemorrhage is presented. Acute neurological deterioration accompanied propagation of the thrombus. The patient was anticoagulated on day 5 post-SAH with no haemorrhagic complications and made a full recovery. The optimum time to commence anticoagulation is not clear and is discussed.

  4. Epidemiology of chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Robertson, L; Evans, C; Fowkes, F G R

    2008-01-01

    Chronic venous disease of the legs occurs commonly in the general population in the Western world. Estimates of the prevalence of varicose veins vary widely from 2-56% in men and from 1-60% in women. These variations reflect differences in variability of study populations including age, race and gender, methods of measurement and disease definition. Definitions of chronic venous disease may rely on reports of varicose veins by study participants, based on self-diagnosis or recall of a diagnosis, or on a standardized physical examination. Venous ulceration is less common, affecting approximately 0.3% of the adult population. Age and pregnancy have been established as risk factors for developing varicose veins. Evidence on other risk factors for venous disease is inconclusive. Prolonged standing has been proposed, but results of studies should be interpreted with caution given the difficulty in measuring levels of posture. Obesity has been suggested as a risk factor in women, but appears to be an aggravating factor rather than a primary cause. Other postulated risk factors include dietary intake and smoking, but evidence is lacking. Longitudinal studies using standardized methods of evaluation are required before the true incidence of chronic venous disease and associated risk factors can be determined.

  5. Device sizing for transcatheter closure of ruptured sinus of Valsalva as per echocardiography color Doppler turbulent flow jet diameter.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Khurshid; Munawar, Muhammad; Chakraborty, Rabin; Hartono, Beny; Yusri, Achmad

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of sinus of Valsalva (SV) is a rare occurrence with a wide spectrum of presentation, ranging from an asymptomatic murmur to cardiogenic shock or even sudden cardiac death. We hereby report a case which was successfully closed by transcatheter technique. In this case, ruptured SV was entered from the aorta, an arteriovenous loop was created and device was implanted using a venous approach. The procedure was safe, effective and uncomplicated, obviating the need for surgery. In this case, the authors report for the first time the use of echo color Doppler turbulent flow jet diameter as a reference value for sizing the device.

  6. Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer (Treatment Options by Stage)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor sizes. The following stages are used for maxillary sinus cancer: Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) In ... are found in the innermost lining of the maxillary sinus . These abnormal cells may become cancer and ...

  7. Stages of Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor sizes. The following stages are used for maxillary sinus cancer: Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) In ... are found in the innermost lining of the maxillary sinus . These abnormal cells may become cancer and ...

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor sizes. The following stages are used for maxillary sinus cancer: Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) In ... are found in the innermost lining of the maxillary sinus . These abnormal cells may become cancer and ...

  9. General Information about Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor sizes. The following stages are used for maxillary sinus cancer: Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) In ... are found in the innermost lining of the maxillary sinus . These abnormal cells may become cancer and ...

  10. Prevalence of fungal infection among Iranian patients with chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Naghibzadeh, B; Razmpa, E; Alavi, Sh; Emami, M; Shidfar, M; Naghibzadeh, Gh; Morteza, A

    2011-02-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a major cause of morbidity today. Regional variations in the incidence of this disease have been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of fungal infection as the causative agent of chronic sinusitis among Iranian patients. A cross sectional hospital based study was designed; the patients underwent paranasal sinus washing and maxillary sinus biopsy. All specimens were studied by light microscopy. Fungal culturing was employed to confirm diagnosis. The patients underwent Computed Tomography for sinus evaluation. Of 162 participants, 12 samples from patients showed fungal elements, 2 of them Aspergillus fulvous (1.2%), 9 of them Alternaria species (5.56%) and 1 of them Psilomysis (0.6%). All patients presented radiologic evidence of sinusitis, ranging from mucosal thickening to total opacity. In conclusion, results obtained showed a low prevalence of fungal sinusitis among Iranian patients with chronic sinusitis. Findings also showed that Alternaria is the most causative agent.

  11. Paecilomyces lilacinus as the cause of chronic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rockhill, R C; Klein, M D

    1980-01-01

    Paecilomyces lilacinus was isolated on two separate occasions from the left antrum of a patient with chronic maxillary sinusitis. The clinical presentation and characteristics of the fungus and the sinus debris histopathology are discussed. Images PMID:7430339

  12. Epidural Abscess Masquerading as Lateral Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Brodner, David C.; Cutler, Jeff; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Amedee, Ronald G.

    2000-01-01

    Controversy regarding the use of anticoagulants, the evacuation of the sinus, or the use of medical treatment alone surrounds the treatment of lateral sinus thrombosis. Treatment of an epidural abscess associated with coalescent mastoiditis is much less controversial-drainage is usually recommended. The differing treatments of these complications mandate accurate diagnosis. The advent of more sophisticated radiological studies has facilitated diagnosis of these complications; however, tests are not infallible. We present three cases in which preoperative imaging demonstrates an epidural abscess mimicking lateral sinus thrombosis by compression of the vessel. A false-positive computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study may lead to the wrong diagnosis and, consequently, improper treatment. In light of this possibility, we recommend surgical exploration in all such cases. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171148

  13. Medical management of pediatric chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, L L; Brown, K R

    2000-10-01

    Pediatric sinusitis can be a challenging disease to treat, whether by a primary care physician or an otolaryngologist. When initial appropriate therapy fails to resolve the disorder, frustration may develop on the part of the patient, the family, and the physician. In addition to treatment with appropriate antibiotics for a sufficient length of time, other associated conditions that can exacerbate the condition must be considered and addressed as necessary. These may include viral upper respiratory infections, allergic rhinitis, immune deficiencies, asthma, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Unless all associated conditions have been optimized, treatment of chronic sinusitis will often be unsuccessful. Recognition that there may be another factor contributing to the patient's continuing illness should prompt appropriate evaluation and occasionally referral to appropriate specialists. Except for the unusual pediatric patient with a truly anatomic disorder or an underlying chronic illness such as cystic fibrosis, proper medical management will almost always resolve chronic sinusitis.

  14. Grade 4 spondylolisthesis of the L5 vertebra associated with dural ectasia in neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Modi, H N; Srinivasalu, S; Suh, S W; Yang, J H

    2009-08-01

    Spondylolisthesis associated with neurofibromatosis is rare, and only 12 cases have been reported so far. However, only one report of grade 4 spondylolisthesis with neurofibromatosis has been reported in the literature. A 15-year-old boy with neurofibromatosis was admitted for back pain and neurological claudication. Radiograph showed grade 4 spondylolisthesis of the L5 vertebra with scalloping of the L4-L5 vertebrae. L4-L5 laminectomy, reduction, L3-S1 posterior instrumentation and fusion were performed. The reduction of the spondylisthesis was done entirely from the posterior approach using pedicle screws. Radiography at four months showed a broken S1 screw with a loss of reduction. The patient was re-operated on, to provide additional stability with pelvic fixation. He was pain-free with a good fusion at the two-year follow-up. Adequate posterior stabilisation with fusion gives good results in grade 4 spondylolisthesis associated with neurofibromatosis and dural ectasia.

  15. Acute Paraplegia After Lumbar Steroid Injection in Patients With Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas: Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (SDAVFs) are the most common type of spinal vascular malformations. However, SDAVFs are still underdiagnosed entities because their clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, as they include low back pain or radiating pain to the limb. There have been several reports of acute paraplegia after lumbar epidural steroid injections in patients with SDAVFs. We present 4 patients with SDAVFs who received lumbar steroid injection. Among the 4 cases, acute paraplegia developed in 2 cases that received a larger volume of injectate than the other cases. Thus, we are suggesting that the volume of injectate may be a contributing factor for acute paraplegia after lumbar steroid injection in patients with SDAVFs. PMID:27847727

  16. Onyx extrusion through the scalp after embolization of dural arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Singla, Amit; Fargen, Kyle Michael; Hoh, Brian

    2015-07-28

    A man in his sixties referred with symptoms of episodic left lip numbness and left arm weakness was diagnosed with a Borden type 3 dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) on DSA. Successful Onyx embolization of the DAVF was performed via the distal left occipital artery using an ev3 Apollo detachable tip microcatheter. He underwent surgical obliteration for the residual DAVF 3 days later. Three months later during a routine postoperative clinic visit, the patient produced a plastic bag containing multiple small pieces of Onyx cast and the detached tip of the Apollo microcatheter that had extruded out from his scalp through small spontaneous holes about 5 weeks after the embolization procedure. This spontaneous extrusion of Onyx can be alarming to the patient not expecting it; however, prior knowledge and discussion can lessen the anxiety of both the treating physician and the patient dealing with such a situation.

  17. Systemic venous drainage: can we help Newton?

    PubMed

    Corno, Antonio F

    2007-06-01

    In recent years substantial progress occurred in the techniques of cardiopulmonary bypass, but the factor potentially limiting the flexibility of cardiopulmonary bypass remains the drainage of the systemic venous return. In the daily clinical practice of cardiac surgery, the amount of systemic venous return on cardiopulmonary bypass is directly correlated with the amount of the pump flow. As a consequence, the pump flow is limited by the amount of venous return that the pump is receiving. On cardiopulmonary bypass the amount of venous drainage depends upon the central venous pressure, the height differential between patient and inlet of the venous line into the venous reservoir, and the resistance in the venous cannula(s) and circuit. The factors determining the venous return to be taken into consideration in cardiac surgery are the following: (a) characteristics of the individual patient; (b) type of planned surgical procedure; (c) type of venous cannula(s); (d) type of circuit for cardiopulmonary bypass; (e) strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass; (f) use of accessory mechanical systems to increased the systemic venous return. The careful pre-operative evaluation of all the elements affecting the systemic venous drainage, including the characteristics of the individual patient and the type of required surgical procedure, the choice of the best strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass, and the use of the most advanced materials and tools, can provide a systemic venous drainage substantially better than what it would be allowed by the simple "Law of universal gravitation" by Isaac Newton.

  18. Fourth branchial pouch sinus: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, R M; Biller, H F

    1991-07-01

    The fourth branchial pouch sinus (FBPS) is a rare translaryngeal anomaly with diverse manifestations, including neonatal stridor and recurrent deep neck infection. Review of the world literature reveals 23 reports of sinuses consistent with fourth pouch origin. We present two additional cases, including the only example of a right-sided FBPS. Retrograde excision, beginning at the piriform apex, ensures complete removal of the tract and protection of the recurrent nerve. The posterior border of the thyroid ala must be resected or retracted for adequate exposure. Failure to remove the translaryngeal portion of the tract almost guarantees recurrence.

  19. [Anorexia with sinus bradycardia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-fang; Xu, Ling; Chen, Bao-xia; Cui, Ming; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-02-18

    As anorexia patients always go to the psychiatric clinic, little is concerned about the occurrence of sinus bradycardia in these patients for cardiologists and psychiatrists. The aim of this paper is to discuss the relationship between anorexia and sinus bradycardia, and the feature analysis, differential diagnosis and therapeutic principles of this type of sinus bradycardia. We report a case of sinus bradycardia in an anorexia patient with the clinical manifestations, laboratory exams, auxiliary exams, therapeutic methods, and her prognosis, who was admitted to Peking University Third Hospital recently. The patient was a 19-year-old female, who had the manifestation of anorexia. She lost obvious weight in a short time (about 15 kg in 6 months), and her body mass index was 14.8 kg/m(2). The patient felt apparent palpitation, chest depression and short breath, without dizziness, amaurosis or unconsciousness. Vitals on presentation were notable for hypotension, and bradycardia. The initial exam was significant for emaciation, but without lethargy or lower extremity edema. The electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia with her heart rate being 32 beats per minute. The laboratory work -up revealed her normal blood routine, electrolytes and liver function. But in her thyroid function test, the free thyroid (FT) hormones 3 was 0.91 ng/L (2.3-4.2 ng/L),and FT4 was 8.2 ng/L (8.9-18.0 ng/L), which were all lower; yet the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was normal 1.48 IU/mL (0.55-4.78 IU/mL). Ultrasound revealed her normal thyroid. Anorexia is an eating disorder characterized by extremely low body weight, fear of gaining weight or distorted perception of body image, and amenorrhea. Anorexia patients who lose weight apparently in short time enhance the excitability of the parasympathetic nerve, and inhibit the sympathetic nerve which lead to the appearance of sinus bradycardia, and functional abnormalities of multiple systems such as hypothyroidism. But this kind of sinus

  20. Rhinoplasty and Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, George L.

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of patients are opting for combining sinus surgery and cosmetic rhinoplasty. The author has been performing rhinoplasty with FESS since April of 1990. The technique and equipment used in early cases is much different than that used in more recent surgeries. Specific advances include high definition monitor, intraoperative navigation system, and powered dissecting instruments. The benefits of these advances are illustrated by a review of the more recent cases performed by the author. Combined rhinoplasty and FESS can be performed with good results (functional and cosmetic) and minimal complications. Advances in sinus surgery technique and equipment have made the procedure safer, faster, more precise, and more comfortable. PMID:22567242

  1. Pilonidal sinus (Nadi vrana): A case study

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Pradeep; Toshikhane, Hemant

    2010-01-01

    Pilonidal sinus (PNS) occurs in the cleavage between the buttocks (natal cleft) and can cause discomfort, embarrassment and absence from work for thousands of young people (mostly men) annually. The incidence of the disease is calculated to be 26 per 100,000 people. It occurs 2.2 times more often in men than in women. Age at presentation is 21 years for men and 19 years for women this case report describes a 22-year-old man with pilonidal sinus who was treated with ksharasutra. PMID:21170212

  2. [Sinusitis is common in small children].

    PubMed

    Herløv-Nielsen, Henrik; Højby, Niels

    2010-11-29

    Children have air-filled paranasal sinuses from birth. Acute sinusitis is common in early childhood and complicates 5-13% of common colds. Bacteriology comprises 30% Streptococcus pneumoniae, 20% Haemophilus influenzae, 20% Moraxella catarrhalis. While suppurative complications are rare, there has been an increasing focus on comorbidity affecting the lower airways (asthma). The diagnosis is based on clinical criteria developed through microbiological studies. Antibiotic treatment is controversial, but evidence suggests an effect when the diagnosis has been made correctly. We advocate antibiotic treatment in selected cases.

  3. Superior sinus of the pericardium: CT appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Aronberg, D.J.; Peterson, R.R.; Glazer, H.S.; Sagel, S.S.

    1984-11-01

    On computed tomography, a mass-like density is often observed, just posterior to the ascending aorta, that occasionally has been mistaken for mediastinal lymph node enlargement. Cadaver studies confirmed this retroaortic structure to be an extension of the periocardial cavity, the superior sinus. Anatomic studies revealed the presence of a superior sinus in all of the 28 cadavers studied. Retrospective review of 116 consecutive adult chest computed tomographic examinations disclosed its presence in 49%. This normal variant has a characteristic location, shape, and attenuation value by CT that should allow recognition and prevent misinterpretation.

  4. Compressive Optic Neuropathy from Allergic Fungal Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jessica; Jefferson, Niall; Chaganti, Joga; Fraser, Clare L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ophthalmic manifestations of allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) are rare, but can occur in advanced disease. A 32-year-old man with advanced AFS presented with severe bilateral vision loss and restricted ocular motility. Magnetic resonance imaging and histological analysis confirmed active chronic AFS. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery was performed, with adjunctive steroid therapy. Although AFS is a reasonably well-recognised entity, severe disease causing bilateral visual deficits is rarely encountered. This can confound the diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Ophthalmologists should thus be aware of compressive optic neuropathy as a complication of advanced AFS to prompt early treatment and mitigate visual loss. PMID:27928361

  5. Dutch Venous Ulcer guideline update.

    PubMed

    Maessen-Visch, M Birgitte; de Roos, Kees-Peter

    2014-05-01

    The revised guideline of 2013 is an update of the 2005 guideline "venous leg ulcer". In this special project four separate guidelines (venous leg ulcer, varicose veins, compression therapy and deep venous disorders) were revised and developed simultaneously. A meeting was held including representatives of any organisation involved in venous disease management including patient organizations and health insurance companies. Eighteen clinical questions where defined, and a new strategy was used to accelerate the process. This resulted in two new and two revised guidelines within one year. The guideline committee advises use of the C of the CEAP classification as well as the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and a Quality of life (QoL) score in the assessment of clinical signs. These can provide insight into the burden of disease and the effects of treatment as experienced by the patient. A duplex ultrasound should be performed in every patient to establish the underlying aetiology and to evaluate the need for treatment (which is discussed in a separate guideline). The use of the TIME model for describing venous ulcers is recommended. There is no evidence for antiseptic or antibiotic wound care products except for a Cochrane review in which some evidence is presented for cadexomer iodine. Signs of infection are the main reason for the use of oral antibiotics. When the ulcer fails to heal the use of oral aspirin and pentoxifylline can be considered as an adjunct. For the individual patient, the following aspects should be considered: the appearance of the ulcer (amount of exudate) according to the TIME model, the influence of wound care products on moisturising the wound, frequency of changing compression bandages, pain and allergies. The cost of the dressings should also be considered. Education and training of patients t improves compliance with compression therapy but does not influence wound healing rates.

  6. Different types of fungal sinusitis occurring concurrently: implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Rupa, V; Thomas, Meera

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the clinical and histopathological features, management and outcome of a series of patients with simultaneous occurrence of invasive and non-invasive fungal sinusitis (mixed fungal sinusitis). The histopathological records of patients with fungal sinusitis seen over the last 6 years were reviewed. The clinical, histopathological, treatment and follow up details of all cases with mixed fungal sinusitis were noted. Six cases of mixed fungal sinusitis with concurrent occurrence of chronic granulomatous fungal sinusitis and allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) were seen during the study period. Most (83.3 %) had bilateral disease. All patients had undergone prior endoscopic sinus surgery at least once within the previous 2 years. Histopathological features showed predominance of invasive disease in half the patients. Except for one patient who did not report for follow up, all patients with predominant chronic granulomatous fungal sinusitis received systemic antifungal therapy and inhaled steroids. Those with predominant features of AFS received oral and inhaled steroids. Five patients with mixed fungal sinusitis who had follow up ranging from 6 months to 5 years were disease free following treatment. Mixed fungal sinusitis should be recognized by the surgeon and pathologist as a separate category of fungal sinusitis whose treatment depends on accurate histological diagnosis. A good outcome may be expected with appropriate therapy.

  7. Sinusitis associated with nasogastric intubation in 3 horses

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Jorge E.; Yamout, Sawsan; Dechant, Julie E.

    2014-01-01

    Sinusitis has not been reported as a complication of long-term nasogastric intubation in horses. We describe 3 horses that developed nosocomial sinusitis following abdominal surgery with associated perioperative nasogastric intubation. Sinusitis was suspected by the presence of malodorous discharge and confirmed by percussion, upper airway endoscopy, radiographs (n = 3), and bacterial culture (n = 1). PMID:24891638

  8. Pharmacological prophylaxis of venous thrombo-embolism.

    PubMed

    Flute, P T

    1976-02-07

    The pathogenesis of venous thrombosis is briefly discussed as a basis for the understanding of preventive measures used in this condition. Prophylaxis in venous thrombosis is then reviewed with emphasis on pharmacological treatment, and more particularly on heparin.

