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Sample records for dusk

  1. Composition measurements in the dusk flank magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Elphic, R. C.; Gosling, J. T.

    1999-03-01

    The dusk flank magnetosphere exhibits significant structure. Several regions have been identified, including the plasma sheet, mantle, and low latitude boundary layer. Transitions from one region to the next, for example from the mantle to the plasma sheet, can be abrupt or indistinct. In addition, the density within the flank mantle can range over several orders of magnitude. Although there is significant structure in this region of the magnetosphere, individual regions often can be distinguished by their energy spectra and ion composition. ISEE Fast Plasma Experiment and Plasma Composition Experiment data are used to examine the composition of the mantle and to study a set of transitions from the mantle to the plasma sheet where plasmas with mantle-like and plasma sheet-like energies mix. This study indicates that the variability of the mantle density is largely due to variability in the solar wind component (H+ and He2+); the ionospheric plasma (O+) density is roughly constant. Similarly, the plasma with mantle-like energy found in the mixed region is largely of solar wind origin.

  2. A dawn to dusk electric field in the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Ip, W. I.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that if Io-injected plasma is lost via a planetary wind-fixed Birkeland current system may result. This is due to the fact that the azimuthal centrifugal current flows across a density gradient produced by the loss of plasma through the planetary wind in the tail. The divergent centrifugal current is connected to field-aligned Birkeland currents which flow into the ionosphere at dawn and out of it at dusk. The closure currents in the ionosphere require a dawn to dusk electric field which at the orbit of Io is estimated to have a strength of 0.2 mV/m. However, the values of crucial parameters are not well known and the field at Io's orbit may well be significantly larger. Independent estimates derived from the local time asymmetry of the torus UV emission indicate a field of 1.5 mV/m.

  3. Dawn-dusk asymmetries in the magnetopause and ring current.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaland, S.

    2014-12-01

    Motion of charged particles in the Earth's magnetosphere sets up a system of currents. Current continuity requires that these currents are closed, either locally or via other current systems. We have investigated whether magnetopause surface currents can contribute to ring current closure. Using 10 years of measurements from the Cluster constellation of spacecraft, we calculated the magnetopause current density for a large number of flank magnetopause traversals. For each event, we also consulted sectorial ring current indices, derived from SuperMAG - a large constellation of ground based magnetometer stations. SuperMAG results show a significant and persistent dawn-dusk asymmetry in ground magnetic perturbations which indicates a more intense ring current on the dusk side. The asymmetries become more pronounced during disturbed magnetospheric conditions, indicating an increased divergence of the current and closure through other current systems. A similar response to geomagnetic activity is also observed at the magnetopause. Duskside magnetopause current densities are generally higher than their dawnside counterparts, and the magnetopause asymmetry becomes more pronounced during disturbed conditions. Although the two current systems are related to different processes - gradient drift of energetic plasma sheet particles for the ring current and a surface current due to differential motion of ions and electrons inside the magnetopause interface for the magnetopause current - the results demonstrate a mutual relation between the two current systems.

  4. Dawn-dusk asymmetry in the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at Mercury.

    PubMed

    Paral, Jan; Rankin, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The NASA MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft entered orbital phase around Mercury on 18 March 2011. A surprising consistent feature in the data returned is large-scale vortices that form exclusively on the dusk side of the magnetosphere. Here we present global kinetic hybrid simulations that explain these observations. It is shown that vortices are excited by a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability near the subsolar point, which grows convectively along the dusk-side magnetopause. Virtual time series along a track approximating a flyby of the MESSENGER show correspondence with the satellite data; the data contain sawtooth oscillations in plasma density, flow and magnetic field, and exhibit the observed dawn-dusk asymmetry. It is shown that asymmetry between dawn and dusk at Mercury is controlled by the finite gyroradius of ions and by convection electric fields. Mercury's magnetosphere offers a natural laboratory for studying plasma regimes not present in other planetary magnetospheres or the laboratory.

  5. Occurrence rate and dawn dusk asymmetry of fast flows near lunar obit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiehas, Stefan; Runov, Andrei; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Hietala, Heli

    2017-04-01

    We use five years (2011-2015) of ARTEMIS data to statistically investigate earthward (EW) and tailward (TW) flows at around 60 RE downtail. We find that a significant portion of fast flows is directed EW. Depending on the flow speed, the EW directed flows contribute by 43 % (flows > 400 km/s) to 53 % (flows > 100 km/s) to the observed flows. As expected, EW (TW) flows are predominantly accompanied with positive (negative) Bz. A dawn-dusk asymmetry in the flow occurrence is seen for both EW and TW flows with about 50%-60% (60%-70%) of the EW (TW) flows occurring in the dusk sector. This asymmetry is stronger for TW than for EW flows and increases slightly with higher flow speeds. Considering only the flow component perpendicular to the magnetic field, the portion of EW flows reduces to about 30%-40%, depending on the flow speed. The dawn-dusk asymmetry is also seen in perpendicular flows. We conclude that EW flows contribute significantly to the totally observed magnetotail flows near lunar orbit. The stronger dawn-dusk asymmetry for TW flows compared to EW flows indicates that the dawn-dusk asymmetry is more pronounced closer to the Earth.

  6. Relationship of dusk sector radial electric field to energy dispersion at the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that, by assuming that the magnetospheric particle boundaries are the result of steady state convection, the electron boundaries in the dusk sector are essentially sensitive to the local, not the global, electric field configuration. A simple, direct relationship is obtained between the dusk sector radial electric field and the inner edge of electron boundaries at various energies.

  7. Relationship of dusk sector radial electric field to energy dispersion at the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that, by assuming that the magnetospheric particle boundaries are the result of steady state convection, the electron boundaries in the dusk sector are essentially sensitive to the local, not the global, electric field configuration. A simple, direct relationship is obtained between the dusk sector radial electric field and the inner edge of electron boundaries at various energies.

  8. Dawn-dusk asymmetries in rotating magnetospheres: Lessons from modeling Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xianzhe; Kivelson, Margaret G.

    2016-02-01

    Spacecraft measurements reveal perplexing dawn-dusk asymmetries of field and plasma properties in the magnetospheres of Saturn and Jupiter. Here we describe a previously unrecognized source of dawn-dusk asymmetry in a rapidly rotating magnetosphere. We analyze two magnetohydrodynamic simulations, focusing on how flows along and across the field vary with local time in Saturn's dayside magnetosphere. As plasma rotates from dawn to noon on a dipolarizing flux tube, it flows away from the equator along the flux tube at roughly half of the sound speed (Cs), the maximum speed at which a bulk plasma can flow along a flux tube into a lower pressure region. As plasma rotates from noon to dusk on a stretching flux tube, the field-aligned component of its centripetal acceleration decreases and it flows back toward the equator at speeds typically smaller than 1/2 Cs. Correspondingly, the plasma sheet remains far thicker and the field less stretched in the afternoon than in the morning. Different radial force balance in the morning and afternoon sectors produce asymmetry in the plasma sheet thickness and a net dusk-to-dawn flow inside of L = 15 or equivalently, a large-scale electric field (E) oriented from postnoon to premidnight, as reported from observations. Morning-afternoon asymmetry analogous to that found at Saturn has been observed at Jupiter, and a noon-midnight component of E cannot be ruled out.

  9. Temporal variations in the dawn and dusk midlatitude trough position-modeled and measured (Ariel 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Tulunay, Y. K.; Chen, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The temporal development of the latitudinal position of the 600 km midlatitude electron density trough at dawn and dusk during the period 25-27 May 1967, which encompassed a large magnetic storm, was measured by the RF capacitive probe on the polar orbiting Ariel 3 satellite. The substorm-related changes in the L coordinate of the trough minimum and the point of most rapid change of density gradient on the low latitude side of the trough are similar. Oscillations of the trough position at dusk are in phase with substorm activity whereas movement of the trough at dawn is only apparent with the onset of the large storm. Near dusk there is evidence of structure in the form of a tail-like extension of the plasmasphere at the peak of the storm. Detailed model calculations assuming a spatially invariant equatorial convection E field which varies in step with K sub p index reproduces much of the observed behavior, particularly at dusk, and shows that more than one plasmapause-type transition may be identifiable in the trough region.

  10. Microinjections observed by MMS FEEPS in the dusk to midnight region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennell, J. F.; Turner, D. L.; Lemon, C. L.; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Mauk, B. H.; Jaynes, A. N.; Cohen, I. J.; Westlake, J. H.; Baker, D. N.; Craft, J. V.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Giles, B. L.; Paterson, W. R.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    Energetic electron injections are commonly observed in the premidnight to dawn regions in association with substorms. However, successive electron injections are generally separated in time by hours and are rarer in the dusk region of the inner magnetosphere. Early MMS energetic electron data taken in the dusk to premidnight regions above ~9 RE show many clusters of electron injections. These injections of 50-400 keV electrons have energy dispersion signatures indicating that they gradient and curvature drifted from earlier local times. We focus on burst rate data starting near 21:00 UT on 6 August 2015. A cluster of ~40 electron injections occurred in the following 4 h interval. The highest-resolution data showed that the electrons in the injections were trapped and had bidirectional field-aligned angular distributions. These injection clusters are a new phenomenon in this region of the magnetosphere.

  11. Comparative characteristics of ion and electron precipitation in the dawn and dusk sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobjev, V. G.; Yagodkina, O. I.

    2014-01-01

    Characteristics of ion and electron precipitations in the dawn and dusk sectors are investigated by DMSP F6 and F7 satellite observations. It is shown that in the dusk sector the positions of electron and ion precipitation boundaries are nearly coincident for all levels of magnetic activity; however the latitudinal distribution of energy fluxes indicates that the positions of electron and ion precipitation maxima are spatially separated. Maximum energy fluxes of ions is observed at the equatorial precipitation boundary, while those of electrons at the poleward one. In the dawn sector, the electron precipitation region is 3°-4° wider than that of ions. The isotropy boundary in the dusk sector is located in the region of diffuse precipitation (DAZ) near its poleward boundary for all levels of magnetic activity, while in the dawn sector it falls in the region of structured precipitations (AOP). Electron precipitations are dominating in the dawn sector. Here in the region of diffuse precipitation (DAZ), the ion energy fluxes Fi make less than 5% as compared to the electron energy flux Fe. In the region of structured precipitations (AOP), the portion of Fi decreases with increasing magnetic activity from ~10-20% for AL ≈ -100 nT to <5% for AL ≈ -1000 nT. As for the dusk sector, in the AOP region, electron precipitations are dominating as well, while in the DAZ region the ion energy fluxes are significant. In the 1500-1800 MLT sector, the ratio Fi/Fe increases from ~0.7 to ~3.0 with AL changing from -100 nT to -1000 nT.

  12. An Evaluation of Several Personal Weapon-Sighting Systems during Daytime, Dusk, and Night Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    range of the l..ght gradient that constitutes dusk, down to the approximate equivalent of full moon . Subtest 3 (night) conditions were considered to...have been reached when the ambient light level read 0.012 footcandle (correspcnding approximately to full moon ) or darker. Ambient light was monitored...During conditions of full moon or darker, a pistol equipped with either a visible or an infrared laser beam and used with the AN/PVS7B night vision

  13. Light pollution alters the phenology of dawn and dusk singing in common European songbirds.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Arnaud; Valcu, Mihai; Kempenaers, Bart

    2015-05-05

    Artificial night lighting is expanding globally, but its ecological consequences remain little understood. Animals often use changes in day length as a cue to time seasonal behaviour. Artificial night lighting may influence the perception of day length, and may thus affect both circadian and circannual rhythms. Over a 3.5 month period, from winter to breeding, we recorded daily singing activity of six common songbird species in 12 woodland sites, half of which were affected by street lighting. We previously reported on analyses suggesting that artificial night lighting affects the daily timing of singing in five species. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether the presence of artificial night lighting is also associated with the seasonal occurrence of dawn and dusk singing. We found that in four species dawn and dusk singing developed earlier in the year at sites exposed to light pollution. We also examined the effects of weather conditions and found that rain and low temperatures negatively affected the occurrence of dawn and dusk singing. Our results support the hypothesis that artificial night lighting alters natural seasonal rhythms, independently of other effects of urbanization. The fitness consequences of the observed changes in seasonal timing of behaviour remain unknown.

  14. Light pollution alters the phenology of dawn and dusk singing in common European songbirds

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Arnaud; Valcu, Mihai; Kempenaers, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Artificial night lighting is expanding globally, but its ecological consequences remain little understood. Animals often use changes in day length as a cue to time seasonal behaviour. Artificial night lighting may influence the perception of day length, and may thus affect both circadian and circannual rhythms. Over a 3.5 month period, from winter to breeding, we recorded daily singing activity of six common songbird species in 12 woodland sites, half of which were affected by street lighting. We previously reported on analyses suggesting that artificial night lighting affects the daily timing of singing in five species. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether the presence of artificial night lighting is also associated with the seasonal occurrence of dawn and dusk singing. We found that in four species dawn and dusk singing developed earlier in the year at sites exposed to light pollution. We also examined the effects of weather conditions and found that rain and low temperatures negatively affected the occurrence of dawn and dusk singing. Our results support the hypothesis that artificial night lighting alters natural seasonal rhythms, independently of other effects of urbanization. The fitness consequences of the observed changes in seasonal timing of behaviour remain unknown. PMID:25780238

  15. Near-terminator Venus ionosphere: Evidence for a dawn/dusk asymmetry in the thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, J. L.; Kasprzak, W. T.

    2007-09-01

    Recent models of the near-terminator ionosphere of Venus constructed using neutral density profiles from the VTS3 model of Hedin et al. (1983) have shown that altitudes of the electron density peaks are in agreement with those measured by Pioneer Venus (PV) Orbiter Radio Occultation (ORO) and other radio occultation profiles in the solar zenith angle (SZA) range 60 to 70°, where they are near 140 km (Fox, 2007). The model peaks in the 75-85° range, however, do not decrease in altitude to near 135 km, as do the PV ORO electron density peaks shown in the study of Cravens et al. (1981). We investigate here possible reasons for this decrease. The PV Orbiter Neutral Mass Spectrometer (ONMS) measured densities of CO2, O, CO, N2, N, and He for many of the first 600 orbits. We have chosen 10 orbits in the dawn sector and 12 orbits in the dusk sector for which the solar zenith angles at periapsis were in the 75-85° range, and we have examined the ONMS density profiles reported in the PV Unified Abstract Data System. We find that for most of the orbits, the appropriately normalized ONMS measured densities for CO2 and O are, however, either similar to or larger than those generated from the VTS3 model for the same solar zenith angle and F 10.7 flux, and the use of these densities in our models would therefore produce a higher, rather than a lower, peak. The VTS3 models are, however, not expected to be accurate in the terminator region because of the small number of spherical harmonics used in the models and the large density changes that are expected near the terminators. We have also investigated a possible dawn/dusk asymmetry in the ionosphere. All the low-altitude PV radio occultation electron density peaks reported in the study of Cravens et al. (1981) in the 70 to 85° range were in the dawn sector at high latitudes. In the VTS3 models, the exospheric temperatures are predicted to be smaller at dawn that at dusk, but the asymmetries are confined to the region above

  16. Dawn-Dusk Asymmetry in Bursty Hot Electron Enhancements in the Mid-Tail Magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. P.; Xing, X.; Nakamura, T.; Lyons, L. R.

    2015-12-01

    Bursty (a few minutes) enhancements of hot electrons (1-10 keV) in the tail magnetosheath, which we name hot electron enhancements (HEEs), are sometimes observed. To understand the processes leading to HEEs, we have used 4 years of measurements from Acceleration Reconnection Turbulence & Electrodynamics of Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) mission to statistically investigate the dawn-dusk asymmetry of HEEs in the mid-tail (X from -30 to -70 RE) magnetosheath and their correlations with the solar wind/interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. We find two strong dawn-dusk asymmetries associated with HEEs: (1) They occur about 3 to 4 times more frequently on the dawnside. (2) Their fluxes on the dawnside are about twice as large as those on the duskside. The magnitudes of HEE fluxes are similar to those of the magnetosphere fluxes near the magnetopause, which are also a factor of 2 higher on the dawnside, indicating that the magnetosphere electrons are likely the source for HEEs and the cause for the HEE flux asymmetry. HEEs occur preferentially during higher solar wind speed and the majority of HEEs are associated with sharp IMF direction changes and are accompanied by large and transient magnetosheath density changes. These correlations are stronger on the dawnside, suggesting that perturbations created near the quasi-parallel bow shock, which is most of the time on the dawnside, associated with IMF discontinuities is a possible process leading to HEEs and could account for the higher HEE occurrence on the dawnside.

  17. Coherent HF radar backscatter from small-scale irregularities in the dusk sector of the subauroral ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.; Villain, J.-P.; Baker, K. B.; Newell, P. T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of backscatter from decameter-scale ionospheric plasma density irregualarities, observed with an impressive regularity by the Goose Bay (Labrador) high-frequency (HF) radar in the dusk sector of the winter ionosphere, and discusses the relation of the scatter to the midlatitude trough. It is shown that this dusk scatter can be readily distinguished from other types of late afternoon/early evening scatter by the extreme equatorward position of its source region and by the low values of its associated radar Doppler velocities (not above 200 m/s) and spectral widths (not more than 200 m/s). A comparison of the radar observations with nearly simultaneous particle precipitation data obtained with the DMSP F6 satellite demonstrated that the source region of the backscatter lies within the subauroral ionosphere. It is shown that the characteristics of dusk scatter are compatible with the Spiro et al. (1978) model of the electrodynamics of the midlatitude trough.

  18. F region dusk ion temperature spikes at the equatorward edge of the high-latitude convection pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, L.; St.-Maurice, J.-P.; Richards, P.; Nicolls, M.; Hairston, M.

    2014-01-01

    Using Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar data from the International Polar Year, we observed unexpected short-lived enhancements of a few 100 K in the F region ion temperature, or "Ti spikes", in conjunction with sharp F region plasma density drops near the dusk plasmapause. The geomagnetic conditions were moderately to weakly disturbed and the dusk spikes were often the largest Ti values recorded within the day. Taking various other observations into consideration, we conclude that the radar observed ion frictional heating events driven by large ion-neutral relative drifts caused by temporary intensifications in the convection pattern. The heating rate was enhanced through an increase in the size of the convection pattern, causing the neutrals just poleward of the dusk plasmapause to be moving antisunward while ions were moving sunward.

  19. The Dusk Chorus from an Owl Perspective: Eagle Owls Vocalize When Their White Throat Badge Contrasts Most

    PubMed Central

    Penteriani, Vincenzo; Delgado, Maria del Mar

    2009-01-01

    Background An impressive number of studies have investigated bird vocal displays, and many of them have tried to explain the widespread phenomenon of the so-called dawn and dusk chorus, the sunrise and sunset peaks in bird song output. As many as twelve non-exclusive hypotheses have been proposed to explain why twilight peaks in vocal display might be advantageous; but, even after more than two decades of study, the basis underlying the dusk and dawn chorus is still unclear. Moreover, to date, the majority of studies on this topic have focused on songbirds. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigate here a novel hypothesis on why nocturnal birds with patches of white feathers call at twilight. We propose that white plumage patches and the timing of visual signaling have co-evolved to maximize the effectiveness of social communication such as the dusk chorus. This hypothesis centers on the recent discovery that eagle owls can adopt specific forms of visual signaling and is supported by the observation that adult eagle owls possess a white throat badge that is only visible during vocal displays. By monitoring the calling of eagle owls at dusk, a peak time for bird call output, we found that white throat badges contrasted most with the surrounding background during the owls' twilight chorusing. Conclusions/Significance Crepuscular and nocturnal species appear to have evolved white patches that, shown in association with vocal displays, allow them to communicate in dark surroundings. The evolution of a white badge that operates jointly with call displays at dawn and dusk may be relevant to the eagle owls' social dynamics. Our explanation for the dusk chorus may possibly represent an overlooked but common pattern of signaling among crepuscular and nocturnal birds that combine patches of white feathers with twilight displays. Furthermore, our findings could be relevant to songbirds that breed in dark forest habitats and have contrasting white badges, as well as birds

  20. Distinct sources of particles near the cusp and the dusk flank of the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoubet, C. P.; Grison, B.; Berchem, J.; Trattner, K. J.; Lavraud, B.; Pitout, F.; Soucek, J.; Richard, R. L.; Laakso, H. E.; Masson, A.; Dunlop, M.; Dandouras, I. S.; Rème, H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Daly, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    At the magnetopause, the location of the magnetic reconnection sites depends on the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in the solar wind: on the dayside magnetosphere for an IMF southward, on the lobes for an IMF northward and on the flanks for an IMF in the East-West direction. Since most of observations of reconnection events have sampled a limited region of space simultaneously it is still not yet know if the reconnection line is extended over large regions of the magnetosphere or if is patchy and made of many reconnection lines. We report a Cluster crossing on 5 January 2002 near the exterior cusp on the southern dusk side where we observe multiple sources of reconnection/injections. The IMF was mainly azimuthal (IMF-By around -5 nT), the solar wind speed lower than usual around 280 km/s with the density of order 5 cm-3. The four Cluster spacecraft had an elongated configuration near the magnetopause. C4 was the first spacecraft to enter the cusp around 19:52:04 UT, followed by C2 at 19:52:35 UT, C1 at 19:54:24 UT and C3 at 20:13:15 UT. C4 and C1 observed two ion energy dispersions at 20:10 UT and 20:40 UT and C3 at 20:35 UT and 21:15 UT. Using the time of flight technique on the upgoing and downgoing ions, which leads to energy dispersions, we obtain distances of the ion sources between 14 and 20 RE from the spacecraft. The slope of the ion energy dispersions confirmed these distances. Using Tsyganenko model, we find that these sources are located on the dusk flank, past the terminator. The first injection by C3 is seen at approximately the same time as the 2nd injection on C1 but their sources at the magnetopause were separated by more than 7 RE. This would imply that two distinct sources were active at the same time on the dusk flank of the magnetosphere. In addition, a flow reversal was observed at the magnetopause on C4 which would be an indication that reconnection is also taking place near the exterior cusp quasi-simultaneously. A

  1. Possible Signatures Of Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves On The Dusk Flank Of The Kronian Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Jack; Masters, Adam; Dougherty, Michele; Lucek, Elizabeth; Kanani, Sheila

    2010-05-01

    A comprehensive survey of crossings of both Saturn's magnetopause and bow shock on the dusk side between January 2007 and December 2007 was compiled, using data from the Cassini fluxgate magnetometer and the Cassini electron spectrometer. Bow shock and magnetopause crossings were determined by the criteria discussed in Masters et al., 2008 and Masters et al., 2009 [1] respectively. 396 magnetopause crossings and 165 bow shock crossings were identified with large spatial variation; the high temporal frequency of crossings combined with the large radial variation was indicative of highly dynamic boundaries. A set of magnetopause crossings occurring near the nose of the magnetopause on the 30th June and 1st July 2007 were then analysed using minimum variance analysis (MVA) of the magnetic field vectors over the crossing interval to determine the direction of the boundary normal at each crossing. Using MVA analysis again to calculate the maximum variance direction of the magnetopause normals, I found a clear preferred direction of variance of the normals. The normals were found to deviate by an average of 30° about the average normal direction in the plane of maximum variance, but only by 12° in the perpendicular plane. The observed oscillation of dawn side crossing normals (Masters et al., 2009) was not present throughout the whole dusk set, but was present for subsets, which is suggestive of wave activity. Considering the orientation between the magnetospheric magnetic field and the direction of maximum variance of the normals, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability is the likely driving force of these boundary perturbations. Current work involves analyzing two further magnetopause crossing sets, one further dusk-ward and one closer to noon (SLT), to identify whether K-H waves are also present at these locations. [1] Masters, A.; McAndrews, H. J.; Steinberg, J. T.; Thomsen, M. F.; Arridge, C. S.; Dougherty, M. K.; Billingham, L.; Schwartz, S. J.; Sergis, N

  2. North-south and dawn-dusk plasma asymmetries in the distant tail lobes - ISEE 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Smith, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    ISEE 3 plasma measurements made in the distant geomagnetic tail during rapid traversals of the current sheet from one lobe to the other show that the lobe densities on opposite sides of the current sheet often differ by a factor of approximately 3-10 or more. On the dawnside of the tail the north lobe plasma has the higher density when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) has a +By component, and the south lobe plasma has the higher density when the IMF has a -By component. The sense of this asymmetry is reversed on the dusk-side of the tail. Such IMF-controlled asymmetries in lobe plasma density are consistent with earlier observations made much closer to earth and can be interpreted most simply as a consequence of an 'open' geomagnetic tail.

  3. Reconciling the Dawn-Dusk Asymmetry in Mercury’s Exosphere with the Micrometeoroid Impact Directionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, Petr; Sarantos, Menelaos; Janches, Diego

    2017-06-01

    Combining dynamical models of dust from Jupiter-family comets and Halley-type comets, we demonstrate that the seasonal variation of the dust/meteoroid environment at Mercury is responsible for producing the dawn-dusk asymmetry in Mercury’s exosphere observed by the MESSENGER spacecraft. Our latest models, calibrated recently from ground-based and space-borne measurements, provide unprecedented statistics that enable us to study the longitudinal and latitudinal distribution of meteoroids impacting Mercury’s surface. We predict that the micrometeoroid impact vaporization source is expected to undergo significant motion on Mercury’s surface toward the nightside during Mercury’s approach to aphelion and toward the dayside when the planet is approaching the Sun.

  4. Dawn and Dusk Set States of the Circadian Oscillator in Sprouting Barley (Hordeum vulgare) Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Weiwei; Clausen, Jenni; Boden, Scott; Oliver, Sandra N.; Casao, M. Cristina; Ford, Brett; Anderssen, Robert S.; Trevaskis, Ben

    2015-01-01

    The plant circadian clock is an internal timekeeper that coordinates biological processes with daily changes in the external environment. The transcript levels of clock genes, which oscillate to control circadian outputs, were examined during early seedling development in barley (Hordeum vulgare), a model for temperate cereal crops. Oscillations of clock gene transcript levels do not occur in barley seedlings grown in darkness or constant light but were observed with day-night cycles. A dark-to-light transition influenced transcript levels of some clock genes but triggered only weak oscillations of gene expression, whereas a light-to-dark transition triggered robust oscillations. Single light pulses of 6, 12 or 18 hours induced robust oscillations. The light-to-dark transition was the primary determinant of the timing of subsequent peaks of clock gene expression. After the light-to-dark transition the timing of peak transcript levels of clock gene also varied depending on the length of the preceding light pulse. Thus, a single photoperiod can trigger initiation of photoperiod-dependent circadian rhythms in barley seedlings. Photoperiod-specific rhythms of clock gene expression were observed in two week old barley plants. Changing the timing of dusk altered clock gene expression patterns within a single day, showing that alteration of circadian oscillator behaviour is amongst the most rapid molecular responses to changing photoperiod in barley. A barley EARLY FLOWERING3 mutant, which exhibits rapid photoperiod–insensitive flowering behaviour, does not establish clock rhythms in response to a single photoperiod. The data presented show that dawn and dusk cues are important signals for setting the state of the circadian oscillator during early development of barley and that the circadian oscillator of barley exhibits photoperiod-dependent oscillation states. PMID:26068005

  5. Intensification and fading of auroral arcs in the dusk-midnight sector of the polar cap

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.; Rosenberg, T.J. ); Berkey, F.T. ); Eather, R.H. )

    1991-05-01

    Observations of the aurora from South Pole station (magnetic latitude = {minus}74.2{degree}) have been used to study the intensification and fading of polar arcs observed near the dusk meridian. Most of the cases examined have the following features in common: (1) a preexisting auroral form intensifies for about 10 min; (2) this activation is followed by a pronounced decrease of luminosity; (3) the auroral fade terminates after 30-60 min with the onset of intense aurora which sweeps rapidly overhead. The availability of all-sky camera, auroral electrojet (AE) index and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data for some of the cases enables the following additional characterizations of these events. The preexisting form is a Sun- or oval-aligned arc (or part of a multiple arc system) which disappears following the activation; equatorward drift of the arc (or system) accompanies the luminosity change. There is some evidence to suggest that the arc is poleward of the auroral oval. The brief intensification and/or the onset of fading occurs during the growth phase or near the start of the expansive phase of a substorm; termination of the fade is near the maximum in AE and is probably indicative of the beginning of the recovery phase of the substorm. For all three cases for which IMF data were available the onset of fading occurred 20-30 min after B{sub z} turned southward. Sun-aligned arcs are a common feature of the polar cap during northward B{sub z} but disappear during the increasingly disturbed conditions that accompany southward B{sub z}. The present results suggest that brief intensifications of southern hemisphere polar cap arcs near dusk may be linked in part to the sunward orientation of the IMF which favors enhanced electron fluxes in the southern lobe of the magnetotail.

  6. Weak auroral emissions and particle precipitations in the dusk auroral oval

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, T.; Hirasawa, T. ); Ching-I. Meng )

    1989-09-01

    Faint auroral displays in the low-latitude region of the duskside auroral oval were examined by using 5577 A, 6300 A, and 4861 A auroral images from three monochromatic all-sky television cameras at Syowa Station, Antarctica, and simultaneous precipitating auroral particle data obtained by the U.S. Air Force/Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (USAF/DMSP) F6 satellite. In the low-latitude region of the duskside auroral oval, we found three types of auroral displays with weak optical intensity: (1) proton auroras, (2) pulsating auroras, and (3) faint discrete auroral arcs distinct only in the 6300 A emission. In usual cases, the energy input into this region is mostly carried y proton precipitations to produce proton auroras mainly at wavelengths of 4861 A and 5577 A. Pulsating features are sometimes observed in the diffuse auroral region in the dusk sector. Comparing auroral images with the nearly simultaneous data of precipitating auroral particles, we confirmed that the pulsating auroras are associated with the intensification of precipitating electron flux from the central plasma sheet. Furthermore, electrons are the main contributors to the energy input into the duskside auroral oval in this case. We also found that discrete auroras sometimes appeared in the 6300 A images, but not in images at other wavelengths. They appear in the equatorial part of the dusk auroral oval. These 6300 A discrete auroras correspond to weak precipitation spikes of low-energy electrons simultaneously measured by DMSP satellites. The flux and average energy of these electron spikes are about 10{sup 8}/(cm{sup 2} sr s) and 100 eV, respectively. They are intense enough to excite 6300 A emissions but not 5577 A emissions, as detected from the ground observations. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

  7. Dawn and Dusk Set States of the Circadian Oscillator in Sprouting Barley (Hordeum vulgare) Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weiwei; Clausen, Jenni; Boden, Scott; Oliver, Sandra N; Casao, M Cristina; Ford, Brett; Anderssen, Robert S; Trevaskis, Ben

    2015-01-01

    The plant circadian clock is an internal timekeeper that coordinates biological processes with daily changes in the external environment. The transcript levels of clock genes, which oscillate to control circadian outputs, were examined during early seedling development in barley (Hordeum vulgare), a model for temperate cereal crops. Oscillations of clock gene transcript levels do not occur in barley seedlings grown in darkness or constant light but were observed with day-night cycles. A dark-to-light transition influenced transcript levels of some clock genes but triggered only weak oscillations of gene expression, whereas a light-to-dark transition triggered robust oscillations. Single light pulses of 6, 12 or 18 hours induced robust oscillations. The light-to-dark transition was the primary determinant of the timing of subsequent peaks of clock gene expression. After the light-to-dark transition the timing of peak transcript levels of clock gene also varied depending on the length of the preceding light pulse. Thus, a single photoperiod can trigger initiation of photoperiod-dependent circadian rhythms in barley seedlings. Photoperiod-specific rhythms of clock gene expression were observed in two week old barley plants. Changing the timing of dusk altered clock gene expression patterns within a single day, showing that alteration of circadian oscillator behaviour is amongst the most rapid molecular responses to changing photoperiod in barley. A barley EARLY FLOWERING3 mutant, which exhibits rapid photoperiod-insensitive flowering behaviour, does not establish clock rhythms in response to a single photoperiod. The data presented show that dawn and dusk cues are important signals for setting the state of the circadian oscillator during early development of barley and that the circadian oscillator of barley exhibits photoperiod-dependent oscillation states.

  8. Simulation scheme of dusk scene using piece-wise multiple regression based on time-series color-block images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Yang, Chih-Chao

    2010-09-01

    Dusk and dawn are usually the most beautiful moments of the day, and are almost always too short for busy people nowadays to witness their coming. In this work, an efficient strategy for simulating a dusk scene of an outdoor scene image taken at other times before the sunset is presented. The strategy is a hybrid approach combining the piece-wise multiple regression (PMR) of data, discrete cosine transformation (DCT), and a look-up table algorithm. The process begins using a series of color-block images taken in the afternoon of a day. The best fitting functions of PMR for these color block images exist on separate planes (red, green, and blue) in the DCT domain individually. The reference databases of the DCT coefficients varying with respect to time are then established according to the best fitting functions of PMR. Finally, the dusk scene of an outdoor scene taken in the afternoon is synthesized by querying the reference database. The experiment results show that the presented algorithm can precisely simulate the desired dusk scene from a scene image taken in the afternoon.

  9. Dusk side magnetopause surface waves: boundary motion, thickness, and wave steepening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaschke, F.; Kahr, N.; Fischer, D.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Magnes, W.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Giles, B. L.; Strangeway, R. J.; Leinweber, H. K.; Bromund, K. R.; Anderson, B. J.; Le, G.; Chutter, M.; Slavin, J. A.; Kepko, L.

    2016-12-01

    Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) amplified surface waves that propagate tailward along the flank magnetopause should feature steeper, i.e. more inclined, leading (anti-sunward facing) than trailing (sunward facing) edges. The gradients in fields and plasma moments, however, are expected to be larger across the trailing edges of the waves. To test these predictions, highly accurate determinations of local magnetopause normal directions and velocities are required. For the first time, four-spacecraft measurements by the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft make these determinations possible in a routine manner by timing analysis, due to the small-scale tetrahedral spacecraft configuration and the high time resolution of the measurements. We analyse MMS observations of dusk side magnetopause surface waves and present corresponding statistical results pertaining to the magnetopause motion, thickness and shape. Indeed, we find that 77% of the analysed wave intervals show KH-wave (expected/regular) steepening. In agreement therewith, leading/trailing edges are generally found to be thicker/thinner. Contrary to expectations, a rather large fraction of 23% of the waves exhibits inverse steepening. Comparison with solar wind conditions shows that this latter type of steepening occurs during intervals of mainly northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), as previously reported, and, in addition, during dominantly equatorial IMF conditions that stabilize the equatorial magnetopause.

  10. Sunbeams from mirrors in dawn-dusk orbit for earth solar power fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, Lewis M.

    2013-09-01

    There are two problems limiting solar electric power. The amount of sunlight is limited and there is no sunlight during peak demand in the evening hours. These problems can be addressed by placing light weight mirror satellite constellations in sun synchronous dawn to dusk low earth orbits in space at an altitude of 1000 km. These satellites can deflect sunbeams down to an array of solar power stations distributed near major population centers around the earth. These solar PV earth stations are already being built. The additional solar energy provided in the early morning and evening hours can potentially reduce the cost of solar electricity at the ground sites to less than 6 cents per kWh. Herein, a specific mirror satellite design concept is proposed with the idea that if one practical mirror satellite can be built, it then can be replicated as many times as required for a specific mission. The proposed mirror satellite is comprised of a lightweight thin aluminized mirror membrane stretched flat by three radial spokes telescoping out from a central body. Control moment gyros similar to those used in the International Space Station (ISS) are mounted inside the central body of the mirror satellite for attitude control and sunbeam pointing. The three spokes collapse and the mirror membrane is folded such that several of these mirror satellites can potentially be stowed inside the fairing of today's available rockets for launch and deployment.

  11. Dusk to dawn activity patterns of anopheline mosquitoes in West Timor and Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ndoen, Ermi; Wild, Clyde; Dale, Pat; Sipe, Neil; Dale, Mike

    2011-05-01

    Malaria is a serious health issue in Indonesia. We investigated the dusk to dawn anopheline mosquito activity patterns, host-seeking and resting locations in coastal plain, hilly and highland areas in West Timor and Java. Adult mosquitoes were captured landing on humans or resting in houses or animal barns. Data analyzed were: mosquito night-time activities; period of peak activity; night-time activity in specific periods of time and for mosquito resting locations. Eleven species were recorded; data were sparse for some species therefore detailed analyses were performed for four species only. In Java Anopheles vagus was common, with a bimodal pattern of high activity. In West Timor, its activity peaked around midnight. Other species with peak activity around the middle of the night were An. barbirostris and An. subpictus. Most species showed no biting and resting preference for indoors or outdoors, although An. barbirostris preferred indoors in West Timor, but outdoors in Java. An. aconitus and An. annularis preferred resting in human dwellings; An. subpictus and An. vagus preferred resting in animal barns. An. barbirostris preferred resting in human dwellings in West Timor and in animal barns in Java. The information is useful for planning the mosquito control aspect of malaria management. For example, where mosquito species have peak activity at night indoors, bednets and indoor residual spraying should reduce malaria risk, but where mosquitoes are most active outdoors, other options may be more effective.

  12. A DE-1/whistler study of the thermal plasma structure and dynamics in the dusk bulge sector of the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research was to obtain new understanding of the thermal plasma structure and dynamics of the plasmasphere bulge region of the magnetosphere, with special emphasis on the erosion process that results in a reduction in plasmasphere size and on the manner in which erosion leads to the presence of patches of dense plasma in the middle and outer afternoon-dusk magnetosphere. Case studies involving data from the DE 1, GEOS 2, and ISEE 1 satellites and from ground whistler stations Siple, Halley, and Kerguelen were used. A copy of the published paper entitled 'A case study of plasma structure in the dusk sector associated with enhanced magnetospheric convection,' is included.

  13. A mechanism to produce a dawn-dusk component of plasma flow during magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, J. G.; Lee, L. C.; Yan, M.; Lin, Y.; Perkins, F. W.; Yamada, M.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection between antiparallel field lines in the magnetotail is generally thought to produce plasma acceleration in the earthward-tailward direction. However, measurements of the plasma velocity in the magnetotail during substorm activity sometimes reveal a dawn-dusk component of plasma flow. In this paper, we show that a dawn-dusk component of plasma acceleration may be produced during reconnection if the neutral line is not perpendicular to the magnetic field. In this case, Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations show that reconnection between antiparallel field lines will initially produce plasma acceleration that is nearly parallel to the neutral line because the magnetic tension force is not opposed by a pressure gradient force in this direction. As the magnetic field topology evolves to a steady state, the plasma flow direction rotates until it is nearly parallel to the plane that initially contained the antiparallel magnetic field lines before reconnection (hereafter referred to as the initial field plane). However, the time required to reach a steady state (typically several hundred seconds in the magnetotail region) may be greater than the time during which the reconnection process is active. Consequently, bursts of plasma flow with a dawn-dusk component may occur in the magnetotail. The initial acceleration along the neutral line depends on the angle theta (sub B) between the neutral line and the initial field plane, with the largest burst of plasma flow along the neutral line occuring when theta (s ub B) = 45 degs.

  14. Dawn-dusk difference of periodic oxygen EUV dayglow variations at Venus observed by Hisaki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunaga, Kei; Seki, Kanako; Terada, Naoki; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Kimura, Tomoki; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Murakami, Go; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Tao, Chihiro; Leblanc, François; Yoshikawa, Ichiro

    2017-08-01

    We report a dawn-dusk difference of periodic variations of oxygen EUV dayglow (OII 83.4 nm, OI 130.4 nm and OI 135.6 nm) in the upper atmosphere of Venus observed by the Hisaki spacecraft in 2015. Observations show that the periodic dayglow variations are mainly controlled by the solar EUV flux. Additionally, we observed characteristic ∼1 day and ∼4 day periodicities in the OI 135.6 nm brightness. The ∼1 day periodicity was dominant on the duskside while the ∼4 day periodicity was dominant on the dawnside. Although the driver of the ∼1 day periodicity is still uncertain, we suggest that the ∼4 day periodicity is caused by gravity waves that propagate from the middle atmosphere. The thermospheric subsolar-antisolar flow and the gravity waves dominantly enhance eddy diffusion on the dawnside, and the eddy diffusion coefficient changes every ∼4 days due to large periodic modulations of wind velocity of the super-rotating atmosphere. Since the ∼4 day modulations on the dawnside are not continuously observed, it is possible that there is an intermittent coupling between the thermosphere and middle atmosphere due to variations of wave source altitudes. Moreover, if there are variations of the wind velocity in the mesosphere or lower thermosphere, it is possible that gravity waves occasionally propagate to the thermosphere even on the duskside due to periodic disappearance of the critical level and the ∼4 day periodic O atomic modulations occur. Thus, our observations imply that the ∼4 day periodicity of the EUV dayglow may reflect the dynamics of the middle atmosphere of Venus. We also examined the effects of the solar wind on the dayglow variations by shifting the solar wind measurements from earth to Venus. We did not find clear correlations between them. However, since there are no local measurements of the solar wind at Venus, the effect of the solar wind on the dayglow is still uncertain.

  15. Evidence for a biological dawn and dusk in the human circadian timing system

    PubMed Central

    Wehr, T A; Aeschbach, D; Duncan, W C

    2001-01-01

    Because individuals differ in the phase angle at which their circadian rhythms are entrained to external time cues, averaging group data relative to clock time sometimes obscures abrupt changes that are characteristic of waveforms of the rhythms in individuals. Such changes may have important implications for the temporal organization of human circadian physiology. To control for variance in phase angle of entrainment, we used dual internal reference points – onset and offset of the nocturnal period of melatonin secretion – to calculate average profiles of circadian rhythm data from five previously published studies. Onset and/or offset of melatonin secretion were found to coincide with switch-like transitions between distinct diurnal and nocturnal periods of circadian rhythms in core body temperature, sleepiness, power in the theta band of the wake EEG, sleep propensity and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep propensity. Transitions between diurnal and nocturnal periods of sleep–wake and cortisol circadian rhythms were found to lag the other transitions by 1–3 h. When the duration of the daily light period was manipulated experimentally, melatonin-onset-related transitions in circadian rhythms appeared to be entrained to the light-to-dark transition, while melatonin-offset-related transitions appeared to be entrained to the dark-to-light transition. These results suggest a model of the human circadian timing system in which two states, one diurnal and one nocturnal, alternate with one another, and in which transitions between the states are switch-like and are separately entrained to dawn and dusk. This description of the human circadian system is similar to the Pittendrigh–Daan model of the rodent circadian system, and it suggests that core features of the system in other mammals are conserved in humans. PMID:11559786

  16. Theory and Simulations of Auroral Undulations Associated with Instabilities in the Dusk Sector Plasma Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, J. C.; Horton, W.; Lewis, W. S.; Burch, J.; Goldstein, J.; Frey, H.; Anderson, P.

    2005-12-01

    Ion drift wave theory and simulations of large-scale auroral undulations are presented for the observations in Lewis et al (2005). These undulations are identified as a nonlinear stage of the drift balloning-interchange mode in the presence of a sheared E×B flow for high Richardson's number in the dusk sector of the plasma sheet. The system is ideal MHD stable. Theoretical density, temperature and pressure profiles are constructed and constrained from data and used as input for a 2-1/2 D nonlinear Chebyshev-Fourier-tau pseudospectral code which reproduces the undulation structure to a good degree. Undulations were observed on February 6, 2002 along the equatorward edge of the auroral oval with the Far-Ultraviolet Wideband Imaging Camera on NASA's IMAGE satellite during the recovery phase of a moderate magnetic storm. The undulations occurred in the 18.5-14.5 magnetic local time sector between 63° and 71° magnetic latitude. Their wavelength and crest-to-base length averaged 292~km and 224~km, respectively; and they propagated westward with an average speed of 0.90±0.06~km/s. Such undulations are a relatively uncommon auroral phenomenon, and the mechanism that produce them and the magnetospheric conditions under which they occur are not well understood. Work supported by the National Science Foundation. [1] W.~S. Lewis, J.~L. Burch, J. Goldstein, W. Horton, J.~C. Perez, H.~U. Frey and P.~C. Anderson, submitted to GRL (2005).

  17. Hall effect control of magnetotail dawn-dusk asymmetry: A three-dimensional global hybrid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, San; Lin, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Artemyev, A. V.; Pritchett, P. L.; Lu, Quanming; Wang, X. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetotail reconnection and related phenomena (e.g., flux ropes, dipolarizing flux bundles, flow bursts, and particle injections) occur more frequently on the duskside than on the dawnside. Because this asymmetry can directly result in dawn-dusk asymmetric space weather effects, uncovering its physical origin is important for better understanding, modeling, and prediction of the space weather phenomena. However, the cause of this pervasive asymmetry is unclear. Using three-dimensional global hybrid simulations, we demonstrate that the Hall physics in the magnetotail current sheet is responsible for the asymmetry. The current sheet thins progressively under enhanced global convection; when its thickness reaches ion kinetic scales, some ions are decoupled from the magnetized electrons (the Hall effect). The resultant Hall electric field Ez is directed toward the neutral plane. The Hall effect is stronger (grows faster) on the duskside; i.e., more ions become unmagnetized there and do not comove with the magnetized dawnward Ez × Bx drifting electrons, thus creating a larger additional cross-tail current intensity jy (in addition to the diamagnetic current) on the duskside, compared to the dawnside. The stronger Hall effect strength on the duskside is controlled by the higher ion temperature, thinner current sheet, and smaller normal magnetic field Bz there. These asymmetric current sheet properties are in turn controlled by two competing processes that correspond to the Hall effect: (1) the dawnward E × B drift of the magnetic flux and magnetized ions and electrons and (2) the transient motion of the unmagnetized ions which do not execute E × B drift.

  18. SAR arc observation as the mapping of plasmasphere dusk-bulge during a magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ievenko, Igor; Parnikov, Stanislav

    2016-07-01

    The stable auroral red (SAR) arcs are the consequence of interaction of the outer plasmasphere (plasmapause) with energetic ions of the ring current. In this work we analyze the observation of aurorae and SAR arc with the all-sky imager (ASI) at the Yakutsk meridian (130ºE; 200ºE, geom.) during the magnetic storm main phase on March 17, 2015. ASI registers the SAR arc with a maximum of its intensity and the latitude on the westward horizon of station from the start of observations at ~1116 UT during the decrease of magnetic activity after the main phase onset of magnetic storm at ~0630 UT. The measurements of the thermal ion fluxes with ECT HOPE Instrument aboard the Van Allen Probes B satellite at ~1230 UT testify to a plasmapause location on L ~ 3.5 at the meridian ~1825 MLT. The inner boundary of the energetic H+ and O+ ions flux has been registered by the satellite on L ~ 2.8-3.3 at the meridian ~ 1800 MLT at 1210-1220 UT. At this time ASI observes SAR arc up to a meridian 1840 MLT on the westward horizon of station. Further the dynamics of aurorae in the 557.7, 630.0, 470.9 and 486.1 (Hβ) nm emissions owing to sharp changes in the solar wind and during three substorms is observed. We consider differences in the precipitation dynamics of energetic protons and electrons during substorms. It is shown that the SAR arc registered with ASI maps the ring current overlap with the region of plasmasphere dusk-bulge or plume. The research is supported by RFBR grant No 15-05-02372 a.

  19. Dawn-dusk asymmetries in the low-latitude boundary layer arising from the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: A particle simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilber, M.; Winglee, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    Along the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL), the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability can provide a means for injection of solar wind plasma across closed field lines of the magnetosphere. A fully electromagnetic, two-dimensional (three-velocity) particle code is used to investigate dawn-dusk asymmetries that can arise from velocity differences due to gradient drifts and electric field gradients, and ion acceleration across the narrow field transition layers in the dawn and dusk flanks. The model includes the dawn and dusk sides of the LLBL simultaneously in a slab geometry, incorporating seperate populations of ions and electrons for the magnetosphere and the magnetosheath plasmas. We report several effects: (1) asymmetries in the observed morphology of the turbulent structures, with familiar fluidlike vortex formation on the duskside, but tongues of magnetosheath plasma penetrating into the magnetosphere on the dawnside; (2) the formation of discrete current layers, characterized by strong currents and sharp gradients in the magnetic field, and discrete charge layers, having net charges and constant, weaker currents; (3) increasing asymmetry in dawn/dusk behavior with a decrease of initial currents; (3) increasing asymmetry in dawn/dusk behavior with a decrease of initial boundary layer width; and (4) enhancement of the dawn-to-dusk electric field as magnetosheath particles and momenta are transported across the magnetopause.

  20. The dawn-dusk asymmetry of ion density in the dayside magnetosheath and its annual variability measured by THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, Andrew P.; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.; Osmane, Adnane; Nykyri, Katariina

    2016-05-01

    The local and global plasma properties in the magnetosheath play a fundamental role in regulating solar wind-magnetosphere coupling processes. However, the magnetosheath is a complex region to characterise as it has been shown theoretically, observationally and through simulations that plasma properties are inhomogeneous, non-isotropic and asymmetric about the Sun-Earth line. To complicate matters, dawn-dusk asymmetries are sensitive to various changes in the upstream conditions on an array of timescales. The present paper focuses exclusively on dawn-dusk asymmetries, in particularly that of ion density. We present a statistical study using THEMIS data of the dawn-dusk asymmetry of ion density in the dayside magnetosheath and its long-term variations between 2009 and 2015. Our data suggest that, in general, the dawn-side densities are higher, and the asymmetry grows from noon towards the terminator. This trend was only observed close to the magnetopause and not in the central magnetosheath. In addition, between 2009 and 2015, the largest asymmetry occurred around 2009 decreasing thereafter. We also concluded that no single parameter such as the Alfvén Mach number, plasma velocity, or the interplanetary magnetic field strength could exclusively account for the observed asymmetry. Interestingly, the dependence on Alfvén Mach number differed between data sets from different time periods. The asymmetry obtained in the THEMIS data set is consistent with previous studies, but the solar cycle dependence was opposite to an analysis based on IMP-8 data. We discuss the physical mechanisms for this asymmetry and its temporal variation. We also put the current results into context with the existing literature in order to relate THEMIS era measurements to those made during earlier solar cycles.

  1. Observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves Along the Dusk-Side Boundary of Mercury's Magnetosphere During MESSENGER's Third Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boardsen, Scott A.; Sundberg, Torgjoern; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Solomon, Sean C.; Blomberg, Lars G.

    2010-01-01

    During the third MESSENGER flyby of Mercury on 29 September 2009, 15 crossings of the dusk-side magnetopause were observed in the magnetic field data over a 2-min period, during which the spacecraft traveled a distance of 0.2 R(sub M) (where R(sub M) is Mercury's radius). The quasi-periodic nature of the magnetic field variations during the crossings, the characteristic time separations of approx.16 s between pairs of crossings, and the variations of the magnetopause normal directions indicate that the signals are likely the signature of surface waves highly steepened at their leading edge that arose from the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. At Earth, the Kelvin- Helmholtz instability is believed to lead to the turbulent transport of solar wind plasma into Earth's plasma sheet. This solar wind entry mechanism could also be important at Mercury. Citation: Boardsen, S. A., T. Sundberg, J. A.Slavin, B. J. Anderson, H. Korth, S. C. Solomon, and L. G. Blomberg (2010), Observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz waves along the dusk-side boundary of Mercury s magnetosphere during MESSENGER's third flyby,

  2. Why is it worth flying at dusk for aquatic insects? Polarotactic water detection is easiest at low solar elevations.

    PubMed

    Bernáth, Balázs; Gál, József; Horváth, Gábor

    2004-02-01

    Using 180 degrees field-of-view imaging polarimetry, we measured the reflection-polarization patterns of two artificial surfaces (water-dummies) in the red, green and blue spectral ranges under clear and partly cloudy skies at different solar elevations. The dummies consisted of a horizontal glass pane with a matt black or matt light grey cloth underneath, imitating a dark or bright water body, respectively. Assuming that polarotactic water insects interpret a surface as representing water if the degree of linear polarization of reflected light is higher than a threshold and the deviation of the direction of polarization from the horizontal is lower than a threshold, we calculated the proportion, P, of the artificial surfaces detected polarotactically as water. We found that at sunrise and sunset P is maximal for both water-dummies and their reflection-polarizational characteristics are most similar. From this, we conclude that polarotactic water detection is easiest at low solar elevations, because the risk that a polarotactic insect will be unable to recognize the surface of a dark or bright water body is minimal. This partly explains why many aquatic insect species usually fly en masse at dusk. The daily change in the reflection-polarization pattern of water surfaces is an important visual ecological factor that may contribute to the preference of the twilight period for habitat searching by polarotactic water insects. Air temperature at sunrise is generally low, so dusk is the optimal period for polarotactic aquatic insects to seek new habitats.

  3. Observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves Along the Dusk-Side Boundary of Mercury's Magnetosphere During MESSENGER's Third Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boardsen, Scott A.; Sundberg, Torgjoern; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Solomon, Sean C.; Blomberg, Lars G.

    2010-01-01

    During the third MESSENGER flyby of Mercury on 29 September 2009, 15 crossings of the dusk-side magnetopause were observed in the magnetic field data over a 2-min period, during which the spacecraft traveled a distance of 0.2 R(sub M) (where R(sub M) is Mercury's radius). The quasi-periodic nature of the magnetic field variations during the crossings, the characteristic time separations of approx.16 s between pairs of crossings, and the variations of the magnetopause normal directions indicate that the signals are likely the signature of surface waves highly steepened at their leading edge that arose from the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. At Earth, the Kelvin- Helmholtz instability is believed to lead to the turbulent transport of solar wind plasma into Earth's plasma sheet. This solar wind entry mechanism could also be important at Mercury. Citation: Boardsen, S. A., T. Sundberg, J. A.Slavin, B. J. Anderson, H. Korth, S. C. Solomon, and L. G. Blomberg (2010), Observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz waves along the dusk-side boundary of Mercury s magnetosphere during MESSENGER's third flyby,

  4. Varying and unchanging whiteness on the wings of dusk-active and shade-inhabiting Carystoides escalantei butterflies.

    PubMed

    Ge, Dengteng; Wu, Gaoxiang; Yang, Lili; Kim, Hye-Na; Hallwachs, Winnie; Burns, John M; Janzen, Daniel H; Yang, Shu

    2017-07-11

    Whiteness, although frequently apparent on the wings, legs, antennae, or bodies of many species of moths and butterflies, along with other colors and shades, has often escaped our attention. Here, we investigate the nanostructure and microstructure of white spots on the wings of Carystoides escalantei, a dusk-active and shade-inhabiting Costa Rican rain forest butterfly (Hesperiidae). On both males and females, two types of whiteness occur: angle dependent (dull or bright) and angle independent, which differ in the microstructure, orientation, and associated properties of their scales. Some spots on the male wings are absent from the female wings. Whether the angle-dependent whiteness is bright or dull depends on the observation directions. The angle-dependent scales also show enhanced retro-reflection. We speculate that the biological functions and evolution of Carystoides spot patterns, scale structures, and their varying whiteness are adaptations to butterfly's low light habitat and to airflow experienced on the wing base vs. wing tip.

  5. SAPS-associated explosive brightening on the dusk-side: A new type of onset-like disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, L.; Henderson, M. G.; Morley, S.

    2016-12-01

    Quasi-periodic energetic particle injections have been observed at geosynchronous orbit on the dusk-side during a steady magnetospheric convection event. We examine high resolution auroral imager data and ground magnetometer data associated with the first of these injections and conclude that it was not associated with classical substorm signatures. It is proposed that these injections are caused by the explosive non-linear growth of a shear-flow-ballooning instability in the region where sub-auroral polarization streams (SAPS) also occur. We propose that the observed particle injection signatures and auroral morphology constitute a new type of SAPS-associated explosive `onset-like' disturbance that can occur during intervals of strong convection. Several other distrubances occuring during this time period were identified as pseudo-breakups and may result from similar processes. The relationship between these observations and more recent THEMIS ASI-based results are discussed.

  6. Modeling of Equatorial Anomaly Development and Collapse at Dusk Observed by TIMED/GUVI Over Indian Longitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Huba, J.; Makela, J.; Ray, S.; Groves, K.

    2007-05-01

    The GUVI instrument on NASA's TIMED satellite acquires images of 135.6-nm emission in the Earth's ionosphere/thermosphere system. The brightness of the GUVI images is approximately proportional to the square of the electron density and, as such, the images can be used to monitor the equatorial F region ionization anomaly. The intensity and separation of these bands are controlled by the equatorial E-B drift and the meridional neutral wind. Further, the collapse of the anomaly has been linked to the suppression of irregularities causing scintillations. The SAMI3, another model of the ionosphere, has been utilized to model the evening collapse of the anomaly in the Indian longitude sector where measurements of TEC, scintillations and estimates of the daytime vertical drifts are available. Preliminary results from SAMI3 show that the collapse of the anomaly at dusk can be simulated by a reduction of the vertical drift, and its reversal in mid-afternoon in agreement with the drift estimates from magnetometer observations. Introduction of neutral winds into SAMI3 reproduces the dusk behavior of TEC at low latitude stations in India. While preliminary results from SAMI3 provide some insights into the day-to-day variation of scintillations, much further work is necessary, particularly on the relative effects of the pre-reversal enhancement of the vertical drifts, time of reversal, neutral winds and the conductivity in the E-region on the generation and suppression of instabilities. We hope these modeling efforts will eventually lead to the isolation of a unique set of drivers that control large and small scale plasma structuring.

  7. Ground and satellite observations of the SAR arc in the dusk-bulge region of the plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ievenko, Igor; Parnikov, Stanislav; Alexeyev, Valeriy

    It is known that stable auroral red (SAR) arcs are the consequence of interaction of the outer plasmasphere (plasmapause) with energetic ions of the ring current. An arisen downward flux of superthermal electrons along the magnetic field lines increases the ambient electron temperature at the altitudes of ionosphere F2 region in the form of Te-peak. As a result, an enhancement of the atomic oxygen red line intensity in the SAR arc mapping the plasmapause (cold plasma density radial gradient) takes place. A boundary location of plasmasphere (plasmapause) in the dusk-bulge region strongly depends on LT and shifts towards the lower latitudes during evening hours. The ground observer can register a relative motion of this boundary projection at the height of the ionosphere F2 region if it is mapped by the red arc at this time. In this work the results of observations of the SAR arc equatorward movement by the meridian scanning photometer at 19-20 LT at the Yakutsk meridian (199ºE geomagnetic longitude) during a recovery phase of the weak magnetic storm on February 7, 2000 are presented. The data of simultaneous registration of Te-peaks aboard DMSP F14 and F15 satellites at the meridian of optical observations and eastward of it shows that the SAR arc in this event maps the cold plasma density radial gradient in the dusk-bulge region. A wide band of the westward ionospheric drift (SAPS) observed by F14 and F15 is probably a specific signature of this plasmasphere region.

  8. Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices observed by Themis at the dusk side of the magnetopause under southward IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Yan Guang; McFadden, James; Parks, George; Shen, Chao; Mozer, Forrest; Chen, professor. Tao; Cai, Chunlin

    Under southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), 3 spacecraft of Themis observed several crossings of the magnetopause periodically at the duskside of the magnetopause, with tailward shear flows in the magnetosheath and significant sunward returning flows inside the magnetopause. The observed flow velocity shows rotating features for each of the spacecraft, and periodical enhancements could be seen in the vorticity calculated normal to the 3-point spacecraft plain based on the 3-point velocity measurements. The rotating features of the velocity and the periodic enhancements in the normal vorticity could be considered the evidence of the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices due to the velocity shear at the dusk side of the magnetopause. The tailward propagation of the vortices along the flank magnetopause could be notable in the time lags from one spacecraft to another, which could be estimated as about 330 km/s, similar to the previous estimate under southward IMF. At the edges of the vortices, enhancements in the magnetic field due to the compression of the magnetic field could be found. By investigating the difference between the observed and convective electric fields, the non-convective electric field of 5-8 mV/m was observed at small scale from electron gyro-radius to ion gyro-radius, some of which consistent with the compression of the magnetic field at the distorted magnetopause. The non-convective electric field might possibly be one of the factors to induce possible reconnection inside the vortices.

  9. The global distribution of the dusk-to-nighttime enhancement of summer NmF2 at solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiding; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Wan, Weixing; Zhang, Hui

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the dusk-to-nighttime enhancement (DNE) of summer NmF2 was investigated based on Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate radio occultation observations at solar minimum. The global distributions of the magnitude and the peak time of the DNE as well as the role of the DNE in NmF2 diurnal cycle were presented. The DNE mainly exists in three regions (one in the Southern Hemisphere and two in the Northern Hemisphere), and its distribution is related to geomagnetic configuration, especially in the Southern Hemisphere. For most DNEs, their peaks correspond to the maxima of NmF2 diurnal cycle. The DNEs are much more prominent in the southern than in the northern summer hemisphere; they last to later nighttime hours, have larger magnitudes, and play more important roles in NmF2 diurnal cycle in the southern than in the northern summer hemisphere. The distribution of the DNE was analyzed in terms of photoionization and the vertical plasma drift induced by neutral winds. The positive geomagnetic declinations and the smaller geomagnetic inclinations at higher geographic latitudes over the South Pacific are crucial for the prominent DNEs in the southern summer hemisphere; they result in larger upward plasma drift at higher latitudes where photoionization is still significant at sunset and evening hours.

  10. Evidence of surface wave on the dusk flank of Saturn's magnetopause possibly caused by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, J. C.; Dougherty, M. K.; Lucek, E.; Masters, A.

    2011-10-01

    Boundary waves on Saturn's dusk side magnetopause were identified from magnetopause crossings made by the Cassini spacecraft. These crossings occurred over a 48 h period from 14 July to 15 July 2007 when Cassini was on the inbound leg of revolution (Rev.) 48, and were located at around 17:00 SLT at low latitudes above the equatorial plane. The boundary normal for each magnetopause crossing was determined from minimum variance analysis (MVA) on the magnetic field within the current sheet interval. MVA was then performed on the normals themselves to identify a maximum variance direction, in an attempt to identify a preferred plane in which the normals varied. The first few crossings of the group exhibited no wave activity. The following 17 crossings showed clear oscillation of consecutive boundary normals about a mean direction in a well defined plane, with a clear periodicity of the order 50 min, suggesting the presence of surface waves with similar characteristics to those observed by Masters et al. (2009). Subsequent normals also exhibited clear consecutive oscillation in a preferred plane, but with no apparent periodicity. The direction along which maximum variance of the normals occurred was assumed to be the direction of wave propagation, and was found to be almost perpendicular to the average magnetospheric field for the duration of the crossings. Both the wave periodicity and propagation direction support the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability as a strong candidate mechanism for generating these waves.

  11. A statistical study into the spatial distribution and dawn-dusk asymmetry of dayside magnetosheath ion temperatures as a function of upstream solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, A. P.; Nykyri, K.; Karimabadi, H.; Osmane, A.; Pulkkinen, T. I.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetosheath contains the shocked solar wind and behaves as a natural filter to the solar wind plasma before it reaches the magnetosphere. The redistribution of kinetic energy at the bow shock results in significant thermalization of the solar wind plasma, resulting in a magnetosheath temperature profile which is highly nonhomogeneous and nonisotropic and differs between the dawn and dusk flanks. The present study attempts to study the spatial distribution of magnetosheath ion temperature as a function of upstream solar wind conditions. We pay particular attention to the dawn/dusk asymmetry in which we attempt to quantify using experimental data collected over a 7 year period. We also compare these data to simulated data from both the Block-Adaptive-Tree-Solarwind-Roe-Upwind-Scheme (BATS-R-US) MHD code and a kinetic hybrid model. We present evidence that the dawn flank is consistently hotter than the dusk flank for a variety of upstream conditions. Our statistical data also suggest a dependency on solar wind speed such that the level of asymmetry increases with faster speeds. We conclude that the dawn-favored asymmetry of the magnetosheath seed population is insufficient to explain the dawn asymmetry (30-40%) of cold component ions in the cold, dense plasma sheet, and therefore, other mechanisms are likely required.

  12. Control of the Polarity of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field on the Dawn-Dusk Symmetry of the Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shue, J.; Jhuang, B.; Song, P.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Russell, C. T.; Chen, S.

    2008-12-01

    The solar wind dynamic pressure is reduced when the solar wind flows around the magnetosphere due to the diversion of the flows. The magnetopause is the boundary where the reduced dynamic pressure is balanced with the magnetic pressure of the compressed magnetosphere by the solar wind. The size and shape of the magnetopause have long been considered among the most important parameters in Solar Terrestrial physics. Previous models of the size and shape of the magnetopause often assumed the axis- symmetry of the magnetopause with respect to the Sun-Earth line. With a large number of magnetopause crossings by ISEE-1 and -2, AMPTE/IRM, Hawkeye, Geotail, Interball-1, and Magion-4, we are able to consider the asymmetry of the magnetopuase. In the Shue et al. [1997] model, the magnetopause was modeled by two parameters, r0 and alpha, representing the subsolar standoff distance and the flaring level of the magnetopause, respectively. Parameter alpha was assumed to be independent of phi in the Shue et al. [1997] model, where phi is the angle between the Z axis and the mapping of the radial vector of the magnetopause on the YZ plane. In the present study we allow alpha to be a function of phi. We separate crossings with different phis and fit them in each bin to the new functional form proposed by Shue et al. [1997]. We find that the magnetopause is symmetric in the dawn-dusk direction for northward IMF. However, its size on the dawnside becomes larger when the IMF is southward. The function of alpha in terms of phi can be combined with the 2-D Shue et al. [1997] model into a 3-D magnetopause model. (Shue, J.-H., J. K. Chao, H. C. Fu, C. T. Russell, P. Song, K. K. Khurana, and H. J. Singer, A new functional form to study the solar wind control of the magnetopause size and shape, J. Geophys. Res., 102, 9497, 1997.)

  13. An Owl Before Dusk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagai, Michio

    We must learn to anticipate and to alter our futures, and higher education holds the key to that achievement. The role of universities is defined as twofold: (1) to bring about a well-balanced industrial society in which there is sufficient diversity of ideas; and (2) to redesign the industrial society to cope with problems brought about by…

  14. Dusk in the South

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-23

    Slipping into shadow, the south polar vortex at Saturn's moon Titan still stands out against the orange and blue haze layers that are characteristic of Titan's atmosphere. Images like this, from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, lead scientists to conclude that the polar vortex clouds form at a much higher altitude -- where sunlight can still reach -- than the lower-altitude surrounding haze. This view looks towards the trailing hemisphere of Titan (3,200 miles or 5,150 kilometers across). North on Titan is up and rotated 17 degrees to the left. Images taken using red, green and blue spectral filters were combined to create this natural-color view. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 30, 2013. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 895,000 miles (1.441 million kilometers) from Titan. Image scale is 5 miles (9 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA17177

  15. A Circadian Rhythm Set by Dusk Determines the Expression of FT Homologs and the Short-Day Photoperiodic Flowering Response in Pharbitis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hayama, Ryosuke; Agashe, Bhavna; Luley, Elisabeth; King, Rod; Coupland, George

    2007-01-01

    Seasonal control of flowering through responsiveness to daylength shows extreme variation. Different species flower in response to long days or short days (SDs), and this difference evolved several times. The molecular mechanisms conferring these responses have been compared in detail only in Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa) and suggest that a conserved pathway confers daylength responses through regulation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) transcription by CONSTANS (CO). We studied Pharbitis (Ipomoea nil; formerly, Pharbitis nil), a widely used SD model species and a member of the Convolvulaceae, and showed using transgenic plants together with detailed expression analysis that two putative orthologs of FT (Pn FT1 and Pn FT2) promote flowering specifically under SDs. These genes are expressed only under SDs, and light flashes given during the night reduce their expression and prevent flowering. We demonstrate that in Pharbitis a circadian rhythm set by the light-to-dark transition at dusk regulates Pn FT expression, which rises only when the night is longer than 11 h. Furthermore, Pharbitis accessions that differ in their critical night-length responses express Pn FT at different times after dusk, demonstrating that natural genetic variation influencing the clock regulating Pn FT expression alters the flowering response. In these assays, Pn FT mRNA abundance was not related to Pn CO expression, suggesting that Pn FT may be regulated by a different transcription factor in Pharbitis. We conclude that SD response in Pharbitis is controlled by a dedicated light sensitive clock, set by dusk, that activates Pn FT transcription in darkness, a different mechanism for measuring daylength than described for Arabidopsis and rice. PMID:17965272

  16. Geotail Observations of the Spatial Dependence of Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves on an Inbound Passage through the Dusk Flank Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Farrugia, C. J.; Gratton, F. T.; Mukai, T.; Nagai, T.

    2005-01-01

    On August 1, 1998, the Geotail spacecraft made an inbound passage perpendicular to the dusk magnetopause at the dusk terminator when the interplanetary magnetic field had been very northward for more than 10 hours. Typical 3-minute-period Kelvin-Helmholtz waves were observed and the density in the boundary layer and magnetopause was observed to have an unusually high value near 5 /cc. Compressible MHD calculations using the measured values at Geotail yield substantial growth rates that support the idea that the magnetopause was Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable. In contrast to many previous events where a spacecraft remained in the boundary layer, this passage allowed study of how the waves varied with distance inward from the magnetopause. In a layer adjacent to the magnetosheath, rapid magnetic field fluctuations were seen with variations of at least 50 nT/s. Initially the boundary waves led to transitions between the magnetosheath and the fluctuating region with magnetosheath-like densities and tailward velocities, but as the spacecraft moved inward, the transitions were more likely to be between the fluctuating region and a hotter region with magnetosphere-like densities of 5kc. Gradually the velocity perturbations began to exhibit 360 degree rotations. Such rotations are similar to the vortices seen earlier by the ISEE spacecraft throughout the magnetotail which were suspected of being caused by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of the boundary.

