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Sample records for dust models consistent

  1. Interstellar Dust Models Consistent with Extinction, Emission, and Abundance Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubko, Viktor; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.

    2004-01-01

    We present new interstellar dust models which have been derived by simultaneously fitting the far ultraviolet to near infrared extinction, the diffuse infrared emission, and, unlike previous models, the elemental abundances in dust for the diffuse interstellar medium. We found that dust models consisting of a mixture of spherical graphite and silicate grains, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, in addition to porous composite particles containing silicate, organic refractory, and water ice, provide an improved .t to the UV-to-infrared extinction and infrared emission measurements, while consuming the amounts of elements well within the uncertainties of adopted interstellar abundances, including B star abundances. These models are a signi.cant improvement over the recent Li & Draine (2001, ApJ, 554, 778) model which requires an excessive amount of silicon to be locked up in dust: 48 ppm (atoms per million of H atoms), considerably more than the solar abundance of 34 ppm or the B star abundance of 19 ppm.

  2. Consistent dust and gas models for protoplanetary disks. I. Disk shape, dust settling, opacities, and PAHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woitke, P.; Min, M.; Pinte, C.; Thi, W.-F.; Kamp, I.; Rab, C.; Anthonioz, F.; Antonellini, S.; Baldovin-Saavedra, C.; Carmona, A.; Dominik, C.; Dionatos, O.; Greaves, J.; Güdel, M.; Ilee, J. D.; Liebhart, A.; Ménard, F.; Rigon, L.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a set of standard assumptions for the modelling of Class II and III protoplanetary disks, which includes detailed continuum radiative transfer, thermo-chemical modelling of gas and ice, and line radiative transfer from optical to cm wavelengths. The first paper of this series focuses on the assumptions about the shape of the disk, the dust opacities, dust settling, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In particular, we propose new standard dust opacities for disk models, we present a simplified treatment of PAHs in radiative equilibrium which is sufficient to reproduce the PAH emission features, and we suggest using a simple yet physically justified treatment of dust settling. We roughly adjust parameters to obtain a model that predicts continuum and line observations that resemble typical multi-wavelength continuum and line observations of Class II T Tauri stars. We systematically study the impact of each model parameter (disk mass, disk extension and shape, dust settling, dust size and opacity, gas/dust ratio, etc.) on all mainstream continuum and line observables, in particular on the SED, mm-slope, continuum visibilities, and emission lines including [OI] 63 μm, high-J CO lines, (sub-)mm CO isotopologue lines, and CO fundamental ro-vibrational lines. We find that evolved dust properties, i.e. large grains, often needed to fit the SED, have important consequences for disk chemistry and heating/cooling balance, leading to stronger near- to far-IR emission lines in general. Strong dust settling and missing disk flaring have similar effects on continuum observations, but opposite effects on far-IR gas emission lines. PAH molecules can efficiently shield the gas from stellar UV radiation because of their strong absorption and negligible scattering opacities in comparison to evolved dust. The observable millimetre-slope of the SED can become significantly more gentle in the case of cold disk midplanes, which we find regularly in our T Tauri models

  3. Model Of Comet Dust Consistent With Ground Based Observations And Studies Of Stardust Returned Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Kimura, H.

    2007-10-01

    Recently a significant progress has been achieved in theoretical interpretation of the remote-sensing studies of comet dust. The most successful model was the one that presented comet dust as large aggregates of submicron particles. This model could qualitatively explain spectral and angular change in comet dust brightness, polarization, and thermal emission and was also consistent with the composition of the comet dust obtained in-situ for comet Halley. The tracks in Stardust aerogel confirmed presence of large aggregates in the dust of comet Wild-2 and, thus, supported the theoretical model. However, among the Stardust samples, compact particles of silicate composition were also found. In this paper we present a model of comet dust that is consistent with the Stardust findings, i.e. presents a mixture of aggregates and compact particles. A power-law size distribution was selected with the power equal to -3 that is between the power obtained by Stardust DFMI measurements and the power obtained from the study of the tracks in the aerogel (Hoertz et al., Science, 314, 1716, 2006). Aggregates in our model were simulated as Ballistic Cluster-Cluster Aggregates and compact particles were simulated as a polydisperse mixture of silicate spheroids with some distribution of the aspect ratio. The computations were based on the T-matrix codes by Mishchenko et al. This model could provide much better fit to the photometric and polarimetric observational data than the model which considered only aggregates. The model reproduces the correct shape of the polarization curve, including negative polarization reaching the value -2% and positive polarization with the maximum value less than 35%, red polarimetric color, red color of comet dust, albedo of the dust equal to 4%, and the ratio of silicates to carbonaceous materials in the dust equal to 0.5 that is in accordance with the elemental abundances of Halley's dust.

  4. New Interstellar Dust Models Consistent with Interstellar Extinction, Emission and Abundances Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubko, V.; Dwek, E.; Arendt, R. G.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present new interstellar dust models that are consistent with both, the FUV to near-IR extinction and infrared (IR) emission measurements from the diffuse interstellar medium. The models are characterized by different dust compositions and abundances. The problem we solve consists of determining the size distribution of the various dust components of the model. This problem is a typical ill-posed inversion problem which we solve using the regularization approach. We reproduce the Li Draine (2001, ApJ, 554, 778) results, however their model requires an excessive amount of interstellar silicon (48 ppM of hydrogen compared to the 36 ppM available for an ISM of solar composition) to be locked up in dust. We found that dust models consisting of PAHs, amorphous silicate, graphite, and composite grains made up from silicates, organic refractory, and water ice, provide an improved fit to the extinction and IR emission measurements, while still requiring a subsolar amount of silicon to be in the dust. This research was supported by NASA Astrophysical Theory Program NRA 99-OSS-01.

  5. Different dust and gas radial extents in protoplanetary disks: consistent models of grain growth and CO emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, S.; Birnstiel, T.; Bruderer, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2017-09-01

    Context. ALMA observations of protoplanetary disks confirm earlier indications that there is a clear difference between the dust and gas radial extents. The origin of this difference is still debated, with both radial drift of the dust and optical depth effects suggested in the literature. Aims: In thermo-chemical models, the dust properties are usually prescribed by simple parametrisations. In this work, the feedback of more realistic dust particle distributions onto the gas chemistry and molecular emissivity is investigated, with a particular focus on CO isotopologues. Methods: The radial dust grain size distribution is determined using dust evolution models that include growth, fragmentation, and radial drift for a given static gas density structure. The vertical settling of dust particles is computed in steady-state. A new version of the code DALI is used to take into account how dust surface area and density influence the disk thermal structure, molecular abundances, and excitation. Synthetic images of both continuum thermal emission and low J CO isotopologues lines are produced. Results: The difference of dust and gas radial sizes is largely due to differences in the optical depth of CO lines and millimeter continuum, without the need to invoke radial drift. The effect of radial drift is primarily visible in the sharp outer edge of the continuum intensity profile. The gas outer radius probed by 12CO emission can easily differ by a factor of two between the models for a turbulent α ranging between 10-4 and 10-2, with the ratio of the CO and mm radius RoutCO/Routmm increasing with turbulence. Grain growth and settling concur in thermally decoupling the gas and dust components, due to the low collision rate with large grains. As a result, the gas can be much colder than the dust at intermediate heights, reducing the CO excitation and emission, especially for low turbulence values. Also, due to disk mid-plane shadowing, a second CO thermal desorption (rather

  6. The Martian dust cycle: A proposed model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    1987-01-01

    Despite more than a decade of study of martian dust storms, many of their characteristics and associated processes remain enigmatic, including the mechanisms for dust raising, modes of settling, and the nature of dust deposits. However, observations of Mars dust, considerations of terrestrial analogs, theoretical models, and laboratory simulations permit the formulation of a Martian Dust Cycle Model, which consists of three main processes: (1) suspension threshold, (2) transportation, and (3) deposition; two associated processes are also included: (4) dust removal and (5) the addition of new dust to the cycle. Although definitions vary, dust includes particles less than 4 to approx. 60 microns in diameter, which by terrestrial usage includes silt, loess, clay, and aerosolic dust particles. The dust cycle model is explained.