  9. Retinal venous blood carbon monoxide response to bright light in male pigs: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Oren, Dan A; Duda, Magdalena; Kozioł, Katarzyna; Romerowicz-Misielak, Maria; Koziorowska, Anna; Sołek, Przemysław; Nowak, Sławomir; Kulpa, Magdalena; Koziorowski, Marek

    2017-03-01

    The physical mechanism by which light is absorbed in the eye and has antidepressant and energizing effects in Seasonal Affective Disorder and other forms of psychiatric major depression is of scientific interest. This study was designed to explore one specific aspect of a proposed humoral phototransduction mechanism, namely that carbon monoxide (CO) levels increase in retinal venous blood in response to bright light. Eleven mature male pigs approximately six months of age were kept for 7days in darkness and fasted for 12h prior to surgery. Following mild sedation, anesthesia was induced. Silastic catheters were inserted into the dorsal nasal vein through the angular vein of the eye to reach the ophthalmic sinus, from which venous blood outflowing from the eye area was collected. The animals were exposed to 5000lx of fluorescent-generated white light. CO levels in the blood were analyzed by gas chromatography before and after 80min of light exposure. At baseline, mean CO levels in the retinal venous blood were 0.43±0.05(SE)nmol/ml. After bright light, mean CO levels increased to 0.54±0.06nmol/ml (two-tailed t-test p<0.05). This study provides preliminary mammalian evidence that acute bright light exposure raises carbon monoxide levels in ophthalmic venous blood.

  10. Preventing venous ulcer recurrence: a review.

    PubMed

    Vowden, Kathryn R; Vowden, Peter

    2006-03-01

    This review article examines the available evidence on both the primary and secondary prevention of venous ulceration, exploring both the individual, social and financial implications of system failures that allow patients to remain at increased risk of recurrent ulceration. The role of both venous disease assessment and corrective superficial venous surgery are discussed in the light of recently published randomised controlled studies on the role of superficial venous surgery as both an adjunct to ulcer healing and ulcer prevention.

  11. CT maxillary sinus evaluation-A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Paula; Faria-Almeida, Ricardo; Braga, Ana-Cristina; Felino, António

    2015-01-01

    Background Proximity of the dental roots to the sinus floor makes dental disease a probable cause of maxillary sinusitis. The aim of this study was to find out if maxillary sinus pathologic changes were more prevalent in patients with dental disease and to evaluate the performance of computed tomography (CT) in analyzing and detecting apical periodontitis and other odontogenic causes on the maxillary sinusitis etiology in a Portuguese Caucasian population. Material and Methods Retrospective cohort study. The total sample of 504 patients and their CT was included in this study. The patients were from a private dental clinic, specializing in oral surgery, where the first complaint was not directly related to sinus disease, but with dental pathology. For each patient, the etiological factors of maxillary sinusitis and the imaging CT findings were analyzed. All the axial, coronal and sagittal CT slices were evaluated and general data were registered. The latter was selected based on the maxillary sinus CT published literature. Results 32.40% of patients presented normal sinus (without any etiological factor associated), 29.00% showed presence of etiological and imaging findings in the maxillary sinus, 20.60% had only imaging changes in the maxillary sinus and 18.00% of patients presented only etiological factors and no change in the maxillary sinus. Conclusions Radiological imaging is an important tool for establishing the diagnosis of maxillary sinus pathology. These results indicate that the CT scan should be an excellent tool for complement the odontogenic sinusitis diagnosis. Key words: Maxillary sinusitis/etiology, odontogenic, computed tomography, maxillary sinus. PMID:25858084

  12. Extraordinary cerebral venous drainage pathway with mastoid emissary and posterior external jugular veins detected by contrast-enhanced neck computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bulbul, Erdogan; Yanik, Bahar; Demirpolat, Gulen; Koksal, Vildan

    2015-12-01

    An extraordinary cerebral venous drainage pathway and dilated vein at the left posterior cervical region were detected with routine contrast-enhanced neck computed tomography exam. The left sigmoid sinus was drained by dilated mastoid emissary vein (MEV). The MEV continued as posterior auricular and posterior external jugular veins (PEJVs). The left PEJV directly drained into subclavian vein. Atretic right transverse sinus, left facial vein forming the external jugular vein, atresia and hypoplasia of upper internal jugular veins at the right and left sides, respectively, were the other uncommon findings in our case. Detecting venous variations may prevent complications during surgical and interventional procedures, so the radiologists should examine the superficial cervical veins closely.

  13. Giant-cell granuloma of the sinuses

    SciTech Connect

    Rhea, J.T.; Weber, A.L.

    1983-04-01

    Three cases are presented which illustrate giant-cell granulomas in the maxillary, ethmoid, and sphenoid sinuses. The radiographic features are nonspecific, and the lesion can mimic carcinoma. Ossification can be demonstrated, especially with computed tomography, and may indicate a benign lesion.

  14. Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Wald, Ellen R

    2011-05-01

    Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis are 2 of the most common indications for antimicrobial agents in children. Together, they are responsible for billions of dollars of health care expenditures. The pathogenesis of the 2 conditions is identical. In the majority of children with each condition, a preceding viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of the acute bacterial complication. It has been shown that viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of acute otitis media in 37% of cases. Currently, precise microbiologic diagnosis of acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis requires performance of tympanocentesis in the former and sinus aspiration in the latter. The identification of a virus from the nasopharynx in either case does not obviate the need for antimicrobial therapy. Furthermore, nasal and nasopharyngeal swabs are not useful in predicting the results of culture of the middle ear or paranasal sinus. However, it is possible that a combination of information regarding nasopharyngeal colonization with bacteria and infection with specific viruses may inform treatment decisions in the future.

  15. [Congenital left sinus of Valsalva aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Simões, M V; Figueira, R R; Barbato, D; Miziara, H L

    1991-01-01

    Two cases of left sinus of Valsalva congenital aneurysm (SVCA), incidentally found are described. The authors call attention on rarity of them, and present new concepts about their morphogenesis and incidence. They also suggested a higher incidence of asymptomatic and undiagnosed cases of SVCA should be considered.

  16. Stent hypersensitivity and infection in sinus cavities

    PubMed Central

    Soufras, George D.; Hahalis, George

    2013-01-01

    Persistent mucosal inflammation, granulation tissue formation, hypersensitivity, and multifactorial infection are newly described complications of retained drug-eluting stents from endoscopic sinus surgery for refractory rhinosinusitis. In an important report published in Allergy and Rhinology, a 45-year-old male patient suffering from recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery and was found, for the first time, to have steroid-eluting catheters that were inadvertently left in the ethmoid and frontal sinuses. The retained catheters had caused persistent mucosal inflammation and formation of granulation tissue denoting hypersensitivity reaction. These consequences had induced perpetuation of symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis. Meticulous removal of the retained stents with the nitinol wings from inflamed tissues of the frontal, ethmoidal, and sphenoethmoidal recesses in which they were completely imbedded was successfully performed without polypoid regrowth. Cultures of specimens taken from both left and right stents showed heavy growth of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and moderate growth of Klebsiella oxytoca, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, and beta-hemolytic Streptococcus anginosus. Fungal infection was not detected. The current knowledge and experience regarding stent hypersensitivity and infection in relation with the use of stents in sinus cavities is reviewed. PMID:24498522

  17. Development of the venous pole of the heart in the frog Xenopus laevis: a morphological study with special focus on the development of the venoatrial connections.

    PubMed

    Jahr, Maike; Männer, Jörg

    2011-06-01

    The heart of lung-breathing vertebrates normally shows an asymmetric arrangement of its venoatrial connections along the left-right (L-R) body axis. The systemic venous tributaries empty into the right atrium while the pulmonary venous tributaries empty into the left atrium. The ways by which this asymmetry evolves from the originally symmetrically arranged embryonic venous heart pole are poorly defined. Here we document the development of the venous heart pole in Xenopus laevis (stages 40-46). We show that, prior to the appearance of the mouth of the common pulmonary vein (MCPV), the systemic venous tributaries empty into a bilaterally symmetric chamber (sinus venosus) that is demarcated from the developing atriums by a circular ridge of tissue (sinu-atrial ridge). A solitary MCPV appears during stage 41. From the time point of its first appearance onwards, the MCPV lies cranial to the sinu-atrial ridge and to the left of the developing interatrial septum and body midline. L-R lineage analysis shows that the interatrial septum and MCPV both derive from the left body half. The CPV, therefore, opens from the beginning into the future left atrium. The definitive venoatrial connections are established by the formation of a septal complex that divides the lumen of the venous heart pole into systemic and pulmonary venous flow pathways. This complex arises from the anlage of the interatrial septum and the left half of the sinu-atrial ridge.

  18. Air travel and venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Shanthi; Yach, Derek; Alwan, Ala

    2002-01-01

    There has recently been increased publicity on the risk of venous thrombosis after long-haul flights. This paper reviews the evidence base related to the association between air travel and venous thromboembolism. The evidence consists only of case reports, clinical case-control studies and observational studies involving the use of intermediate end-points, or expert opinion. Some studies have suggested that there is no clear association, whereas others have indicated a strong relationship. On the whole it appears that there is probably a link between air travel and venous thrombosis. However, the link is likely to be weak, mainly affecting passengers with additional risk factors for venous thromboembolism. The available evidence is not adequate to allow quantification of the risk. There are insufficient scientific data on which to base specific recommendations for prevention, other than that leg exercise should be taken during travel. Further studies are urgently needed in order to identify prospectively the incidence of the condition and those at risk. PMID:12077617

  19. Duplex evaluation of venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Labropoulos, Nicos; Leon, Luis R

    2005-03-01

    Duplex ultrasound is the most useful examination for the evaluation of venous valvular incompetence. Multi-frequency 4 to 7-MHz linear array transducers are typically used for this assessment of superficial and deep reflux. The examination is done with the patient standing and manual compression maneuvers are used to initiate reflux. Automatic rapid inflation and deflation cuffs may be used when a standard stimulus is needed. Cutoff values for reflux have been defined. Perforating veins must be identified and flow direction during compression recorded. When ulcers are present, duplex ultrasound is used to investigate veins of the ulcerated legs. Venous outflow obstruction is also studied by duplex ultrasound and chronic changes in deep and superficial veins following deep venous thrombosis noted. The main drawback in evaluation of chronic obstruction is inability to quantify hemodynamic significance. Anatomic variations in superficial and deep veins are common and their identification is necessary. Reporting results of duplex ultrasound studies must take into consideration the proper classification of venous disease as well as the new anatomic terms that have been accepted.

  20. Venous ulceration, fibrinogen and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of long and short-term venous hypertension upon lymph fibrinogen concentrations was studied in an attempt to explain the peri-capillary deposition of fibrin reported in patients with post-phlebitic syndromes. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of rats and human volunteers was also studied. Both long- and short-term venous hypertension were found to increase fibrinogen transport across the interstitial space by more than 600%. Not only was there evidence of fibrinolytic activity in the lymph but after long-term venous hypertension alpha 2 antiplasmin activity was also detectable. Skin biopsies from the venous hypertensive ankles showed deposition of interstitial fibrin. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of the rat was found to be delayed if the rats were given epsilon amino caproic acid but it could not be increased with stanozolol. In human subjects it was found that patients with lipodermatosclerosis had delayed clot clearance and retarded blood fibrinolytic activity when compared with normal volunteers and patients with uncomplicated varicose veins. The principle cause why tall men are more subject to ulcers than short men, Dr Young conceived to be then length of the column of blood in their veins; which by its pressure, renders the legs less able to recover when hurt by any violence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:6742738

  1. Carcinoma of Maxillary Sinus Masquerading as Odontogenic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ramachamparambathu, Ashir Kolikkal; Vengal, Manoj; Siyo, Nizaro; Ahmed, Anis

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumours of maxillary sinus are rare. They are usually diagnosed in the late stages when they perforate the sinus walls. The presence of large air space in the maxillary sinus facilitates asymptomatic growth of the sinus malignancy. The clinical presentation of these tumours depends on the sinus wall involved by the disease. The medial wall is usually the first to become eroded, leading to nasal obstruction, epistaxis or discharge. Rarely, symptoms of maxillary sinus carcinoma can resemble dental infection and the affected patients may visit dental clinic seeking treatment. This report presents a case of carcinoma of maxillary sinus mimicking odontogenic infection. Computed tomographic findings explained the reason for the present lesion to masquerade as an inflammatory condition. The importance of advanced imaging modalities for prompt identification of such lesions is discussed. PMID:27790593

  2. Epidural anesthesia for cesarean section in a patient with Marfan syndrome and dural ectasia -A case report-

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gahyun; Ko, Justin Sangwook

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy is considered a period of high risk for cardiovascular complications in patients with Marfan syndrome. Therefore the choice of anesthetic technique for delivery should be focused on minimizing hemodynamic fluctuations, and preferably provide adequate post-operative pain control. For this purpose, neuraxial blocks, such as spinal or epidural anesthesia, may be deemed a safe option. However, dural ectasia is present in 63-92% of patients with Marfan syndrome, and the increased amount of cerebrospinal fluid volume is thought to be one of main reasons for spinal anesthesia failure. We report herein the peri-operative management of a patient with Marfan syndrome and dural ectasia for cesarean section using epidural anesthesia. PMID:21490825

  3. Coincidental vascular anomalies at the foramen magnum: dural arteriovenous fistula and high flow aneurysm on perimedullary fistula.

    PubMed

    Gilard, V; Curey, S; Tollard, E; Proust, F

    2013-12-01

    We report the case of a 59-year-old woman admitted for a sudden headache due to a subarachnoid haemorrhage. On CT scan, the clots predominated into the posterior fossa without high-density in the sylvian or interhemispheric fissures. The vertebral angiography revealed a dural arteriovenous fistula at the foramen magnum associated to an aneurysm of the cervical anterior spinal artery. Due to the high rebleeding risk of a dural shunt, we proposed curative treatment using microsurgical interruption of the intradural draining vein. On the postoperative angiography at 15-day follow-up, the 2 malformations were corrected and the outcome at 6 months was excellent. Based on the literature, we assess this exceptional association and suggest its possible management.

  4. Anatomical basis of central venous catheter fracture.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark O

    2008-03-01

    Central venous catheter fracture is a rare complication of long-term indwelling subclavian venous access. Subclavian vein access has been the recommended approach for placing central venous catheters. The anatomical landmark method for subclavian access remains a highly successful and nonequipment-dependent method for rapid central access. More recently, the internal jugular vein approach has emerged as the preferred route for long-term central venous access. However, variations in internal jugular vein anatomy make the landmark method less reliable. Use of two-dimensional real-time ultrasound during internal jugular vein access is associated with better success, a lower complication rate, and faster access. A case of central venous catheter fracture initiated an internal review of long-term central venous access procedures. We have converted to a predominantly internal jugular vein approach. This case report and literature review may assist other physicians and institutions in re-evaluating long-term central venous access protocols.

  5. Preservation and Tissue Handling Technique on Iatrogenic Dural Tear with Herniated Nerve Root at Cauda Equina Level

    PubMed Central

    Djaja, Yoshi Pratama; Saleh, Ifran; Safri, Ahmad Yanuar

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic or incidental dural tear is a relatively common complication in lumbar decompression surgery. Although mostly there are no changes that occurred in long-term result following an incidental durotomy, the sequelae are not always benign especially when the herniated nerve root is involved. Preservation and tissue handling is paramount in order to prevent further injury. Two cases of dural tear with herniated nerve root complicating the lumbar decompression surgery are presented. Direct watertight repair was performed using the preservation and tissue handling concept. Assessing the relative size between the dural tear and the root mass is the key in determining whether enlargement of tear is needed. Whenever feasible, the tear will not be enlarged. Opening the vent by using a suture anchor and manually repositioning the nerve root with a fine instrument is the key for an atraumatic handling of the herniated nerve root. Clinical and neurophysiology examination was performed postoperatively and no further neurologic deficit occurred despite the iatrogenic injury. Although some debate on a few intraoperative and postoperative details still persists, tissue handling and preservation concept should be applied in all cases. PMID:28127488

  6. Histological analysis of the repair of dural lesions with silicone mesh in rats subjected to experimental lesions

    PubMed Central

    da Rosa, Fernando William Figueiredo; Pohl, Pedro Henrique Isoldi; Mader, Ana Maria Amaral Antônio; de Paiva, Carla Peluso; dos Santos, Aline Amaro; Bianco, Bianca; Rodrigues, Luciano Miller Reis

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate inflammatory reaction, fibrosis and neovascularization in dural repairs in Wistar rats using four techniques: simple suture, bovine collagen membrane, silicon mesh and silicon mesh with suture. Methods Thirty Wistar rats were randomized in five groups: the first was the control group, submitted to dural tear only. The others underwent durotomy and simple suture, bovine collagen membrane, silicon mesh and silicon mesh with suture. Animals were euthanized and the spine was submitted to histological evaluation with a score system (ranging from zero to 3) for inflammation, neovascularization and fibrosis. Results Fibrosis was significantly different between simple suture and silicon mesh (p=0.005) and between simple suture and mesh with suture (p=0.015), showing that fibrosis is more intense when a foreign body is used in the repair. Bovine membrane was significantly different from mesh plus suture (p=0.011) regarding vascularization. Inflammation was significantly different between simple suture and bovine collagen membrane. Conclusion Silicon mesh, compared to other commercial products available, is a possible alternative for dural repair. More studies are necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:26761555

  7. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of cerebral venous thrombosis in Chinese women during pregnancy and puerperium

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhu-Wei; Gao, Wan-Li; Feng, Li-Min

    2017-01-01

    Due to the specific physiology associated with pregnancy and puerperium, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT) may manifest different characteristics. This study aimed to identify the clinical manifestations and prognosis of pregnancy-associated CVT. A total of 43 pregnancy-associated CVT patients were enrolled. We analysed the clinical presentations of the disease and performed a multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine which variables were associated with prognosis. Our descriptive results showed the following: 1) the incidence was 202 per 100,000 deliveries, and the mortality rate was 11.63%; 2) the most frequent symptom was headache; 3) the most frequent abnormal laboratory findings were increased levels of fibrinogen and several serum lipoproteins (including triglyceride, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, apolipoprotein A1, and apolipoprotein B); and 4) the superior sagittal sinus and transverse sinus were the most frequently affected locations. Moreover, an increased modified Rankin Scale score was positively associated with infection, seizure, intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP). Comparably, the occurrence of death was positively and significantly associated with infection, seizure and ICH. Consequently, timely diagnosis and treatment of pregnancy-associated CVT patients with infection, seizure, ICH or HDP are needed. Patients with infection, seizure or ICH have a greater risk of death. PMID:28262755

  8. Carotid and cranial nerve reconstruction after removal of cavernous sinus lesions.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, L N; Sen, C N; Lanzino, G; Pomonis, S

    1991-12-01

    During the last 7 years, approximately 170 neoplasms, and 35 vascular lesions involving the cavernous sinus were treated by the first two authors. During the treatment of such lesions, the direct vein graft reconstruction of the internal carotid artery from the petrous to the supraclinoid or infraclinoid ICA was performed in 23 patients. Graft occlusion occurred in 3 patients and in one of these, it was successfully salvaged by placing a long venous graft from the extracranial ICA to the M3 segment of the middle cerebral artery. The latter 3 patients were neurologically normal. One patient with significant atherosclerotic disease suffered the dissection of the distal internal carotid artery with the graft being patent. The suturing technique. This patient eventually died. Two patients with severely compromised collateral circulation suffered minor strokes due to the temporary occlusion of the ICA. This has been avoided in the more recent patients by the adoption of brain protection techniques such as moderate hypothermia, induced hypertension, and barbiturate coma. Low dose heparin therapy during grafting and high dose intravenous steroids prior to the grafting also appear to be beneficial. Direct vein graft reconstruction of the intracavernous carotid artery is a valuable tool during the management of cavernous sinus lesions. The advantages and disadvantages of this technique as well as the pros and cons of other revascularization techniques will be discussed. During microsurgical removal of cavernous sinus lesions, the cranial nerves III-VI were reconstructed by direct resuture or by nerve grafting in 16 patients. In the majority of these patients, recovery of cranial nerve function was observed, which was very encouraging.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Frontal sinus parameters in computed tomography and sex determination.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Mitra; Bakhtavar, Khadijeh; Moarefdoost, Jhale; Kamali, Artin; Rafeifar, Shahram

    2016-03-01

    The frontal sinus is a sturdy part of the skull that is likely to be retrieved for forensic investigations. We evaluated frontal sinus parameters in paranasal sinus computed tomography (CT) images for sex determination. The study was conducted on 200 normal paranasal sinus CT images of 100 men and 100 women of Persian origin. We categorized the studied population into three age groups of 20-34, 35-49 and ⩾ 50 years. The number of partial septa in the right frontal sinus and the maximum height and width were significantly different between the two sexes. The highest precision for sex determination was for the maximum height of the left frontal sinus (61.3%). In the 20-34 years age-group, height and width of the frontal sinus were significantly different between the two sexes and the height of the left sinus had the highest precision (60.8%). In the 35-49 years age-group, right anterior-posterior diameter had a sex determination precision of 52.3%. No frontal sinus parameter reached a statistically significant level for sex determination in the ⩾ 50 years age-group. The number of septa and scallopings were not useful in sex determination. Frontal sinus parameters did not have a high precision in sex determination among Persian adults.