  17. The global ionospheric circulation pattern during a Sudden Impulse and the influence of the interplanetary magnetic field on the dawn-dusk asymmetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piersanti, Mirko; Marcucci, Federica; Coco, Igino; Villante, Umberto

    2017-04-01

    The definite identification of the characteristics of the geomagnetic response to Solar Wind (SW) pressure changes represents an interesting element of the magnetospheric dynamics that is also important in the Space Weather context. In the present analysis, we evaluate the ionospheric current flow pattern and amplitude in response to several Sudden Impulses by applying the Piersanti and Villante model [2016] and compare the results with the convection maps obtained by using SuperDARN radars data in order to evaluate a global ionospheric circulation pattern from lowest to highest latitude. We found that, in general, the global structure of twin vortex-like ionospheric flows is found to be consistent with the twin vortices of ionospheric Hall current deduced by the geomagnetic field observations. Moreover, we investigate the role of By,IMF and Bz,IMF on the dawn-dusk asymmetry of flow vortices. We speculate that the dawn-dusk asymmetry could be caused by the interaction between the pre-existing round convection cell and a pair of the transient convection vortices associated with SIs.

  18. Geotail Observations of the Spatial Dependence of Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves on an Inbound Passage through the Dusk Flank Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Farrugia, C. J.; Gratton, F. T.; Mukai, T.; Nagai, T.

    2005-01-01

    On August 1, 1998, the Geotail spacecraft made an inbound passage perpendicular to the dusk magnetopause at the dusk terminator when the interplanetary magnetic field had been very northward for more than 10 hours. Typical 3-minute-period Kelvin-Helmholtz waves were observed and the density in the boundary layer and magnetopause was observed to have an unusually high value near 5 /cc. Compressible MHD calculations using the measured values at Geotail yield substantial growth rates that support the idea that the magnetopause was Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable. In contrast to many previous events where a spacecraft remained in the boundary layer, this passage allowed study of how the waves varied with distance inward from the magnetopause. In a layer adjacent to the magnetosheath, rapid magnetic field fluctuations were seen with variations of at least 50 nT/s. Initially the boundary waves led to transitions between the magnetosheath and the fluctuating region with magnetosheath-like densities and tailward velocities, but as the spacecraft moved inward, the transitions were more likely to be between the fluctuating region and a hotter region with magnetosphere-like densities of 5kc. Gradually the velocity perturbations began to exhibit 360 degree rotations. Such rotations are similar to the vortices seen earlier by the ISEE spacecraft throughout the magnetotail which were suspected of being caused by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of the boundary.

  19. The Role of the Upper Atmosphere for Dawn-Dusk and Interhemispheric Differences in the Coupled Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, M.; Doornbos, E.; Haaland, S.

    2016-12-01

    Solar wind and IMF interaction with the geomagnetic field sets up a large-scale plasma circulation in the Earth's magnetosphere and the magnetically tightly connected ionosphere. The ionospheric ExB ion drift at polar latitudes accelerates the neutral gas as a nondivergent momentum source primarily in force balance with pressure gradients, while the neutral upper thermosphere circulation is essentially modified by apparent forces due to Earth's rotation (Coriolis and centrifugal forces) as well as advection and viscous forces. The apparent forces affect the dawn and dusk side asymmetrically, favouring a large dusk-side neutral wind vortex, while the non-dipolar portions of the Earth's magnetic field constitute significant hemispheric differences in magnetic flux and field configurations that lead to essential interhemispheric differences of the ion-neutral interaction. We present statistical studies of both the high-latitude ionospheric convection and the upper thermospheric circulation patterns based on measurements of the electron drift instrument (EDI) on board the Cluster satellites and by the accelerometer on board the CHAMP, GOCE, and Swarm spacecraft, respectively.

  20. Direct observations in the dusk hours of the characteristics of the storm-time ring current particles during the beginning of magnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristic features of the initial enhancement of the storm-time ring current particles in the evening hours are consistent with flow patterns resulting from a combination of inward convection, gradient drift, and corotation which carries plasma sheet protons into low L-values near midnight and the higher energy proton component into the plasmasphere and through the evening hours. Data from four magnetic storms during the early life of Explorer 45, when the local time of apogee was in the afternoon and evening hours, show that protons with lower magnetic moments penetrate deeper into the magnetosphere until a low limit, determined by the corotation and gradient drift forces, is reached. Such particle motions produce the stable energy dependent inner boundary of the ring current protons inside the plasmapause in the dusk sector and also provide the mechanism for energy injection into the ring current region. From the analyses of the pitch angle distributions it is evident that charge exchange and wave particle interactions are not the dominant causes of this inner boundary.

  1. Electrodynamics of the Inner Magnetosphere Observed in the Dusk Sector by CRRES and DMSP during the Magnetic Storm of June 4-6, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruke, W. J.; Maynard, N. C.; Hagan, M. P.; Wolf, R. A.; Wilson, G. R.; Gentile, L. C.; Gussenhoven, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Garner, T. W.; Rich, F. J.

    1998-01-01

    We compare equatorward/earthward boundaries of convection electric fields and auroral/plasma sheet electrons detected by the DMSP F8 and CRRES satellites during the June 1991 magnetic storm. Measurements come from the dusk magnetic local time sector where the ring current penetrates closest to the Earth. The storm was triggered by a rapid increase in the solar wind dynamic pressure accompanied by a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Satellite data show the following: (1) all particle and field boundaries moved equatorward/earthward during the initial phase, probably in response to the strong southward IMF turning; (2) electric field boundaries were either at lower magnetic L shells or close to the inner edge of ring current ions throughout the main and early recovery phases. Penetration earthward of the ring current occurred twice as the polar cap potential increased rapidly; (3) electric potentials at subauroral latitudes were large fractions of the total potentials in the afternoon cell, twice exceeding 60 kV; and (4) the boundaries of auroral electron precipitation were more variable than those of electric fields and mapped to lower L shells than where CRRES encountered plasma sheet electrons. Observations qualitatively agree with predictions of empirical models for auroral electron and electric field boundaries.

  2. Photoperiod-dependent changes in the phase of core clock transcripts and global transcriptional outputs at dawn and dusk in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Flis, Anna; Sulpice, Ronan; Seaton, Daniel D; Ivakov, Alexander A; Liput, Magda; Abel, Christin; Millar, Andrew J; Stitt, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Plants use the circadian clock to sense photoperiod length. Seasonal responses like flowering are triggered at a critical photoperiod when a light-sensitive clock output coincides with light or darkness. However, many metabolic processes, like starch turnover, and growth respond progressively to photoperiod duration. We first tested the photoperiod response of 10 core clock genes and two output genes. qRT-PCR analyses of transcript abundance under 6, 8, 12 and 18 h photoperiods revealed 1-4 h earlier peak times under short photoperiods and detailed changes like rising PRR7 expression before dawn. Clock models recapitulated most of these changes. We explored the consequences for global gene expression by performing transcript profiling in 4, 6, 8, 12 and 18 h photoperiods. There were major changes in transcript abundance at dawn, which were as large as those between dawn and dusk in a given photoperiod. Contributing factors included altered timing of the clock relative to dawn, light signalling and changes in carbon availability at night as a result of clock-dependent regulation of starch degradation. Their interaction facilitates coordinated transcriptional regulation of key processes like starch turnover, anthocyanin, flavonoid and glucosinolate biosynthesis and protein synthesis and underpins the response of metabolism and growth to photoperiod. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Equatorward propagating auroral arcs driven by ULF wave activity: Multipoint ground- and space-based observations in the dusk sector auroral oval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddeley, L. J.; Lorentzen, D. A.; Partamies, N.; Denig, M.; Pilipenko, V. A.; Oksavik, K.; Chen, X.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-05-01

    Observations of multiple equatorward propagating arcs driven by a resonant Alfvén wave on closed field lines are presented. Data sets from the European Incoherent Scatter Svalbard Radar (ESR) and Meridian Scanning Photometer in Longyearbyen, All-Sky Camera in Ny Ålesund, ground magnetometer data in Svalbard, and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F16 satellite were utilized to study the arc structures. The arcs had an equatorward phase propagation of 0.46 km s-1 and were observed in the dusk ionosphere from 1800 to 2030 magnetic local time. Analysis of the optical data indicates that the Alfvén wave had a frequency of 1.63 mHz and an azimuthal wave number, m -20 (the negative sign indicating a westward propagation). Inverted-V electron populations associated with field-aligned currents of between 0.5 and 0.8 μA m-2 are observed by DMSP F16 inside the arc structures. In addition to electron density enhancements associated with the arcs, the ESR data show elevated ion temperatures in between the arcs consistent with electric field enhancements and ionospheric heating effects. The combination of ESR and DMSP F16 data indicates that the wave energy was dissipated through ionospheric Joule and/or ion frictional heating and acceleration of particles into the ionosphere, generating the auroral displays. The fine-scale structuring, in addition to the propagation direction and scale size, would suggest that the auroral features are the signatures of a field line resonance driven by an interaction with a compressional fast mode wave propagating earthward from the magnetotail.

  4. The dusk flank of Jupiter's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Kurth, W S; Gurnett, D A; Hospodarsky, G B; Farrell, W M; Roux, A; Dougherty, M K; Joy, S P; Kivelson, M G; Walker, R J; Crary, F J; Alexander, C J

    2002-02-28

    Limited single-spacecraft observations of Jupiter's magnetopause have been used to infer that the boundary moves inward or outward in response to variations in the dynamic pressure of the solar wind. At Earth, multiple-spacecraft observations have been implemented to understand the physics of how this motion occurs, because they can provide a snapshot of a transient event in progress. Here we present a set of nearly simultaneous two-point measurements of the jovian magnetopause at a time when the jovian magnetopause was in a state of transition from a relatively larger to a relatively smaller size in response to an increase in solar-wind pressure. The response of Jupiter's magnetopause is very similar to that of the Earth, confirming that the understanding built on studies of the Earth's magnetosphere is valid. The data also reveal evidence for a well-developed boundary layer just inside the magnetopause.

  5. The reason "Why" graze cattle at dusk

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This work aimed and designed to assess the impact of timing of herbage allocation and fasting on patterns of ingestive behavior, herbage intake, ruminal fermentation, and nutrient flow to the duodenum. Treatments were daily herbage allocation in the afternoon (1500, AHA), morning (0800, MHA), AHA af...

  6. Dusk Lighting of Layered Textures in 'Cape Verde'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Full-shade lighting in the late Martian afternoon helps make details visible in this view of the layered cliff face of the 'Cape Verde' promontory making up part of the rim of Victoria Crater in the Meridiani Planum region of equatorial Mars.

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to shoot the dozens of individual images that have been combined into this mosaic. Opportunity was inside Victoria Crater and near the base of the cliff when it took these images on the 1,579th and 1,580th Martian days, or sols, of the mission (July 2 and 3, 2008).

    Photographing the promontory from this position in Victoria Crater presented challenges for the rover team. The geometry was such that Cape Verde was between the rover and the sun, which could cause a range of negative effects, from glinting off Pancam's dusty lenses to shadowing on the cliff face. The team's solution was to take the images for this mosaic just after the sun disappeared behind the crater rim, at about 5:30 p.m. local solar time. The atmosphere was still lit, but no direct sunlight was illuminating the wall of Cape Verde.

    The result is a high-resolution view of Cape Verde in relatively uniform diffuse sky lighting across the scene.

    Pancam used a clear filter for taking the images for this mosaic. Capturing images in low-light situations was one of the main motivations for including the clear filter among the camera's assortment of filters available for use.

    The face of Cape Verde is about 6 meters (20 feet) tall. Victoria Crater, at about 800 meters (one-half mile) wide, is the largest and deepest crater that Opportunity has visited. It sits more than 5 kilometers (almost 4 miles) away from Opportunity's Eagle Crater landing site. Researchers sent Opportunity into Victoria Crater to study the rock layers exposed inside. The textures seen in the rock layers of Cape Verde suggest that the exposed layers were originally deposited by wind.

  7. Linking pasture and animal processes. Why graze cattle at dusk?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This work aimed and designed to assess the impact of timing of herbage allocation and fasting on patterns of ingestive behavior, herbage intake, ruminal fermentation, and nutrient flow to the duodenum. Treatments were daily herbage allocation in the afternoon (1500, AHA), morning (0800, MHA), AHA af...

  8. Intensity asymmetries in the dusk sector of the poleward auroral oval due to IMF Bx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, J. P.; Østgaard, N.; Laundal, K. M.; Haaland, S.; Tenfjord, P.; Snekvik, K.; Oksavik, K.; Milan, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    In the exploration of global-scale features of the Earth's aurora, little attention has been given to the radial component of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). This study investigates the global auroral response in both hemispheres when the IMF is southward and lies in the xz plane. We present a statistical study of the average auroral response in the 12-24 magnetic local time (MLT) sector to an x component in the IMF. Maps of auroral intensity in both hemispheres for two IMF Bx dominated conditions (± IMF Bx) are shown during periods of negative IMF Bz, small IMF By, and local winter. This is obtained by using global imaging from the Wideband Imaging Camera on the IMAGE satellite. The analysis indicates a significant asymmetry between the two IMF Bx dominated conditions in both hemispheres. In the Northern Hemisphere the aurora is brighter in the 15-19 MLT region during negative IMF Bx. In the Southern Hemisphere the aurora is brighter in the 16-20 MLT sector during positive IMF Bx. We interpret the results in the context of a more efficient solar wind dynamo in one hemisphere. Both the intensity asymmetry and its location are consistent with this idea. This has earlier been suggested from case studies of simultaneous observations of the aurora in both hemispheres, but hitherto never been observed to have a general impact on global auroral brightness in both hemispheres from a statistical study. The observed asymmetries between the two IMF Bx cases are not large; however, the difference is significant with a 95% confidence level. As the solar wind conditions examined in the study are rather common (37% of the time) the accumulative effect of this small influence may be important for the total energy budget.

  9. Statistics of intense dawn-dusk currents in the Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Nakamura, R.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2015-05-01

    We consider Cluster observations of events with an intense current density (>5 nA/m2) in the magnetotail current sheet. We use measurements by Cluster mission in the central magnetotail (X <- 16 RE, |Y|<10 RE, and |Bx|<10 nT) in the 2003 season when the spacecraft separation was about ˜300 km. For this season, when Cluster can probe very small scale currents, we collect the statistics of observations of strong current densities jy (in GSM coordinate system) and compare curlometer data with plasma parameters. The most intense currents are observed under disturbed conditions (plasma flow vx>300 km/s). We introduce the parameter vD/vTi (where vD=jy/ene, ne is an electron density, and vTi is a proton thermal velocity) and show that cases with vD/vTi˜1 correspond to the most intense currents observed in the vicinity of the reconnection regions. The comparison of electron and proton velocities demonstrates that electron often carry almost the entire current measured by a curlometer technique. The strong electron temperature anisotropy Te∥/Te⊥>1.2 corresponds to large magnitudes of By component of the magnetic field. We conclude that intense current sheets are often characterized by significant (more than 30%) contribution of electron curvature currents to the cross-tail current. The comparison of observations and models shows that the electron anisotropy level is likely controlled by competition of two processes: the electron scattering on fluctuations generated by fire-hose instability and the acceleration in sheared magnetic field configurations. We also suggest that current sheets embedded into the strong plasma flows (vx/vTi>0.1) can be balanced by ion flow anisotropy.

  10. Ionosphere of venus: first observations of the dayside ion composition near dawn and dusk.

    PubMed

    Taylor, H A; Brinton, H C; Bauer, S J; Hartle, R E; Donahue, T M; Cloutier, P A; Michel, F C; Daniell, R E; Blackwell, B H

    1979-02-23

    The first in situ measurements of the composition of the ionosphere of Venus are provided by independent Bennett radio-frequency ion mass spectrometers on the Pioneer Venus bits and orbiter spacecraft, exploring the dawn and duskside regions, respectively. An extensive composition of ion species, rich in oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon chemistry is idenitified. The dominant topside ion is O(+), with C(+), N(+), H(+), and He(+) as prominent secondary ions. In the lower ionosphere, the ionzization peak or F(1) layer near 150 kilometers reaches a concentration of about 5 x l0(3) ions per cubic centimeter, and is composed of the dominant molecular ion, O(2)(+), with NO(+), CO(+), and CO(2)(+), constituting less than 10 percent of the total. Below the O(+) peak near 200 kilometers, the ions exhibit scale heights consistent with a neutral gas temperature of about 180 K near the terminator. In the upper ionosphere, scale heights of all species reflect the effects of plasma transport, which lifts the composition upward to the often abrupt ionopause, or thermal ion boundary, which is observed to vary in height between 250 to 1800 kilometers, in response to solar wind dynamics.

  11. Latitudinal plasma distribution in the dusk plasmaspheric bulge - Refilling phase and quasi-equilibrium state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decreau, P. M. E.; Carpenter, D.; Chappell, C. R.; Green, J.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Very low-energy trapped ions, mostly protons, have been observed in a region of moderate density characteristic of the plasmapause boundary and of the plasmaspheric bulge. The present paper is concerned with an examination of the latitudinal structure of the bulge under quasi-steady conditions and the conditions of the recovery phase. Details regarding the data base are considered along with observations of the morphology and dynamics of the bulge, the latitudinal density distribution in the expanded bulge, the convection scenario during the replenishment phase, and latitudinal effects on plasma characteristics during plasmasphere refilling. The data utilized have been mainly provided by the DE 1 and GEOS 2 spacecraft traveling in two perpendicular planes. It is found that the bulge is a dynamic region, where no reasonable interpretation of the observed density distribution can be achieved without taking into account the mechanism of magnetospheric convection.

  12. Second harmonic poloidal waves observed by Van Allen Probes in the dusk-midnight sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyungguk; Takahashi, Kazue; Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr Y.; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Spence, Harlan E.; Singer, Howard, J.; Claudepierre, Seth G.; Larsen, Brian A.; Soto-Chavez, A. Rualdo; Cohen, Ross J.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents observations of ultralow-frequency (ULF) waves from Van Allen Probes. The event that generated the ULF waves occurred 2 days after a minor geomagnetic storm during a geomagnetically quiet time. Narrowband pulsations with a frequency of about 7 mHz with moderate amplitudes were registered in the premidnight sector when Probe A was passing through an enhanced density region near geosynchronous orbit. Probe B, which passed through the region earlier, did not detect the narrowband pulsations but only broadband noise. Despite the single-spacecraft measurements, we were able to determine various wave properties. We find that (1) the observed waves are a second harmonic poloidal mode propagating westward with an azimuthal wave number estimated to be ˜100; (2) the magnetic field fluctuations have a finite compressional component due to small but finite plasma beta (˜0.1); (3) the energetic proton fluxes in the energy ranging from above 10 keV to about 100 keV exhibit pulsations with the same frequency as the poloidal mode and energy-dependent phase delays relative to the azimuthal component of the electric field, providing evidence for drift-bounce resonance; and (4) the second harmonic poloidal mode may have been excited via the drift-bounce resonance mechanism with free energy fed by the inward radial gradient of ˜80 keV protons. We show that the wave active region is where the plume overlaps the outer edge of ring current and suggest that this region can have a wide longitudinal extent near geosynchronous orbit.

  13. From dusk till dawn: nocturnal and diurnal pollination in the epiphyte Tillandsia heterophylla (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Rodríguez, P A; Krömer, T; García-Franco, J G; MacSwiney G, M C

    2016-01-01

    In order to compare the effectiveness of diurnal and nocturnal pollinators, we studied the reproductive biology and pollinators of Tillandsia heterophylla E. Morren, an epiphytic tank bromeliad endemic to southeastern Mexico. Since anthesis in T. heterophylla is predominantly nocturnal but lasts until the following day, we hypothesised that this bromeliad would receive visits from both diurnal and nocturnal visitors, but that nocturnal visitors would be the most effective pollinators, since they arrive first to the receptive flower, and that bats would be the most frequent nocturnal visitors, given the characteristics of the nectar. Flowering of T. heterophylla began in May and lasted until July. The species is fully self-compatible, with an anthesis that lasts for ca. 15-16 h. Mean volume of nectar produced per flower was 82.21 μl, with a mean sugar concentration of 6.33%. The highest volume and concentration of nectar were found at 20:00 h, with a subsequent decline in both to almost zero over the following 12-h period. T. heterophylla has a generalist pollination system, since at least four different morphospecies of visitors pollinate its flowers: bats, moths, hummingbirds and bees. Most of the pollinating visits corresponded to bats and took place in the early evening, when stigma receptivity had already begun; making bats the probable pollinator on most occasions. However, diurnal pollinators may be important as a 'fail-safe' system by which to guarantee the pollination of T. heterophylla. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  14. Equatorial disc and dawn-dusk currents in the frontside magnetosphere of Jupiter - Pioneer 10 and 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. E.; Thomas, B. T.; Melville, J. G., II

    1981-01-01

    Observations by Pioneer 10 and 11 show that the strongest azimuthal fields are observed near the dawn meridian (Pioneer 10) while the weakest occur near the noon meridian (Pioneer 11), suggesting a strong local time dependence for the corresponding radial current system. Modeling studies of the radial component of the field observed by both spacecraft suggest that the corresponding azimuthal current system must also be a strong function of local time. Both the azimuthal and the radial field component signatures exhibit sharp dips and reversals, requiring thin radial and azimuthal current systems. There is also a suggestion that these two current systems either are interacting or are due, at least in part, to the same current. It is suggested that a plausible current model consists of the superposition of a thin, local-time-independent azimuthal current system plus the equatorial portion of a tail-like current system that extends into the dayside magnetosphere.

  15. Reed warbler orientation: initiation of nocturnal migratory flights in relation to visibility of celestial cues at dusk.

    PubMed

    Åkesson, S.; Walinder, G.; Karlsson, L.; Ehnbom, S.

    2001-01-01

    We used radiotelemetry to investigate the time of migratory flight initiation relative to available celestial orientation cues and departure direction of a nocturnal passerine migrant, the reed warbler, Acrocephalus scirpaceus, during autumn migration. The study was carried out at Falsterbo, a coastal site in southwest Sweden. The warblers initiated migration from times well after local sunset and well into the night, corresponding to sun elevations between -4 degrees and -35 degrees, coinciding with the occurrence of stars at night. They departed in the expected migratory direction towards south of southwest with a few initiating migration in reverse directions towards northeast to east. Flight directions under overcast conditions (7-8/8) were more scattered than under clear sky conditions (0-4/8). There were fewer clouds on departure nights than on nights when the birds did not initiate migration. For birds staying longer than one night at stopover the horizontal visibility was higher and precipitation was less likely on departure nights than on the previous night. The results show that the visibility of celestial cues, and stars in particular, are important for the decision to initiate migration in reed warblers. However, cloud cover, horizontal visibility and precipitation might be correlated with other weather variables (i.e. wind or air pressure) that are also likely to be important for the decision to migrate. Copyright 2001 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  16. Equatorial disc and dawn-dusk currents in the frontside magnetosphere of Jupiter - Pioneer 10 and 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. E.; Thomas, B. T.; Melville, J. G., II

    1981-01-01

    Observations by Pioneer 10 and 11 show that the strongest azimuthal fields are observed near the dawn meridian (Pioneer 10) while the weakest occur near the noon meridian (Pioneer 11), suggesting a strong local time dependence for the corresponding radial current system. Modeling studies of the radial component of the field observed by both spacecraft suggest that the corresponding azimuthal current system must also be a strong function of local time. Both the azimuthal and the radial field component signatures exhibit sharp dips and reversals, requiring thin radial and azimuthal current systems. There is also a suggestion that these two current systems either are interacting or are due, at least in part, to the same current. It is suggested that a plausible current model consists of the superposition of a thin, local-time-independent azimuthal current system plus the equatorial portion of a tail-like current system that extends into the dayside magnetosphere.

  17. Comparison of Dawn and Dusk Precipitating Electron Energy Populations Shortly After the Initial Shock for the January 10th, 1997 Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J.; Germany, G.; Swift, W.; Parks, G.; Brittnacher, M.; Elsen, R.

    1997-01-01

    The observed precipitating electron energy between 0130 UT and 0400 UT of January 10 th, 1997, indicates that there is a more energetic precipitating electron population that appears in the auroral oval at 1800-2200 UT at 030) UT. This increase in energy occurs after the initial shock of the magnetic cloud reaches the Earth (0114 UT) and after faint but dynamic polar cap precipitation has been cleared out. The more energetic population is observed to remain rather constant in MLT through the onset of auroral activity (0330 UT) and to the end of the Polar spacecraft apogee pass. Data from the Ultraviolet Imager LBH long and LBH short images are used to quantify the average energy of the precipitating auroral electrons. The Wind spacecraft located about 100 RE upstream monitored the IMF and plasma parameters during the passing of the cloud. The affects of oblique angle viewing are included in the analysis. Suggestions as to the source of this hot electron population will be presented.

  18. Melatonin Signal Transduction Pathways Require E-Box-Mediated Transcription of Per1 and Per2 to Reset the SCN Clock at Dusk

    PubMed Central

    Kandalepas, Patty C.; Mitchell, Jennifer W.; Gillette, Martha U.

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin is released from the pineal gland into the circulatory system at night in the absence of light, acting as “hormone of darkness” to the brain and body. Melatonin also can regulate circadian phasing of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). During the day-to-night transition, melatonin exposure advances intrinsic SCN neural activity rhythms via the melatonin type-2 (MT2) receptor and downstream activation of protein kinase C (PKC). The effects of melatonin on SCN phasing have not been linked to daily changes in the expression of core genes that constitute the molecular framework of the circadian clock. Using real-time RT-PCR, we found that melatonin induces an increase in the expression of two clock genes, Period 1 (Per1) and Period 2 (Per2). This effect occurs at CT 10, when melatonin advances SCN phase, but not at CT 6, when it does not. Using anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotides (α ODNs) to Per 1 and Per 2, as well as to E-box enhancer sequences in the promoters of these genes, we show that their specific induction is necessary for the phase-altering effects of melatonin on SCN neural activity rhythms in the rat. These effects of melatonin on Per1 and Per2 were mediated by PKC. This is unlike day-active non-photic signals that reset the SCN clock by non-PCK signal transduction mechanisms and by decreasing Per1 expression. Rather, this finding extends roles for Per1 and Per2, which are critical to photic phase-resetting, to a nonphotic zeitgeber, melatonin, and suggest that the regulation of these clock gene transcripts is required for clock resetting by diverse regulatory cues. PMID:27362940

  19. Investigation of sudden electron density depletions observed in the dusk sector by the Poker Flat, Alaska incoherent scatter radar in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, P. G.; Nicolls, M. J.; St.-Maurice, J.-P.; Goodwin, L.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    This paper investigates unusually deep and sudden electron density depletions (troughs) observed in the Poker Flat (Alaska) Incoherent Scatter Radar data in middle summer of 2007 and 2008. The troughs were observed in the premidnight sector during periods of weak magnetic and solar activity. The density recovered to normal levels around midnight. At the time when the electron density was undergoing its steep decrease, there was usually a surge of the order of 100 to 400 K in the ion temperature that lasted less than 1 h. The Ti surges were usually related to similar surges in the AE index, indicating that the high-latitude convection pattern was expanding and intensifying at the time of the steep electron density drop. The convection patterns from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network also indicate that the density troughs were associated with the expansion of the convection pattern to Poker Flat. The sudden decreases in the electron density are difficult to explain in summer because the high-latitude region remains sunlit for most of the day. This paper suggests that the summer density troughs result from lower latitude plasma that had initially been corotating in darkness for several hours post sunset and brought back toward the sunlit side as the convection pattern expanded. The magnetic declination of ~22° east at 300 km at Poker Flat greatly facilitates the contrast between the plasma convecting from lower latitudes and the plasma that follows the high-latitude convection pattern.

  20. Comparison of Dawn and Dusk Precipitating Electron Energy Populations Shortly After the Initial Shock for the January 10th, 1997 Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J.; Germany, G.; Swift, W.; Parks, G.; Brittnacher, M.; Elsen, R.

    1997-01-01

    The observed precipitating electron energy between 0130 UT and 0400 UT of January 10 th, 1997, indicates that there is a more energetic precipitating electron population that appears in the auroral oval at 1800-2200 UT at 030) UT. This increase in energy occurs after the initial shock of the magnetic cloud reaches the Earth (0114 UT) and after faint but dynamic polar cap precipitation has been cleared out. The more energetic population is observed to remain rather constant in MLT through the onset of auroral activity (0330 UT) and to the end of the Polar spacecraft apogee pass. Data from the Ultraviolet Imager LBH long and LBH short images are used to quantify the average energy of the precipitating auroral electrons. The Wind spacecraft located about 100 RE upstream monitored the IMF and plasma parameters during the passing of the cloud. The affects of oblique angle viewing are included in the analysis. Suggestions as to the source of this hot electron population will be presented.

  1. Combined influences of gradual changes in room temperature and light around dusk and dawn on circadian rhythms of core temperature, urinary 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate and waking sensation just after rising.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Masayuki; Tokura, Hiromi; Wakamura, Tomoko; Hyun, Ki-Ja; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Morita, Takeshi; Oishi, Tadashi

    2007-06-01

    The present experiment aimed at knowing how a gradual changes of room temperature (T(a)) and light in the evening and early morning could influence circadian rhythms of core temperature (T(core)), skin temperatures, urinary 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate and waking sensation just after rising in humans. Two kinds of room environment were provided for each participant: 1) Constant room temperature (T(a)) of 27 degrees C over the 24 h and LD-rectangular light change with abrupt decreasing from 3,000 lx to 100 lx at 1800, abrupt increasing from 0 lx to 3,000 lx at 0700. 2) Cyclic changes of T(a) and with gradual decrease from 3,000 lx to 100 lx onset at 1700 (twilight period about 2 h), with gradual increasing from 0 lx to 3,000 lx onset at 0500 (about 2 h). Main results are summarized as follows: 1) Circadian rhythms of nadir in the core temperature (T(core)) significantly advanced earlier under the influence of gradual changes of T(a) and light than no gradual changes of T(a) and light. 2) Nocturnal fall of T(core) and morning rise of T(core) were greater and quicker, respectively, under the influence of gradual changes of T(a) and light than no gradual changes of T(a) and light. 3) Urinary 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate during nocturnal sleep was significantly greater under the influence of gradual changes of T(a) and light. 4) Waking sensation just after rising was significantly better under the influence of gradual changes of T(a) and light. We discussed these findings in terms of circadian and thermoregulatory physiology.

  2. Quantitative analysis of regulatory flexibility under changing environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Kieron D; Akman, Ozgur E; Knox, Kirsten; Lumsden, Peter J; Thomson, Adrian W; Brown, Paul E; Pokhilko, Alexandra; Kozma-Bognar, Laszlo; Nagy, Ferenc; Rand, David A; Millar, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    The circadian clock controls 24-h rhythms in many biological processes, allowing appropriate timing of biological rhythms relative to dawn and dusk. Known clock circuits include multiple, interlocked feedback loops. Theory suggested that multiple loops contribute the flexibility for molecular rhythms to track multiple phases of the external cycle. Clear dawn- and dusk-tracking rhythms illustrate the flexibility of timing in Ipomoea nil. Molecular clock components in Arabidopsis thaliana showed complex, photoperiod-dependent regulation, which was analysed by comparison with three contrasting models. A simple, quantitative measure, Dusk Sensitivity, was introduced to compare the behaviour of clock models with varying loop complexity. Evening-expressed clock genes showed photoperiod-dependent dusk sensitivity, as predicted by the three-loop model, whereas the one- and two-loop models tracked dawn and dusk, respectively. Output genes for starch degradation achieved dusk-tracking expression through light regulation, rather than a dusk-tracking rhythm. Model analysis predicted which biochemical processes could be manipulated to extend dusk tracking. Our results reveal how an operating principle of biological regulators applies specifically to the plant circadian clock. PMID:21045818

  3. Linking pasture and animal processes. Grazing few hours during the afternoon and evening

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cattle instinctively concentrate grazing during dusk, when pasture is more nutritive. Afternoon allocations of fresh pasture (PM) increase duration and intensity of dusk grazing bouts and consequently pasture intake at that time of day, which certainly has demonstrated to improve animal performance ...

  4. Response of Jupiter's inner magnetosphere to the solar wind derived from extreme ultraviolet monitoring of the Io plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Go; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Kimura, Tomoki; Tao, Chihiro; Kita, Hajime; Kagitani, Masato; Sakanoi, Takeshi; Uemizu, Kazunori; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2016-12-01

    Because Jupiter's magnetosphere is huge and is rotationally dominated, solar wind influence on its inner part has been thought to be negligible. Meanwhile, dawn-dusk asymmetric features of this region have been reported. Presence of dawn-to-dusk electric field is one of the leading explanations of the asymmetry; however, the physical process of generating such an intense electric field still remains unclear. Here we present long and continuous monitoring of the extreme ultraviolet emissions from the Io plasma torus in Jupiter's inner magnetosphere made by the Hisaki satellite between December 2013 and March 2014. We found five occasions where the dusk/dawn brightness ratio was enhanced above 2.5 in response to rapid increase of the solar wind dynamic pressure. The enhancement is achieved as the dusk region brightens and the dawn region dims. The observation indicates that dawn-to-dusk electric field in the inner magnetosphere is enhanced under compressed conditions.

  5. Effect of solar UV/EUV heating on the intensity and spatial distribution of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, H.; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Tao, C.; Morioka, A.

    2013-10-01

    We analyzed the Very Large Array archived data observed in 2000 to determine whether solar ultraviolet (UV)/extreme ultraviolet (EUV) heating of the Jovian thermosphere causes variations in the total flux density and dawn-dusk asymmetry (the characteristic differences between the peak emissions at dawn and dusk) of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation (JSR). The total flux density varied by 10% over 6 days of observations and accorded with theoretical expectations. The average dawn-dusk peak emission ratio indicated that the dawn side emissions were brighter than those on the dusk side and this was expected to have been caused by diurnal wind induced by the solar UV/EUV. The daily variations in the dawn-dusk ratio did not correspond to the solar UV/EUV, and this finding did not support the theoretical expectation that the dawn-dusk ratio and diurnal wind velocity varies in correspondence with the solar UV/EUV. We tried to determine whether the average dawn-dusk ratio could be explained by a reasonable diurnal wind velocity. We constructed an equatorial brightness distribution model of JSR using the revised Divine-Garrett particle distribution model and used it to derive a relation between the dawn-dusk ratio and diurnal wind velocity. The estimated diurnal wind velocity reasonably corresponded to a numerical simulation of the Jovian thermosphere. We also found that realistic changes in the diurnal wind velocity could not cause the daily variations in the dawn-dusk ratio. Hence, we propose that the solar UV/EUV related variations were below the detection limit and some other processes dominated the daily variations in the dawn-dusk ratio.

  6. Leishmaniasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... parasitic disease spread by the bite of infected sand flies. There are several different forms of leishmaniasis. ... prevent the disease is to protect yourself from sand fly bites: Stay indoors from dusk to dawn, ...

  7. 32 CFR 636.27 - Regulations for bicycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... § 636.27 Regulations for bicycles. (a) Parents will not knowingly allow their children to violate any of... in single-file. (f) Bicycles operated between dusk and dawn will utilize a headlight visible for...

  8. The terrestrial magnetosphere: a half-wave rectifier of the interplanetary electric field.

    PubMed

    Burton, R K; McPherron, R L; Russell, C T

    1975-08-29

    A study of geomagnetic disturbances during 1967 and 1968, for which in situ solar wind observations are available, reveals that the magnetosphere acts as a half-wave rectifier of the interplanetary electric field. The rate of injection of energy into the magnetosphere, as inferred from the strength of the disturbance, is approximately linearly proportional to the component of the electric field from dawn to dusk but is effectively zero if the electricfield has a component from dusk to dawn.

  9. Ecology of colors of firefly bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Lall, A.B.; Seliger, H.H.; Biggley, W.H.; Lloyd, J.E.

    1980-10-31

    Dark-active North American fireflies emit green bioluminescence and dusk-active species emit yellow, in general. Yellow light and yellow visual spectral sensitivity may be adaptations to increase the signal-to-noise (that is, foliage-reflected ambient light) ratio for sexual signaling during twilight. The peaks of the electroretinogram visual spectral sensitivities of four species tested, two dark- and two dusk-active, correspond with the peak of their bioluminescent emissions.

  10. Characteristics of the flank magnetopause: Cluster observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaland, S.; Reistad, J.; Tenfjord, P.; Gjerloev, J.; Maes, L.; DeKeyser, J.; Maggiolo, R.; Anekallu, C.; Dorville, N.

    2014-11-01

    The magnetopause is a current sheet forming the boundary between the geomagnetic field on one side and the shocked solar wind on the other side. This paper discusses properties of the low-latitude dawn and dusk flanks of the magnetopause. The reported results are based on a large number of measurements obtained by the Cluster satellites during magnetopause traversals. Using a combination of single-spacecraft and multispacecraft techniques, we calculated macroscopic features such as thickness, location, and motion of the magnetopause. The results show that the typical flank magnetopause is significantly thicker than the dayside magnetopause and also possesses a pronounced and persistent dawn-dusk asymmetry. Thicknesses vary from 150 to 5000 km, with an median thickness of around 1400 km at dawn and around 1150 km at dusk. Current densities are on average higher on dusk, suggesting that the total current at dawn and dusk are similar. Solar wind conditions and the interplanetary magnetic field cannot fully explain the observed dawn-dusk asymmetry. For a number of crossings we were also able to derive detailed current density profiles. The profiles show that the magnetopause often consists of two or more adjacent current sheets, each current sheet typically several ion gyroradii thick and often with different current direction. This demonstrates that the flank magnetopause has a structure that is more complex than the thin, one-dimensional current sheet described by a Chapman-Ferraro layer.

  11. Gyroresonance of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices with Na+ in Mercury's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingell, Peter; Sundberg, Torbjorn; Burgess, David

    2015-04-01

    Observations of Mercury's plasma environment by the MESSENGER spacecraft have revealed that the planet hosts a strongly asymmetric magnetosphere as a result of an off-axis internal magnetic field, and significant finite Larmor radius effects at the boundary layer between magnetospheric and solar wind plasma environments. Linear analysis and global hybrid simulations suggest asymmetric growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability between the dusk and dawn flanks of the magnetopause, and indeed Kelvin-Helmholtz waves have been observed almost exclusively at the dusk flank during northward IMF. A previous study has shown that Kelvin-Helmholtz waves at the dusk flank are observed predominantly at scales associated with the gyration of hot sodium ions - a population originating at the dayside exosphere, and distributed preferentially at the dusk flank. This suggests that a resonance may occur between sodium ion gyration and Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex growth. Using two- and three-dimensional local hybrid simulations of dusk and dawn boundaries, with varying magnetospheric sodium ion density, we have reproduced the main observational features: we see a strong peak in the Kelvin-Helmholtz wave spectra at sodium gyro scales at the dusk boundaries, and suppression of the growth of vortices at the dawn boundaries. We examine the mechanism of the resonant interaction between counter-gyrating sodium ions and K-H vortices using test particle simulations. Finally, we discuss the effect of the sodium ion population on cross-boundary particle transport.

  12. The impact of a hot sodium ion population on the growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in Mercury's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingell, P. W.; Sundberg, T.; Burgess, D.

    2015-07-01

    Observations of Mercury's local plasma environment by MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging have revealed that the planet hosts a strongly asymmetric magnetosphere as a result of an off-axis dipolar or quadrupolar internal field and significant finite Larmor radius effects at the boundary layer between magnetospheric and solar wind plasma environments. One important asymmetry appears in the growth and evolution of Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) waves at the dawn and dusk flanks of the magnetopause. Linear analysis and global hybrid simulations support a dusk-dawn asymmetry in the growth rate caused by finite Larmor radius effects, and indeed, K-H waves have been almost exclusively observed at the dusk magnetopause during northward interplanetary magnetic field. Observations of these K-H waves at sodium gyroscales invite investigation into the impact of the hot planetary sodium ion population, itself distributed preferentially on the dusk flank, on the growth of the K-H instability and associated plasma transport. We present local two-dimensional hybrid simulations of the dusk and dawn boundary layers, with varying magnetospheric sodium ion number density, and examine the associated changes in the growth rates of the K-H instability, K-H wave spectra, and cross-boundary particle transport. We show that gyroresonance between growing K-H vortices and sodium ion gyration introduces a strong spectral peak at sodium gyroscales at the dusk magnetopause, that an increase in sodium ion number density increases dawn-dusk asymmetry of K-H growth rates, and that cross-boundary particle transport decreases with sodium number density at the dawn flank.

  13. MESSENGER Observations of Asymmetries at Mercury's Magnetotail Current Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poh, Gangkai; Slavin, James; Jia, Xianzhe; Raines, Jim; Sun, Wei-Jie; Genestreti, Kevin; Smith, Andy; Gershman, Daniel; Anderson, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Dawn-dusk asymmetries in the Earth's magnetotail current sheet have been observed and remain an active area of research. With an internal magnetic dipole field structure similar to Earth's, similar dawn-dusk asymmetries might be expected in Mercury's magnetotail current sheet. However, no observation of dawn-dusk asymmetries has been reported in the structure of Mercury's magnetotail. Using 4 years of MESSENGER's magnetic field and plasma data, we analyzed 319 current sheet crossings. From the polarity of Bz in the cross-tail current sheet, we determined that MESSENGER is on closed field lines about 90% of the time. During the other 10% MESSENGER observed negative Bz indicating that it was tailward of the Near Mercury Neutral Line (NMNL). The Bz magnetic field is also observed to be higher at the dawnside than the duskside of the magnetotail current sheet by approximately a factor of three. Further the asymmetry decreases with increasing downstream distance. A reduction (enhancement) in Bz should correspond to a more (less) stretched and thinned (thickened) current sheet. Analysis of current sheet thickness based upon MESSENGER's observations confirms this behavior with mean current sheet thickness and Bz intensity having dawn-dusk asymmetries with the same sense. Plasma β in the current sheet also exhibits a dawn-dusk asymmetry opposite to that of Bz. This is consistent with expectations based on MHD stress balance. Earlier studies had shown a dawn-dusk asymmetry in the heavy ion in Mercury's magnetotail. We suggest that this enhancement of heavy ions in the duskside current sheet, due to centrifugal acceleration of ions from the cusp and gradient-curvature drift from the NMNL, may provide a partial explanation of the dawn-dusk current sheet asymmetries found in this study.

  14. Application of ground-truth for classification and quantification of bird movements on migratory bird habitat initiative sites in southwest Louisiana: final report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrow, Wylie C.; Baldwin, Michael J.; Randall, Lori A.; Pitre, John; Dudley, Kyle J.

    2013-01-01

    This project was initiated to assess migrating and wintering bird use of lands enrolled in the Natural Resources Conservation Service’s (NRCS) Migratory Bird Habitat Initiative (MBHI). The MBHI program was developed in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010, with the goal of improving/creating habitat for waterbirds affected by the spill. In collaboration with the University of Delaware (UDEL), we used weather surveillance radar data (Sieges 2014), portable marine radar data, thermal infrared images, and visual observations to assess bird use of MBHI easements. Migrating and wintering birds routinely make synchronous flights near dusk (e.g., departure during migration, feeding flights during winter). Weather radars readily detect birds at the onset of these flights and have proven to be useful remote sensing tools for assessing bird-habitat relations during migration and determining the response of wintering waterfowl to wetland restoration (e.g., Wetlands Reserve Program lands). However, ground-truthing is required to identify radar echoes to species or species group. We designed a field study to ground-truth a larger-scale, weather radar assessment of bird use of MBHI sites in southwest Louisiana. We examined seasonal bird use of MBHI fields in fall, winter, and spring of 2011-2012. To assess diurnal use, we conducted total area surveys of MBHI sites in the afternoon, collecting data on bird species composition, abundance, behavior, and habitat use. In the evenings, we quantified bird activity at the MBHI easements and described flight behavior (i.e., birds landing in, departing from, circling, or flying over the MBHI tract). Our field sampling captured the onset of evening flights and spanned the period of collection of the weather radar data analyzed. Pre- and post-dusk surveys were conducted using a portable radar system and a thermal infrared camera. Landbirds, shorebirds, and wading birds were commonly found on MBHI fields during diurnal

  15. Daily Cycles in Body Temperature in a Songbird Change with Photoperiod and Are Weakly Circadian.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Alistair

    2017-04-01

    Although it is well known that body temperature (Tb) is higher during the day in diurnal birds than at night, no data are available regarding exactly how Tb varies during a 24-h period, how this differs under different photoperiods, and how it responds to a change in photoperiod. This study used implanted temperature loggers in starlings ( Sturnus vulgaris) to address these questions. The duration of elevated Tb was directly related to photoperiod, but the amplitude of the daily cycle was significantly greater under shorter photoperiods. Under all photoperiods, Tb started to increase before dawn and continued to increase after dawn; there was no sudden change associated with dawn. In contrast, Tb decreased immediately and rapidly at dusk (significantly by 15 min). The daily cycle in Tb rapidly adjusted to a change in photoperiod. Following an acute increase in photoperiod, Tb increased immediately at the new earlier dawn but did not decrease until the new later dusk. Following a decrease in photoperiod, Tb did not increase after the time of the missed dawn; it only increased after the new later dawn. It decreased at the new earlier dusk. Following transfer to constant darkness, there was a moderate increase in Tb around the missed dawn, but then Tb gradually decreased before the missed dusk to lower values than during the previous night. The results suggest that the daily cycle in Tb is weakly circadian and may be entrained by dusk rather than dawn.

  16. Diurnal activity of soil surface arthropods in agroecosystems: design for an inexpensive time-sorting pitfall trap

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, A.Y.; Crossley, D.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The design for an inexpensive time-sorting pitfall trap is presented. The basis of the mechanism is a rotary stepping solenoid powered by lantern batteries. Traps were utilized to sample soil surface arthropods at two hour intervals for five 24 hr periods in 1983. One trap each was placed in conventional tillage (CT) and no-tillage (NT) agroecosystems. Soil arthropod surface activity was greatest in CT on 9 July during the dawn and dusk periods but the data did not indicate other dominant trends. Activity in NT was greatest during dusk on 27 June, but again no other dominant trends were evident. When CT and NT are combined over the sample dates, surface soil arthropod activity peaked during dusk, with a smaller activity peak at dawn. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Fast flow statistic in the Earth's magnetotail near lunar orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiehas, S.; Runov, A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Hietala, H.

    2016-12-01

    We use five years (2011-2015) of ARTEMIS data to statistically investigate earthward and tailward flows at around 60 RE downtail. We find that a significant portion ( 50%) of fast flows is directed earthward. This contribution reduces with increasing flow speed. As expected, earthward (tailward) flows are predominantly accompanied with positive (negative) Bz. A dawn-dusk asymmetry in the flow occurrence is seen for both earthward and tailward flows with about 50%-60% (60%-70%) of the earthward (tailward) flows occurring in the dusk sector. This asymmetry is more dominant for tailward than for earthward flows and increases slightly with higher flow speeds. Considering only the flow component perpendicular to the magnetic field, the portion of earthward flows reduces to about 30%-40%, depending on the flow speed. The dawn-dusk asymmetry is also seen in this perpendicular flows.

  18. Synchronous Crepuscular Flight of Female Asian Gypsy Moths: Relationships of Light Intensity and Ambient and Body Temperatures

    Treesearch

    Ralph E. Charlton; Ring T. Carde; William E. Wallner; William E. Wallner

    1999-01-01

    Female gypsy moths (Lymantria dispar) of Asian heritage studied in central Siberia and Germany exhibit a highly synchronous flight at dusk, after light intensity falls to about 2 lux. This critical light intensity sets the timing of flight behaviors independent of ambient temperature. Flight follows several minutes of preflight wing fanning during which females in...

  19. Temporal Links in Daily Activity Patterns between Coral Reef Predators and Their Prey

    PubMed Central

    Bosiger, Yoland J.; McCormick, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have documented the activity patterns of both predators and their common prey over 24 h diel cycles. This study documents the temporal periodicity of two common resident predators of juvenile reef fishes, Cephalopholis cyanostigma (rockcod) and Pseudochromis fuscus (dottyback) and compares these to the activity and foraging pattern of a common prey species, juvenile Pomacentrus moluccensis (lemon damselfish). Detailed observations of activity in the field and using 24 h infrared video in the laboratory revealed that the two predators had very different activity patterns. C. cyanostigma was active over the whole 24 h period, with a peak in feeding strikes at dusk and increased activity at both dawn and dusk, while P. fuscus was not active at night and had its highest strike rates at midday. The activity and foraging pattern of P. moluccensis directly opposes that of C. cyanostigma with individuals reducing strike rate and intraspecific aggression at both dawn and dusk, and reducing distance from shelter and boldness at dusk only. Juveniles examined were just outside the size-selection window of P. fuscus. We suggest that the relatively predictable diel behaviour of coral reef predators results from physiological factors such as visual sensory abilities, circadian rhythmicity, variation in hunting profitability, and predation risk at different times of the day. Our study suggests that the diel periodicity of P. moluccensis behaviour may represent a response to increased predation risk at times when both the ability to efficiently capture food and visually detect predators is reduced. PMID:25354096

  20. Remote Observations of Ion Temperatures in the Quiet Time Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesee, A. M.; Buzulukova, N.; Goldstein, J.; McComas, D. J.; Scime, E. E.; Spence, H.; Fok, M. C.; Tallaksen, K.

    2011-01-01

    Ion temperature analysis of the first energetic neutral atom images of the quiet -time, extended magnetosphere provides evidence of multiple regions of ion heating. This study confirms the existence of a dawn -dusk asymmetry in ion temperature predicted for quiescent magnetospheric conditions by Spence and Kivelson (1993) and demonstrates that it is an inherent magnetospheric feature.

  1. The plasmapause revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Gebowsky, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Saturation of the dc double probe instrument on Explorer 45 was used to identify the plasmapause. A data base was developed to statistically study the average position of the plasmapause over 14.5 hours of magnetic local time under differing magnetic conditions. The afternoon-evening bulge in the L coordinate of the plasmapause versus local time was found centered between 20 and 21 hours MLT during magnetically quiet periods and shifted toward dusk as activity increased, but always post dusk. During quiet periods a bulge in the L coordinate near noon was also seen, which disappeared as activity increased. The average local time distribution plasmapause position during high magnetic activity was irregular in the afternoon region where large scale convection models predict the creation of plasmatails or detached plasma regions from increases in the solar wind induced convection. The results suggest that solar wind induced convection is partially shielded from the dayside. As the intensity of the convection is increased, it more effectively penetrates the dayside, which shifts the post dusk bulge nearer to dusk and eliminates the quiet-time bulge near noon.

  2. Remote Observations of Ion Temperatures in the Quiet Time Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesee, A. M.; Buzulukova, N.; Goldstein, J.; McComas, D. J.; Scime, E. E.; Spence, H.; Fok, M. C.; Tallaksen, K.

    2011-01-01

    Ion temperature analysis of the first energetic neutral atom images of the quiet -time, extended magnetosphere provides evidence of multiple regions of ion heating. This study confirms the existence of a dawn -dusk asymmetry in ion temperature predicted for quiescent magnetospheric conditions by Spence and Kivelson (1993) and demonstrates that it is an inherent magnetospheric feature.

  3. WIDE AWAKE mediates the circadian timing of sleep onset.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Lamaze, Angelique; Liu, Qili; Tabuchi, Masashi; Yang, Yong; Fowler, Melissa; Bharadwaj, Rajnish; Zhang, Julia; Bedont, Joseph; Blackshaw, Seth; Lloyd, Thomas E; Montell, Craig; Sehgal, Amita; Koh, Kyunghee; Wu, Mark N

    2014-04-02

    How the circadian clock regulates the timing of sleep is poorly understood. Here, we identify a Drosophila mutant, wide awake (wake), that exhibits a marked delay in sleep onset at dusk. Loss of WAKE in a set of arousal-promoting clock neurons, the large ventrolateral neurons (l-LNvs), impairs sleep onset. WAKE levels cycle, peaking near dusk, and the expression of WAKE in l-LNvs is Clock dependent. Strikingly, Clock and cycle mutants also exhibit a profound delay in sleep onset, which can be rescued by restoring WAKE expression in LNvs. WAKE interacts with the GABAA receptor Resistant to Dieldrin (RDL), upregulating its levels and promoting its localization to the plasma membrane. In wake mutant l-LNvs, GABA sensitivity is decreased and excitability is increased at dusk. We propose that WAKE acts as a clock output molecule specifically for sleep, inhibiting LNvs at dusk to promote the transition from wake to sleep. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Chapter 12: Daily Patterns of Marbled Murrelet Activity at Inland Sites

    Treesearch

    Nancy L. Naslund; Brian P. O’Donnell

    1995-01-01

    Patterns in the daily activity of Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) at inland sites has been studied throughout their range from California to Alaska. Murrelets are most active at inland sites around dawn, and to a lesser degree, at dusk. Throughout their range, peak levels of activity (detections) occur in the hour around dawn, but...

  5. Origin and Evolution of Europa's Oxygen Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Apurva V.; Leblanc, Francois; Schmidt, Carl; Johnson, Robert E.

    2016-10-01

    Europa's icy surface is constantly bombarded by sulfur and oxygen ions originating from the Io plasma torus. The momentum transferred to molecules in Europa's surface results in the sputtering of water ice, populating a water product exosphere. We simulate Europa's neutral exosphere using a ballistic 3D Monte Carlo routine and find that the O2 exosphere, while global, is not uniformly symmetric in Europa local time. The O2 exosphere, sourced at a rate of ~ 5 kg/s with a disk-averaged column density of NO2 ~ 2.5 x 1014 O2/cm2, preferentially accumulates towards Europa's dusk. These dawn-dusk atmospheric inhomogeneities escalate as the surface-bounded O2 dissociates into an atomic O corona via electron impact. The inhomogeneities persist and evolve throughout the satellite's orbit, implying a diurnal cycle of the exosphere, recently evidenced by a detailed HST oxygen aurorae campaign (Roth et al. 2016). We conclude that the consistently observed 50% increase in FUV auroral emission from dusk to dawn is principally driven by the day-to-night thermal diffusion of O2 coupled with the Coriolis acceleration. This leads to a dawn-to-dusk gradient, peaking at Europa's leading hemisphere. This exospheric oxygen cycle, dependent on both orbital longitude and magnetic latitude, is fundamentally due to the bulk-sputtering vector changing with respect to the subsolar and subjovian points throughout the orbit. In principle, a similar mechanism should be present at other tidally-locked, rapidly orbiting satellite exospheres.

  6. 76 FR 21637 - Safety Zone; Ford Estate Wedding Fireworks, Lake St. Clair, Grosse Pointe Shores, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Ford Estate Wedding Fireworks, Lake St... Wedding Fireworks. DATES: This rule is effective and enforced, at dusk, from approximately 8:30 p.m... wedding that will include fireworks launched from a point on Lake St. Clair. This temporary safety zone is...

  7. The near-Earth magnetic field at 1980 determined from MAGSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Estes, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Data from the MAGSAT spacecraft for November 1979 through April 1980 and from 91 magnetic observatories for 1978 through 1982 are used to derive a spherical harmonic model of the Earth's main magnetic field and its secular variation. Constant coefficients are determined through degree and order 13 and secular variation coefficients through degree and order 10. The first degree external terms and corresponding induced internal terms are given as a function of Dst. Preliminary modeling using separate data sets at dawn and dusk local time showed that the dusk data contains a substantial field contribution from the equatorial electrojet current. The final data set is selected first from dawn data and then augmented by dusk data to achieve a good geographic data distribution for each of three time periods: (1) November/December, 1979; (2) January/February; 1980; (3) March/April, 1980. A correction for the effects of the equatorial electrojet is applied to the dusk data utilized. The solution included calculation of fixed biases, or anomalies, for the observation data.

  8. The Use of Technology in Literacy Instruction: Implications for Teaching Students from Low Socioeconomic Backgrounds. HBSK 4072, Section 3, Fall 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Jennifer D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Almost every aspect of modern life is affected in some way by technology. Many people utilize technology from dawn to dusk to communicate; make decisions; reflect, gain, synthesize, evaluate or distribute information, among many other functions. One would be hard pressed to find a single professional, regardless of career field,…

  9. The near-earth magnetic field at 1980 determined from Magsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Estes, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Data from the Magsat spacecraft for November 1979 through April 1980 and from 91 magnetic observatories for 1978 through 1982 are used to derive a spherical harmonic model of the earth's main magnetic field and its secular variation. Constant coefficients are determined through degree and order 13 and secular variation coefficients through degree and order 10. The first degree external terms and corresponding induced internal terms are given as a function of Dst. Preliminary modeling using separate data sets at dawn and dusk local time showed that the dusk data contains a substantial field contribution from the equatorial electrojet current. The final data set is selected first from dawn data and then augmented by dusk data to achieve a good geographic data distribution for each of three time periods: (1) November/December, 1979; (2) January/February, 1980; (3) March/April, 1980. A correction for the effects of the equatorial electrojet is applied to the dusk data utilized. The solution included calculation of fixed biases, or anomalies, for the observation data.

  10. Earth Observations taken by Expedition 47 Crewmember

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-28

    ISS047e025377 (03/28/2016) --- "Islands in the Sky" . Members of the International Space Station Expedition 47 crew took in the beauty of our planet on Mar. 3, 2016 as dusk falls over the oceans. NASA astronaut Jeff Williams took this majestic image.

  11. Northern Saw-whet Owls (Aegolius acadicus) captured at Cape May Point, NJ, 1980-1994: comparison of two capture techniques

    Treesearch

    Katharine E. Duffy; Patrick E. Matheny

    1997-01-01

    During autumn migration 1980-1994, 1,270 Northern Saw-whet Owls (Aegolius acadicus) (NSWO) were captured and banded at Cape May Point, NJ. From 1980-1988, captures were effected by passive mist-netting. From 1989-1994, an audiolure (NSWO territorial song broadcast loudly from dusk to dawn in the trapping area) was used to enhance capture rate. 638...

  12. Diurnal flight response of the walnut twig beetle, Pityophthorus juglandis, to pheromone-baited traps in two northern California walnut habitats

    Treesearch

    Steven J. Seybold; Jennifer A. King; Daren R. Harris; Lori J. Nelson; Shakeeb M. Hamud; Yigen. Chen

    2012-01-01

    The diurnal flight response of the walnut twig beetle, Pityophthorus juglandis Blackman (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), was assessed during two seasonal periods at two sites in northern California. Males and females flew primarily at dusk in response to aggregation pheromone-baited traps during late June/early July, and the percentage of beetles that...

  13. Spontaneous and transient predinner hyperglycemia in some patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Du, Si-na; Shi, Min-jia; Sun, Zhan-zhan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Blood glucose fluctuations have higher risk than absolute blood glucose level in diabetic chronic complications. At present, “dawn phenomenon” is well known by clinicians, but “dusk phenomenon” has not been recognized. This study explored the objective existence of “dusk phenomenon” (spontaneous and transient predinner hyperglycemia) and its clinical significance. The data of 54 patients with diabetes, who received routine insulin pump therapy between December 2010 and October 2012 in our hospital, were retrospectively analyzed. These patients included 4 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) (T1DM) and 50 patients with type 2 DM (T2DM). According to the difference between predinner and postlunch blood glucose levels, the 50 patients with T2DM were divided into dusk phenomenon group (4 patients, all the differences ≥0 mmol/L during insulin pump therapy), nondusk phenomenon group (12 patients, all the differences <0 mmol/L during insulin pump therapy), and suspicious group (34 patients, the differences were uncertain during insulin pump therapy). In the 4 patients with T1DM of this study, the differences all were more than 0 mmol/L during insulin pump therapy. The changes in blood glucose levels were observed, and the correlations of blood glucose level with other factors were analyzed in T1DM and T2DM patients, respectively. In T1DM patients, blood glucose level was significantly higher in predinner than in prebreakfast and prelunch (all P < 0.01), and in postdinner 2 hour than in postlunch 2 hour (P = 0.021). The predinner blood level had no significant correlations with the blood glucose level at other time points and insulin dosages (all P > 0.05). In T2DM patients, the predinner blood glucose level was significantly higher in dusk phenomenon group than in suspicious group and nondusk phenomenon group (all P < 0.05). In dusk phenomenon group, the blood glucose level remained rising from predinner to prebed, and

  14. A Consistent Ribbon Structure for the Io Plasma Torus at the Voyager 1 and Galileo J0 Epochs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, William H.; Peterson, C. A.; Marconi, M. L.

    2008-09-01

    The peak density structure for the plasma torus electrons and heavy ions occurs radially near and inside of Io's orbit. This structure has been documented remotely by ground-based observations at the dawn and dusk ansae in S+ (6716 Å, 6731 Å) and S++ (9531 Å) emissions and from Voyager 2 UVS observations at the 35 degree pre-dawn and pre-dusk ansae for S++ (685Å) emission. It has also been documented by in situ observations by the Voyager 1 PLS instrument for the O+, S+, S++ ions and electrons at pre-dusk local-times and by the Galileo PWS and PLS instruments for electrons at noon local-time. The focus of this presentation is to compare the radial location of the peak density structure for the S+ ions (so-called ribbon feature) acquired at different local-times from ground-based (Schneider and Trauger, Ap. J. 450, 450, 1995) and Voyager (Bagenal, JGR 99, 11043, 1994) measurements and inferred from Galileo measurements (Gurnett et al., Science, 274, 391, 1996; Frank and Paterson, JGR 99, 11043, 2000). This is accomplished by the application of a newly developed more accurate, four-dimensional (three spatial dimensions and local-time) empirical model for the plasma torus. This model includes System III longitudinal asymmetries and also local-time asymmetries created by a dawn-dusk electric field that is equipotential along the magnetic field lines and has an adjustable magnitude and direction. It is found that all of the measurements can be fit by a set of different magnitudes and directions for the dawn-dusk electric field and that a limited range of such solutions is possible for the three measurements that allow a consistent radial location for the S+ ribbon feature, resolving a long-standing issue for the plasma torus (Bagenal et al., GRL 24, 2119, 1997). Information will be presented to illustrate the nature of these solutions.

  15. Effect of the Solar UV/EUV Heating on the Intensity and Spatial Distribution of Jupiter's Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Hajime; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Tao, C.; Morioka, A.

    2012-10-01

    Jupiter's synchrotron radiation (JSR) is the emission from relativistic electrons, and it is the most effective probe for remote sensing of Jupiter's radiation belt from the Earth. Recent observations reveal short term variations of JSR with the time scale of days to weeks. Brice and McDonough (1973) proposed that the solar UV/EUV heating for Jupiter's upper atmosphere causes enhancement of total flux density. If such a process occurs at Jupiter, it is also expected that diurnal wind system produces dawn-dusk asymmetry of the JSR brightness distribution. Preceding studies confirmed that the short term variations in total flux density correspond to the solar UV/EUV. However, the effect of solar UV/EUV heating on the brightness distribution has not been confirmed. Hence, the purpose of this study is to confirm the solar UV/EUV heating effect on total flux density and brightness distribution. We made radio imaging analysis using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) archived data of the Very Large Array (VLA) obtained in 2000, and following results were shown. 1, Total flux density varied corresponding to the solar UV/EUV. 2, Dawn side emission was brighter than dusk side emission almost every day. 3, Variations of the dawn-dusk asymmetry did not correspond to the solar UV/EUV. In order to explain the second result, we estimate the diurnal wind velocity from the observed dawn-dusk ratio by using the model brightness distribution of JSR. Estimated neutral wind velocity is 46+/-11 m/s, which reasonably corresponds to the numerical simulation of Jupiter's upper atmosphere. In order to explain the third result, we examined the effect of the global convection electric field driven by tailward outflow of plasma in Jupiter's magnetosphere. As the result, it is suggested that typical fluctuation of the convection electric field strength was enough to cause the observed variations of the dawn-dusk asymmetry.

  16. Duskside enhancement of equatorial zonal electric field response to convection electric fields during the St. Patrick's Day storm on 17 March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulasi Ram, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Shiokawa, K.; Sripathi, S.; Veenadhari, B.; Heelis, R.; Ajith, K. K.; Gowtam, V. S.; Gurubaran, S.; Supnithi, P.; Le Huy, M.

    2016-01-01

    The equatorial zonal electric field responses to prompt penetration of eastward convection electric fields (PPEF) were compared at closely spaced longitudinal intervals at dusk to premidnight sectors during the intense geomagnetic storm of 17 March 2015. At dusk sector (Indian longitudes), a rapid uplift of equatorial F layer to >550 km and development of intense equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) were observed. These EPBs were found to extend up to 27.13°N and 25.98°S magnetic dip latitudes indicating their altitude development to ~1670 km at apex. In contrast, at few degrees east in the premidnight sector (Thailand-Indonesian longitudes), no significant height rise and/or EPB activity has been observed. The eastward electric field perturbations due to PPEF are greatly dominated at dusk sector despite the existence of background westward ionospheric disturbance dynamo (IDD) fields, whereas they were mostly counter balanced by the IDD fields in the premidnight sector. In situ observations from SWARM-A and SWARM-C and Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellites detected a large plasma density depletion near Indian equatorial region due to large electrodynamic uplift of F layer to higher than satellite altitudes. Further, this large uplift is found to confine to a narrow longitudinal sector centered on sunset terminator. This study brings out the significantly enhanced equatorial zonal electric field in response to PPEF that is uniquely confined to dusk sector. The responsible mechanisms are discussed in terms of unique electrodynamic conditions prevailing at dusk sector in the presence of convection electric fields associated with the onset of a substorm under southward interplanetary magnetic field Bz.

  17. Bimodal oscillations of cyclic nucleotide concentrations in the circadian system of the Madeira cockroach Rhyparobia maderae.

    PubMed

    Schendzielorz, Julia; Schendzielorz, Thomas; Arendt, Andreas; Stengl, Monika

    2014-10-01

    Pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) is the most important coupling factor of the circadian system in insects, comparable to its functional ortholog vasoactive intestinal polypeptide of the mammalian circadian clock. In Drosophila melanogaster, PDF signals via activation of adenylyl cyclases, controlling circadian locomotor activity rhythms at dusk and dawn. In addition, PDF mediates circadian rhythms of the visual system and is involved in entrainment to different photoperiods. We examined whether PDF daytime-dependently elevates cAMP levels in the Madeira cockroach Rhyparobia maderae and whether cAMP mimics PDF effects on locomotor activity rhythms. To determine time windows of PDF release, we searched for circadian rhythms in concentrations of cAMP and its functional opponent cGMP in the accessory medulla (AMe), the insect circadian pacemaker controlling locomotor activity rhythms, and in the optic lobes, as the major input and output area of the circadian clock. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays detected PDF-dependent increases of cAMP in optic lobes and daytime-dependent oscillations of cAMP and cGMP baseline levels in the AMe, both with maxima at dusk and dawn. Although these rhythms disappeared at the first day in constant conditions (DD1), cAMP but not cGMP oscillations returned at the second day in constant conditions (DD2). Whereas in light-dark cycles the cAMP baseline level remained constant in other optic lobe neuropils, it oscillated in phase with the AMe at DD2. To determine whether cAMP and cGMP mimic PDF-dependent control of locomotor activity rhythms, both cyclic nucleotides were injected at different times of the circadian day using running-wheel assays. Whereas cAMP injections generated delays at dusk and advances at dawn, cGMP only delayed locomotor activity at dusk. For the first time we found PDF-dependent phase advances at dawn in addition to previously described phase delays at dusk. Thus, we hypothesize that PDF release at dusk and dawn

  18. The inner edge of the plasma sheet and the diffuse aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Vinas, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    Three dimensional measurements from the ISEE-1 low energy electron spectrometer are used to map the location of the inner edge of the plasma sheet and study the anisotropies in the electron distribution function associated with this boundary. Lower energy plasma sheet electrons have inner edges closer to the Earth than higher energies with the separations at different energies being larger near dawn and after dusk than at midnight. Lowest energy inner edges are frequently located adjacent to the plasmapause in the dawn hemisphere but are often separated from it in the dusk hemisphere by a gap of at least several Re. The energy dispersion is minimal in the afternoon quadrant where the inner edge is near the magnetopause and frequently oscillating on a time scale of minutes. The location of the inner edge is probably determined primarily by the motion of electrons in the existing electric and magnetic fields rather than by strong diffusion as has sometimes been supposed.

  19. Diel changes in the near-surface biomass of zooplankton and the carbon content of vertical migrants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Graeme C.; Harris, Roger P.; Head, Robert N.

    Zooplankton biomass and the carbon content of vertical migrants were measured in the NE Atlantic (36.5°N, 19.2°W) between 11 and 18 July 1996 as part of the Plankton Reactivity in the Marine Environment (PRIME) programme. The increase in zooplankton biomass near the surface (0-100 m) at night compared to during the day suggested that diel vertical migration was an important feature at this site. For three species of vertically migrant copepods, Pleuromamma pisekii, P. gracilis and P. abdominalis, the carbon content of individuals collected at dusk was significantly less than for individuals collected at dawn, with this reduction being 6.2, 7.3 and 14.8%, respectively. This dawn-dusk reduction in carbon content is consistent with the diel pattern of feeding and fasting exhibited by vertical migrants and supports the suggestion that migrating zooplankton will cause an active export of carbon from the surface layers.

  20. Coincident observations of ionospheric troughs and the equatorial plasmapause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Maynard, N. C.; Tulunay, Y. K.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    Electron-density observations made in the topside ionosphere by the Ariel 4 and Isis 2 satellites are examined in conjunction with results obtained by Explorer 45 when it traversed the near-equatorial plasmapause with one hour (both UT and MLT) of the Ariel and Isis traversals of the same L coordinate. Both dusk and night observations are analyzed, and an attempt is made to show that depressions in ionospheric electron density occur in the vicinity of the plasmapause field line. It is concluded that the electron distributions observed in the electron-density troughs at 550 km near dusk by Ariel and at 1400 km near midnight by Isis do not always parallel variations in the light-ion distribution inferred from the Explorer plasmapause traversals and that there appears to be no specific feature of the main ionospheric trough which can be used to identify the plasmapause field line except in a statistical sense.