  7. Consistent model driven architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  8. Modeling Europa's Dust Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, B.; Kempf, S.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of Europa maintaining a probably sporadic water vapor plume constitutes a huge scientific opportunity for NASA's upcoming mission to this Galilean moon. Measuring the properties of material emerging from interior sources offers a unique chance to understand conditions at Europa's subsurface ocean. Exploiting results obtained for the Enceladus plume, we adjust the ejection model by Schmidt et al. [2008] to the conditions at Europa. In this way, we estimate properties of a possible, yet unobserved dust component of the Europa plume. For a size-dependent speed distribution of emerging ice particles we use the model from Kempf et al. [2010] for grain dynamics, modified to run simulations of plumes on Europa. Specifically, we model emission from the two plume locations determined from observations by Roth et al. [2014] and also from other locations chosen at the closest approach of low-altitude flybys investigated in the Europa Clipper study. This allows us to estimate expected fluxes of ice grains on the spacecraft. We then explore the parameter space of Europa dust plumes with regard to particle speed distribution parameters, plume location, and spacecraft flyby elevation. Each parameter set results in a 3-dimensional particle density structure through which we simulate flybys, and a map of particle fallback ('snowfall') on the surface of Europa. Due to the moon's high escape speed, a Europa plume will eject few to no particles that can escape its gravity, which has several further consequences: (i) For given ejection velocity a Europa plume will have a smaller scale height, with a higher particle number densities than the plume on Enceladus, (ii) plume particles will not feed the diffuse Galilean dust ring, (iii) the snowfall pattern on the surface will be more localized about the plume location, and will not induce a global m = 2 pattern as seen on Enceladus, and (iv) safely observing an active plume will require low altitude flybys, preferably at 50

  9. Wind modeling of Chihuahuan Desert dust outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Rivera, Nancy I.; Gill, Thomas E.; Gebhart, Kristi A.; Hand, Jennifer L.; Bleiweiss, Max P.; Fitzgerald, Rosa M.

    The Chihuahuan Desert region of North America is a significant source of mineral aerosols in the Western Hemisphere, and Chihuahuan Desert dust storms frequently impact the Paso del Norte (El Paso, USA/Ciudad Juarez, Mexico) metropolitan area. A statistical analysis of HYSPLIT back trajectory residence times evaluated airflow into El Paso on all days and on days with synoptic (non-convective) dust events in 2001-2005. The incremental probability—a measure of the areas most likely to have been traversed by air masses arriving at El Paso during dusty days—was only strongly positively associated with the region west-southwest of the city, a zone of known dust source areas. Focused case studies were made of major dust events on 15 April and 15 December 2003. Trajectories approached the surface and MM5 (NCAR/Penn State Mesoscale Model) wind speeds increased at locations consistent with dust sources observed in satellite imagery on those dates. Back trajectory and model analyses suggested that surface cyclones adjacent to the Chihuahuan Desert were associated with the extreme dust events, consistent with previous studies of dust storms in the Southern High Plains to the northeast. The recognition of these meteorological patterns serves as a forecast aid for prediction of dust events likely to impact the Paso del Norte.

  10. Model of Image Artifacts from Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Reg

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of image artifacts produced by dust particles on lenses has been derived. Machine-vision systems often have to work with camera lenses that become dusty during use. Dust particles on the front surface of a lens produce image artifacts that can potentially affect the performance of a machine-vision algorithm. The present model satisfies a need for a means of synthesizing dust image artifacts for testing machine-vision algorithms for robustness (or the lack thereof) in the presence of dust on lenses. A dust particle can absorb light or scatter light out of some pixels, thereby giving rise to a dark dust artifact. It can also scatter light into other pixels, thereby giving rise to a bright dust artifact. For the sake of simplicity, this model deals only with dark dust artifacts. The model effectively represents dark dust artifacts as an attenuation image consisting of an array of diffuse darkened spots centered at image locations corresponding to the locations of dust particles. The dust artifacts are computationally incorporated into a given test image by simply multiplying the brightness value of each pixel by a transmission factor that incorporates the factor of attenuation, by dust particles, of the light incident on that pixel. With respect to computation of the attenuation and transmission factors, the model is based on a first-order geometric (ray)-optics treatment of the shadows cast by dust particles on the image detector. In this model, the light collected by a pixel is deemed to be confined to a pair of cones defined by the location of the pixel s image in object space, the entrance pupil of the lens, and the location of the pixel in the image plane (see Figure 1). For simplicity, it is assumed that the size of a dust particle is somewhat less than the diameter, at the front surface of the lens, of any collection cone containing all or part of that dust particle. Under this assumption, the shape of any individual dust particle artifact

  11. Self-Consistent Simulation of the Brownian Stage of Dust Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempf, S.; Pfalzner, S.; Henning, Th.

    1996-01-01

    It is a widely accepted view that in proto-planetary accretion disks the collision and following sticking of dust particles embedded in the gas eventually leads to the formation of planetesimals (coagulation). For the smallest dust grains, Brownian motion is assumed to be the dominant source of their relative velocities leading to collisions between these dust grains. As the dust grains grow they eventually couple to the turbulent motion of the gas which then drives the coagulation much more efficiently. Many numerical coagulation simulations have been carried out to calculate the fractal dimension of the aggregates, which determines the duration of the ineffective Brownian stage of growth. Predominantly on-lattice and off-lattice methods were used. However, both methods require simplification of the astrophysical conditions. The aggregates found by those methods had a fractal dimension of approximately 2 which is equivalent to a constant, mass-independent friction time. If this value were valid for the conditions in an accretion disk, this would mean that the coagulation process would finally 'freeze out' and the growth of a planetesimal would be impossible within the lifetime of an accretion disk. In order to investigate whether this fractal dimension is model independent, we simulate self-consistently the Brownian stage of the coagulation by an N-particle code. This method has the advantage that no further assumptions about homogeneity of the dust have to be made. In our model, the dust grains are considered as aggregates built up of spheres. The equation of motion of the dust grains is based on the probability density for the diffusive transport within the gas atmosphere. Because of the very low number density of the dust grains, only 2-body-collisions have to be considered. As the Brownian stage of growth is very inefficient, the system is to be simulated over long periods of time. In order to find close particle pairs of the system which are most likely to

  12. Consistency of dimensional distributions and refractive indices of desert dust measured over Lampedusa with IASI radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzi, Giuliano; Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine; Meloni, Daniela; Di Biagio, Claudia; Formenti, Paola

    2017-02-01

    In the context of the ChArMEx campaign, we present here some results concerning the quantitative comparison between simulated and observed radiances in the presence of atmospheric desert dust, between June and July 2013 in the southern Mediterranean Basin, in the air mass above the island of Lampedusa. In particular, comparisons have been performed between radiances as observed by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) and those simulated using the σ-IASI-as radiative transfer model, which takes into account aerosol extinction effect through a set of fast parameterizations. Simulations have been carried out using different sets of input complex refractive indices, which take into account the parent soils of the aerosols. Their accuracy also relies on the quality of the characterization of desert dust microphysical properties, achieved through direct measurements in the ChArMEx experiment. On the one hand, the fact that the model can ingest such a variable input proves its feasibility. On the other hand, this work goes through a direct validation of different refractive index sets for desert dust in the thermal infrared, and pursues an assessment of the sensitivity of IASI data with respect to the dimensional distribution of desert dust particles. Results show a good consistency between calculations and observations, especially in the spectral interval 800-1000 cm-1; further, the comparison between calculations and observations suggests that further efforts are needed to better characterize desert dust optical properties in the shortwave (above 2000 cm-1). Whatever the case, we show that it is necessary to properly tune the refractive indices according to the geographical origin of the observed aerosol.