  10. [The role of carbocystein in the treatment of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Piotr; Leszczyńska, Małgorzata; Mielcarek-Kuchta, Daniela

    2012-09-01

    Chronic sinusitis is one of the most common presenting complaints of all doctor visits in the United States and Europe, with more than 13% of people affected in any given year. This disease has a wide range of impact on communities. Patients with recurrent or chronic sinusitis report a deteriorative sense of general health and vitality, when compared to general population. In our Department we perform about 600 functional endoscopic sinus surgeries (FESS) per year. Chronic rhinosinusitis represents a spectrum of inflammatory and infectious processes concurrently affecting the nose and paranasal sinuses. Among chronic paranasal sinusitis one must single out paranasal sinusitis with and without polyps. In the paranasal sinusitis patomechanism the blockage of natural ostium plays one of the most important roles. The closure of sinus proper ventilation passages leads to the triggering of many pathological occurrences within mucous membrane of this region. The treatment of paranasal sinusitis is diversified and involves a surgical procedure as well as anti-inflammatory and antiallergic drugs (medications) and mucolytics. Its purpose is to clear the nose through the elimination of bacterial infection, liquidating and removal of lying discharge and the restoration of the proper muco-ciliary transportation, and through this the improvement of local condition and faster recovery. In this work the usage of carboxycysteine to treat paranasal sinus conditions has been presented.

  11. Retrograde coronary sinus versus aortic root perfusion with cold cardioplegia: randomized study of levels of cardiac enzymes in 40 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Guiraudon, G.M.; Campbell, C.S.; McLellan, D.G.; Kostuk, W.J.; Purves, P.D.; MacDonald, J.L.; Cleland, A.G.; Tadros, N.B.

    1986-11-01

    Myocardial injury was assessed with the use of enzyme indexes in 40 patients randomly assigned to one of two groups undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. Twenty patients received cold cardioplegia delivered by retrograde coronary sinus perfusion and 20 received cardioplegic solution by anterograde aortic root perfusion. Creatine kinase isoenzyme MB and lactate dehydrogenese isoenzyme 1 and isoenzyme 2 assays were carried out on blood samples obtained from the coronary sinus before aortic cross-clamping and 0, 5, and 30 min after aortic unclamping. Levels of these enzymes were also obtained from venous blood samples before aortic cross-clamping and 3, 8, 14, and 20 hr after aortic unclamping and 2, 3, 4, and 5 days after surgery. Preoperative and postoperative hemodynamic measurements (Swan-Ganz catheter) and radionuclide wall motion studies were also obtained for comparison. There was no overall significant difference between the two groups postoperatively in terms of enzyme indexes, hemodynamic measurements, or results of wall motion studies. We conclude that retrograde coronary sinus perfusion is an alternative to aortic root perfusion in delivering cold cardioplegia. More studies are required to determine which subgroup of patients with coronary artery disease may benefit from retrograde coronary perfusion.

  12. Venous thromboembolic disease and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fennerty, A

    2006-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease is a common cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with cancer. Patients have a 5–6‐fold increase in the risk for a venous thromboembolism (VTE) compared with the general population, increasing to 6–7‐fold for some cancers. Prophylaxis for VTE should be considered whenever additional risk factors intervene. About 10% of patients with an idiopathic VTE will harbour an occult cancer. Half of these can probably be detected after a focused history, examination, routine blood tests and a chest x ray. The remaining cases may be diagnosed with an intensive screening protocol. About 60% of patients diagnosed on screening will have early disease, but we do not know whether screening improves the outcome. Evidence suggests that patients with cancer and a VTE should be treated with low‐molecular‐weight heparin, and treatment continued until the cancer is cured. PMID:17068274

  13. Varicose veins and chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Partsch, H

    2009-11-01

    Varicose veins are a very frequent disorder with prevalence in our adult population between 14% for large varices and 59% for small teleangiectasias. Subjective symptoms may be very non-specific. The term "chronic venous insufficiency (CVI)" defines functional abnormalities of the venous system producing advanced symptoms like oedema, skin changes or leg ulcers. Both entities, varicose veins and CVI, may be summarized under the term "chronic venous disorders" which includes the full spectrum of morphological and functional abnormalities of the venous system. A classification system to describe chronic venous disorders regarding clinical appearance, etiology, anatomical distribution and pathophysiology has been proposed under the acronym of CEAP. The revised version of the CEAP classification contains also definitions of clinical signs and suggests three levels of apparative investigations adjusted to the clinical stage. Concerning the etiology of venous disorders controversial theories exist leading to different therapeutic concepts. As a matter of fact there is a vicious circle between structural changes in valves and venous wall and hemodynamic forces leading to reflux and venous hypertension. Different methods for treating varicose veins are available producing satisfactory early outcome in most cases, but followed by a high recurrence rate after years. Chronic venous insufficiency requires "chronic management". Compression therapy by bandages for initial treatment of severe stages and maintenance therapy using medical compression stockings is essential. In addition correction of venous refluxes by surgery or endovenous procedures including echo-guided foam sclerotherapy should be considered in every single case.

  14. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented as cavernous sinus tumour.

    PubMed

    Moona, Mohammad Shafi; Mehdi, Itrat

    2011-12-01

    A 32 year Libyan male presented with the complaints of headache and diplopia. He was diagnosed with a cavernous sinus meningioma on the basis of MRI findings but no initial biopsy was taken. Depending on the radiologic diagnosis the patient was treated with gamma knife surgery twice, abroad. During follow up he developed left ear deafness and left cervical lymph adenopathy. An ENT evaluation with biopsy from the nasopharynx and cervical lymph node was taken. The histopathologic diagnosis of the resected tumour showed a nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cervical lymph node metastasis (poorly differentiated lympho-epithelial carcinoma). The cavernous sinus tumour which was initially treated as a meningioma was in fact metastasis from the nasopharyngeal carcinoma, making this an interesting and rare occurrence.

  15. Sinus pause in association with Lyme carditis.

    PubMed

    Oktay, A Afsin; Dibs, Samer R; Friedman, Harvey

    2015-06-01

    Lyme disease is the most prevalent tick-borne disease in the United States. It is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Cardiac involvement is seen in 4% to 10% of patients with Lyme disease. The principal manifestation of Lyme carditis is self-limited conduction system disease, with predominant involvement of the atrioventricular node. On rare occasions, Lyme carditis patients present with other conduction system disorders such as bundle branch block, intraventricular conduction delay, and supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia. We report the unusual case of a 59-year-old man who presented with new-onset symptomatic sinus pauses one month after hiking in upstate New York. To our knowledge, this is the first case report from North America that describes the relationship between symptomatic sinus pause and Lyme carditis.

  16. Aspergillosis of the nose and paranasal sinuses.

    PubMed Central

    Milroy, C M; Blanshard, J D; Lucas, S; Michaels, L

    1989-01-01

    Fulminant aspergillosis was diagnosed on nasal biopsy in a 49 year old man who had features of an aspergilloma. Further postmortem examination of this area was performed and the results were contrasted with the histological features of other Aspergillus infections. The nasal biopsy specimen and postmortem examination showed infiltrating Aspergillus hyphae with tissue necrosis and little inflammatory response. The hyphae were easily seen with routine stains. This contrasts with the findings in invasive aspergillosis where there is fibrosis and a granulomatous response to the Aspergillus hyphae. The hyphae are seen in giant cells using fungal stains. In the saprophytic infections aspergilloma and allergic Aspergillus sinusitis there is no tissue invasion or destruction. Aspergillus infections of the nose and paranasal sinuses often require biopsy for accurate diagnosis. As treatment varies pathologists need to be able to distinguish the different patterns of infection. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 PMID:2921352

  17. Infantile Maxillary Sinus Osteomyelitis Mimicking Orbital Cellulitis

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Nagarajan; Ramamoorthy, Nathan; Panchanathan, Suresh; Balasundaram, Jothiramalingam S

    2014-01-01

    Periorbital soft tissue swelling may result due to primary orbital pathology or from adjacent facio-maxillary or sino-nasal inflammatory causes. Osteomyelitis of maxilla in the pediatric age group is a rare entity in this era of antibiotics. We present an 11-month-old female infant who was brought with peri-orbital selling and purulent nasal discharge. Computed Tomography showed erosions of the walls of maxillary sinus suggestive of osteomyelitis. Culture of sinus scraping showed Staphylococcus aureus growth and the child improved with intravenous cloxacillin therapy. This case is presented due to the rarity of its presentation in this age group and for awareness to consider this entity in children having fever and peri-orbital swelling. PMID:25191055

  18. Cavernous sinus syndrome: need for early diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Jaime; Burbano, Lisseth Estefania; Reyes, Saúl; Barreras, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous sinus syndrome (CSS) is a rare condition characterised by ophthalmoplegia, proptosis, ocular and conjunctival congestion, trigeminal sensory loss and Horner’s syndrome. These signs and symptoms result from the involvement of the cranial nerves passing through the cavernous sinus. We report the case of a 53-year-old man with a history of daily stabbing headache associated with dizziness, progressive blurred vision, right ocular pain, ptosis and ophthalmoplegia. After working up the patient, a meningioma was identified as the cause of the CSS. Despite advances in neuroimaging techniques, in some cases, the aetiology of CSS remains difficult to determine. We highlight the clinical and radiological features of a meningioma, one of the causes of CSS. Early diagnosis and treatment of CSS play a key role in a better prognosis. PMID:25819816

  19. Sinus Pause in Association with Lyme Carditis

    PubMed Central

    Dibs, Samer R.; Friedman, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most prevalent tick-borne disease in the United States. It is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Cardiac involvement is seen in 4% to 10% of patients with Lyme disease. The principal manifestation of Lyme carditis is self-limited conduction system disease, with predominant involvement of the atrioventricular node. On rare occasions, Lyme carditis patients present with other conduction system disorders such as bundle branch block, intraventricular conduction delay, and supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia. We report the unusual case of a 59-year-old man who presented with new-onset symptomatic sinus pauses one month after hiking in upstate New York. To our knowledge, this is the first case report from North America that describes the relationship between symptomatic sinus pause and Lyme carditis. PMID:26175640

  20. Septic Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arian, Mahdieh; Kamali, Azadeh; Tabatabaeichehr, Mahbubeh; Arashnia, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is a rare condition that can result in high mortality and morbidity rates if not treated immediately. CST may be aseptic or septic. Less common primary sites of infection include the tonsils, soft palate, middle ear, and orbit. Reported cases of middle ear infection are very rare, and response to treatment is poor. Case Presentation The present study is a case report of acute otitis media which led to septic cavernous sinus thrombosis in a 56-year-old woman in Bojnord city, North Khorasan, Iran. Conclusions Findings of laboratory tests and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Clinical-based medical care led to successful management of the patient with broad spectrum intravenous antibiotics that prevented serious complications. PMID:27781123

  1. [Bases of central venous catheterization].

    PubMed

    Schmalz-Ott, Stéphane; Monti, Matteo; Vollenweider, Peter

    2008-10-29

    Central venous catheterization is a frequently performed procedure in internal medicine units. Residents in training frequently share the same questions, doubts and fears about this procedure : "Should I perform a subclavian catheterization in a patient with mild thrombopenia?"; "Which site has the lesser complication rate?"; "After how long does a catheter need to be replaced?". This mini-review of the current literature tries to answer this and other questions.

  2. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring during hyperventilation in healthy volunteers with a novel optoacoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Deyo, Donald J.; Henkel, Sheryl N.; Seeton, Roger; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2013-03-01

    Monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation is useful to facilitate management of patients with severe or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prompt recognition of low cerebral venous oxygenation is a key to avoiding secondary brain injury associated with brain hypoxia. In specialized clinical research centers, jugular venous bulb catheters have been used for cerebral venous oxygenation monitoring and have demonstrated that oxygen saturation < 50% (normal range is 55-75%) correlates with poor clinical outcome. We developed an optoacoustic technique for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation. Recently, we designed and built a novel, medical grade optoacoustic system operating in the near-infrared spectral range for continuous, real-time oxygenation monitoring in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein. In this work, we designed and built a novel SSS optoacoustic probe and developed a new algorithm for SSS oxygenation measurement. The SSS signals were measured in healthy volunteers during voluntary hyperventilation, which induced changes in SSS oxygenation. Simultaneously, we measured exhaled carbon dioxide concentration (EtCO2) using capnography. Good temporal correlation between decreases in optoacoustically measured SSS oxygenation and decreases in EtCO2 was obtained. Decreases in EtCO2 from normal values (35-45 mmHg) to 20-25 mmHg resulted in SSS oxygenation decreases by 3-10%. Intersubject variability of the responses may relate to nonspecific brain activation associated with voluntary hyperventilation. The obtained data demonstrate the capability of the optoacoustic system to detect in real time minor changes in the SSS blood oxygenation.

  3. Successful endovascular treatment of a spinal dural arteriovenous fistula with trisacryl gelatin microspheres.

    PubMed

    Rodiek, S O

    2002-09-01

    We report on the endovascular treatment of a spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) in a 50-year-old man, who presented with rapidly progressive paraparesis of lower extremities. Standard treatment of SDAVFs is by either embolization with liquid adhesive agents like NBCA or microsurgery. In our case the fistula was successfully occluded by application of trisacryl gelatin microspheres (TGM). Due to a small size of the feeding intercostal artery a superselective catheterization of the fistula itself by a microcatheter could not be performed. The particles were hence delivered through a diagnostic spinal catheter positioned within the proximal part of the feeding intercostal artery. Control MRI five weeks after intervention showed normalized perimedullary veins, which were dilated and tortuous initially. It also displayed a clinically silent focal ischaemia within the spongiosa of an adjacent hemi-vertebra due to particle passage through intersegmental vascular collaterals. A control angiogram confirmed the disappearance of the fistula. The patient underwent physiotherapy and experienced significant improvement of his gait within three months after intervention.

  4. Case report: management of persistent dural anastomotic dehiscence in a patient treated with bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Elstner, Kristen E; Clarke, Frederick K; Turner, Scott J

    2013-12-01

    A 55-year-old woman with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme on palliative chemotherapy including Avastin, an angiogenesis inhibitor, presents with several episodes of bacterial meningitis secondary to a persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Anastomotic dehiscence of the dura mater in the region of the previous craniotomy sites was evident. Attempts to repair the cranial CSF leak with external ventricular drain and ventriculoperitoneal shunt were unsuccessful. This patient underwent repair of the dural defects with a radial forearm free fascial flap, with consequent resolution of the CSF leak.A literature search was performed, and the available data on angiogenesis inhibitors and anastomotic dehiscence was reviewed, specifically focusing on delayed anastomotic dehiscence in patients receiving Avastin (bevacizumab). Although the potential complications of anastomotic dehiscence in patients receiving angiogenesis inhibitors are well documented, there is comparatively little documentation in the literature regarding delayed wound or anastomotic dehiscence. Twenty such cases were found cited in the literature; however, only one study was found which specifically considered angiogenesis inhibitors within the context of central nervous system malignancies.

  5. Radiographic imaging of the distal dural ring for determining the intradural or extradural location of aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Beretta, Federica; Sepahi, Ali Nader; Zuccarello, Mario; Tomsick, Thomas A; Keller, Jeffrey T

    2005-11-01

    The effectiveness of several anatomical and radiological landmarks proposed to determine whether an aneurysm is located intradurally or extradurally is still debated. In anatomical and radiological studies, we examined the relationships of the distal dural ring (DDR) to the internal carotid artery (ICA) and surrounding bony structures to aid in the localization of aneurysms near the DDR. Anatomical relationships were examined by performing dissections on 10 specimens (5 formalin-fixed cadaveric heads). After the position of the DDR, optic nerve, and tuberculum sellae were marked with surgical steel wire, radiographs were taken in multiple projections. The only bony landmark consistently visible on radiographs was the planum sphenoidale. The superior border of the DDR is located at or below the level of the tuberculum sellae, which laterally becomes the superomedial aspect of the optic strut; thus, the optic strut marks the dorsal limit of the DDR. On 50 dry skulls, we measured the vertical distance between the planum sphenoidale and medial aspect of the optic strut (5.0 +/- 0.4 mm), the interoptic strut distance (14.4 +/- 1.4 mm), and the linear distance between the most posterior aspect of the planum sphenoidale (limbus sphenoidale) and the tuberculum sellae (6.0 +/- 0.5 mm). Using these measurements and the planum sphenoidale, tuberculum sellae, and optic strut as reference landmarks, we determined the location of the aneurysm relative to the DDR on angiographic images. In this way, we were able to identify whether lesions were intra- or extradural.

  6. The advantages of balloon assistance in endovascular embolization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Moscovici, Samuel; Itshayek, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular embolization is accepted as an alternative to surgical management of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVF) in most patients; however, when the feeder vessel arises from the trunk vessel with an acutely angled origin, microcatheter navigation may be difficult, hazardous, and sometimes impossible. We propose a technique that eases microguidewire engagement and microcatheterization of arteries that arise at very acute angles with the assistance of a parallel compliant balloon that acts as supporter, guider, and protector. This technique was successfully applied in three consecutive patients with spinal DAVF with unfavorable vascular anatomy that limited selective microcatheterization. The balloon supports and guides the microguidewire along the feeder (supportive role). The balloon can then be placed at the origin of the feeder vessel and inflated during embolization to prevent liquid agent reflux (protective role). Use of this technique as a first option reduces procedure time and radiation exposure. A limiting factor is the need for a relatively large working channel to allow the combined use of a balloon and a microcatheter.