  1. Observations of Energetic Particle Escape at the Magnetopause: Early Results from the MMS Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Westlake, J. H.; Sibeck, David Gary; Giles, Barbara L.; Pollock, C. J.; Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Energetic (greater than tens of keV) magnetospheric particle escape into the magnetosheath occurs commonly, irrespective of conditions that engender reconnection and boundary-normal magnetic fields. A signature observed by the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, simultaneous monohemispheric streaming of multiple species (electrons, H+, Hen+), is reported here as unexpectedly common in the dayside, dusk quadrant of the magnetosheath even though that region is thought to be drift-shadowed from energetic electrons. This signature is sometimes part of a pitch angle distribution evolving from symmetric in the magnetosphere, to asymmetric approaching the magnetopause, to monohemispheric streaming in the magnetosheath. While monohemispheric streaming in the magnetosheath may be possible without a boundary-normal magnetic field, the additional pitch angle depletion, particularly of electrons, on the magnetospheric side requires one. Observations of this signature in the dayside dusk sector imply that the static picture of magnetospheric drift-shadowing is inappropriate for energetic particle dynamics in the outer magnetosphere.

  2. Observation of bow shock protons at the lunar orbit. M.S. Thesis; [particle trajectory analysis of solar protons in the lunar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Protons with energies ranging from about 500 eV to 3,500 eV were observed by the Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment (SIDE) on both the dusk and dawn sides of the magnetosphere. On each lunation these particles appeared as a rather continuous phenomenon for 3 to 5 days after crossing from the dawn-side magnetosheath into the solar wind and for about 2 days prior to entering the dusk-side magnetosheath. Data from the SIDE and from the Explorer 35 lunar orbiting magnetometer were analyzed and these data indicated that the transverse ion flows observed by the SIDE in the pre and post bow shock crossing regions of the lunar orbit are due to these deviated solar wind particles. A computer model based on drift trajectories for particles leaving the shock was developed and synthetic particle data produced by this model are in good agreement with the observed data.

  3. Observations of energetic particle escape at the magnetopause: Early results from the MMS Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Westlake, J. H.; Sibeck, D. G.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Craft, J. V.; Spence, H. E.; Niehof, J. T.; Reeves, G. D.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Magnes, W.; Trattner, K. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Energetic (greater than tens of keV) magnetospheric particle escape into the magnetosheath occurs commonly, irrespective of conditions that engender reconnection and boundary-normal magnetic fields. A signature observed by the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, simultaneous monohemispheric streaming of multiple species (electrons, H+, Hen+), is reported here as unexpectedly common in the dayside, dusk quadrant of the magnetosheath even though that region is thought to be drift-shadowed from energetic electrons. This signature is sometimes part of a pitch angle distribution evolving from symmetric in the magnetosphere, to asymmetric approaching the magnetopause, to monohemispheric streaming in the magnetosheath. While monohemispheric streaming in the magnetosheath may be possible without a boundary-normal magnetic field, the additional pitch angle depletion, particularly of electrons, on the magnetospheric side requires one. Observations of this signature in the dayside dusk sector imply that the static picture of magnetospheric drift-shadowing is inappropriate for energetic particle dynamics in the outer magnetosphere.

  4. Penetration of the Solar Wind Electric Field Throughout the Magnetosphere/Ionosphere System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, J. L.; Kelley, M. C.; Makela, J. J.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2002-12-01

    On April 17, 2002 an intense, long duration electric field penetration event was captured by the Jicamarca incoherent scatter radar. Other radars in the U. S. chain detected the event as well, although not with as much clarity. The interplanetary electric field (IEF) is available from the ACE satellite as well. The ratio of the dawn dusk component of the IEF to the dawn dusk component in the equatorial ionosphere for periods less that about two hours is 15:1. We argue that this corresponds to the ratio of the size of the magnetosphere to the length of the connection line between the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the Earth's magnetic field. Simultaneous magnetic field measurements at Huancayo reveal the same high frequency components and suggest that a chain of stations or an equatorial fleet of satellites in low earth orbit could be used to monitor the connection length continuously.

  5. Comparison of storm-time changes of geomagnetic field at ground and at MAGSAT altitudes, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Kane, R. P.; Trivedi, N. B.

    1982-01-01

    The latitudinal distributions of delta H, delta X, delta Y, and delta Z were studied for quiet and disturbed periods. For quiet periods, the average patterns showed some variations common to dusk and dawn, thus indicating probable ground anomaly. However, there were significant differences too between dusk and dawn, indicating considerable diurnal variation effects. Particularly in delta Y, these effects were large and were symmetric about the dip equator. For disturbed day passes, the quiet day patterns were considered as base levels and the latter were subtracted from the former. The resulting residual latitudinal patterns were, on the average, symmetric about the geographical equator. However, individual passes showed considerable north-south asymmetries, probably indicating meanderings of the central plane of the magnetospheric ring current.

  6. Relativistic Electron Pitch Angle Distributions in the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, R. H. W.; Zhao, H.; Reeves, G. D.; Chen, Y.; Henderson, M. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.

    2016-12-01

    Relativistic electron pitch angle distributions (PADs) in the trapped inner region of the magnetosphere are a sensitive measure of many processes that govern the dynamics of these particles. We report here on statistical observations of relativistic electron PADs from the Van Allen Probes mission, which show an unexpected dawn/dusk asymmetry that seems to be a persistent feature during quiet times of Dst > -20 nT. The observed PADs show a more peaked pancake distribution at dusk compared to dawn for energies above 1.8 MeV. These observations hint at persistent processes that can aect relativistic electrons on timescales on the order of the outer radiation belt drift period ( 10 minutes).

  7. Factors affecting perception of outdoor public environments.

    PubMed

    Nelson, T M; Loewen, L J

    1993-02-01

    Comfort and related perceptions are important in respect to use of outdoor public places. In a laboratory, 170 persons viewed four such places on slides and rated them on 10 dimensions, namely, "comfortable," "playful," "serious," "active," "unsafe," "good," "tense," "interesting," "gloomy," and "pleasing." Instructions were used to vary time of day and the number of people present at the location. It was found that women (n = 96) regard outdoor environments as more threatening than do men (n = 74) which suggests that women feel more vulnerable to untoward acts and that public places are rated less desirous at dusk than at dawn, presumably because dusk is followed by night and dawn by day. It was also discovered that such public environments are rated better than deserted places when occupied by two or more persons. Some of these results are consistent with the Prospect-Refuge Theory of Appleton.

  8. Annual rhythmicity and maturation of physiological parameters in goats.

    PubMed

    Piccione, G; Caola, G; Refinetti, R

    2007-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate seasonal rhythmicity and maturation of physiological parameters in goats. Five kids (Capra hircus, Maltese breed) were studied for 24 months, starting at 5 months of age. Rectal temperature and various blood-borne substances (melatonin, cholesterol, urea, total bilirubin, albumin, glucose, calcium, magnesium, phosphate, and sodium) were measured once a month at dawn and dusk. Serum bilirubin concentration exhibited statistically significant 12-month rhythmicity, and melatonin concentration exhibited 6-month rhythmicity. Changes in the dusk-to-dawn difference in rectal temperature during the course of the study provided suggestive evidence that the circadian rhythm of body temperature in goats is not fully developed until the end of the second year of life. The results documented also maturational changes in cholesterol production and blood glucose regulation.

  9. The relationship between the IMF B(y) and the distant tail (150-238 Re) lobe and plasmasheet B(y) fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Jones, D. E.; Lepping, R. P.; Sibeck, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    The relationships between the Solar Magnetospheric (SM) y-component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the lobe and plasmasheet magnetic fields have been studied for the two ISEE-3 deep tail passes. It is found that for positive sector IMFs, 13 percent of the interplanetary magnetic field penetrates into the aberrated north-dawn and south-dusk lobe quadrants, and about the same amount in the north-dusk and south-dawn lobe quadrants for negative sector IMFs. For the above cases, field penetration is significantly less for opposite polarity IMFs. The former results are generally consistent with open magnetospheric models, but the latter (the lack of response in certain quadrants) are unexplained by theory at this time. If the magnitude of the plasmasheet B(y) fields are related to plasma pressure anisotropies, very small anisotropies of about 1.01 are expected.

  10. Joule heating at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. C.; St.-Maurice, J.-P.; Abreu, V. J.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations based on simultaneous observations of the electric field magnitude, and individual measurements of ion drift velocity and particle precipitation, over the lifetime of the AE-C satellite, are used to determine high latitude Joule heating. Conductivities produced by an averaged seasonal illumination were included with those calculated from particle precipitation. It is found that high latitude Joule heating occurs in an approximately oval pattern, and consists of dayside cleft, dawn and dusk sunward convection, and night sector heating regions. On average, heating in the cleft and dawn-dusk regions contributes the largest heat input, and there is no apparent difference between hemispheres for similar seasons. Joule heat input is 50 percent greater in summer than in winter, due primarily to the greater conductivity caused by solar production.

  11. Comparison of storm-time changes of geomagnetic field at ground and at MAGSAT altitudes, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Kane, R. P.; Trivedi, N. B.

    1982-01-01

    Geomagnetic field variations were studied by considering the parameter delta H which indicated H(observed) minus H(model), where H = (X squared + Y squared) (1/2) where X, Y, and Z are the components actually observed. Quiet time base values for 5 deg longitude belts were estimated. After subtracting these from the observed values, the residual delta H (dawn) and delta H (dusk) were studied for the two major storms. It was noticed that the dusk values attained larger (negative) values for a longer time, than the dawn value. Some changes in delta Y and delta Z were also noticed, indicating possibilities of either meridional currents and/or noncoincidence of the central plane of the ring current with the equatorial plane of the Earth. Other details are described.

  12. A statistical study of ion pitch-angle distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Mcentire, R. W.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary results of a statistical study of energetic (34-50 keV) ion pitch-angle distributions (PADs) within 9 Re of earth provide evidence for an orderly pattern consistent with both drift-shell splitting and magnetopause shadowing. Normal ion PADs dominate the dayside and inner magnetosphere. Butterfly PADs typically occur in a narrow belt stretching from dusk to dawn through midnight, where they approach within 6 Re of earth. While those ion butterfly PADs that typically occur on closed drift paths are mainly caused by drift-shell splitting, there is also evidence for magnetopause shadowing in observations of more frequent butterfly PAD occurrence in the outer magnetosphere near dawn than dusk. Isotropic and gradient boundary PADs terminate the tailward extent of the butterfly ion PAD belt.

  13. Environmental elements involved in communal roosting in Heliconius butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae).

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Several Heliconius L. butterflies species form nocturnal aggregations in sites with a particular architecture. Roosts are usually formed under relatively dense vegetation mats where dry vines or branches provide a perch for the night. These sites may last for months. To understand the importance of factors related to the expression of Heliconius roosting, data on light, temperature, relative humidity, wind, and use of wing color cues were recorded at H. erato and H. sara roost sites in Costa Rica and Panama in 2008 and 2009. The results show that roost sites offer reduced light conditions at dusk, provide a drier environment compared with its vicinity, and offer protection from wind and rain. Moreover, individuals use wing color recognition under reduced light conditions at dusk to successfully assemble aggregations. These findings provide key information for future experiments to study the use of landmarks, hygrosensitivity, and dim-light eye adaptations in Heliconius navigation to find roost sites.

  14. Magnetotail flows near lunar orbit: ARTEMIS statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiehas, Stefan; Runov, Andrei; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Hietala, Heli

    2016-04-01

    Since 2011 the two ARTEMIS probes orbit the moon and cross the Earth's magnetotail for about four days every month. We use five years of this data to analyze magnetotail flows on a statistical basis. We find that tailward and earthward fast flows (|v| > 300 km/s) occur at a comparable rate. Earthward flows are predominantly (80%) associated with northward Bz, while tailward flows are primarily accompanied by southward Bz. The dominance of southward Bz in tailward flows increases with the flow speed from about 60% for flows with |v| > 200 km/s to 70% for flows with |v| > 400 km/s. For either earthward and tailward flows, we find a clear dawn-dusk asymmetry with 60% (70%) of the earthward (tailward) flows occuring in the dusk sector.

  15. Storm Time Global Thermosphere: A Driven-Dissipative Thermodynamic System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-11

    rely on data from ground magnetometers at auroral latitudes greatly underes- timate IT energy inputs, and (2) the ring current acts as an energy...point, ~234 RK upstream of Earth. The solar wind density and velocity are measured by the Solar Wind Electron, Proton , and Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM...GRACE’S orbit-averaged altitude was ~486.5 km; its orbital plane precessed from near the noon-midnight to the dawn-dusk meridian. Values of TK and

  16. Diel and Seasonal Activities of Culicoides spp. near Yankeetown, Florida.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    Corbet , 1965; Davies, 1966; Braverman, 1970). The major characteristics of all traps are a lower section that covers the pupal habitat and an upper...frequency of emergence. Corbet (1964) defines 4 basic temporal patterns of emergence in insects: continuous, rhythmic, sporadic, and seasonal...obsened at dusk (Kline and Roberts, 1992 ). The activity of L. torrens Townsend, L. foulki Clastrier and Wirth, and L. knowltoni is diurnally bimodal

  17. Detailed Analysis Case Studies of Trapped Plasmas at the Earth’s Magnetic Equator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    5 Figure 2. Plasma Density L Dependance ...... ......... 7 Figure 3. Plasmapause Magnetic Activity Dependance . . 8 Figure 4. Plasma Density L... Dependance - Normalized . . 10 Figure 5. The Dusk Bulge . . . .............. 13 Figure 6. Magnetosphere’s Electric and Magnetic Fields 14 Figure 7...1970). 6 -. ~ .ZJ.:AUGUST 12,1968 . -. ----- OUTBOUND PASS - 2 3 4 5 ___ ... 7....9 L Figure 2. Plasma Density L Dependance 7 0D3 #n /2 OUT JND tN

  18. Improving Counterterrorism Efforts by Removing Misconceptions about Islam in the Western World

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    during which all food , drink and sexual activity are forbidden between dawn and dusk.49 Fasting during this time is obligatory for every Muslim adult if...thirteen kinds of Jihad, which are categorized into four categories.101 a. Jihad An-Nafs This stage requires a Muslim to make efforts to educate and mold ...and teachings to suit their agendas, in the same way so-called religious scholars today from respective countries continue to mold young and fresh

  19. Cluster Observations of Particle Injections in the Exterior Cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoubet, C. P.; Grison, B.; Berchem, J.; Trattner, K. J.; Lavraud, B.; Pitout, F.; Soucek, J.; Richard, R. L.; Laakso, H. E.; Masson, A.; Dunlop, M. W.; Dandouras, I. S.; Reme, H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Daly, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    The main process that injects solar wind plasma into the polar cusp is now generally accepted to be magnetic reconnection. Depending on the IMF direction, this process takes place equatorward (for IMF southward), poleward (for IMF northward) or on the dusk or dawn sides (for IMF azimuthal) of the cusp. We report a Cluster crossing on 5 January 2002 near the exterior cusp on the southern dusk side. The IMF was mainly azimuthal (IMF-By around -5 nT), the solar wind speed lower than usual around 280 km/s with the density of order 5 cm-3. The four Cluster spacecraft had an elongated configuration near the magnetopause. C4 was the first spacecraft to enter the cusp around 19:52:04 UT, followed by C2 at 19:52:35 UT, C1 at 19:54:24 UT and C3 at 20:13:15 UT. C4 and C1 observed two ion energy dispersions at 20:10 UT and 20:40 UT and C3 at 20:35 UT and 21:15 UT. Using the time of flight technique on the upgoing and downgoing ions, which leads to energy dispersions, we obtain distances of the ion sources between 14 and 20 RE from the spacecraft. Using Tsyganenko model, we find that these sources are located on the dusk flank, past the terminator. The first injection by C3 is seen at approximately the same time as the 2nd injection on C1 but their sources at the magnetopause were separated by more than 7 RE. This would imply that two distinct sources were active at the same time on the dusk flank of the magnetosphere. In addition, a flow reversal was observed at the magnetopause on C4 which would be an indication that reconnection is taking place near the exterior cusp.

  20. A critical time window for organismal interactions in a pelagic ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; McManus, Margaret A

    2014-01-01

    To measure organismal coherence in a pelagic ecosystem, we used moored sensors to describe the vertical dynamics of each step in the food chain in shelf waters off the west shore of Oahu, Hawaii. Horizontally extensive, intense aggregations of phytoplankton, zooplankton, and micronekton exhibited strong diel patterns in abundance and vertical distribution, resulting in a highly variable potential for interaction amongst trophic levels. Only around dusk did zooplankton layers overlap with phytoplankton layers. Shortly after sunset, micronekton ascended from the deep, aggregating on the island's shelf. Short-lived departures in migration patterns were detected in depth, vertical distribution, density, and total abundance of micronekton when zooplankton layers were present with typical patterns resuming within one hour. Layers of zooplankton began to disappear within 20 minutes of the arrival of micronekton with no layers present after 50 minutes. The effects of zooplankton layers cascaded even further up the food chain, affecting many behaviors of dolphins observed at dusk including their depth, group size, and inter-individual spacing. As a result of these changes in behavior, during a 30-minute window just after dusk, the number of feeding events observed for each dolphin and consequently the feeding time for each individual more than doubled when zooplankton layers were present. Dusk is a critical period for interactions amongst species in this system from phytoplankton to top predators. Our observations that short time windows can drive the structure and function of a complex suite of organisms highlight the importance of explicitly adding a temporal dimension at a scale relevant to individual organisms to our descriptions of heterogeneity in ocean ecosystems.

  1. Air-to-Ground Visual Simulation Demonstration. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-01

    influences by such methods as returning to the first device evaluated for an additional sortie and providing each pilot with an equal amount of task...taken at longer intervals after exposure. 11-51 With the passage of time, factors which influence a rater become less distinct. In Phase II, ratings...efforts are required to develop a more compact, high resolution, high brightness color televison projector. 6. Day/Dusk/Night Capability The display must be

  2. Don't go with the Flow: An Invitation to Magnetosheath and Foreshock Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    This talk reviews the predictions of gasdynamic, magnetohydrodynamic, and kinetic models for the magnetosheath and foreshock and compares these predictions with observations by the recent Cluster and THEMIS missions. Topics of interest include: the depletion layer, dawn/dusk asymmetries, the transmission of solar wind discontinuities, the formation of hot flow anomalies and cavities in the foreshock, and flows accelerated by field-line tension. We conclude by discussing opportunities for magnetosheath imaging.

  3. Comparison of storm-time changes of geomagnetic field at ground and MAGSAT altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Kane, R. P.; Trivedi, N. B.

    1982-01-01

    The MAGSAT data for the period Nov. 2-20, 1979 were studied. From the observed H, the HMD predicted by model was subtracted. The residue delta H = H-HMD shows storm-time variations similar to geomagnetic Dst, at least qualitatively. Delta H sub 0, i.e., equatorial values of delta H were studied separately for dusk and dawn and show some differences.

  4. Seasonal-Longitudinal Variability of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    ionograms , EPBs are also referred our comparisons, to as plasma plumes (Woodman and La Hoz, 1976) and We have sorted data acquired during more than 75 000...Eastward become important. Damping by interhemispheric winds ap- fields enhance growth, and westward fields quench it. A for- pears to be responsible...magnetic equator, and Up is the vertically down- fects of weak gradients in Pedersen conductance near dusk. ward component of neutral wind velocity

  5. Large amplitude perturbations and waves at the duskside LLBL of the magnetopause generated by an interplanetary tangential discontinuity on December 7, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Gratton, F. T.; Bilbao, L.; Gnavi, G.; Farrugia, C. J.; Lund, E.

    2006-12-04

    On December 7, 2000 a joint current sheeth and vorticity layer hit the magnetopause (MP) generating large amplitude oscillations, and wave-like perturbations observed by CLUSTER at the near dusk flank. Linear stability theory and MHD numerical simulations support the hypothesis that the waves were due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. The simulation brings in light novel dynamic properties of the boundary layer under the KH excitation.

  6. Physics-Based Radiometric Signature Modeling and Detection Algorithms of Landmines Using Electro-Optical Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    end to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project 10704-If88), Washington, OC 20503. 1 . AGENCY USE ONLY (tLeave blank) 2 . REPORT...Signatures During Darkness ....................... 1 ) 1 4.1.4 Signatures at Dawn and Dusk ..................... 155 4.2 Case 2 : Polarimetric MWIR...234 A.4 Blackbody Radiation ........ .......................... 2 :35 B. Electro-Optic Sensors .................................. 237 B. 1

  7. Evaluation of the Safety and Efficacy of Excimer Laser Keratorefractive Surgery in U.S. Army Soldiers using the latest Battlefield Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    month after surgery under the following conditions (corrected and uncorrected): 1) NVG and aiming light under simulated starlight, and 2) iron sight...under low light (simulated dusk). Targets were scored using a standard system. Before and after surgery scores were compared for the iron sight and NVG...different from pre-operative performance with best correction for either the iron sight or NVGs (p>0.4). Interestingly, mean post-operative firing

  8. MESSENGER observations of flux ropes and reconnection fronts: locations of the near tail reconnection site at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W. J.; Fu, S.; Slavin, J. A.; Raines, J. M.; Zong, Q.; Poh, G.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2016-12-01

    A statistical study of flux ropes and reconnection fronts (also called dipolarization fronts) base on MESSENGER magnetic field and plasma observations and its implication for the distribution of magnetic reconnection site in the Mercury's magnetotail has been performed in this research. We have surveyed the plasma sheet crossings at Mercury during three hot seasons of MESSENGER for flux ropes and reconnection fronts, which are believed to be highly related with magnetic reconnection. During the three hot season orbits. MESSENGER crossed the plasma sheet were mostly at a distance between - 2 RM and -3 RM, which is the region of previous determined location of Near Mercury Neutral Line. Thirty-nine flux ropes and 92 reconnection fronts were identified. The occurrence frequency distribution of flux ropes and reconnection fronts in the plasma sheet shows a clear dawn-dusk asymmetry with higher occurrence frequency on the dawn side than the dusk side. This suggests that magnetic reconnection in Mercury's magnetotail happens more frequently on the dawn side than dusk side plasma sheet. This is opposite to the observations in Earth's magnetotail showing magnetic reconnection more frequently occurs on the dusk side than the dawn side plasma sheet. The distribution of plasma sheet thickness shows that plasma sheet near the midnight is the thinnest part and does not show obvious asymmetry. Thus, the reasons that cause magnetic reconnection to preferentially occur on the dawnside of the magnetotail at Mercury may not be the plasma sheet thickness and require further study. The peak occurrence rates of flux ropes and reconnection fronts in Mercury's plasma sheet are 60 times higher than that of Earth's values, which we interpret to be due to the highly variable magnetospheric conditions at Mercury. Such higher occurrence rate of magnetic reconnection would generate more plasma flows in the dawnside plasma sheet than in the duskside. These plasma flows would mostly brake and

  9. Transient Sheets of Field-Aligned Current Observed by DMSP During the Main Phase of a Magnetic Superstorm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-16

    ram direction. These are (1) ion traps to measure the total ion moved equatorward and stabilized at -53’ magnetic lati- densities, (2) ion drift meters...F12 and F15) were moving equatorward in the time magnetosphere, (2) applications of Ohm’s law in the morning (evening) sector above the northern...particle fluxes DMSP orbits are on the dusk side of the Earth. Thus the by four Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) satellites satellites move toward the

  10. The Extent to Which Dayside Reconnection Drives Field-Aligned Currents During Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, C.; Shortt, M. W.; Coxon, J.; Rae, J.; Freeman, M. P.; Kalmoni, N. M. E.; Jackman, C. M.; Anderson, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    Field-aligned currents, also known as Birkeland currents, are the agents by which energy and momentum is transferred to the ionosphere from the magnetosphere and solar wind. In order to understand this coupling, it is necessary to analyze the variations in these current systems with respect to the main energy sources of the solar wind and substorms. In this study, we perform a superposed epoch analysis of field-aligned currents determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) project with respect to substorm expansion phase onsets identified using the Substorm Onsets and Phases from Indices of the Electrojet (SOPHIE) technique. We examine the total upward and downward currents separately in the noon, dusk, dawn and midnight sectors. Our results show that the dusk and dawn currents have up to a 66% linear correlated with the dayside reconnection rate estimated from solar wind measurements, whereas the noon and midnight currents are not. The noon currents show little or no variation throughout the substorm cycle. The midnight currents follows the dusk currents up to 20 min before onset, after which the midnight current increases more rapidly and exponentially. At substorm onset, the exponential growth rate increases. While the midnight field-aligned currents grow exponentially after substorm onset, the auroral indices vary with a 1/6th power law. Overall, our results show that the growth and decay rates of the Region 1 and 2 current systems, which are strongest at dawn and dusk, are directly driven by the solar wind, whereas the growth and decay rates of the substorm current system, which are dominant at midnight, act independently of the upstream driver.

  11. Plasma pressure in Mercury's equatorial magnetosphere derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Purucker, Michael E.; Winslow, Reka M.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.

    2011-11-01

    Since insertion of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft into orbit around Mercury on 18 March 2011, the probe's Magnetometer has routinely observed localized reductions of the magnetic field magnitude below the level predicted by a planetary dipole model corrected for magnetospheric magnetic fields. These magnetic depressions are observed on almost every orbit, and the latitude at which they are observed is local-time dependent. The depression signatures are indicators of the presence of enhanced plasma pressures, which inflate the magnetic field locally to maintain pressure balance, thus lowering the magnetic flux density. Mapping the magnetic depressions in local time and latitude provides insight into the plasma distribution near the planet, which complements that provided by MESSENGER's Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer. The spatial distribution shows that magnetic depressions are concentrated in two distinct regions, one near the equator on the nightside and another at high latitudes principally on the dayside. Here we focus on the nightside, equatorial pressure signatures, which we attribute to the magnetotail plasma sheet. The plasma-sheet pressures extend from dusk to dawn and are offset northward from the planetary geographic equator by about 10° in latitude, commensurate with the offset of the planetary dipole. The pressures associated with the plasma-sheet depressions range from 0.1 to 3 nPa and are systematically higher at dawn than at dusk. Proton gradient-curvature and convection drift in Mercury's dipole magnetic field with a dawn-to-dusk electric field result in low drift velocities near dawn, leading to systematically higher densities and pressures at dawn than at dusk, consistent with the observations.

  12. Visibility conditions and diel period affect small-scale spatio-temporal behaviour of pike Esox lucius in the absence of prey and conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, P A; Baktoft, H; Boel, M; Meier, K; Jacobsen, L; Rokkjaer, E M; Clausen, T; Skov, C

    2012-05-01

    Pike Esox lucius in the absence of prey and conspecifics were shown to have the highest habitat-change activity during dusk and to decrease preference for complex habitats in turbid water. As the behaviours indicate routine responses in the absence of behavioural interactions, E. lucius spatio-temporal distributions should be directly affected and thereby more easily assessed and avoided by prey, with potential consequences for encounter rates.

  13. A Critical Time Window for Organismal Interactions in a Pelagic Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; McManus, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    To measure organismal coherence in a pelagic ecosystem, we used moored sensors to describe the vertical dynamics of each step in the food chain in shelf waters off the west shore of Oahu, Hawaii. Horizontally extensive, intense aggregations of phytoplankton, zooplankton, and micronekton exhibited strong diel patterns in abundance and vertical distribution, resulting in a highly variable potential for interaction amongst trophic levels. Only around dusk did zooplankton layers overlap with phytoplankton layers. Shortly after sunset, micronekton ascended from the deep, aggregating on the island's shelf. Short-lived departures in migration patterns were detected in depth, vertical distribution, density, and total abundance of micronekton when zooplankton layers were present with typical patterns resuming within one hour. Layers of zooplankton began to disappear within 20 minutes of the arrival of micronekton with no layers present after 50 minutes. The effects of zooplankton layers cascaded even further up the food chain, affecting many behaviors of dolphins observed at dusk including their depth, group size, and inter-individual spacing. As a result of these changes in behavior, during a 30-minute window just after dusk, the number of feeding events observed for each dolphin and consequently the feeding time for each individual more than doubled when zooplankton layers were present. Dusk is a critical period for interactions amongst species in this system from phytoplankton to top predators. Our observations that short time windows can drive the structure and function of a complex suite of organisms highlight the importance of explicitly adding a temporal dimension at a scale relevant to individual organisms to our descriptions of heterogeneity in ocean ecosystems. PMID:24844981

  14. DE 2 observations of disturbances in the upper atmosphere during a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, N. J.; Brace, L. H.; Spencer, N. W.; Carignan, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of physical interpretations of a sequence of in situ measurements taken in the midlatitude dusk sector during the geomagnetic storm of November 24, 1982 by instruments on board the DE-2 spacecraft in polar orbit. The results represent the first comparison of nearly simultaneous measurements, obtained at different seasons in a common local time sector, of storm disturbances in dc electric fields, zonal ion convection, zonal winds, gas composition and temperature, and electron density and temperature.

  15. On the Symmetry of Ionospheric Polar Cap Patch Exits Around Magnetic Midnight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, J. I.; Hosokawa, K.; Gulbrandsen, N.; Clausen, L.

    2014-12-01

    We present continuous observations of polar cap patches exiting the polar cap ionosphere into the night time auoral oval. Satellite images of the auroral oval and all-sky camera observations of 630.0 nm airglow patches superimposed onto SuperDARN convection maps, reveals a detailed picture on how patches exiting the polar cap and return to the dayside at night, on both the dusk convection cell and the dawn convection cell. We also present eight years of statistics demonstrating that the MLT distribution of patch exits are marginally affected by the IMF BY polarity 3-4 hours around midnight. Synthesizing our observations with previous results there are two, possibly related, explanations to why patches populate both convection cells almost symmetrically. i) Intake of patch material occur on both convection cells for both IMF BY polarities. ii) According to the patch formation model by Lockwood and Carlson et al. [1992] the excitation of flow associated with transient dayside reconnection produces cigar-shaped patches stretching across both the morning and the evening convection cells. Applying the dynamic polar cap flow model by Cowley and Lockwood [1992], we suggest that dawn-dusk elongated patches may be torn apart at night when they are grabbed by transient tail reconnection. The associated twin cell flow disturbance expanding from the reconnection region will divert plasma towards dawn and dusk. This may explain the observed exits on both convection cells.

  16. Energetic Charged-Particle Phenomena in the Jovian Magnetosphere: First Results from the Ulysses COSPIN Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J A; Anglin, J D; Balogh, A; Burrows, J R; Cowley, S W; Ferrando, P; Heber, B; Hynds, R J; Kunow, H; Marsden, R G; McKibben, R B; Müller-Mellin, R; Page, D E; Raviart, A; Sanderson, T R; Staines, K; Wenzel, K P; Wilson, M D; Zhang, M

    1992-09-11

    The Ulysses spacecraft made the first exploration of the region of Jupiter's magnetosphere at high Jovigraphic latitudes ( approximately 37 degrees south) on the dusk side and reached higher magnetic latitudes ( approximately 49 degrees north) on the day side than any previous mission to Jupiter. The cosmic and solar particle investigations (COSPIN) instrumentation achieved a remarkably well integrated set of observations of energetic charged particles in the energy ranges of approximately 1 to 170 megaelectron volts for electrons and 0.3 to 20 megaelectron volts for protons and heavier nuclei. The new findings include (i) an apparent polar cap region in the northern hemisphere in which energetic charged particles following Jovian magnetic field lines may have direct access to the interplanetary medium, (ii) high-energy electron bursts (rise times approximately 17 megaelectron volts) on the dusk side that are apparently associated with field-aligned currents and radio burst emissions, (iii) persistence of the global 10-hour relativistic electron "clock" phenomenon throughout Jupiter's magnetosphere, (iv) on the basis of charged-particle measurements, apparent dragging of magnetic field lines at large radii in the dusk sector toward the tail, and (v) consistent outflow of megaelectron volt electrons and large-scale departures from corotation for nucleons.

  17. Magnetic reconnection in Saturn's magnetotail: A comprehensive magnetic field survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. W.; Jackman, C. M.; Thomsen, M. F.

    2016-04-01

    Reconnection within planetary magnetotails is responsible for locally energizing particles and changing the magnetic topology. Its role in terms of global magnetospheric dynamics can involve changing the mass and flux content of the magnetosphere. We have identified reconnection related events in spacecraft magnetometer data recorded during Cassini's exploration of Saturn's magnetotail. The events are identified from deflections in the north-south component of the magnetic field, significant above a background level. Data were selected to provide full tail coverage, encompassing the dawn and dusk flanks as well as the deepest midnight orbits. Overall 2094 reconnection related events were identified, with an average rate of 5.0 events per day. The majority of events occur in clusters (within 3 h of other events). We examine changes in this rate in terms of local time and latitude coverage, taking seasonal effects into account. The observed reconnection rate peaks postmidnight with more infrequent but steady loss seen on the dusk flank. We estimate the mass loss from the event catalog and find it to be insufficient to balance the input from the moon Enceladus. Several reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. The reconnection X line location appears to be highly variable, though a statistical separation between events tailward and planetward of the X line is observed at a radial distance of between 20 and 30RS downtail. The small sample size at dawn prevents comprehensive statistical comparison with the dusk flank observations in terms of flux closure.

  18. FORTRAN programs to process Magsat data for lithospheric, external field, and residual core components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsdorf, Douglas E.; Vonfrese, Ralph R. B.

    1994-01-01

    The FORTRAN programs supplied in this document provide a complete processing package for statistically extracting residual core, external field and lithospheric components in Magsat observations. To process the individual passes: (1) orbits are separated into dawn and dusk local times and by altitude, (2) passes are selected based on the variance of the magnetic field observations after a least-squares fit of the core field is removed from each pass over the study area, and (3) spatially adjacent passes are processed with a Fourier correlation coefficient filter to separate coherent and non-coherent features between neighboring tracks. In the second state of map processing: (1) data from the passes are normalized to a common altitude and gridded into dawn and dusk maps with least squares collocation, (2) dawn and dusk maps are correlated with a Fourier correlation efficient filter to separate coherent and non-coherent features; the coherent features are averaged to produce a total field grid, (3) total field grids from all altitudes are continued to a common altitude, correlation filtered for coherent anomaly features, and subsequently averaged to produce the final total field grid for the study region, and (4) the total field map is differentially reduced to the pole.

  19. Passive ranging redundancy reduction in diurnal weather conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jae H.; Abbott, A. Lynn; Szu, Harold H.

    2013-05-01

    Ambiguity in binocular ranging (David Marr's paradox) may be resolved by using two eyes moving from side to side behind an optical bench while integrating multiple views. Moving a head from left to right with one eye closed can also help resolve the foreground and background range uncertainty. That empirical experiment implies redundancy in image data, which may be reduced by adopting a 3-D camera imaging model to perform compressive sensing. Here, the compressive sensing concept is examined from the perspective of redundancy reduction in images subject to diurnal and weather variations for the purpose of resolving range uncertainty at all weather conditions such as the dawn or dusk, the daytime with different light level or the nighttime at different spectral band. As an example, a scenario at an intersection of a country road at dawn/dusk is discussed where the location of the traffic signs needs to be resolved by passive ranging to answer whether it is located on the same side of the road or the opposite side, which is under the influence of temporal light/color level variation. A spectral band extrapolation via application of Lagrange Constrained Neural Network (LCNN) learning algorithm is discussed to address lost color restoration at dawn/dusk. A numerical simulation is illustrated along with the code example.

  20. IMF dependence of energetic oxygen and hydrogen ion distributions in the near-Earth magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Kronberg, E. A.; Nykyri, K.; Trattner, K. J.; Daly, P. W.; Chen, G. X.; Du, A. M.; Ge, Y. S.

    2017-05-01

    Energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet can provide important information for understanding the entry of ions into the magnetosphere and their transportation, acceleration, and losses in the near-Earth region. In this study, 11 years of energetic proton and oxygen observations (> 274 keV) from Cluster/Research with Adaptive Particle Imaging Detectors were used to statistically study the energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth region. The dawn-dusk asymmetries of the distributions in three different regions (dayside magnetosphere, near-Earth nightside plasma sheet, and tail plasma sheet) are examined in Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The results show that the energetic ion distributions are influenced by the dawn-dusk interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction. The enhancement of ion intensity largely correlates with the location of the magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause. The results imply that substorm-related acceleration processes in the magnetotail are not the only source of energetic ions in the dayside and the near-Earth magnetosphere. Energetic ions delivered through reconnection at the magnetopause significantly affect the energetic ion population in the magnetosphere. We also believe that the influence of the dawn-dusk IMF direction should not be neglected in models of the particle population in the magnetosphere.

  1. IMF dependence of energetic oxygen and hydrogen ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hao; Kronberg, Elena; Nykyri, Katariina; Daly, Patrick; Chen, Gengxiong; Du, Aimin; Ge, Yasong

    2017-04-01

    Energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet can provide important information for understanding the entry of ions into the magnetosphere, and their transportation, acceleration, and losses in the near-Earth region. In this study, 11 years of energetic proton and oxygen observations (> 100 keV) from Cluster/RAPID were used to statistically study the energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth region. The dawn-dusk asymmetries of the distributions in three different regions (dayside magnetosphere, near-Earth nightside plasma sheet, and tail plasma sheet) are examined in northern and southern hemispheres. The results show that the energetic ion distributions are influenced by the dawn-dusk IMF direction. The enhancement of intensity largely correlates with the location of the magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause and the consequent formation of a diamagnetic cavity in the same quadrant of the magnetosphere. The results imply that substorm-related processes in the magnetotail are not the only source of energetic ions in the dayside and the near-Earth plasma sheet. We propose that large-scale cusp diamagnetic cavities can be an additional source and can thus significantly affect the energetic ion population in the magnetosphere. We also believe that the influence of the dawn-dusk IMF direction should not be neglected in models of the particle population in the magnetosphere.

  2. Defining Structure in Tongues of Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, C. M.; Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Knipp, D. J.

    2001-12-01

    The Utah State University (USU) Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) simulates the high latitude ionosphere for the storm study day of January 14, 1988, based upon inputs of electric field convection patterns using the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) technique. The quasi-steady state development of tongues of ionization (TOIs) emerges in the simulation at the peak of storm time forcing. A three-dimensional analysis of the structure of the TOIs is presented in this paper, with morphological features closely tied to convection pattern traits. An unambiguous bifurcated density pattern develops in the polar cap consisting of two independent TOIs, one related to the dusk convection cell and the other related to the dawn convection cell, with a narrow low density trough between them. This newly predicted feature is given the name Polar Dayside Upward Convecting Trough (Polar DUCT). The structural definition of the TOIs also includes a definite altitude profile along the extent of the high density plasma flowing into the polar cap. The height of the F-layer peak (NmF_2) in the extended TOI first rises dramatically at the point of entry into the cusp/throat region, then drops steadily as plasma approaches the pole. The altitude profiles of the dusk and dawn TOI are independent, with differences due to distinctions in the characteristics of the dawn and dusk convection cells.

  3. Solar wind influence on the Jovian inner magnetosphere observed by Hisaki/EXCEED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, G.; Yoshioka, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kimura, T.; Tao, C.; Kagitani, M.; Sakanoi, T.; Uemizu, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Yoshikawa, I.; Fujimoto, M.

    2015-12-01

    The dawn-dusk asymmetry of the Io plasma torus has been seen by several observations [e.g., Sandel and Broadfoot, 1982; Steffl et al., 2004]. Ip and Goertz [1983] explained this asymmetry can be caused by a dawn-to-dusk electric field in the Jupiter's inner magnetosphere. However, the question what physical process can impose such an electric field deep inside the strong magnetosphere still remains. The long-term monitoring of the Io plasma torus is a key observation to answer this question. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer EXCEED onboard the Hisaki satellite observed the Io plasma torus continuously during the two periods: from December 2013 to March 2014 and from November 2014 to May 2015. We found clear responses of the dawn-dusk asymmetry to rapid increases of the solar wind dynamic pressure. We statistically analyzed the relations between solar wind and IPT response. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of Io's volcanic activity, detected by Hisaki in January 2015, on the solar wind response of Jovian inner magnetosphere. We will report the initial results of this study.

  4. Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope determination of the Io torus electron temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. T.; Bednar, C. J.; Durrance, S. T.; Feldman, P. D.; Mcgrath, M. A.; Moos, H. W.; Strobel, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    Sulfur ion emissions from the Io plasma torus observed by the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) in 1990 December have been analyzed to determine the effective temperature of the exciting electrons. Spectra were obtained with a long slit that extended from 3.1 to 8.7 Jupiter radii R(sub J) on both dawn and dusk torus ansae. The average temperature of electrons exciting S(2+) emissions from the dawn ansa is (4800 +/- 2400) K lower than on the dusk ansa, a dawn-dusk asymmetry comparable in both sign and magnitude to that measured by the Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) experiment. Emissions from S(2+) ions are generated in a source region with electron temperatures in the range 32,000-56,000 K; S(3+) ion emissions are excited by electrons that average 20,000-40,000 K hotter. This distinct difference suggests that the S(3+) emission source region is spatially separate from the S(2+) source region. Estimated relative aperture filling factors suggest that the S(3+) emissions originate from a region more extended out of the centrifugal plane than the S(2+) emissions.

  5. System III variations in apparent distance of Io plasma torus from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessler, A. J.; Sandel, B. R.

    1992-01-01

    System III variations in apparent distance of the Io plasma torus from Jupiter are examined on the basis of data obtained from UVS scans across Jupiter's satellite system. The displacement of the dawn and dusk ansae are found to be unexpectedly complex. The displacements are unequal and both ansae are in motion with the motion of the approaching ansa being the lesser of the two. The radial motions, as measured from either the center of Jupiter or the offset-tilted dipole, are of unequal magnitude and have the System III periodicity. It is concluded that the cross-tail electric field that causes these torus motions is concentrated on the dusk ansa, varied with the System III period, and shows magnetic-anomaly phase control. It is found that the dawn-dust asymmetry in brightness is not explained simply by the cross-tail electric field. It is concluded that there is a heating mechanism that causes the dusk side of the Io plasma torus to be brighter than the dawn side.

  6. Energetic charged-particle phenomena in the Jovian magnetosphere - First results from the Ulysses COSPIN collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Anglin, J. D.; Balogh, A.; Burrows, J. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Ferrando, P.; Heber, B.; Hynds, R. J.; Kunow, H.; Marsden, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft made the first exploration of the region of Jupiter's magnetosphere at high Jovigraphic latitudes on the dusk side and reached higher magnetic latitudes on the day side than any previous mission to Jupiter. The cosmic and solar particle investigations (COSPIN) instrumentation achieved a remarkably well integrated set of observations of energetic charged particles in the energy ranges of about 1 to 170 megaelectron volts for electrons and 0.3 to 20 megaelectron volts for protons and heavier nuclei. The new findings include an apparent polar cap region in the northern hemisphere in which energetic charged particles following Jovian magnetic field lines may have direct access to the interplanetary medium; high-energy electron bursts on the dusk side that are apparently associated with field-aligned currents and radio burst emissions; persistence of the global 10-hour relativistic electron 'clock' phenomenon throughout Jupiter's magnetosphere; on the basis of charged-particle measurements, apparent dragging of magnetic field lines at large radii in the dusk sector toward the tail; and consistent outflow of megaelectron volt electrons and large-scale departures from corotation for nucleons.

  7. MMS FEEPS Energetic Electron Microinjection Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennell, J. F.; Turner, D. L.; Lemon, C.; Jaynes, A. N.; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Spence, H. E.; Mauk, B.; Baker, D. N.; Cohen, I. J.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    The early MMS energetic electron data taken in the dusk to pre midnight regions above 9 RE showed many clusters of electron injections we call microinjections because of their short duration signatures. These microinjections of 50-400 keV electrons have energy dispersion signatures indicating that they gradient and curvature drifted from earlier local times. A particular cluster of about 40 electron microinjections occurred in a 4.5-hour interval starting at 21:15 UT on 6 August 2015. We show detailed results from microinjections taken with burst mode data starting near 21:16 UT. These high temporal resolution data showed that the electrons in the microinjections were trapped and had bidirectional field-aligned angular distributions. Drift calculations constrained by the observed electron dispersion times indicate the electrons had drifted from near the magnetopause approximately two hours earlier in local time. Many multiple clusters of microinjections were observed as MMS apogee traversed the premidnight to dusk region. They were not observed as the MMS apogee passed from dusk through the dayside regions. Later, as the MMS apogee once again moved through the midnight to pre midnight region, during mission phase 1X, injections were once again observed. We provide statistics on the occurrence of the injections and discuss possible implications. These injection clusters are a new phenomenon in this region of the magnetosphere.

  8. Auditory sensitivity of an acoustic parasitoid (Emblemasoma sp., Sarcophagidae, Diptera) and the calling behavior of potential hosts

    PubMed Central

    Farris, H.E.; Oshinsky, M.; Forrest, T.G.; Hoy, R.R.

    2009-01-01

    Using field broadcasts of model male calling songs, we tested whether Tibicen pruinosa and T. chloromera (Homoptera: Cicadidae) are candidate hosts for acoustic parasitoid flies. The model calling song of T. pruinosa attracted 90% of the flies (Sarcophagidae: Emblemasoma sp.; all larvapositing females) when broadcast simultaneously with the model T. chloromera song, a phonotactic bias reconfirmed in single song playbacks. In paired broadcasts of model T. pruinosa songs with different relative amplitudes (3 dB or 6 dB), significantly more flies were attracted to the more powerful song, a result consistent with the responses predicted by a model proposed by Forrest and Raspet [1994]. Using intracellular recordings and dye injections, we characterized the sensitivity of auditory units in sound-trapped flies. Intracellular recordings from six auditory units (5 interneurons, 1 afferent) revealed best sensitivity for frequencies near 3-4 kHz, matching the predominant spectral components of the calling songs of both species of cicada. Interestingly, although flies could be attracted to T. pruinosa broadcasts throughout the day, hourly censuses of singing males revealed that calling occurred exclusively at dusk. Furthermore, the duration of the dusk chorus in T. pruinosa was significantly shorter than the midday chorus of the less attractive song of T. chloromera. We propose that the tight temporal aggregation of the dusk chorus time could function to reduce risk from attracted parasitoids. PMID:18560209

  9. A numerical modeling study of the interaction between the tides and the circulation forced by high-latitude plasma convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, I. S.; Larsen, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    A spectral, time-varying thermospheric general circulation model has been used to study the nonlinear interaction at high latitudes between the tides propagating into the thermosphere from below and the circulation induced by magnetospheric forcing and in situ solar heating. The model is discrete in the vertical with 27 layers spaced by half a scale height. In the horizontal, the fields are expanded in a series of spherical harmonics using a triangular truncation at wave number 31, equivalent to a homogeneous global resolution with a minimum wavelength of 1270 km. A hypothetical uniform grid point model would require a horizontal spacing of 417 km to describe the same minimum wavelength. In the high-latitude F region the tides affect the dusk vortex of the neutral flow very little, but the dawn vortex is either suppressed or amplified dependent upon the universal time and tidal phase. In the E region neutral flow, both the dusk and dawn vortices are shifted in local time by the tides, again as a function of universal time and tidal phase. At dusk a nonlinear amplification of the sunward winds occurs for certain combinations of parameters, and at dawn the winds may be completely suppressed. Below 120 km altitude the magnetospheric forcing creates a single cyclonic vortex which is also sensitive to the high-latitude tidal structure.

  10. A numerical modeling study of the interaction between the tides and the circulation forced by high-latitude plasma convection

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, I.S. ); Larsen, M.F. )

    1991-02-01

    A spectral, time-varying thermospheric general circulation model has been used to study the nonlinear interaction at high latitudes between the tides propagating into the thermosphere from below and the circulation induced by magnetospheric forcing and in situ solar heating. The model is discrete in the vertical with 27 layers spaced by half a scale height. In the horizontal, the fields are expanded in a series of spherical harmonics using a triangular truncation at wave number 31, equivalent to a homogeneous global resolution with a minimum wavelength of 1,270 km. A hypothetical uniform grid point model would require a horizontal spacing of 417 km to describe the same minimum wavelength. In the high-latitude F region the tides affect the dusk vortex of the neutral flow very little, but the dawn vortex is either suppressed or amplified dependent upon the universal time and tidal phase. In the E region neutral flow, both the dusk and dawn vortices are shifted in local time by the tides, again as a function of universal time and tidal phase. At dusk a nonlinear amplification of the sunward winds occurs for certain combination of parameters, and at dawn the winds may be completely suppressed. Below 120 km altitude the magnetospheric forcing creates a single cyclonic vortex which is also sensitive to the high-latitude tidal structure.

  11. Two encounters with the flank low-latitude boundary layer - Further evidence for closed field topology and investigation of the internal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traver, D. P.; Mitchell, D. G.; Williams, D. J.; Frank, L. A.; Huang, C. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the flank low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) is examined through differential energy spectra and particle angular anisotropies for traversals of the dawn flank (December 19, 1977) and dusk flank (July 7, 1978) during periods of predominantly northward magnetosheath field orientation. Spectra are presented that were obtained from combined ISEE 1 low-energy-proton and electron-differential-energy-analyzer and medium-energy-particle-instrument data extending over the 200-eV/q to 2-MeV energy range for the plasma sheet, stagnation region, outer LLBL, and magnetosheath regions. The stagnation region and the outer LLBL are each a mixture of plasma-sheet and magnetosheath populations, but the stagnation region contains a relatively higher fraction of plasma sheet particles, consistent with its placement earthward of the outer LLBL. Evidence for energization of thermal electrons appears during the dusk flank crossing. Bidirectional field-aligned ion distributions are observed with typically 5-to-1 enhancement of the flux along the magnetic field during certain portions of the dusk flank crossing.

  12. Electrodynamic Context of Magnetotail and Magnetopause Dynamics Observed by Magnetospheric Multiscal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Waters, C. L.; Barnes, R. J.; Samara, M.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Plaschke, F.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Merkin, V. G.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Torbert, R. B.; Leinweber, H. K.; Le, G.; Bromund, K. R.; Chutter, M.; Slavin, J. A.; Kepko, L.; Le Contel, O.; Mauk, B.; Westlake, J. H.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    After successful launch and deployment on 14 March 2015, the four Magnetosphere Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft were commissioned during the first local time precession of the orbit line of apsides across the magnetotail from dawn to dusk. Prime science observations began in September 2015 when orbit apogee had moved to the dusk sector at magnetopause distances. Signatures of magnetotail dynamics were observed during payload and fleet commissioning. The electrodynamic context of the magnetotail events at MMS as well as observations at the dusk and afternoon magnetopause is assessed using correlative observations from low Earth orbit and ground-based instruments including the Active Magnetosphere and Polar Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE), SuperMAG, and SuperDARN. Substorm current onsets are prevalent in AMPERE data and are highly correlated with magnetotail injections and dipolarizations observed by MMS. To better constrain how the MMS magnetotail observations are related to global processes, we also examine the occurrence and prevalence of similar ionospheric onset signatures when MMS was at high altitudes in the magnetotail but observed no local signatures of injections or dipolarizations. For MMS magnetopause observations, we explore the relationship of magnetic reconnection signatures at MMS with the convection patterns derived from AMPERE and ionosphere observations to establish the relationship of the local MMS observations and global magnetospheric convective state.

  13. Conjugate Observations of EMIC Waves and Precipitation of Relativistic Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dedong; Shprits, Yuri; Yuan, Zhigang; Yu, Xiongdong; Huang, Shiyong

    2017-04-01

    Utilizing data from NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-12 and low-altitude Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES)-15, a well-conjugate observation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves and precipitation of ring current ions and relativistic electrons is reported. This event took place in periods without geomagnetic storms at near 21:30 on June 19, 2008. During this interval, GOES-12 observed EMIC waves at geosynchronous orbit in dusk Magnetic Local Time (MLT) sector. Conjugately, low-altitude NOAA POES-15 observed precipitation of ring current ions and relativistic electrons. To our knowledge, this is the best conjugated observation from satellites to illustrate EMIC wave-driven Relativistic Electron Precipitation (REP) in the MLT dusk sector during non-storm periods. The REP was observed by POES-15 at the same L (the radial distance in the equatorial plane under dipolar geomagnetic model) and MLT as where EMIC waves were observed by GOES-12, and the projections along the geomagnetic field line of NOAA GOES-12 and POES-15 at the altitude of 100 km above the Earth are nearly at the same geomagnetic latitude and longitude (△MLAT 0.7°, △MLong 0.6°). The diffusion coefficients of relativistic electrons by the EMIC waves are also calculated. This event suggests that, during the periods without geomagnetic storms, EMIC waves can also cause the loss of ring current ions and relativistic electrons through pitch-angle scattering in the dusk sector.

  14. Conjugate Observations of EMIC Waves and Precipitation of Relativistic Electrons by GOES and NOAA POES Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves are believed to be able to pitch-angle scatter ring current ions and relativistic electrons leading to the precipitation of them. Utilizing data from GOES and NOAA Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), a conjugate observation of EMIC waves and precipitation of ring current ions and relativistic electrons is found. This event took place under quiet geomagnetic conditions. During this interval, GOES satellite observed EMIC waves at geosynchronous orbit in dusk MLT sector. Conjugately, during this interval, low-altitude NOAA POES satellite observed precipitation of ring current ions and relativistic electrons. To our knowledge, this is the best conjugated observation by satellites to illustrate EMIC wave-driven Relativistic Electron Precipitation (REP) in the Magnetic Local Time (MLT) dusk sector. The REP was observed by NOAA POES at the same L and MLT as where EMIC wave was observed by GOES, and the projections of GOES and NOAA POES on the Earth along the geomagnetic field line are nearly at the same geomagnetic latitude and longitude (△MLAT 0.7°, △MLong 0.6°). This event suggests that, during the quiet geomagnetic conditions, EMIC waves can also cause the loss of ring current ions and relativistic electrons through pitch-angle scattering in the dusk sector.

  15. System III variations in apparent distance of Io plasma torus from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessler, A. J.; Sandel, B. R.

    1992-01-01

    System III variations in apparent distance of the Io plasma torus from Jupiter are examined on the basis of data obtained from UVS scans across Jupiter's satellite system. The displacement of the dawn and dusk ansae are found to be unexpectedly complex. The displacements are unequal and both ansae are in motion with the motion of the approaching ansa being the lesser of the two. The radial motions, as measured from either the center of Jupiter or the offset-tilted dipole, are of unequal magnitude and have the System III periodicity. It is concluded that the cross-tail electric field that causes these torus motions is concentrated on the dusk ansa, varied with the System III period, and shows magnetic-anomaly phase control. It is found that the dawn-dust asymmetry in brightness is not explained simply by the cross-tail electric field. It is concluded that there is a heating mechanism that causes the dusk side of the Io plasma torus to be brighter than the dawn side.

  16. Comparison of the dynamics and structure of Saturn and Jupiter magnetospheres: camshaft, magnetic anomalies and corotating convection models compared.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southwood, D. J.; Kivelson, M. G.

    Scenarios are presented for the overall flux and mass circulation in the jovian and saturnian magnetospheres It is argued that similar fundamanetal processes underly the dynamical processes at both planets However the differences in parameter regime for the two systems leads to substantial resulting differences in morphology Transport is accomplished from the inner magnetosphere by interchange motion which then feeds into the outer magnetosphere where ballooning driven by centrifugal stress leads to field reconnection and plasma loss It seems likely that Jupiter loses much more material per rotation cycle than Saturn and is possibly much more symmetrically loaded in respect of planetary longitude Material loss and flux return at Jupiter have fixed orientations in local time early evening and morning sector respectively and newly returned flux is probably responsible for the morningside cushion region in the outer magnetosphere At Jupiter the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the current sheet thin in morning thick in afternoon is also a dominant feature At Saturn there seems no evidence of a cushion region flux return is thought to take place sporadically over much of the nightside Although definitive statements about the dusk plasma sheet await the orbit evolution of Cassini a fundamental observational feature in the Saturnian context is a planetary rotation induced magnetic field asymmetry which argues against major dawn-dusk asymmetry We propose the rotational feature could originate from a localized ionospheric magnetic anomaly The

  17. Magnetic reconnection in Saturn's magnetotail: A comprehensive magnetic field survey.

    PubMed

    Smith, A W; Jackman, C M; Thomsen, M F

    2016-04-01

    Reconnection within planetary magnetotails is responsible for locally energizing particles and changing the magnetic topology. Its role in terms of global magnetospheric dynamics can involve changing the mass and flux content of the magnetosphere. We have identified reconnection related events in spacecraft magnetometer data recorded during Cassini's exploration of Saturn's magnetotail. The events are identified from deflections in the north-south component of the magnetic field, significant above a background level. Data were selected to provide full tail coverage, encompassing the dawn and dusk flanks as well as the deepest midnight orbits. Overall 2094 reconnection related events were identified, with an average rate of 5.0 events per day. The majority of events occur in clusters (within 3 h of other events). We examine changes in this rate in terms of local time and latitude coverage, taking seasonal effects into account. The observed reconnection rate peaks postmidnight with more infrequent but steady loss seen on the dusk flank. We estimate the mass loss from the event catalog and find it to be insufficient to balance the input from the moon Enceladus. Several reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. The reconnection X line location appears to be highly variable, though a statistical separation between events tailward and planetward of the X line is observed at a radial distance of between 20 and 30RS downtail. The small sample size at dawn prevents comprehensive statistical comparison with the dusk flank observations in terms of flux closure.

  18. Magnetotail fast flow statistics near lunar orbit by ARTEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiehas, Stefan; Runov, Andrei; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2016-07-01

    We use five years (2011-2015) of ARTEMIS data to statistically investigate earthward and tailward flows at around 60 RE downtail. We find that a significant portion of fast flows is directed earthward. Depending on the flow speed, the earthward directed flows contribute by 43% (flows > 400 km/s) to 53% (flows > 100 km/s) to the observed flows. This contribution reduces with increasing flow speed. Also for times of an enhanced AE index (AE > 600), earthward flows contribute to about 50 % to the totally observed flows. As expected, earthward (tailward) flows are predominantly accompanied with positive (negative) Bz. A dawn-dusk asymmetry in the flow occurrence is seen for both earthward and tailward flows with about 50%-60% (60%-70%) of the earthward (tailward) flows occurring in the dusk sector. This asymmetry is more dominant for tailward than for earthward flows and increases slightly with higher flow speeds. Considering only the flow component perpendicular to the magnetic field, the portion of earthward flows reduces to about 30%-40%, depending on the flow speed. The dawn-dusk asymmetry is also seen in this perpendicular flows. We conclude that earthward flows contribute significantly to the totally observed magnetotail flows near lunar orbit. The question arises if the source of these flows is a distant X-line based on classical substorm models, or if several X-lines on various locations in the magnetotail are responsible for these flows.

  19. Evolution and characteristics of global Pc5 ULF waves during a high solar wind speed interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, I. J.; Donovan, E. F.; Mann, I. R.; Fenrich, F. R.; Watt, C. E. J.; Milling, D. K.; Lester, M.; Lavraud, B.; Wild, J. A.; Singer, H. J.; RèMe, H.; Balogh, A.

    2005-12-01

    We present an interval of extremely long-lasting narrow-band Pc5 pulsations during the recovery phase of a large geomagnetic storm. These pulsations occurred continuously for many hours and were observed throughout the magnetosphere and in the dusk-sector ionosphere. The subject of this paper is the favorable radial alignment of the Cluster, Polar, and geosynchronous satellites in the dusk sector during a 3-hour subset of this interval that allows extensive analysis of the global nature of the pulsations and the tracing of their energy transfer from the solar wind to the ground. Virtually monochromatic large-amplitude pulsations were observed by the CANOPUS magnetometer chain at dusk for several hours, during which the Cluster spacecraft constellation traversed the dusk magnetopause. The solar wind conditions were very steady, the solar wind speed was fast, and time series analysis of the solar wind dynamic pressure shows no significant power concentrated in the Pc5 band. The pulsations are observed in both geosynchronous electron and magnetic field data over a wide range of local times while Cluster is in the vicinity of the magnetopause providing clear evidence of boundary oscillations with the same periodicity as the ground and geosynchronous pulsations. Furthermore, the Polar spacecraft crossed the equatorial dusk magnetosphere outside of geosynchronous orbit (L ˜ 6-9) and observed significant electric and magnetic perturbations around the same quasi-stable central frequency (1.4-1.6 mHz). The Poynting vector observed by the Polar spacecraft associated with these pulsations has strong field-aligned oscillations, as expected for standing Alfvén waves, as well as a nonzero azimuthal component, indicating a downtail component to the energy propagation. In the ionosphere, ground-based magnetometers observed signatures characteristic of a field-line resonance, and HF radars observed flows as a direct consequence of the energy input. We conclude that the most

  20. Ionospheric vertical drift response at a mid-latitude station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouba, Daniel; Koucká Knížová, Petra

    2016-07-01

    Vertical plasma drift data measured at a mid-latitude ionospheric station Pruhonice (50.0 ° N, 14.6 ° E) were collected and analysed for the year 2006, a year of low solar and geomagnetic activity. Hence these data provide insight into the drift behaviour during quiet conditions. The following typical diurnal trend is evident: a significant decay to negative values (downward peak) at dawn; generally less pronounced downward peak at dusk hours. Magnitude of the downward drift varies during the year. Typically it reaches values about 20 ms-1 at dawn hours and 10 ms-1 at dusk hours. Maximum dawn magnitude of about 40 ms-1 has been detected in August. During daytime the vertical drifts increases from the initial small downward drifts to zero drift around noon and to small upward drifts in the afternoon. Night-time drift values display large variability around a near zero vertical drift average. There is a significant trend to larger downward drift values near dawn and a less pronounced decrease of the afternoon upward vertical drifts near sunset. Two regular downward peaks of the drift associated with the dawn and dusk are general characteristics of the analysed data throughout the year 2006. Their seasonal course corresponds to the seasonal course of the sunrise and sunset. The duration of prevailing negative drift velocities forming these peaks and thus the influence of the dawn/dusk on the drift velocity is mostly 1.5-3 h. The dawn effect on vertical drift tends to be larger than the effect of the dusk. The observed magnitude of the sunrise and sunset peaks show significant annual course. The highest variability of the magnitude is seen during winter. High variability is detected till March equinox and again after September equinox. Around solstice, both peaks reaches lowest values. After that, the magnitudes of the drift velocity increase smoothly till maxima in summer (August). The vertical drift velocity course is smooth between June solstice and September

  1. Magnetic Field Observations of Partial Ring Current during Storm Recovery Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan; Russell, C. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Lucek, E. A.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of an extensive survey of the magnetic field observations in the inner magnetosphere using 30 years of magnetospheric magnetic field data from Polar, Cluster, ISEE, and AMPTE/CCE missions. The purpose of this study is to understand the magnetic field evolution during the recovery phase of geomagnetic storms, and its implication to the ring current recovery and loss mechanisms of ring current particles. Our previous work on global ring current distribution [Le et al., 2004] has shown that a significant partial ring current is always present at all Dst levels (regardless of storm phases) even for quiet time ring current. The total current carried by the partial ring current is much stronger than (during stormtime) or at least comparable to (during quiet time) the symmetric ring current. It is now commonly believed that a strong partial ring current is formed during the storm main phase due to the enhanced earthward convection of energetic ions from nightside plasma sheet. But the presence of a strong partial ring current throughout the recovery phase remains controversial. The magnetic field generated by the ring current inflates the inner magnetosphere and causes magnetic field depressions in the equatorial magnetosphere. During the storm recovery phase, we find that the distribution of the equatorial magnetic field depression exhibits similar local time dependence as the ring current distribution obtained from the combined dataset in the earlier study. It shows that a strong partial ring current is a permanent feature throughout the recovery phase. In the early recovery phase, the partial ring current peaks near the dusk terminator as indicated by the peak of the magnetic field depression. As the recovery phase progresses, the partial ring current decays most quickly near the dusk and results in a dusk-to-midnight moving of the peak of the partial ring current. Thus the loss mechanisms work most effectively near the dusk. The magnetic field

  2. Patterns of daily flight activity in onitine dung beetles (Scarabaeinae: Onitini).

    PubMed

    Caveney, Stanley; Scholtz, Clarke H; McIntyre, Peter

    1995-09-01

    Different species of African dung beetles emerge from the soil at characteristic times of the day to fly and colonize the freshly-deposited dung of mammalian herbivores. Onitine dung beetles in their natural habitat displayed one of five distinctive daily flight behaviours: dusk crepuscular (Onitis alexis Klug, O. caffer Boheman, O. fulgidus Klug, O. tortuosus Houston, O. vanderkelleni Lansberge, O. westermanni Lansberge); dusk/dawn crepuscular (O. pecuarius Lansberge and O. viridulus Boheman); dusk/dawn crepuscular and nocturnal (O. aygulus (Fabricius), O. mendax Gillet, O. uncinatus Klug); late afternoon-dusk and dawn-early morning [Heteronitis castelnaui (Harold)]; or diurnal flight activity [O. belial (Fabricius), O. ion (Olivier)]. These diagnostic daily flight behaviours span a light intensity range of over 6 orders of magnitude and have been retained in selected species introduced into Australia. Ambient light intensity appears to be the primary determinant of the daily flight period in onitine dung beetles. Because the dung of mobile herbivores is rapidly exploited by onitine species for feeding and breeding purposes, different flight behaviours result in a spatial and temporal partitioning of species in the local dung beetle community. The timing of flight may contribute to, or lead to avoidance of, competition between species which may ultimately affect colonization success. Many onitines show a strong preference for dung of specific herbivores, which may further reduce interspecific competition. All crepuscular-nocturnal species examined raised their thoracic temperatures endothermically to between 35°C and 40°C before the onset of flight. In O. aygulus the thoracic temperature excess was as large as 19.3°C. The thermal threshold below which the frequency of flight onsets drops off rapidly is about 12°C for O. aygulus and 17°C for O. alexis and O. pecuarius. Radiant loss of body heat during cool nights and dawns may explain why smaller species (<0

  3. Turbulence in a Global Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of the Earth's Magnetosphere during Northward and Southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Alaoui, M.; Richard, R. L.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Walker, R. J.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of MHD simulations of Earth's magnetosphere for idealized steady solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The simulations feature purely northward and southward magnetic fields and were designed to study turbulence in the magnetotail plasma sheet. We found that the power spectral densities (PSDs) for both northward and southward IMF had the characteristics of turbulent flow. In both cases, the PSDs showed the three scale ranges expected from theory: the energy-containing scale, the inertial range, and the dissipative range. The results were generally consistent with in-situ observations and theoretical predictions. While the two cases studied, northward and southward IMF, had some similar characteristics, there were significant differences as well. For southward IMF, localized reconnection was the main energy source for the turbulence. For northward IMF, remnant reconnection contributed to driving the turbulence. Boundary waves may also have contributed. In both cases, the PSD slopes had spatial distributions in the dissipative range that reflected the pattern of resistive dissipation. For southward IMF there was a trend toward steeper slopes in the dissipative range with distance down the tail. For northward IMF there was a marked dusk-dawn asymmetry with steeper slopes on the dusk side of the tail. The inertial scale PSDs had a dusk-dawn symmetry during the northward IMF interval with steeper slopes on the dawn side. This asymmetry was not found in the distribution of inertial range slopes for southward IMF. The inertial range PSD slopes were clustered around values close to the theoretical expectation for both northward and southward IMF. In the dissipative range, however, the slopes were broadly distributed and the median values were significantly different, consistent with a different distribution of resistivity.

  4. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Wave by Low-Altitude Space Technology 5 Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three-microsatellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km dawn-dusk and Sun-synchronous polar orbit with 105.6deg inclination angle. Because of the Earth's rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft's dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse the dayside closed field line region at subauroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc2-3 frequency range. These Pc2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 min. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 min, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that these unique Pc2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-dusk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field line resonances.

  5. Improving car drivers' perception of motorcycle motion through innovative headlight configurations.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Viola; Ranchet, Maud; Pinto, Maria; Espié, Stéphane; Vienne, Fabrice; Dang, Nguyen-Thong

    2015-08-01

    The most frequent cause of motorcycle accidents occurs when another vehicle violates the motorcycle's right-of-way at an intersection. In addition to detection errors, misperception of the approaching motorcycle's speed and time-to-arrival is another driver error that accounts for these accidents, although this error has been studied less often. Such misperceptions have been shown to be related to the small size of motorcycles and to their small angular velocity when approaching. In two experiments we tested the impact of different motorcycle headlight configurations in various ambient lighting conditions (daytime, dusk, and nighttime). The participants drove on a driving simulator and had to turn left across a line of vehicles composed of motorcycles and cars. The motorcycles were approaching at different speeds and were equipped with either a "standard" headlight, a "horizontal" configuration (added to the standard headlight were two lights on the rearview mirrors so as to visually increase the horizontal dimension of the motorcycle), a "vertical" configuration (one light on the rider's helmet and two lights on the fork were added to the standard headlight so as to increase the vertical dimension of the motorcycle), or a "combined" configuration (combining the horizontal and vertical configurations). The findings of the first experiment in nighttime conditions indicated that both the vertical and combined configurations significantly increased the gap car drivers accepted with respect to the motorcycle as compared to the standard configuration, and that the accepted gaps did not differ significantly from those accepted for cars. The advantage of the vertical and combined configurations showed up especially when the motorcycle's approach speed was high. The findings of the second experiment in dusk and daytime conditions indicated similar patterns, but the headlight-configuration effect was less pronounced at dusk, and nonsignificant during the day. The results

  6. Observation of magnetopause fluctuations during a Cluster-THEMIS conjunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Kyoung-Joo; Goldstein, Mevlyn

    On April 27, 2007, THEMIS observed quasi-periodic magnetopause fluctuations for a prolonged time period (9 hrs) as they skimmed the dusk-side magnetopause, while Cluster detected 1.5-hour-long boundary undulations as they traversed the morning-side magnetopause. The com-parison between Cluster and THEMIS with ACE data implies that: 1) Similar periodicity and patterns of its variability between Cluster and THEMIS observations, with a certain time in-terval longer than is expected from the upstream magnetosheath travel time between THEMIS and Cluster locations, indicate that the dusk-side surface waves have been excited at the nearly subsolar region; 2) The complicated inner-LLBL fluctuations observed by THEMIS have been resulted from the development and modulation of the waves according to the local environment during convection along the LLBL, while Cluster observed the magnetopause fluctuations that appear to be more explicitly controlled by SW variations in the morning sector; 3) The intensity of KHW, often well characterized by Bm power spectra reflect the effects of IMF conditions, exhibiting a correlation with SW temperature and IMF clock angle, i.e., a more solid power law when IMF points due north or south rather than due dawn or dusk; 4) Steeper wavefront at the anti-sunward/sunward edge of KHW during southward/northward IMF support more rapid and turbulent evolution of KHW under southward IMF conditions [Hwang et al., 2010; Kuznetsova et al., 2008], and the steepening effects of the curvature forces of the magnetosheath flux tubes during northward IMF [Chen et al., 1997].