  13. Modeling Europa's dust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, B. S.; Kempf, S.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of Jupiter's moon Europa maintaining a probably sporadic water vapor plume constitutes a huge scientific opportunity for NASA's upcoming mission to this Galilean moon. Measuring properties of material emerging from interior sources offers a unique chance to understand conditions at Europa's subsurface ocean. Exploiting results obtained for the Enceladus plume, we simulate possible Europa plume configurations, analyze particle number density and surface deposition results, and estimate the expected flux of ice grains on a spacecraft. Due to Europa's high escape speed, observing an active plume will require low-altitude flybys, preferably at altitudes of 5-100 km. At higher altitudes a plume may escape detection. Our simulations provide an extensive library documenting the possible structure of Europa dust plumes, which can be quickly refined as more data on Europa dust plumes are collected.

  14. The Martian Dust Cycle: Observations and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahre, Melinda A.

    2013-01-01

    The dust cycle is critically important for Mars' current climate system. Suspended atmospheric dust affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere, and thus greatly influences the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere. Evidence for the presence of dust in the Martian atmosphere can be traced back to yellow clouds telescopically observed as early as the early 19th century. The Mariner 9 orbiter arrived at Mars in November of 1971 to find a planet completely enshrouded in airborne dust. Since that time, the exchange of dust between the planet's surface and atmosphere and the role of airborne dust on Mars' weather and climate has been studied using observations and numerical models. The goal of this talk is to give an overview of the observations and to discuss the successes and challenges associated with modeling the dust cycle. Dust raising events on Mars range in size from meters to hundreds of kilometers. During some years, regional storms merge to produce hemispheric or planet encircling dust clouds that obscure the surface and raise atmospheric temperatures by tens of kelvin. The interannual variability of planet encircling dust storms is poorly understood. Although the occurrence and season of large regional and global dust storms are highly variable from one year to the next, there are many features of the dust cycle that occur year after year. A low-level dust haze is maintained during northern spring and summer, while elevated levels of atmospheric dust occur during northern autumn and winter. During years without global-scale dust storms, two peaks in total dust loading are generally observed: one peak occurs before northern winter solstice and one peak occurs after northern winter solstice. Numerical modeling studies attempting to interactively simulate the Martian dust cycle with general circulation models (GCMs) include the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Two dust lifting processes are commonly represented in

  15. Modeling the dust size distribution in comets with dust fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konno, Ichishiro; Huebner, Walter F.

    1990-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model was developed of a spherically symmetric dusty gas flow in a cometary atmosphere assuming a single fluid, inviscid, perfect gas. The hydrodynamics for gas and dust, which involves the gas drag force (momentum transfer), heat exchange between gas and dust, photodissociation energy for H2O gas, and radiative heating and cooling terms for dust particles, are solved using the Gear method for stiff, coupled differential equations. Calculations were done with a dust size distribution for radii alpha = 0.01 micron to 10 cm with densities variable with the size. A nucleus size of 4.0 km radius with a density of 0.5 g/cu cm and a total dust-to-gas mass ratio chi = 1 was adopted. There are indications from in situ observations that dust particle fragment into smaller ones. Fragmentation of dust particles was incorporated into the model. This is done by adding source and sink terms in the continuity equations for the dust. Lifetimes for the decay of dust particles were assumed as a function of particle size. It is also assumed that dust particles always fragment only into the next smaller size.

  16. Dust in fusion plasmas: theory and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, R. D.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Mendis, D. A.; Rosenberg, M.; Rudakov, D.; Tanaka, Y.; Rognlien, T. D.; Soboleva, T. K.; Shukla, P. K.; Bray, B. D.; West, W. P.; Roquemore, A. L.; Skinner, C. H.

    2008-09-07

    Dust may have a large impact on ITER-scale plasma experiments including both safety and performance issues. However, the physics of dust in fusion plasmas is very complex and multifaceted. Here, we discuss different aspects of dust dynamics including dust-plasma, and dust-surface interactions. We consider the models of dust charging, heating, evaporation/sublimation, dust collision with material walls, etc., which are suitable for the conditions of fusion plasmas. The physical models of all these processes have been incorporated into the DUST Transport (DUSTT) code. Numerical simulations demonstrate that dust particles are very mobile and accelerate to large velocities due to the ion drag force (cruise speed >100 m/s). Deep penetration of dust particles toward the plasma core is predicted. It is shown that DUSTT is capable of reproducing many features of recent dust-related experiments, but much more work is still needed.

  17. Self-consistent triaxial models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jason L.; Evans, N. Wyn

    2015-11-01

    We present self-consistent triaxial stellar systems that have analytic distribution functions (DFs) expressed in terms of the actions. These provide triaxial density profiles with cores or cusps at the centre. They are the first self-consistent triaxial models with analytic DFs suitable for modelling giant ellipticals and dark haloes. Specifically, we study triaxial models that reproduce the Hernquist profile from Williams & Evans, as well as flattened isochrones of the form proposed by Binney. We explore the kinematics and orbital structure of these models in some detail. The models typically become more radially anisotropic on moving outwards, have velocity ellipsoids aligned in Cartesian coordinates in the centre and aligned in spherical polar coordinates in the outer parts. In projection, the ellipticity of the isophotes and the position angle of the major axis of our models generally changes with radius. So, a natural application is to elliptical galaxies that exhibit isophote twisting. As triaxial Stäckel models do not show isophote twists, our DFs are the first to generate mass density distributions that do exhibit this phenomenon, typically with a gradient of ≈10°/effective radius, which is comparable to the data. Triaxiality is a natural consequence of models that are susceptible to the radial orbit instability. We show how a family of spherical models with anisotropy profiles that transition from isotropic at the centre to radially anisotropic becomes unstable when the outer anisotropy is made sufficiently radial. Models with a larger outer anisotropy can be constructed but are found to be triaxial. We argue that the onset of the radial orbit instability can be identified with the transition point when adiabatic relaxation yields strongly triaxial rather than weakly spherical endpoints.

  18. Identifying errors in dust models from data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, R. J.; Marsham, J. H.; Knippertz, P.; Brooks, M. E.; Roberts, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    Airborne mineral dust is an important component of the Earth system and is increasingly predicted prognostically in weather and climate models. The recent development of data assimilation for remotely sensed aerosol optical depths (AODs) into models offers a new opportunity to better understand the characteristics and sources of model error. Here we examine assimilation increments from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer AODs over northern Africa in the Met Office global forecast model. The model underpredicts (overpredicts) dust in light (strong) winds, consistent with (submesoscale) mesoscale processes lifting dust in reality but being missed by the model. Dust is overpredicted in the Sahara and underpredicted in the Sahel. Using observations of lighting and rain, we show that haboobs (cold pool outflows from moist convection) are an important dust source in reality but are badly handled by the model's convection scheme. The approach shows promise to serve as a useful framework for future model development.