  7. Tentorial dural arteriovenous fistula presenting as myelopathy: Case series and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Robert; Ali, Rushna; Kole, Max; Dorbeistein, Curtis; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; Khan, Muhib

    2014-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) is a rare type of cerebral arteriovenous malformation. Common presenting symptoms are related to hemorrhage. However, rarely these patients may present with myelopathy. We present two cases of DAVF presenting as rapidly progressive myelopathy. Two treatment options are available: microsurgical interruption of the fistula and endovascular embolization. These treatment options of DAVFs have improved significantly in the last decade. The optimal treatment of DAVFs remains controversial, and there is an ongoing debate as to whether primary endovascular or primary microsurgical treatment is the optimal management for these lesions. However, despite treatment a high percentage of patients are still left with severe disability. The potential for functional ambulation in patients with DAVF is related to the time of intervention. This emphasizes the important of early diagnosis and early intervention in DAVF. The eventual outcome may depend on several factors, such as the duration of symptoms, the degree of disability before treatment, and the success of the initial procedure to close the fistula. The usage of magnetic resonance imaging and selective angiography has significantly improved the ability to characterize DAVFs, however, these lesions remain inefficiently diagnosed. If intervention is delayed even prolonged time in rehabilitation does not change the grave prognosis. This review outlines the presentation, classication and management of DAVF as well as discussing patient outcomes. PMID:25516869

  8. The Incidence of Trigeminocardiac Reflex in Endovascular Treatment of Dural Arteriovenous Fistula with Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Lv, X.; Li, Y.; Jiang, C.; Wu, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary This paper reports the incidence of trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) in endovascular treatment of dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) with Onyx. The consecutive case histories of 45 patients with DAVFs, treated with Onyx transarterially and transvenously, from February 2005 to February 2008 at Beijing Tiantan Hospital, China, were retrospectively reviewed. The time period was limited as the anesthetic and intravascular procedure was performed under the same standardized anesthetic protocol and by the same team. The TCR rate was subsequently calculated. Of the 45 patients, five showed evidence of TCR during transarterial Onyx injection and transvenous DMSO injection. Their HR fell 50% during intravascular procedures compared with levels immediately before the stimulus. However, blood pressure values were stable in all cases. The TCR rate for all patients was 11.1% (95% CI, 4 to 24%), 7.7% (95% CI, 2 to 21%) in patients treated intraarterially and 33.3% (4 to 78%) in patients treated intravenously. Once HR has fallen, intravenous atropine is indicated to block the depressor response and prevention further TCR episodes. TCR may occur due to chemical stimulus of DMSO and Onyx cast formation under a standardized anesthetic protocol and should be blunted by atropine. PMID:20377980

  9. Dural reconstruction by fascia using a temperature-controlled CO2 laser soldering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forer, Boaz; Vasilyev, Tamar; Brosh, Tamar; Kariv, Naam; Gil, Ziv; Fliss, Dan M.; Katzir, Abraham

    2005-04-01

    Conventional methods for dura repair are normally based on sutures or stitches. These methods have several disadvantages: (1) The dura is often brittle, and the standard procedures are difficult and time consuming. (2) The seal is leaky. (3) The introduction of a foreign body (e.g. sutures) may cause an inflammatory response. In order to overcome these difficulties we used a temperature controlled fiber optic based CO2 laser soldering system. In a set of in vitro experiments we generated a hole of diameter 10 mm in the dura of a pig corpse, covered the hole with a segment of fascia, and soldered the fascia to the edges of the hole, using 47% bovine albumin as a solder. The soldering was carried out spot by spot, and each spot was heated to 65° C for 3-6 seconds. The soldered dura was removed and the burst pressure of the soldered patch was measured. The average value for microscopic muscular side soldering was 194 mm Hg. This is much higher than the maximal physiological pressure of the CSF fluid in the brain, which is 15 mm Hg. In a set of in vivo experiments, fascia patches were soldered on holes in five farm pigs. The long term results of these experiments were very promising. In conclusion, we have developed an advanced technique for dural reconstruction, which will find important clinical applications.

  10. Surgery of the Sinuses and Eyes.

    PubMed

    Schleining, Jennifer A

    2016-11-01

    Conditions of the head requiring surgery in cattle are not uncommon when considering the incidence of conditions such as ocular squamous cell carcinoma and requests for surgical dehorning. Surgery involving the eyes in cattle is relatively common, whereas surgery of the paranasal sinuses is less common. Generally speaking, however, surgery for conditions of the head tend to have a more favorable prognosis when there is early intervention.

  11. Paranasal Sinus Involvement in Metastatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Fadel, Francois; Smith, Peter R.; Ayaz, Asim; Sundaram, Krishnamurthi

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic carcinoma involving the paranasal sinuses is uncommon. One hundred-sixty seven cases have been published in the literature since 1951. Symptoms, signs, and rhinoscopic and imaging findings are often nonspecific, and the diagnosis may be missed for considerable time. Therefore, a high level of suspicion is warranted in patients with known malignancies presenting with persistent or recurrent rhinosinusitis or facial complaints. PMID:23946928

  12. [Invasive maxilar sinusitis by Rhizopus oryzae].

    PubMed

    Perea, S; del Palacio, A; Gil, R; de la Serna, J; Mata, R; Arribi, A

    1997-12-01

    We herein present a diabetic with non Hodgkin lymphoma patient that had been treated with steroids and developed fungal invasive sinusitis. The patient had intensive facial pain that did not respond to antibiotics and on clinical inspection had a necrotic lesion on right nasal area. A smear and biopsy tissue showed broad non septate hyphae and on cultures Rhizopus oryzae was isolated. There was an unfavorable outcome, and the patient died even though liposomal Amphotericin B was administered and surgical treatment was performed.

  13. [Third cranial nerve palsy in sphenoid sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Dores, Luís Almeida; Simão, Marco Alveirinho; Marques, Marta Canas; Dias, Éscar

    2014-01-01

    Sphenoid sinus disease is particular not only for its clinical presentation, as well as their complications. Although rare, these may present as cranial nerve deficits, so it is important to have a high index of suspicion and be familiar with its diagnosis and management. Symptoms are often nonspecific, but the most common are headache, changes in visual acuity and diplopia due to dysfunction of one or more ocular motor nerves. The authors report a case of a 59 years-old male, who was referred to the ENT emergency department with frontal headaches for one week which had progressively worsened and were associated, since the last 12 hours, with diplopia caused by left third cranial nerve palsy. Neurologic examination was normal aside from the left third cranial nerve palsy. Anterior and posterior rhinoscopy excluded the presence of nasal masses and purulent rhinorrhea. The CT scan revealed a soft tissue component and erosion of the roof of the left sphenoid sinus. Patient was admitted for intravenous antibiotics and steroids treatment without any benefit after 48 hours. He was submitted to endoscopic sinus surgery with resolution of the symptoms 10 days after surgery. The authors present this case for its rarity focusing on the importance of differential diagnosis in patients with headaches and cranial nerves palsies.

  14. Hereditary thrombophilia in cerebral venous thrombosis: a study from India.

    PubMed

    Pai, Navin; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2013-07-01

    A systematic study of thrombophilia markers in a large series of patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) from India is scarce. The present study was undertaken to know the prevalence of common hereditary thrombophilia in a large series of CVT patients from India. Six hundred and twelve (354 men, 219 women and 39 children) consecutive patients with CVT admitted to various hospitals in Mumbai between 2001 and 2010 were investigated for the common thrombophilia markers, that is, protein C (PC), protein S, antithrombin (AT), and factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation. The main presenting clinical manifestations included papilledema (62%), headache (62%), hemiparesis (48%), seizures (31%), and cranial nerve palsy (7%). All the patients were managed with heparin followed by warfarin during the succeeding 6 months. Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis was the commonest site (74%) followed by cortical venous thrombosis (15%). Associated clinical pathologies were dehydration, sepsis, pregnancy and puerperium, malaria, and tuberculosis; but in the majority of patients, there was no obvious cause. Eighteen percent of the patients had any of the thrombophilia markers studied; PC deficiency was the commonest thrombophilia marker followed by deficiency of protein S, FVL mutation and AT deficiency. The men below 45 years with PC deficiency (P=0.03) and women with protein S deficiency were significantly higher (P=0.04). In conclusion, CVT is not an uncommon cause of neurological deficit as was presented in earlier reports. Pregnancy and puerperium-related CVT was much less common. Thrombophilia markers accounted for approximately one-fifth of the patients. Death due to CVT has shown remarkable reduction (13%) because of early diagnosis and appropriate anticoagulation.

  15. Atrial septal defect combined with partial anomalous pulmonary venous return: complete anatomic and functional characterization by cardiac magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Dellegrottaglie, Santo; Pedrotti, Patrizia; Pedretti, Stefano; Mauri, Francesco; Roghi, Alberto

    2008-11-01

    The presented case regards a 17-year-old male with new-onset right bundle branch block and significantly enlarged right-heart sections as the only pathologic finding on transthoracic echocardiography. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) revealed the presence of a superior sinus venosus atrial septal defect associated with a partial anomalous pulmonary venous return, with the right upper lobe pulmonary vein draining into the superior vena cava. CMR has developed in recent years into an accurate modality for non-invasive evaluation of patients with congenital heart disease, especially through improvements in quality and speed of image acquisition. With echocardiography, sinus venosus defects and anomalous pulmonary vein drainage may be more easily detected by a transoesophageal approach because of the proximity of the transducer to the atrial septum. CMR may be specifically recommended as an alternative to transoesophageal echocardiography in any patient with an unexplained dilatation of the right ventricle.

  16. Isolated Sphenoid Sinus Lesions: Experience with a Few Rare Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Sadashiva, Nishanth; Nandeesh, B. N.; Shukla, Dhaval; Bhat, Dhananjaya; Somanna, Sampath; Devi, Bhagavatula Indira

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The sphenoid sinus is often neglected because of its difficult access. The deep position of the sphenoid sinus hinders early diagnosis of pathologies in that location. Delayed diagnosis can cause serious complications due to proximity to many important structures. Objectives: The aim of this study is to demonstrate different pathologies which can affect the sphenoid sinus and elucidate the findings. Methods: Cases of isolated sphenoid sinus lesions encountered in the neurosurgical setting which had rare pathologies are discussed. Pathologies such as Langerhans cell histiocytosis, solitary plasmacytoma, chordoma, pituitary adenoma, leiomyosarcoma, fungal infection, and mucocele which appeared primarily in sphenoid sinus are discussed along with their imaging features and pathological findings. Conclusion: Multitude of different pathologies can occur in sphenoid sinus. Detailed preoperative imaging is very helpful, but transnasal biopsy and histological study are required often for definitive diagnosis. The possible advantages of early diagnosis before spread of pathology for prognosis cannot be overemphasized. PMID:28149092

  17. Misplaced central venous catheter in the jugular venous arch exposed during dissection before sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Tae-Eun; Jee, Daelim

    2008-11-01

    Subclavian vein catheterization rarely results in misplacement of the central venous catheter (CVC) into the jugular venous arch (JVA). We present a case of misplacement of the CVC into the JVA during cardiac surgery.

  18. Differential diagnosis of allergic rhinitis and sinusitis an expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Creider, R.D.; Sundar Singh, P.S.

    1996-12-31

    Nasal congestion is a common problem for many people. It is a symptom of chronic sinusitis and also a characteristic of allergic rhinitis. Individuals frequently confuse sinusitis and allergic rhinitis. The expert system described below will diagnose the problem to be either rhinitis or sinusitis. In this paper we describe the expert system, the need for such an expert system and the process of developing the system.

  19. Pleomorphic adenoma of the frontal sinus masquerading as a mucocele.

    PubMed

    Chew, Yok Kuan; Brito-Mutunayagam, Sushil; Chong, Aun Wee; Prepageran, Narayanan; Chandran, Patricia Ann; Khairuzzana, Baharudin; Lingham, Omkara Rubini

    2015-12-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common type of benign salivary gland tumor. It can also be found in the larynx, ear, neck, and nasal septum. It is rarely found in the maxillary sinus, and it has never been reported in the frontal sinus. We report a case of pleomorphic adenoma of the frontal sinus that masqueraded as a mucocele. We discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this patient, and we review the literature.

  20. Drug treatment of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulceration: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Cheatle, T R; Scurr, J H; Smith, P D

    1991-01-01

    Treatment of venous insufficiency and venous ulceration has for many years relied on established principles of compression and limb elevation. Drug treatment has been of little benefit. In recent years, a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying skin damage in venous disease has allowed more rational pharmacotherapeutic approaches to be made. This review examines these, with special reference to current theories of the cause of venous ulceration. PMID:2061904

  1. Metastasis of prostate adenocarcinoma to the frontal and ethmoid sinus

    PubMed Central

    Akdemir, Fatih; Aldemir, Mustafa; Çakar, Hasan; Güler, Gülnur

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial metastasis of prostate cancer is rarely seen, and there are few studies in this regard in the literature. Most of these studies in the literature comprise the metastasis of prostate cancer to the sphenoid sinus, and metastasis to the frontal and ethmoid sinus is a much rare entity. Association of visual symptoms, epistaxis, headache, and hematuria may indicate a urologic malignancy in terms of the origin of the primary tumor. This study was aimed to present the prostate cancer case of a 73-year-old patient whose paranasal sinus tomograms revealed the presence of frontal and ethmoid sinus metastasis. PMID:27909626

  2. Anatomic variations of posterior paranasal sinuses and optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Efendić, Alma; Muharemović, Edin; Skomorac, Rasim; Bečulić, Hakija; Šestić, Sabina; Halilović, Benjamin; Mahmić-Kaknjo, Mersiha

    2017-02-01

    Aim To define direct anatomical relations of the sphenoidal (alae minores), ethmoidal sinuses and optic nerve, with an emphasis on determining the effect of age on pneumatisation and dehiscence. Methods This retrospective, descriptive study involved 60 consecutive patients: 30 patients younger than 30 and30 patients older than 60 years of age. All patients underwent computerized tomography(CT). The relationship of the optic nerve and the sphenoidal and ethmoidal sinuses was classified. The presence of dehiscence in the bone structures, forming the optic canal, was checked. Dehiscence was defined as absence of visible bone density located between the sinus and the optic nerve. Protrusion of the optic nerve into the sphenoidal sinus was defined as optic nerve surrounded by pneumatised space. Results The most common type of relation between the optic nerve and sphenoidal sinus was type I, where the optic nerve was immediately adjacent to the lateral or superior wall of the sphenoidal sinus, without impression on the sinus wall. Dehiscence was documented in 15 (25%) cases, it was more common in older patients (8, 27%) than in younger ones (7, 23%). The pneumatisation processes were more frequent in patients over 60 (5, 17%) than in those younger than 30 years (4, 13%). Conclusion Surgeons and ophthalmologists should be aware of high frequency of dehiscence of sphenoidal sinus walls when treating adult patients in our population, especially when evaluating risks and complications of surgical procedures or when diagnosing inflammatory or tumorous processes in the close vicinity of posterior paranasal sinuses.

  3. [Use of bone blocks by sinus floor lifting].

    PubMed

    Nazarian, D N; Karaian, A S; Zakharov, G K; Seniuk, A N; Aliev, S E

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents clinical cases illustrating two sinus floor lifting technique performed for dental implant placement in areas with maxillary sinus floor atrophy: bone block fixation for vertical augmentation (used for immediate implant placement by sinus floor atrophy to 1 mm thickness) and perforation closure. Sinus floor perforations wider than 5 mm were repaired by mandible bone graft providing the possibility of immediate implantation. Bone block was fixed between cortical layers of the maxilla with no internal fixation. Free bone blocks provide additional primary stability of dental implants.

  4. Coronary Flow Impacts Aortic Leaflet Mechanics and Aortic Sinus Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon L; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical stresses on aortic valve leaflets are well-known mediators for initiating processes leading to calcific aortic valve disease. Given that non-coronary leaflets calcify first, it may be hypothesized that coronary flow originating from the ostia significantly influences aortic leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics. High resolution time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to map the spatiotemporal characteristics of aortic sinus blood flow and leaflet motion with and without physiological coronary flow in a well-controlled in vitro setup. The in vitro setup consists of a porcine aortic valve mounted in a physiological aorta sinus chamber with dynamically controlled coronary resistance to emulate physiological coronary flow. Results were analyzed using qualitative streak plots illustrating the spatiotemporal complexity of blood flow patterns, and quantitative velocity vector and shear stress contour plots to show differences in the mechanical environments between the coronary and non-coronary sinuses. It is shown that the presence of coronary flow pulls the classical sinus vorticity deeper into the sinus and increases flow velocity near the leaflet base. This creates a beneficial increase in shear stress and washout near the leaflet that is not seen in the non-coronary sinus. Further, leaflet opens approximately 10% farther into the sinus with coronary flow case indicating superior valve opening area. The presence of coronary flow significantly improves leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics in a manner that would reduce low wall shear stress conditions while improving washout at the base of the leaflet.

  5. Maxillary sinus atelectasis in a wild born gibbon (Hylobates moloch).

    PubMed

    Koppe, Thomas; Röhrer-Ertl, Olav; Breier, Silvana; Wallner, Claus-Peter

    2006-04-01

    In a mixed sex sample of ten adult gibbon (Hylobates moloch) skulls, one cranium of a male with maxillary sinus atelectasis of the left side was identified. While external inspection revealed a slight drop of the left orbital floor, serial coronal computer tomography (CT) scans show characteristic changes of the left maxillary sinus and its surrounding structures. In addition to the sunken orbital floor, radiological features of the specimen include an inward bowing of the medial sinus wall, sinus opacification, and a reduction in maxillary sinus size to a slit-like cavity, which suggest a diagnosis of silent sinus syndrome. This report is the first, to our knowledge, of maxillary sinus atelectasis in a non-human primate. This finding is valuable for the understanding of the pathogenesis and etiology of maxillary sinus atelectasis. At the same time, however, paleoanthropologists and primatologists may refer to this information when dealing with the interpretation of maxillary sinus pneumatization of partially broken archaeological and fossil skulls.

  6. Traversing and dilating venous collaterals: a useful adjunct in left ventricular electrode placement.

    PubMed

    Abben, Richard P; Chaisson, Gary; Nair, Vinod

    2010-06-01

    In patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), the left ventricular electrode cannot always be positioned in the preferred lateral or posterolateral locations due to technical factors and anatomic variations in the coronary sinus. Recent reports also suggest that CRT outcomes are improved by pacing the site of latest dyssynchrony and accessing these regions is not always possible. We report the utility of applying a technique described in the interventional literature over the past 3 years, effectively traversing and dilating collateral channels. Our patients demonstrated either no venous targets in the optimal location, or problems accessing this location using a antegrade approach. Subsequently, collaterals supplying this region were traversed with a guidewire using a retrograde approach and dilated with a balloon catheter. In the first case, the pacing electrode was then advanced in similar fashion and successfully positioned in an ideal lateral location. In the second case, the retrograde guidewire was captured with a vascular snare and pulled into a second guiding catheter, allowing appropriate dilatation and stenting of a problematic proximal venous stenosis with resultant facile placement of the pacing electrode. This technique offers a potential alternative to patients with challenging venous anatomy as a method to facilitate optimal CRT outcomes.