  7. Simulating the effect of centrifugal forces in rapidly rotating magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, M. F.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Walker, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    Centrifugal forces play an important role in the dynamics of rapidly rotating magnetospheres such as Jupiter and Saturn. For example, at Jupiter, centrifugal stresses are thought to be the dominant factor in driving the release of mass and energy from the system. It has also been proposed that the effects of rotation and field line stretching can explain local time asymmetries in the thickness of Jupiter's plasma sheet. Observations show that Jupiter's plasma sheet is thinnest in the post-midnight to dawn local time sectors, thickens as it rotates through the morning sector through noon, and becomes thickest near dusk. Kivelson and Southwood [2005] attributed the dusk side plasma sheet heating and thickening to centrifugal forces due to Jupiter's rapid rotation, suggesting that as a result of rotation, low energy particles gain parallel velocity as they move radially outward, and the resulting anisotropy makes the plasma sheet become unstable. We have developed a large-scale kinetic (LSK) simulation [Ashour-Abdalla et al., 1992] to test the key physical processes in this idea that rotation and field line stretching can produce an increase in net energy and particle anisotropy. In this simulation the Jovian magnetic field is represented by a simplified, axisymmetric version of the Khurana [1997] field, which we vary in time to reproduce the stretching that occurs as field lines rotate from noon to dusk. Here we will present the most recent results from this simulation project. Because we are testing only the key physical processes, our findings should help us understand the effects of rapid rotation and centrifugal stresses at both Jupiter and Saturn.

  8. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Wave by Low-Altitude Space Technology 5 Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three-microsatellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km dawn-dusk and Sun-synchronous polar orbit with 105.6deg inclination angle. Because of the Earth's rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft's dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse the dayside closed field line region at subauroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc2-3 frequency range. These Pc2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 min. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 min, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that these unique Pc2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-dusk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field line resonances.

  9. Diel rhythmicity in amino acid uptake by Prochlorococcus.

    PubMed

    Mary, Isabelle; Garczarek, Laurence; Tarran, Glen A; Kolowrat, Christian; Terry, Matthew J; Scanlan, David J; Burkill, Peter H; Zubkov, Mikhail V

    2008-08-01

    The marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus, the most abundant phototrophic organism on Earth, numerically dominates the phytoplankton in nitrogen (N)-depleted oceanic gyres. Alongside inorganic N sources such as nitrite and ammonium, natural populations of this genus also acquire organic N, specifically amino acids. Here, we investigated using isotopic tracer and flow cytometric cell sorting techniques whether amino acid uptake by Prochlorococcus is subject to a diel rhythmicity, and if so, whether this was linked to a specific cell cycle stage. We observed, in contrast to diurnally similar methionine uptake rates by Synechococcus cells, obvious diurnal rhythms in methionine uptake by Prochlorococcus cells in the tropical Atlantic. These rhythms were confirmed using reproducible cyclostat experiments with a light-synchronized axenic Prochlorococcus (PCC9511 strain) culture and (35)S-methionine and (3)H-leucine tracers. Cells acquired the tracers at lower rates around dawn and higher rates around dusk despite >10(4) times higher concentration of ammonium in the medium, presumably because amino acids can be directly incorporated into protein. Leucine uptake rates by cells in the S+G(2) cell cycle stage were consistently 2.2 times higher than those of cells at the G(1) stage. Furthermore, S+G(2) cells upregulated amino acid uptake 3.5 times from dawn to dusk to boost protein synthesis prior to cell division. Because Prochlorococcus populations can account from 13% at midday to 42% at dusk of total microbial uptake of methionine and probably of other amino acids in N-depleted oceanic waters, this genus exerts diurnally variable, strong competitive pressure on other bacterioplankton populations.

  10. Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices around the magnetotail and cold plasma sheet formation: Insight as a multiscale phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Masaki N.; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Masaki; Mukai, Toshifumi; Saito, Yoshifumi; Reme, Henri; Retino, Alessandro; Nakamura, Rumi; Lucek, Elizabeth

    The magnetopause of the Earth's magnetosphere is a key region in magnetospheric physics, especially in the sense of multiscale coupling from global large-scale phenomena to microscale physics. The velocity shear across the magnetopause is believed to cause Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) on both the dawn and dusk sides when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) points northward; magnetic reconnection and some secondary instabilities are likely to occur in the vortical structure induced by KHI and to play a significant role in solar wind entry across the magnetopause as well as plasma mixing there. This is a manifestation of multiscale coupling; that is, large-scale KH instability may induce micro-scale phenomenon in the rolled-up vortices and resultant formation of the cold plasma sheet in a wide region of the near-Earth magnetotail. Here we show a nice simultaneous measurement of solar wind entry associated with KHI on both sides of the magnetosphere under prolonged northward IMF. In the event that we have found, Cluster on the dawnside and Geotail on the duskside had an opportunity to stay around the magnetopause simultaneously on the opposite side to each other for more than several hours. Proton distribution function on the magnetosphere side of the magnetopause presents dawn-dusk asymmetry, which means that different plasma mixing processes are actually taking place on both sides. Using the Grad-Shafranov reconstruction (GSR) technique that can visualize ambient plasma and field around spacecraft, we clarify that vortical structures due to KHI indeed developed on both sides. These observations and reconstruction analysis suggest that vortical structures induced by KHI result in dawn-dusk asymmetry of plasma mixing around the magnetopause and formation of the cold plasma sheet in a wide region of the near-Earth magnetotail.

  11. Observations of Thermospheric Horizontal Winds at Watson Lake, Yukon Territory (lambda=65 Deg N)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niciejewski, R. J.; Killeen, T. L.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1996-01-01

    Fabry-Perot interferometer observations of the thermospheric O I (6300 A) emission have been conducted from an airglow observatory at a dark field site in the southeastern Yukon Territory, Canada, for the period November 1991 to April 1993. The experiment operated in unattended, remote fashion, has resulted in a substantial data set from which mean neutral winds have been determined. Dependent upon geomagnetic activity, the nocturnal location of the site is either equatorward of the auroral oval or within oval boundaries. The data set is rich enough to permit hourly binning of neutral winds based upon the K(sub p) geomagnetic disturbance index as well as the season. For cases of low geomagnetic activity the averaged vector horizontal neutral wind exhibits the characteristics of a midlatitude site displaying antisunward pressure-gradient-driven winds. As the geomagnetic activity rises in the late afternoon and evening winds slowly rotate sunward in an anticlockwise direction, initially remaining near 100 m/s in speed but eventually increasing to 300 m/s for K(sub p) greater than 5. For the higher levels of activity the observed neutral wind flow pattern resembles a higher-latitude polar cap pattern characterized by ion drag forcing of thermospheric neutral gases. In addition, rotational Coriolis forcing on the dusk side enhances the ion drag forcing, resulting in dusk winds which trace out the clockwise dusk cell plasma flow. On the dawn side the neutral winds also rotate in an anticlockwise direction as the strength of geomagnetic disturbances increase. Since the site is located at a transition latitude between the midlatitude and the polar cap the data set provides a sensitive test for general circulation models which attempt to parameterize the contribution of magnetospheric processes. A comparison with the Vector Spherical Harmonic (VSH) model indicates several regions of poor correspondence for December solstice conditions but reasonable agreement for the

  12. Generation of large-amplitude electric field and subsequent enhancement of O+ ion flux in the inner magnetosphere during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-06-01

    Energetic O+ ions are rapidly enhanced in the inner magnetosphere because of abrupt intensification of the dawn-to-dusk electric field and significantly contribute to the ring current during substorms. Here we examine the generation mechanism of the dawn-to-dusk electric field that accelerates the O+ ions and the spatial and temporal evolution of the differential flux of the O+ ions by using a test particle simulation in the electric and magnetic fields that are provided by a global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation. In the MHD simulation, strong dawn-to-dusk electric field appears in the near-Earth tail region by a joint action of the earthward tension force and pileup of magnetic flux near an onset of substorm expansion. The peak of the electric field is ~9-13 mV/m and is located ~1-2 RE earthward of the peak of the plasma bulk speed because of the pileup. O+ ions coming from the lobe are accelerated from ~eV to >100 keV in ~10 min. The reconstructed flux of the O+ ions shows that at ~7 RE near midnight, the flux has a peak near a few tens of keV and the flux below ~10 keV is small. This structure, called a "void" structure, is consistent with the Polar observation and can be regarded as a manifestation of the acceleration of unmagnetized ions perpendicular to the magnetic field. In the inner magnetosphere (at 6.0 RE), reconstructed energy-time spectrograms show the nose dispersion structure that is also consistent with satellite observations.

  13. Foraging behaviour of larval cod (Gadus morhua) at low light intensities.

    PubMed

    Vollset, K W; Folkvord, A; Browman, H I

    2011-01-01

    The ability to forage at low light intensities can be of great importance for the survival of fish larvae in a pelagic environment. Three-dimensional silhouette imaging was used to observe larval cod foraging and swimming behaviour at three light intensities (dusk ~1.36 × 10(-3) W/m(2), night ~1.38 × 10(-4) W/m(2) and darkness ~3.67 × 10(-6) W/m(2)) at 4 different ages from 6 to 53 days post-hatch (dph). At 6 dph, active pursuit of prey was only observed under dusk conditions. Attacks, and frequent orientations, were observed from 26 dph under night conditions. This was consistent with swimming behaviour which suggested that turn angles were the same under dusk and night conditions, but lower in darkness. Cod at 53 dph attacked prey in darkness and turn angles were not different from those under other light conditions. This suggests that larvae are still able to feed at light intensities of 3.67 × 10(-6) W/m(2). We conclude that larval cod can maintain foraging behaviour under light intensities that correspond to night-time at depths at which they are observed in the field, at least if they encounter high-density patches of prey such as those that they would encounter at thin layers or fronts.

  14. MESSENGER Magnetometer Observations of the Plasma Distribution in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Raines, J. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Johnson, C. L.; Purucker, M. E.; Winslow, R. M.; Zurbuchen, T.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Since insertion of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft into orbit around Mercury on 18 March 2011, the Magnetometer (MAG) has routinely observed localized reductions of the magnetic field magnitude below the level predicted by a planetary dipole model corrected for magnetospheric magnetic fields. These magnetic depressions are observed on almost every orbit, and the latitude at which they are observed is local-time dependent. The depression signatures are indicators for the presence of enhanced plasma populations, which inflate the magnetic field locally to maintain pressure balance, thus lowering the magnetic flux density. Mapping the magnetic depressions in local time and latitude, the MAG observations provide comprehensive insight into the plasma distribution near the planet, which is complementary to that provided by MESSENGER's Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS). The spatial distribution shows that magnetic depressions are concentrated in two distinct regions. First, there is a population in the nightside equatorial region extending from dusk to dawn, which is offset northward from the planetary geographic equator by about 10°, commensurate with the offset of the planetary dipole. The extent of this population is indicative of the plasma sheet located in the equatorial magnetotail. A second concentration of magnetic depressions is found at high latitudes, predominantly on the dayside, and is associated with the magnetospheric cusp. The magnitude of the pressures associated with the depressions ranges from 0.1 to 3 nPa in the equatorial region, shows a systematic gradient from dusk to dawn, and reaches 10 nPa at high latitudes. We discuss the MAG observations and interpret the dusk-to-dawn gradient in the derived pressure distribution with a simple paradigm of particle drifts within Mercury's magnetosphere.

  15. The role of pollinators in maintaining variation in flower colour in the Rocky Mountain columbine, Aquilegia coerulea

    PubMed Central

    Thairu, Margaret W.; Brunet, Johanne

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Flower colour varies within and among populations of the Rocky Mountain columbine, Aquilegia coerulea, in conjunction with the abundance of its two major pollinators, hawkmoths and bumble-bees. This study seeks to understand whether the choice of flower colour by these major pollinators can help explain the variation in flower colour observed in A. coerulea populations. Methods Dual choice assays and experimental arrays of blue and white flowers were used to determine the preference of hawkmoths and bumble-bees for flower colour. A test was made to determine whether a differential preference for flower colour, with bumble-bees preferring blue and hawkmoths white flowers, could explain the variation in flower colour. Whether a single pollinator could maintain a flower colour polymorphism was examined by testing to see if preference for a flower colour varied between day and dusk for hawkmoths and whether bumble-bees preferred novel or rare flower colour morphs. Key Results Hawkmoths preferred blue flowers under both day and dusk light conditions. Naïve bumble-bees preferred blue flowers but quickly learned to forage randomly on the two colour morphs when similar rewards were presented in the flowers. Bees quickly learned to associate a flower colour with a pollen reward. Prior experience affected the choice of flower colour by bees, but they did not preferentially visit novel flower colours or rare or common colour morphs. Conclusions Differences in flower colour preference between the two major pollinators could not explain the variation in flower colour observed in A. coerulea. The preference of hawkmoths for flower colour did not change between day and dusk, and bumble-bees did not prefer a novel or a rare flower colour morph. The data therefore suggest that factors other than pollinators may be more likely to affect the flower colour variation observed in A. coerulea. PMID:25808657

  16. Penetration Electric Fields and Inner Magnetosphere Dynamics: A Model and Data Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nelson C.

    1998-01-01

    Significant progress has been made on the analysis of the June, 1991 storm. We have completed the analysis of the CRRES and DMSP data sets. We have been able to follow the evolution during the storm of the inner edge of the electric field patterns in the dusk sector and its relation to electron boundaries, ion boundaries and the ring current. Whereas the CRRES data provide radial cuts out through the plasmasphere every I 0 hours, DMSP provides snapshots every orbit of the potential and particle boundaries. Electric field and energetic particle measurements from CRRES and ion drifts and energetic particle measurements from DMSP provide the principal data sets. The combined data set provides high resolution definition of the boundary motions over the phases of the storm. L shell differences between the DMSP and CRRES particle boundaries are easily explained by inflation of the dusk sector by the ring current. The electric field boundaries are typically associated with the ion boundary and the inner edge of the ring current except during rapid increases in the cross-polar cap potential. A significant fraction of the dusk cell potential is found inside the plasmasheet electron inner edge. Twice during the storm this potential exceeded 60 kV. A paper (copy attached) has been prepared (Burke et al., 1998) and submitted to JGR. An invited paper will be presented by Burke at the spring AGU meeting. An abstract has also been submitted to the COSPAR meeting for presentation by Maynard. New simulations have been carried out with the Rice Convection Model for the magnetic storm of June 4-5, 1991, and comparisons have been made with CRRES and DMSP data.

  17. Radiotelemetric measurement of body temperature in feedlot steers during winter.

    PubMed

    Lefcourt, A M; Adams, W R

    1998-07-01

    Little is known concerning body temperature regulation in cattle under conditions of low ambient temperature. To investigate the influence of cold on body temperature regulation, core body temperatures of feedlot steers (crossbred Bos taurus) were monitored for two winters in Nebraska, from late December to mid-March in yr 1 and from late December through June in yr 2. In yr 1, radiotransmitters to monitor temperature were implanted in the peritoneum of five steers (360 kg); in yr 2, four steers (320 kg) were used. Body temperatures and ambient temperatures were recorded at 3-min intervals and were mathematically filtered to produce 120 readings/d. For yr 1 and 2, daily maximum (40.09 and 39.66 degrees C), minimum (38.78 and 38.64 degrees C), and average (39.29 and 39.06 degrees C) body temperatures were not affected by ambient temperatures. Body temperatures exhibited circadian rhythms with the minima at approximately 0800 and the maxima at approximately 1900. For both years, sharp peaks in body temperature were often seen in the evening and, for yr 2, to a lesser extent in the morning. The occurrence of peaks was normally congruent, within a 1.5-h window, across steers. Congruent peaks in the evening with peak heights of 1.05 and .77 degrees C occurred on 65 and 56% of the days in yr 1 and 2, respectively. Occurrence of congruent peaks was correlated with dusk; peaks followed dusk by 30 to 60 min. Ambient temperature also influenced the occurrence of peaks; few peaks were observed when average daily ambient temperatures were below -7.5 degrees C. The dynamic changes in body temperature throughout the day, including the peaks in body temperature after dusk, strongly suggest that thermoregulatory systems in steers respond not only to current ambient conditions, but also to more integrative measures such as day length and daily heat load.

  18. Dynamical Consequences of Two Modes of Centrifugal Instability in Jupiter's Outer Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, M. G.; Southwood, D. J.

    2004-12-01

    The global scale structure of the Jovian magnetosphere has been established through analysis of data from seven spacecraft whose collective passes cover all local times, mainly in the near-equatorial region. As contrasted with Earth's magnetosphere and auroral ionosphere, where the day-night asymmetries dominate the local time variation of structure, the Jovian magnetosphere and auroral ionosphere also reveal strong dawn-dusk asymmetries. Those asymmetries illuminate the effects of plasma rotation in the presence of externally imposed forces at the magnetopause. Analysis of the system leads to a description of the physical processes that produce the asymmetry and gives insight into unique aspects of the plasma transport in a magnetosphere dominated by rotation. The most dynamic portion of the magnetosphere is the plasma disk. At some local times, its outer edge is marginally stable and at others strongly unstable. The most unstable sector is localized on the night side, where an outflow of material down tail thins the plasma disk. The same outflow evacuates portions of the flux tubes, causing the outer portions to break off and leave closed depleted flux tubes behind. As the depleted flux tubes move on to the dayside at large radial distance on the morning side, they form a distinct plasma/magnetic regime. The residual sheet thickens as flux tubes rotate to noon. During this rotation, there is some evidence of weak loss of plasma. A massive change takes place in the afternoon sector where the sheet energizes and thickens as it moves from noon to dusk and assimilates the empty flux tubes of the outer magnetosphere. It is probable that this assimilation is accomplished through a short perpendicular scale centrifugally driven ballooning leading to Bohm diffusion of plasma to refill the previously emptied tubes. The well-known dawn dusk asymmetry in the UV aurora is very likely associated with the vastly larger tapping of the ionospheric `flywheel' in the afternoon

  19. Statistical Characterization of Stormtime Ionospheric Redistribution At Mid-Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, P. J.; Foster, J. C.; Miskin, M. Z.; Beroz, F.; Rideout, W.

    2009-12-01

    During major geomagnetic disturbances, dramatic redistribution of ionospheric plasma can occur in the mid-latitude plasmasphere boundary layer, driven by a complex set of interlocked dynamics involving photoionization, magnetospheric influence, ionospheric feedback mechanisms, and the background magnetic field direction. Large amounts of ionospheric material are seen to stream from the dusk sector sunward to the polar cap cusp region, as mesoscale plumes of storm enhanced density (SED) move under the influence of the sub-auroral polarization stream (SAPS) electric field in regions magnetically linked to the region 2 currents associated with the asymmetric ring current. Studies over the last decade have shown that these several degree wide SAPS flow channels, with sunward fluxes delivering over 1E14 ions/m^2/sec to the noontime cusp, are the signatures of processes which can deplete an entire L shell of plasmaspheric material in one hours' time for particularly intense storms. Ground based ionospheric radar measurements of these features lend considerable insight into magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes and dynamics. We discuss a statistical study of SAPS/SED region sunward ionospheric flux in the dusk magnetic local time sector using a database of over 1000 Millstone Hill ionospheric radar scans during Kp >= 3 disturbances from 1979-2001. We highlight several persistent features of ionospheric F region velocity and SAPS ion flux magnitude. In particular, sunward F region ion flux is relatively insensitive to magnetic local time and the passage of the dusk solar terminator. Potential explanations focus on the interplay between poleward perpendicular electric field and ionospheric height-integrated Pedersen conductance in the E and F regions as the thermosphere and ionosphere change state from day to night.

  20. Plasma composition in Jupiter's magnetosphere - Initial results from the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiss, J.; Gloeckler, G.; Balsiger, H.; Fisk, L. A.; Galvin, A. B.; Gliem, F.; Hamilton, D. C.; Ipavich, F. M.; Livi, S.; Mall, U.

    1992-01-01

    The ion composition in the Jovian environment was investigated with the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer on board Ulysses. A hot tenuous plasma was observed throughout the outer and middle magnetosphere. In some regions two thermally different components were identified. Oxygen and sulfur ions with several different charge states, from the volcanic satellite Io, make the largest contribution to the mass density of the hot plasma, even at high latitude. Solar wind particles were observed in all regions investigated. Ions from Jupiter's ionosphere were abundant in the middle magnetosphere, particularly in the high-latitude region on the dusk side, which was traversed for the first time.

  1. Plasma Composition in Jupiter's Magnetosphere: Initial Results from the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Geiss, J; Gloeckler, G; Balsiger, H; Fisk, L A; Galvin, A B; Gliem, F; Hamilton, D C; Ipavich, F M; Livi, S; Mall, U; Ogilvie, K W; von Steiger, R; Wilken, B

    1992-09-11

    The ion composition in the Jovian environment was investigated with the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer on board Ulysses. A hot tenuous plasma was observed throughout the outer and middle magnetosphere. In some regions two thermally different components were identified. Oxygen and sulfur ions with several different charge states, from the volcanic satellite lo, make the largest contribution to the mass density of the hot plasma, even at high latitude. Solar wind particles were observed in all regions investigated. Ions from Jupiter's ionosphere were abundant in the middle magnetosphere, particularly in the highlatitude region on the dusk side, which was traversed for the first time.

  2. The Los Alamos Photon Counting Detector Debris Detection Project: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Cheng; Priedhorsky, W.; Baron, M.; Casperson, D.

    1995-03-01

    At Los Alamos, the authors have been pursuing a project for space debris detection using a photon counting detector with high spatial and time resolution. By exploiting the three dimensionality of the high quality data, they expect to be able to detect an orbiting object of size below 2 cm, using a moderate size telescope and state-of-the-art photon counting detector. A working tube has been used to collect skyward looking data during dusk. In this paper, they discuss the progress in the development of detector and data acquisition system. They also report on analysis and results of these data sets.

  3. Aspects of Clock Resetting in Flowering of Xanthium 1

    PubMed Central

    Papenfuss, Herbert D.; Salisbury, Frank B.

    1967-01-01

    Flowering is induced in Xanthium strumarium by a single dark period exceeding about 8.3 hours in length (the critical night). To study the mechanism which measures this dark period, plants were placed in growth chambers for about 2 days under constant light and temperature, given a phasing dark period terminated by an intervening light period (1 min to several hrs in duration), and finally a test dark period long enough normally to induce flowering. In some experiments, light interruptions during the test dark period were given to establish the time of maximum sensitivity. If the phasing dark period was less than 5 hours long, its termination by a light flash only broadened the subsequent time of maximum sensitivity to a light flash, but the critical night was delayed. In causing the delay, the end of the intervening light period was acting like the dusk signal which initiated time measurement at the beginning of the phasing dark period. If the phasing dark period was 6 hours or longer, time of maximum sensitivity during the subsequent test dark period was shifted by as much as 10 to 14 hours. In this case the light terminating the phasing dark period acted as a rephaser or a dawn signal. Following a 7.5-hour phasing dark period, intervening light periods of 1 minute to 5 hours did not shift the subsequent time of maximum sensitivity, but with intervening light periods longer than 5 hours, termination of the light acts clearly like a dusk signal. The clock appears to be suspended during intervening light periods longer than 5 to 15 hours. It is restarted by a dusk signal. There is an anomaly with intervening light periods of 10 to 13 hours, following which time of maximum sensitivity is actually less than the usual 8 hours after dusk. Ability of the clock in Xanthium to be rephased, suspended, restarted, or delayed, depending always upon conditions of the experiment, is characteristic of an oscillating timer and may confer upon this plant its ability to respond to

  4. Central Plasma Sheet Ion Properties as Inferred from Ionospheric Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, Simon; Newell, Patrick T.

    1998-01-01

    A method of inferring central plasma sheet (CPS) temperature, density, and pressure from ionospheric observations is developed. The advantage of this method over in situ measurements is that the CPS can be studied in its entirely, rather than only in fragments. As a result, for the first time, comprehensive two-dimensional equatorial maps of CPS pressure, density, and temperature within the isotropic plasma sheet are produced. These particle properties are calculated from data taken by the Special Sensor for Precipitating Particles, version 4 (SSJ4) particle instruments onboard DMSP F8, F9, F10, and F11 satellites during the entire year of 1992. Ion spectra occurring in conjunction with electron acceleration events are specifically excluded. Because of the variability of magnetotail stretching, the mapping to the plasma sheet is done using a modified Tsyganenko [1989] magnetic field model (T89) adjusted to agree with the actual magnetotail stretch at observation time. The latter is inferred with a high degree of accuracy (correlation coefficient -0.9) from the latitude of the DMSP b2i boundary (equivalent to the ion isotropy boundary). The results show that temperature, pressure, and density all exhibit dawn-dusk asymmetries unresolved with previous measurements. The ion temperature peaks near the midnight meridian. This peak, which has been associated with bursty bulk flow events, widens in the Y direction with increased activity. The temperature is higher at dusk than at dawn, and this asymmetry increases with decreasing distance from the Earth. In contrast, the density is higher at dawn than at dusk, and there appears to be a density enhancement in the low-latitude boundary layer regions which increases with decreasing magnetic activity. In the near-Earth regions, the pressure is higher at dusk than at dawn, but this asymmetry weakens with increasing distance from the Earth and may even reverse so that at distances X less than approx. 10 to -12 R(sub E

  5. Modeling of Radiation Belt Electron Loss due to EMIC Wave Induced Advection and Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Chen, L.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in dusk side plasmasphere and plasmaspheric plumes scatter MeV electrons into the loss cone, and consist a major loss mechanism for outer radiation belt electrons. Through nonlinear wave-particle interactions, strong EMIC waves cause not only a diffusion of electrons in phase space, but also an advection toward the loss cone that corresponds to an additional advection term to the Fokker-Planck equation. The electron loss effect due to strong EMIC waves is studied via comparisons of test particle simulations and numerical solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation. Enhanced electron loss rate is expected as a result of the phase space advection.

  6. Physically Demanding Labor and Health Among Indigenous Women in the Ecuadorian Highlands.

    PubMed

    Waters, William F; Ehlers, Jessica; Ortega, Fernando; Kuhlmann, Anne Sebert

    2017-07-20

    Physically demanding work carried out during long workdays affects women's health. In rural and agrarian societies, women perform a variety of domestic and productive tasks, often from dawn to dusk, with little or no leisure time. This paper presents the results of a survey of indigenous women in six rural communities in the Ecuadorian highlands. It was conducted to measure the amount of time women spend on physically demanding work in the context of food security, parity outcomes, and access to prenatal health care. The findings demonstrate that these women work very long workdays and also experience food insecurity and poor access to prenatal health care.

  7. Ground-Based Radar Detection of the Inner Boundary of the Ion Plasma Sheet and its Response to the Changes in the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    3Department of Physics, University of Calgary Calgary, Alberta, Canada eric@phys.ucalgary.ca ABSTRACT SuperDARN is an array of HF radars, which covers...in order to understand the Solar wind – Magnetosphere- Ionosphere coupling (SW-M-I). Wide area coverage of the SuperDARN radars made it possible...fundamental problems in the SW- M-I coupling process. One of the recent discoveries is that SuperDARN radar E region backscatter boundary in the dusk

  8. Studying internal and external magnetic fields in Japan using MAGSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukushima, N. (Principal Investigator); Maeda, H.; Yukutake, T.; Tanaka, M.; Oshima, S.; Ogawa, K.; Kawamura, M.; Miyazaki, Y.; Uyeda, S.; Kobayashi, K.

    1980-01-01

    Examination of the total intensity data of CHRONIT on a few paths over Japan and its neighboring sea shows MAGSAT is extremely useful for studying the local magnetic anomaly. In high latitudes, the signatures of field aligned currents are clearly recognized. These include (1) the persistent basic pattern of current flow; (2) the more intense currents in the summer hemisphere than in the winter hemisphere; (3) more fluctuations in current intensities in summer dawn hours; and (4) apparent dawn-dusk asymmetry in the field-aligned current intensity between the north and south polar regions.

  9. Coherent radar observations of a storm sudden commencement having a preliminary reverse impulse

    SciTech Connect

    McDiarmid, D.R.; Nielsen, E. )

    1987-01-01

    Observations of the February 4, 1983, storm sudden commencement (ssc) by the STARE and SABRE radar systems are presented. The observing stations were in the dusk sector, where the ssc was accompanied by a preliminary reverse impulse (PRI). The radar data show the PRI to be a consequence of the ssc compression wave producing an initial antisunward flow. The polarization of the ssc electric field in the ionosphere is seen to have both longitudinal and latitudinal structure. The observations are discussed in terms of the propagation of the ssc disturbance throughout the magnetosphere.

  10. Global distribution of SAGE II data products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Russell, G.; Lerner, J.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques employed to map the global distribution of stratospheric aerosols using SAGE II data at four wavelengths (385, 453, 525 and 1020 microns) are described. The methods were devised to integrate the 900 data points scanned by the instrument with account taken of the different times the vertical profiles were obtained. The data have been used to calculate the O3, H2O, NO2 and aerosol optical thicknesses. Sample details of data gathered during April 1985 are discussed, with emphasis on difficulties being encountered in analyzing the differences being observed in the dawn and dusk data.

  11. Small-scale variability in Saturn’s lower ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matcheva, Katia I.; Barrow, Daniel J.

    2012-11-01

    We perform and present a wavelet analysis on all 31 Cassini electron density profiles published to date (Nagy, A.F. et al. [2006]. J. Geophys. Res. 111 (A6), CiteID A06310; Kliore, A.J. et al. [2009]. J. Geophys. Res. 114 (A4), CiteID A04315). We detect several discrete scales of variability present in the observations. Small-scale variability (S < 700 km) is observed in almost all data sets at different latitudes, both at dawn and dusk conditions. The most typical scale of variability is 300 km with scales between 200 km and 450 km being commonly present in the vast majority of the profiles. A low latitude dawn/dusk asymmetry is noted in the prevalent scales with the spectrum peaking sharply at the 300 km scale at dusk conditions and being broader at dawn conditions. Compared to dawn conditions the dusk ionosphere also shows more significant variability at the 100 km scale. The 300 km vertical scale is also present in the few available profiles from the northern hemisphere. Early observations from 2005 show a dominant scale at 350 km whereas later in 2007-2008 the spectrum shifts to the shorter scales with the most prominent scale being 300 km. The performed wavelet analysis and the obtained results are independent of assumptions about the nature of the layers and do not require a definition for a “background” electron density profile. In the second part of the paper we present a gravity wave propagation/dissipation model for Saturn’s upper atmosphere and compare the wave properties to the characteristics of the observed electron density variability at different scales. The general features observed in the data are consistent with gravity waves being present in the lower ionosphere and causing layering of the ions and the electrons. The wave-driving mechanism provides a simultaneous explanation for several of the properties of the observed variability: (i) lack of variability in the electron density above the predicted region of wave dissipation; (ii) in

  12. Relativistic electron precipitation at International Space Station: Space weather monitoring by Calorimetric Electron Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Ryuho; Asaoka, Yoichi; Torii, Shoji; Terasawa, Toshio; Ozawa, Shunsuke; Tamura, Tadahisa; Shimizu, Yuki; Akaike, Yosui; Mori, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    The charge detector (CHD) of the Calorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) on board the International Space Station (ISS) has a huge geometric factor for detecting MeV electrons and is sensitive to relativistic electron precipitation (REP) events. During the first 4 months, CALET CHD observed REP events mainly at the dusk to midnight sector near the plasmapause, where the trapped radiation belt electrons can be efficiently scattered by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. Here we show that interesting 5-20 s periodicity regularly exists during the REP events at ISS, which is useful to diagnose the wave-particle interactions associated with the nonlinear wave growth of EMIC-triggered emissions.

  13. Global distribution of SAGE II data products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Russell, G.; Lerner, J.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques employed to map the global distribution of stratospheric aerosols using SAGE II data at four wavelengths (385, 453, 525 and 1020 microns) are described. The methods were devised to integrate the 900 data points scanned by the instrument with account taken of the different times the vertical profiles were obtained. The data have been used to calculate the O3, H2O, NO2 and aerosol optical thicknesses. Sample details of data gathered during April 1985 are discussed, with emphasis on difficulties being encountered in analyzing the differences being observed in the dawn and dusk data.

  14. Visual systems - The state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorrock, David

    State-of-the-art, computer-generated image simulator visual systems typically encompass a data base which generates the model of the operating environment, an image generator, and a display system suitable for the applications envisaged. Two basic approaches to such systems are discernible: those employing hybrid raster/calligraphy and those using raster/continuous tone. Attention is presently given to such capabilities and elements of visual displays as texture effects, transparencies, fade level-of-detail management, animation effects, and image generator functions for daylight and night/dusk conditions, as well as prospective developments in this field.

  15. Woodcock feeding habits as related to summer field usage in central Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krohn, W.B.

    1970-01-01

    In 1968 and 1969, 60 American woodcock (Philohela minor) were collected before and after alighting on summer fields in central Maine. A comparison of stomach contents from these birds showed that woodcock fed prior to entering fields at dusk. No evidence was found to indicate that any substantial amount of food was eaten by birds remaining on fields throughout the night. In 1968, the availability and abundance of known woodcock foods were measured in 30 soil samples from one field. Few woodcock foods were found in samples located randomly and at flush sites, thus providing no evidence that birds selected sites where soil invertebrates were concentrated.

  16. Satellite telemetry and wildlife studies in India: Advantages, options and challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Javed, S.; Higuchi, H.; Nagendran, Meenakshi; Takekawa, J.Y.

    2003-01-01

    In 1968 and 1969, 60 American woodcock (Philohela minor) were collected before and after alighting on summer fields in central Maine. A comparison of stomach contents from these birds showed that woodcock fed prior to entering fields at dusk. No evidence was found to indicate that any substantial amount of food was eaten by birds remaining on fields throughout the night. In 1968, the availability and abundance of known woodcock foods were measured in 30 soil samples from one field. Few woodcock foods were found in samples located randomly and at flush sites, thus providing no evidence that birds selected sites where soil invertebrates were concentrated.

  17. Opening the cusp. [using magnetic field topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Gussenhoven, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the magnetic field topology (determined by the superposition of dipole, image, and uniform fields) for mapping the cusp to the ionosphere. The model results are compared to both new and published observations and are then used to map the footprint of a flux transfer event caused by a time variation in the merging rate. It is shown that the cusp geometry distorts the field lines mapped from the magnetopause to yield footprints with dawn and dusk protrusions into the region of closed magnetic flux.

  18. Recirculation and Acceleration of Ionospheric Plasma in the Martian Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Wing-Huen

    2012-07-01

    The presence of strong crustal remnant magnetic fields on Mars has important influence on the dynamical behavior of the ionospheric plasma. A model based on computational simulation of the time-varying configuration of the mini-magnetosphere is described to examine the possible process of acceleration and heating of photo electrons and ions embedded in the magnetic flux tubes as Mars rotates from dawn to dusk. The main idea is that ionospheric H+ and O+ ions pumped into the mini-magnetospheres on the dawn side could be subject to adiabatic heating during "depolarization" of the magnetic field as the local time approaches noon.

  19. Envisaged in-situ plasma observations on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, Martin; Remizov, Anatoli; Auster, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    In autumn2014, ESA's corner stone mission Rosetta will orbit comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and deliver the cometary lander Philae onto the comet surface. The instrument ROMAP (Rosetta Lander Magnetometer and Plasma Monitor) onboard Philae consists of a fluxgate magnetometer, a plasma ion and an electron sensor. ROMAP will measure for the first time the magnetic field and the bulk plasma density, velocity and temperature on a cometary surface. We will discuss the determination of Philae surface attitude as derived from the solar wind velocity vector as well as the dawn to dusk plasma observations and their relevance for the nucleus regolith and dust grain charging.

  20. Does Solar Wind also Drive Convection in Jupiter's Magnetosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, K. K.

    2001-05-01

    Using a simple model of magnetic field and plasma velocity, Brice and Ioannidis [1970] showed that the corotation electric field exceeds convection electric field throughout the Jovian magnetosphere. Since that time it has been tacitly assumed that Jupiter's magnetosphere is driven from within. If Brice and Ioannidis conjecture is correct then one would not expect major asymmetries in the field and plasma parameters in the middle magnetosphere of Jupiter. Yet, new field and plasma observations from Galileo and simultaneous auroral observations from HST show that there are large dawn/dusk and day/night asymmetries in many magnetospheric parameters. For example, the magnetic observations show that a partial ring current and an associated Region-2 type field-aligned current system exist in the magnetosphere of Jupiter. In the Earth's magnetosphere it is well known that the region-2 current system is created by the asymmetries imposed by a solar wind driven convection. Thus, we are getting first hints that the solar wind driven convection is important in Jupiter's magnetosphere as well. Other in-situ observations also point to dawn-dusk asymmetries imposed by the solar wind. For example, first order anisotropies in the Energetic Particle Detector show that the plasma is close to corotational on the dawn side but lags behind corotation in the dusk sector. Magnetic field data show that the current sheet is thin and highly organized on the dawn side but thick and disturbed on the dusk side. I will discuss the reasons why Brice and Ioannidis calculation may not be valid. I will show that both the magnetic field and plasma velocity estimates used by Brice and Ioannidis were rather excessive. Using more modern estimates of the field and velocity values I show that the solar wind convection can penetrate as deep as 40 RJ on the dawnside. I will present a new model of convection that invokes in addition to a distant neutral line spanning the whole magnetotail, a near

  1. HF (High-Frequency) Channel Probe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-31

    ionosphere can be calculated from the relation [Basler and Scott, 19731 (~ 2R(R + [’ -Cos (D-)] +h’(5.1) where R is the radius of the earth (6359 km for...emanating from the earth at high latitudes are a convected sunward on the dawn- and dusk-sides of the auroral zones. When they reach the noon sector, the...for refracting HF radio waves back to the earth , the plasma is essentially swept along with the flux tubes delineated by the magnetic field lines. The

  2. Ramadan fasting and dental treatment considerations: a review.

    PubMed

    Shaeesta, Khaleelahmed Bhavikatti; Prabhuji, M Lv; Shruthi, J R

    2015-01-01

    During the sacred month of Ramadan, Muslims abstain from the consumption of food from dawn until dusk. Extended fasting hours produce changes in the body's metabolism during this period. A majority of the population who fast also restrict themselves from undergoing dental treatments due to a fear of breaking the fast. Even among health professionals, a certain amount of uncertainty prevails about the implications of treating a patient who is fasting. To help clinicians carry out safe and effective treatment without hampering a patient's religious beliefs, the present article focuses on the effect of Ramadan fasting on the body's metabolism and the ramifications for treatment aspects, including medications and dental procedures.

  3. Angustus Labyrinthus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-16

    This image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows the region near the south polar cap called Angustus Labyrinthus, which is defined by the linear ridges. The Odyssey spacecraft orbit is near the day/night terminator, which means looking at the surface near dawn and dusk. This image was taken in the late afternoon and the low sun angle casts shadows behind the taller peaks. The shadows show the topography of the ridges, which is hard to see from above. Orbit Number: 67658 Latitude: -81.3907 Longitude: 296.204 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2017-03-15 21:34 https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21661

  4. The average tangential electric field at the noon magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindqvist, P.-A.; Mozer, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    Two hundred and five magnetopause passes of the ISEE 1 satellite through the magnetopause within 2 hrs of local noon during the time period 1977-1981 were examined in order to determine the relationship between the dawn-dusk tangential electric field at the magnetopause and the northward component of the magnetosheath magnetic field; the ratio of these quantities yields the speed of the plasma flow toward the magnetopause (i.e., the reconnection flow speed). The results indicate that, on the average, reconnection occurs at the subsolar magnetopause, and that the average reconnection flow speed of magnetosheath plasma toward the magnetopause is about 15 percent of the local Alfven speed.

  5. Structure of the plasmapause from ISEE 1 low-energy ion and plasma wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagai, T.; Horwitz, J. L.; Anderson, R. R.; Chappell, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low-energy ion pitch angle distributions are compared with plasma density profiles in the near-earth magnetosphere using ISEE 1 observations. The classical plasmapause determined by the sharp density gradient is not always observed in the dayside region, whereas there almost always exists the ion pitch angle distribution transition from cold, isotropic to warm, bidirectional, field-aligned distributions. In the nightside region the plasmapause density gradient is typically found, and it normally coincides with the ion pitch angle distribution transition. The sunward motion of the plasma is found in the outer part of the 'plasmaspheric' plasma in the dusk bulge region.

  6. Longitudinal asymmetries in aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michell, R.; Samara, M.; Grubbs, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present a comparative study of auroral structure and dynamics over Poker Flat, Alaska and Tromso, Norway. These stations are at the same geomagnetic latitude but differ significantly (by 4 degrees) in geographic latitude. In the period of 25 November 2012 to 15 March 2013 we have optical imaging data from both stations. There is approximately a 12 hour difference in local time between them and therefore near winter solstice we have simultaneous observations in the dawn and dusk sectors. Differences in auroral morphology, for similar solar wind driving conditions, will be investigated.

  7. Magnetic flux ropes in 3-dimensional MHD simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogino, Tatsuki; Walker, Raymond J.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1990-01-01

    The interaction of the solar wind and the earth's magnetosphere is presently simulated by a 3D, time-dependent, global MHD method in order to model the magnetopause and magnetotail generation of magnetic flux ropes. It is noted that strongly twisted and localized magnetic flux tubes simular to magnetic flux ropes appear at the subpolar magnetopause when the IMF has a large azimuthal component, as well as a southward component. Plasmoids are generated in the magnetotail after the formation of a near-earth magnetic neutral line; the magnetic field lines have a helical structure that is connected from dawn to dusk.

  8. The Antiaircraft Journal. Volume 92, Number 4, July-August 1949

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1949-08-01

    picket ships at a radius of about 70 miles. Day fighters were landed at dusk and night fighters were " scrambled " and "pancaked" at odd intervals all... recip - ient and on the deliverer, and have analyzed the major mili- tary and political considerations which govern its use. From this scrutiny we must...Schlesinger) ..••........... 5.00 Civilization an Trial (Toynbee) •..•.....•... 3.50 Company Commander (MacDonald) 3.00 The Egg and I (MacDonald) 2.75

  9. A simple model for polar cap convection patterns and generation of theta auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    An addition of the uniform interplanetary magnetic field and the earth's dipole magnetic field is used to evaluate electric field convection patterns over the polar caps that result from solar wind flow across open geomagnetic field lines. The model also accounts for field-aligned patterns within, and auroral arcs across, the polar cap. The qualitative predictions derived from the model express the electric field magnitudes, aurora intensity, sunward and antisunward flow, and the dusk-side reversal of the convection field in terms of the x and y components of the interplanetary magnetic field.

  10. Particle orbits in model current sheet with a nonzero B(y) component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Zhongwei; Parks, George

    1993-01-01

    The problem of charged particle motions in magnetotaillike model current sheets is revisited with the inclusion of a nonzero dawn-dusk magnetic field component. Three cases are examined considering both trapped and escaped orbits. The results show that a nonzero B(y) component disturbs the particle orbits by destroying orbit symmetry in the phase space about the z = 0 plane. It also changes the bounce frequency of particle orbits. The presence of B(y) thus modifies the Speiser orbits, particularly near the ejection phase. The process of ejected particle such as ejection direction, ejection velocity, and pitch angles are shown to depend on the sign of the charge.

  11. Considerations of variations in ionospheric field effects in mapping equatorial lithospheric Magsat magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravat, D.; Hinze, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    The longitudinal, seasonal, and altitude-dependent variability of the magnetic field in equatorial latitudes is investigated to determine the effect of these variabilities on the isolation of lithospheric Magsat magnetic anomalies. It was found that the amplitudes of the dawn dip-latitude averages were small compared to the dusk averages, and that they were of the opposite sign. The longitudinal variation in the equatorial amplitudes of the dawn dip-latitude averages was not entirely consistent with the present knowledge of the electrojet field. Based on the results, a procedure is implemented for reducing the equatorial ionospheric effects from the Magsat data on the lithospheric component.

  12. Magnetic flux ropes in 3-dimensional MHD simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogino, Tatsuki; Walker, Raymond J.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1990-01-01

    The interaction of the solar wind and the earth's magnetosphere is presently simulated by a 3D, time-dependent, global MHD method in order to model the magnetopause and magnetotail generation of magnetic flux ropes. It is noted that strongly twisted and localized magnetic flux tubes simular to magnetic flux ropes appear at the subpolar magnetopause when the IMF has a large azimuthal component, as well as a southward component. Plasmoids are generated in the magnetotail after the formation of a near-earth magnetic neutral line; the magnetic field lines have a helical structure that is connected from dawn to dusk.

  13. Structure of the plasmapause from ISEE 1 low-energy ion and plasma wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagai, T.; Horwitz, J. L.; Anderson, R. R.; Chappell, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low-energy ion pitch angle distributions are compared with plasma density profiles in the near-earth magnetosphere using ISEE 1 observations. The classical plasmapause determined by the sharp density gradient is not always observed in the dayside region, whereas there almost always exists the ion pitch angle distribution transition from cold, isotropic to warm, bidirectional, field-aligned distributions. In the nightside region the plasmapause density gradient is typically found, and it normally coincides with the ion pitch angle distribution transition. The sunward motion of the plasma is found in the outer part of the 'plasmaspheric' plasma in the dusk bulge region.

  14. Ion measurements during Pioneer Venus reentry: Implications for solar cycle variation of ion composition and dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hartle, R. E.; Kar, J.; Cloutier, P. A.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.; Brace, L. H.

    1993-01-01

    During the final, low solar activity phase of the Pioneer Venus (PV) mission, the Orbiter Ion Mass Spectrometer (OIMS) measurements found all ion species, in the midnight-dusk sector, reduced in concentration relative to that observed at solar maximum. Molecular ion species comprised a greater part of the total ion concentration as O(+) and H(+) had the greatest depletions. The nightside ionospheric states were strikingly similar to the isolated solar maximum 'disappearing' ionospheres. Both are very dynamic states characterized by a rapidly drifting plasma and 30-100 eV superthermal O(+) ions.

  15. Ion Measurements During Pioneer Venus Reentry: Implications for Solar Cycle Variation of Ion Composition and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hartle, R. E.; Kar, J.; Cloutier, P. A.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.; Brace, L. H.

    1993-01-01

    During the final, low solar activity phase of the Pioneer Venus mission, the Orbiter Ion Mass Spectrometer measurements found all ion species, in the midnight-dusk sector, reduced in concentration relative to that observed at solar maximum. Molecular ion species comprised a greater part of the total ion concentration as O(+) and H(+) had the greatest depletions. The nightside ionospheric states were strikingly similar to the isolated solar maximum "disappearing" ionospheres. Both are very dynamic states characterized by a rapidly drifting plasma and 30-100 eV superthermal O(+) ions.

  16. The Galileo Earth encounter - Magnetometer and allied measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kivelson, M. G.; Kennel, C. F.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.; Southwood, D. J.; Walker, R. J.; Khurana, K. K.; Coleman, P. J.; Hammond, C. M.; Angelopoulos, V.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the Galileo magnetometer observations from the crossing of the tail magnetopause at an antisolar distance of close to 100 R(E) through exit into the solar wind on the dayside is presented. These measurements are linked with correlative data from ground stations and from IMP 8 which was ideally located to serve as a monitor of the solar wind upstream of the bow shock. A time line of the important geomagnetic events of the day that provides a framework for the full multiinstrument analysis of the flyby data is presented. The observations are used to investigate apsects of the relationship between magnetotail dynamics and the separate intensifications of a multiple onset substorm inferred from ground-based data. It is proposed that the signatures associated with individual substorm intensifications are localized in the dawn-to-dusk extent even at remote locations in the magnetotail, just as they are in the ionosphere, and that the tail disturbances associated with successive substorm intensifications step across the tail towards the dusk flank.

  17. The hot plasma environment at Jupiter - Ulysses results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Armstrong, T. P.; Gold, R. E.; Anderson, K. A.; Krimigis, S. M.; Lin, R. P.; Pick, M.; Roelof, E. C.; Sarris, E. T.; Simnett, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    Initial results obtained from measurements made by the HI-SCALE (heliosphere instrument for spectra, composition, and anisotropy at low energies) experiment are reported. Data revealed that the Jovian magnetosphere is very extended, with the day-side magnetopause located at about 105 Jupiter radii. The relative abundances of sulfur, oxygen, and sodium to helium decreased with the decreasing radial distance from the planet on the day-side, which suggests that the abundances of Jupiter-derived species are dependent on latitude. Intense fluxes of counter-streaming ions and electrons were discovered in the dusk-side, high-latitude region from the edge of the plasma sheet to the dusk-side magnetopause. These beams of ions and electrons appeared to be very tightly aligned with the magnetic field and to be superimposed on a time- and space variable isotropic hot plasma background. The current carried by measured hot plasma particles are about 1.6 x 10 exp -4 microamps per sq m.

  18. Epithermal Neutron Evidence for a Diurnal Surface Hydration Process in the Moon's High Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Parsons, A.; Starr, R. D.; Evans, L. G.; Sanin, A.; Litvak, M.; Livengood, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report evidence from epithermal neutron flux observations that show that the Moon's high latitude surfaces are being actively hydrated, dehydrated and rehydrated in a diurnal cycle. The near-surface hydration is indicated by an enhanced suppression of the lunar epithermal neutron leakage flux on the dayside of the dawn terminator on poleward-facing slopes (PFS). At 0600 to 0800 local-time, hydrogen concentrations within the upper 1 meter of PFS are observed to be maximized relative to equivalent equator-facing slopes (EFS). During the lunar day surface hydrogen concentrations diminish towards dusk and then rebuild overnight. Surface hydration is determined by differential comparison of the averaged EFS to PFS epithermal neutron count rates above +/- 75 deg latitude. At dawn the contrast bias towards PFS is consistent with at least 15 to 25 parts-per-million (ppm) hydrogen that dissipates by dusk. We review several lines of evidence derived from temperature and epithermal neutron data by a correlated analysis of observations from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) that were mapped as a function of lunar local-time, Lunar Observing Laser Altimeter (LOLA) topography and Diviner (DLRE) surface temperature.

  19. Spatial Distribution of Rolled up Kelvin-Helmholtz Vortices at Earth's Dayside and Flank Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M. G. G. T.; Hasegawa, H.; Lavraud, B.; Phan, T.; Escoubet, C. P.; Dunlop, M. W.; Bogdanova, Y. V.; Borg, A. L.; Volwerk, M.; Berchem, J.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability (KHI) can drive waves at the magnetopause. These waves can grow to form rolled-up vortices and facilitate transfer of plasma into the magnetosphere. To investigate the persistence and frequency of such waves at the magnetopause we have carried out a survey of all Double Star 1 magnetopause crossings, using a combination of ion and magnetic field measurements. Using criteria originally used in a Geotail study made by Hasegawa et al. (2006) (forthwith referred to as H2006), 17 candidate events were identified from the entire TC-1 mission (covering 623 orbits where the magnetopause was sampled), a majority of which were on the dayside of the terminator. The relationship between density and shear velocity was then investigated, to identify the predicted signature of a rolled up vortex from H2006 and all 17 events exhibited some level of rolled up behavior. The location of the events had a clear dawn-dusk asymmetry, with 12 (71 %) on the post noon, dusk flank suggesting preferential growth in this region.

  20. Inner Magnetosphere keV Ion Drift Path Boundaries as Observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strangeway, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Larsen, B.

    2014-12-01

    The drifts of keV ions in the inner magnetosphere are controlled by both electric field drifts and gradient and curvature (i.e., magnetic field) drifts, and further the magnetic field drifts oppose the corotation electric field drift in the dusk local time sector. Consequently, the ion drift paths can be quite complicated with the medium-energy ions drifting close to the Earth, but still being on open drift paths. In addition, structure in the energy-time spectrograms can be a consequence of either particle injection or particle loss. In order to distinguish between the two we will compare the energy-time spectrograms acquired with the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) mass spectrometer on board the Van Allen Probes with predictions of drift path boundaries. The simplest model assumes a uniform convection electric field and dipole model field, and we will use this a starting point for the comparison. The model can be modified to include shielding of the convection electric field, and rotation in local time of the zero-energy dusk-side stagnation point. As an additional check of the model we will compare the electric field used in the model with the electric field as measured by the Van Allen Probes, as well as the validity of using a dipole magnetic field through comparison with the measured magnetic field.

  1. Biting activity of mosquito species (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Turkey-Armenia border area, Ararat Valley, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aldemir, Adnan; Bedir, Hilal; Demirci, Berna; Alten, Bulent

    2010-01-01

    During nine consecutive nights in July 2007 (from 18:15-05:45 h), mosquitoes landing-biting on humans were collected outdoors and indoors at the Turkey-Armenia border. A total of 1005 females were collected consisting of nine species. The dominant species was Aedes dorsalis (Meigen) (47.5% of total catch), followed by Anopheles hyrcanus (Pallas) (22.9%), Culex theileri (Theobald) (9.3%),Ae. vexans (Meigen) (6.6%), Ae. caspius (Pallas) (4.9%),Anopheles maculipennis s.l. (Meigen) (3.1%), Culex territans (Walker) (2.8%), Coquillettidia richiardii (Ficalbi) (1.6%), and Cx. pipiens L. (1.5%). The biting rate outdoors (15.1 mosquitoes/human/h) was greater than indoors (3.4 mosquitoes/human/h). The landing-biting of Ae. dorsalis peaked at dusk (19:15-19:45 h) and dawn (04:15-04:45 h). Ae. vexans activity increased soon after dark (20:15-20:45 h) and reached a peak at dawn (04:15-04:45 h). Maximum biting activity of An. hyrcanus and Cx. theileri occurred during the first sampling interval after dusk (20:15-20:45 h). A large number of An. maculipennis s.l. adults were collected during the second half of the night. We believe that these findings will contribute to decisions on the timing of mosquito control in Ararat Valley.

  2. MESSENGER Orbital Observations of Large-Amplitude Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves at Mercury's Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Torbjorn; Boardsen, Scott A.; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Raines, Jim M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    We present a survey of Kelvi\\ n-Helmholtz (KH) waves at Mercury's magnetopause during MESSENGER's first Mercury year in orb it. The waves were identified on the basis of the well-established sawtooth wave signatures that are associated with non-linear KH vortices at the magnetopause. MESSENGER frequently observed such KH waves in the dayside region of the magnetosphere where the magnetosheath flow velocity is still sub -sonic, which implies that instability growth rates at Mercury's magnetopau are much larger than at Earth. We attribute these greater rates to the limited wave energy dissipation in Mercury's highly resistive regolith. The wave amplitude was often on the order of ' 00 nT or more, and the wave periods were - 10- 20 s. A clear dawn-dusk asymmetry is present in the data, in that all of the observed wave events occurred in the post-noon and dusk-side sectors of the magnetopause. This asymmetry is like ly related to finite Larmor-radius effects and is in agreement with results from particle-in-cell simulations of the instability. The waves were observed almost exclusively during periods when the north-south component of the magnetosheath magnetic field was northward, a pattern similar to that for most terrestrial KH wave events. Accompanying plasma measurements show that the waves were associated with the transport of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere.

  3. The Galileo Earth encounter - Magnetometer and allied measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kivelson, M. G.; Kennel, C. F.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.; Southwood, D. J.; Walker, R. J.; Khurana, K. K.; Coleman, P. J.; Hammond, C. M.; Angelopoulos, V.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the Galileo magnetometer observations from the crossing of the tail magnetopause at an antisolar distance of close to 100 R(E) through exit into the solar wind on the dayside is presented. These measurements are linked with correlative data from ground stations and from IMP 8 which was ideally located to serve as a monitor of the solar wind upstream of the bow shock. A time line of the important geomagnetic events of the day that provides a framework for the full multiinstrument analysis of the flyby data is presented. The observations are used to investigate apsects of the relationship between magnetotail dynamics and the separate intensifications of a multiple onset substorm inferred from ground-based data. It is proposed that the signatures associated with individual substorm intensifications are localized in the dawn-to-dusk extent even at remote locations in the magnetotail, just as they are in the ionosphere, and that the tail disturbances associated with successive substorm intensifications step across the tail towards the dusk flank.

  4. Diurnal variations in, and influences on, concentrations of particulate and dissolved arsenic and metals in the mildly alkaline Wallkill River, New Jersey, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, J.L.; Wilson, T.P.; Szabo, Z.; Bonin, J.L.; Fischer, J.M.; Smith, N.P.

    2008-01-01

    Diurnal variations in particulate and dissolved As and metal concentrations were observed in mildly alkaline water from a wetlands site on the Wallkill River in northwestern New Jersey. The site, underlain by glacial sediments over dolomite bedrock, is 10 km downstream from a mined area of the Franklin Marble, host to Zn ores, also As and Mn minerals. In mid-September 2005, maxima and minima in dissolved-oxygen-concentration and pH, typically caused by photosynthesis and respiration, occurred at 2000 and 0800 hours. Concentrations of dissolved As (1.52-1.95 ??g/L) peaked at dusk (2000 hours), whereas dissolved Mn and Zn concentrations (76.5-96.9 and 8.55-12.8 ??g/L, respectively) were lowest at dusk and peaked at 1000 hours. These opposing cycles probably reflect sorption and desorption of As (an anion), and Mn and Zn (cations) as pH varied throughout the 24-h period. Doubly-peaked cycles of B, Cl, SO4, and nutrients also were observed; these may result from upstream discharges of septic-system effluent. Both recoverable amd particulate Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn concentrations peaked between 0200 and 0600 hours. The particulate metals cycle, with perturbations at 0400 hours, may be influenced by biological activity. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Asymmetric Magnetosphere Deformation Driven by Hot Flow Anomaly(ies)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safrankova, J.; Goncharov, O.; Nemecek, Z.; Prech, L.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    We present a case study of a large deformation of the magnetopause on November 26, 2008. The investigation is based on observations of five THEMIS spacecraft located at the dawn flank in the magnetosphere and magnetosheath, on Cluster measurements at the dusk magnetosheath, and is supported by ACE solar wind monitoring. The main revelation of our study is that the interaction of the IMF discontinuity with the bow shock creates either one very elongated hot flow anomaly (HFA) or a pair of them that is (are) simultaneously observed at both flanks. Whereas the dusk HFA is weak and does not cause observable deformation of the magnetopause, the pressure variations connected with the dawn HFA lead to a magnetopause displacement by approx. = 5 R(sub E) outward from its nominal position. This is followed by a rapid inward motion of the magnetopause approx. = 4 R(sub E) inward with respect to the model location. The surface deformation is so large that the outermost THEMIS spacecraft was in the magnetosphere, whereas the spacecraft located 9 R(sub E) inbound entered into the magnetosheath at the same time. The whole event lasted about 5 minutes.

  6. Asymmetries observed in Saturn's magnetopause geometry.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, N M; Achilleos, N; Arridge, C S; Guio, P; Masters, A; Ray, L C; Sergis, N; Thomsen, M F; Coates, A J; Dougherty, M K

    2015-09-16

    For over 10 years, the Cassini spacecraft has patrolled Saturn's magnetosphere and observed its magnetopause boundary over a wide range of prevailing solar wind and interior plasma conditions. We now have data that enable us to resolve a significant dawn-dusk asymmetry and find that the magnetosphere extends farther from the planet on the dawnside of the planet by 7 ± 1%. In addition, an opposing dawn-dusk asymmetry in the suprathermal plasma pressure adjacent to the magnetopause has been observed. This probably acts to reduce the size asymmetry and may explain the discrepancy between the degree of asymmetry found here and a similar asymmetry found by Kivelson and Jia (2014) using MHD simulations. Finally, these observations sample a wide range of season, allowing the "intrinsic" polar flattening (14 ± 1%) caused by the magnetodisc to be separated from the seasonally induced north-south asymmetry in the magnetopause shape found theoretically (5 ± 1% when the planet's magnetic dipole is tilted away from the Sun by 10-17°).

  7. 3D PIC Simulation of the Magnetosphere during IMF Rotation from North to South: Signatures of Substorm Triggering in the Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Cao. D/ S/; Lembege, B.

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional PIC simulations are performed in order to analyse the dynamics of the magnetotail as the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) rotates from northward to southward direction. This dynamics reveals to be quite different within meridian/equatorial planes over two successive phases of this rotation. First, as IMF rotates from North to Dawn-Dusk direction, the X-Point (magnetic reconnection) evidenced in the magnetotail (meridian plane) is moving earthward (from x=-35 Re to x=-17.5 ) distance at which it stabilizes. This motion is coupled with the formation of "Crosstail-S" patterns (within the plane perpendicular to the Sun-Earth mine) through the neutral sheet in the nearby magnetotail. Second, as IMF rotates from dawn-dusk to South, the minimum B field region is expanding within the equatorial plane and forms a ring. This two-steps dynamics is analyzed in strong association with the cross field magnetotail current Jy, in order to recover the signatures of substorms triggering.

  8. The global context of the 14 November 2012 storm event

    DOE PAGES

    Hwang, K. -J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Fok, M. -C. H.; ...

    2015-03-01

    From 2 to 5 UT on 14 November 2012, the Van Allen Probes observed repeated particle flux dropouts during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm as the satellites traversed the post-midnight to dawnside inner magnetosphere. Each flux dropout corresponded to an abrupt change in the magnetic topology, i.e., from a more dipolar configuration to a configuration with magnetic field lines stretched in the dawn-dusk direction. Geosynchronous GOES spacecraft located in the dusk and near-midnight sectors and the LANL constellation with wide local time coverage also observed repeated flux dropouts and stretched field lines with similar occurrence patterns to thosemore » of the Van Allen Probe events. THEMIS recorded multiple transient abrupt expansions of the evening-side magnetopause ~20–30 min prior to the sequential Van Allen Probes observations. Ground-based magnetograms and all sky images demonstrate repeatable features in conjunction with the dropouts. We combine the various in-situ and ground-based measurements to define and understand the global spatiotemporal features associated with the dropouts observed by the Van Allen Probes. We discuss various proposed hypotheses for the mechanism that plausibly caused this storm-time dropout event as well as formulate a new hypothesis that explains the combined in-situ and ground-based observations: the earthward motion of magnetic flux ropes containing lobe plasmas that form along an extended magnetotail reconnection line in the near-Earth plasma sheet.« less

  9. The global context of the 14 November 2012 storm event

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K. -J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Fok, M. -C. H.; Zheng, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Lee, J. -J.; Glocer, A.; Partamies, N.; Singer, H. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Mitchell, D. G.; Kletzing, C. A.; Onsager, T.

    2015-03-01

    From 2 to 5 UT on 14 November 2012, the Van Allen Probes observed repeated particle flux dropouts during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm as the satellites traversed the post-midnight to dawnside inner magnetosphere. Each flux dropout corresponded to an abrupt change in the magnetic topology, i.e., from a more dipolar configuration to a configuration with magnetic field lines stretched in the dawn-dusk direction. Geosynchronous GOES spacecraft located in the dusk and near-midnight sectors and the LANL constellation with wide local time coverage also observed repeated flux dropouts and stretched field lines with similar occurrence patterns to those of the Van Allen Probe events. THEMIS recorded multiple transient abrupt expansions of the evening-side magnetopause ~20–30 min prior to the sequential Van Allen Probes observations. Ground-based magnetograms and all sky images demonstrate repeatable features in conjunction with the dropouts. We combine the various in-situ and ground-based measurements to define and understand the global spatiotemporal features associated with the dropouts observed by the Van Allen Probes. We discuss various proposed hypotheses for the mechanism that plausibly caused this storm-time dropout event as well as formulate a new hypothesis that explains the combined in-situ and ground-based observations: the earthward motion of magnetic flux ropes containing lobe plasmas that form along an extended magnetotail reconnection line in the near-Earth plasma sheet.

  10. Polarized skylight does not calibrate the compass system of a migratory bat

    PubMed Central

    Lindecke, Oliver; Voigt, Christian C.; Pētersons, Gunārs; Holland, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    In a recent study, Greif et al. (Greif et al. Nat Commun 5, 4488. (doi:10.1038/ncomms5488)) demonstrated a functional role of polarized light for a bat species confronted with a homing task. These non-migratory bats appeared to calibrate their magnetic compass by using polarized skylight at dusk, yet it is unknown if migratory bats also use these cues for calibration. During autumn migration, we equipped Nathusius' bats, Pipistrellus nathusii, with radio transmitters and tested if experimental animals exposed during dusk to a 90° rotated band of polarized light would head in a different direction compared with control animals. After release, bats of both groups continued their journey in the same direction. This observation argues against the use of a polarization-calibrated magnetic compass by this migratory bat and questions that the ability of using polarized light for navigation is a consistent feature in bats. This finding matches with observations in some passerine birds that used polarized light for calibration of their magnetic compass before but not during migration. PMID:26382077

  11. Investigation of S3-2 satellite data for local time variation of energetic electron precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbe, S.; Sheldon, W. R.; Benbrook, J. R.; Bering, E. A.; Vampola, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Data on precipitating electrons from the S3-2 satellite were investigated for local time variation at four L = 4 stations in the southern hemisphere. The equatorial pitch angles of electrons mirroring at 100 km, assumed to be the edge of the bounce loss cone, are calculated for L = 4 using the International Geomagnetic Reference Field for the epoch of the S3-2 data, along with the variation in mirror altitude per degree of equatorial pitch angle. The largest obstacle to the investigation was uneven sampling in terms of local time for all of the stations. However, this situation was improved upon by the use of S3-2 measurements at the conjugate locations of the four stations which provided additional data on electrons in the southern hemisphere bounce loss cone. Evidence for an effect of the dawn-to-dusk geoelectric field was found at two of the stations, Halley Bay and Siple, in the form of a minimum in electron precipitation at dusk. However, the present study does not completely resolve the question of local time modulation of electron precipitation at L = 4 in the southern hemisphere. Furthermore, while the average precipitation was lowest at the Kerguelen site, as would be expected on the basis of drift loss cone (DLC) theories, the intensity at that site exceeds the level that is expected on the basis of these DLC theories.

  12. Low-energy plasma observations at synchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, W.; Reasoner, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The University of California at San Diego Auroral Particles Experiment on the ATS 6 satellite in synchronous orbit has detected a low-energy plasma population which is separate and distinct from both the ring current and the plasma sheet populations. The density and temperature of this low-energy population are highly variable, with temperatures in the range kT = 1-30 eV and densities ranging from less than 1 per cu cm to more than 10 per cu cm. The occurrence of a dense low-energy plasma is most likely in the afternoon and dusk local time sectors, whereas n greater than 1 per cu cm is seen in the local night sector only during magnetically quiet periods. These observations suggest that this plasma is the outer zone of the plasmasphere. During magnetically active periods this low-energy plasma is often observed flowing sunward. In the dusk sector, strong sunward plasma flow is often observed for 1-2 hours prior to the onset of a substorm-associated particle injection.

  13. SAID-SAPS Paradigm: Beliefs and Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E. V.

    2016-12-01

    Enhanced westward flows are the dominant feature of the plasma convection in the perturbed subauroral geospace. These include latitudinally-narrow "polarization jets" (PJ) or "subauroral ion drifts" (SAID) observed mainly in the premidnight MLT sector and broad flow channels on the duskside. The generic term "sub-auroral polarization streams" (SAPS) was introduced to unite both (narrow and broad) flows, taking for granted that their underlying mechanisms are quite similar, if not the same. The concept of voltage and current generators is believed to explain the SAPS major features. The generator paradigm treats hot, ≥1 keV, plasma sheet (PS) particles as single (test) particles driven by the dawn-to-dusk and co-rotation electric fields and gradient-curvature drift disregarding charge neutrality and concomitant polarization fields, inherent in slow plasma processes. In this approach, the inner boundary of the hot ion trajectories on the duskside extends earthward of that of the PS electrons by some distance increasing toward dusk. However, magnetically conjugate observations in the evening sector reveal that the generator paradigm fails to explain the substorm SAID features and that they are rather explained in terms of a short-circuiting of substorm-injected hot plasma jets over the plasmapause. This report presents multispacecraft magnetically conjugate observations of substorm-enhanced flows on the duskside showing that their features are hardly compatible with the (test particle) generator paradigm. It is suggested that they are causally related to the two-loop system of the westward traveling surge.