  19. Identifying errors in dust models from data assimilation.

    PubMed

    Pope, R J; Marsham, J H; Knippertz, P; Brooks, M E; Roberts, A J

    2016-09-16

    Airborne mineral dust is an important component of the Earth system and is increasingly predicted prognostically in weather and climate models. The recent development of data assimilation for remotely sensed aerosol optical depths (AODs) into models offers a new opportunity to better understand the characteristics and sources of model error. Here we examine assimilation increments from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer AODs over northern Africa in the Met Office global forecast model. The model underpredicts (overpredicts) dust in light (strong) winds, consistent with (submesoscale) mesoscale processes lifting dust in reality but being missed by the model. Dust is overpredicted in the Sahara and underpredicted in the Sahel. Using observations of lighting and rain, we show that haboobs (cold pool outflows from moist convection) are an important dust source in reality but are badly handled by the model's convection scheme. The approach shows promise to serve as a useful framework for future model development.

  20. Simulations of Mineral Dust Content With CHIMERE-Dust Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmechtig, C.; Marticorena, B.; Menut, L.; Bergametti, G.

    2006-12-01

    Simulations of the mineral dust cycle have been performed whith CHIMERE-Dust model over a domain that includes North Africa, the Mediterranean basin and the North Tropical Atlantic Ocean (10S-60N and 90W-90E) with a 1°x1° resolution using the ECMWF (European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) meteorological fields for two years, 2000 and 2001. As a validation, we compare the simulated dust concentration fields with photometric data from the AERONET network. From the comparisons between the simulated and measured aerosol optical depth for several stations of the Mediterranean basin, the model appears to reproduce correctly the intensity and occurrences of the dust events. Over Western Africa, the results are not as satisfying since some of the most intense dust events observed on the continent and downwind are not captured by the model. In addition, the simulated events are generally underestimated compared to the measured ones. It appears that these differences in the model performances are connected to the origin of the dust plumes. For example, dust plumes coming from Libya are well simulated while dust plumes originating from the Bodélé depression not as frequent as intense as the observations suggest. Soil properties in these two regions are comparable and typical of very erodible surfaces. We thus focused on the comparison between the ECMWF 10m wind speed fields and 10m wind speed measured at the meteorological stations located in both areas. We noticed that over Libya, the measured and ECMWF 10m wind speed are in very good agreement, while the meteorological model does not reproduce the extrema of the measured wind speed in the Bodélé depression. We found that a crude empirical correction of the 10m wind field in the Bodélé Depression significantly improve the simulations in terms of occurrence and of intensity.

  1. Revisiting the CALIOP Mineral Dust Optical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winker, D. M.; Omar, A. H.; Liu, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The standard aerosol extinction retrieval applied to CALIOP observations relies heavily on a priori values of the lidar ratio (the ratio of extinction to 180-degree backscatter) for each of several aerosol types. The original CALIOP aerosol models were developed over 10 years ago, based on a combination of Aeronet retrievals, measurements from ground-based lidars, and theoretical scattering calculations. Both prior to and since the launch of CALIPSO, a number of studies using a variety of approaches have shown lidar ratios of around 40 sr for mineral dust. Ground-based Raman lidar measurements in Europe and Morroco, on the other hand, have consistently shown higher values of 50 to 60 sr. Reasons for this inconsistency have not been clearly identified, but may be due to geographical variability, mixtures of dust with fine-mode aerosol, multiple scattering effects on the CALIOP retrieval, other retrieval artifacts, or a combination of these. The simplest explanation for the difference between ground-based Raman and space-based retrievals of dust lidar ratio would be multiple scattering effects on the CALIOP signals. We have taken advantage of improvements in scattering codes and of recent field campaigns to re-evaluate the CALIOP optical model for mineral dust and to revisit multiple scattering effects. The original scattering phase functions used to predict multiple scattering were based on Dipole-Dipole Approximation (DDA) calculations of size-shape mixtures of irregular dust particles. At the time, the DDA calculations were limited to particles of less than 2 um diameter. Using current T-matrix codes, we are now able to compute scattering from particles as large as 10 um diameter. Applying T-matrix scattering calculations to spheroidal particles with size distributions consistent with those measured during the SAMUM campaign in Morroco, we find multiple scattering effects are similar to those predicted from the original DDA calculations. Thus multiple scattering

  2. Dust Observations for Models: Project Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, Richard; Wiggs, Giles; King, James; Thomas, David; Haustein, Karsten; Eckardt, Frank; Vickery, Kate; Bryant, Rob; Nield, Jo; Murray, John; Brindley, Helen

    2013-04-01

    Climate and weather prediction hinge on numerical models. Most of the climate models included in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) and which will underpin the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change 5th Assessment Report (IPCC AR5) include a dust module because dust is known to play an important role in the Earth system. However dust emission schemes in climate models are relatively simple and are tuned to represent observed background aerosol concentrations most of which are many thousands of kilometres from source regions. The physics of dust emission in the models was developed from idealised experiments such as those conducted in wind tunnels decades ago. Improvement of current model dust emission schemes has been difficult to achieve because of the paucity of observations from key dust sources. Dust Observations for Models (DO4Models) is a project designed to gather data from source regions at a scale appropriate to climate model grid box resolution. The UK NERC funded project, led by the University of Oxford, aims to: 1) Generate a data set at an appropriate scale for climate models which characterises surface erodibility and erosivity in dust source areas from remote sensing and fieldwork 2) Quantify how observed erodibility and erosivity influence observed emissions at the climate model scale 3) Test, develop and optimise the dust emission scheme for the Met Office regional model (HadGEM3-RA) using this unique dust source area data set 4) Quantify which component(s) of observed erodibility and erosivity, and at what spatial scale, make the largest improvement to physically-based, observationally optimised dust emission simulations in climate models. This paper provides a project overview and some early observational and modelling results from the 2011 field season.

  3. Modeled estimates of soil and dust ingestion rates for children.

    PubMed

    Ozkaynak, Halûk; Xue, Jianping; Zartarian, Valerie G; Glen, Graham; Smith, Luther

    2011-04-01

    Daily soil/dust ingestion rates typically used in exposure and risk assessments are based on tracer element studies, which have a number of limitations and do not separate contributions from soil and dust. This article presents an alternate approach of modeling soil and dust ingestion via hand and object mouthing of children, using EPA's SHEDS model. Results for children 3 to <6 years old show that mean and 95th percentile total ingestion of soil and dust values are 68 and 224 mg/day, respectively; mean from soil ingestion, hand-to-mouth dust ingestion, and object-to-mouth dust ingestion are 41 mg/day, 20 mg/day, and 7 mg/day, respectively. In general, hand-to-mouth soil ingestion was the most important pathway, followed by hand-to-mouth dust ingestion, then object-to-mouth dust ingestion. The variability results are most sensitive to inputs on surface loadings, soil-skin adherence, hand mouthing frequency, and hand washing frequency. The predicted total soil and dust ingestion fits a lognormal distribution with geometric mean = 35.7 and geometric standard deviation = 3.3. There are two uncertainty distributions, one below the 20th percentile and the other above. Modeled uncertainties ranged within a factor of 3-30. Mean modeled estimates for soil and dust ingestion are consistent with past information but lower than the central values recommended in the 2008 EPA Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook. This new modeling approach, which predicts soil and dust ingestion by pathway, source type, population group, geographic location, and other factors, offers a better characterization of exposures relevant to health risk assessments as compared to using a single value. © 2010 Society for Risk Analysis.