  7. Correlative anatomy for the electrophysiologist, part II: cardiac ganglia, phrenic nerve, coronary venous system.

    PubMed

    Lachman, Nirusha; Syed, Faisal F; Habib, Ammar; Kapa, Suraj; Bisco, Susan E; Venkatachalam, K L; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac Ganglia, Phrenic Nerve, Coronary Venous System. There is an increasing need for invasive electrophysiologists to appreciate the exact anatomy of the epicardial space and the coronary veins. The location of the epicardial fat, the complementary relationship with the main cardiac veins, and the location of sensitive structures (arteries, phrenic nerve, esophagus) have become required knowledge for electrophysiologists, and accessing the epicardial space with this thorough knowledge of the pericardial sinuses and recesses is essential to allow radiographic correlation during catheter manipulation. In this review, we briefly describe the anatomy of the pericardial space and then discuss the specific correlation for the invasive electrophysiologist, highlighting epicardial access, catheter navigation, and avoidance of collateral injury, with specific attention to the important recesses of the pericardial space, their regional anatomy, and radiographic correlation when navigating catheters to these locations. We also discuss the anatomy of the main cardiac veins in the context of catheter mapping and ablation of the epicardial substrate through the venous system and without subxiphoid pericardial access. In part II of this series we discuss the detailed regional anatomy of the cardiac ganglia, phrenic nerve, and coronary venous system.

  8. Cerebral Venous Thromboembolism in Antiphospholipid Syndrome Successfully Treated with the Combined Use of an Anti-Xa Inhibitor and Corticosteroid.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Masayuki; Iizuka, Natsuko; Shimizu, Yuki; Ichikawa, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    We herein report a case presenting with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) associated with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). The patient developed recurrent CVST followed by a hemorrhagic ischemic stroke despite the use of warfarin during the appropriate therapeutic window. Thus, we substituted warfarin to rivaroxaban with prednisolone and obtained a good clinical course. In addition to the effect of prednisolone of inhibiting elevated lupus anticoagulants and the recurrence of arterial thrombosis, rivaroxaban may prevent CVST and inhibit hypercoagulability induced by corticosteroids. The combination of an anti-Xa inhibitor and corticosteroid may be an alternative treatment for CVST and arterial thrombus with warfarin-resistant APS.

  9. Anatomic (positional) variation of maxillary wisdom teeth with special regard to the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Lanzer, Martin; Pejicic, Rada; Kruse, Astrid L; Schneider, Thomas; Grätz, Klaus W; Lübbers, Heinz-Theo

    2015-01-01

    The removal of wisdom teeth is one of the most common interventions in oral surgery. In order to avoid complications, a profound knowledge of the anatomy of teeth and adjacent tissues is crucial. In the case of maxillary wisdom teeth, their relationship to the maxillary sinus, to the pterygoid fossa, to the maxillary tuber and the adjacent venous plexus is particularly important. Three-dimensional (3D) imaging, for example by means of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), is increasingly utilized in practice. However, the necessity of CBCT imaging is still a matter of intensive debate. The aim of this study was to describe the anatomic (positional) variation of maxillary wisdom teeth and, based on these findings, to elucidate the additional benefit of such imaging. A retrospective case study was performed using patients examined by means of CBCT imaging in the Department of Dento-Maxillofacial Radiology during the period from 2008 to 2013. Primary study variables comprised the spatial relationship of the teeth to the maxillary sinus, the degree of retention and root development, the covering of the root with bone and mucosa, the root configuration, and the developmental stage of the tooth. In addition, the association of the inclination of teeth in the transversal and sagittal plane with the above variables was evaluated. Descriptive statistical parameters were calculated for all results of the examination. In total, CBCT recordings of 713 maxillary wisdom teeth from 430 patients were evaluated. Their mean age was 29.8 years, and the proportion of male patients slightly prevailed (54.4%). Most teeth exhibited fully developed roots (64.1%). Overall 22.9% of third molars were impacted, 32.3% were retained, and 6.5% were erupting. In more than a third of the patients, wisdom teeth were in occlusion. The inclination of the third molars both in the transversal and sagittal plane was significantly associated with the distance of the root from the maxillary sinus as well

  10. Venous thromboembolism in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Clifford M

    2012-02-01

    The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is increasing in the pediatric population. Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have an increased risk of thrombosis due to central venous catheters (CVCs), as well as acquired thrombophilia secondary to inflammation, or deficiencies of anticoagulant proteins due to vitamin K deficiency and/or liver dysfunction. CVC-associated thrombosis commonly results in line occlusion, but may develop into serious life-threatening conditions such as deep venous thrombosis (DVT), superior vena cava syndrome or pulmonary embolism (PE). Post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) may be a long complication. Local occlusion of the catheter tip may be managed with instillation of thrombolytics (such as tPA) within the lumen of the catheter; however, CVC-associated thrombosis involving the proximal veins is most often is treated with systemic anticoagulation. Initial treatment with heparin is a standard approach, but thrombolytic therapy, which may carry higher bleeding risks, should be considered for life and limb threatening episodes of VTE. Recommended duration of anticoagulation with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or warfarin ranges from 3 to 6 months for major removable thrombotic risks; longer anticoagulation is considered for recurrent thrombosis, major persistent thrombophilia, or the continued presence of a major risk factor such as a CVC. While CVCs are the most common risk for development of VTE in children, studies have not demonstrated a clear benefit with routine use of systemic thromboprophylaxis. The incidence and risk factors of VTE in CF patients will be reviewed and principles of diagnosis and management will be summarized.

  11. Travel, venous thromboembolism, and thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Gallus, Alexander S

    2005-02-01

    Current evidence indicates that prolonged air travel predisposes to venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. An effect is seen once travel duration exceeds 6 to 9 hours and becomes obvious in long-haul passengers traveling for 12 or more hours. A recent records linkage study found that increase in thrombosis rate among arriving passengers peaked during the first week and was no longer apparent after 2 weeks. Medium- to long-distance travelers have a 2- to 4-fold increase in relative thrombosis risk compared with nontravelers, but the averaged absolute risk is small (approximately one symptomatic event per 2 million arrivals, with a case-fatality rate of approximately 2%) and there is no evidence that thrombosis is more likely in economy class than in business- or first-class passengers. It remains uncertain whether and to what extent thrombosis risk is increased by short-distance air travel or prolonged travel by motorcar, train, or other means. Most travelers who develop venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism also have one or more other predisposing risk factors that may include older age, obesity, recent injury or surgery, previous thrombosis, venous insufficiency, malignancy, hormonal therapies, or pregnancy. Limited (though theoretically plausible) evidence suggests that factor V Leiden and the prothrombin gene mutation predispose to thrombosis in otherwise healthy travelers. Given that very many passengers with such predispositions do not develop thrombosis, and a lack of prospective studies to link predisposition with disease, it is not now possible to allocate absolute thrombosis risk among intending passengers or to estimate benefit-to-risk ratios or benefit-to-cost ratios for prophylaxis. Randomized comparisons using ultrasound imaging indicate a measurable incidence of subclinical leg vein thrombosis after prolonged air travel, which appears to increase with travel duration and is reduced by graded pressure elastic support stockings. Whether this

  12. The Impact of Central Venous Catheters on Pediatric Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Jaffray, Julie; Bauman, Mary; Massicotte, Patti

    2017-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters (CVCs) in children is escalating, which is likely linked to the increased incidence of pediatric venous thromboembolism (VTE). In order to better understand the specific risk factors associated with CVC-VTE in children, as well as available prevention methods, a literature review was performed. The overall incidence of CVC-VTE was found to range from 0 to 74%, depending on the patient population, CVC type, imaging modality, and study design. Throughout the available literature, there was not a consistent determination regarding whether a particular type of central line (tunneled vs. non-tunneled vs. peripherally inserted vs. implanted), catheter material, insertion technique, or insertion location lead to an increased VTE risk. The patient populations who were found to be most at risk for CVC-VTE were those with cancer, congenital heart disease, gastrointestinal failure, systemic infection, intensive care unit admission, or involved in a trauma. Both mechanical and pharmacological prophylactic techniques have been shown to be successful in preventing VTE in adult patients, but studies in children have yet to be performed or are underpowered. In order to better determine true CVC-VTE risk factors and best preventative techniques, an increase in large, prospective pediatric trials needs to be performed. PMID:28168186

  13. The Impact of Central Venous Catheters on Pediatric Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Jaffray, Julie; Bauman, Mary; Massicotte, Patti

    2017-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters (CVCs) in children is escalating, which is likely linked to the increased incidence of pediatric venous thromboembolism (VTE). In order to better understand the specific risk factors associated with CVC-VTE in children, as well as available prevention methods, a literature review was performed. The overall incidence of CVC-VTE was found to range from 0 to 74%, depending on the patient population, CVC type, imaging modality, and study design. Throughout the available literature, there was not a consistent determination regarding whether a particular type of central line (tunneled vs. non-tunneled vs. peripherally inserted vs. implanted), catheter material, insertion technique, or insertion location lead to an increased VTE risk. The patient populations who were found to be most at risk for CVC-VTE were those with cancer, congenital heart disease, gastrointestinal failure, systemic infection, intensive care unit admission, or involved in a trauma. Both mechanical and pharmacological prophylactic techniques have been shown to be successful in preventing VTE in adult patients, but studies in children have yet to be performed or are underpowered. In order to better determine true CVC-VTE risk factors and best preventative techniques, an increase in large, prospective pediatric trials needs to be performed.

  14. Volumetric myelographic magnetic resonance imaging to localize difficult-to-find spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jonathan M; Kaufmann, Timothy J; Campeau, Norbert G; Cloft, Harry J; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2011-03-01

    Although more prevalent in males in the 6th and 7th decade of life, spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (SDAVFs) are an uncommon cause of progressive myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging and more recently Gd bolus MR angiography have been used to diagnose, radiographically define, and preprocedurally localize the contributing lumbar artery. Three-dimensional myelographic MR imaging sequences have recently been developed for anatomical evaluation of the spinal canal. The authors describe 3 recent cases in which volumetric myelographic MR imaging with a 3D phase-cycled fast imaging employing steady state acquisition (PC-FIESTA) and a 3D constructive interference steady state (CISS) technique were particularly useful not only for documenting an SDAVF, but also for providing localization when CT angiography, MR imaging, MR angiography, and spinal angiography failed to localize the fistula. In a patient harboring an SDAVF at T-4, surgical exploration was performed based on the constellation of findings on the PC-FIESTA images as well as the fact that the spinal segments leading to T-4 were the only ones that the authors were unable to catheterize. In a second patient, who harbored an SDAVF at T-6, after 2 separate angiograms failed to demonstrate the fistula, careful assessment of the CISS images led the authors to focus a third angiogram on the left T-6 intercostal artery and to perform superselective microcatheterization. In a third patient with an SDAVF originating from the lateral sacral branch, the PC-FIESTA sequence demonstrated the arterialized vein extending into the S-1 foramen, leading to a second angiogram and superselective internal iliac injections. The authors concluded that myelographic MR imaging sequences can be useful not only as an aid to diagnosis but also for localization of an SDAVF in complex cases.

  15. Health-related quality of life in patients with spinal dural arteriovenous fistulae.

    PubMed

    Sasamori, Toru; Hida, Kazutoshi; Osanai, Toshiya; Yano, Shunsuke; Seki, Toshitaka; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2017-01-01

    Neurological improvement in patients with spinal dural arteriovenous fistulae (SDAVF) is often partial even after adequate treatment. While treatment outcomes have been evaluated primarily on the basis of the postoperative changes in neurological deficits, outcome measures should also reflect the patient-reported outcome (PRO). We conducted a health-related quality of life (HRQOL) survey in 52 SDAVF patients; 33 (63.5%) completed the short-form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire. They were 25 males and 8 females ranging in age from 47 to 85 years (mean age 70.0 years). The mean follow-up period was 95.6 months. We analyzed the completed questionnaires and examined the clinical factors associated with their HRQOL. After treatment, gait- and micturition disturbances persisted in 31 (93.9%) and 31 (93.9%) of our patients; 26 (78.8%) reported chronic leg pain. The SF-36 scores of treated SDAVF patients were significantly lower than the national average of 50 for all 8 sub-items in the questionnaire. The scores for physical functioning (PF) and role-physical (RP) were particularly low. With the exception of bodily pain (BP), there was a significant negative correlation between the Aminoff-Logue scale (ALS) scores for gait- and micturition and the sub-item scores. The score for BP showed a significant positive correlation with the scores for the 7 other SF-36 sub-items. The HRQOL of treated SDAVF patients was lower than the national average with respect to both physical and mental aspects. Persistent post-treatment pain and gait- and micturition disturbances were responsible for their lower HRQOL.

  16. Surgical treatment for ruptured dural arteriovenous fistula with large intracranial hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xianwang; Wang, Haifeng; Huang, Yi; Zhou, Shengjun; Gao, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The rupture of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) is a serious complication endangering the lives of patients. It is difficult to treat such ruptured DAVF with large intracranial hematoma since lacking of early diagnostic methods. Meanwhile, there was no consensus of how to surgically treat these patients in early stage. In this study, we tried to use 4D-CTA to diagnose DAVF and guide surgical treatment. Based on the result of 4D-CTA, we attempted to eliminate DAVF at the same time we removed hematoma. The result was encouraging. 7 patients with ruptured DAVF presented as large spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage were included in this research between May, 2010 and August, 2012 in our hospital. 4D-CTA was performed in all cases. All results of 4D-CTA inspections were studied by both neurosurgeon and neuroradiologist. The therapeutic options were evaluated based on the clinical and angiographic results. All fistulas of seven patients were eliminated at the same time the hematoma being evacuated. 4D-CTA was sufficient for detecting and recognizing basic vessel angioarchitecture of DAVF to guide surgical treatment. Main arterial supplies, fistula location and CVDs found during surgery are consistent with the results 4D-CTA. All seven cases achieved completely fistula occlusion in operation without new neurological complication. We favor one stage surgical treatment for ruptured DAVF with large intracranial hemorrhage. 4D-CTA plays an important role in preoperative emergent inspection for its safety, rapidity and accuracy. However, it still needs further and larger investigations to optimize such treatment methods and to find out other potential risks. PMID:25664027

  17. Dural ossification associated with ossification of ligamentum flavum in the thoracic spine: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Qiu, Guixing; Guo, Shigong; Li, Wenjing; Li, Ye; Peng, Huiming; Wang, Chu; Zhao, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the incidence, distribution and radiological characteristics of dural ossification (DO) associated with ossification of ligamentum flavum (OLF) in the thoracic spine. Design A retrospective radiographical analysis. Setting This study was conducted at a single institution in China. Participants 53 patients with OLF who underwent posterior decompression surgery between January 2011 and July 2015 in a single institution were enrolled in this study. The decompression segments were grouped according to imaging evaluation and intraoperative evidences. Outcome measures The demographic distribution, radiological data and detailed surgical records were collected. First, preoperative CT images of decompressed segments were evaluated to identify imaging signs of DO. The ‘tram tack sign’ (TTS), ‘comma sign’ and ‘bridge sign’ were considered as characteristic imaging findings of DO in OLF. 4 kinds of confusing signs (false TTS) were identified and excluded. Then detailed surgical records were reviewed to finally identify segments with DO. Results The incidence of DO in patients with OLF was 43.4%. The incidence of DO in OLF segments was 21.5%. OLF was more common in the lower thoracic spine, and more than half (53.8%) of the DO was located in T9-T12. TTS was the most common sign, but it might be misdiagnosed. After excluding 4 kinds of false TTS, the sensitivity and specificity of imaging diagnosis were 94.23% and 94.21%, respectively. Conclusions DO was relatively common in thoracic OLF, especially in T9-T12. TTS might be misdiagnosed. After excluding 4 kinds of false TTS, the accuracy of imaging diagnosis was relatively high. PMID:27998902

  18. Cranial Nerve Dysfunction Associated with Cavernous Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas After Transvenous Embolization with Onyx

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chuanhui; Wang, Yang; Li, Youxiang; Jiang, Chuhan; Wu, Zhongxue; Yang, Xinjian

    2015-10-15

    PurposeCranial nerve dysfunction (CND) is not uncommon in patients with cavernous dural arteriovenous fistulas (cDAVFs), and may represent an initial manifestation or a complication after endovascular treatment. This study evaluated the outcome of CND associated with cDAVFs after transvenous embolization (TVE) using Onyx.Materials and MethodsForty-one patients with cDAVFs were treated with TVE in our department between April 2009 and October 2013. For each patient, clinical and radiologic records were retrospectively reviewed and evaluated, with an emphasis placed on evaluating the outcomes of the pre-existing cDAVF-induced CND and the TVE-induced CND.ResultsOf the 41 cases, 25 had a history of preoperative CND. Postoperatively, gradual remission to complete recovery (CR) within 8 months was observed in 17 of these cases, transient aggravation in 7, and significant improvement to be better than preoperative function but no CR in 1. All aggravation of CND occurred immediately or within 1 day after TVE and resolved completely within 5 months. Nine patients developed new CND after TVE. New CND occurred during the perioperative period in 8 cases, but all cases resolved completely within 15 days–6 months. Delayed CND was observed in 3 cases with a time lag of 3–25 months after TVE. Two of these completely resolved within 20 days–1 month and the remaining case significantly improved.ConclusionBoth the pre-existing cDAVF-induced CND and the TVE-induced new or aggravated CND completely resolved in almost all cases after embolization with Onyx.