  14. Ramadan fasting and patients with renal diseases: A mini review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Emami-Naini, Afsoon; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Baradaran, Azar; Abedini, Amin; Abtahi, Mohammad

    2013-08-01

    Fasting during the month of Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam. During this month, adult Muslims are obligated to refrain from eating and drinking from dawn to dusk. Although based on Islamic principles patients are exempted from fasting, each year, many Muslim patients express their willingness to observe the fast in Ramadan month to respect the cultural customs. There are concerns about the impact of fluid restriction and dehydration during Ramadan fasting for patients with renal diseases. In this study, we reviewed the PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, SCIRUS, Embase, and DOAJ data sources to identify the published studies on the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with renal diseases. Our review on published reports on renal transplant recipients revealed no injurious effect of Ramadan fasting for the renal graft function. Nearly all studies on this topic suggest that Ramadan fasting is safe when the function of the renal graft is acceptable and stable. Regarding the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with chronic kidney disease, there is concern about the role of renal hypoperfusion in developing tubular cell injury. Finally, there is controversy between studies about the risk of dehydration in Ramadan in developing renal stones. There are uncertainties about the change in the incidence of renal colic in Ramadan month compared with the other periods of the year. Despite such discrepancies, nearly all studies are in agreement on consuming adequate amounts of water from dusk to dawn to reduce the risk of renal stone formation.

  15. Observations of IMF and seasonal effects in high-latitude convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Strong interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and seasonal effects in the convection of nightside ionospheric plasma are described. The findings are based on a statistical analysis of observations made with the Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Lab (JHU/APL) HF radar located at Goose Bay, Labrador. For positive sign of the IMF dusk-dawn component, By greater than 0 the dawn cell is more crescent shaped and the dusk cell more round while for BY less than 0 these pairings of size and shape are reversed. The more extreme crescent /round cell dichotomy is obtained for BY greater than 0. The return flows associated with the crescent-shaped cell dominate at midnight MLT (magnetic local time); the reversal in the zonal velocity in the 67 deg-69 deg lambda (magnetic latitude) interval occurs 2.5 hr earlier in summer than in winter. The maximum effects are obtained on the nightside for the pairings By greater than 0, summer and BY less than 0, winter; the first produces the more structured cell in the morning, the second in the evening, and this cell dominates the return flow at midnight. The difference in the zonal flow reversals for these pairings exceeds 4 hr in MLT.

  16. Occurrence rate of dipolarization fronts in the plasma sheet: Cluster observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Sudong; Zhang, Tielong; Wang, Guoqiang; Volwerk, Martin; Ge, Yasong; Schmid, Daniel; Nakamura, Rumi; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Plaschke, Ferdinand

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the occurrence rate of dipolarization fronts (DFs) in the plasma sheet by taking full advantage of all four Cluster satellites (C1-4) from years 2001 to 2009. In total, we select 466 joint-observation DF events, in which 318, 282, 254, and 236 DFs are observed by C1, C2, C3, and C4, respectively. Our findings are as follows: (1) the maximum occurrence rate is ˜ 15.3 events per day at X ˜ 15 RE in the XY plane, and the average occurrence rate is ˜ 5.4 events per day over the whole observation period; (2) the occurrence rate on the dusk side of the plasma sheet is larger and decreases with increasing BXY/BLobe; (3) the occurrence rate within |Y| < 6 RE increases gradually from X ≈ -19 to -15 RE and then decreases from X ≈ -15 to -10 RE; (4) the occurrence rate when AE > 200 nT is much larger than that when AE < 200 nT, indicating that DFs preferentially occur during high geomagnetic activity. The magnetic pileup and earthward and duskward ion flows could contribute to the increases in the occurrence rate from X ≈ -19 to -15 RE. We suggest that both geomagnetic activity and multiple DFs contribute to the high occurrence rate of the DFs. In addition, the finite length of the DF in the dawn-dusk direction can affect the chance that a satellite observes the DF.

  17. Asymmetries observed in Saturn's magnetopause geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilkington, N. M.; Achilleos, N.; Arridge, C. S.; Guio, P.; Masters, A.; Ray, L. C.; Sergis, N.; Thomsen, M. F.; Coates, A. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    For over 10 years, the Cassini spacecraft has patrolled Saturn's magnetosphere and observed its magnetopause boundary over a wide range of prevailing solar wind and interior plasma conditions. We now have data that enable us to resolve a significant dawn-dusk asymmetry and find that the magnetosphere extends farther from the planet on the dawnside of the planet by 7 ± 1%. In addition, an opposing dawn-dusk asymmetry in the suprathermal plasma pressure adjacent to the magnetopause has been observed. This probably acts to reduce the size asymmetry and may explain the discrepancy between the degree of asymmetry found here and a similar asymmetry found by Kivelson and Jia (2014) using MHD simulations. Finally, these observations sample a wide range of season, allowing the "intrinsic" polar flattening (14 ± 1%) caused by the magnetodisc to be separated from the seasonally induced north-south asymmetry in the magnetopause shape found theoretically (5 ± 1% when the planet's magnetic dipole is tilted away from the Sun by 10-17°).

  18. Impact of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field rotation from North to South on the Alfven Transition Layer: 3D Global PIC Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, DongSheng; Lembege, Bertrand; Nishikawa, Ken-ichi

    2017-04-01

    Using a global 3D PIC simulation, the solar-terrestrial magnetosphere interaction has been analyzed focusing on the 3D magnetic cusp region. Our recent global simulation results (Cai et al., JGR 2015) have reproduced the main features of the magnetic cusp under a northward IMF configuration comparing with the three-year statistical observations of Cluster satellites (Lavraud et al., JGR, 2005). One of the most important features found in our simulation is the existence of the Alfven Transition Layer (ATL) where Alfven Mach number is nearly zero almost adjacent to the upper stagnant exterior cusp (SEC). Its width measured near the SEC within the meridian plane varies from 1 to 4 Re. From the magnetosheath to SEC, the plasma flows transit from super to sub-Alfvenic regime. Striking features observed in the simulation is the unique depleted funnel shape ATL starting from the high altitude dusk to low altitude dawn above the magnetic cusp in a northward IMF. Both the ion and electron flux enter and spiral into the cups region through this depleted ATL with possibly a curvature drift. Varying IMF from north to south through dusk-dawn direction, this ATL persists although it drastically shrinks. Especially, in the southward IMF, the ion flux enters into the cusp region through the complicated ATL and bounce back to the magnetosheath. ATL can help us to investigate the complex structures of the magnetic cusp.

  19. 3D PIC Simulation of the Magnetosphere during IMF Rotation from North to South: Signatures of Substorm Triggering in the Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Cao. D/ S/; Lembege, B.

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional PIC simulations are performed in order to analyse the dynamics of the magnetotail as the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) rotates from northward to southward direction. This dynamics reveals to be quite different within meridian/equatorial planes over two successive phases of this rotation. First, as IMF rotates from North to Dawn-Dusk direction, the X-Point (magnetic reconnection) evidenced in the magnetotail (meridian plane) is moving earthward (from x=-35 Re to x=-17.5 ) distance at which it stabilizes. This motion is coupled with the formation of "Crosstail-S" patterns (within the plane perpendicular to the Sun-Earth mine) through the neutral sheet in the nearby magnetotail. Second, as IMF rotates from dawn-dusk to South, the minimum B field region is expanding within the equatorial plane and forms a ring. This two-steps dynamics is analyzed in strong association with the cross field magnetotail current Jy, in order to recover the signatures of substorms triggering.

  20. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide mediates circadian rhythms in mammalian olfactory bulb and olfaction.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jae-Eun Kang; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Wang, Thomas; Marpegan, Luciano; Holy, Timothy E; Herzog, Erik D

    2014-04-23

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the olfactory bulbs (OBs) function as an independent circadian system regulating daily rhythms in olfactory performance. However, the cells and signals in the olfactory system that generate and coordinate these circadian rhythms are unknown. Using real-time imaging of gene expression, we found that the isolated olfactory epithelium and OB, but not the piriform cortex, express similar, sustained circadian rhythms in PERIOD2 (PER2). In vivo, PER2 expression in the OB of mice is circadian, approximately doubling with a peak around subjective dusk. Furthermore, mice exhibit circadian rhythms in odor detection performance with a peak at approximately subjective dusk. We also found that circadian rhythms in gene expression and odor detection performance require vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) or its receptor VPAC2R. VIP is expressed, in a circadian manner, in interneurons in the external plexiform and periglomerular layers, whereas VPAC2R is expressed in mitral and external tufted cells in the OB. Together, these results indicate that VIP signaling modulates the output from the OB to maintain circadian rhythms in the mammalian olfactory system.

  1. DC and AC Electric Field Measurements by Spin-Plane Double Probes Onboard MMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Ergun, R. E.; Goodrich, K.; Torbert, R. B.; Argall, M. R.; Nakamura, R.

    2015-12-01

    The four spacecraft of the NASA Magnetospheric Multiscale mission (MMS) were launched on 12 March 2015 into a 1.2 x 12 Re equatorial orbit to study energy conversion processes in Earth's magnetosphere. After a 5-month commissioning period the first scientific phase starts on 1 September as the orbit enters the dusk magnetopause region. The Spin-plane Double Probe electric field instrument (SDP), part of the electric and magnetic fields instrument suite FIELDS, measures the electric field in the range 0.3 - 500 mV/m with a continuous time resolution up to 8192 samples/s. The instrument features adjustable bias currents and guard voltages to optimize the measurement performance. SDP also measures the spacecraft potential, which can be controlled by the Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) ion emitter, and under certain conditions can be used to determine plasma density. We present observations of DC and AC electric fields in different plasma regions covered by MMS since launch including the night side flow braking region, reconnection regions at the dusk and dayside magnetopause, and in the magnetosheath. We compare the electric field measurements by SDP to other, independent determinations of the electric field, in particular by the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI), in order to assess the accuracy of the electric field measurement under different plasma conditions. We also study the influence of the currents emitted by ASPOC and EDI on the SDP measurements.

  2. Distribution of thermal oxygen ions in the near earth magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Cao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Based on eleven years of Cluster particle observations, we investigate the distribution of thermal oxygen ions in the near earth magnetosphere with full spatial coverage between 4 to 20 Re. Averaged oxygen ion fluxes are calculated for three energy ranges (E1: 25-136eV; E2: 136eV-3keV; E3 3-35keV) based on measurements from CIS instrument. In a preliminary analysis, we found that oxygen ions of E1 energy are observed mostly in the Polar Regions flowing toward the nightside with average speed of ~20 km/s at 5 Re. They are accelerated to E2 energy range before they arrive at plasmasheet. Clear dawn-dusk asymmetry is observed in the plasmasheet for oxygen ions of the E1 and E2 energy that they are distributed beyond 10 Re on the duskside and beyond 15 Re on the dawnside, suggesting the transportation from ionosphere to plasmasheet is asymmetric for dawn and dusk sides. These oxygen ions are further accelerated in the plasmasheet to E3 energy range and are transported toward the Earth, while they drift westward. These oxygen ions finally reach the dayside, and then either return to the ionosphere or escape from the dayside magnetopause to magnetosheeth. This study provides background knowledge on complete distribution of thermal oxygen ions in the near earth magnetosphere for the modelling and simulation studies on ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling.

  3. MESSENGER observations of the energization and heating of protons in the near-Mercury magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W. J.; Raines, J. M.; Fu, S. Y.; Slavin, J. A.; Wei, Y.; Poh, G. K.; Pu, Z. Y.; Yao, Z. H.; Zong, Q. G.; Wan, W. X.

    2017-08-01

    The energization and heating processes for protons in the near-Mercury tail are examined with MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) observations. In a case study, suprathermal proton particle flux (STPF) and proton temperature are observed to be clearly enhanced during near-Mercury substorm dipolarizations, indicating the proton energization and heating processes. STPF and proton temperature distributions in near-Mercury central plasma sheets display dawn-dusk asymmetries, with higher values in the dawnside plasma sheet, i.e., postmidnight, than in the duskside, i.e., premidnight. Further investigations reveal that these asymmetries are more prominent during active periods in Mercury's magnetosphere, as compared to quiet periods. Magnetic field variations in the ZMSM component display a similar feature, with variations being more prominent on the dawnside than the duskside during active periods. We propose that the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the distributions of protons could be due to the fact that more substorm dipolarizations were initiated on the dawnside of Mercury's magnetotail.

  4. Polarized skylight does not calibrate the compass system of a migratory bat.

    PubMed

    Lindecke, Oliver; Voigt, Christian C; Pētersons, Gunārs; Holland, Richard A

    2015-09-01

    In a recent study, Greif et al. (Greif et al. Nat Commun 5, 4488. (doi:10.1038/ncomms5488)) demonstrated a functional role of polarized light for a bat species confronted with a homing task. These non-migratory bats appeared to calibrate their magnetic compass by using polarized skylight at dusk, yet it is unknown if migratory bats also use these cues for calibration. During autumn migration, we equipped Nathusius' bats, Pipistrellus nathusii, with radio transmitters and tested if experimental animals exposed during dusk to a 90° rotated band of polarized light would head in a different direction compared with control animals. After release, bats of both groups continued their journey in the same direction. This observation argues against the use of a polarization-calibrated magnetic compass by this migratory bat and questions that the ability of using polarized light for navigation is a consistent feature in bats. This finding matches with observations in some passerine birds that used polarized light for calibration of their magnetic compass before but not during migration. © 2015 The Author(s).

  5. Ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmapauses'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hoffman, J. H.; Maynard, N. C.

    1977-01-01

    During August 1972, Explorer 45 orbiting near the equatorial plane with an apogee of about 5.2 R sub e traversed magnetic field lines in close proximity to those simultaneously traversed by the topside ionospheric satellite ISIS 2 near dusk in the L range 2-5.4. The locations of the Explorer 45 plasmapause crossings during this month were compared to the latitudinal decreases of the H(+) density observed on ISIS 2 near the same magnetic field lines. The equatorially determined plasmapause field lines typically passed through or poleward of the minimum of the ionospheric light ion trough, with coincident satellite passes occurring for which the L separation between the plasmapause and trough field lines was between 1 and 2. Vertical flows of the H(+) ions in the light ion trough as detected by the magnetic ion mass spectrometer on ISIS were directed upward with velocities between 1 and 2 kilometers/sec near dusk on these passes. These velocities decreased to lower values on the low latitude side of the H(+) trough but did not show any noticeable change across the field lines corresponding to the magnetospheric plasmapause.

  6. Global Simulations of the Jovian Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chané, E.; Saur, J.; Poedts, S.

    2012-12-01

    We present global numerical simulations of the interactions between the solar wind and Jupiter's magnetosphere. In our model, an inner boundary region representing the effects of Jupiter's ionosphere (ion-neutral collisions) and the mass-loading associated with the Io torus are explicitly included. To test the quality of our model, the results of four simulations performed on a relatively coarse mesh, using different mass-loading rates and different ionospheric conductances are compared with analytical models, in situ measurements and remote-sensing observations. Our azimuthal velocity profiles and the position of the corotation break-down are in good quantitative agreement with Hill [1979, 2001], with profiles calculated with the model of Saur et al. [2004], and with Voyager observations [McNutt et al., 1981]. In addition, one simulation is performed on a high resolution mesh. The position of the corotation break-down in the equatorial plane maps, as expected, to the main auroral oval in the ionosphere with a clearly visible corotation enforcing current system. The dawn dusk asymmetry (Khurana, 2004) is also visible in the simulations, with a thicker current sheet on the dusk side and with faster azimuthal plasma flows on the dawn side. Finally, our simulations reproduce the discontinuity in Jupiter's main auroral oval in the prenoon sector observed by Radioti et al. (2008).

  7. Anomalous aspects of magnetosheath flow and of the shape and oscillations of the magnetopause during an interval of strongly northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Kivelson, Margaret G.; Gosling, Jack T.; Walker, Raymond T.; Lazarus, Allan J.

    1992-01-01

    On 15 Feb. 1978, the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) remained steadily northward for more than 12 hours. The ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft were located near apogee on the dawn side flank of the magnetotail. IMP 8 was almost symmetrically located in the magnetosheath on the dusk flank and IMP 7 was upstream in the solar wind. Using plasma and magnetic field data, we show the following: (1) the magnetosheath flow speed on the flanks of the magnetotail steadily exceeded the solar wind speed by 20 percent; (2) surface waves with approximately a 5-min period and very non-sinusoidal waveform were persistently present on the dawn magnetopause and waves of similar period were present in the dusk magnetosheath; and (3) the magnetotail ceased to flare at an antisunward distance of 15 R(sub E). We propose that the acceleration of the magnetosheath flow is achieved by magnetic tension in the draped field configuration for northward IMF and that the reduction of tail flaring is consistent with a decreased amount of open magnetic flux and a larger standoff distance of the subsolar magnetopause. Results of a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation support this phenomenological model.

  8. Disturbance diurnal electric field in Indian and American equatorial electrojet regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, R. G.

    1998-10-01

    The yearly mean Disturbance Daily (SD) variation, i.e., solar daily variation on International Disturbed days (Sd) minus that on International Quiet days (Sq) of the geomagnetic H field at Huancayo, an equatorial electrojet station in American zone, for any of the years 1954-61 shows a dawn-maximum and a dusk-minimum as observed at any low and middle latitude station. Contrary to this, the SD(H) variation at Kodaikanal, an equatorial station in the Indian zone, shows a prominent minimum around noon hours besides the usual dawn-maximum and dusk-minimum for any of these years. The amplitude of SD(H) at Huancayo or at Kodaikanal decreases with the decreasing solar activity. Seasonally, SD(H) is larger during equinoctial than during solsticial months. For any particular season, the SD(H) averaged for all hours of the day is lower at Huancayo than at Kodaikanal, while the Sq(H) at Huancayo is always greater than the corresponding amplitude of Sq(H) at Kodaikanal. Thus the sources of electrojet electric fields on quiet and on disturbed days seem to be different and need to be identified.

  9. The CUSP as a Source of Magnetospheric Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, Theodore A.; Chen, Jiasheng

    1999-01-01

    Observations made by the Polar satellite have shown that plasma of solar wind magnetosheath origin is rammed into the high altitude polar cusp creating a diamagnetic cavity of large dimensions. The Earth's dipole field can be excluded from this region in it turbulent manner with the magnitude of the field strength reaching close to zero nT at times. At such times energetic particles are produced in this region in intensities which exceed those measured in the trapping regions of the magnetosphere beyond L = 6.5. These particles can then flow back out of the cusp along field lines that form the magnetopause. A fraction of these particles can enter the magnetosphere along the magnetopause on the dusk and dawn flanks. Due to existing gradients in the geomagnetic field, cusp accelerated ions can enter the magnetosphere along the dawn flank and electrons along the dusk flank. For those particles entering near the geomagnetic equatorial plane with pitch angles close to ninety degrees they will drift along contours of constant magnetic field strength reaching deep into the nightside inner magnetosphere. From observations made by the Polar ATS-6, and ISEE satellites it is argued that this cusp source appears to be capable of providing energetic ions to the magnetosphere and possibly energetic electrons which form the source population of the Subsequent radial diffusion and formation of the radiation belts.

  10. Magnetospheric structure and dynamics: A multisatellite approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, W.J.

    1991-03-20

    This report reviews progress during the first year of a contract to study magnetospheric structure and dynamics. Four areas of scientific investigation are highlighted. Pressure gradients form in the geotail because ions drift preferentially toward the dusk flank. These pressure gradients drive field aligned currents that close in the ionosphere and which provide a natural explanation of the Harang discontinuity when the full electrodynamics are modelled. Observations made during a passage by DE 2 through the dayside cusp at a time when the IMF was directed northwards are consistent with magnetic merging occurring on field line that map to the poleward cusp boundary. The authors infer that tail lobe field lines were merging with magnetosheath field lines at the magnetopause tailward of the external cusp. During the March 1989 magnetic storm, the DMSP F9 spacecraft observed extensive substantial decreases in equatorial ion density in the post-dusk sector. Modelling calculations show that the depletions were caused by unusually large upward flows moving the equatorial F region peak above 850 km. Calculations of ion cyclotron wave group velocities show that they are sensitive to both the hot and cold plasma populations. Calculated group delays agree with their earlier observations.

  11. Diurnal lighting patterns and habitat alter opsin expression and colour preferences in a killifish.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ashley M; Stanis, Shannon; Fuller, Rebecca C

    2013-07-22

    Spatial variation in lighting environments frequently leads to population variation in colour patterns, colour preferences and visual systems. Yet lighting conditions also vary diurnally, and many aspects of visual systems and behaviour vary over this time scale. Here, we use the bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei) to compare how diurnal variation and habitat variation (clear versus tannin-stained water) affect opsin expression and the preference to peck at different-coloured objects. Opsin expression was generally lowest at midnight and dawn, and highest at midday and dusk, and this diurnal variation was many times greater than variation between habitats. Pecking preference was affected by both diurnal and habitat variation but did not correlate with opsin expression. Rather, pecking preference matched lighting conditions, with higher preferences for blue at noon and for red at dawn/dusk, when these wavelengths are comparatively scarce. Similarly, blue pecking preference was higher in tannin-stained water where blue wavelengths are reduced. In conclusion, L. goodei exhibits strong diurnal cycles of opsin expression, but these are not tightly correlated with light intensity or colour. Temporally variable pecking preferences probably result from lighting environment rather than from opsin production. These results may have implications for the colour pattern diversity observed in these fish.

  12. The origin of life and the left-handed amino-acid excess: the furthest heavens and the deepest seas?

    PubMed

    Goodman, Geoffrey; Gershwin, M Eric

    2006-11-01

    The origin of life is an extraordinary problem that leads back to the structure and dynamics of the cosmos and early development of organic molecules. Within that wider question lies an unsolved problem that has troubled biologists for 150 years. What is the origin of the dominant presence of left-handed stereoisomers of amino acids in nature even though their synthesis normally results in an equal mixture of the right- and left-handed molecular forms? We propose that asymmetric Earth rotation caused at dawn and dusk circularly polarized UV light (CPUVL) of opposite polarity and reversed temperature profiles in the oceans. Destruction of the d-isomer by CPUVL at dusk in a sea surface hotter than at dawn created a daily l-isomer excess protected from radiation by nightfall, preserved by down-flow (diffusive, mechanical) into cold, darker regions, eventually initiating an l-amino-acid excess embodied in early marine forms. Innumerable mechanisms have been proposed for the origin of l-chiral dominance in amino acids and none proven. Since the thalidomide tragedy, homochirality of amino acids has been a growing practical issue for medicine. Understanding its origin may bring further and unexpected benefits. It may also be a modest pointer to the possibility of positive answers to whether intelligent life will have the capacity to continue to protect itself from conditions inimical to survival.

  13. [What visual information does the automobile driver need for safe driving in street traffic?].

    PubMed

    Lachenmayr, B; Buser, A; Müller, S

    1994-06-01

    In daytime traffic the driver experiences a tremendous input of visual information: His problem is to extract the relevant stimuli in order to have an adequate reaction. Traffic at dusk or nighttime, however, is characterized by the fact that even a driver with full visual function approaches his physiological limit. By assessing real traffic situations under various circumstances of weather and illumination (daytime, dusk, nighttime, city traffic, country road) limits of adaptation luminance, object size, object contrast and color are demonstrated. In addition, typical distributions of luminance in the visual field of the driver and the distributions of size and location of relevant objects are quantified. For glare situations typical values of glare angle and corneal illuminance of the glare light and the induced reduction of contrast are determined. Our data demonstrate the type of visual information required by the driver in order to drive safely in road traffic. These data allow conclusions to be made with respect to minimum requirements of visual function for car drivers.

  14. Ulysses at jupiter: an overview of the encounter.

    PubMed

    Smith, E J; Wenzel, K P; Page, D E

    1992-09-11

    In February 1992, the Ulysses spacecraft flew through the giant magnetosphere of Jupiter. The primary objective of the encounter was to use the gravity field of Jupiter to redirect the spacecraft to the sun's polar regions, which will now be traversed in 1994 and 1995. However, the Ulysses scientific investigations were well suited to observations of the Jovian magnetosphere, and the encounter has resulted in a major contribution to our understanding of this complex and dynamic plasma environment. Among the more exciting results are (i) possible entry into the polar cap, (ii) the identification of magnetospheric ions originating from Jupiter's ionosphere, lo, and the solar wind, (iii) observation of longitudinal asymmetries in density and discrete wave-emitting regions of the lo plasma torus, (iv) the presence of counter-streaming ions and electrons, field-aligned currents, and energetic electron and radio bursts in the dusk sector on high-latitude magnetic field lines, and (v) the identification of the direction of the magnetic field in the dusk sector, which is indicative of tailward convection. This overview serves as an introduction to the accompanying reports that present the preliminary scientific findings. Aspects of the encounter that are common to all of the investigations, such as spacecraft capabilities, the flight path past Jupiter, and unique aspects of the encounter, are presented herein.

  15. Magnetic field observations during the ulysses flyby of jupiter.

    PubMed

    Balogh, A; Dougherty, M K; Forsyth, R J; Southwood, D J; Smith, E J; Tsurutani, B T; Murphy, N; Burton, M E

    1992-09-11

    The Jovian flyby of the Ulysses spacecraft presented the opportunity to confirm and complement the findings of the four previous missions that investigated the structure and dynamics of the Jovian magnetosphere and magnetic field, as well as to explore for the first time the high-latitude dusk side of the magnetosphere and its boundary regions. In addition to confirming the general structure of the dayside magnetosphere, the Ulysses magnetic field measurements also showed that the importance of the current sheet dynamics extends well into the middle and outer magnetosphere. On the dusk side, the magnetic field is swept back significantly toward the magnetotail. The importance of current systems, both azimuthal and field-aligned, in determining the configuration of the field has been strongly highlighted by the Ulysses data. No significant changes have been found in the internal planetary field; however, the need to modify the external current densities with respect to previous observations on the inbound pass shows that Jovian magnetic and magnetospheric models are highly sensitive to both the intensity and the structure assumed for the current sheet and to any time dependence that may be assigned to these. The observations show that all boundaries and boundary layers in the magnetosphere have a very complex microstructure. Waves and wave-like structures were observed throughout the magnetosphere; these included the longest lasting mirror-mode wave trains observed in space.

  16. Machine vision for airport runway identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Matthew; Moore, Andrew J.; Dolph, Chester; Woodell, Glenn

    2015-03-01

    For rigid objects and fixed scenes, current machine vision technology is capable of identifying imagery rapidly and with specificity over a modest range of camera viewpoints and scene illumination. We applied that capability to the problem of runway identification using video of sixteen runway approaches at nine locations, subject to two simplifying assumptions. First, by using approach video from just one of the several possible seasonal variations (no snow cover and full foliage), we artificially removed one source of scene variation in this study. Secondly, by not using approach video at dawn and dusk, we limited the study to two illumination variants (day and night). We did allow scene variation due to atmospheric turbidity by using approach video from rainy and foggy days in some daytime approaches. With suitable ensemble statistics to account for temporal continuity in video, we observed high location specificity (<90% Bayesian posterior probability). We also tested repeatability, i.e., identification of a given runway across multiple videos, and observed robust repeatability only if illumination (day vs. night) was the same and approach visibility was good. Both specificity and repeatability degraded in poor weather conditions. The results of this simplified study show that geolocation via real-time comparison of cockpit image sensor video to a database of runway approach imagery is feasible, as long as the database contains imagery from about the same time of day (complete daylight and nighttime, excluding dawn and dusk) and the weather is clear at the time of the flight.

  17. Differential success in sampling of Atlantic Forest amphibians among different periods of the day.

    PubMed

    Rocha, C F D; Siqueira, C C; Ariani, C V; Vrcibradic, D; Guedes, D M; Kiefer, M C; Almeida-Gomes, M; Goyannes-Araújo, P; Borges-Júnior, V N T; Van Sluys, M

    2015-05-01

    In general, anurans tend to be nocturnal, though diurnal activity is characteristic of some groups. Studies show that frog activity may be inferred based on the number of individuals collected at different periods of the day, during large-scale field surveys. We investigated the best period of the day to conduct amphibian sampling in nine Atlantic Rainforest areas in southeastern Brazil, based on intensive field surveys. At each locality we employed similar sampling effort during diurnal, crepuscular and nocturnal searches (totaling 704.5 sampling hours). We pooled data from all localities for each period and estimated the proportion of frogs of each species active at each period based on the total number of individuals and on the number of species found during all surveys for that period. We recorded a total of 817 individual frogs from 69 species. Species richness was highest at night (median = 12 species), intermediate at dusk (median = 8), and lowest during the day (median = 4). The percentage of the total number of individual frogs found (pooled species) was highest during the night (ca. 53%) and lowest during the day (ca. 14%). Analyzing each species separately, the number of individuals recorded was consistently higher at dusk and night for most species. Our study evidences a trend for nocturnal activity for most Atlantic Rainforest frogs, with few species having primarily diurnal habits. Those results may favor future studies and conservation efforts for amphibian species.

  18. Spatial distribution of auroral precipitation during storms caused by magnetic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagodkina, O. I.; Despirak, I. V.; Vorobjev, V. G.

    2012-03-01

    The global pattern of auroral precipitation and dynamics of precipitation boundaries during three different intensity magnetic storms driven by magnetic clouds were investigated. For the aim of the research, the empirical model (http://pgia.ru/lang/en/webapps/) in which the boundary locations of the auroral precipitation depend on the geomagnetic activity expressed by the AL- and Dst indices was used. The locations of the boundaries derived from DMSP F10-F15 spacecraft observations were compared to those obtained in the model and displayed reasonable agreement. We find a significant displacement to the lower latitudes of the diffuse auroral zone (DAZ) and auroral oval precipitation (AOP) region with the increase of magnetic activity. The planetary pattern of auroral precipitation indicated different dawn-dusk widening of the DAZ and AOP region (asymmetry) during both main and recovery phases of magnetic storms. Differences in the dawn-dusk widening (i.e., asymmetry) of the DAZ and AOP zone during magnetic storms appear to be sensitive to Dst, where the DAZ widens in the morning only, while the AOP widens in the evening under all Dst intensities, and widens significantly in the morning also for Dst<-100 nT. The average energy of precipitating electrons in both MLT sectors and both zones was estimated and compared with DMSP spacecraft data.

  19. Storm time observations of plasmasphere erosion flux in the magnetosphere and ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Coster, A. J.; Thaller, S.; Tao, J.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2014-02-01

    Plasmasphere erosion carries cold dense plasma of ionospheric origin in a storm-enhanced density plume extending from dusk toward and through the noontime cusp and dayside magnetopause and back across polar latitudes in a polar tongue of ionization. We examine dusk sector (20 MLT) plasmasphere erosion during the 17 March 2013 storm (Dst ~ -130 nT) using simultaneous, magnetically aligned direct sunward ion flux observations at high altitude by Van Allen Probes RBSP-A (at ~3.0 Re) and at ionospheric heights (~840 km) by DMSP F-18. Plasma erosion occurs at both high and low altitudes where the subauroral polarization stream flow overlaps the outer plasmasphere. At ~20 UT, RBSP-A observed ~1.2E12 m-2 s-1 erosion flux, while DMSP F-18 observed ~2E13 m-2 s-1 sunward flux. We find close similarities at high and low altitudes between the erosion plume in both invariant latitude spatial extent and plasma characteristics.

  20. Activation of MT(2) melatonin receptors in rat suprachiasmatic nucleus phase advances the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Hunt, A E; Al-Ghoul, W M; Gillette, M U; Dubocovich, M L

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the melatonin receptor type(s) (MT(1) or MT(2)) mediating circadian clock resetting by melatonin in the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Quantitative receptor autoradiography with 2-[(125)I]iodomelatonin and in situ hybridization histochemistry, with either (33)P- or digoxigenin-labeled antisense MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptor mRNA oligonucleotide probes, revealed specific expression of both melatonin receptor types in the SCN of inbred Long-Evans rats. The melatonin receptor type mediating phase advances of the circadian rhythm of neuronal firing rate in the SCN slice was assessed using competitive melatonin receptor antagonists, the MT(1)/MT(2) nonselective luzindole and the MT(2)-selective 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetraline (4P-PDOT). Luzindole and 4P-PDOT (1 nM-1 microM) did not affect circadian phase on their own; however, they blocked both the phase advances (approximately 4 h) in the neuronal firing rate induced by melatonin (3 pM) at temporally distinct times of day [i.e., subjective dusk, circadian time (CT) 10; and dawn, CT 23], as well as the associated increases in protein kinase C activity. We conclude that melatonin mediates phase advances of the SCN circadian clock at both dusk and dawn via activation of MT(2) melatonin receptor signaling.

  1. Observations of IMF and seasonal effects in high-latitude convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Strong interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and seasonal effects in the convection of nightside ionospheric plasma are described. The findings are based on a statistical analysis of observations made with the Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Lab (JHU/APL) HF radar located at Goose Bay, Labrador. For positive sign of the IMF dusk-dawn component, By greater than 0 the dawn cell is more crescent shaped and the dusk cell more round while for BY less than 0 these pairings of size and shape are reversed. The more extreme crescent /round cell dichotomy is obtained for BY greater than 0. The return flows associated with the crescent-shaped cell dominate at midnight MLT (magnetic local time); the reversal in the zonal velocity in the 67 deg-69 deg lambda (magnetic latitude) interval occurs 2.5 hr earlier in summer than in winter. The maximum effects are obtained on the nightside for the pairings By greater than 0, summer and BY less than 0, winter; the first produces the more structured cell in the morning, the second in the evening, and this cell dominates the return flow at midnight. The difference in the zonal flow reversals for these pairings exceeds 4 hr in MLT.

  2. Analysis and modeling of the GLO-1 observations of meteoric metals in the thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. A.; Broadfoot, A. L.; McNeil, W. J.; Lai, S. T.; Murad, E.

    1999-05-01

    The GLO-1 experiment measured the radiance of ambient atmospheric species and of meteoric metals, including Na, Mg, Mg+ and Ca+, along lines of sight with tangent altitudes between 120-350 km. The results confirm earlier observations of a strong dawn/dusk asymmetry in thermospheric ion density and the concentration of ion density near the geomagnetic equator. The data also show a substantial amount of neutral Na in the thermosphere, with a dawn/dusk asymmetry similar to the ions. We observe the presence of Ca+ and Mg+ in the relative abundance comparable to the abundance ratio in meteoric material and in the sun. We are also able to simultaneously observe Mg and Mg+ in a few cases, over a range of altitudes. We have developed a model in an attempt to better understand these features. The one-dimensional model realistically and comprehensively incorporates the deposition of cosmic dust, transport by the equatorial electric field and diffusion, and ion and neutral chemistry specific to the three metal species studied. The model is driven by a single source function for dust influx, so that it can be used to predict the relative amounts of one metal species to another. These features of the model allow for diurnal variations and variations in latitude, reproducing the observations reasonably well on average.

  3. Magnetotail origins of auroral Alfvénic power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Lotko, W.; Brambles, O.; Damiano, P.; Wiltberger, M.; Lyon, J.

    2012-09-01

    The generation of Alfvénic Poynting flux in the central plasma sheet and its polar distribution at low altitude are studied using three dimensional global simulations of the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction. A 24-hour event simulation (4-5 Feb 2004) driven by solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field data reproduces the global morphology of Alfvénic Poynting flux measured by the Polar satellite, including its dawn-dusk asymmetry. Controlled simulations show that the dawn-dusk asymmetry is regulated by the spatial variation in ionospheric conductance. The asymmetry disappears when the conductance is taken to be spatially uniform. The simulated Alfvénic Poynting flux is generated in the magnetotail by time-variable, fast flows emerging from nightside reconnection. The simulated fast flows are more intense in the premidnight sector as observed; this asymmetry also disappears when the ionospheric conductance is spatially uniform. Analysis of the wave propagation in the plasma sheet source region, near xGSM ≈ -15 RE, shows that as the fast flow brakes, a portion of its kinetic energy is transformed into the electromagnetic energy of intermediate and fast magnetohydrodynamic waves. The wave power is dominantly compressional in the source region and becomes increasingly Alfvénic as it propagates along magnetic field lines toward the ionosphere.

  4. MESSENGER observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz waves at Mercury's magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, T.; Boardsen, S. A.; Slavin, J. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Zurbuchen, T.; Raines, J. M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    We present a survey of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) waves at Mercury's magnetopause during MESSENGER's first Mercury year in orbit. The waves were identified on the basis of the well-established sawtooth wave signatures that are associated with non-linear KH vortices at the magnetopause. Remarkably, the results show that MESSENGER frequently observed such KH waves in the dayside region of the magnetosphere where the magnetosheath flow velocity is still sub-sonic, which implies that instability growth rates at Mercury's magnetopause are much larger than at Earth. The wave amplitude was often on the order of 100 nT or more, and the wave periods were ~10-20 s. A clear dawn-dusk asymmetry is also present in the data, with all of the observed events taking place in the post-noon and the dusk-side sectors of the magnetopause. This asymmetry is likely related to finite ion-gyroradius effects and is in agreement with the results from particle-in-cell simulations of the instability. Similar to most terrestrial events, the wave observations were made almost exclusively during periods when the north-south component of the magnetosheath magnetic field was northward. Accompanying measurements from the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) show that the waves were associated with a substantial transport of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere.

  5. The magnetic field of the equatorial magnetotail from 10 to 40 earth radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    A statistical study of IMP 6, 7, and 8 magnetotail magnetic field measurements near the equatorial plane reveals new information about various aspects of magnetospheric structure. More magnetic flux crosses the equatorial plane on the dawn and dusk flanks of the tail than near midnight, but no evidence is found for a dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field sector polarity. Field magnitudes within 3 earth radii of the equatorial plane near dawn are more than twice as large as those near dusk for Xsm = -20 to -10 earth radii. The frequency of occurrence of southward fields is greatest near midnight, and such fields are seen almost twice as often for Xsm = -20 to -10 earth radii as for Xsm beyond -20 earth radii. This latter result supports the idea that the midnight region of the tail between 10 and 20 is a special location where neutral lines are particularly apt to form. Such a neutral line will approach nearest the earth in the midnight and premidnight region, where substorms are thought to have their onset.

  6. The interaction of a magnetic cloud with the Earth - Ionospheric convection in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for a wide range of quasi-steady interplanetary magnetic field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, M. P.; Farrugia, C. J.; Burlaga, L. F.; Hairston, M. R.; Greenspan, M. E.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Lepping, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    Observations are presented of the ionospheric convection in cross sections of the polar cap and auroral zone as part of the study of the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the magnetic cloud of January 13-15, 1988. For strongly northward IMF, the convection in the Southern Hemisphere is characterized by a two-cell convection pattern comfined to high latitudes with sunward flow over the pole. The strength of the flows is comparable to that later seen under southward IMF. Superimposed on this convection pattern there are clear dawn-dusk asymmetries associated with a one-cell convection component whose sense depends on the polarity of the magnetic cloud's large east-west magnetic field component. When the cloud's magnetic field turns southward, the convection is characterized by a two-cell pattern extending to lower latitude with antisunward flow over the pole. There is no evident interhemispheric difference in the structure and strength of the convection. Superimposed dawn-dusk asymmetries in the flow patterns are observed which are only in part attributable to the east-west component of the magnetic field.

  7. On the influence of localized electric fields and field-aligned currents associated with polar arcs on the global potential distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Marklund, G.T.; Blomberg, L.G. )

    1991-08-01

    The influence of localized field-aligned current, associated with intense transpolar arcs mostly occurring during periods of northward interplaentary magnetic field (IMF), on the global electrodynamics has been investigated using a numerical simulation model. Idealized field-aligned current distributions representing both the region 1/2 system of the auroral oval and the transpolar arc as well as a corresponding ionospheric conductivity distribution are fed into the model to calculate the potential distributions. The transpolar arc has been represented by a few alternative field-aligned current distributions which are different in the way the downward return currents are distributed in the ionosphere. If the conductivity of the main auroral oval is comparable to that of the polar arc the dusk cell will have two local potential minima and thus a region of weak antisunward convection in between. Depending on the direction of the polar arc current sheets the dawn-dusk electric field will either be reversed (or weakened) or intensified at the location of the transpolar arc. The presence of a reversal depend, however, not only on the relative magnitude between the polar arc current sand those of the region 1/2 system but also on the characteristics of the acceleration region and of the conductivity distribution associated with the polar arc. Comparisons are made between the model results and Viking electric field data for a number of polar arc crossings to reveal the most common electrodynamical signatures of these auroral phenomena.

  8. Tidal influence on O(1S) airglow emission rate distributions at the geographic equator as observed by WINDII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephere, G. G.; Mclandress, C.; Solheim, B. H.

    1995-01-01

    WINDII, the Wind Imaging Interferometer on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, observes winds, temperatures and emission rates in the upper mesosphere and thermosphere. In this paper we report on nighttime observations of the vertical distribution of the O(1S) 557.7 nm emission near the geographic equator for March/April, 1993. The airglow volume emission rate distribution is found to be strongly dependent on local time. Beginning at dusk, an intense airglow emission layer descends from a mean altitude of 95 km, reaching 89 km by midnight after which the emission rapidly decays. Shortly after midnight it reappears weakly at a higher altitude and remains at this level as the emission rate gradually increases towards dawn. This strong local time dependence leads us to conclude that the effect is tidally driven. Comparison with the Forbes (1982a,b) model suggest that total density perturbations and changes in the atomic oxygen mixing ratio may the cause of the changes in emission rate distribution between dusk and midnight. The reappearance of the emission after midnight may be caused by downward winds bringing oxygen-rich air from above.

  9. DMSP F8 observations of the mid-latitude and low-latitude topside ionosphere near solar minimum

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, M.E.; Hughes, W.J. |; Burke, W.J.; Rich, F.J.; Heelis, R.A.

    1994-03-01

    The retarding potential analyzer on the DMSP F8 satellite measured ion density, composition, temperature, and ram flow velocity at 840-km altitude near the dawn and dusk meridians close to solar minimum. Nine days of data were selected for study to represent the summer and winter solstices and the autumnal equinox under quiet, moderately active, and disturbed geomagnetic conditions. The observations revealed extensive regions of light-ion dominance along both the dawn and dusk legs of the DMSP F8 orbit. These regions showed seasonal, longitudinal, and geomagnetic control, with light ions commonly predominating in places where the subsatellite ionosphere was relatively cold. Field-aligned plasma flows also were detected. In the morning, ions flowed toward the equator from both sides. In the evening, DMSP F8 detected flows that either diverged away from the equator or were directed toward the northern hemisphere. The effects of diurnal variations in plasma pressure gradients in the ionosphere and plasmasphere, momentum coupling between neutral winds and ions at the feet of field lines, and E {times} B drifts qualitatively explain most features of these composition and velocity measurements. 23 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Toroidal quarter waves in the Earth's magnetosphere: observational perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Jayashree; Sinha, A. K.; Vichare, Geeta

    2015-05-01

    Quarter waves in the Earth's magnetosphere are standing Alfvén waves excited on geomagnetic field lines when the conjugate ionospheres display strong asymmetry in conductivity. In this paper, we have examined the characteristics of these waves by analyzing two years (2007-2008) of magnetometer data from the geostationary satellite GOES-11. These waves are predominantly identified during quiet geomagnetic conditions based on interhemispheric conductivity contrast and opposite signs of wave reflection coefficients at the conjugate ionospheres. The observed frequencies are used in a numerical model to compute the equatorial ion density by assuming that the plasma consists only of protons at geostationary height during quiet conditions. The number density of protons thus obtained is compared with an empirical model. The phase difference between the waves observed at the satellite and northern conjugate ground station is in accord with model expectations for quarter mode waves. We also for the first time report the occurrence of an event depicting harmonically structured quarter wave oscillations. Statistical analysis of the seasonal and MLT (Magnetic local time) dependence of these oscillations shows that they mostly occur during solstices and around terminators (i.e. dawn and dusk time). In addition, it is observed that occurrence is more prevalent during dawn in the June solstice and dusk during the December solstice.

  11. Ramadan fasting and patients with renal diseases: A mini review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Emami-Naini, Afsoon; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Baradaran, Azar; Abedini, Amin; Abtahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Fasting during the month of Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam. During this month, adult Muslims are obligated to refrain from eating and drinking from dawn to dusk. Although based on Islamic principles patients are exempted from fasting, each year, many Muslim patients express their willingness to observe the fast in Ramadan month to respect the cultural customs. There are concerns about the impact of fluid restriction and dehydration during Ramadan fasting for patients with renal diseases. In this study, we reviewed the PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, SCIRUS, Embase, and DOAJ data sources to identify the published studies on the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with renal diseases. Our review on published reports on renal transplant recipients revealed no injurious effect of Ramadan fasting for the renal graft function. Nearly all studies on this topic suggest that Ramadan fasting is safe when the function of the renal graft is acceptable and stable. Regarding the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with chronic kidney disease, there is concern about the role of renal hypoperfusion in developing tubular cell injury. Finally, there is controversy between studies about the risk of dehydration in Ramadan in developing renal stones. There are uncertainties about the change in the incidence of renal colic in Ramadan month compared with the other periods of the year. Despite such discrepancies, nearly all studies are in agreement on consuming adequate amounts of water from dusk to dawn to reduce the risk of renal stone formation. PMID:24379850

  12. Deformation of the Earth's magnetosphere under low Alfven-Mach-number solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Masaki N.; Saito, Yoshifumi; Mukai, Toshifumi; Kuznetsova, Masha M.; Rastaetter, Lutz; Phan, Tai; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2012-07-01

    The density of the solar wind (SW) around the Earth's magnetosphere sometimes decreases to only several percent of the usual value, and such density extrema results in a significant reduction of dynamic pressure and Alfven Mach number (Ma) of the SW flow. Such density reduction plays an important role in magnetospheric phenomena; for instance, a magnetospheric expansion by a low density region of a coronal mass ejection causes an extreme enhancement of killer electrons in the radiation belt (Kataoka and Miyoshi, Geophys. Res. Lett., 2007). While simple expansion of the Earth's magnetosphere by the low dynamic pressure was assumed in previous studies, a recent simulation study predicted a remarkable dawn-dusk asymmetry of the magnetotail in shape under low Ma SW and Parker-spiral IMF configuration (Nishino et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2008). We further show evidence of strong deformation of the magnetotail under low Ma SW and Parker-spiral IMF conditions, based on Geotail observations on both the dawn and dusk sides. In addition to the magnetospheric expansion, the deformation during low Ma SW might also affect physical process there, changing drift passes of charged particles in the magnetosphere.

  13. Distribution of H2 in the Lunar Exosphere from LAMP Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Dana; Retherford, Kurt; Cook, Jason; Grava, Cesare; Greathouse, Thomas; Gladstone, Randy; Stern, Alan

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen gas (H2) has been detected in the Moon’s exosphere. It was identified spectrally during the LCROSS impact plume (Gladstone et al., 2010). Then it was found in LAMP data from the nominal exosphere (Stern et al., 2013). We examine the distribution of H2 in the lunar exosphere using a Monte Carlo model and data from the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) FUV imaging spectrograph onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). LAMP observations made in twilight, i.e., through illuminated exosphere, but with a footprint on the nightside of the Moon, are routinely made with LRO. However, during times when the beta angle of the orbit is close to beta=90°, a great portion of the nightside orbit is in the twilight viewing geometry. Using data from just behind the terminator on the post-dusk and pre-dawn sides, we compile a cumulative spectrum throughout LAMP’s bandpass. A dawn/dusk asymmetry is detected in the H2 abundance. Modeling is used to decipher the release mechanism and source distribution of diatomic hydrogen that best fits the observations. We examine the source rate and the total mass of the H2 exosphere consistent with the observations.

  14. F-region and Topside Plasma Response During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Fedrizzi, M.; Maruyama, N.; Richards, P.; Fang, T. W.; Codrescu, M.

    2015-12-01

    The noon to dusk mid-latitudes sector appears to be a preferred region for substantial rise in plasma density during elevated geomagnetic activity. Previous the plasma density increase in this sector was referred to as the "dusk effect" and more recently the "storm enhanced density". Certainly in some longitude sectors, if the increase in magnetospheric convection occurs at the appropriate Universal Time, the activity does not need to be particularly strong to produce a significant increase in plasma content, such as during the February 27th 2014 event when Kp reached only 6 but there was substantial loss of the FAA WAAS system. The March 2015 St. Patrick's Day storm was considerably more intense with respect to Kp and Dst, and different in timing and duration, so the response and longitude sectors affected were quite different. Numerical simulation of the St. Patrick's Day storm with a coupled thermosphere-ionosphere model (CTIPe) and a stand-alone ionosphere-plasmasphere code (IPE) can be used to understand the physical processes in the plasma and neutral response. In particular the focus is on the vertical distribution of the plasma from the F-region to the topside. The models can be used to assess the impact of electric fields, meridional neutral winds, and solar illumination aiding plasma buildup and storage, neutral composition creating depletions, and magnetospheric convection creating structure.

  15. The global context of the 14 November 2012 storm event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Fok, M.-C. H.; Zheng, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Lee, J.-J.; Glocer, A.; Partamies, N.; Singer, H. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Mitchell, D. G.; Kletzing, C. A.; Onsager, T.

    2015-03-01

    From 2 to 5 UT on 14 November 2012, the Van Allen Probes observed repeated particle flux dropouts during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm as the satellites traversed the post-midnight to dawnside inner magnetosphere. Each flux dropout corresponded to an abrupt change in the magnetic topology, i.e., from a more dipolar configuration to a configuration with magnetic field lines stretched in the dawn-dusk direction. Geosynchronous GOES spacecraft located in the dusk and near-midnight sectors and the LANL constellation with wide local time coverage also observed repeated flux dropouts and stretched field lines with similar occurrence patterns to those of the Van Allen Probe events. THEMIS recorded multiple transient abrupt expansions of the evening-side magnetopause ˜20-30 min prior to the sequential Van Allen Probes observations. Ground-based magnetograms and all sky images demonstrate repeatable features in conjunction with the dropouts. We combine the various in situ and ground-based measurements to define and understand the global spatiotemporal features associated with the dropouts observed by the Van Allen Probes. We discuss various proposed hypotheses for the mechanism that plausibly caused this storm-time dropout event as well as formulate a new hypothesis that explains the combined in situ and ground-based observations: the earthward motion of magnetic flux ropes containing lobe plasmas that form along an extended magnetotail reconnection line in the near-Earth plasma sheet.

  16. Low-frequency wave activity related to dipolarization fronts detected by MMS in the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Contel, O.; Retino, A.; Breuillard, H.; Mirioni, L.; Roux, A.; Chust, T.; Chasapis, A.; Lavraud, B.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Vaivads, A.; Fu, H.; Marklund, G. T.; Nakamura, R.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Moore, T. E.; Ergun, R.; Goodrich, K.; Needell, J.; Chutter, M.; Rau, D.; Dors, I.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Strangeway, R. J.; Le, G.; Bromund, K. R.; Plaschke, F.; Fischer, D.; Leinweber, H. K.; Anderson, B. J.; Argall, M. R.; Slavin, J. A.; Kepko, L.; Baumjohann, W.; Pollock, C. J.; Mauk, B.; Fuselier, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dipolarization fronts are often associated to reconnection jets in the magnetotail current sheet and are sites of important energy dissipation and particle energization. Since the launch on March 12th and until the 9th of July 2015, the MMS constellation has been moving from dawn to dusk in a string of pearls formation. Although particle instruments were rarely operating and only FIELDS instrument suite was often gathering data, the MMS spacecraft have detected numerous dipolarization fronts, in particular on May 15th. Since 9th of July, the MMS evolved into a tetrahedral configuration with an average inter-satellite distance of 160 km and was still able to detect dipolarization fronts in the dusk magnetotail. As the Larmor radius of thermal protons is about 500 km in this region and dipolarization fronts have a typical thickness of the order of the Larmor radius, such a separation allows us to investigate in detail the microphysics of dipolarization fronts. In this study, we focus in particular on low-frequency electromagnetic wave activity related to the fronts and discuss possible mechanisms of particle heating and acceleration both at large scales (string of pearls configuration) and at kinetic scales (tetrahedral configuration).

  17. Low-energy plasma observations at synchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, W.; Reasoner, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The University of California at San Diego Auroral Particles Experiment on the ATS 6 satellite in synchronous orbit has detected a low-energy plasma population which is separate and distinct from both the ring current and the plasma sheet populations. The density and temperature of this low-energy population are highly variable, with temperatures in the range kT = 1-30 eV and densities ranging from less than 1 per cu cm to more than 10 per cu cm. The occurrence of a dense low-energy plasma is most likely in the afternoon and dusk local time sectors, whereas n greater than 1 per cu cm is seen in the local night sector only during magnetically quiet periods. These observations suggest that this plasma is the outer zone of the plasmasphere. During magnetically active periods this low-energy plasma is often observed flowing sunward. In the dusk sector, strong sunward plasma flow is often observed for 1-2 hours prior to the onset of a substorm-associated particle injection.

  18. Radar observations of the seasonal migration of brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens Stål) in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Qi, H; Jiang, C; Zhang, Y; Yang, X; Cheng, D

    2014-12-01

    The summer and autumn migrations of the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) were observed in Southern China with a millimetric scanning entomological radar and a searchlight trap supplemented with capture in field cages, field surveys, and dissections of females. Nilaparvata lugens took off at dusk and dawn in summer, but in autumn there was sometimes only a dusk take-off. The variation of the area density of the radar targets indicated that flight durations were about 9-10 h. In summer, planthopper-size targets generally flew below 1800 m above ground level (AGL), although some insects reached 2000 m AGL; in autumn, they flew lower, generally below 1100 m although some insects reached 1700 m AGL. Multiple layer concentrations were seen every night in both summer and autumn. The depths of these layers in autumn were less than in summer. Nilaparvata lugens flew in strong winds; wind shear may be the main factor causing them to accumulate and form dense layers at certain heights. Nilaparvata lugens emigrating in summer from the vicinity of the radar site in the Northeastern Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, and carried by the prevailing southwesterly wind, would have travelled northeastwards and reached Northern Hunan Province. In autumn, with the prevailing northeasterly wind, emigrants would have reached overwintering areas (south of 21°N).

  19. Observational test of shock drift and Fermi acceleration on a seed particle population upstream of earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Sarris, E. T.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of proposed shock acceleration mechanisms as they operate at the bow shock in the presence of a seed energetic particle population was examined using data from simultaneous observations of energetic solar-origin protons, carried out by the IMP 7 and 8 spacecraft in the vicinity of the quasi-parallel (dawn) and quasi-perpendicular (dusk) regions of the earth's bow shock, respectively. The results of observations (which include acceleration effects in the intensities of the energetic protons with energies as high as 4 MeV observed at the vicinity of the dusk bow shock, but no evidence for any particle acceleration at the energy equal to or above 50 keV at the dawn side of the bow shock) indicate that the acceleration of a seed particle population occurs only at the quasi-perpendicular bow shock through shock drift acceleration and that the major source of observed upstream ion populations is the leakage of magnetospheric ions of energies not less than 50 keV, rather than in situ acceleration.

  20. Take-Off Time of the First Generation of the Overwintering Small Brown Planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus in the Temperate Zone in East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Sanada-Morimura, Sachiyo; Otuka, Akira; Matsumura, Masaya; Etoh, Tomoki; Zhu, Yeqin; Zhou, Yijun; Zhang, Gufeng

    2015-01-01

    Overseas migration of the small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén), occurs during the winter wheat harvest season in East Asia. Knowing the take-off time of emigrating L. striatellus is crucial for predicting such migrations with a simulation technique because winds, carriers of migratory insects, change continuously. Several methods were used in China and Japan from late May to early June 2012 and again in 2013 to identify the precise timing of take-off. These methods included: a tow net trap mounted to a pole at 10 m above the ground, a helicopter-towed net trap, and a canopy trap (which also had video monitoring) set over wheat plants. Laodelphax striatellus emigrated from wheat fields mainly in the early evening, before dusk. The insects also emigrated during the daytime but rarely emigrated at dawn, showing a pattern that is unlike the bimodal emigration at dusk and dawn of two other rice planthoppers, the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), and the white-backed planthopper, Sogatella furcifera (Horváth). There was no significant difference in the temporal pattern of take-off behavior between females and males of Japanese L. striatellus populations. PMID:25780936

  1. Woody clockworks: circadian regulation of night-time water use in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Resco de Dios, Víctor; Díaz-Sierra, Rubén; Goulden, Michael L; Barton, Craig V M; Boer, Matthias M; Gessler, Arthur; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Pfautsch, Sebastian; Tissue, David T

    2013-11-01

    The role of the circadian clock in controlling the metabolism of entire trees has seldom been considered. We tested whether the clock influences nocturnal whole-tree water use. Whole-tree chambers allowed the control of environmental variables (temperature, relative humidity). Night-time stomatal conductance (gs ) and sap flow (Q) were monitored in 6- to 8-m-tall Eucalyptus globulus trees during nights when environmental variables were kept constant, and also when conditions varied with time. Artificial neural networks were used to quantify the relative importance of circadian regulation of gs and Q. Under a constant environment, gs and Q declined from 0 to 6 h after dusk, but increased from 6 to 12 h after dusk. While the initial decline could be attributed to multiple processes, the subsequent increase is most consistent with circadian regulation of gs and Q. We conclude that endogenous regulation of gs is an important driver of night-time Q under natural environmental variability. The proportion of nocturnal Q variation associated with circadian regulation (23-56%) was comparable to that attributed to vapor pressure deficit variation (25-58%). This study contributes to our understanding of the linkages between molecular and cellular processes related to circadian regulation, and whole-tree processes related to ecosystem gas exchange in the field. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Diurnal lighting patterns and habitat alter opsin expression and colour preferences in a killifish

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ashley M.; Stanis, Shannon; Fuller, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation in lighting environments frequently leads to population variation in colour patterns, colour preferences and visual systems. Yet lighting conditions also vary diurnally, and many aspects of visual systems and behaviour vary over this time scale. Here, we use the bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei) to compare how diurnal variation and habitat variation (clear versus tannin-stained water) affect opsin expression and the preference to peck at different-coloured objects. Opsin expression was generally lowest at midnight and dawn, and highest at midday and dusk, and this diurnal variation was many times greater than variation between habitats. Pecking preference was affected by both diurnal and habitat variation but did not correlate with opsin expression. Rather, pecking preference matched lighting conditions, with higher preferences for blue at noon and for red at dawn/dusk, when these wavelengths are comparatively scarce. Similarly, blue pecking preference was higher in tannin-stained water where blue wavelengths are reduced. In conclusion, L. goodei exhibits strong diurnal cycles of opsin expression, but these are not tightly correlated with light intensity or colour. Temporally variable pecking preferences probably result from lighting environment rather than from opsin production. These results may have implications for the colour pattern diversity observed in these fish. PMID:23698009

  3. Short term variations in Jupiter's synchrotron radiation derived from VLA data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, H.; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Morioka, A.

    2011-12-01

    Jupiter's synchrotron radiation (JSR) is the emission from relativistic electrons in the strong magnetic field of the inner magnetosphere, and it is the most effective prove for remote sensing of Jupiter's radiation belt from the Earth. Although JSR has been thought to be stable for a long time, intensive observations for JSR have made after the collisions of comet P/SL9 to Jupiter in 1994, and these observations revealed short term variations of JSR on time scale of days to weeks. However, the mechanisms which cause the short term variations of total flux density and brightness distribution have not been revealed well. In order to reveal the mechanism of short term variations of JSR more precisely, we have made radio image analysis using the NRAO (National Radio Astronomy Observatory) archived data of the VLA [*]. Brice and McDonough [1973, Icarus] proposed a scenario for the short term variations: i.e, the solar UV/EUV heating for Jupiter's upper atmosphere drives neutral wind perturbations and then the induced dynamo electric field leads to enhancement of radial diffusion. It is also suggested that induced dynamo electric field produce dawn-dusk electric potential difference, which cause dawn-dusk asymmetry in electron spatial distribution and emission distribution. So far the following results have been indicated for the short term variations. Miyoshi et al. [1999, GRL] showed that a short term variation event at 2.3GHz is well correlate to solar UV/EUV flux variations. Tsuchiya et al. [2010, Adv. Geosci.] showed that JSR at 325MHz and 785MHz have short term variations. These JSR observations confirmed the existence of the short term variation which is caused by solar UV/EUV. However, the effect of solar UV/EUV heating on the spatial distribution of JSR has never been confirmed, so this study is the first attempt to confirm the solar UV/EUV effect on spatial distribution of JSR. We have selected the data observed from 28th Jan. to 5th Feb. 2000 at 327MHz

  4. Quasi-periodic injections of relativistic electrons in Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C.; Krimigis, S. M.; Andriopoulou, M.; Palmaerts, B.; Kurth, W. S.; Badman, S. V.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    Quasi-periodic, short-period injections of relativistic electrons have been observed in both Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetospheres, but understanding their origin or significance has been challenging, primarily due to the limited number of in-situ observations of such events by past flyby missions. Here we present the first survey of such injections in an outer planetary magnetosphere using almost nine years of energetic charged particle and magnetic field measurements at Saturn. We focus on events with a characteristic period of about 60-70 min (QP60, where QP stands for quasi-periodic). We find that the majority of QP60, which are very common in the outer magnetosphere, map outside Titan's orbit. QP60 are also observed over a very wide range of local times and latitudes. A local time asymmetry in their distribution is the most striking feature, with QP60 at dusk being between 5 and 25 times more frequent than at dawn. Field-line tracing and pitch angle distributions suggest that most events at dusk reside on closed field lines. They are distributed either near the magnetopause, or, in the case of the post-dusk (or pre-midnight) sector, up to about 30 RS inside it, along an area extending parallel to the dawn-dusk direction. QP60 at dawn map either on open field lines and/or near the magnetopause. Both the asymmetries and varying mapping characteristics as a function of local time indicate that generation of QP60 cannot be assigned to a single process. The locations of QP60 seem to trace sites that reconnection is expected to take place. In that respect, the subset of events observed post-dusk and deep inside the magnetopause may be directly or indirectly linked to the Vasyliunas reconnection cycle, while magnetopause reconnection/Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability could be invoked to explain all other events at the duskside. Using similar arguments, injections at the dawnside magnetosphere may result from solar-wind induced storms and/or magnetopause reconnection

  5. The search for Ar in the lunar atmosphere using the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's LAMP instrument.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J. C.; Stern, S. A.; Feldman, P. D.; Gladstone, R.; Retherford, K. D.; Greathouse, T. K.; Grava, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Apollo 17 mass spectrometer, LACE, first measured mass 40 particles in the lunar atmosphere, and over a nine-month period, detected variations correlated with the lunar day (Hoffman et al., 1973, LPSC, 4, 2865). LACE detected a high particle density at dusk (0.6-1.0x104 cm-3), decreasing through the lunar night to a few hundred cm-3, then increasing rapidly before dawn to levels 2-4 times greater than at dusk. No daytime measurements were made due to instrument saturation. Given the LACE measurements' periodic nature, and the Ar abundance in lunar regolith samples (Kaiser, 1972, EPSL, 13, 387), it was concluded that mass 40 was likely due to Ar. Benna et al. (2014, LPSC, 45, 1535) recently reported that the Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) aboard LADEE also detected Ar (mass 40) with similar diurnal profiles. We report on UV spectra of the lunar atmosphere as obtained by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Aboard LRO is the UV-spectrograph, LAMP (Lyman Alpha Mapping Project), spanning the spectral range 575 to 1965 Å. LAMP is typically oriented toward the surface and has been mapping the Moon since September 2009. LAMP also observes the tenuous lunar atmosphere when the surface is in darkness, but the atmospheric column below LRO is illuminated. We have previously used nadir oriented twilight observations to examine the sparse lunar atmosphere (Feldman et al., 2012, Icarus, 221, 854; Cook et al., 2013, Icarus, 225, 681; Stern et al., 2013, Icarus, 226, 1210; Cook & Stern 2014, Icarus, 236, 48). In Cook et al., 2013, we reported an upper limit for Ar of 2.3x104 cm-3. Since then, we have collected additional data and refined our search method by focusing on the regions (near equator) and local times (dawn and dusk) where Ar has been reported previously. We have carefully considered effective area calibration and g-factor accuracies and find these to be unlikely explanations for the order of magnitude differences. We will report new results, which provide much

  6. Investigation of storm time magnetotail and ion injection using three-dimensional global hybrid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Wang, X. Y.; Lu, S.; Perez, J. D.; Lu, Q.