  4. Should precipitation influence dust emission in global dust models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okin, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture modulates the threshold shear stress required to initiate aeolian transport and dust emission. Most of the theoretical and laboratory work that has confirmed the impact of soil moisture has appropriately acknowledged that it is the soil moisture of a surface layer a few grain diameters thick that truly controls threshold shear velocity. Global and regional models of dust emission include the effect of soil moisture on transport threshold, but most ignore the fact that only the moisture of the very topmost "active layer" matters. The soil moisture in the active layer can differ greatly from that integrated through the top 2, 5, 10, or 100 cm (surface layers used by various global models) because the top 2 mm of heavy texture soils dries within ~1/2 day while sandy soils dry within less than 2 hours. Thus, in drylands where dust emission occurs, it is likely that this top layer is drier than the underlying soil in the days and weeks after rain. This paper explores, globally, the time between rain events in relation to the time for the active layer to dry and the timing of high wind events. This analysis is carried out using the same coarse reanalyses used in global dust models and is intended to inform the soil moisture controls in these models. The results of this analysis indicate that the timing between events is, in almost all dust-producing areas, significantly longer than the drying time of the active layer, even when considering soil texture differences. Further, the analysis shows that the probability of a high wind event during the period after a rain where the surface is wet is small. Therefore, in coarse global models, there is little reason to include rain-derived soil moisture in the modeling scheme.

  5. Model for charged dust expansion across a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, H.; Scales, W. A.

    2013-07-15

    Plasma fluctuations arise in the boundary region between charged dust clouds and background plasmas. A self-consistent computational model is developed to study expansion of a charged dust cloud across a magnetic field, creation of the inhomogeneous boundary layer and associated processes. The charging of the dust particulates produces a boundary layer and associated ambipolar electric field. This ambipolar field provides a source for low frequency dust acoustic waves in unmagnetized plasmas. A background magnetic field if sufficiently strong, may impact the dust acoustic wave evolution and dust density structures due to E×B and diamagnetic current generation. The dust acoustic density fluctuation generation across a strong magnetic field (ω{sub pe}/Ω{sub ce}≪1) may be suppressed as compared to an unmagnetized dusty plasma, which will be discussed. Fluctuations generated at longer timescales propagating along the dust boundary layer will also be investigated in the lower hybrid and dust lower hybrid frequency range. Applications to space and laboratory plasmas are discussed.

  6. Desert Dust Properties, Modelling, and Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaskaoutis, Dimitris G.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Gupta, Pawan; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Bartzokas, Aristides

    2013-01-01

    This paper is just the three-page introduction to a Special Issue of Advances in Meteorology focusing on desert dust. It provides a paragraph each on 13 accepted papers, most relating to the used of satellite data to assess attributes or distribution of airborne desert dust. As guest Associate Editors of this issue, we organized the papers into a systematic whole, beginning with large-scale transport and seasonal behavior, then to regional dust transport, transport history, and climate impacts, first in the Mediterranean region, then India and central Asia, and finally focusing on transport model assessment and the use of lidar as a technique to constrain dust spatial-temporal distribution.

  7. Desert Dust Properties, Modelling, and Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaskaoutis, Dimitris G.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Gupta, Pawan; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Bartzokas, Aristides

    2013-01-01

    This paper is just the three-page introduction to a Special Issue of Advances in Meteorology focusing on desert dust. It provides a paragraph each on 13 accepted papers, most relating to the used of satellite data to assess attributes or distribution of airborne desert dust. As guest Associate Editors of this issue, we organized the papers into a systematic whole, beginning with large-scale transport and seasonal behavior, then to regional dust transport, transport history, and climate impacts, first in the Mediterranean region, then India and central Asia, and finally focusing on transport model assessment and the use of lidar as a technique to constrain dust spatial-temporal distribution.

  8. Models of dust around Europa and Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miljković, K.; Hillier, J. K.; Mason, N. J.; Zarnecki, J. C.

    2012-09-01

    We use numerical models, supported by our laboratory data, to predict the dust densities of ejecta outflux at any altitude within the Hill spheres of Europa and Ganymede. The ejecta are created by micrometeoroid bombardment and five different dust populations are investigated as sources of dust around the moons. The impacting dust flux (influx) causes the ejection of a certain amount of surface material (outflux). The outflux populates the space around the moons, where a part of the ejecta escapes and the rest falls back to the surface. These models were validated against existing Galileo DDS (Dust Detector System) data collected during Europa and Ganymede flybys. Uncertainties of the input parameters and their effects on the model outcome are also included. The results of this model are important for future missions to Europa and Ganymede, such as JUICE (JUpiter ICy moon Explorer), recently selected as ESA's next large space mission to be launched in 2022.

  9. Comet Gas and Dust Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Allmen, Paul A.; Lee, Seungwon

    2010-01-01

    This software models the gas and dust dynamics of comet coma (the head region of a comet) in order to support the Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO) project. MIRO will study the evolution of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's coma system. The instrument will measure surface temperature, gas-production rates and relative abundances, and velocity and excitation temperatures of each species along with their spatial temporal variability. This software will use these measurements to improve the understanding of coma dynamics. The modeling tool solves the equation of motion of a dust particle, the energy balance equation of the dust particle, the continuity equation for the dust and gas flow, and the dust and gas mixture energy equation. By solving these equations numerically, the software calculates the temperature and velocity of gas and dust as a function of time for a given initial gas and dust production rate, and a dust characteristic parameter that measures the ability of a dust particle to adjust its velocity to the local gas velocity. The software is written in a modular manner, thereby allowing the addition of more dynamics equations as needed. All of the numerical algorithms are added in-house and no third-party libraries are used.

  10. Modeling Dust in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonca, Alberto; Casu, Silvia; Mulas, Giacomo; Aresu, Giambattista; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare

    2015-09-01

    We model the extinction profiles observed in the Small and Large Magellanic clouds with a synthetic population of dust grains consisting of core-mantle particles and a collection of free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). All different flavors of the extinction curves observed in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) can be described by the present model, which has been previously (successfully) applied to a large sample of diffuse and translucent lines of sight in the Milky Way. We find that in the MCs the extinction produced by classical grains is generally larger than absorption by PAHs. Within this model, the nonlinear far-UV rise is accounted for by PAHs, whose presence in turn is always associated with a gap in the size distribution of classical particles. This hints either at a physical connection between (e.g., a common cause for) PAHs and the absence of middle-sized dust particles or the need for an additional component in the model that can account for the nonlinear far-UV rise without contributing to the UV bump at ∼217 nm such as, e.g., nanodiamonds.

  11. MODELING DUST IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Zonca, Alberto; Casu, Silvia; Mulas, Giacomo; Aresu, Giambattista; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare E-mail: silvia@oa-cagliari.inaf.it E-mail: garesu@oa-cagliari.inaf.it

    2015-09-01

    We model the extinction profiles observed in the Small and Large Magellanic clouds with a synthetic population of dust grains consisting of core-mantle particles and a collection of free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). All different flavors of the extinction curves observed in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) can be described by the present model, which has been previously (successfully) applied to a large sample of diffuse and translucent lines of sight in the Milky Way. We find that in the MCs the extinction produced by classical grains is generally larger than absorption by PAHs. Within this model, the nonlinear far-UV rise is accounted for by PAHs, whose presence in turn is always associated with a gap in the size distribution of classical particles. This hints either at a physical connection between (e.g., a common cause for) PAHs and the absence of middle-sized dust particles or the need for an additional component in the model that can account for the nonlinear far-UV rise without contributing to the UV bump at ∼217 nm such as, e.g., nanodiamonds.

  12. Solar wind plasma profiles during interplanetary field enhancements (IFEs): Consistent with charged-dust pickup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. R.; Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-06-01

    The solar wind contains many magnetic structures, and most of them have identifiable correlated changes in the flowing plasma. However, the very characteristic rise and fall of the magnetic field in an interplanetary field enhancement has no clear solar wind counterpart. It appears to be a pure magnetic ``barrier'' that transfers solar wind momentum to charged dust produced in collisions of interplanetary bodies in the size range of tens to hundreds of meters. This transfer lifts the fine scale dust out of the Sun's gravitational well. We demonstrate the lack of field-plasma correlation with several examples from spacecraft records as well as show an ensemble average velocity profile during IFEs which is consistent with our IFE formation hypothesis.