  19. Higher risk of dural tears and recurrent herniation with lumbar micro-endoscopic discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lovi, Alessio; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Zagra, Antonino; Corriero, Andrea; Giudici, Fabrizio; Minoia, Leone

    2010-01-01

    Existing studies on micro-endoscopic lumbar discectomy report similar outcomes to those of open and microdiscectomy and conflicting results on complications. We designed a randomised controlled trial to investigate the hypothesis of different outcomes and complications obtainable with the three techniques. 240 patients aged 18–65 years affected by posterior lumbar disc herniation and symptoms lasting over 6 weeks of conservative management were randomised to micro-endoscopic (group 1), micro (group 2) or open (group 3) discectomy. Exclusion criteria were less than 6 weeks of pain duration, cauda equina compromise, foraminal or extra-foraminal herniations, spinal stenosis, malignancy, previous spinal surgery, spinal deformity, concurrent infection and rheumatic disease. Surgery and follow-up were made at a single Institution. A biomedical researcher independently collected and reviewed the data. ODI, back and leg VAS and SF-36 were the outcome measures used preoperatively, postoperatively and at 6-, 12- and 24-month follow-up. 212/240 (91%) patients completed the 24-month follow-up period. VAS back and leg, ODI and SF36 scores showed clinically and statistically significant improvements within groups without significant difference among groups throughout follow-up. Dural tears, root injuries and recurrent herniations were significantly more common in group 1. Wound infections were similar in group 2 and 3, but did not affect patients in group 1. Overall costs were significantly higher in group 1 and lower in group 3. In conclusion, outcome measures are equivalent 2 years following lumbar discectomy with micro-endoscopy, microscopy or open technique, but severe complications are more likely and costs higher with micro-endoscopy. PMID:20127495

  20. Venous Access Devices: Clinical Rounds

    PubMed Central

    Matey, Laurl; Camp-Sorrell, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Nursing management of venous access devices (VADs) requires knowledge of current evidence, as well as knowledge of when evidence is limited. Do you know which practices we do based on evidence and those that we do based on institutional history or preference? This article will present complex VAD infection and occlusion complications and some of the controversies associated with them. Important strategies for identifying these complications, troubleshooting, and evaluating the evidence related to lack of blood return, malposition, infection, access and maintenance protocols, and scope of practice issues are presented. PMID:28083553

  1. Olfactory Training in Improving Sense of Smell After Radiation Therapy in Patients With Paranasal Sinus or Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-06

    Stage 0 Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage 0 Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage I Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage I Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage II Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage II Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IIA Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IIB Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage III Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage III Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IV Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IVA Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVA Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IVB Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVB Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IVC Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVC Paranasal Sinus Cancer

  2. Dural afferents express acid-sensing ion channels: a role for decreased meningeal pH in migraine headache.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin; Edelmayer, Rebecca M; Wei, Xiaomei; De Felice, Milena; Porreca, Frank; Dussor, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Migraine headache is one of the most common neurological disorders. The pathological conditions that directly initiate afferent pain signaling are poorly understood. In trigeminal neurons retrogradely labeled from the cranial meninges, we have recorded pH-evoked currents using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. Approximately 80% of dural-afferent neurons responded to a pH 6.0 application with a rapidly activating and rapidly desensitizing ASIC-like current that often exceeded 20nA in amplitude. Inward currents were observed in response to a wide range of pH values and 30% of the neurons exhibited inward currents at pH 7.1. These currents led to action potentials in 53%, 30% and 7% of the dural afferents at pH 6.8, 6.9 and 7.0, respectively. Small decreases in extracellular pH were also able to generate sustained window currents and sustained membrane depolarizations. Amiloride, a non-specific blocker of ASIC channels, inhibited the peak currents evoked upon application of decreased pH while no inhibition was observed upon application of TRPV1 antagonists. The desensitization time constant of pH 6.0-evoked currents in the majority of dural afferents was less than 500ms which is consistent with that reported for ASIC3 homomeric or heteromeric channels. Finally, application of pH 5.0 synthetic-interstitial fluid to the dura produced significant decreases in facial and hind-paw withdrawal threshold, an effect blocked by amiloride but not TRPV1 antagonists, suggesting that ASIC activation produces migraine-related behavior in vivo. These data provide a cellular mechanism by which decreased pH in the meninges following ischemic or inflammatory events directly excites afferent pain-sensing neurons potentially contributing to migraine headache.

  3. Transhepatic Venous Approach for Balloon-assisted Cervical Collateral Venous Access

    SciTech Connect

    Eyheremendy, Eduardo P.; Malizia, Patricio; Sierre, Sergio

    2011-12-15

    Central venous catheter placement is indicated in many situations, and an increasing number of patients require temporary and long-term central catheters. Frequently, patients who have undergone multiple central veins catheterizations develop complete and diffuse venous occlusion, and this constitutes a difficult-to-manage clinical problem. We report a case of a 20-year-old patient who was referred to our department for central venous line placement who manifested bilateral femoral, jugular, and subclavian veins occlusion. A central venous catheter was implanted through a cervical collateral vein, targeting on and puncturing an angioplasty balloon, and advanced into the collateral vein through a transhepatic venous access.

  4. Early dural metastasis from a case of glioblastoma with primitive neuroectodermal differentiation: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Konar, Subhas K; Bir, Shyamal C; Maiti, Tanmoy K; Patra, Devi Prasad; DiPoto Brahmbhatt, Angela C; Jacobsohn, Jamie A; Nanda, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma with a primitive neuroectodermal (PNET) variant is a rare primary parenchymal tumor. Only a few cases of extraparenchymal metastasis are reported in world literature. Although the overall survival duration of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) variety may be prolonged in comparison to classical glioblastoma, the metastatic trend is completely different, and the prognosis is worse. We report an early dural metastasis of pure PNET component appearing in a case of primary glioblastoma with PNET variant. The lesson learned from this case is to look for early craniospinal metastasis in GBM patient with PNET component, even after completion of adjuvant radiochemotherapy.

  5. Serious myelopathy due to magnetic resonance imaging-occult arteriovenous fistula: Case report of petrous ridge dural arteriovenous fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose We present a case of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-occult intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) with serious cervical myelopathy and review the pathophysiological background. Summary of case A 61-year-old man had suffered from progressive neurological deterioration. He had demonstrated swollen spinal cord with diffuse enhancement and no dilated vascularity on MRI. Finally, digital subtraction angiography revealed DAVF at the petrous ridge and it was successfully treated by embolization. Conclusion A slow flow DAVF is not readily recognizable on MRI. Whenever a patient presents with unexplainable progressive myelopathy, a possibility of vascular origin has to be considered. PMID:26116647

  6. Micro-field evoked potentials recorded from the porcine sub-dural cortical surface utilizing a microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Hansford, Derek J; Fortin, Linda D; Obrietan, Karl H; Bergdall, Valerie K; Beversdorf, David Q

    2007-05-15

    A sub-dural surface microelectrode array designed to detect micro-field evoked potentials has been developed. The device is comprised of an array of 350-microm square gold contacts, with bidirectional spacing of 150 microm, contained within a polyimide Kapton material. Cytotoxicity testing suggests that the device is suitable for use with animal and human patients. Implementation of the device in animal studies revealed that reliable evoked potentials could be acquired. Further work will be needed to determine how these micro-field potentials, which demonstrate selectivity for one eye, relate to the distribution of the ocular dominance columns of the occipital cortex.

  7. Two alternative dural sealing techniques in posterior fossa surgery: (Polylactide-co-glycolide) self-adhesive resorbable membrane versus polyethylene glycol hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Schiariti, Marco; Acerbi, Francesco; Broggi, Morgan; Tringali, Giovanni; Raggi, Alberto; Broggi, Giovanni; Ferroli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Post-operative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak in posterior fossa surgery remains a significant source of morbidity. TissuePatchDural (TPD), a novel impermeable adhesive membrane, was used to reinforce dural closure. A comparison with one of the most commonly used dural sealing devices, DuraSeal, has been made. Methods: A retrospective, single-center study was conducted on 161 patients who underwent elective posterior fossa surgery. On surgeon's opinion, when a primary watertight closure was not possible, they received TPD or DuraSeal to reinforce dural closure. Results: Out of 161 patients analyzed, 115 were treated with TPD and 46 with DuraSeal. The post-operative leaks related purely to TPD or DuraSeal failure were recognized in 3 (2.6%) and 5 (10.86%) cases, respectively (P = 0.015). The presence of pre- and post-operative risk factors was associated with an increased incidence of CSF leak in both groups. TPD showed a better control in patients without these risk factors (P = 0.08). The incidence of CSF leak in patients who underwent posterior fossa surgery by craniectomy was statistically lower in TPD group compared to DuraSeal group (3.22% vs 17.8%, respectively; P = 0.008) Conclusions: TPD seems to be a safe tool for use as an adjunct to standard dural closure in posterior fossa surgery, particularly in patients without pre- or post-oper ative risk factors, in those who did not develop hydrocephalus, and who underwent craniectomy. The CSF leak rate in TPD group was found to be lower or within the range of the more advanced alternative dural closure strategies, including polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based sealant. PMID:25593755

  8. Primary endoscopic management of the frontal sinus.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, F A; Javer, A R

    2001-02-01

    Surgical treatment of the frontal sinus continues to be an area of much interest and controversy. The complex anatomy and confined space of this region require the endoscopic surgeon to be knowledgeable and delicate to obtain a positive result. Proper instrumentation is crucial and continues to evolve over time. Postoperative endoscopic care is integral to the success of endoscopic frontal sinusotomy and the availability of proper office equipment to perform this care is critical. In most instances, the intranasal endoscopic approach can be accomplished successfully without the need for an external procedure.

  9. Brain Abscess Associated with Isolated Left Superior Vena Cava Draining into the Left Atrium in the Absence of Coronary Sinus and Atrial Septal Defect

    SciTech Connect

    Erol, Ilknur Cetin, I. Ilker; Alehan, Fuesun; Varan, Birguel; Ozkan, Sueleyman; Agildere, A. Muhtesem; Tokel, Kursad

    2006-06-15

    A previously healthy 12-year-old girl presented with severe headache for 2 weeks. On physical examination, there was finger clubbing without apparent cyanosis. Neurological examination revealed only papiledema without focal neurologic signs. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging showed the characteristic features of brain abscess in the left frontal lobe. Cardiologic workup to exclude a right-to-left shunt showed an abnormality of the systemic venous drainage: presence of isolated left superior vena cava draining into the left atrium in the absence of coronary sinus and atrial septal defect. This anomaly is rare, because only a few other cases have been reported.

  10. Iliofemoral Venous Thrombosis Mainly Related to Iliofemoral Venous Obstruction by External Tumor Compression in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Tzu-Yao; Hsu, Hui-Ching; Wen, Min-Sheng; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Hung, Yu-Hsin; Liaw, Chuang-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Background To study iliofemoral venous thrombosis related to iliofemoral venous obstruction in cancer patients. Methods In this case series study, 829 cancer patients were surveyed for iliofemoral obstruction/thrombosis within 10 years. The criteria for inclusion were: (1) presence of unilateral lower-extremity swelling; (2) computed tomography (CT) scans showing a tumor with external compression of the iliac or femoral vein, and (3) duplex ultrasound scans showing venous thrombosis or venous flow insufficiency over a femoral vein or saphenous vein. Results Sixty-three patients (8%) developed an iliofemoral venous obstruction. The presence of iliofemoral venous thrombosis was detected in 21 of these patients (33%). The rate of iliofemoral venous thrombosis was significantly higher in patients with an invasion of the inguinal region, D-dimer levels >3,000 ng/ml, gastrointestinal cancer, or invasion of the inguinal lymph nodes. However, none of our patients with iliofemoral venous thrombosis had a detection of iliofemoral venous obstruction. Improved lower-extremity swelling was reported in 84% of the patients following combination therapy involving low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and systemic therapy. Conclusion Patients with an iliofemoral venous thrombosis mainly had iliofemoral venous obstruction by external tumor compression. Combination therapy with LMWH and systemic therapy were mandatory for these patients. PMID:27990113

  11. Developmental Venous Anomaly: Benign or Not Benign

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Rie; SRIVATANAKUL, Kittipong

    2016-01-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), previously called venous angiomas, are the most frequently encountered cerebral vascular malformations. However, DVA is considered to be rather an extreme developmental anatomical variation of medullary veins than true malformation. DVAs are composed of dilated medullary veins converging centripetally into a large collecting venous system that drains into the superficial or deep venous system. Their etiology and mechanism are generally accepted that DVAs result from the focal arrest of the normal parenchymal vein development or occlusion of the medullary veins as a compensatory venous system. DVAs per se are benign and asymptomatic except for under certain unusual conditions. The pathomechanisms of symptomatic DVAs are divided into mechanical, flow-related causes, and idiopathic. However, in cases of DVAs associated with hemorrhage, cavernous malformations (CMs) are most often the cause rather than DVAs themselves. The coexistence of CM and DVA is common. There are some possibilities that DVA affects the formation and clinical course of CM because CM related to DVA is generally located within the drainage territory of DVA and is more aggressive than isolated CM in the literature. Brain parenchymal abnormalities surrounding DVA and cerebral varix have also been reported. These phenomena are considered to be the result of venous hypertension associated with DVAs. With the advance of diagnostic imagings, perfusion study supports this hypothesis demonstrating that some DVAs have venous congestion pattern. Although DVAs should be considered benign and clinically silent, they can have potential venous hypertension and can be vulnerable to hemodynamic changes. PMID:27250700

  12. Stent Placement on Fresh Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.; Schuermann, Karl

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To report on the efficacy of fixing fresh venous thrombus to the venous wall by stent placement. Methods: Seven patients underwent stenting to treat acute venous thrombosis. In two patients, the hemodialysis fistula was thrombosed with the thrombus extending into the brachial veins. In three patients, the hemodialysis fistula was patent but massive swelling of the ipsilateral arm was caused by proximal venous thrombosis. Two patients presented with iliac venous thrombosis within stented pelvic veins. Stent placement was preceded by other mechanical thrombectomy methods in all cases. Results: Attachment of thrombus to the venous wall was successful in all cases treated. Acute rethrombosis did not occur. Follow-up patency in dialysis patients was 7.2 {+-} 2.1 months. One patient had rethrombosis of the dialysis graft 3 months after primary treatment. Three patients developed restenosis within a mean period of 7.7 months. One shunt remained patent for 10 months with no event of reobstruction during follow-up. In both patients with iliac stent placement, the vein remained patent over a follow-up period of 8 and 12 months respectively. Conclusion: Stenting fresh venous thrombus can achieve immediate venous patency. It may be used as an alternative approach when all other percutaneous methods fail. Frequent restenosis within stented veins limits its use to very selected cases.

  13. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lauren; Seraj, Samina

    2010-04-15

    Venous ulcer, also known as stasis ulcer, is the most common etiology of lower extremity ulceration, affecting approximately 1 percent of the U.S. population. Possible causes of venous ulcers include inflammatory processes resulting in leukocyte activation, endothelial damage, platelet aggregation, and intracellular edema. The primary risk factors for venous ulcer development are older age, obesity, previous leg injuries, deep venous thrombosis, and phlebitis. On physical examination, venous ulcers are generally irregular, shallow, and located over bony prominences. Granulation tissue and fibrin are typically present in the ulcer base. Associated findings include lower extremity varicosities, edema, venous dermatitis, and lipodermatosclerosis. Venous ulcers are usually recurrent, and an open ulcer can persist for weeks to many years. Severe complications include cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and malignant change. Poor prognostic factors include large ulcer size and prolonged duration. Evidence-based treatment options for venous ulcers include leg elevation, compression therapy, dressings, pentoxifylline, and aspirin therapy. Surgical management may be considered for ulcers that are large in size, of prolonged duration, or refractory to conservative measures.

  15. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in a patient with chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency and persistent left superior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Lupattelli, T; Benassi, F; Righi, E; Bavera, P; Bellagamba, G

    2014-04-01

    Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a syndrome characterized by stenoses of the internal jugular veins (IJVs) and/or azygos veins and formation of collateral venous channels. A case of a 57-year-old patient with CCSVI in whom the venous outflow from the left IJV to the right atrium occurred through a venous anomaly, the persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC), is reported. PLSVC is caused by persistence of the left anterior cardinal vein that drains blood from the limb effluent from the left and the left side of head and neck into coronary sinus (Type a), or in the left atrium (Type b). PLSVC can be associated either with innominate vein hypoplasia or other congenital heart abnormalities. Because of evidence of left innominate vein hypoplasia, angioplasty was not performed using the ordinary route but passing with the balloon directly through the PLSVC up to the left IJV. Finally, angioplasty was carried out in a standard manner in the right IJV as well as in the azygous vein. Confirmation angiogram revealed complete reopening of all treated vessels with no evidence of peri- and postoperative complications. The patient was discharged home the following day in good general conditions. PLSVC is a rare congenital vein anomaly but in case of concomitant innominate vein hypoplasia may prove to be a valuable alternative to treat patients with IJV diseases.

  16. Heritability of chronic venous disease

    PubMed Central

    Krusche, Petra; Wolf, Andreas; Krawczak, Michael; Timm, Birgitt; Nikolaus, Susanna; Frings, Norbert; Schreiber, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Varicose veins without skin changes have a prevalence of approximately 20% in Northern and Western Europe whereas advanced chronic venous insufficiency affects about 3% of the population. Genetic risk factors are thought to play an important role in the aetiology of both these chronic venous diseases (CVD). We evaluated the relative genetic and environmental impact upon CVD risk by estimating the heritability of the disease in 4,033 nuclear families, comprising 16,434 individuals from all over Germany. Upon clinical examination, patients were classified according to the CEAP guidelines as either C2 (simple varicose veins), C3 (oedema), C4 (skin changes without ulceration), C5 (healed ulceration), or C6 (active ulcers). The narrow-sense heritability (h2) of CVD equals 17.3% (standard error 2.5%, likelihood ratio test P = 1.4 × 10−13). The proportion of disease risk attributable to age (at ascertainment) and sex, the two main risk factors for CVD, was estimated as 10.7% (Kullback–Leibler deviance R2). The heritability of CVD is high, thereby suggesting a notable genetic component in the aetiology of the disease. Systematic population-based searches for CVD susceptibility genes are therefore warranted. PMID:20354728

  17. Calcium hydroxide paste in the maxillary sinus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fava, L R

    1993-09-01

    A case is reported in which a perforation of the sinus floor of the maxillary sinus occurred with extrusion of a calcium hydroxide paste during routine root canal treatment of a maxillary premolar. All clinical manifestations are described as well as the results of a follow-up evaluation.

  18. Venous pressure in man during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, K. A.; Roecker, L.; Gauer, O. H.; Krause, R.; Wicke, H. J.; Leach, C.; Landry, R.

    1984-01-01

    To determine whether the body fluid shift from the lower limbs toward the head that occurs during spaceflight leads to lasting increases of venous pressure in the upper body, venous pressure and hematocrit measurements were made on four astronauts before flight and 1 and 12 hours after recovery and compared with measurements in space. During the mission the hematocrit was elevated and the venous pressure lowered by 1 to 8 centimeters of water as compared with the preflight data. One hour after landing the hematocrit decreased, indicating a hemodilution, venous pressures were unexpectedly high, and a body weight loss of 4 to 5 percent was observed. Twelve hours later the venous pressures were the lowest recorded during the study. The fluid shift apparently takes place during the first several hours of spaceflight. Thereafter, the pressure in the peripheral veins and the central circulation is lower than that measured before flight.

  19. Cervical venous reflux in dynamic brain scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Hayt, D B; Perez, L A

    1976-01-01

    Cervical venous reflux, shown by dynamic brain scintigraphy, was investigated through three avenues of approach: (A) by reviewing 371 randomly chosen routine dynamic intracerebral bloodflow studies to estimate its incidence; (B) by correlative positive-contrast superior venacavography in patients with characteristic cervical venous reflux; and (C) by performing dynamic brain scintigraphy while utilizing various positional and physiologic maneuvers to attempt to produce cervical venous reflux in patients who did not exhibit this phenomenon on earlier examination. Although any obstruction of the superior vena cava or a properly timed Valsalva maneuver in selected patients can produce the scintigraphic picture of cervical venous reflux, in most cases it is a normal phenomenon due to incompetent or absent cervical venous valves.

  20. Venous and arterial thrombosis in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Ocak, Gurbey; Vossen, Carla Y; Rotmans, Joris I; Lijfering, Willem M; Rosendaal, Frits R; Parlevliet, Karien J; Krediet, Ray T; Boeschoten, Els W; Dekker, Friedo W; Verduijn, Marion

    2011-12-01

    Whether the risk of both venous and arterial thrombosis is increased in dialysis patients as compared to the general population is unknown. In addition, it is unknown which subgroups are at highest risk. Furthermore, it is unknown whether having a history of venous thrombosis or arterial thrombosis prior to dialysis treatment increases mortality risk. A total of 455 dialysis patients were followed for objectively verified symptomatic thrombotic events between January 1997 and June 2009. The incidence rates in dialysis patients as compared to the general population was 5.6-fold (95% CI 3.1-8.9) increased for venous thrombosis, 11.9-fold (95% CI 9.3-14.9) increased for myocardial infarction, and 8.4-fold (95% CI 5.7-11.5) increased for ischaemic stroke. The combination of haemodialysis, lowest tertile of albumin, history of venous thrombosis, and malignancy was associated with subsequent venous thrombosis. Increased age, renal vascular disease, diabetes, high cholesterol levels, history of venous thrombosis, and history of arterial thrombosis were associated with subsequent arterial thrombosis. The all-cause mortality risk was 1.9-fold (95% CI 1.1-3.3) increased for patients with a history of venous thrombosis and 1.9-fold (95% CI 1.4-2.6) increased for patients with a history of arterial thrombosis. A potential limitation of this study was that in some risk categories associations with venous thrombosis did not reach statistical significance due to small numbers. In conclusion, dialysis patients have clearly elevated risks of venous thrombosis and arterial thrombosis and occurrence of venous thrombosis or arterial thrombosis prior to the start of dialysis is associated with an increased mortality risk.