    2014-09-01

    Dynamics of the near-Earth magnetotail associated with substorms during a period of extended southward interplanetary magnetic field is studied using a three-dimensional (3-D) global hybrid simulation model that includes both the dayside and nightside magnetosphere, for the first time, with physics from the ion kinetic to the global Alfvénic convection scales. It is found that the dayside reconnection leads to the penetration of the dawn-dusk electric field through the magnetopause and thus a thinning of the plasma sheet, followed by the magnetotail reconnection with 3-D, multiple flux ropes. Ion kinetic physics is found to play important roles in the magnetotail dynamics, which leads to the following results: (1) Hall electric fields in the thin current layer cause a systematic dawnward ion drift motion and thus a dawn-dusk asymmetry of the plasma sheet with a higher (lower) density on the dawnside (duskside). Correspondingly, more reconnection occurs on the duskside. Bidirectional fast ions are generated due to acceleration in reconnection, and more high-speed earthward flow injections are found on the duskside than the dawnside. Such finding of the dawn-dusk asymmetry is consistent with recent satellite observations. (2) The injected ions undergo the magnetic gradient and curvature drift in the dipole-like field, forming a ring current. (3) Ion particle distributions reveal multiple populations/beams at various distances in the tail. (4) Dipolarization of the tail magnetic field takes place due to the pileup of the injected magnetic fluxes and thermal pressure of injected ions, where the fast earthward flow is stopped. Oscillation of the dipolarization front is developed at the fast-flow braking, predominantly on the dawnside. (5) Kinetic compressional wave turbulence is present around the dipolarization front. The cross-tail currents break into small-scale structures with k⟂ρi˜1, where k⟂ is the perpendicular wave number. A sharp dip of magnetic field

  7. Equatorial counterelectrojets during geomagnetic storms and their possible dynamos in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Hashimoto, K. K.; Ebihara, Y.; Tsuji, Y.; Veenadhari, B.; Nishimura, T.; Tanaka, T.; Fujita, S.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2012-12-01

    During the substorm growth phase and storm main phase, the high pressure plasma accumulated in the cusp and mantle regions activates a dynamo for the dawn-to-dusk convection electric field and the Region-1 field-aligned currents (R1 FACs) [Tanaka, 1995]. The electric field and FACs are conveyed by the shear Alfven waves to the polar ionosphere and the electric field extends promptly to low latitude through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide [Kikuchi and Araki, 1979]. The electric field drives the DP2 currents at mid latitudes [Wilson et al., 2001; Tsuji et al., 2012] and intensifies the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) [Kikuchi et al., 1996, 2008]. The convection electric field extends to the inner magnetosphere promptly [Nishimura et al., 2009] and energizes the plasma in the partial ring current region with the help of the gradient and curvature drift [Ebihara and Ejiri, 2000], which in turn works as a dynamo for the dusk-to-dawn electric field and the R2 FACs. The dusk-to-dawn electric field causes the counterelectrojet (CEJ) at the equator when the IMF turns northward [Rastogi, 1975]. The CEJ often appears during substorms [Kobea et al., 2000; Kikuchi et al., 2000]. Both the R1 and R2 FACs are intensified by the substorm expansion, with the R2 FACs strong enough to cause the CEJ [Hashimoto et al., 2011]. The CEJ often occurs during the recovery phase of geomagnetic storms [Kikuchi et al., 2008; Tsuji et al., 2012], while the CEJ also appears during the storm main phase under the relatively stable southward IMF [Fejer et al., 2007; Veenadhari et al., 2010]. In this paper, we analyzed several storm events to identify the dynamo for the stormtime CEJ. The disturbance dynamo is a commonly accepted dynamo for the long lasting stormtime CEJ [Blanc and Richmond, 1980; Fejer and Scherliess 1997]. However, the observed rapid and periodic development of the CEJ should be attributed to the R2 FACs generated in the inner magnetosphere. Based on the magnetometer and radar

  8. Hybrid-Kinetic Modelling of Space Plasma with Application to Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paral, Jan

    A planet's magnetosphere is often very dynamic, undergoing large topological changes in response to high speed (˜400km/s) solar wind intervals, coronal mass ejections, and naturally excited plasma wave modes. Plasma waves are very effective at transporting energy throughout the magnetosphere, and are therefore of interest in the context of the coupling between solar wind and magnetosphere. Of relevance to this thesis is Kelvin-Helmholtz macro-instability. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) is excited by shear of the flows. KHI is commonly observed at equatorial regions of the magnetopause where fast flowing magnetosheath plasma may interact with slow bulk velocities of magnetospheric plasma. The instability is responsible for exciting shear Alfven waves which (at Earth) may be detected using the ground based magnetometers located at latitude of excited field lines. This thesis uses numerical modelling to understand and to explain the generation and propagation of the KHI in Mercury's magnetosphere. The instability is initiated close to the planet and convectively grows while being transported along the tail. When the wave amplitude reaches a nonlinear stage, the structure of the wave becomes complex due to the wrapping of the plasma into the vortex. A vortex structure is typical for KHI and it is used for identifying the wave in the data from satellites. The instability commonly occurs at the dawn or dusk flank magnetopause (MP) of Earth with approximately the same probability. But the data from NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft, currently in the orbit of the planet Mercury, suggest a strong asymmetry in the observations of KHI. It is shown that the KHI initiated near the subsolar point evolves into large-scale vortices propagating anti-sunward along the dusk-side MP. The simulations are in agreement with the third flyby of the MESSENGER spacecraft, where saw-tooth oscillations in the plasma density, flow, and magnetic field were observed. The observed asymmetry in the

  9. Impact of Feed Delivery Pattern on Aerial Particulate Matter and Behavior of Feedlot Cattle †.

    PubMed

    Mitloehner, Frank M; Dailey, Jeff W; Morrow, Julie L; McGlone, John J

    2017-03-01

    Fine particulate matter with less than 2.5 microns diameter (PM2.5) generated by cattle in feedlots is an environmental pollutant and a potential human and animal health issue. The objective of this study was to determine if a feeding schedule affects cattle behaviors that promote PM2.5 in a commercial feedlot. The study used 2813 crossbred steers housed in 14 adjacent pens at a large-scale commercial West Texas feedlot. Treatments were conventional feeding at 0700, 1000, and 1200 (CON) or feeding at 0700, 1000, and 1830 (ALT), the latter feeding time coincided with dusk. A mobile behavior lab was used to quantify behaviors of steers that were associated with generation of PM2.5 (e.g., fighting, mounting of peers, and increased locomotion). PM2.5 samplers measured respirable particles with a mass median diameter ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5) every 15 min over a period of 7 d in April and May. Simultaneously, the ambient temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction, precipitation, air pressure, and solar radiation were measured with a weather station. Elevated downwind PM2.5 concentrations were measured at dusk, when cattle that were fed according to the ALT vs. the CON feeding schedule, demonstrated less PM2.5-generating behaviors (p < 0.05). At dusk, steers on ALT vs. CON feeding schedules ate or were waiting to eat (standing in second row behind feeding cattle) at much greater rates (p < 0.05). Upwind PM2.5 concentrations were similar between the treatments. Downwind PM2.5 concentrations averaged over 24 h were lower from ALT compared with CON pens (0.072 vs. 0.115 mg/m³, p < 0.01). However, dry matter intake (DMI) was less (p < 0.05), and average daily gain (ADG) tended to be less (p < 0.1) in cattle that were fed according to the ALT vs. the CON feeding schedules, whereas feed efficiency (aka gain to feed, G:F) was not affected. Although ALT feeding may pose a challenge in feed delivery and labor scheduling, cattle exhibited fewer PM2.5-generating behaviors and

  10. Potential causes and consequences of behavioural resilience and resistance in malaria vector populations: a mathematical modelling analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The ability of mosquitoes to evade fatal exposure to insecticidal nets and sprays represents the primary obstacle to eliminating malaria. However, it remains unclear which behaviours are most important for buffering mosquito and parasite populations against vector control. Methods Simulated life histories were used to compare the impact of alternative feeding behaviour strategies upon overall lifetime feeding success, and upon temporal distributions of successful feeds and biting rates experienced by unprotected humans, in the presence and absence of insecticidal nets. Strictly nocturnal preferred feeding times were contrasted with 1) a wider preference window extending to dawn and dusk, and 2) crepuscular preferences wherein foraging is suppressed when humans sleep and can use nets but is maximal immediately before and after. Simulations with diversion and mortality parameters typical of endophagic, endophilic African vectors, such as Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus, were compared with those for endophagic but exophilic species, such as Anopheles arabiensis, that also enter houses but leave earlier before lethal exposure to insecticide-treated surfaces occurs. Results Insecticidal nets were predicted to redistribute successful feeding events to dawn and dusk where these were included in the profile of innately preferred feeding times. However, predicted distributions of biting unprotected humans were unaffected because extended host-seeking activity was redistributed to innately preferred feeding times. Recently observed alterations of biting activity distributions therefore reflect processes not captured in this model, such as evolutionary selection of heritably modified feeding time preferences or phenotypically plastic expression of feeding time preference caused by associative learning. Surprisingly, endophagy combined with exophily, among mosquitoes that enter houses but then feed and/or rest briefly before rapidly exiting, consistently

  11. Behavior of zonal ion drifts in low and middle latitude ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Sasmita

    The Earth's environment consists of a neutral and an ionized atmosphere. The neutral atmosphere can be divided by its temperature profile into the troposphere (0-12 km), the stratosphere (12-45 km), the mesosphere (45-85 km), the thermosphere (85-1000 km) and exosphere (>1000 km). The Earth's ionized atmosphere is typically divided by density and composition into the ionosphere (70-1000 km), the plasmasphere (1000 km to 4 Re for MLAT less than 60°), and the magnetosphere extending to nearly 8 Re on the dayside and to approximately 1000 Re on the nightside. The Earth's ionosphere does not get direct energy from the solar wind because it is shielded by its magnetic field. The region of geospace is dominated by Earth's magnetic field is called the magnetosphere and outermost edge of the magnetosphere, called the magnetopause is maintained by the charged particles from the solar wind flowing along the boundary. The largest energy transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere is driven by an electric field directed dawn to dusk. This limited study shows that during large magnetic storms, ion drifts driven by the magnetosphere penetrate to latitudes as low as the dip equator on the dusk side and extend a few degrees equatorward of the auroral zone on the dawn side. A description of the evolution of the auroral precipitation and the zonal ion drifts at high latitudes during times of extreme storm activity is produced by applying some quantitative definitions that allow us to identify the expansion and penetration of the high-latitude zonal ion drifts to middle and low latitudes in the ionosphere. Times are identified when ion drifts driven from the magnetosphere exist at latitudes inside the plasmasphere and when regions below the auroral zone may be influenced by a disturbance dynamo. The resolved boundaries in the ion drifts and the electron precipitation allow us to distinguish penetration events from sub-auroral polarization fields. This limited study also shows

  12. Elements of M-I Coupling in Repetitive Substorm Activity Driven by Interplanetary CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Sandholt, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    By means of case studies we explore key elements of the magnetosphere-ionosphere current system associated with repetitive substorm activity during persistent strong forcing by ICMEs. Our approach consists of a combination of the magnetospheric and ionospheric perspectives on the substorm activity. The first aspect is the near-Earth plasma sheet with its repetitive excitations of the substorm current wedge, as monitored by spacecraft GOES-10 when it traversed the 2100-0300 MLT sector, and its coupling to the westward auroral electrojet (WEJ) centered near midnight during the stable interplanetary (IP) conditions. The second aspect is the excitation of Bostrom type II currents maximizing at dusk and dawn and their associated ionospheric Pedersen current closure giving rise to EEJ (WEJ) events at dusk (dawn). As documented in our study, this aspect is related to the braking phase of Earthward-moving dipolarization fronts-bursty bulk flows. We follow the magnetospheric flow/field events from spacecraft Geotail in the midtail (X = - 11 Re) lobe to geostationary altitude at pre-dawn MLTs (GOES 10). The associated M-I coupling is obtained from ground-satellite conjunctions across the double auroral oval configuration along the meridian at dusk. By this technique we distinguish between ionospheric manifestations in three latitude regimes: (i) auroral oval south, (ii) auroral oval north, and (iii) polar cap. Regime (iii) is characterized by events of enhanced antisunward convection near the polar cap boundary (flow channel events) and in the central polar cap (PCN-index events). The repetitive substorm activity is discussed in the context of the level of IP driving as given by the geoeffective IP electric field (E_KL), magnetotail reconnection (inferred from the PCN-index and spacecraft Wind at X = - 77 Re) and the storm SYM-H index. We distinguish between different variants of the repetitive substorm activity, giving rise to electrojet (AL)-plasma convection (PCN) events

  13. Calculating Hemispheric Power and Joule Heating using Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F13 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M.; Emery, B. A.; Maute, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) simulates the thermosphere-ionosphere with self consistent electrodynamics. The Weimer 2005 ion convection model can be used with a parameterized model of the aurora based on the electron auroral hemispheric power. The spatial location and radius of the auroral model is adjusted with respect to the Weimer 2005 boundary for zero electric potential, but the resulting Joule heating may be an under or over estimation of the real magnetosphere-ionosphere energy transfer. To improve the auroral model so that the resulting Joule heating is relatively realistic is the ultimate aim of this project. To this end, we achieve a number of sub-goals using data from the DMSP-F13, which is in a dawn-dusk orbit. We use data from the Ion Drift Meter (IDM) to quantify the relative positions of the convection reversal boundary (CRB), the cross-track ion drift (Vy) sunward peaks, and the equatorward boundary of zero velocities (or zero electric potential) and compare them to Weimer 2005 positions for the same orbits. The electric field is estimated only from the cross-track ion velocity Vy in the dawn-dusk orbits, while the along-track ion velocity Vx is ignored. We also calculate auroral Pederson conductance using the auroral electron energy flux and mean electron energy measurements from the DMSP Special Sensor Precipitating Electron and Ion Spectrometer (SSJ/4). The hemispheric power is estimated from the electron energy flux. The Joule heating is approximately the product of the Pedersen conductance and the square of the electric field, where we include Pedersen conductance from EUV and from the aurora to estimate EUV Joule heating and particle Joule heating. Our results for a range of Bz Interplanetary Magnetic Fields (IMF Bz) values show that the hemispheric power is largest in the morning sector where the aurora is widest. The aurora mostly lies in the sunward ion flow region and thus the integrated

  14. Dipolarization fronts as earthward propagating flux ropes: A three-dimensional global hybrid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Ge, Yasong; Wang, Rongsheng; Zhou, Meng; Fu, Huishan; Huang, Can; Wu, Mingyu; Wang, Shui

    2015-08-01

    Dipolarization fronts (DFs) as earthward propagating flux ropes (FRs) in the Earth's magnetotail are presented and investigated with a three-dimensional (3-D) global hybrid simulation for the first time. In the simulation, several small-scale earthward propagating FRs are found to be formed by multiple X line reconnection in the near tail. During their earthward propagation, the magnetic field Bz of the FRs becomes highly asymmetric due to the imbalance of the reconnection rates between the multiple X lines. At the later stage, when the FRs approach the near-Earth dipole-like region, the antireconnection between the southward/negative Bz of the FRs and the northward geomagnetic field leads to the erosion of the southward magnetic flux of the FRs, which further aggravates the Bz asymmetry. Eventually, the FRs merge into the near-Earth region through the antireconnection. These earthward propagating FRs can fully reproduce the observational features of the DFs, e.g., a sharp enhancement of Bz preceded by a smaller amplitude Bz dip, an earthward flow enhancement, the presence of the electric field components in the normal and dawn-dusk directions, and ion energization. Our results show that the earthward propagating FRs can be used to explain the DFs observed in the magnetotail. The thickness of the DFs is on the order of several ion inertial lengths, and the electric field normal to the front is found to be dominated by the Hall physics. During the earthward propagation from the near-tail to the near-Earth region, the speed of the FR/DFs increases from ~150 km/s to ~1000 km/s. The FR/DFs can be tilted in the GSM (x, y) plane with respect to the y (dawn-dusk) axis and only extend several Earth radii in this direction. Moreover, the structure and evolution of the FRs/DFs are nonuniform in the dawn-dusk direction, which indicates that the DFs are essentially 3-D.

  15. Dipolarization fronts as earthward propagating flux ropes: A three-dimensional global hybrid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, S.; Lu, Q.; Lin, Y.; Wang, X.; Ge, Y.; Wang, R.; Zhou, M.; Fu, H.; Huang, C.; Wu, M.; Wang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Dipolarization fronts (DFs) as earthward propagating flux ropes (FRs) in the Earth's magnetotail are presented and investigated with a three-dimensional (3-D) global hybrid simulation for the first time. In the simulation, several small-scale earthward propagating FRs are found to be formed by multiple X-line reconnection in the near-tail. During their earthward propagation, the magnetic field Bz of the FRs becomes highly asymmetric due to the imbalance of the reconnection rates between the multiple X-lines. At the later stage, when the FRs approach the near-Earth dipole-like region, the anti-reconnection between the southward/negative Bz of the FRs and the northward geomagnetic field leads to the erosion of the southward magnetic flux of the FRs, which further aggravates the Bz asymmetry. Eventually, the FRs merge into the near-Earth region through the anti-reconnection. These earthward propagating FRs can fully reproduce the observational features of the DFs, e.g., a sharp enhancement of Bz preceded by a smaller amplitude Bz dip, an earthward flow enhancement, the presence of the electric field components in the normal and dawn-dusk directions, and ion energization. Our results show that the earthward propagating FRs can be used to explain the DFs observed in the magnetotail. The thickness of the DFs is on the order of several ion inertial lengths, and the electric field normal to the front is found to be dominated by the Hall physics. During the earthward propagation from the near-tail to the near-Earth region, the speed of the FR/DFs increases from ~150km/s to ~1000km/s. The FR/DFs can be tilted in the GSM xy plane with respect to the y (dawn-dusk) axis and only extend several RE in this direction. Moreover, the structure and evolution of the FRs/DFs are non-uniform in the dawn-dusk direction, which indicates that the DFs are essentially 3-D.

  16. Circadian regulation of teleost retinal cone movements in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In the retinas of many species of lower vertebrates, retinal photoreceptors and pigment epithelium pigment granules undergo daily movements in response to both diurnal, and in the case of teleost cone photoreceptors, endogenous circadian signals. Typically, these cone movements take place at dawn and at dusk when teleosts are maintained on a cyclic light (LD) regime, and at expected dawn and expected dusk when animals are maintained in continuous darkness (DD). Because these movements are so strictly controlled, they provide an overt indicator of the stage of the underlying clock mechanism. In this study we report that both light-induced and circadian-driven cone myoid movements in the Midas cichlid (Cichlasoma citrinellum), occur normally in vitro. Many of the features of retinomotor movements found in vivo also occur in our culture conditions, including responses to light and circadian stimuli and dopamine. Circadian induced predawn contraction and maintenance of expected day position in response to circadian modulation, are also normal. Our studies suggest that circadian regulation of cone myoid movement in vitro is mediated locally by dopamine, acting via a D2 receptor. Cone myoid contraction can be induced at midnight and expected mid-day by dark culture with dopamine or the D2 receptor agonist LY171555. Further, circadian induced predawn contraction can be increased with either dopamine or LY171555, or may be reversed with the dopamine D2 antagonist, sulpiride. Sulpiride will also induce cone myoid elongation in retinal cultures at expected mid- day, but will not induce cone myoid elongation at dusk. In contrast, circadian cone myoid movements in vitro were unaffected by the D1 receptor agonist SCH23390, or the D1 receptor antagonist SKF38393. Our short-term culture experiments indicate that circadian regulation of immediate cone myoid movement does not require humoral control but is regulated locally within the retina. The inclusion of dopamine, or dopamine

  17. Space-based pseudo-fixed latitude observation mode based on the characteristics of geosynchronous orbit belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yun-peng; Chen, Lei; Huang, Jian-yu

    2017-08-01

    The US Lincoln Laboratory proved that space-based visible (SBV) observation is efficient to observe space objects, especially Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) objects. After that, SBV observation plays an important role in the space surveillance. In this paper, a novel space-based observation mode is designed to observe all the GEO objects in a relatively short time. A low earth orbit (LEO) satellite, especially a dawn-dusk sun-synchronous orbit satellite, is useful for space-based observation. Thus, the observation mode for GEO objects is based on a dawn-dusk sun-synchronous orbit satellite. It is found that the Pinch Point (PP) regions proposed by the US Lincoln Laboratory are spreading based on the analysis of the evolution principles of GEO objects. As the PP regions becoming more and more widely in the future, many strategies based on it may not be efficient any more. Hence, the key point of the space-based observation strategy design for GEO objects should be emphasized on the whole GEO belt as far as possible. The pseudo-fixed latitude observation mode is proposed in this paper based on the characteristics of GEO belt. Unlike classical space-based observation modes, pseudo-fixed latitude observation mode makes use of the one-dimensional attitude adjustment of the observation satellite. The pseudo-fixed latitude observation mode is more reliable and simple in engineering, compared with the gazing observation mode which needs to adjust the attitude from the two dimensions. It includes two types of attitude adjustment, i.e. daily and continuous attitude adjustment. Therefore, the pseudo-fixed latitude observation mode has two characteristics. In a day, the latitude of the observation region is fixed and the scanning region is about a rectangle, while the latitude of the observation region centre changes each day in a long term based on a daily strategy. The capabilities of a pseudo-fixed latitude observation instrument with a 98° dawn-dusk sun-synchronous orbit are

  18. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging at Low Altitudes from the Swedish Microsatellite Astrid: Images and Spectral Analysis. Paper 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Pontus C:son; Barabash, Stas; Norberg, Olle; Lundin, Rickard; Roelof, Rdmond C.; Chase, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) in the energy range 26- 52 keV are reported from four occasions during geomagnetically disturbed periods. The data were acquired by the ENA imager flown on the Swedish microsatellite Astrid in a 1000 km circular orbit with 83 deg inclination. The ENA imager separates charged particles from neutrals through an electrostatic deflection system in the energy range between 0.1 and 114 keV. ENA images obtained from vantage points in the polar cap and in the afternoon magnetic local time (MLT) hours looking into the antisunward hemisphere show intense ENA fluxes (approx. 10(exp 4)/sq cm sr s over 26-37 keV) coming from the dusk region and low altitudes (approx. 300 km). The morphology shows no relation to local magnetic field excluding the possibility of charged particle detection. It is concluded that the source of these ENAs are precipitating/mirroring ions from the ring current/trapped radiation interacting with the exobase on auroral L-shells and in the dusk region. The observed ENA fluxes show a relation with Kp and Dst geomagnetic indices. The observed ENA spectrum from a geomagnetic storm on February 8, 1995, is investigated in more detail and compared to the parent ion spectrum obtained by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Project (DMSP) satellite, Fl2, during the same period on L = 6 +/- 2 around dusk. The observed ENA spectral slope is used to derive the parent ion spectral temperature. The derived ion temperatures range is 3.0 - 6.0 keV for H and 4.5 - 8.5 keV for O. The higher of these ion temperatures comes closest in agreement to the extrapolated DMSP spectrum leading us to favor O over H as the species of the detected ENAS. It is shown that the detected ENAs must have been produced at L greater than or equal to 6 to reach the detector without atmospheric attenuation and that the main energy dependence of the ENA spectrum, apart from the parent ion spectrum, is governed by the energy dependence of the charge

  19. Substorms and polar cap convection: the 10 January 2004 interplanetary CME case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andalsvik, Y.; Sandholt, P. E.; Farrugia, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    The expansion-contraction model of Dungey cell plasma convection has two different convection sources, i.e. reconnections at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail. The spatial-temporal structure of the nightside source is not yet well understood. In this study we shall identify temporal variations in the winter polar cap convection structure during substorm activity under steady interplanetary conditions. Substorm activity (electrojets and particle precipitations) is monitored by excellent ground-satellite DMSP F15 conjunctions in the dusk-premidnight sector. We take advantage of the wide latitudinal coverage of the IMAGE chain of ground magnetometers in Svalbard - Scandinavia - Russia for the purpose of monitoring magnetic deflections associated with polar cap convection and substorm electrojets. These are augmented by direct observations of polar cap convection derived from SuperDARN radars and cross-track ion drift observations during traversals of polar cap along the dusk-dawn meridian by spacecraft DMSP F13. The interval we study is characterized by moderate, stable forcing of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system (EKL = 4.0-4.5 mV m-1; cross polar cap potential (CPCP), Φ (Boyle) = 115 kV) during Earth passage of an interplanetary CME (ICME), choosing an 4-h interval where the magnetic field pointed continuously south-west (Bz < 0; By < 0). The combination of continuous monitoring of ground magnetic deflections and the F13 cross-track ion drift observations in the polar cap allows us to infer the temporal CPCP structure on time scales less than the ~10 min duration of F13 polar cap transits. We arrived at the following estimates of the dayside and nightside contributions to the CPCP (CPCP = CPCP/day + CPCP/night) under two intervals of substorm activity: CPCP/day ~110 kV; CPCP/night ~50 kV (45% CPCP increase during substorms). The temporal CPCP structure during one of the substorm cases resulted in a dawn-dusk convection asymmetry measured by DMSP F13 which

  20. Plasmasphere dynamics in the duskside bulge region: A new look at old topic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, D. L.; Giles, B. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Decreau, P. M. E.; Anderson, R. R.; Persoon, A. M.; Smith, A. J.; Corcuff, Y.; Canu, P.

    1993-01-01

    Data acquired during several multiday periods in 1982 at ground stations Siple, Halley, and Kerguelen and on satellites Dynamics Explorer 1, International Sun Earth Explorer 1, and GEOS 2 have been used to investigate thermal plasma structure and dynamics in the duskside plasmasphere bulge region of the Earth. The distribution of thermal plasma in the dusk bulge sector is difficult to describe realistically, in part because of the time integral manner in which the thermal plasma distribution depends upon on the effects of bulk cross-B flow and interchange plasma flows along B. While relatively simple MHD models can be useful for qualitatively predicting certain effects of enhanced convection on a quiet plasmasphere, such as an initial sunward entrainment of the outer regions, they are of limited value in predicting the duskside thermal plasma structures that are observed. Furthermore, use of such models can be misleading if one fails to realize that they do not address the question of the formation of the steep plasmapause profile or provide for a possible role of instabilities or other irreversible processes in plasmapause formation. Our specific findings, which are based both upon the present case studies and upon earlier work, include the following: (1) during active periods the plasmasphere appears to become divided into two entities, a main plasmasphere and a duskside bulge region. (2) in the aftermath of an increase in convection activity, the main plasmasphere tends (from a statistical point of view) to become roughly circular in equatorial cross section, with only a slight bulge at dusk; (3) the abrupt westward edge of the duskside bulge observed from whistlers represents a state in the evolution of sunward extending streamers; (4) in the aftermath of a weak magnetic storm, 10 to 30% of the plasma 'removed' from the outer plasmasphere appears to remain in the afternoon-dusk sector beyond the main plasmasphere. (5) outlying dense plasma structures may

  1. Ionospheric feedback effects on the quasi-stationary coupling between LLBL and postnoon/evening discrete auroral arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echim, M. M.; Roth, M.; de Keyser, J.

    2008-05-01

    We discuss a model for the quasi-stationary coupling between magnetospheric sheared flows in the dusk sector and discrete auroral arcs, previously analyzed for the case of a uniform height-integrated Pedersen conductivity (ΣP). Here we introduce an ionospheric feedback as the variation of ΣP with the energy flux of precipitating magnetospheric electrons (ɛem). One key-component of the model is the kinetic description of the interface between the duskward LLBL and the plasma sheet that gives the profile of Φm, the magnetospheric electrostatic potential. The velocity shear in the dusk LLBL plays the role of a generator for the auroral circuit closing through Pedersen currents in the auroral ionosphere. The field-aligned current density, j||, and the energy flux of precipitating electrons are given by analytic functions of the field-aligned potential drop, ΔΦ, derived from standard kinetic models of the adiabatic motion of particles. The ionospheric electrostatic potential, Φi (and implicitely ΔΦ) is determined from the current continuity equation in the ionosphere. We obtain values of ΔΦ of the order of kilovolt and of j|| of the order of tens of μA/m2 in thin regions of the order of several kilometers at 200 km altitude. The spatial scale is significantly smaller and the peak values of ΔΦ, j|| and ɛem are higher than in the case of a uniform ΣP. Effects on the postnoon/evening auroral arc electrodynamics due to variations of dusk LLBL and solar wind dynamic and kinetic pressure are discussed. In thin regions (of the order of kilometer) embedding the maximum of ΔΦ we evidence a non-linear regime of the current-voltage relationship. The model predicts also that visible arcs form when the velocity shear in LLBL is above a threshold value depending on the generator and ionospheric plasma properties. Brighter arcs are obtained for increased velocity shear in the LLBL; their spatial scale remains virtually unmodified. The field-aligned potential drop

  2. Penetration of Solar Wind and Magnetospheric Electric Fields to the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    Almost 40 years ago Nishida showed that magnetic field fluctuations measured in the solar wind were sometimes highly correlated with magnetic fields measured near the magnetic equator. With the development of electric field measurements, tracking the chain of events from the solar wind to the inner magnetosphere is now possible. Here we present several case studies illustrating this chain. We often find almost identical waveforms for the dawn-to-dusk component of the interplanetary electric field (IEF) and the zonal component of the ionospheric field at latitudes from the auroral zone to the equator. The response is symmetric in that the inner magnetosphere responds to both IEF increases and decreases, implying that an energy storage element in the system can be traced to inductance of the ring current. Thus, when the IEF abruptly turns toward the dusk-to-dawn direction, the inner magnetospheric current system (region 2 currents) continues to flow, with a portion closing in the ionosphere. Likewise, when the IEF dawn-to-dusk component increases, region 1 currents intensify but region 2 currents cannot change immediately. Again, this imbalance is associated with currents in the inner ionosphere. To study the temporal response of this system, four years of electric field data were compared to the IEF using ACE data. The ratio of these parameters is like a transfer function (TF) between the interplanetary and ionospheric systems, which is a function of frequency. Using the average of many such TFs revealed a distinct logarithmic dependence on Kp with a 16 db difference between low and high values. The average TF is significant for periods from 30 min. to 6 hours and displays a small peak near a 1 hour period, suggesting that some capacitance exists in the system and possibly a weak resonance. The average TF indicates that about 3% of the IEF appears in the equatorial ionosphere whereas case studies indicate values as high as 10%. Case studies also show a higher

  3. An Investigation of Trajectories of Atoms in Mercury's Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Eric Todd

    2016-10-01

    Mercury's neutral exosphere consists of atoms or molecules ejected from the surface that are on individual trajectories that may re-impact the surface if there is insufficient energy to escape the gravity of the planet. This is an investigation of how the radiation pressure, orbital acceleration of the planet, and planetary rotation combine together to produce complicated trajectories. Because of Mercury's non-zero eccentricity the planet is not in uniform circular motion, which leads to radial and tangential accelerations that vary throughout the Mercury year. Besides radiation pressure the trajectory of an exospheric atom is affected by the planet accelerating during the time of flight of the atom that 1) causes the atom's position with respect to the ejection point to vary in a manner that is different than if the planet were not accelerating and 2) causes the planet-atom distance to vary in a manner that is different than for a typical ballistic trajectory resulting in variation of the gravitational force that the planet exerts on the atom. These effects are small but persistent and affect where the atom re-impacts the surface, which may lead to asymmetrical distributions of atoms in the surface regolith and exosphere.Preliminary results from simulations of ejected atoms that include 1) radiation pressure that varies with the atom's velocity due to Doppler shifting, 2) radial and tangential accelerations of the planet, and 3) the variation of the planet's gravity on the atom with distance above the planet show that atoms ejected at low energies normal to the surface from the subsolar point re-impact on the dusk side hemisphere of the planet. However atoms ejected at high energies normal to the surface from the subsolar point re-impact on the dawn side hemisphere of the planet. A fraction of atoms ejected normal to the surface from the dawn terminator within an energy range that results in the atom re-impacting and sticking to the night side surface behind the

  4. The role of pollinators in maintaining variation in flower colour in the Rocky Mountain columbine, Aquilegia coerulea.

    PubMed

    Thairu, Margaret W; Brunet, Johanne

    2015-05-01

    Flower colour varies within and among populations of the Rocky Mountain columbine, Aquilegia coerulea, in conjunction with the abundance of its two major pollinators, hawkmoths and bumble-bees. This study seeks to understand whether the choice of flower colour by these major pollinators can help explain the variation in flower colour observed in A. coerulea populations. Dual choice assays and experimental arrays of blue and white flowers were used to determine the preference of hawkmoths and bumble-bees for flower colour. A test was made to determine whether a differential preference for flower colour, with bumble-bees preferring blue and hawkmoths white flowers, could explain the variation in flower colour. Whether a single pollinator could maintain a flower colour polymorphism was examined by testing to see if preference for a flower colour varied between day and dusk for hawkmoths and whether bumble-bees preferred novel or rare flower colour morphs. Hawkmoths preferred blue flowers under both day and dusk light conditions. Naïve bumble-bees preferred blue flowers but quickly learned to forage randomly on the two colour morphs when similar rewards were presented in the flowers. Bees quickly learned to associate a flower colour with a pollen reward. Prior experience affected the choice of flower colour by bees, but they did not preferentially visit novel flower colours or rare or common colour morphs. Differences in flower colour preference between the two major pollinators could not explain the variation in flower colour observed in A. coerulea. The preference of hawkmoths for flower colour did not change between day and dusk, and bumble-bees did not prefer a novel or a rare flower colour morph. The data therefore suggest that factors other than pollinators may be more likely to affect the flower colour variation observed in A. coerulea. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government

  5. Magnetospheric-field distortions observed by OGO 3 and 5.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Ledley, B. G.; Skillman, T. L.; Heppner, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The rubidium vapor magnetometer data of the scalar magnetic-field intensity obtained by the OGO 3 and 5 satellites are analyzed to study the magnetospheric-field distortions in terms of the observed field magnitude under quiet and slightly disturbed conditions minus the magnitude of the reference geomagnetic field (delta B). Average contours of equal delta Bs are shown in the geomagnetic noon-midnight and dawn-dusk meridian planes for magnetically quiet and slightly disturbed conditions. The equatorial distribution of observed delta Bs as a function of geocentric distance differs substantially from that expected from the well-known models of the quiet-time ring current. Other findings suggest that there must be a population of low-energy particles with substantial total energy near the equator at distances of 2 to 5 earth radii that has not been recognized as having sufficient energy to inflate the magnetic field.

  6. Operation Dominic, Fish Bowl Series. Project Officer's report. Project 9. 1b. Ionospheric wind and diffusion measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, K.; Manring, E.R.

    1985-09-01

    The aim of this project was to measure high-altitude wind velocities and diffusion coefficients in the altitude region between 60 and 150 km. The method involved the ejection of a sodium vapor trail from a Cajun rocket at dust or dawn twilight. The sodium was sunlit, and as a result of emission of resonance radiation, was visible against a darkened background for about 20 minutes. The trail was photographed simultaneously from four different sites, allowing for subsequent triangulation to determine the altitude of various parts of the cloud. A major application of these wind and diffusion data, taken at dusk and dawn following the high-altitude nuclear tests, was to aid in determining the disposition of the nuclear debris.

  7. First MMS Observations of High Time Resolution 3D Electric and Magnetic fields at the Dayside Magnetopause.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Le Contel, O.; Vaith, H.; Macri, J.; Myers, S.; Rau, D.; Needell, J.; King, B.; Granoff, M.; Chutter, M.; Dors, I.; Argall, M. R.; Shuster, J. R.; Olsson, G.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Eriksson, A. I.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S. R.; Anderson, B. J.; Baumjohann, W.; Steller, M.; Bromund, K. R.; Le, G.; Nakamura, R.; Strangeway, R. J.; Leinweber, H. K.; Tucker, S.; Westfall, J.; Fischer, D.; Plaschke, F.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Mauk, B.; Fuselier, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The electrodynamics at the magnetopause is key to our understanding of ion and electron acceleration within reconnection regions. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) fleet of four spacecraft was launched into its Phase-1 equatorial orbit of 12 Re apogee specifically to investigate these regions at the Earth's magnetopause. In addition to a comprehensive suite of particle measurements, MMS makes very high time resolution 3D electric and magnetic field measurements of high accuracy using flux-gate, search coil, 3-axis double probe, and electron drift sensors. In September 2015, the MMS fleet will begin to encounter the dusk-side magnetopause in its initial configuration of approximately 160 km separation, allowing investigation of the spatial and temporal characteristics of important electrodynamics during reconnection. Using these field and particle measurements, we present first observations of 3D magnetic and electric fields (including their parallel component), and inferred current sheets, during active magnetopause crossings using the highest time resolution data available on MMS.

  8. High latitude proton precipitation and light-ion density profiles during the magnetic storm initial phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of precipitating protons and light ion densities by experiments on OGO-4 indicate that widespread proton precipitation occurs in predawn hours during the magnetic storm initial phase from the latitude of the high-latitude ion trough, or plasmapause , up to Lambda 75 deg. A softening of the proton spectrum is apparent as the plasmapause is approached. The separation of the low-latitude precipitation boundaries for 7.3 kev and 23.8 kev protons is approximately 1 deg, compared with a 3.6 deg separation which has been computed using the formulas of Gendrin and Eather and Carovillano. Consideration of probable proton drift morphology leads to the conclusion that protons ase injected in predawn hours, with widespread precipitation occurring in the region outside the plasmapause. Protons less energetic than approximately 7 kev drift eastward, while the more energetic protons drift westward, producing the observed dawn-dusk asymmetry for the lower-energy protons.

  9. Charged particle acceleration by induction electric field in Neptune magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, I. Y.; Malova, H. V.; Artemyev, A. V.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    The precession of the Neptune magnetic dipole leads to strong dynamics of the magnetosphere and results in continuous transformation from the “Earth-like” configuration to the “pole-on” one and vice versa. In the present work we use simple model of the Neptune magnetotail to investigate the influence of magnetotail topology transformation on particle acceleration and transport through the tail. Energy spectra are obtained for protons penetrating from the solar wind and heavier ions N+ from the Neptune ionosphere. We have found that protons and heavier ions are accelerated up to ∼330 keV and ∼150 keV, respectively. More particles are accelerated and leave the tail during transformations from the “pole-on” configuration to the “Earth-like” one than during inverse transformations. We have shown that the dusk-dawn convection field is responsible for particle leaving through the dawn flank. We briefly compare our results with Voyager-2 observations.

  10. Theoretical magnetograms based on quantitative simulation of a magnetospheric substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.-K.; Wolf, R. A.; Karty, J. L.; Harel, M.

    1982-01-01

    Substorm currents derived from the Rice University computer simulation of the September 19, 1976 substorm event are used to compute theoretical magnetograms as a function of universal time for various stations, integrating the Biot-Savart law over a maze of about 2700 wires and bands that carry the ring, Birkeland and horizontal ionospheric currents. A comparison of theoretical results with corresponding observations leads to a claim of general agreement, especially for stations at high and middle magnetic latitudes. Model results suggest that the ground magnetic field perturbations arise from complicated combinations of different kinds of currents, and that magnetic field disturbances due to different but related currents cancel each other out despite the inapplicability of Fukushima's (1973) theorem. It is also found that the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the horizontal magnetic field disturbance component at low latitudes is due to a net downward Birkeland current at noon, a net upward current at midnight, and, generally, antisunward-flowing electrojets.

  11. Nocturnal activity by diurnal lizards (Sceloporus jarrovi, S. virgatus) eaten by small owls (Glaucidium gnoma, Otus trichopsis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duncan, W.W.; Gehlbach, F.R.; Middendorf, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    Whiskered screech-owls (Otus trichopsis) and northern pygmy-owls (Glaucidium gnoma) delivered freshly caught Yarrow's spiny lizards (Sceloporus jarrovi) and striped plateau lizards (S. virgatus) to nestlings from dusk to dark in southeastern Arizona. This observation stimulated studies of the prey deliveries by the owls and lizard activity patterns, because the lizards are not known to be nocturnal. Lizards were more frequent prey of both owls than endothermic vertebrates but infrequent compared to arthropods, a pattern in the pygmy-owl that differs from its northern populations. Yarrow's spiny lizard, the most abundant and frequently captured lizard, was most active in the morning but also active in the evening. Striped plateau lizard, the second most abundant and depredated species, had morning and evening peaks of activity. Few lizards, including S. clarki and Urosaurus ornatus, but not Cnemidophorus exsanguis and C. sonorae, were active at or after dark, when relatively few were captured by the owls.

  12. Simulations and observations of vortices near Saturn's dayside magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Raymond; Fukazawa, Keiichiro; Ogino, Tatsuki; Morozoff, Daniel

    We have used a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with Saturn's magnetosphere and Cassini observations to investigate vorticity in the dayside magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is northward. Following the northward turning of the IMF, vortices form on the morning magnetopause in the region of large velocity shear. Later vortices form on the afternoon magnetopause near dusk. In the simulations the boundary vortices cause magnetic field oscillations in the Kronian magnetosphere. The oscillations have a period of about three hours. We have examined Cassini magnetic field observations1 in the morning magnetosphere and find similar oscillations. We will present a comparison between the observations and the simulation results. 1 Daugherty, M. K., S. Kellock, A. P. Slootweg, N. Achilles, S. P. Joy and J. N. Mafi, CASSINI MAG CALIBRATED SUMMARY AVERAGED , CO-E/SWS/J/S-MAG-4-SUMM-AVERAGED-V1.0, NASA Planetary Data System, 2007.

  13. Regulation of assimilate partitioning by daylength and spectral quality

    SciTech Connect

    Britz, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    Photosynthesis is the process by which plants utilize light energy to assimilate and transform carbon dioxide into products that support growth and development. The preceding review provides an excellent summary of photosynthetic mechanisms and diurnal patterns of carbon metabolism with emphasis on the importance of gradual changes in photosynthetically-active radiation at dawn and dusk. In addition to these direct effects of irradiance, there are indirect effects of light period duration and spectral quality on carbohydrate metabolism and assimilate partitioning. Both daylength and spectral quality trigger developmental phenomena such as flowering (e.g., photoperiodism) and shade avoidance responses, but their effects on partitioning of photoassimilates in leaves are less well known. Moreover, the adaptive significance to the plants of such effects is sometimes not clear.

  14. Mercury's Magnetospheric Cusps and Cross-Tail Current Sheet: Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poh, Gang Kai

    Mercury has proven to be a unique natural laboratory for space plasma processes. Mercury's magnetosphere is formed by the interaction between its intrinsic planetary magnetic field and the supersonic solar wind. The structure of Mercury's magnetosphere is very similar to Earth's; yet the results from the MESSENGER mission to Mercury have shown that the spatial and temporal scales of magnetospheric processes are very different at Mercury. In this thesis, we analyze in situ observations from the MESSENGER spacecraft to characterize and understand the dynamic physical plasma processes occurring in Mercury's magnetosphere. We identified and analyzed 345 plasma filaments in Mercury's northern magnetospheric cusp to determine their physical properties. Cusp plasma filaments are magnetic structures that are identified on the basis of their characteristic 2-3 seconds long decrease in magnetic field intensity. Our analysis indicates that these cusp filaments are cylindrical flux tubes filled with plasma, which causes a diamagnetic decrease in the magnetic field inside the flux tube. MESSENGER observations of flux transfer events (FTEs) and cusp filament suggests that cusp filaments properties are the low-altitude extension of FTEs formed at Mercury's dayside magnetopause. We examined 319 central plasma sheet crossings observed by MESSENGER. Using a Harris model, we determined the physical properties of Mercury's cross-tail current sheet. Analysis of BZ in the current sheet indicated that MESSENGER usually crossed the current sheet sunward of the Near Mercury Neutral Line. Magnetohydrodynamics-based analysis using the MESSENGER magnetic field and plasma measurements suggests that heavy planetary ions and/or ion temperature anisotropy may be important in maintaining radial stress balance within Mercury's central plasma sheet. We report the observation of significant dawn-dusk variation in Mercury's cross-tail current sheet with thicker, lower plasma beta dawn side current

  15. KSC-2011-1867

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-25

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Dusk descends on the Freedom Star, one of NASA's solid rocket booster retrieval ships stationed in the Atlantic Ocean, to recover the right spent booster after it splashed down following space shuttle Discovery's final launch. The shuttle’s two solid rocket booster casings and associated flight hardware are recovered in the Atlantic Ocean after every launch by Freedom Star and Liberty Star. The boosters impact the Atlantic about seven minutes after liftoff and the retrieval ships are stationed about 10 miles from the impact area at the time of splashdown. After the spent segments are processed, they will be transported to Utah, where they will be refurbished and stored, if needed. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux

  16. Numerical solution of the geoelectrodynamic problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Joseph C.

    1990-01-01

    The primary goal is to understand the sources of the near-Earth ambient magnetic field as observed by recent spacecraft surveys and surface variational magnetic observations so as to determine the electrical properties of the crust and upper mantle. Also included is the structure and changes on a short time scale of the core field which must be separated and identified. The Magsat data collection interval provides an opportunity to compare the vector field projections of ionospheric currents computed from surface data above the ionosphere as does the POGO data for scalar projections. The limitation of Magsat is its sun-synchronous orbit, which only sampled low latitudes at dawn and dusk, whereas POGO, though only making observations of the scalar field, sampled all local times. Magsat operated at a lower altitude than POGO (down to 350 km) whereas the orbits of the three POGO spacecraft ranged up to 1500 km and were never lower than about 400 km.

  17. Colonization of Anopheles pseudopunctipennis from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, C; Arredondo-Jiménez, J I; Rodriguez, M H; Ulloa, A

    1998-12-01

    Two colonies of Anopheles pseudopunctipennis, Tapachula and Abasolo strains, were established under laboratory conditions with a thermoperiod (29 degrees C during the day; 24 degrees C during the night) and artificial dusk. To stimulate mating, a light beam from a flashlight was shone on the cage shortly after lights off. This procedure was repeated for the first 6 mosquito generations (parental to F6) and thereafter light stimulation was unnecessary for mating. The Tapachula colony has been maintained for 24 generations in 24 months, with insemination rates in females > 80% since the F3, and a monthly production of 30,000 pupae since the F7. Using the same procedure, the Abasolo colony from northeastern Mexico has been maintained for 13 generations in 14 months, with insemination rates of 26-52%.

  18. Assessment of Plasma Transport and Convection at High Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The high-latitude ionosphere is strongly coupled to the thermosphere and magnetosphere. The magnetospheric coupling occurs via electric fields, field-aligned currents, and particle precipitation. Owing to the interaction of the shocked solar wind with the geomagnetic field, an electric potential difference is generated across the tail of the magnetosphere, with the resulting electric field pointing from dawn to dusk. Energetic particle precipitation from the magnetosphere in the auroral region leads to the creation of ionization and to electron, ion, and neutral gas heating. In order to assess the current understanding of plasma transport and convection at high latitudes, it is necessary to take account of the strong coupling between the ionosphere, thermosphere, and magnetosphere.

  19. The magnetosheath electron population at lunar distance - General features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiff, P. H.; Reasoner, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of the electron population in the earth's magnetosheath at lunar distance. The data used were collected by the Apollo 14 charged particle lunar environment experiment (CPLEE) during four inbound (dusk) and three outbound (dawn) passages of the moon through the magnetosheath. The magnetotail has a diameter of 52 earth radii, while the bow-shock cross section is about 91 earth radii. The average boundary locations computed from the complete data set are consistent with the prediction of fluid dynamics. The electron characteristics for the two least-disturbed passages are presented in detail. An examination of the energy spectra shows that a high-energy (200-2000 eV) tail is superimposed on the expected low-energy (40-200 eV) magnetosheath distribution. It is argued that the high-energy magnetosheath electron population originates at the bow shock, rather than from the plasma sheet.

  20. Some initial ISEE-1 results on the ring current composition and dynamics during the magnetics storm of December 11, 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, W.; Shelley, E. G.; Sharp, R. D.; Johnson, R. G.; Balsiger, H.

    1979-01-01

    On December 11, 1977 the ISEE-1 spacecraft traversed the equatorial magnetosphere in the prenoon and dawn sectors during the early recovery phase of a magnetic storm with peak DST of -125 gamma. Along the dayside leg O(+) was comparable to or exceeded H(+) in number density in the energy range 0.1-17 keV. The velocity distribution of O(+) showed a characteristic dispersion, consistent with the ions being transported to the dayside from the dusk to midnight sector. The high-energy slope of the H(+) and O(+) distribution functions showed different radial dependence, with the slope of H(+) being consistent with a harder component carrying most of the energy density.

  1. Low energy (<130 eV) oxygen ions at the geosynchronous orbit during the CDAW 6 event of March 22, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Stokholm, M.; Amata, E.; Balsiger, H.; Candidi, M.; Orsini, S.; Pedersen, A.

    1985-02-01

    Anisotropic O/sup +/ ions were frequently observed by the GEOS 2 ion composition experiment in the energy range 4--130 eV, during the CDAW 6 event of March 22, 1979. These observations allow the study of the plasma flow in the electric and magnetic fields as known from data of other experiments in the geosynchronous orbit, in the noon, dusk and midnight sectors. By comparison of these measurements with plasma observations made by the ISEE 2 plasma experiment, at the same local time and a different latitudes, the observation of cold plasma streaming along magnetic field lines from the polar ionosphere to the equatorial magnetosphere is extended from the magnetotail to the near earth equatorial region.

  2. Looking to the sky to predict Solar Power Intermittency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thottathil Jayadevan, Vijai; Cronin, Alex; Lonij, Vincent; Jones, Sarah; Torres, Gabe

    2011-10-01

    Intermittency in solar power production is one of the grand challenges impeding the adoption of solar power on a Giga Watt scale. Intermittency due to clouds will lead to mismatches between power production and consumption which can affect grid power quality and cause blackouts. We have installed a camera at the Tucson Electric Solar Power Test Yard which continuously tracks the sun from dawn to dusk. By analyzing images that the camera provides, we are developing an algorithm which can predict solar irradiance and cloud motion. These predictions can then be incorporated in a solar-aware smart-grid (using load management and energy storage) to reduce production/consumption mismatch due to solar intermittency.

  3. New Understanding of Mercury's Magnetosphere from MESSENGER'S First Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho, George C.; Killen, M.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Raines, James M.; Schriver, David; Somomon, Sean C.; Starr, Richard; Travnicek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    Observations by the MESSENGER spacecraft on 14 January 2008 have revealed new features of the solar system's smallest planetary magnetosphere. The interplanetary magnetic field orientation was unfavorable for large inputs of energy from the solar wind and no evidence of magnetic substorms, internal magnetic reconnection, or energetic particle acceleration was detected. Large-scale rotations of the magnetic field were measured along the dusk flank of the magnetosphere and ultra-tow frequency waves were frequently observed beginning near closest approach. Outbound the spacecraft encountered two current-sheet boundaries across which the magnetic field intensity decreased in a step-like manner. The outer current sheet is the magnetopause boundary. The inner current sheet is similar in structure, but weaker and -1000 km closer to the planet. Between these two current sheets the magnetic field intensity is depressed by the diamagnetic effect of planetary ions created by the photo-ionization of Mercury's exosphere.

  4. Optical Fiber Illumination System for visual flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollow, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    An electronically controlled lighting system simulating runway, aircraft carrier, and landing aid lights for flight simulations is described. The various colored lights that would be visible to a pilot by day, at dusk, or at night are duplicated at the distances the lights would normally become visible. Plastic optical fiber illuminators using tungsten halogen lights are distributed behind the model. The tips of the fibers of illuminators simulating runway lights are bevelled in order that they may be seen from long distances and at low angles. Fibers representing taxiway lights are pointed and polished for omni-directional visibility. The electronic intensity controls, which can be operated either manually or remotely, regulate the intensity of the lights to simulate changes in distance. A dichronic mirror, infrared filter system is used to maintain color integrity.

  5. Development of anti-slip sustainable tiles from agricultural waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkefli, Zainordin Firdaus; Zainol, Mohd Remy Rozainy Mohd Arif; Osman, Norhayati

    2017-04-01

    In general of 80% the human activities is located in the building. Buildings constructed should be in line with full functions and optimum safety features. Aspects to be emphasized is the slip on the floor of the building. The selection of tiles must have anti-slip characteristics and achieve standard strength stress. This study is conducted to develop anti-slip tiles modification using agricultural waste. The material used is agricultural waste such rice husks, palm fibre and saw dusk mixed into the clay and then baked at a temperature of 900-1185 C °. Agricultural waste mixture ratio is 5%, 10% and 15%. The samples of tiles are produced for experiments. The results of agricultural waste tiles show that the strength is higher than standard strength, the water absorption less than standard tiles and pendulum value test is exceeds 36.

  6. Isolated cold plasma regions: Observations and their relation to possible production mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Chen, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Regions of enhanced cold plasma, isolated from the main plasmasphere along the Explorer 45 orbit on the equatorial plane, are reported using the sheath induced potentials seen by the electric field experiment. The occurrence of these regions has a strong correlation with negative enhancements of Dst, and their locations are primarily in the noon-dusk quadrant. The data support the concept that changes in large scale convection play a dominant role in the formation of these regions. Plasmatails that are predicted from enhancements of large scale convection electric fields in general define where these regions may be found. More localized processes are necessary to account for the exact configuration and structure seen in these regions and may eventually result in detachment from the main plasmasphere.

  7. Satellite observations of whistler-mode signals in the conjugate region of a 200-kilohertz station.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laaspere, T.; Orphanoudakis, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the signals recorded by a narrow-band (about 200 Hz) receiver at a broadcast station operating at 200 kHz and in the conjugate region of Ashkhabad. The latitude of the station is nearly low enough for propagation of a 200-kHz signal in the ducted whistler mode to the conjugate hemisphere along field lines terminating at the station. In the dawn-dusk orbital plane signals are indeed relatively often observed in the conjugate region, but the source of the signals and their path of propagation is not completely clear. The pattern of observations is consistent with propagation over the long magnetospheric path in field-aligned ducts spread in longitude near 22 deg invariant latitude, but an interpretation involving nonducted propagation is preferred, in which the occasionally high electric-field intensities encountered (greater than 10 microvolts/m) result from focusing effects or from propagation near the resonance angle.

  8. The electric field and global electrodynamics of the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    The conception of the electrodynamics of the quiet-time magnetosphere obtained during the last four years of magnetospheric study is presented. Current understandings of the open magnetosphere, convective plasma flows in the plasma sheet, the shielding of the inner magnetosphere from the convective magnetospheric electric field, the space charge produced when injected electrons drift towards dawn and injected ions drift towards dusk, the disruption of the flow of the Birkeland current by plasma instabilities and the shielding of the convective electric field by the dayside magnetopause are discussed. Attention is also given to changes of magnetic field line topology magnetic storms and substorms. Unresolved questions and new tools which may play a role in the further understanding of magnetospheric electrodynamics and the role of the magnetospheric electric field are presented.

  9. Substorm electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, David P.

    1990-01-01

    The present one-dimensional model analysis of substorm electrodynamics proceeds from the standard scenario in which the plasma sheet collapses into a neutral sheet, and magnetic merging occurs between the two tail lobes; plasma flows into the neutral sheet from the lobes and the sides, undergoing acceleration in the dawn-dusk direction. The process is modified by the tendency of the accelerated plasma to unbalance charge neutrality, leading to an exchange of electrons with the ionosphere in order to maintain neutrality. The cross-tail current is weakened by the diversion: this reduces the adjacent lobe-field intensity, but without notable effects apart from a slight expansion of the tail boundary.

  10. Quiet-time plasma irregularities at 1400 km in the cleft region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, S. E.; Maier, E. J.; Brace, L. H.

    1978-01-01

    The quiet north polar cleft at 1400 km was studied by Isis-2 instruments, and data from the retarding potential analyzer and the cylindrical electrostatic probe show that thermal plasma density fluctuations are distributed in a region between 75 deg and 82 deg invariant latitude and approximately dawn to dusk. Cleft shape and shape variations are described. Thermal ions and thermal electrons usually fluctuated together, but suprathermal electrons fluctuated independently. Data on thermal plasma patterns correlates fairly well with observations of soft particles and auroral optical emissions and not as well with measurements of high-energy particles. The data suggest that the energy source for the thermal irregularities is associated with soft particles and that precipitating high-energy particles do not drive the thermal plasma at these altitudes.

  11. Isolated cold plasma regions - Observations and their relation to possible production mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Chen, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Regions of enhanced cold plasma, isolated from the main plasmasphere along the Explorer 45 (53-A) orbit in the equatorial plane, have been detected by using the sheath-induced potentials seen by the electric field experiment. The occurrence of these regions has a strong correlation with negative enhancements of Dst, and their locations are primarily in the noon-dusk quadrant. The data support the concept that changes in large-scale convection play a dominant role in the formation of these regions. Plasma tails that are predicted from enhancements of large-scale convection electric fields in general define where these regions may be found. More localized processes are necessary to account for the exact configuration and structure seen in these regions and may eventually result in detachment from the main plasmasphere.

  12. A two-temperature plasma distribution in the magnetosheath at lunar distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, G. D.; Freeman, J. W.; Maher, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    Least squares Maxwellian fits have been made to data from the Apollo 15 suprathermal ion detector experiment (SIDE) during the moon's passage through the dusk magnetosheath. It is found that the data are best fit by superimposing two co-moving proton populations whose temperatures differ radically: kT roughly 10 eV and kT roughly 100 eV. This two-temperature distribution cannot be explained by alpha particles. The higher temperature population is typical of that expected for the fully shocked magnetosheath at lunar distances. The colder distribution could arise from cold plasma from within the magnetosphere brought up to magnetosheath flow speeds, but it is more probably due to unshocked solar wind.

  13. A study of population changes in adult Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) during a mosquito control programme in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Holmes, P R

    1986-02-01

    The effectiveness of insecticidal control measures on adult Culex quinquefasciatus Say in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, was examined. Direct treatment of the study site with cypermethrin applied as a fog caused a temporary reduction both in total numbers (males and females) and in the proportion of older females. When cypermethrin was applied as an ultra low volume formulation at dusk and dawn numbers of males were greatly reduced, but numbers of females were not affected. It appears that the adulticiding operations had little overall effect on the total numbers or survival rate of females, or breeding success. The oviposition cycle duration was estimated to be two days, with the survival rate per oviposition cycle calculated as 30%. With these values it is thought unlikely that filariasis would be transmitted in Dubai.

  14. Solar wind pressure pulse-driven magnetospheric vortices and their global consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q. Q.; Hartinger, M. D.; Angelopoulos, V.; Tian, A. M.; Fu, S. Y.; Zong, Q.-G.; Weygand, J. M.; Raeder, J.; Pu, Z. Y.; Zhou, X. Z.; Dunlop, M. W.; Liu, W. L.; Zhang, H.; Yao, Z. H.; Shen, X. C.

    2014-06-01

    We report the in situ observation of a plasma vortex induced by a solar wind dynamic pressure enhancement in the nightside plasma sheet using multipoint measurements from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellites. The vortex has a scale of 5-10 Re and propagates several Re downtail, expanding while propagating. The features of the vortex are consistent with the prediction of the Sibeck (1990) model, and the vortex can penetrate deep (~8 Re) in the dawn-dusk direction and couple to field line oscillations. Global magnetohydrodynamics simulations are carried out, and it is found that the simulation and observations are consistent with each other. Data from THEMIS ground magnetometer stations indicate a poleward propagating vortex in the ionosphere, with a rotational sense consistent with the existence of the vortex observed in the magnetotail.

  15. PDF-modulated visual inputs and cryptochrome define diurnal behavior in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cusumano, Paola; Klarsfeld, André; Chélot, Elisabeth; Picot, Marie; Richier, Benjamin; Rouyer, François

    2009-11-01

    Morning and evening circadian oscillators control the bimodal activity of Drosophila in light-dark cycles. The lateral neurons evening oscillator (LN-EO) is important for promoting diurnal activity at dusk. We found that the LN-EO autonomously synchronized to light-dark cycles through either the cryptochrome (CRY) that it expressed or the visual system. In conditions in which CRY was not activated, flies depleted for pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) or its receptor lost the evening activity and displayed reversed PER oscillations in the LN-EO. Rescue experiments indicated that normal PER cycling and the presence of evening activity relied on PDF secretion from the large ventral lateral neurons and PDF receptor function in the LN-EO. The LN-EO thus integrates light inputs and PDF signaling to control Drosophila diurnal behavior, revealing a new clock-independent function for PDF.

  16. Multipoint Observations of Oval-aligned Transpolar Arc Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumnock, J. A.; Le, G.; Zhang, Y.; Slavin, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We analyze changes in field-aligned currents associated with auroral oval-aligned transpolar arc formation during quiet times on time scales of a few minutes. This is accomplished using observations from the highly accurate multipoint magnetic field measurements provided by the Space Technology 5 mission which consists of three micro-satellites in low Earth orbit. Simultaneous measurements of precipitating particles are provided by three DMSP satellites. We analyze field-aligned currents associated with the dusk oval. For the first time we observe the field-aligned currents associated with the formation of an oval-aligned transpolar arc poleward of the auroral oval which in one case are large compared with the field-aligned currents associated with the auroral oval measured 10 minutes earlier. These events clearly illustrate the dynamic nature of oval-aligned arc formation.

  17. Outer satellite atmospheres: Their extended nature and planetary interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, W. H.; Combi, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Model calculations for the brightness of the sodium cloud in Region A were performed to clarify the role played by the plasma torus sink in producing the east-west intensity asymmetry observed in the sodium D-lines. It was determined that the east-west electric field, proposed by Barbosa and Kievelson (1983) and Ip and Goertz (1983) to explain the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the torus ion emissions measured by the Voyager UVS instrument, could also produce the east-west sodium intensity asymmetry discovered earlier by Bergstralh et al. (1975, 1977). Model results for the directional features of the sodium cloud are also reported. The completion of the development of the Io potassium cloud model, progress in improving the Titan hydrogen torus model, and efforts in developing our model for hydrogen cometary atmospheres are also discussed.

  18. Digital hf radar observations of equatorial spread-F

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.

    1984-01-01

    Modern digital ionosondes, with both direction finding and doppler capabilities can provide large scale pictures of the Spread-F irregularity regions. A morphological framework has been developed that allows interpretation of the hf radar data. A large scale irregularity structure is found to be nightward of the dusk terminator, stationary in the solar reference frame. As the plasma moves through this foehn-wall-like structure it descends, and irregularities may be generated. Localized upwellings, or bubbles, may be produced, and they drift with the background plasma. The spread-F irregularity region is found to be best characterized as a partly cloudy sky, due to the patchiness of the substructures. 13 references, 16 figures.

  19. A cold-pole enhancement in Mercury's sodium exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; McClintock, William E.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Merkel, Aimee W.; Vervack, Ronald J.; Burger, Matthew H.

    2016-11-01

    The ultraviolet and visible spectrometer component of the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft characterized the local-time distribution of the sodium exosphere over the course of its orbital mission. The observations show that the sodium exosphere is enhanced above Mercury's cold-pole longitudes. Based on previously published sodium exosphere models, we infer that these regions act as night side surface reservoirs, temporary sinks to the exosphere that collect sodium atoms transported antisunward. The reservoirs are revealed as exospheric enhancements when they are exposed to sunlight. As in the models the reservoir is depleted as the cold poles rotate from dawn to dusk, but unlike the models the depletion is only partial. The persistence of the reservoir means that it could, over the course of geologically long periods of time, contribute to an increase in the bulk concentration of sodium near the cold-pole longitudes.

  20. High-Latitude Ionospheric Dynamics During Conditions of Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharber, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    In order to better understand the physical processes operating during conditions of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), in situ measurements from the Dynamics Explorer-2 (low altitude) polar satellite and simultaneous observations from the auroral imager on the Dynamics Explorer-1 (high altitude) satellite were used to investigate the relationships between optical emissions, particle precipitation, and convective flows in the high-latitude ionosphere. Field aligned current and convective flow patterns during IMF north include polar cap arcs, the theta aurora or transpolar arc, and the 'horse-collar' aurora. The initial part of the study concentrated on the electrodynamics of auroral features in the horse-collar aurora, a contracted but thickened emission region in which the dawn and dusk portions can spread to very high latitudes, while the latter part focused on the evolution of one type of IMF north auroral pattern to another, specifically the quiet-time horse-collar pattern to a theta aurora.

  1. On the azimuthal variation of the equatorial plasmapause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.; Moore, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    Previous results of plasmapause position surveys have been synthesized into a comprehensive description of the plasmapause, taken to represent the boundary between diurnal near-corotation and large-scale circulation streamlines that traverse the entire magnetosphere. The result indicates a plasmapause that has a pronounced bulge in the dusk sector, that rotates sunward and shrinks markedly as geomagnetic activity (and presumably magnetospheric convection) increase. The shape of the plasmapause so determined is significantly different from that associated with the simple superposition of sunward flow and corotation, both in its detailed shape and in its varying orientation. The results imply that the magnetospheric circulation departs from a uniform flow field, having a radial dependence with respect to the Earth that is qualitatively consistent with electrostatic shielding of the convection electric field. Also, the results imply the the inner magnetospheric flow field rotates from duskward to dawnward as its intensity increases.

  2. Adiabatic particle motion in a nearly drift-free magnetic field - Application to the geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation is made of the adiabatic particle motion occurring in an almost drift-free magnetic field. The dependence of the mean drift velocity on the equatorial pitch angle and the variation of the local drift velocity along the trajectories is studied. The fields considered are two-dimensional and resemble the geomagnetic tail. Derivations are presented for instantaneous and average drift velocities, bounce times, longitudinal invariants, and approximations to the adiabatic Hamiltonian. As expected, the mean drift velocity is significantly smaller than the instantaneous drift velocities found at typical points on the trajectory. The slow drift indicates that particles advance in the dawn-dusk direction rather slowly in the plasma sheet of the magnetospheric tail.

  3. Sentential influences on acoustic-phonetic processing: A Granger causality analysis of multimodal imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Gow, David W.; Olson, Bruna B.

    2015-01-01

    Sentential context influences the way that listeners identify phonetically ambiguous or perceptual degraded speech sounds. Unfortunately, inherent inferential limitations on the interpretation of behavioral or BOLD imaging results make it unclear whether context influences perceptual processing directly, or acts at a post-perceptual decision stage. In this paper, we use Kalman-filter enabled Granger causation analysis of MR-constrained MEG/EEG data to distinguish between these possibilities. Using a retrospective probe verification task, we found that sentential context strongly affected the interpretation of words with ambiguous initial voicing (e.g. DUSK-TUSK). This behavioral context effect coincided with increased influence by brain regions associated with lexical representation on regions associated with acoustic-phonetic processing. These results support an interactive view of sentence context effects on speech perception. PMID:27595118

  4. Absolute measurements of night-time electron density using ISR gyro lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Asti; Kelley, Michael; Nicolls, Michael; Sulzer, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Gyro line in Incoherent Scatter Spectrum is the underused cousin of the more popular Plasma line. This is because it is very weak during the day and stronger during dawn and dusk hours. When the electron density is such that the electron plasma frequency drops below the electron gyro frequency, the gyro line frequency becomes proportional to the electron density. This is during a time when the plasma line is no longer detected, and we have no other means for getting precise measurements for absolute electron density. In this paper, we will present a linear equation for the gyro line frequency and measurements from the Arecibo radar in Puerto Rico, showing comparison with the plasma line data and derived electron density.

  5. High Energy Particle Effects in the D Region During and After Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauter, E. A.; Wagner, C. U.

    1984-01-01

    The precipitation of energetic particles from the magnetosphere produces a remarkable modification of the mid-latitude D-region structure during daytime and at dawn and dusk conditions. Beside the heavily fluctuating precipitation during the main storm phase, there exists a more continuous input of high energy electrons into the mesosphere in the belt between phi= 50 deg and the auroral zone up to ten days after the disturbance. The excessive D-region ionization, the after-effect of geomagnetic storms, is caused at least partly by additional nitric oxide production. The winter anomaly effects are especially amplified and prolonged by this effect. The source of this mid-latitude particle precipitation is thought to be situated in magnetospheric slot region processes.

  6. The magnetic topology of the plasmoid flux rope in a MHD simulation of magnetotail reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of a three-dimensional MHD simulation we discuss the magnetic topology of a plasmoid that forms by a localized reconnection process in a magnetotail configuration including a net dawn-dusk magnetic field component B/sub yN/. As a consequence of b/sub yN/ /ne/ 0 the plasmid gets a helical flux rope structure rather than an isolated island or bubble structure. Initially all field lines of the plasmid flux rope remain connected with the Earth, while at later times a gradually increasing amount of flux tubes becomes separated, connecting to either the distant boundary or to the flank boundaries. In this stage topologically different flux tubes become tangled and wrapped around each other, consistent with predictions on the basis of ad-hoc plasmid models. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  7. New forecasting methods of the intensity and time development of geomagnetic and ionospheric storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    The main phase of a geomagnetic storm develops differently from one storm to another. A description is given of the solar wind quantity which controls directly the development of the main phase of geomagnetic storms. The parameters involved include the solar wind speed, the magnetic field intensity, and the polar angle of the solar wind magnetic field projected onto the dawn-dusk plane. A redefinition of geomagnetic storm and auroral activity is given. It is pointed out that geomagnetic disturbances are caused by the magnetic fields of electric currents which are generated by the solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo. Attention is given to approaches for forecasting the occurrence and intensity of geomagnetic storms and ionospheric disturbances.

  8. Mosquito records from a hot and dry climatic area experiencing frequent outbreaks of Japanese encephalitis, Bellary district, Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Kanojia, P C; Jamgaonkar, A V

    2008-03-01

    Mosquito species occurring in Bellary district, Karnataka, India were surveyed for Japanese encephalitis (JE) and West Nile virus (WNV) from 2001 to 2003. A total of 37 mosquito species in 6 genera were recovered from larval and adult habitats. Aedes, Anopheles and Culex were represented by 11 species each, Mansonia by 2 species, and Armigeres and Lutzia by a single species. A total of 68,506 mosquitoes belonging to 20 species were collected at dusk. Most (74.6%) were Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and occurred in 2 peaks of abundance in February (304 per man hour density [PMHD]) and October (465 PMHD). The mosquito fauna of Bellary district is not diverse, possibly because of the hot and dry climatic conditions in the area.

  9. Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission Observations and Non-Force Free Modeling of a Flux Transfer Event Immersed in a Super-Alfvenic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Lavraud, B.; Torbert, R. B.; Argall, M.; Kacem, I.; Yu, W.; Alm, L.; Burch, J.; Russell, C. T.; Shuster, J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We analyze plasma, magnetic field, and electric field data for a flux transfer event (FTE) to highlight improvements in our understanding of these transient reconnection signatures resulting from high-resolution data. The approximate 20 s long, reverse FTE, which occurred south of the geomagnetic equator near dusk, was immersed in super-Alfvnic flow. The field line twist is illustrated by the behavior of flows parallel perpendicular to the magnetic field. Four-spacecraft timing and energetic particle pitch angle anisotropies indicate a flux rope (FR) connected to the Northern Hemisphere and moving southeast. The flow forces evidently overcame the magnetic tension. The high-speed flows inside the FR were different from those outside. The external flows were perpendicular to the field as expected for draping of the external field around the FR. Modeling the FR analytically, we adopt a non-force free approach since the current perpendicular to the field is nonzero. It reproduces many features of the observations.

  10. Theory of the low-latitude boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnerup, B. U. OE.

    1980-01-01

    A one-dimensional steady state fluid mechanical model is developed of the low-latitude plasma boundary layer inside the dawn and dusk magnetopause. Momentum transfer in the layer is produced by viscosity and/or mass diffusion. Coupling to the ionosphere is achieved via field-aligned currents, the magnitude of which is limited by parallel potential drops. These currents flow into and out of the ionosphere in the manner described by Iijima and Potemra. The higher-latitude (region 1) currents are associated with the boundary layer proper, while the lower-latitude (region 2) ones are associated with a region of sunward return flow adjacent to the boundary layer. The parallel potential drops have a magnitude of typically 2-3 kV and a north-south extent of 100-200 km. The calculated potential profile corresponds reasonably well to observed inverted V precipitation events.

  11. ARISTOTELES: A European approach for an Earth gravity field recovery mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, R.; Faulks, H.; Langemann, M.

    1989-06-01

    Under contract of the European Space Agency a system study for a spaceborne gravity field recovery mission was performed, covering as a secondary mission objective geodetic point positioning in the cm range as well. It was demonstrated that under the given programmatic constraints including dual launch and a very tight development schedule, a six months gravity field mission in a 200 km near polar, dawn-dusk orbit is adequate to determine gravity anomalies to better than 5 mgal with a spatial resolution of 100 x 100 km half wavelength. This will enable scientists to determine improved spherical harmonic coefficients of the Earth gravity field equation to the order and degree of 180 or better.

  12. The GRADIO spaceborne gravity gradiometer: Development and accommodation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, A.

    1989-01-01

    The European ARISTOTELES mission aims at the determination of the Earth's gravity field at short wavelength with a global coverage. Gravity gradient measurements will be achieved during six months by the GRADIO instrument onboard a dedicated satellite in a near dawn-dusk sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 200 km. The objective is an accuracy of better than 5 mgals for gravity anomalies, at ground level for blocks of 1 x 1 deg. According to present knowledge of the potential, the recovery of higher spherical harmonics (degree and order greater than 30) is of main importance. This leads to focus on the variations of the measured components T(sub ij) of the gravity gradient tensor, at frequencies greater than 5 x 10(exp -3) Hz. The resolution, required for the gradiometer is 10(exp -2) Eotvos (i.e., 10(exp -11)/s squared) with an averaging time of 4 s.

  13. The GRADIO spaceborne gravity gradiometer: Development and accommodation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, A.

    1989-06-01

    The European ARISTOTELES mission aims at the determination of the Earth's gravity field at short wavelength with a global coverage. Gravity gradient measurements will be achieved during six months by the GRADIO instrument onboard a dedicated satellite in a near dawn-dusk sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 200 km. The objective is an accuracy of better than 5 mgals for gravity anomalies, at ground level for blocks of 1 x 1 deg. According to present knowledge of the potential, the recovery of higher spherical harmonics (degree and order greater than 30) is of main importance. This leads to focus on the variations of the measured components T(sub ij) of the gravity gradient tensor, at frequencies greater than 5 x 10(exp -3) Hz. The resolution, required for the gradiometer is 10(exp -2) Eotvos (i.e., 10(exp -11)/s squared) with an averaging time of 4 s.

  14. ARISTOTELES: A European approach for an Earth gravity field recovery mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, R.; Faulks, H.; Langemann, M.

    1989-01-01

    Under contract of the European Space Agency a system study for a spaceborne gravity field recovery mission was performed, covering as a secondary mission objective geodetic point positioning in the cm range as well. It was demonstrated that under the given programmatic constraints including dual launch and a very tight development schedule, a six months gravity field mission in a 200 km near polar, dawn-dusk orbit is adequate to determine gravity anomalies to better than 5 mgal with a spatial resolution of 100 x 100 km half wavelength. This will enable scientists to determine improved spherical harmonic coefficients of the Earth gravity field equation to the order and degree of 180 or better.