  13. The impact of surface dust source exhaustion on the martian dust cycle, dust storms and interannual variability, as simulated by the MarsWRF General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Claire E.; Richardson, Mark I.

    2015-09-01

    Observations of albedo on Mars suggest a largely invariant long-term mean surface dust distribution, but also reveal variations on shorter (seasonal to annual) timescales, particularly associated with major dust storms. We study the impact of finite surface dust availability on the dust cycle in the MarsWRF General Circulation Model (GCM), which uses radiatively active dust with parameterized 'dust devil' and wind stress dust lifting to enable the spontaneous production of dust storms, and tracks budgets of dust lifting, deposition, and total surface dust inventory. We seek a self-consistent, long-term 'steady state' dust cycle for present day Mars, consisting of (a) a surface dust distribution that varies from year to year but is constant longer-term and in balance with current dust redistribution processes, and (b) a fixed set of dust lifting parameters that continue to produce major storms for this distribution of surface dust. We relax the GCM's surface dust inventory toward this steady state using an iterative process, in which dust lifting rate parameters are increased as progressively more surface sites are exhausted of dust. Late in the equilibration process, the GCM exhibits quasi-steady state behavior in which few new surface grid points are exhausted during a 60 year period with constant dust lifting parameters. Complex regional-scale dust redistribution occurs on time-scales from less than seasonal to decadal, and the GCM generates regional to global dust storms with many realistic features. These include merging regional storms, cross-equatorial storms, and the timing and location of several storm types, though very early major storms and large amounts of late storm activity are not reproduced. Surface dust availability in key onset and growth source regions appears vital for 'early' major storms, with replenishment of these regions required before another large storm can occur, whereas 'late' major storms appear primarily dependent on atmospheric

  14. Modelling ice nucleation due to dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Petkovic, Slavko; Pejanovic, Goran; Madonna, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Formation of cold clouds is enhanced if ice nuclei (IN) are available. Cold clouds contribute at global scale with 60% in average in precipitation and their presence significantly affects the atmospheric radiation properties. It is expected that better description of the IN process should substantially improve cloud parameterization in climate and numerical weather prediction models. Observations show that mineral dust particles are the dominant residuals found in cloud ice. In this study we employ the regional dust DREAM model based on high horizontal and vertical grid resolution to parameterize IN caused by mineral dust. DREAM has been already deployed in a study related to IN process (Klein et al, 2010), also in model experiments using several IN parameterization schemes in support of the IN field experiment CALIMA over Canaries. The model has been also extended by adding the major dust mineral fractions as tracers in order to facilitate staying a role of dust mineralogy in ice nucleation. This study will present parameterization of IN using the simulated dust concentration, water moisture and temperature. Preliminary results of simulated IN will be shown, as well as IN validation against lidar aerosol profiles and ice cloud water profiles observed by cloud radar in the Potenza EARLINET site. This study is an initial step in improving a cloud physics parameterization using IN as an input variable in an integrated dust-atmospheric modelling system.

  15. Stochastic Models of Molecule Formation on Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven; Wirstroem, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We will present new theoretical models for the formation of molecules on dust. The growth of ice mantles and their layered structure is accounted for and compared directly to observations through simulation of the expected ice absorption spectra

  16. Pebble Bed Reactor Dust Production Model

    SciTech Connect

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Joshua J. Cogliati

    2008-09-01

    The operation of pebble bed reactors, including fuel circulation, can generate graphite dust, which in turn could be a concern for internal components; and to the near field in the remote event of a break in the coolant circuits. The design of the reactor system must, therefore, take the dust into account and the operation must include contingencies for dust removal and for mitigation of potential releases. Such planning requires a proper assessment of the dust inventory. This paper presents a predictive model of dust generation in an operating pebble bed with recirculating fuel. In this preliminary work the production model is based on the use of the assumption of proportionality between the dust production and the normal force and distance traveled. The model developed in this work uses the slip distances and the inter-pebble forces computed by the authors’ PEBBLES. The code, based on the discrete element method, simulates the relevant static and kinetic friction interactions between the pebbles as well as the recirculation of the pebbles through the reactor vessel. The interaction between pebbles and walls of the reactor vat is treated using the same approach. The amount of dust produced is proportional to the wear coefficient for adhesive wear (taken from literature) and to the slip volume, the product of the contact area and the slip distance. The paper will compare the predicted volume with the measured production rates. The simulation tallies the dust production based on the location of creation. Two peak production zones from intra pebble forces are predicted within the bed. The first zone is located near the pebble inlet chute due to the speed of the dropping pebbles. The second peak zone occurs lower in the reactor with increased pebble contact force due to the weight of supported pebbles. This paper presents the first use of a Discrete Element Method simulation of pebble bed dust production.

  17. Computer Model Predicts the Movement of Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new computer model of the atmosphere can now actually pinpoint where global dust events come from, and can project where they're going. The model may help scientists better evaluate the impact of dust on human health, climate, ocean carbon cycles, ecosystems, and atmospheric chemistry. Also, by seeing where dust originates and where it blows people with respiratory problems can get advanced warning of approaching dust clouds. 'The model is physically more realistic than previous ones,' said Mian Chin, a co-author of the study and an Earth and atmospheric scientist at Georgia Tech and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Md. 'It is able to reproduce the short term day-to-day variations and long term inter-annual variations of dust concentrations and distributions that are measured from field experiments and observed from satellites.' The above images show both aerosols measured from space (left) and the movement of aerosols predicted by computer model for the same date (right). For more information, read New Computer Model Tracks and Predicts Paths Of Earth's Dust Images courtesy Paul Giroux, Georgia Tech/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

  18. A study on solar dust ring formation based on fractal dust models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, H.; Ishimoto, H.; Mukai, T.

    1997-10-01

    Using the fractal aggregate model for circumsolar dust grains, the nature of the circumsolar dust clouds is examined. As a fractal dimension of the aggregate decreases, the porosity of the aggregate increases. Consequently, its temperature becomes independent of its size, and approaches that of its constituent particles. This evidence suggests that the fractal aggregates with different sizes and made of the same chemical components sublimate at the same solar distance. This implies that the distance of the sublimation zone depends on the chemical composition alone. We have found that the aggregates consisting of silicate material, as well as carbon material, sublimate in the solar F-corona. On the other hand, a ratio of radiation pressure force to solar gravity on the fractal aggregate scarcely increases with decreasing size due to sublimation, in contrast with a strong dependence of its ratio on its size for a compact sphere. Our computer simulation for dynamical evolution of fractal aggregates suggests that they produce a narrow ring structure in the circumsolar dust cloud, compared with that expected for spherical dust grains. When the aggregates have more fluffy structure with a small fractal dimension, however, it is found that the circumsolar dust clouds would make no remarkable ring structure.

  19. Airborne Dust Models in Valley Fever Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprigg, W. A.; Galgiani, J. N.; Vujadinovic, M.; Pejanovic, G.; Vukovic, A. J.; Prasad, A. K.; Djurdjevic, V.; Nickovic, S.