  1. [Current controversies in the treatment of frontal sinus fractures].

    PubMed

    Litschel, Ralph; Tasman, A-J

    2009-09-01

    The surgical treatment of frontal sinus fractures is foreshadowed by fears of late complications. Complications such as meningitis and mucoceles should be prevented by cranialization or obliteration of the frontal sinus. These procedures are still standard treatment despite of recent developments over the last two decades in endoscopic sinus surgery, in medical imaging and surgical instrumentation. Nowadays the role of cranialization and obliteration is challenged by refined endoscopic frontal sinus surgery techniques, the widely-used image-guided systems and the multiplanar high-resolution computed tomography along with new data about postoperative complications. This overview summarizes the current literature, taking into account the existing evidence in the treatment of frontal sinus fractures.

  2. Psittacine paranasal sinus--a new definition of compartments.

    PubMed

    Artmann, A; Henninger, W

    2001-12-01

    Documentation of the psittacine paranasal sinuses has been limited. To provide more published detail, spiral computed tomography (CT) was used to scan the cephalic and cervical region from cadavers of 10 psittacine birds (Ara ararauna, Ara chloroptera, Ara macao, and Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus). Skeletal studies, histologic examinations, and evaluation of deep-frozen sections and anatomic preparations confirmed the results of the CT scans. New morphologic details of the paranasal sinus and some compartments were discovered. The paranasal sinuses of these macaws consist of two unpaired rostral compartments, followed caudally by eight paired compartments. Histologic examinations revealed that the walls of the paranasal sinuses consist of flat or cubic monolayer epithelium with underlying connective tissue. The described method of CT examination of these macaws, especially the positioning, scan orientation and parameters, and documentation of the normal paranasal sinus, provides a basis for future clinical use of CT.

  3. [Cerebellar abscesses secondary to infection of an occipital dermal sinus].

    PubMed

    García Galera, A; Martínez León, M I; Pérez da Rosa, S; Ros López, B

    2013-09-01

    A dermal sinus is a congenital defect arising from a closure failure of the neural tube that results in different degrees of communication between the skin and the central nervous system. A dermal sinus can occur anywhere from the root of the nose to the conus medullaris, and the occipital location is the second most common. Dermal sinuses are often found in association with dermoid or epidermoid cysts and less frequently with teratomas. Patients with an occipital dermoid cyst associated with a dermal sinus can develop meningitis and/or abscesses as the first clinical manifestation of the disease due to the dermoid cyst itself becoming abscessed or to the formation of secondary abscesses; few cases of the formation of secondary abscesses have been reported. We present a case of a dermoid cyst associated with an infected dermal sinus and posterior development of cerebellar abscesses and hydrocephalus.

  4. Meta-analytic study of implant survival following sinus augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Barona-Dorado, Cristina; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Fernández-Cáliz, Fernando; Martínez-González, José-María

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate graft types used for maxillary sinus augmentation and review success rates of dental implants inserted in these areas, analyzing the graft materials used, implant surface types and the moment of implant placement. Study Design: A meta-analytic study reviewing articles on sinus augmentation published during the last ten years. Results: 3,975 implants placed in sinus augmentations (with bony windows) were registered, of which 3,749 implants survived, a survival rate of 94.3%. Conclusions: When performing sinus augmentation, bone substitute materials are just as effective as autologous bone, whether used alone or in combination with autologous bone. Implant surface treatments can have an important effect on implant survival and it would appear that roughened surfaces are the best option. When implants are inserted simultaneously to grafting, a higher failure rate can be expected. Key words: Sinus augmentation, bone implant, bone regeneration, dental implant. PMID:22157658

  5. Management of orbital complications of sinusitis in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kinis, Vefa; Ozbay, Musa; Bakir, Salih; Yorgancilar, Ediz; Gun, Ramazan; Akdag, Mehmet; Sahin, Muhammed; Topcu, Ismail

    2013-09-01

    The most common reason of orbital infections is sinusitis. Orbital complications of sinusitis are mostly seen in children. Loss of vision and intracranial infections are among the complications of sinusitis. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is very important in the management of orbital complications. The orbital complication can be in the form of cellulitis or abscess. A retrospective review of 26 pediatric patients with orbital complications due to sinusitis was presented in this study. Of 26 patients, there were 13 cases of preseptal cellulitis, 2 cases of orbital cellulitis, and 11 cases of subperiosteal abscess. We grouped the preseptal and orbital cellulites in one category and the subperiosteal abscess in the other. All patients in the cellulitis group recovered by medical treatment. All the patients were treated by surgical drainage. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment method are vital for the treatment of orbital complications secondary to sinusitis.

  6. Ruptured aneurysms of sinuses of Valsalva

    PubMed Central

    Jugdutt, B. I.; Fraser, R. S.; Rossall, R. E.; Lee, S. J. K.

    1974-01-01

    At least one additional cardiac lesion was present in 18 consecutive patients with ruptured aneurysms of the sinuses of Valsalva who were investigated between 1956 and 1973 at the University of Alberta Hospital. Clinical diagnosis was made in 78% (14/18) of the patients. Confirmation at cardiac catheterization, operation or autopsy was obtained in all but one. The main sites of rupture were the right ventricle (seven cases), right atrium (five) and left ventricle (five). Fifty percent (9/18) are alive and well following prompt operative repair, an average of 8.2 years later (range, six months to 15 years). Replacement of the aortic valve was associated with a high mortality (50% early, 13% late, total 63%) which could be explained by the higher operative risk in this group of very ill patients. Eight patients (44.4%) had had bacterial endocarditis prior to presentation and this may have played a significant role in the rupture of the sinus of Valsalva aneurysm. ImagesFIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4278257

  7. Nasal nitric oxide in unilateral sinus disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chia-Hsiang; Tseng, Hsiao-Jung; Huang, Chi-Che; Chang, Po-Hung; Chen, Yi-Wei; Lee, Ta-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Unilateral sinus disease (USD) can sometimes be difficult to accurately diagnose before surgery. The application of nasal nitric oxide (nNO) for USD diagnosis and its surgical outcome in USD has not been reported in the literature. We prospectively enrolled sixty-six USD patients who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery for fungal rhinosinusitis (n = 19), chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) without nasal polyps (n = 13), CRS with nasal polyps (n = 12) and sinonasal mass lesions (n = 22). nNO levels were measured preoperatively and at three and six months postoperatively. Correlations between nNO levels and potential clinical parameters, type of disease, disease severity, and disease-related quality of life (QOL) were assessed. Unlike bilateral CRS, in USD, nNO levels did not correlate with disease severity or postoperative QOL improvements. Except for fungus group, there were no differences in nNO levels between lesion and non-lesion sides in all the other groups. nNO levels on both sides were significantly elevated six months postoperatively in all groups. Fungal rhinosinusitis patients had the lowest preoperative nNO levels, and a cutoff of 239.3 ppb had the best sensitivity (79.0%) and specificity (87.2%) for preoperative diagnosis. While preoperative nNO levels cannot serve as an alternative marker for disease severity of USD, they were lower in fungal rhinosinusitis patients than in other USD patients and may be useful for more accurate diagnosis prior to surgery. PMID:28199369

  8. Sublingual Immunotherapy for Allergic Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Jonathan M; Driskill, Brent R; Clenney, Timothy L; Gessler, Eric M

    2015-10-01

    Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) is a condition that has an allergic basis caused by exposure to fungi in the sinonasal tract leading to chronic inflammation. Despite standard treatment modalities, which typically include surgery and medical management of allergies, patients still have a high rate of recurrence. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been used as adjuvant treatment for AFS. Evidence exists to support the use of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) as a safe and efficacious method of treating allergies, but no studies have assessed the utility of SLIT in the management of allergic fungal sinusitis. A record review of cases of AFS that are currently or previously treated with sublingual immunotherapy from 2007 to 2011 was performed. Parameters of interest included serum IgE levels, changes in symptoms, Lund-McKay scores, decreased sensitization to fungal allergens associated with AFS, and serum IgE levels. Ten patients with diagnosed AFS were treated with SLIT. No adverse effects related to the use of SLIT therapy were identified. Decreases in subjective complaints, exam findings, Lund-McKay scores, and serum IgE levels were observed. Thus, sublingual immunotherapy appears to be a safe adjunct to the management of AFS that may improve patient outcomes.

  9. Simulating cell apoptosis induced sinus node dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kharche, Sanjay; Beling, John; Biktasheva, Irina V; Zhang, Henggui; Biktashev, Vadim N

    2013-01-01

    Sinus node dysfunction (SND) is correlated to the pacemaker sinoatrial node (SAN) cell apoptosis. This study explores the effect of such a dysfunctional SAN on electrical propagation into neighboring atrial tissue. The Fenton Karma model was extended to simulate mouse SAN and atrial cell action potentials. The cell models were incorporated into a 2D model consisting of a central SAN region surrounded by atrial tissue. The intercellular gap junctional coupling, as quantified by the diffusion constant, was estimated to give conduction speeds as observed in mouse atrial tissue. The size of mouse SAN pacemaking region was estimated using the 2D model. In multiple simulations, the effects of an increasing proportion of apoptotic pacemaker cells on atrial tissue pacing were simulated and quantified. The SAN size that gave a basal mouse atrial cycle length (ACL) of 295 ms was found to be 0.6 mm in radius. At low pacemaker cell apoptosis proportion, there was a drastic increase of ACL. At modest increase in the number of apoptotic cells, bradycardia was observed. The incidence of sinus arrest was also found to be high. When the number of apoptotic cells were 10% of the total number of pacemaking cells, all pacemaking was arrested. Phenomenological models have been developed to study mouse atrial electrophysiology and confirm experimental findings. The results show the significance of cell apoptosis as a major mechanism of SND.

  10. [Nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer].

    PubMed

    Peyraga, G; Lafond, C; Pointreau, Y; Giraud, P; Maingon, P

    2016-09-01

    The nasal cavity and parasinusal cancer are rare (10% of tumors of the head and neck) and are mainly represented by squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal cavity or the maxillary sinus and adenocarcinoma of the ethmoid sinus (occupational disease, wood dust). The most common clinical sign is nasal obstruction, but tumors can also manifest as rhinorrhea and/or epistaxis (usually unilateral signs). A magnetic resonance imaging of the facial structure is systematic for staging before treatment. The treatment consists of a first surgery if the patient is operable with a resectable tumor. If it is not the case, the treatment consists of radiotherapy (RT) associated with chemotherapy (CT) according to the initial data (T3/T4 or N+). After first surgery, RT is indicated (except T1N0 with complete resection) associated with a CT based on postoperative data (capsular effraction or incomplete resection). Lymph node irradiation is considered case by case, but is indicated in any nodal involvement. RT must be an intensity modulated RT (IMRT), static or dynamic, and must be imagery guided (IGRT). According to ICRU 83, doses to organs at risk and target volumes must be carried. Finally, after a post-treatment baseline imaging between 2 and 4 months, monitoring will be alternated with the ENT surgeon every 2 or 3 months for 2 years, then every 4 to 6 months for 5 years.

  11. Near-infrared imaging of the sinuses: preliminary evaluation of a new technology for diagnosing maxillary sinusitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Usama; Cerussi, Albert; Dehdari, Reza; Nguyen, Quoc; Kelley, Timothy; Tromberg, Bruce; Wong, Brian

    2010-05-01

    Diagnosing sinusitis remains a challenge for primary care physicians. There is a need for a simple, office-based technique to aid in the diagnosis of sinusitis without the cost and radiation risk of conventional radiologic imaging. We designed a low-cost near-infrared (NIR) device to transilluminate the maxillary sinuses. The use of NIR light allows for greater interrogation of deep-tissue structures as compared to visible light. NIR imaging of 21 patients was performed and compared with computed tomography (CT) scans. Individual maxillary sinuses were scored on a scale from 0 to 2 based on their degree of aeration present on CT and similarly based on the NIR signal penetration into the maxilla on NIR images. Our results showed that air-filled and fluid/tissue-filled spaces can be reasonably distinguished by their differing NIR signal penetration patterns, with average NIR imaging scores for fluid-filled maxillary sinuses (0.93+/-0.78, n=29) significantly lower than those for normal maxillary sinuses (1.62+/-0.57, n=13) (p=0.003). NIR imaging of the sinuses is a simple, safe, and cost-effective modality that can potentially aid in the diagnosis of sinusitis. Long-term, significant device refinement and large clinical trials will be needed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of this technique.

  12. Primary Osteolytic Intraosseous Atypical Meningioma with Soft Tissue and Dural Invasion: Report of a Case and Review of Literatures

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Primary intraosseous meningioma is a rare tumor, and atypical pathologic components both osteolytic lesion and dura and soft tissue invasion is extremely rare. A 65-year-old woman presented with a 5-month history of a soft mass on the right frontal area. MR imaging revealed a 4 cm sized, multilobulated, strongly-enhancing lesion on the right frontal bone, and CT showed a destructive skull lesion. The mass was adhered tightly to the scalp and dura mater, and it extended to some part of the outer and inner dural layers without brain invasion. The extradural mass and soft tissue mass were totally removed simultaneously and we reconstructed the calvarial defect with artificial bone material. The pathological study revealed an atypical meningioma as World Health Organization grade II. Six months after the operation, brain MR imaging showed that not found recurrence in both cranial and spinal lesion. Here, we report a case of primary osteolytic intraosseous atypical meningioma with soft tissue and dural invasion. PMID:25628813

  13. Assessment of the Diagnostic Accuracy of Limited CT Scan of Paranasal Sinuses in the Identification of Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Noorian, Vahid; Motaghi, Arya

    2012-01-01

    Background Paranasal sinus CT has high sensitivity and specificity for sinusitis. However, this modality is costly and involves greater radiation exposure than plain radiographs. Objectives We tried to compare 10-cut limited CT scan and standard CT scan in the diagnosis of sinusitis. Materials and Methods We conducted a cross sectional case series from August to December 2010 on 150 patients with non-randomized sampling method in academic hospitals related to medical school of Shahid Beheshti University of medical sciences. Using standard CT scan as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of limited series were calculated for each sinus group. Results In our study limited CT scan had a sensitivity of 92%, specificity of 94%, positive predictive value of 90% and negative predictive value of 95%. Conclusions The limited CT scan is useful for confirming the clinical diagnosis of sinusitis. PMID:23396584

  14. Total dural irradiation: RapidArc versus static-field IMRT: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Paul J.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare conventional fixed-gantry angle intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with RapidArc for total dural irradiation. We also hypothesize that target volume-individualized collimator angles may produce substantial normal tissue sparing when planning with RapidArc. Five-, 7-, and 9-field fixed-gantry angle sliding-window IMRT plans were generated for comparison with RapidArc plans. Optimization and normal tissue constraints were constant for all plans. All plans were normalized so that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 100% of the dose. RapidArc was delivered using 350 Degree-Sign clockwise and counterclockwise arcs. Conventional collimator angles of 45 Degree-Sign and 315 Degree-Sign were compared with 90 Degree-Sign on both arcs. Dose prescription was 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions. PTV metrics used for comparison were coverage, V{sub 107}%, D1%, conformality index (CI{sub 95}%), and heterogeneity index (D{sub 5}%-D{sub 95}%). Brain dose, the main challenge of this case, was compared using D{sub 1}%, Dmean, and V{sub 5} Gy. Dose to optic chiasm, optic nerves, globes, and lenses was also compared. The use of unconventional collimator angles (90 Degree-Sign on both arcs) substantially reduced dose to normal brain. All plans achieved acceptable target coverage. Homogeneity was similar for RapidArc and 9-field IMRT plans. However, heterogeneity increased with decreasing number of IMRT fields, resulting in unacceptable hotspots within the brain. Conformality was marginally better with RapidArc relative to IMRT. Low dose to brain, as indicated by V5Gy, was comparable in all plans. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed no clinically meaningful differences. The number of monitor units was lower and delivery time was reduced with RapidArc. The case-individualized RapidArc plan compared favorably with the 9-field conventional IMRT plan. In view of lower monitor unit requirements and shorter delivery time, Rapid

  15. [Suppurative thrombophlebitis central venous catheterization].

    PubMed

    Ramos Martínez, A; Sánchez Romero, I; Saura Lorente, P A; Parajón Díaz, A

    2008-06-01

    Suppurative thrombophlebitisis a very infrequent complication of the central venous catheterization. The majority of the cases are produced by species of staphylococci. A 22-year-old colombian-woman, student, without toxic habits was admitted because of temporary left astrocytoma (grade II). Nine days after implementing a catheter in the right subclavian vein she presented high fever (39.5 degrees C), shivers, progressive right side neck swelling and odinofagia. She had leukocytosis (26,300 cells/microl) and normal cerebrospinal fluid. After withdrawing the catheter, Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in the tip of the catheter and in four bottles of blood cultures. A neck CT demonstrated expansion and absence of contrast in the right internal jugular vein. The patient evolved satisfactorily with cloxacillin, gentamycin and low molecular weight heparin.

  16. The extracranial venous system in the heads of beaked whales, with implications on diving physiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Costidis, Alexander M; Rommel, Sentiel A

    2016-01-01

    Beaked whales are a poorly known but diverse group of whales that have received considerable attention due to strandings that have been temporally and spatially associated with naval sonar deployment. Postmortem studies on stranded carcasses have revealed lesions consistent with decompression sickness, including intravascular gas and fat emboli. These findings have been supported by analyses of intravascular gas emboli showing composition dominated by nitrogen gas. To increase our understanding of the pathophysiology of nitrogen bubble formation and intravascular embolization, we examined the gross and microscopic anatomy of the venous system in the head of beaked whales. Since the potential sources of intravascular fat and gas emboli were of greatest interest, focus was placed on the acoustic fat bodies and pneumatic accessory sinus system. Herein, we describe intimate arteriovenous associations with specialized adipose depots and air sinuses in beaked whales. These vascular structures comprise an extensive network of thin-walled vessels with a large surface area, which is likely to facilitate exchange of nitrogen gas and may, therefore, form anatomic regions that may be important in physiological management of diving gases. These structures may also be vulnerable to pathologic introduction of emboli into the vascular system. Expansive, thin-walled venous lakes are found within the pterygoid region, which suggest the potential for nitrogen exchange as well as for compensation of middle-ear pressures during descent on a dive. These findings warrant further research into the structure and function of this morphology as it relates to normal and pathologic physiology.

  17. Upper Body Venous Compliance Exceeds Lower Body Venous Compliance in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.