  15. A two-temperature plasma distribution in the magnetosheath at lunar distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, G. D.; Freeman, J. W.; Maher, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    Least squares Maxwellian fits have been made to data from the Apollo 15 suprathermal ion detector experiment (SIDE) during the moon's passage through the dusk magnetosheath. It is found that the data are best fit by superimposing two co-moving proton populations whose temperatures differ radically: kT roughly 10 eV and kT roughly 100 eV. This two-temperature distribution cannot be explained by alpha particles. The higher temperature population is typical of that expected for the fully shocked magnetosheath at lunar distances. The colder distribution could arise from cold plasma from within the magnetosphere brought up to magnetosheath flow speeds, but it is more probably due to unshocked solar wind.

  16. Seasonal and solar cycle variations in the ionospheric convection reversal boundary location inferred from monthly SuperDARN data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koustov, Alexander V.; Fiori, Robyn A. D.

    2016-02-01

    Multi-year (1995-2013) velocity data collected by the Super Dual Auroral Network (SuperDARN) HF radars are considered to investigate seasonal and solar cycle variations of the convection reversal boundary (CRB) location for interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz < 0. By considering monthly data sets we show that the CRB is at higher latitudes in summer between 1995 and 2007. The poleward shifts are on the order of 2-5°. After 2007, the seasonal effect weakens, and the highest latitudes for the CRB start to occur during the winter time. We show that the CRB latitudes decrease with an increase of the IMF transverse component at a rate of (1-2°)/2 nT. Because of this effect, on average, the CRB latitudes are lower during high solar activity periods with stronger IMFs. We also confirm the effect of the CRB dawn-dusk shifts related to the IMF changes in the IMF By sign.

  17. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability under Parker-Spiral Interplanetary Magnetic Field conditions at the magnetospheric flanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, E.; Nykyri, K.; Otto, A.

    2016-07-01

    We have generated fully three-dimensional, high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) Instability during Parker-Spiral Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) conditions at the dawnside magnetospheric flank magnetopause. Results of these simulations show that, although the draping of a strong tangential magnetic field component around the magnetopause, tailward of the terminator (due to the Parker-Spiral orientation), tends to stabilize the growth of such instabilities within the shear-flow plane, Kelvin-Helmholtz waves with a k -vector tilted out of this plane may, nonetheless, develop into the nonlinear phase. This result suggests that obliquely propagating KH waves may contribute to the dawn-dusk asymmetries observed in plasma sheet parameters.

  18. Scalar magnetic anomaly maps of Earth derived from POGO and Magsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Jafar; Langel, Robert A.; Purucker, Mike

    1994-01-01

    A new Polar Orbit Geophysical Observatory (POGO) scalar magnetic anomaly map at 400 km altitude is presented which consists of spherical harmonics of degree 15-60. On the basis of the common features of this map with two new Magsat anomaly maps, dawn and dusk, two scalar magnetic anomaly maps of the Earth are presented using two selection criteria with different levels of stringency. These selection criteria suppress the noncrustal components of the original maps by different amounts. The more stringent selection criteria seek to eliminate as much contamination as possible, at the expense of suppressing some anomaly signal. This map is represented by spherical harmonics of degree 15-60. The less stringent selection criteria seek to retain as much crustal signal as possible, at the expense of also retaining some contaminating fields. This map is represented by spherical harmonics of degree 15-65. The resulting two maps are highly correlated with degree correlation coefficients greater than 0.8.

  19. Electron dropout echoes induced by interplanetary shock: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y. X.; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Fu, S. Y.; Rankin, R.; Yuan, C.-J.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.

    2016-06-01

    On 23 November 2012, a sudden dropout of the relativistic electron flux was observed after an interplanetary shock arrival. The dropout peaks at ˜1 MeV and more than 80% of the electrons disappeared from the drift shell. Van Allen twin Probes observed a sharp electron flux dropout with clear energy dispersion signals. The repeating flux dropout and recovery signatures, or "dropout echoes", constitute a new phenomenon referred to as a "drifting electron dropout" with a limited initial spatial range. The azimuthal range of the dropout is estimated to be on the duskside, from ˜1300 to 0100 LT. We conclude that the shock-induced electron dropout is not caused by the magnetopause shadowing. The dropout and consequent echoes suggest that the radial migration of relativistic electrons is induced by the strong dusk-dawn asymmetric interplanetary shock compression on the magnetosphere.

  20. Plasma and electric field boundaries at high and low altitudes on July 29, 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennell, J. F.; Johnson, R. G.; Young, D. T.; Torbert, R. B.; Moore, T. E.

    1982-01-01

    Hot plasma observations at high and low altitudes were compared. The plasma ion composition at high altitudes outside the plasmasphere was 0+. Heavy ions were also observed at low altitudes outside the plasmasphere. It is shown that at times these ions are found well below the plasmapause inside the plasmasphere. Comparisons of the low altitude plasma and dc electric fields show that the outer limits of the plasmasphere is not always corotating at the low L-shells. The corotation boundary, the estimated plasmapause boundary at the boundary of the inner edge of plasma sheet ions were at the same position. The inner edge of plasma sheet electrons is observed at higher latitudes than the plasmasphere boundary during disturbed times. The inner edge of the plasma sheaths shows a strong dawn to dusk asymmetry. At the same time the inner edge of the ring current and plasma sheath also moves to high latitudes reflecting an apparent inflation of the magnetosphere.

  1. Ionospheric plasma cloud dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the thermospheric neutral wind and ionospheric drift made at Eglin AFB, Florida and Kwajalein Atoll are discussed. The neutral wind measurements at Eglin had little variation over a period of four years for moderate magnetic activity (Kp 4); the ionospheric drifts are small. Evidence is presented that indicates that increased magnetic activity has a significant effect on the neutral wind magnitude and direction at this midlatitude station. The neutral wind at dusk near the equator is generally small although in one case out of seven it was significantly larger. It is described how observations of large barium releases can be used to infer the degree of electrodynamic coupling of ion clouds to the background ionosphere. Evidence is presented that indicates that large barium releases are coupled to the conjugate ionosphere at midlatitudes.

  2. Development of large-scale Birkeland currents determined from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Waters, C. L.; ...

    2014-05-07

    The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment uses magnetic field data from the Iridium constellation to derive the global Birkeland current distribution every 10 min. We examine cases in which the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) rotated from northward to southward resulting in onsets of the Birkeland currents. Dayside Region 1/2 currents, totaling ~25% of the final current, appear within 20 min of the IMF southward turning and remain steady. In the onset of nightside currents occurs 40 to 70 min after the dayside currents appear. Afterwards, the currents intensify at dawn, dusk, and on the dayside, yielding a fullymore » formed Region 1/2 system ~30 min after the nightside onset. Our results imply that the dayside Birkeland currents are driven by magnetopause reconnection, and the remainder of the system forms as magnetospheric return flows start and progress sunward, ultimately closing the Dungey convection cycle.« less

  3. Development of large-scale Birkeland currents determined from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Waters, C. L.; Green, D. L.; Merkin, V. G.; Barnes, R. J.; Dyrud, L. P.

    2014-05-07

    The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment uses magnetic field data from the Iridium constellation to derive the global Birkeland current distribution every 10 min. We examine cases in which the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) rotated from northward to southward resulting in onsets of the Birkeland currents. Dayside Region 1/2 currents, totaling ~25% of the final current, appear within 20 min of the IMF southward turning and remain steady. In the onset of nightside currents occurs 40 to 70 min after the dayside currents appear. Afterwards, the currents intensify at dawn, dusk, and on the dayside, yielding a fully formed Region 1/2 system ~30 min after the nightside onset. Our results imply that the dayside Birkeland currents are driven by magnetopause reconnection, and the remainder of the system forms as magnetospheric return flows start and progress sunward, ultimately closing the Dungey convection cycle.

  4. Culicoides Latreille biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) of the Dongzhaigang mangrove forest, Hainan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Hui; Gopurenko, David; Cai, DU-Cheng; Yang, Ye-Meng; Hu, Rong; Thepparat, Arunrat; Wardhana, April H; Kim, Heung-Chul; Klein, Terry A; Kim, Myung-Soon; Bellis, Glenn A

    2017-01-31

    The biting midge fauna of Dongzhaigang Mangrove Forest, Hainan Province, China was sampled on 14 October 2015 using three methods: a pan light trap operated from dusk until dawn the following morning and sweep net and human landing collections performed between 16:15-17:15 hr. Eight species, including two new records for China, Culicoides palawanensis and C. niphanae, and one new record for Hainan, C. circumbasalis, were collected. A key to assist with identification of specimens of these species is provided. DNA barcodes supported the morphological identification of some of these species and identified the potential presence of cryptic species and/or deep population structure in others. The newly recorded species were morphologically similar to species previously reported from Hainan, highlighting the need for further investigation into the taxonomy of biting midges in this region. Species composition and abundance varied considerably between the three collection techniques suggesting that multiple techniques likely provide a more comprehensive sample of biting midge fauna.

  5. Foreshock ions observed behind the Martian bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, R. A.; Yamauchi, M.; Winningham, J. D.; Lundin, R.; Sharber, J. R.; Nilsson, H.; Coates, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Mars Express Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms experiment contains ion and electron instruments for conducting plasma measurements. On January 23, 2012, during in-bound travel of Mars Express in the southern hemisphere of Mars from its dawn side toward periapsis at dusk, the plasma instruments measured foreshock-like ion beams extending from outside the bow shock and into the magnetosphere, continuing to a distance of about a proton gyroradius from the bow shock. These ion beams were mostly protons, were observed to have energies greater than solar wind protons, and were not gyrating, in agreement with reflections of the solar wind proton beam. Furthermore, in the foreshock region the ion energy gradually decreased toward the magnetosheath, in agreement with an acceleration by outward-directed electric field in the bowshock. The observations also suggest that this electric field exists even inside the magnetosheath within the distance of a proton gyroradius from the bow shock.

  6. Further characterisation of allergens associated with hypersensitivity to the "green nimitti" midge (Cladotanytarsus lewisi, Diptera: Chironomidae).

    PubMed

    Tee, R D; Cranston, P S; Kay, A B

    1987-01-01

    Chironomid midges are small (2-15 mm) non-biting flies, characteristically seen swarming by water at dusk. Allergens of the "green nimitti" midge, Cladotanytarsus lewisi (Freeman) (Diptera: Chironomidae), a cause of widespread hypersensitivity in the Sudan, were isolated and partially characterized by Sephacryl S200 chromatography. The allergenicity of the fractions was identified by "rocket" autoradiography, RAST inhibition, skin "prick" tests, and the immunoblot technique. The fractions were further analysed by isoelectric focusing and SDS-PAGE. Two major allergens with pI's ranging from 4.3 to 6.0 were identified and had molecular weights of approximately 17,000 and 32,000 daltons, sizes compatible with their being monomeric and dimeric haemoglobins. Since chironomids occur in nuisance numbers worldwide and their haemoglobins have been shown to produce severe hypersensitivity reactions in man, they should be seen as an important potential cause of environmental and occupational allergy.

  7. KSC-2011-8103

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-30

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The mobile launcher, or ML, makes its way past the turn basin as dusk descends on NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The ML is nearing the end of its 4.2-mile trek from Launch Pad 39B to the park site near the Vehicle Assembly Building. Data on the ML collected from structural and functional engineering tests during its two-week stay on the pad will be used in the next phases of construction. The 355-foot-tall ML structure, which took about two years to construct, will be modified by NASA’s 21st Century Ground Systems Program to support NASA’s Space Launch System, the heavy-lift rocket that will launch astronauts into deep space on future exploration missions. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston

  8. The magnetic topology of the plasmoid flux rope in a MHD-simulation of magnetotail reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    On the basis of a 3D MHD simulation, the magnetic topology of a plasmoid that forms by a localized reconnection process in a magnetotail configuration (including a net dawn-dusk magnetic field component B sub y N is discussed. As a consequence of B sub y N not equalling 0, the plasmoid assumes a helical flux rope structure rather than an isolated island or bubble structure. Initially all field lines of the plasmoid flux rope remain connected with the earth, while at later times a gradually increasing amount of flux tubes becomes separated, connecting to either the distant boundary or to the flank boundaries. In this stage, topologically different flux tubes become tangled and wrapped around each other, consistent with predictions on the basis of an ad hoc plasmoid model.

  9. The magnetic topology of the plasmoid flux rope in a MHD-simulation of magnetotail reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    On the basis of a three-dimensional MHD simulation we discuss the magnetic topology of a plasmoid that forms by a localized reconnection process in a magnetotail configuration including a net dawn-dusk magnetic field component ByN. As a consequence of ByN ≠ 0 the plasmoid assumes a helical flux rope structure rather than an isolated island or bubble structure. Initially all field lines of the plasmoid flux rope remain connected with the Earth, while at later times a gradually increasing amount of flux tubes becomes separated, connecting to either the distant boundary or to the flank boundaries. In this stage topologically different flux tubes become tangled and wrapped around each other, consistent with predictions on the basis of an ad-hoc plasmoid model.

  10. The magnetic topology of the plasmoid flux rope in a MHD simulation of magnetotail reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    On the basis of a three-dimensional MHD simulation we discuss the magnetic topology of a plasmoid that forms by a localized reconnection process in a magnetotail configuration including a net dawn-dusk magnetic field component B sub yN. As a consequence of B sub yN ne 0 the plasmoid gets a helical flux rope structure rather than an isolated island or bubble structure. Initially all field lines of the plasmoid flux rope remain connected with the Earth, while at later times a gradually increasing number of flux tubes becomes separated, connecting to either the distant boundary or to the flank boundaries. In this stage topologically different flux tubes become tangled and wrapped around each other, consistent with predictions on the basis of ad hoc plasmoid models.

  11. Hatching rhythms of Uca thayeri Rathbun: timing in semidiurnal and mixed tidal regimes.

    PubMed

    Kellmeyer, K; Salmon, M

    2001-06-01

    We compared the timing of larval release by Uca thayeri exposed to different tidal regimes. Crabs on Florida's East Coast experience semidiurnal tides, whereas crabs on the Florida's West Coast experience mixed tides.In both populations, hatching occurred shortly after high tide. On the East Coast, most crabs released their larvae between dusk and midnight, a few days before the maximum amplitude spring tides. On the West Coast, most crabs released their larvae during the afternoon tropic tides of greater amplitude. West Coast crabs may release during the day because ebbing tides at night are too weak for effective transport. Thus, at each location, hatching occurs when phase relationships between the ebbing tides, the light-dark cycle, and tidal amplitude are most favorable. Further study is required to determine whether females on each Coast show fixed responses to each tidal regime, or whether they can alter their hatching rhythms upon exposure to different tides.

  12. Toward a political analysis of the consequences of a world climate change produced by increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Schware, R.

    1980-01-01

    It was Hegel's extraordinarily deep and perceptive insight that mankind is caught up in a drama that cannot be fully understood until it has been played out. The owl of Minewa spreads its wings only with the falling of the dusk. On the more hopeful side is the fact that, although we cannot know the consequences of future interactions between climate and society, we can begin to work toward political solutions and gird ourselves for ominous trends that are now coming into view. The purpose of this paper is to identify one such trend, namely the increase of atmospheric temperatures due to increased carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) and lay some initial groundwork for political research related to climate-societal interactions.

  13. Severing of skull cap: A rare trauma attributed to transportation of bulldozer.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Parthasarathi; Vidua, Raghvendra K; Patel, Sweta

    2017-03-01

    Bulldozer fatalities are usually due to accidental crushing of the body at the workplace. However, severance of the skull cap simulating a chopping injury to head is rare in the literature. Medico-legal investigation may be posed with different challenges when carrying out an autopsy of a victim with this devastating head injury. The police will seek an opinion about the type of weapon responsible for the injuries, the nature of injuries produced and manner of death. In the present case, the victim was hit at dusk by a protruding part of the bulldozer blade as he crossed in front of a bulldozer that was approaching his tractor from the opposite side of the road. His skull cap was severed and he died instantly. This report considers the circumstances of his death, its mechanisms and strategies for preventing such deaths.

  14. High latitude f-region drift studies. Technical report, October 1985-September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Reinisch, B.W.; Buchau, J.; Weber, E.J.; Dozois, C.G.; Bibl, K.

    1986-12-01

    The large-scale, high-latitude ionospheric-convection pattern is driven by the interaction of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field with the earth's magnetosphere. Ground-based digital ionosondes, with spaced receiving antennas, have been developed and deployed at the high latitude stations of Thule, Greenland and Goose Bay, Labrador. Results from these stations demonstrate that the ionospheric convection can be measured for the bottomside ionosphere. Data from Thule consistently show the predominant antisunward convection. The data from Goose Bay indicate the sunward return flows of the polar plasma convection and the switch over when the station rotates from the dusk into the dawn cell. These data also illustrate the potential for systematic study of the convection patterns that is possible with a network of ground-based digital ionosondes.

  15. Observations of Field-Aligned Current Spatial and Temporal Variations by Space Technology 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, G.; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, R. J.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report the results of magnetic field measurements of field-aligned currents (FACs) using multi-point magnetic field data from Space Technology 5 (ST-5) mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, sun synchronous polar orbit. The spacecraft were maintained in a 'pearls on a sting' constellation with controlled spacings ranging from just over 5000 km down to under 50 km. During the three-month mission duration, the constellation mission returned high quality multi-point measurements of the magnetic field through Earth's dynamic ionospheric current systems over a range of inter-satellite spacing. In this study, we use the ST-5 magnetic field measurements to separate spatial and temporal variations of FACs and to quantify the imbalance between the region 1 (R1) and the region 2 (R2) currents.

  16. Stray light control for asteroid detection at low solar elongation for the NEOSSat micro-satellite telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbrucker, Victor; Stauder, John; Laurin, Denis; Hollinger, Allan

    2012-09-01

    The Near Earth Object Surveillance Satellite (NEOSSat) is a small satellite dedicated to finding near Earth asteroids. Its surveying strategy consists of imaging areas of the sky to low solar elongation, while in a sun synchronous polar orbit (dawn-dusk). A high performance baffle will control stray light mainly due to Earth shine. Observation scenarios require solar shielding down to 45 degree solar elongation over a wide range of ecliptic latitudes. In order to detect the faintest objects (approx 20th v mag) given a 15 cm telescope and CCD detection system, background from stray light is a critical operational concern. The required attenuation is in the order of 10-12. The requirement was verified by analyses; testing was not attempted because the level of attenuation is difficult to measure reliably. We report consistent results of stray light optical modelling from two independent analyses. Launch is expected for late 2012.

  17. Several features of the earthward and tailward streaming of energetic protons /0.29-0.5 MeV/ in the earth's plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    The reported investigation represents an extension of a study conducted by Lui and Krimigis (1981) who have examined the question of transport of energetic protons measured by the Charged Particle Measurements Experiment on IMP 7 and 8 in the magnetotail. It has been shown that there is a substantial net earthward transport of these particles, with fluxes seemingly capable of replenishing the losses of outer radiation belt protons. In the current investigation the earlier study is extended by reporting several features of the earthward and tailward streaming of these energetic protons. Attention is given to selection criteria and isolation of magnetospheric protons, the dawn-dusk reversal in streaming anisotropy, the amplitude of streaming anisotropy, and spectral hardness.

  18. Towards developing an analytical procedure of defining the equatorial electrojet for correcting satellite magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravat, Dhananjay; Hinze, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the total magnetic intensity MAGSAT data has identified and characterized the variability of ionospheric current effects as reflected in the geomagnetic field as a function of longitude, elevation, and time (daily as well as monthly variations). This analysis verifies previous observations in POGO data and provides important boundary conditions for theoretical studies of ionospheric currents. Furthermore, the observations have led to a procedure to remove these temporal perturbations from lithospheric MAGSAT magnetic anomaly data based on 'along-the-dip-latitude' averages from dawn and dusk data sets grouped according to longitudes, time (months), and elevation. Using this method, high-resolution lithospheric magnetic anomaly maps have been prepared of the earth over a plus or minus 50 deg latitude band. These maps have proven useful in the study of the structures, nature, and processes of the lithosphere.

  19. Statistical mapping of ULF Pc3 velocity fluctuations in the Earth's dayside magnetosheath as a function of solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, A. P.; Nykyri, K.; Osmane, A.; Pulkkinen, T. I.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a statistical study of Pc3 velocity fluctuations in the Earth's dayside magnetosheath. There exists a notable dawn-dusk asymmetry, such that velocity fluctuations generally exhibit enhanced spectral power in the magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The fluctuations in the central magnetosheath and close to bow shock tend to dampen with increasing tail-ward distance while the opposite trend is observed close to the magnetopause. This strongly suggests that velocity shear driven processes such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability drive Pc3 flow variations close to the magnetopause as the velocity shear increases with increasing tail-ward distance. We also show strong evidence that Pc3 velocity fluctuations are significantly enhanced during intervals of faster solar wind speeds. We see negligible differences between data collected during northward and southward IMF orientations, but in general, a dawn-favoured asymmetry persists.

  20. The Substructure of a Flux Transfer Event Observed by the MMS Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Gershman, D.; Avanov, L.; Paterson, W. R.; Dorelli, J. C.; Ergun, R. E.; Russel, C. T.; hide

    2016-01-01

    On 15 August 2015, MMS (Magnetospheric Multiscale mission), skimming the dusk magnetopause, detected an isolated region of an increased magnetic strength and bipolar Bn, indicating a flux transfer event (FTE). The four spacecraft in a tetrahedron allowed for investigations of the shape and motion of the FTE. In particular, high-resolution particle data facilitated our exploration of FTE substructures and their magnetic connectivity inside and surrounding the FTE. Combined field and plasma observations suggest that the core fields are open, magnetically connected to the northern magnetosphere from which high-energy particles leak; ion "D" distributions characterize the axis of flux ropes that carry old-opened field lines; counter streaming electrons superposed by parallel-heated components populate the periphery surrounding the FTE; and the interface between the core and draped regions contains a separatrix of newlyopened magnetic field lines that emanate from the X line above the FTE.

  1. Asymmetric auroral intensities in the Earth's Northern and Southern hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundal, K. M.; Østgaard, N.

    2009-07-01

    It is commonly assumed that the aurora borealis (Northern Hemisphere) and aurora australis (Southern Hemisphere) are mirror images of each other because the charged particles causing the aurora follow the magnetic field lines connecting the two hemispheres. The particles are believed to be evenly distributed between the two hemispheres, from the source region in the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere. Although it has been shown that similar auroral features in the opposite hemispheres can be displaced tens of degree in longitude and that seasonal effects can cause differences in global intensity, the overall auroral patterns were still similar. Here we report observations that clearly contradict the common assumption about symmetric aurora: intense spots are seen at dawn in the Northern summer Hemisphere, and at dusk in the Southern winter Hemisphere. The asymmetry is interpreted in terms of inter-hemispheric currents related to seasons, which have been predicted but hitherto had not been seen.

  2. Design of energy-saving control system for LED street lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiao; Jin, Wenguang

    2013-10-01

    Based on the energy-saving and safe-driving requirements of road lighting, a kind of energy-saving system is proposed for street lamps in this paper, which is handled by two controllers. At daybreak and dusk, the lamps are turned on or off according to local sunrise and sunset. And at night, it is controlled by a fuzzy controller. Traffic flow and its variation rate, the highest road speed limit are taken as the inputs of the controller, at the same time, the lighting comfort and the experience of driver are defined as the fuzzy sets and control rules. LED lamps are used in the system as illuminant. The numerical simulation in MATLAB and analysis on the practical measured data show that the system is effective in energy-saving for road lighting.

  3. Magnetospheric Response to the Arrival of the Shock Wave in Front of the Magnetic Cloud Event of January 10,1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuest, M.; Huddleston, M.; Burch, J. L.; Dempsey, D. L.; Craven, P. D.; Chandler, M. O.; Spann, J. F.; Peterson, W. K.; Collins, H. L.; Lennartsson, W.

    1998-01-01

    We are studying the magnetic cloud event of January 6-11, 1997. Specifically, we have investigated the response of the magnetosphere to the shock wave in front of the magnetic cloud on January 10, 1997 using data from WIND, GEOTAIL and POLAR spacecraft as well as ground magnetometer data. The WIND spacecraft, which was located at about 100 Re upstream from the Earth, observed the arrival of the shock wave front at 005OUT. Geotail was located at the equatorial magnetopause (approx. 8.7 Re), while POLAR was located in the northern dawn sector at 8.4 Re, 6.1 MLT and 61.1 MLAT. A magnetic signature was nearly simultaneously observed at about 0104 UT at the POLAR and Geotail spacecraft. Particle density increases were observed on WIND and Geotail, but not on POLAR. The UV aurora shows an asymmetrical dawn-dusk intensification and presubstorm activity. The significance of these findings will be discussed.

  4. Unfixed in a fixated world: identity, sexuality, race and culture.

    PubMed

    Offord, B; Cantrell, L

    1999-01-01

    At the dusk of the twentieth century the confluence of sexuality and the multicultural subject offers a deep interrogation into identity. On the edge of the world, Australia is experiencing a poignant moment of identity crisis. For someone who is from a multicultural, multisexual background, identity is fragmented. Law and society demand unambiguous subjects, fixed by socio-political-cultural mores and expectations. To be unfixed presents difficulties in negotiating systems of knowledge and power which are fundamentally homeostatic. In the end it is all a matter of being unfixed but connected to "others," aware of the substance beyond identity and labels. This is being unfixed in a fixated world, challenging gravity, resisting definition and compromise.

  5. Jupiter's radiation belts.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, N.; Mcdonough, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    A model for the production and loss of energetic electrons in Jupiter's radiation belt is presented. It is postulated that the electrons originate in the solar wind and are diffused in toward the planet by perturbations which violate the particles' third adiabatic invariant. At large distances, magnetic perturbations, electric fields associated with magnetospheric convection, or interchange instabilities driven by thermal plasma gradients may drive the diffusion. Inside about 10 Jupiter radii, the diffusion is probably driven by electric fields associated with the upper atmosphere dynamo which is driven by neutral winds in the ionosphere. The diurnal component of the dynamo wind fields produces a dawn-dusk asymmetry in the decimetric radiation from the electrons in the belts, and the lack of obvious measured asymmetries in the decimetric radiation measurements provides estimates of upper limits for these Jovian ionospheric neutral winds.

  6. Theoretical magnetograms based on quantitative simulation of a magnetospheric substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.-K.; Wolf, R. A.; Karty, J. L.; Harel, M.

    1982-01-01

    Substorm currents derived from the Rice University computer simulation of the September 19, 1976 substorm event are used to compute theoretical magnetograms as a function of universal time for various stations, integrating the Biot-Savart law over a maze of about 2700 wires and bands that carry the ring, Birkeland and horizontal ionospheric currents. A comparison of theoretical results with corresponding observations leads to a claim of general agreement, especially for stations at high and middle magnetic latitudes. Model results suggest that the ground magnetic field perturbations arise from complicated combinations of different kinds of currents, and that magnetic field disturbances due to different but related currents cancel each other out despite the inapplicability of Fukushima's (1973) theorem. It is also found that the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the horizontal magnetic field disturbance component at low latitudes is due to a net downward Birkeland current at noon, a net upward current at midnight, and, generally, antisunward-flowing electrojets.

  7. Ion cyclotron waves observed near the plasmapause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, B. J.; Samson, J. C.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    Pc2 electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves at 0.1 Hz, near the oxygen cyclotron frequency, have been observed by ISEE-1 and -2 between L = 7.6 - 5.8 on an inbound near equatorial pass in the dusk sector. The waves occurred in a thick plasmapause of width about 1 earth radius and penetrated about 1 earth radius into the plasmasphere. Wave onset was accompanied by significant increases in the thermal (0-100 eV) He(+) and the warm (0.1-16 keV/e) O(+) and He(+) heavy ion populations. Wave polarization is predominantly left-handed with propagation almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field, and the spectral slot and polarization reversal predicted by multicomponent cold plasma propagation theory are identified in the wave data. The results are considered as an example of wave-particle interactions occurring during the outer plasmasphere refilling process at the time of the substorm recovery phase.

  8. Steepening of waves at the duskside magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaschke, F.; Kahr, N.; Fischer, D.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Magnes, W.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Giles, B. L.; Strangeway, R. J.; Leinweber, H. K.; Bromund, K. R.; Anderson, B. J.; Le, G.; Chutter, M.; Slavin, J. A.; Kepko, E. L.

    2016-07-01

    Surface waves at the magnetopause flanks typically feature steeper, i.e., more inclined leading (antisunward facing) than trailing (sunward facing) edges. This is expected for Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) amplified waves. Very rarely, during northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, anomalous/inverse steepening has been observed. The small-scale tetrahedral configuration of the Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft and their high time resolution measurements enable us to routinely ascertain magnetopause boundary inclinations during surface wave passage with high accuracy by four-spacecraft timing analysis. At the dusk flank magnetopause, 77%/23% of the analyzed wave intervals exhibit regular/inverse steepening. Inverse steepening happens during northward IMF conditions, as previously reported and, in addition, during intervals of dominant equatorial IMF. Inverse steepening observed under the latter conditions may be due to the absence of KHI or due to instabilities arising from the alignment of flow and magnetic fields in the magnetosheath.

  9. An analysis of howling response parameters useful for wolf pack censusing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrington, F.H.; Mech, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    Gray wolves (Canis lupus) were studied from April-1972 through April 1974 in the Superior National Forest in northeastern Minnesota by radio-tracking and simulated howling. Based on replies during 217 of 456 howling sessions, the following recommendations were derived for using simulated howling as a census technique: (1) the best times of day are dusk and night; (2) July, August, and September are the best months; (3) precipitation and winds greater than 12 km/hour should be aVQided; (4) a sequence of 5 single howls should be used, alternating 'flat' and 'breaking' howls; (5) trials should be repeated 3 times at about 2-minute intervals with the first trial at lower volume; and (6) the trial series should be repeated on 3 nights as close to each other as possible. Two censuses are described: a saturation census and a sampling census.

  10. Simulation of Sub Aurora Polarization Stream in the storm time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Guo, J.; Deng, Y.; Sheng, C.; Lin, C. Y. T.

    2016-12-01

    Ion velocity in the dusk Sub Aurora region observed by Satellites often shows a significant westward convetion (up to 1000- 2000km/s). The high speed westward stream is distinguished with the two-cell convection pattern. This kind of events are called Sub Aurora Polarization Stream (SAPS). In March 17th 2013 storm, DMSP F18 satellite observed several SAPS cases when crossing the Sub Aurora region. The real particle precipitation data and electric field data from DMSP F18 satellite have been applied to drive the Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (GITM) along the satellite trajectory. Cases with different specifications of forcing have been compared to illustrate the influence SAPS on the ionosphere/thermosphere.

  11. Ion Loss from Titan's Atmosphere versus Local Time: A two-fluid MHD Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Russell, C. T.; Nagy, A. F.; Toth, G.; Dougherty, M. K.; Cravens, T. E.; Wellbrock, A.; Coates, A. J.; Garnier, P.; Wahlund, J.; Crary, F. J.

    2009-12-01

    This presentation report recent progress on modeling of plasma interaction around Titan. The single fluid MHD model reproduces only the sum of the electron temperature and ion temperature. Our recent modeling includes an electron energy equation in the Hall MHD model so that both electron temperature and ion temperature ARE self-consistently calculated. The plasma interaction with Titan is expected to vary as the moon moves around its orbit. Using the improved model, we compare the structure of the interaction under two extreme conditions, corresponding to upstream flow interacting with the nightside and dayside ionosphere respectively. Model results show that the dayside ionosphere is more extended and the flow is more disturbed in the 6 SLT case than in the 18 SLT case. We calculate the ion escape rates under these conditions and compare with Cassini observations of the only two available low altitudes Cassini flybys in Saturn's dawn (T5 flyby) and dusk (T34 flyby) sectors.

  12. Geomagnetic storms of cycle 24 and their solar sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watari, Shinichi

    2017-05-01

    Solar activity of cycle 24 following the deep minimum between cycle 23 and cycle 24 is the weakest one since cycle 14 (1902-1913). Geomagnetic activity is also low in cycle 24. We show that this low geomagnetic activity is caused by the weak dawn-to-dusk solar wind electric field ( E d-d) and that the occurrence rate of E d-d > 5 mV/m decreased in the interval from 2013 to 2014. We picked up seventeen geomagnetic storms with the minimum Dst index of less than -100 nT and identified their solar sources in cycle 24 (2009-2015). It is shown that the relatively slow coronal mass ejections contributed to the geomagnetic storms in cycle 24.

  13. High-resolution multifluid simulations of flux ropes in the Martian magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnett, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional multifluid simulations of the Martian magnetosphere show the development and dynamics of flux ropes. One flux rope, which is analyzed in detail, initiates at a reconnection region near the dusk terminator and travels tailward with a speed on the order of 40 km s-1. The reconnection region forms close to the planet at an altitude of 700 km. Both the location of the reconnection and energy spectra of the plasma in the reconnection region agree with Mars Global Surveyor observations of reconnection. The largest flux ropes have a spatial extent on the order of 2000 km. Energy spectra taken through the flux ropes show an inverted-V type structure similar to those measured by Mars Express, suggesting that some inverted-V observations may be transits through flux ropes. The simulations indicate that the formation of flux ropes can lead to enhanced loss of heavy ions from the atmosphere.

  14. [Phlebotominae (Diptera: Psychodidae) in area of transmission of american tegumentar leishmaniasis in the north coast of the State of São Paulo, Brazil].

    PubMed

    de Brito, Marylene; Casanova, Cláudio; Mascarini, Luciene Maura; Wanderley, Dalva Marli Valério; Corrêa, Fernando Motta de Azevedo

    2002-01-01

    Fourteen, 30 and 104 cases of American tegumentary leishmaniasis were recorded respectively, in 1993, 1994 and 1995, in the coast region of São Paulo State. Aiming to characterize the fauna and seasonal and hourly distributions of the phlebotominic species, adult specimens were captured fortnightly between November/95 and December/96. CDC light traps were used as of dusk intradomiciliarly, peridomiciliarly and in the forest for 12 hours. From the same moment on but only during 6 hours Shannon traps were set in the peridomicile 100 meters from the house. Quarterly this trap was used for 12 hours. The population density fluctuation as well as the occurrence of intra and extradomiciliarly predominant species were observed. In the different traps used and environments investigated Lutzomyia intermedia was the most abundant species.

  15. Circadian light input in plants, flies and mammals.

    PubMed

    Panda, Satchidananda; Hogenesch, John B; Kay, Steve A

    2003-01-01

    The rotation of our planet results in daily changes in light and darkness, as well as seasons with characteristic photoperiods. Adaptation to these daily and seasonal changes in light properties (and associated changes in the environment) is important to the sustained survival of higher life forms on our planet. Many organisms use their intrinsic circadian oscillator or clock to orchestrate daily rhythms in behaviour and physiology to adapt to diurnal changes. Some higher organisms use the same oscillator to monitor day length in selecting the appropriate season for reproductive behaviour. Organisms have developed irradiance measurement mechanisms to ignore photic noise (lightning, moonlight), and use the light of dusk and dawn for circadian photoentrainment. They have also devised multiple photoreceptors and signalling cascades to buffer against changes in the spectral composition of natural light. The interaction of the clock with ambient light is, therefore, quite intricate.

  16. Earth observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-31

    ISS040-E-113700 (31 Aug. 2014) --- This panorama view, photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station, shows tan-colored dust of a major dust storm obscuring the Persian Gulf and the its northern shoreline. Strong north winds often blow in summer, churning up dust from the entire length of the desert surfaces of the Tigris and Euphrates valleys (top left). Dust partly obscures the hundreds of kilometers of Iraq’s light-green agricultural lands along these rivers (left). A line of thunderstorms is being set off by the Zagros Mountains of Iran (right), with the setting sun casting long shadows from the thunderheads. Space station crews see sixteen sunrises and sunsets every day from low Earth orbit. Here the crew captured dusk in a darkening Iranian landscape (right).

  17. Characteristics of High Latitude Precursor Flows Ahead of Dipolarization Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. Z.; Zhou, X.; Angelopoulos, V.; Liu, J.; Runov, A.; Pan, D.; Zong, Q.

    2016-12-01

    Dipolarization fronts (DFs), earthward-propagating structures in the magnetotail current sheet characterized by sharp enhancements of northward magnetic field, are capable of converting electromagnetic energy into particles' kinetic energy. The accelerated and heated ions form plasma flows ahead of DFs, which have been identified as DF precursor flows in both high- and low-latitude plasma sheet. Statistics from THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) observations have shown that the particle and energy fluxes towards the Earth are remarkably larger in high latitude than in low latitude. Moreover, the high-latitude particle and energy fluxes at the DF dawnside are remarkably greater than those at the duskside, which is opposite to the dawn-dusk asymmetries near the equatorial region. These latitude-dependent characteristics of DF precursor flows are reproduced by a simple Liouville-mapping simulation, which provides new understandings of ion dynamics associated with dipolarization fronts.

  18. Plasma structuring by the gradient drift instability at high latitudes and comparison with velocity shear driven processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Sunanda; Mackenzie, E.; Basu, S.; Coley, W. R.; Sharber, J. R.; Hoegy, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Using results of the in situ measurements made by the DE 2 satellite, the nature of plasma structuring at high latitudes, caused by the gradient drift instability process, is described. Using noon-midnight and dawn-dusk orbits of the DE 2 satellite, it was possible to examine the simultaneous density and electric field spectra of convecting large-scale plasma density enhancements in the polar cap known as 'patches', in directions parallel and perpendicular to their antisunward convection. The results provide evidence for the existence of at least two generic classes of instabilities operating in the high-latitude ionosphere: one driven by large-scale density gradients in a homogeneous convection field with respect to the neutrals, and the other driven by the structured convection field itself in an ambient ionosphere where density fluctuations are ubiquitous.

  19. KSC-2010-4817

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-22

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This view at dusk from the stern of Freedom Star, one of NASA's solid rocket booster retrieval ships, shows the Pegasus Barge carrying the Space Shuttle Program's last external fuel tank, ET-122, as it is transported to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The tank will travel 900 miles by sea before being offloaded and moved to Kennedy's Vehicle Assembly Building where it will be integrated to space shuttle Endeavour for the STS-134 mission to the International Space Station. The tank, which is the largest element of the space shuttle stack, was damaged during Hurricane Katrina in August 2005 and restored to flight configuration by Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company employees. STS-134, targeted to launch Feb. 2011, currently is scheduled to be the last mission in the Space Shuttle Program. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  20. Quiet-time plasma irregularities at 1400 km in the cleft region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, S. E.; Maier, E. J.; Brace, L. H.

    1978-01-01

    The quiet north polar cleft at 1400 km was studied by Isis-2 instruments, and data from the retarding potential analyzer and the cylindrical electrostatic probe show that thermal plasma density fluctuations are distributed in a region between 75 deg and 82 deg invariant latitude and approximately dawn to dusk. Cleft shape and shape variations are described. Thermal ions and thermal electrons usually fluctuated together, but suprathermal electrons fluctuated independently. Data on thermal plasma patterns correlates fairly well with observations of soft particles and auroral optical emissions and not as well with measurements of high-energy particles. The data suggest that the energy source for the thermal irregularities is associated with soft particles and that precipitating high-energy particles do not drive the thermal plasma at these altitudes.

  1. Studies of the gas tori of Titan and Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.

    1995-01-01

    Progress in the development of the model for the circumplanetary distribution of atomic hydrogen in the Saturn system produced by a Titan source is discussed. Because of the action of the solar radiation acceleration and the obliquity of Saturn, the hydrogen distribution is shown to undergo seasonal changes as the planet moves about the Sun. Preliminary model calculations show that for a continuous Titan source, the H distribution is highly asymmetric about the planet and has a density maximum near the dusk side of Saturn, qualitatively similar to the pattern recently deduced by Shemansky and Hall from observations acquired by the UVS instruments aboard the Voyager spacecrafts. The investigation of these Voyager data will be undertaken in the next project year.

  2. Large-scale, near-field magnetic fields from external sources and the corresponding induced internal field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Estes, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Data from Magsat analyzed as a function of the Dst index to determine the first degree/order spherical harmonic description of the near-earth external field and its corresponding induced field. The analysis was done separately for data from dawn and dusk. The Magsat data was compared with POGO data. A local time variation of the external field persists even during very quiet magnetic conditions; both a diurnal and 8-hour period are present. A crude estimate of Sq current in the 45 deg geomagnetic latitude range is obtained for 1966 to 1970. The current strength, located in the ionosphere and induced in the earth, is typical of earlier determinations from surface data, although its maximum is displaced in local time from previous results.

  3. The Fast Plasma Investigation on the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rager, A. C.; Pollock, C. J.; Avanov, L. A.; Barrie, A. C.; Burch, J. L.; Chandler, M. O.; Clark, G. B.; Coffey, V. N.; Dickson, C.; Dorelli, J.; Ergun, R.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gliese, U.; Giles, B. L.; Holland, M. P.; Jacques, A. D.; Kreisler, S.; Lavraud, B.; MacDonald, E.; Mauk, B.; Moore, T. E.; Mukai, T.; Nakamura, R.; Rosnack, T.; Saito, Y.; Salo, C.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Smith, D. L.; Smith, S. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Yokota, S.

    2015-12-01

    Launched in March 2015, the Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) instrument suite on the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) is producing the highest time and spatial resolution 3D electron and ion particle distribution function measurements to date. During FPI science operations, the four spacecraft maintain a tetrahedral formation such that 3D measurements of the plasma and field gradients are enabled. This allows the spacecraft to better investigate reconnection and to distinguish between spatial and temporal structures. In the first three months, we expect to observe magnetic phenomena such as dipolarization fronts, the plasma sheet boundary layer, magnetopause crossings, ion dispersive signatures of from remote reconnection sites, and magnetic holes. This poster is intended to supplement the invited talk on FPI results by Pollock et al. by providing further detail of the instrumentation and calibration, as well as a sampling of early magnetospheric plasma observations in the evening-side magnetotail, dusk flank, and afternoon magnetopause.

  4. Bat defence in lekking ghost swifts (Hepialus humuli), a moth without ultrasonic hearing.

    PubMed Central

    Rydell, J

    1998-01-01

    The Hepialidae represents an early branch of the Lepidoptera, whose members lack the ultrasonic hearing and other obvious predator defence systems present in other extant moths. I observed lekking male ghost swifts, Hepialus humuli, being exploited by northern bats, Eptesicus nilssonii, over a hayfield in southern Sweden. Because the moth's display flight was restricted to a brief (30 min) period at dusk, they avoided most predators temporally but were exposed to early emerging aerial-hawking bats. Against these, they apparently employed 'acoustic crypsis', achieved by flying close (< 0.5 m) to the vegetation, thereby hiding from the bats among clutter (echoes returning from the background). Nevertheless, the predation risk for the displaying moth males was very high (20% per night), mainly because they sometimes left the safety of the vegetation. The lack of 'advanced' predator defence mechanisms in H. humuli requires alternative defence strategies, which, however, restrict the behavioural repertoire and still carry a high predation risk. PMID:9721686

  5. Flux transfer events on the magnetopause - Spatial distribution and controlling factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, J.; Russell, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    The spatial distribution of flux transfer events (FTE) of magnetic flux tubes pulled from the earth's magnetopause is analyzed using ISEE 1 and 2 data from 1977-82. Attention is given to interplanetary conditions influencing different observed FTE polarities. FTEs were observed on nearly 25 percent of the passes near the dayside magnetopause. Direct FTEs were located mainly in the northern dawn sector and reverse FTEs appeared in the southern dusk sector. The distribution indicated an origin in the equatorial sector, and data correlate the appearance of FTEs only when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) had southward or nearly horizontal orientation. The presence of a southward component in the IMF was coincident with the appearance of an FTE 45 percent of the events. E-W components in the IMF exhibited no connections with the occurrence of an FTE.

  6. Steepening of Waves at the Duskside Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaschke, F.; Kahr, N.; Fischer, D.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Magnes, W.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R.; Russell, C. T.; Giles, B. L.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Surface waves at the magnetopause flanks typically feature steeper, i.e., more inclined leading (antisunward facing) than trailing (sunward facing) edges. This is expected for Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) amplified waves. Very rarely, during northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, anomalous inverse steepening has been observed. The small-scale tetrahedral configuration of the Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft and their high time resolution measurements enable us to routinely ascertain magnetopause boundary inclinations during surface wave passage with high accuracy by four-spacecraft timing analysis. At the dusk flank magnetopause, 77%/23% of the analyzed wave intervals exhibit regular inverse steepening. Inverse steepening happens during northward IMF conditions, as previously reported and, in addition, during intervals of dominant equatorial IMF. Inverse steepening observed under the latter conditions may be due to the absence of KHI or due to instabilities arising from the alignment of flow and magnetic fields in the magnetosheath.

  7. Observations of Large-Amplitude, Parallel, Electrostatic Waves Associated with the Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability by the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, F. D.; Ergun, R. E.; Schwartz, S. J.; Newman, D. L.; Eriksson, S.; Stawarz, J. E.; Goldman, M. V.; Goodrich, K. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Malaspina, D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    On 8 September 2015, the four Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft encountered a Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable magnetopause near the dusk flank. The spacecraft observed periodic compressed current sheets, between which the plasma was turbulent. We present observations of large-amplitude (up to 100 mVm) oscillations in the electric field. Because these oscillations are purely parallel to the background magnetic field, electrostatic, and below the ion plasma frequency, they are likely to be ion acoustic-like waves. These waves are observed in a turbulent plasma where multiple particle populations are intermittently mixed, including cold electrons with energies less than 10 eV. Stability analysis suggests a cold electron component is necessary for wave growth.

  8. Electromagnetic deep-probing (100-1000 kms) of the Earth's interior from artificial satellites: Constraints on the regional emplacement of crustal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    The reconnaissance phase of using satellite observtions to studying electromagnetic induction in the solid earth is summarized. Several points are made: (1) satellite data apparently suffer far less from the effects of near surface lateral heterogeneities in the earth than do ground-based data; (2) zonal ionospheric currents during the recovery phase of major magnetic storms appear to be minimal, at least in the dawn and dusk sectors wher MAGSAT was flown; hence the internal contributions that satellites observe during these times is in fact due primarily to induction in the Earth with little or no contribution from ionospheric currents; and (3) the interpretation of satellite data in terms of primitive electromagnetic response functions, while grossly over-simplified, results in a surprisingly well-resolved radius for an equivalent super-conductor representing the conductivity region of the Earth's interior (5,370 + or - 120 km).

  9. A comparison of the radio data and model calculations of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation. I - The high energy electron distribution in Jupiter's inner magnetosphere. II - East-west asymmetry in the radiation belts as a function of Jovian longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pater, I.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison has been made between detailed model calculations of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation and the radio data at wavelengths of 6, 21, and 50 cm. The calculations were performed for a Jovian longitude of 200 deg and were based on the multipole field configurations as derived from the Pioneer data. The electron distribution in the inner magnetosphere was derived as a function of energy, pitch angle, and spatial coordinates. In addition, the hot region or east-west asymmetry in the radiation belts is investigated. It is suggested that this asymmetry is due to the combined effect of an overabundance of electrons at jovicentric longitudes of 240-360 deg and the existence of a dusk-to-dawn directed electric field over the inner magnetosphere generated by the wind system in the upper atmosphere.

  10. Statistical distribution of EMIC wave spectra: Observations from Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.-J.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Bortnik, J.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2016-12-01

    It has been known that electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can precipitate ultrarelativistic electrons through cyclotron resonant scattering. However, the overall effectiveness of this mechanism has yet to be quantified, because it is difficult to obtain the global distribution of EMIC waves that usually exhibit limited spatial presence. We construct a statistical distribution of EMIC wave frequency spectra and their intensities based on Van Allen Probes measurements from September 2012 to December 2015. Our results show that as the ratio of plasma frequency over electron gyrofrequency increases, EMIC wave power becomes progressively dominated by the helium band. There is a pronounced dawn-dusk asymmetry in the wave amplitude and the frequency spectrum. The frequency spectrum does not follow the commonly used single-peak Gaussian function. Incorporating these realistic EMIC wave frequency spectra into radiation belt models is expected to improve the quantification of EMIC wave scattering effects in ultrarelativistic electron dynamics.

  11. Outline of a magnetospheric theory. [auroral phenomena generation by solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Magnetospheric and auroral energy dissipation can be described in terms of electric fields and currents. It is suggested that the energy is created by an MHD generator in front of the magnetopause that derives its energy from the slowing down of the solar wind plasma. It drives a westward current in front of the eastward magnetopause surface current. The action of this generator is to produce and maintain the charge polarization that creates the dawn-to-dusk magnetospheric electric field. Various auroral phenomena are direct consequences of this electrostatic field. The source of auroral particles is magnetosheath plasma that enters the magnetotail by diffusion (violating Liouville's theorem) across the sharp boundaries of the cleft.

  12. NASA's Ship-Aircraft Bio-Optical Research (SABOR)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-26

    Instruments Overboard On July 26, 2014, scientists worked past dusk to prepare and deploy the optical instruments and ocean water sensors during NASA's SABOR experiment. NASA's Ship-Aircraft Bio-Optical Research (SABOR) experiment is a coordinated ship and aircraft observation campaign off the Atlantic coast of the United States, an effort to advance space-based capabilities for monitoring microscopic plants that form the base of the marine food chain. Read more: http://1.usa.gov/WWRVzj Credit: NASA/SABOR/Wayne Slade, Sequoia Scientific NASA image use policy.  NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  13. Orbit design for solar and dual satellite occultation measurements of atmospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, D. R.; Harrison, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    Two types of satellite based occultation missions are considered for measuring atmospheric constituents. Nominal cases for each type are presented to demonstrate representative solutions to orbit design problems. For the solar occultation mode, large areas of the globe can be covered during a one year mission, but the measurements are limited to local dawn or dusk. For the dual satellite mode, with a laser aboard a second satellite to act as a source, diurnal coverage can be obtained at the expense of more complex systems and mission scenarios. In this mode, orbit pairs are selected which maintain their relative orbit plane geometry while their differing periods drive cyclic patterns of latitude coverage. A simulated one year solar occultation mission is used to illustrate one way of analyzing occultation data by averaging measurements within bands of constant latitude.

  14. Instantaneous pictures of the high-latitude electrodynamics using Viking and DMSP/F7 observations

    SciTech Connect

    Marklund, G.T.; Blomberg, L.G.; Hardy, D.A.; Rich, F.J.

    1987-08-01

    Simultaneous observations by the Viking and the DMSP/F7 satellites were applied to a new technique to obtain realistic pictures of the auroral electrodynamics. In particular, an instantaneous global equipotential pattern is calculated using field-aligned current and conductivity distributions that are qualitatively consistent with the Viking auroral imager data and quantitatively consistent with magnetic-field and particle data from the two satellites. This convection pattern agrees with the E x B-drift vectors estimated from Viking electric-field data. Discrepancies consistent with upward parallel electric fields occur in regions of upward currents. The pattern is of the normal two-cell type, with a small dusk cell and a large, elongated crescent-shaped dawn cell. The excellent agreement between the satellite and model data demonstrates the reliability of the results.

  15. A simple model of Birkeland currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, David P.

    1993-01-01

    The paper develops a simple representation of the global circuit of Birkeland currents on the basis of a representation of the current density (j) in terms of Euler potentials (alpha, chi). The underlying magnetic field, which shares the potential alpha with j, is assumed to be dipolar, making the model applicable chiefly to region 2 Birkeland currents. A form of j is chosen that gives a current sheet with peak outflow at dawn and peak inflow at dusk (or vice versa), connected across a flat polar cap sheet. The superposition of harmonics of the same type, centered at different 'foci', are found to provide a flexible and powerful representation of harmonic functions, accurate within less than 1 percent. An interpolation formula by which current sheets of finite width could be consistently represented is developed.

  16. Post-equinox periodicities in Saturn's energetic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbary, J. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Krupp, N.

    2011-12-01

    Since Saturn's vernal equinox in August 2009 (day 223), energetic electrons (110-365 keV) have exhibited a variety of periodic and aperiodic behavior within a spectral window of 5-15 hours. From late 2009 through the end of 2010, when the observed at dusk, a single period near 10.7 hours dominated the Lomb spectra of these particles. Near the end of 2010, however, the energetic electrons displayed multiple periods, with the strongest at 10.65 hours. The periodicity observed after equinox has a mean value of 10.69 ± 0.06 hours and agreed closely with that of Saturn kilometric radio (south) emissions. By early 2011, when the observer had moved to the dayside, the periodicities abruptly disappeared and the Lomb spectra show no periodicity. This behavior may suggest changes in Saturn's ionosphere as a result of seasonal change, or may alternately imply a local time dependence of periodicity caused by magnetodisk thickness asymmetry.

  17. Magnetosphere boundary observations along the Imp 7 orbit. I - Boundary locations and wave level variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.; Frank, L. A.; Lepping, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    The paper is concerned with magnetosphere boundary phenomena observed by the Imp 7 magnetic field, plasma, and plasma wave instruments in 1972 and 1973. Boundary locations for a 15-month period are surveyed, and the different types of crossings are described. The spacecraft crosses the dawn and dusk boundaries near 25 earth radii downstream, and the physical processes at the Imp 7 magnetopause appear to be intermediate between those observed over the poles and those observed at the lunar orbit. The Imp 7 orbit also traverses a downstream region near where 'fireball' phenomena occur. Electromagnetic wave modes detected in the broad low-frequency channel of the wave instrument are analyzed, and the interpretation of data of this type suggests that the broad low-frequency channel is sensitive to oscillations in the lower hybrid resonance region of the spectrum.

  18. Structure of the martian ionosphere as revealed by the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer during the first two years of the MAVEN mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benna, Mehdi; Yelle, Roger; Grebowsky, Joseph; Fox, Jane L.; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-07-01

    We report the results of the observations of the ionosphere of Mars by the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS). These observations were conducted during the first two years of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission (MAVEN), which also cover a full Martian year. The NGIMS observations revealed the spatial and temporal structures in the density distributions of major and several minor ion species (H_2^+, H_3^+, He^+, O_2^+, C^+, CH^+, N^+, NH^+, O^+, OH^+, H_2O^+, H_3O^+, N_2^+/CO^+, CO^+/HOC^+/N_2H^+, NO^+, HNO^+, O_2^+, HO_2^+, Ar^+, ArH^+, CO_2^+, and OCOH^+). Dusk/dawn and day/night asymmetries in the density distributions were also observed for nearly all ion species. Additionally, NGIMS revealed the presence of a persistent metal layer below 140 km. This layer was accessible for measurement during the MAVEN's "deep-dip" campaigns.

  19. Comparison of storm-time changes of geomagnetic field at ground and at MAGSAT altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. P.; Trivedi, N. B.

    1981-01-01

    Computations concerning variations of the geomagnetic field at MAGSAT altitudes were investigated. Using MAGSAT data for the X, Y, and Z components of the geomagnetic field, a computer conversion to yield the H component was performed. Two methods of determining delta H normalized to a constant geocentric distance R sub 0 = 6800 were investigated, and the utility of elta H at times of magnetic storms was considered. Delta H at a geographical latitude of 0 at dawn and dusk, the standard Dst, and K sub p histograms were plotted and compared. Magnetic anomalies are considered. Examination of data from the majority of the 400 passes of MAGSAT considered show a reasonable delta H versus latitude variation. Discrepancies in values are discussed.

  20. INSECT FLIGHT. Luminance-dependent visual processing enables moth flight in low light.

    PubMed

    Sponberg, Simon; Dyhr, Jonathan P; Hall, Robert W; Daniel, Thomas L

    2015-06-12

    Animals must operate under an enormous range of light intensities. Nocturnal and twilight flying insects are hypothesized to compensate for dim conditions by integrating light over longer times. This slowing of visual processing would increase light sensitivity but should also reduce movement response times. Using freely hovering moths tracking robotic moving flowers, we showed that the moth's visual processing does slow in dim light. These longer response times are consistent with models of how visual neurons enhance sensitivity at low light intensities, but they could pose a challenge for moths feeding from swaying flowers. Dusk-foraging moths avoid this sensorimotor tradeoff; their nervous systems slow down but not so much as to interfere with their ability to track the movements of real wind-blown flowers.

  1. Food of young and colony-attendance of adult guillemots Uria aalge on Helgoland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leopold, M. F.; Wolf, P. A.; Hüppop, O.

    1992-06-01

    The guillemot colony on Helgoland, Germany, was visited from June 5th to 21st 1990. The presence of adults and food delivery to chicks was studied on a ledge holding about 50 breeding pairs. Attendance varied through the day, with most birds present at mid-day. Food consisted only of fish, 94.6% Clupeidae (herring and sprat) and 5.4% sand-eel. On average, a chick received 2.72 fish per day. After a marked early morning peak of feeding, the number of feeds per hour levelled off to a constant rate during the rest of the day until dusk. At sea, high numbers of guillemots were present in front of the colony, with densities dropping steeply with distance. The birds are thought to forage at distances of more than 5 km away from the colony.

  2. The relationship of total Birkeland currents to the merging electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bythrow, P. F.; Potemra, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Magsat data were used to examine the behavior of Birkeland currents during 1100-2000 UT in consecutive orbits passing near the dawn-dusk meridian. The field was measured with a three-axis fluxgate instrument with a resolution of within 0.5 nT, with the sampling occurring every 1/16th sec. A total of 32 crossings of the Northern Hemisphere auroral zone were available for analysis. The changes in the magnetic readings were correlated more closely with variation in the IMF parameters than to the latitudinal width of the changes. Evidence was found for a relationship between the reconnection electric field and the intensity of the large-scale Birkeland current system. The total conductance of the auroral zone was calculated to be about 18.7 mhos.

  3. Large-scale, near-Earth, magnetic fields from external sources and the corresponding induced internal field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Estes, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Data from MAGSAT analyzed as a function of the Dst index to determine the first degree/order spherical harmonic description of the near-Earth external field and its corresponding induced field. The analysis was done separately for data from dawn and dusk. The MAGSAT data was compared with POGO data. A local time variation of the external field persists even during very quiet magnetic conditions; both a diurnal and 8-hour period are present. A crude estimate of Sq current in the 45 deg geomagnetic latitude range is obtained for 1966 to 1970. The current strength, located in the ionosphere and induced in the Earth, is typical of earlier determinations from surface data, although its maximum is displaced in local time from previous results.

  4. The dayside of the plasmasphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, C. R.; Harris, K. K.; Sharp, G. W.

    1971-01-01

    The concentrations of H(+) ions in the dayside region of the plasmasphere, measured from March 1968 through February 1969 by the Lockheed light-ion mass spectrometer aboard the OGO 5 satellite, are presented and analyzed. The position of the plasmapause on the dayside appears to be determined by the level of magnetic activity present during the previous corotation of the dayside sector through the formative nightside region. Observations of the buildup of H(+) density versus local time following magnetic storms indicate that H(+) ions flow from the dayside ionosphere into the plasmasphere and plasma trough. Plasmapause density profiles in the afternoon-dusk sector show the effects of the dayside filling from the ionosphere. In addition, several of the dayside profiles display a steep drop in the H(+) density of about a factor of 10 inside the plasmapause position.

  5. METRIC: A Dedicated Earth-Orbiting Spacecraft for Investigating Gravitational Physics and the Space Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peron, R.; Lorenzini, E. C.

    2017-07-01

    A dedicated mission in low Earth orbit is proposed to test predictions of gravitational interaction theories and to directly measure the atmospheric density in a relevant altitude range, as well as to provide a metrological platform able to tie different space geodesy techniques. The concept foresees a small spacecraft to be placed in a dawn-dusk eccentric orbit between 450 and 1200 km of altitude. The spacecraft will be tracked from the ground with high precision, and a three-axis accelerometer package on-board will measure the non-gravitational accelerations acting on its surface. Estimates of parameters related to fundamental physics and geophysics should be obtained by a precise orbit determination, while the accelerometer data will be instrumental in constraining the atmospheric density. Along with the mission scientific objectives, a conceptual configuration is described together with an analysis of the dynamical environment experienced by the spacecraft and the acc! elerometer.

  6. Active experiments and single ion motion in the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothwell, P. L.; Yates, G. K.

    1983-07-01

    Analytic solutions to the Lorentz equation which indicate that the magnetic field in the plasma sheet focuses selected ions from the plasma sheet boundaries on the neutral sheet are obtained. The kinetic energy of these ions usually exceeds the threshold energy required for the ion tearing mode instability. Two active experiments based on this effect are proposed. Heavy ions injected towards dusk on the plasma sheet boundary would become focused on the neutral sheet and perhaps trigger the ion tearing mode. A boundary perturbation, such as a thermal chemical release, that locally enhances the boundary turbulence level could be introduced, causing sufficient ksq = 1 ions to be focused on the neutral sheet to trigger the ion tearing mode.

  7. Storm-time changes of geomagnetic field at MAGSAT altitudes (325-550 Km) and their comparison with changes at ground locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Kane, R. P.; Trivedi, N. B.

    1983-01-01

    The values of H, X, Y, Z at MAGSAT altitudes were first expressed as residuals delta H, delta X, delta Y, delta Z after subtracting the model HMD, XMD, YMD, ZMC. The storm-time variations of H showed that delta H (Dusk) was larger (negative) than delta H (Dawn) and occurred earlier, indicating a sort of hysteresis effect. Effects at MAGSAT altitudes were roughly the same (10% accuracy) as at ground, indicating that these effects were mostly of magnetospheric origin. The delta Y component also showed large storm-time changes. The latitudinal distribution of storm-time delta H showed north-south asymmetries varying in nature as the storm progressed. It seems that the central plane of the storm-time magnetospheric ring current undergoes latitudinal meanderings during the course of the storm.

  8. Kansei Calendar, Japanese clocks and the definition of twilight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Takehiko

    2005-06-01

    Edo Japan adopted seasonal time system, which divided daytime and nighttime respectively into six units. According to this time system, dawn and dusk becomes the time of beginning day and night, and it was necessary to define precisely that point of time. Kansei Calendar edited by Yoshitoki Takahashi reformulated the previous definition of the time of dawn as 2.5/100 of a day before the sunrise, and redefined it as the time when the sun falls 7 and 36/100 degrees below the horizon. The definition of twilight in Japanese calendrical system was reflected in certain Japanese clocks. The astronomical model on the top of the Ten Thousand Year Clock made by Hisashige Tanaka well represented the definition of time of Kansei Calendar.

  9. Electron beam experiments at high altitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments with the electron gun on the SCATHA satellite produced evidence of beam-plasma interactions, and heating of the low-energy electrons around the satellite. These experiments were conducted near geosynchronous orbit, in the dusk, bulge, and plasma sheet, with one short operation in the lobe regions, providing a range of ambient plasma densities. The electron gun was operated at 50 eV, with beam currents of 1, 10, and 100 microAmps. Data from electrostatic analyzers and the DC electric field experiment show that the satellite charged to near the beam energy in sunlight, if the beam current had distribution functions with peaks or plateaus at energies greater than the satellite potential. These measurements indicate heating of the ambient plasma, at several Debye lengths from the satellite (several 10s of meters), with the heated plasma then accelerated into the satellite. It is likely that the ambient plasma is, in fact, the photoelectron sheath generated by the satellite.

  10. The structure of the Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, L. H.; Kliore, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The morphology and temporal variability of the Venus ionosphere are characterized, reviewing the results of recent theoretical investigations, observations, and in situ measurements, especially by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO). Consideration is given to the Pioneer mission and orbit evolution, early radio occultation profiles of ionospheric N(e), the mean structure and thermal balance of the ionosphere, the ion composition and its dawn-dusk asymmetry, the small-scale spatial structure on the nightside, latitudinal and seasonal variations, solar-cycle effects, suprathermal electrons and superthermal ions, and the global configuration and stability of the ionopause. Data from a single PVO passage through the ionotail are discussed in detail, examining the implications for ion escape and the solar-cycle and short-term variability. The differences among the terrestrial, Martian, and Venusian ionospheres are outlined; the PVO data base is described; and the sources of measurement error are indicated.

  11. Low-harmonic magnetosonic waves observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, J. L.; Engebretson, M. J.; Olson, C. N.; Thaller, S. A.; Breneman, A. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Boardsen, S. A.; Kletzing, C. A.; Smith, C. W.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-08-01

    Purely compressional electromagnetic waves (fast magnetosonic waves), generated at multiple harmonics of the local proton gyrofrequency, have been observed by various types of satellite instruments (fluxgate and search coil magnetometers and electric field sensors), but most recent studies have used data from search coil sensors, and many have been restricted to high harmonics. We report here on a survey of low-harmonic waves, based on electric and magnetic field data from the Electric Fields and Waves double probe and Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science fluxgate magnetometer instruments, respectively, on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during its first full precession through all local times, from 1 October 2012 to 13 July 2014. These waves were observed both inside and outside the plasmapause (PP), at L shells from 2.4 to ~6 (the spacecraft apogee), and in regions with plasma number densities ranging from 10 to >1000 cm-3. Consistent with earlier studies, wave occurrence was sharply peaked near the magnetic equator. Waves appeared at all local times but were more common from noon to dusk, and often occurred within 3 h after substorm injections. Outside the PP occurrence maximized broadly across noon, and inside the PP occurrence maximized in the dusk sector, in an extended plasmasphere. We confirm recent ray-tracing studies showing wave refraction and/or reflection at PP-like boundaries. Comparison with waveform receiver data indicates that in some cases these low-harmonic magnetosonic wave events occurred independently of higher-harmonic waves; this indicates the importance of including this population in future studies of radiation belt dynamics.

  12. Observations of purely compressional waves in the upper ULF band observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, J. L.; Engebretson, M. J.; Johnson, J.; Kim, E. H.; Thaller, S. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; Reeves, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Purely compressional electromagnetic waves, also denoted fast magnetosonic waves, equatorial noise, and ion Bernstein modes, can both heat thermal protons and accelerate electrons up to relativistic energies. These waves have been observed both in the near-equatorial region in the inner magnetosphere and in the plasma sheet boundary layer. Although these waves have been observed by various types of satellite instruments (DC and AC magnetometers and electric field sensors), most recent studies have used data from AC sensors, and many have been restricted to frequencies above ~50 Hz. We report here on a survey of ~200 of these waves, based on DC electric and magnetic field data from the EFW double probe and EMFISIS fluxgate magnetometer instruments, respectively, on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during its first two years of operation. The high sampling rate of these instruments makes it possible to extend observational studies of the lower frequency population of such waves to lower L shells than any previous study. These waves, often with multiple harmonics of the local proton gyrofrequency, were observed both inside and outside the plasmapause, in regions with plasma number densities ranging from 10 to >1000 cm-3. Wave occurrence was sharply peaked near the magnetic equator and occurred at L shells from below 2 to ~6 (the spacecraft apogee). Waves appeared at all local times but were more common from noon to dusk. Outside the plasmapause, occurrence maximized broadly across noon. Inside the plasmapause, occurrence maximized in the dusk sector, in an extended plasmasphere. Every event occurred in association with a positive gradient in the HOPE omnidirectional proton flux in the range between 2 keV and 10 keV. The Poynting vector, determined for 8 events, was in all cases directed transverse to B, but with variable azimuth, consistent with earlier models and observations.

  13. Relationship of Topside Ionospheric Ion Outflows to Auroral Forms and Precipitations, Plasma Waves, and Convection Observed by POLAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirahara, M.; Horwitz, J. L.; Moore, T. E.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.; Peterson, W. K.; Shelley, E. G.; Chandler, M. O.; Giles, B. L.; Craven, P. D.; Pollock, C. J.; Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; Scudder, J. D.; Maynard, N. C.; Mozer, F. S.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Nagai, T.

    1997-01-01

    The POLAR satellite often observes upflowing ionospheric ions (UFls) in and near the auroral oval on southern perigee (approximately 5000 km altitude) passes. We present the UFI features observed by the thermal ion dynamics experiment (TIDE) and the toroidal imaging mass-angle spectrograph (TIMAS) in the dusk-dawn sector under two different geomagnetic activity conditions in order to elicit their relationships with auroral forms, wave emissions, and convection pattern from additional POLAR instruments. During the active interval, the ultraviolet imager (UVI) observed a bright discrete aurora on the dusk side after the substorm onset and then observed a small isolated aurora form and diffuse auroras on the dawn side during the recovery phase. The UFls showed clear conic distributions when the plasma wave instrument (PWI) detected strong broadband wave emissions below approximately 10 kHz, while no significant auroral activities were observed by UVI. At higher latitudes, the low-energy UFI conics gradually changed to the polar wind component with decreasing intensity of the broadband emissions. V-shaped auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) signatures observed above approximately 200 kHz by PWI coincided with the region where the discrete aurora and the UFI beams were detected. The latitude of these features was lower than that of the UFI conics. During the observations of the UFI beams and conics, the lower-frequency fluctuations observed by the electric field instrument (EFI) were also enhanced, and the convection directions exhibited large fluctuations. It is evident that large electrostatic potential drops produced the precipitating electrons and discrete auroras, the UFI beams, and the AKR, which is also supported by the energetic plasma data from HYDRA. Since the intense broadband emissions were also observed with the UFIs. the ionospheric ions could be energized transversely before or during the parallel acceleration due to the potential drops.