    2011-12-01

    Dust storms (haboobs) struck Phoenix, Arizona, in 2011 on July 5th and again on July 18th. One potential consequence: an estimated 3,600 new cases of Valley Fever in Maricopa County from the first storm alone. The fungi, Coccidioides immitis, the cause of the respiratory infection, Valley Fever, lives in the dry desert soils of the American southwest and southward through Mexico, Central America and South America. The fungi become part of the dust storm and, a few weeks after inhalation, symptoms of Valley Fever may appear, including pneumonia-like illness, rashes, and severe fatigue. Some fatalities occur. Our airborne dust forecast system predicted the timing and extent of the storm, as it has done with other, often different, dust events. Atmosphere/land surface models can be part of public health services to reduce risk of Valley Fever and exacerbation of other respiratory and cardiovascular illness.

  20. TWO-POP-PY: Two-population dust evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnstiel, T.; Klahr, H.; Ercolano, B.

    2017-08-01

    TWO-POP-PY runs a two-population dust evolution model that follows the upper end of the dust size distribution and the evolution of the dust surface density profile and treats dust surface density, maximum particle size, small and large grain velocity, and fragmentation. It derives profiles that describe the dust-to-gas ratios and the dust surface density profiles well in protoplanetary disks, in addition to the radial flux by solid material rain out.

  1. Isothermal Circumstellar Dust Shell Model for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, G.; Towers, I. N.; Jovanoski, Z.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model of radiative transfer in circumstellar dust shells. By assuming that the shell is both isothermal and its thickness is small compared to its radius, the model is simple enough for students to grasp and yet still provides a quantitative description of the relevant physical features. The isothermal model can be used in a…

  2. Isothermal Circumstellar Dust Shell Model for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, G.; Towers, I. N.; Jovanoski, Z.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model of radiative transfer in circumstellar dust shells. By assuming that the shell is both isothermal and its thickness is small compared to its radius, the model is simple enough for students to grasp and yet still provides a quantitative description of the relevant physical features. The isothermal model can be used in a…

  3. Dust Assimilation in a Martian Global Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Tao; Montabone, Luca; Read, Peter; Lewis, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    With spacecraft, including Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Odyssey and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), in orbit about Mars in sequence since 1997, there are now measurements of atmospheric temperature and dust extending over nearly 7 Martian years with unprecedented spatial coverage. Although those observations have greatly developed our understanding of the evolution, structure and climate of the Red Planet, the intermittent nature of the measurements still limits our ability to study the full details of the circulation, especially relating to dust activity. A numerical model, on the other hand, can provide continuous simulated data with high temporal and spatial resolutions, but typically fails to produce some significant features of dust storms, as well as their interannual variability. In this context, we make use of data assimilation into a Martian Global Climate Model (MGCM). This approach is able to provide a complete, four-dimensional solution consistent with both observations and with physical constraints and balances represented by the numerical model. The MGCM we use combines a spectral dynamical solver, a tracer transport scheme and dust lifting routines developed in the UK and the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD; Paris, France) Mars GCM physics package, developed in collaboration with Oxford, The Open University and Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (Granada, Spain). Previous attempts at data assimilation for Mars have been conducted without explicitly advecting a dust tracer field, mainly because the Mars Global Surveyor/Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS/TES) did not provide information on the dust distribution in the vertical direction. The newly-available Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) data, however, provides relatively detailed information in the vertical direction, and accordingly here we describe a new data assimilation scheme with full assimilation of both temperature and dust measurements. The resulting assimilated reanalysis is

  4. Modeling Respiratory Toxicity of Authentic Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santana, Patricia A.; James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-Wing

    2010-01-01

    The lunar expeditions of the Apollo operations from the 60 s and early 70 s have generated awareness about lunar dust exposures and their implication towards future lunar explorations. Critical analyses on the reports from the Apollo crew members suggest that lunar dust is a mild respiratory and ocular irritant. Currently, NASA s space toxicology group is functioning with the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Assessment Group (LADTAG) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to investigate and examine toxic effects to the respiratory system of rats in order to establish permissible exposure levels (PELs) for human exposure to lunar dust. In collaboration with the space toxicology group, LADTAG and NIOSH the goal of the present research is to analyze dose-response curves from rat exposures seven and twenty-eight days after intrapharyngeal instillations, and model the response using BenchMark Dose Software (BMDS) from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Via this analysis, the relative toxicities of three types of Apollo 14 lunar dust samples and two control dust samples, titanium dioxide (TiO2) and quartz will be determined. This will be executed for several toxicity endpoints such as cell counts and biochemical markers in bronchoaveolar lavage fluid (BALF) harvested from the rats.

  5. Retrieval of dust storm aerosols using an integrated Neural Network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Fei; Wong, Man Sing; Lee, Kwon Ho; Campbell, James R.; Shea, Yu-kai

    2015-12-01

    Dust storms are known to have adverse effects on public health. Atmospheric dust loading is also one of the major uncertainties in global climatic modeling as it is known to have a significant impact on the radiation budget and atmospheric stability. This study develops an integrated model for dust storm detection and retrieval based on the combination of geostationary satellite images and forward trajectory model. The proposed model consists of three components: (i) a Neural Network (NN) model for near real-time detection of dust storms; (ii) a NN model for dust Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) retrieval; and (iii) the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model to analyze the transports of dust storms. These three components are combined using an event-driven active geo-processing workflow technique. The NN models were trained for the dust detection and validated using sunphotometer measurements from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). The HYSPLIT model was applied in the regions with high probabilities of dust locations, and simulated the transport pathways of dust storms. This newly automated hybrid method can be used to give advance near real-time warning of dust storms, for both environmental authorities and public. The proposed methodology can be applied on early warning of adverse air quality conditions, and prediction of low visibility associated with dust storm events for port and airport authorities.

  6. A Dynamic Fountain Model for Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, T. J.; Vondrak, R. R.; Farrell, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    During the Apollo era of exploration it was discovered that sunlight was scattered at the terminators giving rise to horizon glow and streamers above the lunar surface. This was observed from the dark side of the Moon during sunset and sunrise by both surface landers and astronauts in orbit. These observations were quite unexpected, as the Moon was thought to be a pristine environment with a negligible atmosphere or exosphere. Subsequent investigations have shown that the sunlight was most likely scattered by electrostatically charged dust grains originating from the surface. It has since been demonstrated that this dust population could have serious implications for astronomical observations from the lunar surface. The lunar surface is electrostatically charged by the Moon s large-scale interaction with the local plasma environment and the photoemission of electrons due to solar ultra-violet (UV) light and X-rays. The like-charged surface and dust grains then act to repel each other, such that under certain conditions the dust grains are lifted above the surface. We present a dynamic fountain model which can explain how sub-micron dust is able to reach altitudes of up to approximately 100 km above the lunar surface. Previous static dust levitation models are most applicable to the heavier micron-sized grains in close proximity proximity to the surface, but they cannot explain the presence of extremely light grains at high altitudes. If we relax the static constraint applied to previous models, and instead assume that the grains are in constant motion (under the action of dynamic forces), a new picture emerges for the behavior of sub-micron lunar dust.

  7. Dust Observations for Models (DO4Models): Project Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, R.; Wiggs, G.; King, J.; Thomas, D. S.; Woodward, S.; Eckardt, F. D.; Haustein, K.; Vickery, K.; Bryant, R. G.; Nield, J. M.; Murray, J.; Brindley, H.; Jones, R.