    1996-01-01

    Human venous compliance hypothetically decreases from upper to lower body as a mechanism for maintenance of the hydrostatic indifference level 'headward' in the body, near the heart. This maintains cardiac filling pressure, and thus cardiac output and cerebral perfusion, during orthostasis. This project entailed four steps. First, acute whole-body tilting was employed to alter human calf and neck venous volumes. Subjects were tilted on a tilt table equipped with a footplate as follows: 90 deg, 53 deg, 30 deg, 12 deg, O deg, -6 deg, -12 deg, -6 deg, O deg, 12 deg, 30 deg, 53 deg, and 90 deg. Tilt angles were held for 30 sec each, with 10 sec transitions between angles. Neck volume increased and calf volume decreased during head-down tilting, and the opposite occurred during head-up tilt. Second, I sought to cross-validate Katkov and Chestukhin's (1980) measurements of human leg and neck venous pressures during whole-body tilting, so that those data could be used with volume data from the present study to calculate calf and neck venous compliance (compliance = (Delta)volume/(Delta)pressure). Direct measurements of venous pressures during postural chances and whole-body tilting confirmed that the local changes in venous pressures seen by Katkov and Chestukhin (1980) are valid. The present data also confirmed that gravitational changes in calf venous pressure substantially exceed those changes in upper body venous pressure. Third, the volume and pressure data above were used to find that human neck venous compliance exceeds calf venous compliance by a factor of 6, thereby upholding the primary hypothesis. Also, calf and neck venous compliance correlated significantly with each other (r(exp 2) = 0.56). Fourth, I wished to determine whether human calf muscle activation during head-up tilt reduces calf venous compliance. Findings from tilting and from supine assessments of relaxed calf venous compliance were similar, indicating that tilt-induced muscle activation is

  18. [Cholesterol granuloma in paranasal sinus. An unfrequent pseudotumor in maxillary sinuses].

    PubMed

    García de Hombre, Alina María; Pérez Peñate, Armando

    2005-01-01

    The cholesterol granuloma is well known in the middle ear, in the mastoid antrum and the air cells of temporal bone, mostly related to a chronic infectious process. There are other localizations such as the pleura, lung, pericardium, kidneys, arterial wall, nerves, brain, testicles, lymphatic ganglion and in the paranasals sinuses. Its localization in the mediofacial area is very unfrequent, having only been described 44 cases up to the year 2002. We present a 42 year-old patient, who required surgical treatment because of a increase in the volume of area her left facial of one month's old. It resulted to be secundary to an expansion of the maxilar sinus, such as seen on the computerized tomography carried out on the patient. The diagnosis was cholesterol granuloma, performed, through the anatomo-pathology study. We review the litterature on this subject and analyse the possible etiologic cause of this lesion, its clinic, diagnostic methodology and treatment.

  19. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  2. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  3. [Mechanical complication of central venous catheterization].

    PubMed

    Koja, Hiroki; Tokumine, Joho; Sugahara, Kazuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Central venous catheterization is a procedure with a high success rate. However, life-threatening complications are occasionally caused by mechanical injury during the catheterization process. Therefore, surgeons should have sufficient knowledge of the potential complications and the effective use of preventative measures when performing catheterization. We herein review and discuss the mechanical complications previously reported to have occurred in association with central venous catheterization. Comprehensive knowledge about various complication-inducing factors, the ability to make a quick and accurate diagnosis of such complications, and sufficient skill to prevent worsening of these complications can thus help patients from suffering lethal complications due to central venous catheterization.

  4. Measurement of venous compliance (8-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thirsk, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    The prime objective of this International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) investigation is to measure the bulk compliance (distensibility) of the veins in the lower leg before, during, and after spaceflight. It is of particular interest whether venous compliance over the range of both positive and negative transmural pressures (various states of venous distention and collapse) changes throughout the duration of spaceflight. Information concerning the occurrence and character of compliance changes could have implications for the design of improved antigravity suits and further the understanding of inflight and postflight venous hemodynamics.

  5. Clinical Study on the Etiology of Postthyroidectomy Skin Sinus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Wuyuntu; Borkhuu, Oyungerel; Yang, Yun-Tian

    2017-01-01

    Background. Thyroidectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures worldwide. Despite technical advances and high experience of thyroidectomy of specialized centers, it is still burdened by a significant rate of postoperative complications. Among them, the skin sinus formation is an extremely rare postthyroidectomy complication. Here, we first report the incidence of the skin sinus formation after thyroidectomy to identify the causes for skin sinus formation after thyroidectomy and to discuss its prevention and treatment options. Methods. A retrospective analysis was carried out of patients who underwent excision operation of fistula for postthyroidectomy skin sinus formation. Data were retrieved from medical records department of the Affiliated Hospital of Inner Mongolia Medical University. Results. Of the 5,686 patients who underwent thyroid surgery, only 5 patients (0.088%) had developed skin sinus formation. All 5 patients successfully underwent complete excision of fistula. Conclusion. Infection, foreign body, thyroid surgery procedure, combined disease, and iatrogenic factors may be related with skin sinus formation after thyroidectomy. To reduce the recurrence of postoperative infections and sinus formation, intra- and postoperative compliance with aseptic processing, intraoperative use absorbable surgical suture/ligature, repeated irrigation and drainage, and postoperative administration of anti-inflammatory treatment are to be followed. PMID:28386584

  6. CT features of alveolitis and sinusitis in horses.

    PubMed

    Henninger, Wolfgang; Frame, E Mairi; Willmann, Michael; Simhofer, Hubert; Malleczek, Dieter; Kneissl, Sibylle M; Mayrhofer, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    Sinusitis is a common disorder in horses and may result from trauma, dental diseases, or space-occupying lesions. Radiography can only provide a limited amount of information. Computed tomography (CT) has been documented as an alternative imaging method. Eighteen horses (mostly Warmblood) with signs of chronic sinusitis were examined preoperatively with CT to assist in diagnosis of the underlying cause. There was a group of common CT features in horses with dental disease and sinusitis. The first molar was the most frequently affected maxillary cheek tooth. Hypoattenuation of the cementum, destruction of the enamel, and filling of the infundibular cavity with gas were the most frequent CT findings associated with caries. Gas bubbles within the bulging root area or fragmentation of the root in combination with swelling of the adjacent sinus lining were the most important CT features of dental decay. CT findings associated with sinusitis included excessive thickening of the respiratory epithelium in the rostral maxillary sinus; the caudal maxillary sinus was less often involved. The infraorbital canal, the nasomaxillary duct, and the frontomaxillary aperture were usually involved. The maxillary bone, however, especially the facial crest, was involved in nearly every horse, being characterized by endosteal sclerosis, thickening, periosteal reaction, and deformation leading to facial swelling in chronic infections. CT images allowed identification of involvement of individual teeth more clearly to reveal the diseased one for treatment. Three-dimensional imaging allowed improved understanding of the extent and severity of the pathologic change.

  7. Quality of life in patients with venous stasis ulcers and others with advanced venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Tracz, Edyta; Zamojska, Ewa; Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Zaborski, Daniel; Grzesiak, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    The quality of life (QoL) in patients with advanced venous insufficiency (including venous stasis ulcers, skin discoloration, stasis eczema, and lipodermatosclerosis) assessed using the Clinical Etiological Anatomical Pathophysiological (CEAP) and Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) classifications is presented. Also, disease features such as: intensity of pain, edema and inflammatory response that exerted the most profound effect on different domains of QoL are reported. The global QoL in patients with lower leg venous ulcerations was relatively similar to that observed in other patients with chronic venous insufficiency. The presence of venous ulcerations was associated with lower QoL in a Physical domain. Significant correlations were found between pain intensity and the values of Physical, Physiological, Level of Independence and Environmental domains, between edema intensity and Social domain as well as between the intensity of inflammatory response and Physical and Spiritual domains.

  8. Near-infrared imaging for management of chronic maxillary sinusitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Joon S.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Kim, James; Ison, Sean; Wong, Brian; Cui, Haotian; Bhandarkar, Naveen

    2015-03-01

    Efficient management of chronic sinusitis remains a great challenge for primary care physicians. Unlike ENT specialists using Computed Tomography scans, they lack an affordable and safe method to accurately screen and monitor sinus diseases in primary care settings. Lack of evidence-based sinusitis management leads to frequent under-treatments and unnecessary over-treatments (i.e. antibiotics). Previously, we reported low-cost optical imaging designs for oral illumination and facial optical imaging setup. It exploits the sensitivity of NIR transmission intensity and their unique patterns to the sinus structures and presence of fluid/mucous-buildup within the sinus cavities. Using the improved NIR system, we have obtained NIR sinus images of 45 subjects with varying degrees of sinusitis symptoms. We made diagnoses of these patients based on two types of evidence: symptoms alone or NIR images along. These diagnostic results were then compared to the gold standard diagnosis using computed tomography through sensitivity and specificity analysis. Our results indicate that diagnosis of mere presence of sinusitis that is, distinguishing between healthy individuals vs. diseased individuals did not improve much when using NIR imaging compared to the diagnosis based on symptoms alone (69% in sensitivity, 75% specificity). However, use of NIR imaging improved the differential diagnosis between mild and severe diseases significantly as the sensitivity improved from 75% for using diagnosis based on symptoms alone up to 95% for using diagnosis based on NIR images. Reported results demonstrate great promise for using NIR imaging system for management of chronic sinusitis patients in primary care settings without resorting to CT.

  9. HLA-typing analysis following allogeneic bone grafting for sinus lifting.

    PubMed

    Piaia, Marcelo; Bub, Carolina Bonet; Succi, Guilherme de Menezes; Torres, Margareth; Costa, Thiago Henrique; Pinheiro, Fabricio Costa; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique

    2017-03-01

    According to the Brazilian Association of Organ Transplants, in 2015, 19,408 bone transplants were performed in Brazil, over 90% by Dental Surgeons. The surgical technique itself has a respectable number of reports regarding its clinical efficacy, as measured by long-term survival of dental implants in grafted areas. Uncertainty remains, however, as to whether fresh frozen grafts from human bone donors remain immunologically innocuous in the body of the host. Six male with no previous medical history of note, including systemic diseases, surgery or blood transfusion were selected. These patients underwent reconstructive procedures (sinus lifting) using fresh frozen human bone from a tissue bank. All patients had venous blood samples collected prior to surgery and 6 months after the procedure. Anti-HLA analysis for the detection of HLA (human leukocyte antigen) antibodies was performed using methods such as the LABScreen PRA Class I and Class II, LABScreen Single Antigen Class I and Class II, Luminex Platform. Reactive individuals to the screening tests (LABScreen PRA) were further investigated to determine the specificity of the antibodies detected (LABScreen Single Antigen) with a cutoff value of median fluorescence intensity ≥500. As a result, it was observed that two patients (33%) were positive in screening tests, one presenting with anti-HLA Class I and II sensitization and the other with anti-HLA class II. The specificity analysis showed that the patients sensitized to HLA class II presented 4 specificities, 3 of which immunologically relevant. In the second individual, 23 specificities were identified, 6 of which immunologically important for HLA class I and 4 specificities for HLA class II, 3 of these were immunologically important. All specificities detected had average fluorescence. These findings are suggestive that sinus-lifting procedures with allogeneic bone can induce immunological sensitization.

  10. Asian venous thromboembolism guidelines: prevention of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Liew, N C; Chang, Y H; Choi, G; Chu, P H; Gao, X; Gibbs, H; Ho, C O; Ibrahim, H; Kim, T K; Kritpracha, B; Lee, L H; Lee, L; Lee, W Y; Li, Y J; Nicolaides, A N; Oh, D; Pratama, D; Ramakrishnan, N; Robless, P A; Villarama-Alemany, G; Wong, R

    2012-12-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis is under-utilized in Asia because of the misconception that its incidence is lower in Asians as compared to the Caucasians. The available data on VTE in Asia is limited due to the lack of well-designed multicenter randomized controlled trials as well as non-standardized research designs, making data comparison difficult. Emerging data indicates that the VTE incidence is not low in Asia, and is comparable to that reported in the Western literature in some instances. There is also a trend towards increasing incidence of VTE, as demonstrated by a number of hospital-based studies in Asia. This could be attributed to lifestyle changes, ageing population, increasing awareness of VTE and wider availability of Duplex ultrasound. The risk of VTE in hospitalized patients remain the same in Asians and Caucasians, even though there may be factors that are inherent to patients in Asia that influence the slight variation in incidence. The utilization rate of VTE prophylaxis remains suboptimal in Asia. The Asian Venous Thrombosis Forum (AVTF) comprises participants from various countries such as China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand and experts from Australia and Europe. The forum evaluated the available data on VTE from the Asian region and formulated guidelines tailored to meet the needs of the region. We recommend that serious considerations are given to VTE prophylaxis especially in the at-risk group and a formal hospital policy be established to facilitate the implementation. On admission to the hospital, we recommend assessing the patients for both VTE and bleeding risk. We recommend mechanical prophylaxis for patients at increased risk of bleeding and utilizing it as an adjunctive measure in combination with pharmacological prophylaxis in patients with high risk of VTE. For patients undergoing general or gynecological surgery and with moderate risk for VTE, we recommend

  11. Unilateral Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula Causing Bilateral Ocular Manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Demartini Jr., Zeferino; Liebert, Fernando; Gatto, Luana Antunes Maranha; Jung, Thiago Simiano; Rocha Jr., Carlos; Santos, Alex Marques Borges; Koppe, Gelson Luis

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral carotid cavernous fistula presents with ipsilateral ocular findings. Bilateral presentation is only seen in bilateral fistulas, usually associated with indirect (dural) carotid cavernous fistulas. Direct carotid cavernous fistulas are an abnormal communication between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. They typically begin with a traumatic disruption in the artery wall into the cavernous sinus, presenting with a classic triad of unilateral pulsatile exophthalmos, cranial bruit and episcleral venous engorgement. We report the case of a 38-year-old male with traumatic right carotid cavernous sinus fistula and bilateral ocular presentation successfully treated by interventional neuroradiology. PMID:26955353

  12. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Baytinger, V. F. Kurochkina, O. S. Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-17

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  13. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baytinger, V. F.; Kurochkina, O. S.; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  14. Bradycardia: sinus and AV node dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Cara N; Scheinman, Melvin M

    2015-09-01

    The surface electrocardiogram (ECG) holds many clues with regard to the etiology of bradycardia and site of atrioventricular (AV) block. Bedside maneuvers may prove helpful in cases of 2:1 AV block or situations where the data is not all concordant. Wenckebach conduction may occur in any region of the heart, and there are nonpathologic mimickers of Mobitz II AV block as well. The surface ECG may aid in the inference of etiology for better than expected or slowed rather than blocked AV conduction. Sinus node dysfunction may present in several forms and often accompanies other conduction system disease. On occasion invasive studies may be required to help elucidate the mechanism of bradycardia.

  15. Giant complex odontoma in maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho Visioli, Adriano Rossini; de Oliveira e Silva, Cléverson; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present a rare case report of giant complex odontoma in the maxillary sinus, where the applied therapy included complete excision of the lesion with a conservative approach. Odontomas are also called benign growth abnormalities or hamartomas. They represent a more common type of odontogenic tumor and are related to various disorders such as bad dental placements, expansion, increased volumetric bone, and no eruption of permanent teeth. Usually they have an asymptomatic evolutionary course. The etiologic factors, although obscure, are related to local trauma, infection, and genetic factor. The structural composition of an odontoma consists of mature dental tissues. Odontomas can be differentiated according to their anatomical presentations: Compound odontoma-clusters of several denticles and complex odontoma-well defined tumefaction mass. The diagnosis can be performed by radiographic examination. PMID:26389051

  16. Aneurysm of the sinus of valsalva.

    PubMed

    Ott, David A

    2006-01-01

    Aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva (ASVs) are rare. They can be congenital or acquired through infection, trauma, or degenerative diseases. They frequently co-occur with ventricular septal defects, aortic valve dysfunction, or other cardiac abnormalities. Although unruptured ASVs are usually asymptomatic, ruptured ASVs often cause symptoms similar to those of heart failure and produce a continuous, mechanical-sounding murmur. Transsternal or transesophageal echocardiography is usually effective in detecting ASVs. Because symptomatic ASVs pose significant risks for the patient, and because the repair of asymptomatic ASVs generally produces excellent outcomes, surgery is indicated in most cases. The primary goals of surgical repair are to close the ASV securely, remove or obliterate the aneurysmal sac, and repair any associated defects. Operative mortality is generally low except in patients with concomitant bacterial endocarditis or other infections. Late events are uncommon and tend to be related to aortic valve prothesis or Marfan syndrome.

  17. Acute Vision Loss Following Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Antisdel, Jastin

    2017-01-01

    A 41-year-old female with a history of uterine cancer and Celiac and Raynaud's Disease presented to our institution with frequent migraines and nasal congestion. She underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) and experienced acute unilateral vision loss postoperatively. Rapid recognition of the etiology and effective treatment are paramount given the permanent and irreversible vision loss that can result. Arterial vasospasm following FESS is rare. Patients with autoimmune diseases have perhaps an increased risk for vasospasm secondary to an increased vasoreactive profile. We present the first documented case of nitroglycerin sublingual therapy to successfully treat ophthalmic artery vasospasm following FESS. Nitroglycerin sublingual therapy is a promising treatment for ophthalmic vasospasm secondary to its ability to cross the blood-ocular barrier, its rapid onset of action, and its ability to promote relaxation of vascular smooth muscle. PMID:28286685

  18. Measurement of velocity of air flow in the sinus maxillaris.

    PubMed

    Müsebeck, K; Rosenberg, H

    1979-03-01

    Anemometry with the hot wire and hot film technique previously described, enables the rhinologist to record slow and rapidly changing air flow in the maxillary sinus. The advantages and disadvantages of this method are considered. Anemometry together with manometry may be designated sinumetry and used as a diagnostic procedure following sinuscopy in chronic maxillary sinus disease. The value of the function from velocity of time allows the estimation of flow-volume in the sinus. Furthermore, the method is useful to evaluate the optimal therapy to restore ventilation in the case of an obstructed ostium demonstrated before and after surgical opening in the inferior meatus.

  19. Effects of amiodarone on sinus node in man.

    PubMed Central

    Touboul, P; Atallah, G; Gressard, A; Kirkorian, G

    1979-01-01

    The effects of amiodarone on the sinuatrial node were studied in 24 patients after an intravenous injection of the drug (5 mg/kg). Sinuatrial function was assessed by rapid atrial pacing and premature atrial stimulation. Sinus cycle length did not change significantly, but the corrected sinus node recovery time was prolonged. While there was no significant change in sinuatrial conduction time, prolongation of the non-reset zone in 14 cases, as well as the abolition of the platesu in 2/24 patients, suggested that conduction of the atrial responses to the sinus node might have been depressed. PMID:518781

  20. Aplasia and hypoplasia of the maxillary sinus: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Jafari-Pozve, Nasim; Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Ataie-Khorasgani, Masoud; Jafari-Pozve, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinus aplasia and hypoplasia are rare conditions that can cause symptoms such as headaches and voice alteration. The majority of patients are asymptomatic, but these conditions must be noticed for importance of differential diagnosis such as infection and neoplasms. Conventional radiographs could not differentiate between inflammatory mucosal thickening, neoplasm, and hypoplasia of the sinus. Computed tomography (CT) and also cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are the proper modalities to detect these conditions. In the present study, CBCT findings of three cases with maxillary sinus hypoplasia and aplasia are reported. PMID:25426156