  14. Current Systems in Saturn's Magnetosphere and their Local-time Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, K. K.; Liu, J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    Electric currents in a magnetosphere help confine, guide and accelerate plasmas through the action of Lorentz force. A knowledge of large-scale current systems in a magnetosphere provides valuable clues about the dominant physical processes operating in that magnetosphere. In addition, field-aligned currents transport linear and angular momentum between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. An understanding of these current systems is therefore vital in characterizing the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. The only comprehensive study of current systems in outer planetary magnetosphere is that by Khurana (2001) which used Galileo magnetometer data in the Jovian magnetosphere. This work showed that there are clear noon-midnight asymmetries in the height-integrated azimuthal current and equally strong dawn-dusk asymmetries in the height integrated radial current in most regions of the Jovian magnetosphere suggesting that solar wind forcing plays a major role in this magnetosphere. We would like to know if similar asymmetries exist in Saturn's magnetosphere. In this presentation we present results from a new data fitting technique that uses a generalized form of a Harris current sheet to solve for current density and current sheet thickness in different local time and radial distance regions of Saturn's magnetosphere. This study uses data primarily from the magnetometer from all regions of the magnetosphere mapped by Cassini during the period of June 2004- Sep 2014. We show that the current sheet is indeed thicker in the dusk magnetosphere compared to its thickness in the dawn magnetosphere. We also observe a clear day/night asymmetry in the strength of the ring current suggesting that a partial ring current also exists in Saturn's magnetosphere.

  15. Discontinuous ammonia excretion and glutamine storage in littoral Oniscidea (Crustacea: Isopoda): testing tidal and circadian models.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Maya; Wright, Jonathan C

    2013-01-01

    A key evolutionary development facilitating land colonization in terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscidea) is the intermittent liberation of waste nitrogen as volatile ammonia. Intermittent ammonia release exploits glutamine (Gln) as an intermediary nitrogen store. Here, we explore the relationship between temporal patterns of ammonia release and Gln accumulation in three littoral oniscideans from Southern California. Results are interpreted in terms of water availability, habitat, activity patterns, and ancestry. A two-way experimental design was used to test whether ammonia excretion and Gln accumulation follow a tidal or diel periodicity. Ammonia excretion was studied in the laboratory using chambers with or without available seawater and using an acid trap to collect volatile ammonia. Ligia occidentalis releases ammonia directly into seawater and accumulates Gln during low tide (48.9 ± 6.5 μmol g⁻¹ at low tide, 24.1 ± 3.0 μmol g⁻¹ at high tide), indicating that excretion is tidally constrained. Alloniscus perconvexus and Tylos punctatus can excrete ammonia directly into seawater or utilize volatilization. Both species burrow in sand by day and show a diel excretory pattern, accumulating Gln nocturnally (31.8 ± 2.7 μmol g⁻¹ at dawn and 21.8 ± 2.3 μmol g⁻¹ at dusk for A. perconvexus; 85.7 ± 15.1 μmol g⁻¹ at dawn and 25.4 ± 2.9 μmol g⁻¹ at dusk for T. punctatus) and liberating ammonia diurnally. Glutaminase shows higher activity in terrestrial (0.54-0.86 U g⁻¹) compared to intertidal (0.25-0.31 U g⁻¹) species, consistent with the need to generate high PNH₃ for volatilization. The predominant isoform in Armadillidium vulgare is phosphate dependent and maleate independent; phosphate is a plausible regulator in vivo.

  16. Npas4 Is Activated by Melatonin, and Drives the Clock Gene Cry1 in the Ovine Pars Tuberalis

    PubMed Central

    West, A.; Dupré, S.M.; Yu, L.; Paton, I.R.; Miedzinska, K.; McNeilly, A.S.; Davis, J.R.E.

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal mammals integrate changes in the duration of nocturnal melatonin secretion to drive annual physiologic cycles. Melatonin receptors within the proximal pituitary region, the pars tuberalis (PT), are essential in regulating seasonal neuroendocrine responses. In the ovine PT, melatonin is known to influence acute changes in transcriptional dynamics coupled to the onset (dusk) and offset (dawn) of melatonin secretion, leading to a potential interval-timing mechanism capable of decoding changes in day length (photoperiod). Melatonin offset at dawn is linked to cAMP accumulation, which directly induces transcription of the clock gene Per1. The rise of melatonin at dusk induces a separate and distinct cohort, including the clock-regulated genes Cry1 and Nampt, but little is known of the up-stream mechanisms involved. Here, we used next-generation sequencing of the ovine PT transcriptome at melatonin onset and identified Npas4 as a rapidly induced basic helix-loop-helix Per-Arnt-Sim domain transcription factor. In vivo we show nuclear localization of NPAS4 protein in presumptive melatonin target cells of the PT (α-glycoprotein hormone-expressing cells), whereas in situ hybridization studies identified acute and transient expression in the PT of Npas4 in response to melatonin. In vitro, NPAS4 forms functional dimers with basic helix loop helix-PAS domain cofactors aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), ARNT2, and ARNTL, transactivating both Cry1 and Nampt ovine promoter reporters. Using a combination of 5′-deletions and site-directed mutagenesis, we show NPAS4-ARNT transactivation to be codependent upon two conserved central midline elements within the Cry1 promoter. Our data thus reveal NPAS4 as a candidate immediate early-response gene in the ovine PT, driving molecular responses to melatonin. PMID:23598442

  17. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Waves by Low-Latitude Space Technology Five Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6deg inclination angle. Due to the Earth s rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft s dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at subauroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 minutes, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that these unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc 4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-disk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field-aligned resonances.

  18. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Waves by Low-Latitude Space Technology 5 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6 degree inclination angle. Due to the Earth's rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft's dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at sub auroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 minutes, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that these unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc 4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-disk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field-aligned resonances.

  19. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Waves by Low-Latitude Space Technology 5 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan; Chi, P.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6 inclination angle. Due to the Earth's rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft's dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as sub auroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at sub auroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 minutes, the three ST -5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that these unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc 4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-disk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field-aligned resonances.

  20. How does a carnivore guild utilise a substantial but unpredictable anthropogenic food source? Scavenging on hunter-shot ungulate carcasses by wild dogs/dingoes, red foxes and feral cats in south-eastern Australia revealed by camera traps.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, David M; Woodford, Luke; Moloney, Paul D; Hampton, Jordan O; Woolnough, Andrew P; Tucker, Mark

    2014-01-01

    There is much interest in understanding how anthropogenic food resources subsidise carnivore populations. Carcasses of hunter-shot ungulates are a potentially substantial food source for mammalian carnivores. The sambar deer (Rusa unicolor) is a large (≥ 150 kg) exotic ungulate that can be hunted throughout the year in south-eastern Australia, and hunters are not required to remove or bury carcasses. We investigated how wild dogs/dingoes and their hybrids (Canis lupus familiaris/dingo), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cats (Felis catus) utilised sambar deer carcasses during the peak hunting seasons (i.e. winter and spring). We placed carcasses at 1-km intervals along each of six transects that extended 4-km into forest from farm boundaries. Visits to carcasses were monitored using camera traps, and the rate of change in edible biomass estimated at ∼ 14-day intervals. Wild dogs and foxes fed on 70% and 60% of 30 carcasses, respectively, but feral cats seldom (10%) fed on carcasses. Spatial and temporal patterns of visits to carcasses were consistent with the hypothesis that foxes avoid wild dogs. Wild dog activity peaked at carcasses 2 and 3 km from farms, a likely legacy of wild dog control, whereas fox activity peaked at carcasses 0 and 4 km from farms. Wild dog activity peaked at dawn and dusk, whereas nearly all fox activity occurred after dusk and before dawn. Neither wild dogs nor foxes remained at carcasses for long periods and the amount of feeding activity by either species was a less important predictor of the loss of edible biomass than season. Reasons for the low impacts of wild dogs and foxes on sambar deer carcass biomass include the spatially and temporally unpredictable distribution of carcasses in the landscape, the rapid rate of edible biomass decomposition in warm periods, low wild dog densities and the availability of alternative food resources.

  1. Short-Term Regulation of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Activity in a Tropical Hemiepiphyte, Clusia uvitana.

    PubMed

    Zotz, G.; Winter, K.

    1993-07-01

    Diel courses of net CO2 exchange of leaves were studied in Clusia uvitana (Clusiaceae), a tropical Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) hemiepiphyte, growing in the crown of a 47-m tall kapok tree on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Measurements on days without precipitation showed that net uptake of atmospheric CO2 occurred at night, a feature of CAM, as well as in the early morning and late afternoon. During 36 h of almost continuous rainfall, nocturnal net CO2 uptake was abolished and the diel pattern of net CO2 exchange became similar to that of a C3 plant. Exposing well-watered, potted plants of Clusia in the laboratory to temperatures and photosynthetic photon flux densities similar to those during the tropical rainstorm also abolished nocturnal net CO2 uptake. In contrast, Kalanchoe pinnata (Crassulaceae), an obligate CAM plant, still showed net CO2 dark fixation following the same low-light and moderate-temperature conditions, albeit at decreased rates. During these 12-h photoperiods, titratable acidity in Clusia increased slightly above its high level measured at the end of the previous dark period, whereas in Kalanchoe, the acid content decreased by about 40%. A survey among outer canopy leaves of Clusia on Barro Colorado Island showed that leaves that exhibited little or no nocturnal acidification maintained high levels of H+ at dawn and dusk. Progressively lower levels of H+ at dusk were accompanied by progressively higher nocturnal increases in H+. The data suggest that in C. uvitana the rapid switching between CAM- and C3-type carbon fixation that may occur within 24 h in response to environmental changes is controlled by the acidity status of the leaves in the light. Nocturnal CO2 fixation is enhanced by conditions that decrease the organic acid content during the light period.

  2. Short-Term Regulation of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Activity in a Tropical Hemiepiphyte, Clusia uvitana.

    PubMed Central

    Zotz, G.; Winter, K.

    1993-01-01

    Diel courses of net CO2 exchange of leaves were studied in Clusia uvitana (Clusiaceae), a tropical Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) hemiepiphyte, growing in the crown of a 47-m tall kapok tree on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Measurements on days without precipitation showed that net uptake of atmospheric CO2 occurred at night, a feature of CAM, as well as in the early morning and late afternoon. During 36 h of almost continuous rainfall, nocturnal net CO2 uptake was abolished and the diel pattern of net CO2 exchange became similar to that of a C3 plant. Exposing well-watered, potted plants of Clusia in the laboratory to temperatures and photosynthetic photon flux densities similar to those during the tropical rainstorm also abolished nocturnal net CO2 uptake. In contrast, Kalanchoe pinnata (Crassulaceae), an obligate CAM plant, still showed net CO2 dark fixation following the same low-light and moderate-temperature conditions, albeit at decreased rates. During these 12-h photoperiods, titratable acidity in Clusia increased slightly above its high level measured at the end of the previous dark period, whereas in Kalanchoe, the acid content decreased by about 40%. A survey among outer canopy leaves of Clusia on Barro Colorado Island showed that leaves that exhibited little or no nocturnal acidification maintained high levels of H+ at dawn and dusk. Progressively lower levels of H+ at dusk were accompanied by progressively higher nocturnal increases in H+. The data suggest that in C. uvitana the rapid switching between CAM- and C3-type carbon fixation that may occur within 24 h in response to environmental changes is controlled by the acidity status of the leaves in the light. Nocturnal CO2 fixation is enhanced by conditions that decrease the organic acid content during the light period. PMID:12231870

  3. The study of bulk plasma motions and associated electric fields in the plasmasphere by means of whistler-mode signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, D. L.; Smith, A. J.

    2001-07-01

    Whistler-mode waves propagating to ground stations along geomagnetic-field-aligned paths provide powerful tools for investigating bulk motions of the magnetospheric plasma and thus the corresponding convection electric fields. Natural whistlers from lightning as well as signals from very low frequency (VLF) transmitters have been employed. The whistler method emphasizes measurement of temporal variations in the frequency versus time, or dispersion, properties of whistlers, while the transmitter method focuses upon measurement of the phase and group paths of fixed-frequency signal propagation. The methods depend upon wave properties that are sensitive to inhomogeneities in the geomagnetic field, and thus provide information on what are essentially cross-/L plasma motions in a frame of reference rotating with the Earth. In addition, whistler data on the duskside plasmasphere bulge have been used to estimate values of the radial convection electric field (GSE /Y direction) near dusk. In this topical review we discuss the development, beginning in the 1960s, of the whistler and transmitter methods, as well as a few of their geophysical applications. Whistlers have provided substantial new information on the spatially and temporally structured manner in which convection electric fields penetrate the plasmasphere, one example being the still unexplained reversal from inward to outward of the post-midnight radial flow direction following temporally isolated substorms. Whistlers have also been useful in identifying the plasmaspheric drifts associated with quiet-day electric fields of ionospheric dynamo origin and in showing that the Ey (duskward), component of the convection electric field in the outer plasmasphere is substantially larger near dusk than it is near mid-night. Whistler-mode signals from transmitters have been found to be a powerful means of tracking cross-/L motions in the plasmasphere near /L=2.5 while separately identifying the effects of interchange

  4. Kelvin Helmholtz Instability at the Equatorial Magnetotail Boundary: MHD Simulation and Comparison with Geotail Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, Donald H.; Otto, A.

    1999-01-01

    On March 24, 1995 the Geotail spacecraft observed large fluctuations of the magnetic field and plasma properties in the Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL) about 15 R(sub E) tailward of the dusk meridian. Although the magnetospheric and the magnetosheath field were strongly northward, the B(sub z) component showed strong short duration fluctuations in which B(sub z) could even reach negative values. We have used two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations with magnetospheric and magnetosheath input parameters specifically chosen for this. Geotail event to identify the processes which cause the observed boundary properties. It is shown that these fluctuations can be explained by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability if the k vector of the instability has a component along the magnetic field direction. The simulation results show many of the characteristic properties of the Geotail observations. In particular, the quasi-periodic strong fluctuations are well explained by satellite crossings through the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices. It is illustrated how the interior structure of the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices leads to the rapid fluctuations in the Geotail observations. Our results suggest an average Kelvin-Helmholtz wavelength of about 5 R(sub E) with a vortex size of close to 2 R(sub E) for an average repetition time of 2.5 minutes. The growth time for these waves implies a source region of about 10 to 16 R(sub E) upstream from the location of the Geotail spacecraft (i.e., near the dusk meridian). The results also indicate a considerable mass transport of magnetosheath material into the magnetosphere by magnetic reconnection in the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices.

  5. Tracking the Plasmapause by Its Optical and Thermal Signatures in the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, M.; Wroten, J.; Baumgardner, J. L.; Martinis, C. R.; Smith, S. M.; Merenda, K.; Fritz, T. A.; Hairston, M. R.; Heelis, R. A.; Barbieri, C.

    2013-12-01

    Ionospheric optical emissions and in-situ plasma temperatures can be used to identify energy sources and structures in the magnetosphere via geomagnetic field-line mapping between the two regions. At mid-latitudes, stable auroral red (SAR) arcs appear in all-sky imagers (ASIs) with fields of view that map to the L ~ 2-4 domain of the inner magnetosphere. The emission at 6300 Å is excited at ~400 km by ambient ionospheric electrons heated by conduction from the plasmapause-ring current interaction region. The plasma instruments onboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) vehicles detect electron temperature (Te) enhancements and ionospheric plasma depletions along the same SAR arc field line at ~840 km. In this study, we present the first case of a SAR arc observed from three widely-spaced ASI systems (Europe, North American, New Zealand) during the geomagnetic storm of 26-27 September 2011. Mapping the SAR arcs' latitude centers-of-emission to the geomagnetic equatorial plane provided the continuous location of the plasmapause (to × 0.1 L-value) from 18:00 UT on the 26th to 18:00 UT on the 27th. Using the lowest latitude where Te = 5000 K as the thermal marker of a SAR arc at ~840 km, DMSP satellites F15-16-17 encountered this signature 60 times within the L < 4 Re domain during the same 24-hour UT period. The average location at dusk was Ldusk = 3.1 × 0.3 Re, while at dawn Ldawn = 2.7 × 0.1 Re, in excellent agreement with the SAR arc optical locations. We thus demonstrate than plasmapause locations can be determined under cloudy sky conditions using DMSP data (but only along satellite longitudes near dawn and dusk local times), while optical imaging can give locations of the plasmpause throughout the local time night (but only regionally, and only if skies are clear).

  6. On the Azimuthal Scale Size of Mid-tail Plasmoids from Two-point ARTEMIS Observations at the Earth-Moon Lagrange Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Based on the one-to-one correlation between distant-tail (X < -200 RE) plasmoids observed by single spacecraft and large substorms, these plasmoids have been thought of as remote substorm signatures. This correlation suggests that distant-tail plasmoids extend across most of the magnetotail (~40 RE). Recent studies in the near-Earth region (X > -30 RE), however, have revealed that near-Earth reconnection sites (where plasmoids originate) and plasmoids are likely to be localized on dusk side of the magnetotail. Comprehensive multi-point mid-tail plasmoid observations are needed to explain these discrepancies, which indicate that the plasmoid has evolved during its progress from the near-Earth region to the distant tail. Between October 2010 and July 2011 the ARTEMIS spacecraft (P1 and P2) at the Earth-Moon Lagrange points (mid-tail, X ~ -45 to -65RE) provided two-point plasmoid observations across the magnetotail for 4 days every lunar month, with a large range of spacecraft separations (0.1-25RE). According to these observations, plasmoids near lunar orbit, like other reconnection-related phenomena in the near-Earth region, occur preferentially on the dusk side of the magnetotail. Our database covers all geomagnetic activity levels (median AE ~ 200 nT). The typical plasmoid azimuthal size based on correlatedtwo-spacecraft observations is about 6 RE, much smaller than expected from previous distant-tail observations. Plasmoids with azimuthal size greater than 9 RE exist in our database, but only for large geomagnetic activity levels based on the AE-index. We conclude that plasmoid azimuthal sizes are small for low levels of geomagnetic activity but increase in size with increasing activity level.

  7. Three-Dimensional MHD Simulation of the Magnetosheath Plasma and Magnetic Field in the Presence of Cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H. C.; Sibeck, D. G.; Wing, S.

    2001-12-01

    An accurate knowledge of the magnetosheath is essential for studies of the bow shock, magnetopause, and solar input into the magnetosphere. Gasdynamic models may not give sufficient accuracy whereas the cost/time constraints preclude running the 3-D MHD global simulations for numerous solar wind conditions. A 3-D magnetosheath MHD model is needed and presented as a viable alternative. The inner boundary of the model is the magnetopause, which has been previously determined from the pressure balance and exhibits a small indentation near the cusp regions. The initial position of the bow shock is taken from a gasdynamic model and subsequently adjusted when the magnetic field is included. The results of the gasdynamic and MHD models are compared with the following input parameters: the heat capacity ration γ = 2, the solar wind sonic Mach number, M∞ = 7, 9.81 (solar wind velocity v = 400 ; km ; s-1), temperature T = 105, 1.96 x 105 K, n = 10 ; cm-3, Bx = 10 \\cos θ \\cos φ ; nT, By = 10 \\cos θ sin φ ; nT, and Bz = 10 sin θ ; nT. There is a pronounced dawn-dusk asymmetry for both Mack numbers, and the presence of a strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field results in an equatorial belt of depressed depletion layer densities and plasma pressures between the cusp. The missing pressure is supplied by an equatorial band of enhanced magnetic field strengths. Near the subsolar point MHD densities fall to values 60% and 45 % of those in the gasdynamic models for M∞ = 9.81 and 7, resepctively. However, the standoff distance of bow shock increases significantly with stronger southward field component for low Mack numbers. By contrast, a standing shock wave attached to the the cusp becomes particularly noticeable for a strong dawn-dusk IMF orientation and high Mach numbers (M∞ = 9.81).

  8. A comparison of 2 techniques for estimating deer density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storm, G.L.; Cottam, D.F.; Yahner, R.H.; Nichols, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    We applied mark-resight and area-conversion methods to estimate deer abundance at a 2,862-ha area in and surrounding the Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site during 1987-1991. One observer in each of 11 compartments counted marked and unmarked deer during 65-75 minutes at dusk during 3 counts in each of April and November. Use of radio-collars and vinyl collars provided a complete inventory of marked deer in the population prior to the counts. We sighted 54% of the marked deer during April 1987 and 1988, and 43% of the marked deer during November 1987 and 1988. Mean number of deer counted increased from 427 in April 1987 to 582 in April 1991, and increased from 467 in November 1987 to 662 in November 1990. Herd size during April, based on the mark-resight method, increased from approximately 700-1,400 from 1987-1991, whereas the estimates for November indicated an increase from 983 for 1987 to 1,592 for 1990. Given the large proportion of open area and the extensive road system throughout the study area, we concluded that the sighting probability for marked and unmarked deer was fairly similar. We believe that the mark-resight method was better suited to our study than the area-conversion method because deer were not evenly distributed between areas suitable and unsuitable for sighting within open and forested areas. The assumption of equal distribution is required by the area-conversion method. Deer marked for the mark-resight method also helped reduce double counting during the dusk surveys.

  9. Using Auroral Asymmetries to Test MHD Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, P. H.; Longley, W. J.; Ostgaard, N.; Reistad, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    From 16:40 to 19:00 UT on August 17th, 2001, the IMAGE satellite viewed the Northern aurora, while the POLAR satellite simultaneously observed the Southern aurora. Unlike typical cases where the aurora is nearly conjugate, the Y-component of Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF By) during this storm ranged from +20 to +32 nT, causing the polar cap to shift towards the dusk in the Southern hemisphere and towards the dawn in the Northern. Using satellite images in the 130 nm to 160 nm wavelength range, we have been able to identify the polar cap boundary in both hemispheres throughout the event, and calculated the Dawn-Dusk Offset, ∆L, which ranged from 0° to 15° latitude. We then found correlations of 0.90 in the Northern Hemisphere and 0.83 in the Southern Hemisphere between ∆L and IMF By. ∆L also correlated well against IMF Clock Angle (ϴC) and the Epsilon parameter (ɛ = vB2sin[ϴC/2]) when using specific time averages of these parameters. The same methods are then applied to compute the polar cap boundaries in the BATSRUS, OpenGGCM, and LFM-MIX models that were run to simulate the event. We find that none of the models accurately describe the observed open-closed field line boundary during this event, with BATSRUS producing boundaries that are too ideal and symmetric, whereas OpenGGCM and LFM-MIX produced boundaries that are highly distorted and random. The LFM-MIX model gave the best average offset but did not match the observed variation with solar wind parameters.

  10. Relationship of Topside Ionospheric Ion Outflows to Auroral Forms and Precipitations, Plasma Waves, and Convection Observed by POLAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirahara, M.; Horwitz, J. L.; Moore, T. E.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.; Peterson, W. K.; Shelley, E. G.; Chandler, M. O.; Giles, B. L.; Craven, P. D.; hide

    1997-01-01

    The POLAR satellite often observes upflowing ionospheric ions (UFls) in and near the auroral oval on southern perigee (approximately 5000 km altitude) passes. We present the UFI features observed by the thermal ion dynamics experiment (TIDE) and the toroidal imaging mass-angle spectrograph (TIMAS) in the dusk-dawn sector under two different geomagnetic activity conditions in order to elicit their relationships with auroral forms, wave emissions, and convection pattern from additional POLAR instruments. During the active interval, the ultraviolet imager (UVI) observed a bright discrete aurora on the dusk side after the substorm onset and then observed a small isolated aurora form and diffuse auroras on the dawn side during the recovery phase. The UFls showed clear conic distributions when the plasma wave instrument (PWI) detected strong broadband wave emissions below approximately 10 kHz, while no significant auroral activities were observed by UVI. At higher latitudes, the low-energy UFI conics gradually changed to the polar wind component with decreasing intensity of the broadband emissions. V-shaped auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) signatures observed above approximately 200 kHz by PWI coincided with the region where the discrete aurora and the UFI beams were detected. The latitude of these features was lower than that of the UFI conics. During the observations of the UFI beams and conics, the lower-frequency fluctuations observed by the electric field instrument (EFI) were also enhanced, and the convection directions exhibited large fluctuations. It is evident that large electrostatic potential drops produced the precipitating electrons and discrete auroras, the UFI beams, and the AKR, which is also supported by the energetic plasma data from HYDRA. Since the intense broadband emissions were also observed with the UFIs. the ionospheric ions could be energized transversely before or during the parallel acceleration due to the potential drops.

  11. GPS Based Daily Activity Patterns in European Red Deer and North American Elk (Cervus elaphus): Indication for a Weak Circadian Clock in Ungulates

    PubMed Central

    Ensing, Erik P.; Ciuti, Simone; de Wijs, Freek A. L. M.; Lentferink, Dennis H.; ten Hoedt, André; Boyce, Mark S.; Hut, Roelof A.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term tracking using global positioning systems (GPS) is widely used to study vertebrate movement ecology, including fine-scale habitat selection as well as large-scale migrations. These data have the potential to provide much more information about the behavior and ecology of wild vertebrates: here we explore the potential of using GPS datasets to assess timing of activity in a chronobiological context. We compared two different populations of deer (Cervus elaphus), one in the Netherlands (red deer), the other in Canada (elk). GPS tracking data were used to calculate the speed of the animals as a measure for activity to deduce unbiased daily activity rhythms over prolonged periods of time. Speed proved a valid measure for activity, this being validated by comparing GPS based activity data with head movements recorded by activity sensors, and the use of GPS locations was effective for generating long term chronobiological data. Deer showed crepuscular activity rhythms with activity peaks at sunrise (the Netherlands) or after sunrise (Canada) and at the end of civil twilight at dusk. The deer in Canada were mostly diurnal while the deer in the Netherlands were mostly nocturnal. On an annual scale, Canadian deer were more active during the summer months while deer in the Netherlands were more active during winter. We suggest that these differences were mainly driven by human disturbance (on a daily scale) and local weather (on an annual scale). In both populations, the crepuscular activity peaks in the morning and evening showed a stable timing relative to dawn and dusk twilight throughout the year, but marked periods of daily a-rhythmicity occurred in the individual records. We suggest that this might indicate that (changes in) light levels around twilight elicit a direct behavioral response while the contribution of an internal circadian timing mechanism might be weak or even absent. PMID:25208246

  12. Attenuation of the posttranslational oscillator via transcription-translation feedback enhances circadian-phase shifts in Synechococcus.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Norimune; Kushige, Hiroko; Iwasaki, Hideo

    2013-08-27

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous biological timing processes that are ubiquitous in organisms ranging from cyanobacteria to humans. In the photoautotrophic unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, under continuous light (LL) conditions, the transcription-translation feedback loop (TTFL) of KaiC generates a rhythmic change in the accumulation of KaiC relative to KaiA clock proteins (KaiC/KaiA ratio), which peak and trough at subjective dawn and dusk, respectively. However, the role of TTFL in the cyanobacterial circadian system remains unclear because it is not an essential requirement for the basic oscillation driven by the Kai-based posttranslational oscillator (PTO) and the transcriptional output mechanisms. Here, we show that TTFL is important for the circadian photic resetting property in Synechococcus. The robustness of PTO, which is exemplified by the amplitude of the KaiC phosphorylation cycle, changed depending on the KaiC/KaiA ratio, which was cyclic under LL. After cells were transferred from LL to the dark, the clock protein levels remained constant in the dark. When cells were transferred from LL to continuous dark at subjective dawn, the KaiC phosphorylation cycle was attenuated with a lower KaiC/KaiA ratio, a higher KaiC phosphorylation level, and a lower amplitude than that in cells transferred at subjective dusk. We also found that the greater the degree to which PTO was attenuated in continuous dark, the greater the phase shifts upon the subsequent light exposure. Based on these results, we propose that TTFL enhances resetting of the Kai-based PTO in Synechococcus.

  13. GPS based daily activity patterns in European red deer and North American elk (Cervus elaphus): indication for a weak circadian clock in ungulates.

    PubMed

    Ensing, Erik P; Ciuti, Simone; de Wijs, Freek A L M; Lentferink, Dennis H; Ten Hoedt, André; Boyce, Mark S; Hut, Roelof A

    2014-01-01

    Long-term tracking using global positioning systems (GPS) is widely used to study vertebrate movement ecology, including fine-scale habitat selection as well as large-scale migrations. These data have the potential to provide much more information about the behavior and ecology of wild vertebrates: here we explore the potential of using GPS datasets to assess timing of activity in a chronobiological context. We compared two different populations of deer (Cervus elaphus), one in the Netherlands (red deer), the other in Canada (elk). GPS tracking data were used to calculate the speed of the animals as a measure for activity to deduce unbiased daily activity rhythms over prolonged periods of time. Speed proved a valid measure for activity, this being validated by comparing GPS based activity data with head movements recorded by activity sensors, and the use of GPS locations was effective for generating long term chronobiological data. Deer showed crepuscular activity rhythms with activity peaks at sunrise (the Netherlands) or after sunrise (Canada) and at the end of civil twilight at dusk. The deer in Canada were mostly diurnal while the deer in the Netherlands were mostly nocturnal. On an annual scale, Canadian deer were more active during the summer months while deer in the Netherlands were more active during winter. We suggest that these differences were mainly driven by human disturbance (on a daily scale) and local weather (on an annual scale). In both populations, the crepuscular activity peaks in the morning and evening showed a stable timing relative to dawn and dusk twilight throughout the year, but marked periods of daily a-rhythmicity occurred in the individual records. We suggest that this might indicate that (changes in) light levels around twilight elicit a direct behavioral response while the contribution of an internal circadian timing mechanism might be weak or even absent.

  14. How Does a Carnivore Guild Utilise a Substantial but Unpredictable Anthropogenic Food Source? Scavenging on Hunter-Shot Ungulate Carcasses by Wild Dogs/Dingoes, Red Foxes and Feral Cats in South-Eastern Australia Revealed by Camera Traps

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, David M.; Woodford, Luke; Moloney, Paul D.; Hampton, Jordan O.; Woolnough, Andrew P.; Tucker, Mark

    2014-01-01

    There is much interest in understanding how anthropogenic food resources subsidise carnivore populations. Carcasses of hunter-shot ungulates are a potentially substantial food source for mammalian carnivores. The sambar deer (Rusa unicolor) is a large (≥150 kg) exotic ungulate that can be hunted throughout the year in south-eastern Australia, and hunters are not required to remove or bury carcasses. We investigated how wild dogs/dingoes and their hybrids (Canis lupus familiaris/dingo), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cats (Felis catus) utilised sambar deer carcasses during the peak hunting seasons (i.e. winter and spring). We placed carcasses at 1-km intervals along each of six transects that extended 4-km into forest from farm boundaries. Visits to carcasses were monitored using camera traps, and the rate of change in edible biomass estimated at ∼14-day intervals. Wild dogs and foxes fed on 70% and 60% of 30 carcasses, respectively, but feral cats seldom (10%) fed on carcasses. Spatial and temporal patterns of visits to carcasses were consistent with the hypothesis that foxes avoid wild dogs. Wild dog activity peaked at carcasses 2 and 3 km from farms, a likely legacy of wild dog control, whereas fox activity peaked at carcasses 0 and 4 km from farms. Wild dog activity peaked at dawn and dusk, whereas nearly all fox activity occurred after dusk and before dawn. Neither wild dogs nor foxes remained at carcasses for long periods and the amount of feeding activity by either species was a less important predictor of the loss of edible biomass than season. Reasons for the low impacts of wild dogs and foxes on sambar deer carcass biomass include the spatially and temporally unpredictable distribution of carcasses in the landscape, the rapid rate of edible biomass decomposition in warm periods, low wild dog densities and the availability of alternative food resources. PMID:24918425

  15. Latitudinal and MLT dependence of the seasonal variation of geomagnetic field around auroral zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jin; Du, Aimin; Ou, Jiaming; Xu, Wenyao

    2017-08-01

    Seasonal variation of geomagnetic field around auroral zone is analyzed in terms of geomagnetic latitude, magnetic local time (MLT) and geomagnetic condition in this study. The study uses horizontal component (H) of geomagnetic field obtained from 6 observatories located in geomagnetic latitude of 57.8°N-73.8°N along 115°E longitudinal line. The results indicate that seasonal variations of geomagnetic field around auroral zone are different combinations of annual and semiannual variations at different latitudinal ranges. Both annual and semiannual variations show distinct MLT dependency: (1) At dayside auroral latitudes (around 72°N geomagnetic latitude), geomagnetic field shows distinct annual variation under both quiet and disturbed conditions. Furthermore, the annual component is mainly contributed by data of dusk sector. (2) At nightside auroral latitudes (around 65°N), geomagnetic field shows semiannual dominated seasonal variation. Under quiet conditions the annual component is comparable to the semiannual component, while under disturbed conditions, the semiannual component is twice as much as the annual component. Under quiet conditions, the semiannual component is mainly contributed by 1300-1400 MLT, while the annual component has two peaks: one is around 1100-1300 MLT and the other is around 2000-2200 MLT. Under disturbed conditions, the semiannual component is mainly contributed by data around midnight, while the annual component is mainly contributed by dusk sector. (3) At subauroral latitudes (around 60°N), annual variation is comparable to semiannual variation under both quiet and disturbed conditions. Both annual and semiannual components show similar MLT dependencies as that of nightside auroral latitudes.

  16. Dipolarization fronts as Earthward Propagating Flux Ropes: A Three-dimensional Global Hybrid Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Q.; Lu, S.; Lin, Y.; Wang, X.

    2016-12-01

    Dipolarization fronts (DFs) as earthward propagating flux ropes (FRs) in the Earth's magnetotailare presented and investigated with a three-dimensional (3-D) global hybrid simulation for the first time. In thesimulation, several small-scale earthward propagating FRs are found to be formed by multiple X line reconnectionin the near tail. During their earthward propagation, the magnetic field Bz of the FRs becomes highly asymmetricdue to the imbalance of the reconnection rates between the multiple X lines. At the later stage, when the FRsapproach the near-Earth dipole-like region, the antireconnection between the southward/negative Bz ofthe FRs and the northward geomagnetic field leads to the erosion of the southward magnetic flux of theFRs, which further aggravates the Bz asymmetry. Eventually, the FRs merge into the near-Earth regionthrough the antireconnection. These earthward propagating FRs can fully reproduce the observationalfeatures of the DFs, e.g., a sharp enhancement of Bz preceded by a smaller amplitude Bz dip, an earthwardflow enhancement, the presence of the electric field components in the normal and dawn-dusk directions,and ion energization. Our results show that the earthward propagating FRs can be used to explain the DFsobserved in the magnetotail. The thickness of the DFs is on the order of several ion inertial lengths, and theelectric field normal to the front is found to be dominated by the Hall physics. During the earthward propagationfrom the near-tail to the near-Earth region, the speed of the FR/DFs increases from 150km/s to 1000 km/s. TheFR/DFs can be tilted in the GSM (x, y) plane with respect to the y (dawn-dusk) axis and only extend several Earthradii in this direction. Moreover, the structure and evolution of the FRs/DFs are nonuniform in the dawn-duskdirection, which indicates that the DFs are essentially 3-D.

  17. Spatial dynamics and expanded vertical niche of blue sharks in oceanographic fronts reveal habitat targets for conservation.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Nuno; Humphries, Nicolas E; Noble, Leslie R; Santos, António M; Sims, David W

    2012-01-01

    Dramatic population declines among species of pelagic shark as a result of overfishing have been reported, with some species now at a fraction of their historical biomass. Advanced telemetry techniques enable tracking of spatial dynamics and behaviour, providing fundamental information on habitat preferences of threatened species to aid conservation. We tracked movements of the highest pelagic fisheries by-catch species, the blue shark Prionace glauca, in the North-east Atlantic using pop-off satellite-linked archival tags to determine the degree of space use linked to habitat and to examine vertical niche. Overall, blue sharks moved south-west of tagging sites (English Channel; southern Portugal), exhibiting pronounced site fidelity correlated with localized productive frontal areas, with estimated space-use patterns being significantly different from that of random walks. Tracked female sharks displayed behavioural variability in diel depth preferences, both within and between individuals. Diel depth use ranged from normal DVM (nDVM; dawn descent, dusk ascent), to reverse DVM (rDVM; dawn ascent, dusk descent), to behavioural patterns where no diel differences were apparent. Results showed that blue sharks occupy some of the most productive marine zones for extended periods and structure diel activity patterns across multiple spatio-temporal scales in response to particular habitat types. In so doing, sharks occupied an extraordinarily broad vertical depth range for their size (1.0-2.0 m fork length), from the surface into the bathypelagic realm (max. dive depth, 1160 m). The space-use patterns of blue sharks indicated they spend much of the time in areas where pelagic longlining activities are often highest, and in depth zones where these fisheries particularly target other species, which could account for the rapid declines recently reported for blue sharks in many parts of the world's oceans. Our results provide habitat targets for blue shark conservation that

  18. Effect of subauroral polarization streams on the thermosphere: A statistical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Lühr, Hermann; HäUsler, Kathrin; Ritter, Patricia

    2011-03-01

    Using 2 years of coordinated CHAMP and DMSP observations we have investigated for the first time the relationship between subauroral polarization streams (SAPS), ionospheric Hall current (electrojet), upper thermospheric zonal wind, and mass density at subauroral regions in the dusk and premidnight sectors, separately for both hemispheres. For comparison, we have also analyzed the same parameters as a function of magnetic latitude (30°-80° magnetic latitude) during non-SAPS periods. During periods of non-SAPS, the neutral wind exhibits similar features as during SAPS events in the dusk to premidnight sector, streaming westward in the same direction as the plasma drift. Both neutral and plasma velocities peak at the same latitude regardless of SAPS occurrence. For higher geomagnetic activity both velocities are faster and the peaks shift equatorward. During non-SAPS periods, the ratio between plasma and neutral wind velocity is on average 2.75 ± 0.4 in both hemispheres irrespective of geomagnetic activity. The neutral wind during SAPS events gets enhanced by a factor of 1.5/1.2 for Kp < 4 and 1.3/1.9 for Kp ≥ 4 in the Northern/Southern Hemisphere, respectively, as compared to non-SAPS time. The velocity difference between SAPS and neutral wind is also larger during SAPS period than during non-SAPS period, and the difference tends to increase with increasing geomagnetic activity. The peak latitude of the eastward auroral electrojet appears 1.5° poleward of the plasma drift during SAPS events, confirming the formation of SAPS equatorward of the high-conductivity channel. These SAPS-induced large winds can heat the upper thermosphere. As a result we observe a 10% enhanced mass density at 400 km altitude with respect to periods without SAPS. In addition a density anomaly peak occurs collocated with the SAPS, displaced from the electrojet peak. We regard this as an indication for efficient thermospheric heating by ion neutral friction.

  19. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Waves by Low-Latitude Space Technology 5 Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6deg inclination angle. Due to the Earth s rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft s dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at subauroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 minutes, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that this unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc 4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-disk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field-aligned resonances.

  20. THEMIS measurements of quasi-static electric fields in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Califf, S.; Li, X.; Blum, L.; Jaynes, A.; Schiller, Q.; Zhao, H.; Malaspina, D.; Hartinger, M.; Wolf, R. A.; Rowland, D. E.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    We use 4 years of Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) double-probe measurements to offer, for the first time, a complete picture of the dawn-dusk electric field covering all local times and radial distances in the inner magnetosphere based on in situ equatorial observations. This study is motivated by the results from the CRRES mission, which revealed a local maximum in the electric field developing near Earth during storm times, rather than the expected enhancement at higher L shells that is shielded near Earth as suggested by the Volland-Stern model. The CRRES observations were limited to the duskside, while THEMIS provides complete local time coverage. We show strong agreement with the CRRES results on the duskside, with a local maximum near L = 4 for moderate levels of geomagnetic activity and evidence of strong electric fields inside L = 3 during the most active times. The extensive data set from THEMIS also confirms the day/night asymmetry on the duskside, where the enhancement is closest to Earth in the dusk-midnight sector, and is farther away closer to noon. A similar, but smaller in magnitude, local maximum is observed on the dawnside near L = 4. The noon sector shows the smallest average electric fields, and for more active times, the enhancement develops near L = 7 rather than L = 4. We also investigate the impact of the uncertain boom-shorting factor on the results and show that while the absolute magnitude of the electric field may be underestimated, the trends with geomagnetic activity remain intact.

  1. Global evolution and propagation of electric fields during sudden commencements based on multi-­point observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Kasaba, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Shinbori, A.; Kikuchi, T.; Hori, T.; Nishitani, N.

    2016-12-01

    Sudden commencements (SCs) are triggered by an abrupt compression of the dayside magnetopause, which causes a fast mode wave propagating toward the Earth in the equatorial magnetosphere across the magnetic field line. The sudden compression also induces the Alfven wave propagation toward the polar ionosphere along magnetic field lines. The latter causes the global transmission of ionospheric electric field at speed of light, and can propagate the influence back to the inner and/or nightside magnetosphere. These general propagation processes have been demonstrated in previous papers using direct observations. We study the spatial and temporal evolution of electric fields and the direction of Poynting fluxes between the magnetosphere and ionosphere associated with SCs. We use multi-point magnetospheric and ionospheric satellites (THEMIS, RBSP, GOES, and C/NOFS) with radars (SuperDARN). An event study on 17 March 2013 shows that the magnetospheric electric field is propagated from dayside to nightside magnetosphere. At the onset time, the magnetospheric magnetic field starts to increase, which indicates that the detected electric field is associated with the compression of the magnetosphere. In the ionosphere, C/NOFS satellite and SuperDARN radar detect the dusk-to-dawn electric field about 1 min after the onset in the magnetosphere. Poynting fluxes evaluated from THEMIS and RBSP data are directed toward the ionosphere along magnetic field lines in both dayside and nightside, which indicates that the Alfven wave launches toward the polar ionosphere at the onset. The spatial evolution of magnetospheric electric fields can be interpreted as follows: First, the fast mode wave propagates from dayside to nightside magnetosphere, and 105-120 s after the onset, the magnetospheric convection becomes stronger. We also find that the spatial distribution of the response time is asymmetric between dawn and dusk, which can be due to the asymmetry of the plasmapause location.

  2. Effects of a magnetic cloud simultaneously observed on the equatorial ionosphere in midday and midnight sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Chandra, H.; Das, A. C.; Sridharan, R.; Reinisch, B. W.; Ahmed, Khurshid

    2012-04-01

    An impact of a magnetic cloud on the Earth's magnetosphere occurred at 1636 UT on 25 June, 1998, associated with a sudden increase of the solar wind density and velocity, as well as a sudden increase of the zenithal component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF- B z). Following the impact of the magnetic cloud, IMF- B z was northward (10 nT) and remained steadily strong (about 15 nT) for the next six hours. IMF- B z turned southward at 2330 UT on 25 June, 1998, and remained strongly southward (-15 nT) for the next four hours. During the positive phase of IMF- B z, both the Auroral index and ring current index SYM/H remained steadily low indicating complete isolation of the Earth's magnetosphere from the solar wind and no significant changes were observed in the equatorial ionosphere. After the southward turning, the steady southward IMF- B z permitted solar wind energy to penetrate the magnetosphere and caused the generation of a magnetic storm associated with strong auroral electrojet activity ( A E index). Strong southward IMF- B z corresponds to the dawn-dusk interplanetary electric field (eastward on the dayside and westward on the night side). The ionograms at Jicamarca (night side) showed strong spread- F and at Thumba (dayside) showed an absence of equatorial type of sporadic- E, indicating a dusk-to-dawn electric field. Thus, the observations point to an electric field opposite in direction to that expected by the prompt penetration of the interplanetary electric field. An abnormally-large Auroral index ( A E) associated with the start of the storm suggests that the cause of the equatorial electric field changes is due to the disturbance dynamo effect.

  3. Storm time plasma transport at middle and high latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.C. )

    1993-02-01

    Associated with the large-scale enhancement of the ionospheric convection electric field during disturbed geomagnetic conditions, solar-produced F region plasma is transported to and through the noontime cleft from a source region at middle and low latitudes in the afternoon sector. As a result of the offset between the geomagnetic and geographic poles, the afternoon sector region of strong sunward convection is shifted to increasingly lower geographic latitude throughout the interval between 12 UT and 24 UT. A snowplow effect occurs in which the convection cell continually encounters fresh corotating ionospheric plasma along its equatorward edge, producing a latitudinally narrow region of storm-enhanced plasma density (SED) and increased total electron content which is advected toward higher latitudes in the noon sector. The Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar regularly observes SED as a spatially continuous, large-scale feature spanning local times between noon and midnight and at latitudes between the polar cap and its mid- or low-latitude source region. For local times away from noon, the latitude of most probable SED occurrence moves equatorward by 6[degrees] for an increase of 2 in the Kp index. During strong disturbances the topside SED is observed to be convecting sunward at [approximately]750 m s[sup [minus]1] with a flux of 10[sup 14] m[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1]. This feature accounts for the pronounced enhancement of ionospheric density near dusk at middle latitudes observed during the early stages of magnetic storms (called the dusk effect) and constitutes a source for the enhanced F region plasma observed in the polar cap during disturbed conditions. 34 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Variation of surface electric field during geomagnetic disturbed period at Maitri, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, N. Jeni; Panneerselvam, C.; Anil Kumar, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The paper discusses on the variations of the atmospheric vertical electric field measured at sub-auroral station Maitri (70∘75'S, 11∘75'E), and polar station Vostok (78.5∘S, 107∘E) during the geomagnetic disturbances on 25-26 January 2006. Diurnal variation of surface electric field measured at Maitri shows a similar variation with worldwide thunderstorm activity, whereas the departure of the field is observed during disturbed periods. This part of the field corresponds to the magnetospheric/ionospheric (an additional generator in the polar regions) voltage generators. Solar wind parameters and planetary indices represent the temporal variation of the disturbances, and digital fluxgate magnetometer variation continuously monitored to trace the auroral movement at Maitri. We have observed that the electrojet movement leaves its signature on vertical and horizontal components of the DFM in addition; the study infers the position of auroral current wedge with respect to Maitri. To exhibit the auroral oval, OVATION model is obtained with the aid of DMSP satellite and UV measurements. It is noted that the Maitri is almost within the auroral oval during the periods of disturbances. To examine the simultaneous changes in the vertical electric field associated with this magnetic disturbance, the dawn-dusk potential is studied for every UT hours; the potential was obtained from Weimer model and SuperDARN radar. The comparison reveals the plausible situation for the superposition of dawn-dusk potential on surface electric field over Maitri. This observation also shows that the superposition may not be consistent with the phase of the electrojet. Comparison of surface electric field at Maitri and Vostok shows that the parallel variation exhibits with each other, but during the period of geomagnetic disturbances, the influence is not much discerned at Vostok.

  5. Magnetic reconnection in Saturn's magnetotail: A comprehensive magnetic field survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. W.; Jackman, C. M.; Thomsen, M. F.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process throughout the solar system, significantly shaping and modulating the magnetospheres of the magnetized planets. Within planetary magnetotails reconnection can be responsible for energizing particles and potentially changing the total flux and mass contained within the magnetosphere. The Kronian magnetosphere is thought to be a middle ground between the rotationally dominated Jovian magnetosphere and the solar wind driven terrestrial magnetosphere. However, previous studies have not been able to find a statistical reconnection x-line, as has been possible at both Jupiter and Earth. Additionally the standard picture of magnetotail reconnection at Saturn, developed by Cowley et al. [2004], suggests a potential asymmetry between the dawn and dusk flanks, caused by different reconnection processes dominating. This work centers on the development of an algorithm designed to find reconnection related events in spacecraft magnetometer data, aiming to reduce the bias that manual searches could inherently introduce, thereby ensuring the validity of any statistical analysis. The algorithm primarily identifies the reconnection related events from deflections in the north-south component of the magnetic field, allowing an almost uninterrupted in-situ search (when the spacecraft is situated within the magnetotail). The new catalogue of candidate reconnection events, produced by the algorithm, enables a more complete statistical view of reconnection in the Kronian magnetotail. Well-studied data encompassing the deep magnetotail and dawn flank (particularly from orbits in 2006) were used to train the algorithm and develop reasonable criteria. The algorithm was then applied to data encompassing the dusk flank (including orbits from 2009, for which plasma data have been examined by Thomsen et al. [2014]). This combination enables a robust, and global, comparison of reconnection rates, signatures and properties in the Kronian magnetotail.

  6. 3D kinetic picture of magnetotail explosions and characteristic auroral features prior to and after substorm onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnov, M. I.; Merkin, V. G.; Motoba, T.

    2015-12-01

    Recent findings in theory, observations and 3D particle-in-cell simulations of magnetotail explosions reveal a complex picture of reconnection, buoyancy and flapping motions, which have interesting correlations with the auroral morphology. First, the formation of the tailward Bz gradient as a theoretical prerequisite for tearing, ballooning/interchange and flapping instabilities is consistent with the structure of the pre-onset quiet arc and the associated deep minimum of Bz. Another distinctive pre-onset feature, equatorward extension of the auroral oval in the late growth phase, is conventionally associated with earthward motion of the inner edge of the plasma sheet. However, if open magnetic flux saturates in the late growth phase, it may also be treated as a signature of magnetic flux accumulation tailward of the Bz minimum, which is also favorable for the tail plasma sheet instabilities. 3D PIC simulations of similar magnetotail equilibria with a tailward Bz gradient show spontaneous formation of earthward flows led by dipolarization fronts. They are structured in the dawn-dusk direction on the ion inertial scale, consistent with the minimum scales of the observed auroral beads. At the same time, simulations show the formation of a new X-line in the wake of the dipolarization front with no significant spatial modulation in the dawn-dusk direction suggesting smooth profiles of the substorm current wedge as well as poleward parts of auroral streamers. Flapping motions, which also grow at the dipolarization front, extend beyond it, up to the new X-line region. To understand auroral manifestations of tail structures in our simulations we investigate the plasma moments at the plasma sheet boundary.

  7. The causes of the hardest electron precipitation events seen with SAMPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David M.; Casavant, Eric P.; Comess, Max D.; Liang, Xinqing; Bowers, Gregory S.; Selesnick, Richard S.; Clausen, Lasse B. N.; Millan, Robyn M.; Sample, John G.

    2016-09-01

    We studied the geomagnetic, plasmaspheric, and solar wind context of relativistic electron precipitation (REP) events seen with the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), Proton Electron Telescope (PET) to derive an exponential folding energy E0 for each event. Events with E0< 400 keV peak near midnight, and with increasing E0, the peak magnetic local time (MLT) moves earlier but never peaks as early as the MLT distribution of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the outer belt, and a distinct component near midnight remains. Events with E0>750 keV near dusk (1400 < MLT < 2000) show correlations with solar wind dynamic pressure and proton density, AE index, negative Dst index, and an extended plasmasphere, all supporting an EMIC wave interpretation. Events with 500 keV 500 keV ("hard REP"), we estimate that roughly 45% of the whole population has the distributions of geomagnetic and solar wind parameters associated with EMIC waves, while 55% does not. We hypothesize that the latter events may be caused by current sheet scattering (CSS), which can be mistaken for EMIC wave scattering in that both simultaneously precipitate MeV electrons and keV protons. Since a large number of MeV electrons are lost in the near-midnight hard REP events, and in the large number of E0< 400 keV events that show no dusk-like peak at all, we conclude that CSS should be studied further as a possibly important loss channel for MeV electrons.

  8. Light, predation and the lekking behaviour of the ghost swift Hepialus humuli (L.) (Lepidoptera, Hepialidae)

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, S.; Rydell, J.; Svensson, M. G. E.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the timing of the crepuscular lekking flight of male ghost swift moths in southern Sweden with respect to variations in: (i) the quality of the visual mating signal; and (ii) the behaviour of potential vertebrate predators (mainly bats). The moths' display flights started ca. 57 min after sunset, and occurred during 20–30 min at incident light intensities between 10.0 and 2.0 lux. Owing to the falling and more shortwave ambient light after sunset, the brightness contrast between the moth wings and the background (grass) increased steeply at the time of display onset. The silvery white male wing colour thereby seems to maximize conspicuousness, and may be a secondary adaptation that facilitates visibility at low light intensities. The display timing itself is probably determined by other factors, possibly predation. By displaying only for a short period at dusk, the moths seem to avoid most birds, which normally do not forage at these light levels, and gleaning bats, which typically do not start to feed until the light intensity has fallen even further. Nevertheless, aerial-hawking bats were often (54% of the evenings, n = 22) seen at the leks, and one species (Eptesicus nilssonii) frequently fed on the displaying moths (22% of the moths observed, n = 83). H. humuli represents an ancient clade among the Lepidoptera. By restricting its sexual behaviour to a short time window at dusk, when predation risk may be minimized (but still high), it may to some extent compensate for the lack of sophisticated predator defence systems such as aposematic or mimetic coloration, manoeuvrable flight, and ultrasonic hearing, which predominate among the more recent Lepidopteran clades. However, the time window solution restricts the moths' activities considerably and the lack of defence still carries a considerable cost in terms of predation.

  9. Observations of IMF and seasonal effects in high-latitude convection

    SciTech Connect

    Ruohoniemi, J.M.; Greenwald, R.A.

    1995-05-01

    The authors describe strong interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and seasonal effects in the convection of nightside ionospheric plasma. The findings are based on a statistical analysis of observations made with the JHU/APL HF radar located at Goose Bay, Labrador. For positive sign of the IMF dawn-dusk component, i.e., B{sub y}>0, the dawn cell is more crescent-shaped and the dusk cell more round while for B{sub y}<0 these pairings of size and shape are reversed. The more extreme crescent/round cell dichotomy is obtained for B{sub y}>0. The return flows associated with the crescent-shaped cell dominate at midnight MLT (Magnetic Local Time); the reversal in the zonal velocity in the 67{degrees}-69{degrees}{Lambda} (magnetic latitude) interval occurs 2 1/2 hr earlier for B{sub y}>0. The seasonal dependence of nightside convection resembles in important respects the B{sub y} dependence. Greater latitudinal velocity shears occur in the morning/afternoon sector for summer/winter and the return flow of this sector dominates at midnight. The zonal flow reversal occurs 2 1/2 hr earlier in summer than in winter. The maximum effects are obtained on the nightside for the pairings [B{sub y}>0, summer] and [B{sub y}<0, winter]; the first produces the more structured cell in the morning, the second in the evening, and this cell dominates the return flow at midnight. The difference in the zonal flow reversals for these pairings exceeds 4 hr in MLT. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Energetic electron response to interplanetary shocks at geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Zong, Q.-G.

    2015-06-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks have great impacts on Earth's magnetosphere, especially in causing global dynamic changes of energetic particles. In order to study the response of energetic electrons (50keV-1.5MeV) at geosynchronous orbit to IP shocks, we have systematically analyzed 215 IP shock events based on ACE, GOES, and LANL observations during 1998-2007. Our study shows that after the shock arrival low-energy electron fluxes increase at geosynchronous orbit. However, in higher energy channels fluxes show smaller increases and eventually become unchanged or even decrease. The oscillations of electron fluxes following the shock arrival have also been studied in this paper. Statistical analysis revealed a frequency preference for 2.2 mHz and 3.3 mHz oscillations of energetic electron fluxes. The amplitude of these oscillations is larger under southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) than under northward IMF. Furthermore, oscillations from high-energy and low-energy electron fluxes show different phase characteristics and power distributions. The phase angles of the oscillations are the same in the dawn, dusk, and noon sectors for low-energy channels (50-500keV), while they have a π/2 difference between two adjacent local time sectors for high-energy channels (0.5-1.5MeV). The wave power distribution of electron fluxes shows different dawn-dusk asymmetries for low-energy channels and high-energy channels. The results presented in this paper provide an energetic particle point of view of the magnetospheric response to the interplanetary shock impact.

  11. Photoperiodic and thermosensory pathways interact through CONSTANS to promote flowering at high temperature under short days.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Virginia; Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Le Gourrierec, José; Coupland, George

    2016-06-01

    Plants detect changes in day length to induce seasonal patterns of flowering. The photoperiodic pathway accelerates the flowering of Arabidopsis thaliana under long days (LDs) whereas it is inactive under short days (SDs), resulting in delayed flowering. This delay is overcome by exposure of plants to high temperature (27°C) under SDs (27°C-SD). Previously, the high-temperature flowering response was proposed to involve either the impaired activity of MADS-box transcription factor (TF) floral repressors or PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) TF-mediated activation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), which encodes the output signal of the photoperiodic pathway. We integrate these observations by studying several PIFs, the MADS-box SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) and the photoperiodic pathway under 27°C-SD. We find that the mRNAs of FT and its paralogue TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF) are increased at dusk under 27°C-SD compared with 21°C-SD, and that this requires PIF4 and PIF5 as well as CONSTANS (CO), a TF that promotes flowering under LDs. The CO and PIF4 proteins are present at dusk under 27°C-SD, and they physically interact. Although Col-0 plants flower at similar times under 27°C-SD and 21°C-LD the expression level of FT is approximately 10-fold higher under 21°C-LD, suggesting that responsiveness to FT is also increased under 27°C-SD, perhaps as a result of the reduced activity of SVP in the meristem. Accordingly, only svp-41 ft-10 tsf-1 plants flowered at the same time under 21°C-SD and 27°C-SD. Thus, we propose that under non-inductive SDs, elevated temperatures increase the activity and sensitize the response to the photoperiod pathway.

  12. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Waves by Low-altitude ST5 Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST5) constellation mission. ST5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 lan, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6 inclination angle. Even though the spacecraft are in a high-inclination orbit, the combined effects of the Earth's rotation and dipole tilt allow the spacecraft's dawn-dusk orbit track to reach subauroral latitudes on the day side. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at sub auroral latitudes they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations of the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST5 spacecraft are around 10 minutes, the three ST5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. Coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that this unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST5 are in fact high azimuthal wave number Pc 4-5 waves Doppler-shifted to higher frequencies by the rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. These unique low altitude observations, where the spacecraft motion is mainly azimuthal at subauroral latitudes, reveal the azimuthal wave-number characteristics of the field-aligned resonance signals.

  13. Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Observations of the Imbalance of Region 1 and 2 Field-Aligned Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan

    2010-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST-5) is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, sun-synchronous polar orbit from March 22 to June 21, 2006, for technology validations. In this study, we use the in-situ magnetic field observations from Space Technology 5 mission to quantify the imbalance of Region 1 (R1) and Region 2 (R2) currents. During the three-month duration of the ST5 mission, geomagnetic conditions range from quiet to moderately active. We find that the R1 current intensity is consistently stronger than the R2 current intensity both for the dawnside and the duskside large-scale field-aligned current system. The net currents flowing into (out of) the ionosphere in the dawnside (duskside) are in the order of 5% of the total RI currents. We also find that the net currents flowing into or out of the ionosphere are controlled by the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction in the same way as the field-aligned currents themselves are. Since the net currents due to the imbalance of the R1 and R2 currents require that their closure currents flow across the polar cap from dawn to dusk as Pedersen currents, our results indicate that the total amount of the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents is in the order of approx. 0.1 MA. This study, although with a very limited dataset, is one of the first attempts to quantify the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents. Given the importance of the Joule heating due to Pedersen currents to the high-latitude ionospheric electrodynamics, quantifying the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents and associated Joule heating is needed for developing models of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  14. Multispecies spawning sites for fishes on a low-latitude coral reef: spatial and temporal patterns.

    PubMed

    Claydon, J A B; McCormick, M I; Jones, G P

    2014-04-01

    Spawning sites used by one or more species were located by intensively searching nearshore coral reefs of Kimbe Bay (New Britain, Papua New Guinea). Once identified, the spawning sites were surveyed repeatedly within fixed 5 m radius circular areas, for  > 2000 h of observations ranging from before dawn to after dusk spanning 190 days between July 2001 and May 2004. A total of 38 spawning sites were identified on the seven study reefs distributed at an average of one site every 60 m of reef edge. Pelagic spawning was observed in 41 fish species from six families. On three intensively studied reefs, all 17 spawning sites identified were used by at least three species, with a maximum of 30 different species observed spawning at a single site. Spawning was observed during every month of the study, on all days of the lunar month, at all states of the tide and at most hours of the day studied. Nevertheless, the majority of species were observed spawning on proportionately more days from December to April, on more days around the new moon and in association with higher tides. The strongest temporal association, however, was with species-specific diel spawning times spanning < 3 h for most species. While dawn spawning, afternoon spawning and dusk spawning species were differentiated, the time of spawning for the striated surgeonfish Ctenochaetus striatus also differed significantly among sites. The large number of species spawning at the same restricted locations during predictable times suggests that these sites are extremely important on this low-latitude coral reef.

  15. Seasonal abundance & role of predominant Japanese encephalitis vectors Culex tritaeniorhynchus & Cx. gelidus Theobald in Cuddalore district, Tamil Nadu

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, D.; Muniaraj, M.; Samuel, P. Philip; Thenmozhi, V.; Venkatesh, A.; Nagaraj, J.; Tyagi, B.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia. The first major JE outbreak occurred in 1978 and since 1981 several outbreaks had been reported in the Cuddalore district (erstwhile South Arcot), Tamil Nadu, India. Entomological monitoring was carried out during January 2010 - March 2013, to determine the seasonal abundance and transmission dynamics of the vectors of JE virus, with emphasis on the role of Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. gelidus. Methods: Mosquito collections were carried out fortnightly during dusk hours in three villages viz. Soundara Solapuram, Pennadam, Erappavur of Cuddalore district. Mosquitoes were collected during dusk for a period of one hour in and around the cattle sheds using oral aspirator and torch light. The collected mosquitoes were later identified and pooled to detect JE virus (JEV) infection by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: A total of 46,343 mosquitoes comprising of 25 species and six genera were collected. Species composition included viz, Cx. tritaeniorhynchus (46.26%), Cx. gelidus (43.12%) and other species (10.62%). A total of 17,678 specimens (403 pools) of Cx. gelidus and 14,358 specimens (309 pools) of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus were tested, of which 12 pools of Cx. gelidus and 14 pools of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus were positive for JE virus antigen. The climatic factors were negatively correlated with minimum infection rate (MIR) for both the species, except mean temperature (P<0.05) for Cx. gelidus. Interpretation & conclusions: High abundance of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. gelidus was observed compared to other mosquito species in the study area. Detection of JEV antigen in the two species confirmed the maintenance of virus. Appropriate vector control measures need to be taken to reduce the vector abundance. PMID:26905238

  16. Spatial Dynamics and Expanded Vertical Niche of Blue Sharks in Oceanographic Fronts Reveal Habitat Targets for Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Nuno; Humphries, Nicolas E.; Noble, Leslie R.; Santos, António M.; Sims, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Dramatic population declines among species of pelagic shark as a result of overfishing have been reported, with some species now at a fraction of their historical biomass. Advanced telemetry techniques enable tracking of spatial dynamics and behaviour, providing fundamental information on habitat preferences of threatened species to aid conservation. We tracked movements of the highest pelagic fisheries by-catch species, the blue shark Prionace glauca, in the North-east Atlantic using pop-off satellite-linked archival tags to determine the degree of space use linked to habitat and to examine vertical niche. Overall, blue sharks moved south-west of tagging sites (English Channel; southern Portugal), exhibiting pronounced site fidelity correlated with localized productive frontal areas, with estimated space-use patterns being significantly different from that of random walks. Tracked female sharks displayed behavioural variability in diel depth preferences, both within and between individuals. Diel depth use ranged from normal DVM (nDVM; dawn descent, dusk ascent), to reverse DVM (rDVM; dawn ascent, dusk descent), to behavioural patterns where no diel differences were apparent. Results showed that blue sharks occupy some of the most productive marine zones for extended periods and structure diel activity patterns across multiple spatio-temporal scales in response to particular habitat types. In so doing, sharks occupied an extraordinarily broad vertical depth range for their size (1.0–2.0 m fork length), from the surface into the bathypelagic realm (max. dive depth, 1160 m). The space-use patterns of blue sharks indicated they spend much of the time in areas where pelagic longlining activities are often highest, and in depth zones where these fisheries particularly target other species, which could account for the rapid declines recently reported for blue sharks in many parts of the world's oceans. Our results provide habitat targets for blue shark conservation

  17. Polarization patterns of the twilight sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Thomas W.; Warrant, Eric J.; Greiner, Birgit

    2005-08-01

    Although natural light sources produce depolarized light, patterns of partially linearly polarized light appear in the sky due to scattering from air molecules, dust, and aerosols. Many animals, including bees and ants, orient themselves to patterns of polarization that are present in daytime skies, when the intensity is high and skylight polarization is strong and predictable. The halicitid bee Megalopta genalis inhabits rainforests in Central America. Unlike typical bees, it forages before sunrise and after sunset, when light intensities under the forest canopy are very low, and must find its way to food sources and return to its nest in visually challenging circumstances. An important cue for the orientation could be patterns of polarization in the twilight sky. Therefore, we used a calibrated digital camera to image skylight polarization in an overhead patch of sky, 87.6° across, before dawn on Barro Colorado Island in Panama, where the bees are found. We simultaneously measured the spectral properties of polarized light in a cloudless patch of sky 15° across centered on the zenith. We also performed full-sky imaging of polarization before dawn and after dusk on Lizard Island in Australia, another tropical island. During twilight, celestial polarized light occurs in a wide band stretching perpendicular to the location of the hidden sun and reaching typical degrees of polarization near 80% at wavelengths >600 nm. This pattern appears about 45 minutes before local sunrise or disappears 45 minutes after local sunset (about 20 minutes after the onset of astronomical twilight at dawn, or before its end at dusk) and extends with little change through the entire twilight period. Such a strong and reliable orientation cue could be used for flight orientation by any animal with polarization sensitivity that navigates during twilight.

  18. Dynamical consequences of two modes of centrifugal instability in Jupiter's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, M. G.; Southwood, D. J.

    2005-12-01

    Important global-scale properties of the middle and outer portions of the Jovian magnetosphere can be interpreted in terms of plasma experiencing either marginal or explosive centrifugal instability as a response to rotational stresses. The process accounts for characteristics of the plasmasheet, particularly a strong dawn-dusk asymmetry, inferred from magnetic field data. Confining forces externally imposed at the magnetopause are critical to this analysis. Because of the vast length of magnetospheric flux tubes, most plasma-disk ions do not bounce between mirror points as a flux tube rotates through local time sectors. Rotational stresses can lead to irreversible heating and increase plasma anisotropy, creating the conditions for firehose instability. The outer edge of the plasma disk appears marginally stable prenoon, but there is weak loss of plasma from its outer edge. The plasma disk thickens further postnoon as it assimilates the empty flux tubes of the outer magnetosphere where small perpendicular scale instability enables Bohm diffusion of plasma to refill depleted flux tubes. On the nightside, the plasmasheet becomes strongly unstable, material flows out down tail, the plasma disk thins, and its outer portions can break off leaving depleted closed flux tubes behind. This outflow must dominate solar wind-controlled reconnection in the magnetotail. The depleted flux tubes at large radial distance on the morningside form a distinct low-density plasma/magnetic regime that overlays a thin plasma disk. The dawn-dusk asymmetry in the UV aurora is likely associated with the larger tapping of the ionospheric flywheel in the afternoon sector to drive the heating and instability that the model proposes.

  19. Local time distribution of the SSC-associated HF-Doppler frequency shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Sugiuchi, H.; Ishimine, T.

    1985-01-01

    The HF-Doppler frequency shift observed at the storm's sudden commencement is composed of a frequency increase (+) and decrease (-), and classified into four types, SCF(+ -), SCF(- +), SCF(+) and SCF(-). Since the latter two types are special cases of the former two types, two different kinds of electrical field exist in the F region and cause the ExB drift motion of plasma. HUANG (1976) interpreted the frequency increase of SCF(+ -) as due to the westward induction electric field proportional to delta H/ delta t and the succeeding frequency decrease due to the eastward conduction electric field which produces ionospheric currents responsible for the magnetic increase on the ground. In spite of his success in interpreting the SCF(+ -), some other interpretations are needed for the explanation of the whole set of SCF's, particularly SCF(- +). Local time distributions of the SCF's are derived from 41 SCF's which are observed on the HF standard signal (JJY) as received in Okinawa (path length =1600 km) and Kokubunji (60 km). It is shown that the SCF(+ -) appears mainly during the day, whereas the SCF(- +) is observed during the night. The results indicate that the preliminary frequency shift (+) of SCF(+ -) and (-) of SCF(- +) is caused by a westward electric field in the dayside hemisphere, while by an eastward electric field in the nightside hemisphere. The main frequency shift (-) of SCF(+ -) and (+) of SCF(- +) is caused by the reversed electric field. Consequently, the preliminary frequency shift is caused by the dusk-to-dawn electric field, while the main frequency shift by the dawn-to-dusk electric field.

  20. Constitutive expression of the GIGANTEA ortholog affects circadian rhythms and suppresses one-shot induction of flowering in Pharbitis nil, a typical short-day plant.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yohei; Sage-Ono, Kimiyo; Sasaki, Ryuta; Ohtsuki, Namie; Hoshino, Atsushi; Iida, Shigeru; Kamada, Hiroshi; Ono, Michiyuki

    2011-04-01

    GIGANTEA (GI) is a key regulator of flowering time, which is closely related to the circadian clock function in Arabidopsis. Mutations in the GI gene cause photoperiod-insensitive flowering and altered circadian rhythms. We isolated the GI ortholog PnGI from Pharbitis (Ipomoea) nil, an absolute short-day (SD) plant. PnGI mRNA expression showed diurnal rhythms that peaked at dusk under SD and long-day (LD) conditions, and also showed robust circadian rhythms under continuous dark (DD) and continuous light (LL) conditions. Short irradiation with red light during the flower-inductive dark period did not change PnGI expression levels, suggesting that such a night break does not abolish flowering by affecting the expression of PnGI. In Pharbitis, although a single dusk signal is sufficient to induce expression of the ortholog of FLOWERING LOCUS T (PnFT1), PnGI mRNA expression was not reset by single lights-off signals. Constitutive expression of PnGI (PnGI-OX) in transgenic plants altered period length in leaf-movement rhythms under LL and affected circadian rhythms of PnFT mRNA expression under DD. PnGI-OX plants formed fewer flower buds than the wild type when one-shot darkness was given. In PnGI-OX plants, expression of PnFT1 was down-regulated, suggesting that PnGI functions as a suppressor of flowering, possibly in part through down-regulation of PnFT1.