    2012-12-01

    Climate and weather prediction hinge on numerical models. Most of the climate models included in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) and which will underpin the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change 5th Assessment Report (IPCC AR5) include a dust module because dust is known to play an important role in the Earth system. However dust emission schemes in climate models are relatively simple and are tuned to represent observed background aerosol concentrations most of which are many thousands of kilometres from source regions. The physics of dust emission in the models was developed from idealised experiments such as those conducted in wind tunnels decades ago. Improvement of current model dust emission schemes has been difficult to achieve because of the paucity of observations from key dust sources. Dust Observations for Models (DO4Models) is a project designed to gather data from source regions at a scale appropriate to climate model grid box resolution. The UK NERC funded project, led by the University of Oxford, aims to: 1) Generate a data set at an appropriate scale for climate models which characterises surface erodibility and erosivity in dust source areas from remote sensing and fieldwork 2) Quantify how observed erodibility and erosivity influence observed emissions at the climate model scale 3) Test, develop and optimise the dust emission scheme for the Met Office regional model (HadGEM3-RA) using this unique dust source area data set 4) Quantify which component(s) of observed erodibility and erosivity, and at what spatial scale, make the largest improvement to physically-based, observationally optimised dust emission simulations in climate models. This paper provides a project overview and some early observational and modelling results from the 2011 field season.

  8. The Urban Dust Dome: A Demonstration Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Ralph D.

    1973-01-01

    Working plans for an inexpensive urban dust dome model are presented together with some generalizations about urban atmosphere pollution. Theories and principles of atmospheric pollution which are introduced can be made meaningful to elementary students through classroom use of this model. (SM)

  9. Dust continuum spectra from model HII regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aannestad, P. A.; Emery, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    The infrared spectrum emitted by nebular dust, heated by the ionizing stars in H II blisters and spherical H II regions, is calculated for various model parameters. Absorption of the non-ionizing radiation in a neutral layer is included. Heating by the Lyman alpha photon field is taken into account. The dust is composed of silicate and graphite grains, and evaporation of the grains in the inner region is considered. The models are presented with a view to interpretation of infrared observations of dusty H II regions and can be applied directly to the infrared astronomy satellite survey data. The continuum emission is compared with calculated fine structure line emission.

  10. Dust continuum spectra from model HII regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aannestad, P. A.; Emery, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    The infrared spectrum emitted by nebular dust, heated by the ionizing stars in H II blisters and spherical H II regions, is calculated for various model parameters. Absorption of the non-ionizing radiation in a neutral layer is included. Heating by the Lyman alpha photon field is taken into account. The dust is composed of silicate and graphite grains, and evaporation of the grains in the inner region is considered. The models are presented with a view to interpretation of infrared observations of dusty H II regions and can be applied directly to the infrared astronomy satellite survey data. The continuum emission is compared with calculated fine structure line emission.

  11. Dust models post-Planck: constraining the far-infrared opacity of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanciullo, L.; Guillet, V.; Aniano, G.; Jones, A. P.; Ysard, N.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Boulanger, F.; Köhler, M.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We compare the performance of several dust models in reproducing the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) per unit extinction in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). We use our results to constrain the variability of the optical properties of big grains in the diffuse ISM, as published by the Planck collaboration. Methods: We use two different techniques to compare the predictions of dust models to data from the Planck HFI, IRAS, and SDSS surveys. First, we fit the far-infrared emission spectrum to recover the dust extinction and the intensity of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF). Second, we infer the ISRF intensity from the total power emitted by dust per unit extinction, and then predict the emission spectrum. In both cases, we test the ability of the models to reproduce dust emission and extinction at the same time. Results: We identify two issues. Not all models can reproduce the average dust emission per unit extinction: there are differences of up to a factor ~2 between models, and the best accord between model and observation is obtained with the more emissive grains derived from recent laboratory data on silicates and amorphous carbons. All models fail to reproduce the variations in the emission per unit extinction if the only variable parameter is the ISRF intensity: this confirms that the optical properties of dust are indeed variable in the diffuse ISM. Conclusions: Diffuse ISM observations are consistent with a scenario where both ISRF intensity and dust optical properties vary. The ratio of the far-infrared opacity to the V band extinction cross-section presents variations of the order of ~20% (40-50% in extreme cases), while ISRF intensity varies by ~30% (~60% in extreme cases). This must be accounted for in future modelling. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. A Fractal Model for the Capacitance of Lunar Dust and Lunar Dust Aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Keller, John W.; Farrell, William M.; Marshall, John; Richard, Denis Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Lunar dust grains and dust aggregates exhibit clumping, with an uneven mass distribution, as well as features that span many spatial scales. It has been observed that these aggregates display an almost fractal repetition of geometry with scale. Furthermore, lunar dust grains typically have sharp protrusions and jagged features that result from the lack of aeolian weathering (as opposed to space weathering) on the Moon. A perfectly spherical geometry, frequently used as a model for lunar dust grains, has none of these characteristics (although a sphere may be a reasonable proxy for the very smallest grains and some glasses). We present a fractal model for a lunar dust grain or aggregate of grains that reproduces (1) the irregular clumpy nature of lunar dust, (2) the presence of sharp points, and (3) dust features that span multiple scale lengths. We calculate the capacitance of the fractal lunar dust analytically assuming fixed dust mass (i.e. volume) for an arbitrary number of fractal levels and compare the capacitance to that of a non-fractal object with the same volume, surface area, and characteristic width. The fractal capacitance is larger than that of the equivalent non-fractal object suggesting that for a given potential, electrostatic forces on lunar dust grains and aggregates are greater than one might infer from assuming dust grains are sphericaL Consequently, electrostatic transport of lunar dust grains, for example lofting, appears more plausible than might be inferred by calculations based on less realistic assumptions about dust shape and associated capacitance.

  13. Interstellar Dust Models Towards Some IUE Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katyal, N.; Gupta, R.; Vaidya, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    We study the extinction properties of the composite dust grains, consisting of host silicate spheroids and graphite as inclusions, using discrete dipole approximation (DDA). We calculate the extinction cross sections of the composite grains in the ultraviolet spectral region, 1200\\AA -3200\\AA and study the variation in extinction as a function of the volume fraction of the inclusions. We compare the model extinction curves with the observed interstellar extinction curves obtained from the data given by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. Our results for the composite grains show a distinct variation in the extinction efficiencies with the variation in the volume fraction of the inclusions. In particular, it is found that the wavelength of peak absorption at `2175\\AA' shifts towards the longer wavelength with the variation in the volume fraction of inclusions. We find that the composite grain models with the axial ratios viz. 1.33 and 2.0 fit the observed extinction reasonably well with a grain size distribution, a = 0.005-0.250$\\mu m$. Moreover, our results of the composite grains clearly indicate that the inhomogeneity in the grain structure, composition and the surrounding media modifies the extinction properties of the grains.

  14. Entropy-based consistent model driven architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    A description of software architecture is a plan of the IT system construction, therefore any architecture gaps affect the overall success of an entire project. The definitions mostly describe software architecture as a set of views which are mutually unrelated, hence potentially inconsistent. Software architecture completeness is also often described in an ambiguous way. As a result most methods of IT systems building comprise many gaps and ambiguities, thus presenting obstacles for software building automation. In this article the consistency and completeness of software architecture are mathematically defined based on calculation of entropy of the architecture description. Following this approach, in this paper we also propose our method of automatic verification of consistency and completeness of the software architecture development method presented in our previous article as Consistent Model Driven Architecture (CMDA). The proposed FBS (Functionality-Behaviour-Structure) entropy-based metric applied in our CMDA approach enables IT architects to decide whether the modelling process is complete and consistent. With this metric, software architects could assess the readiness of undergoing modelling work for the start of IT system building. It even allows them to assess objectively whether the designed software architecture of the IT system could be implemented at all. The overall benefit of such an approach is that it facilitates the preparation of complete and consistent software architecture more effectively as well as it enables assessing and monitoring of the ongoing modelling development status. We demonstrate this with a few industry examples of IT system designs.

  15. Self-consistent asset pricing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malevergne, Y.; Sornette, D.

    2007-08-01

    We discuss the foundations of factor or regression models in the light of the self-consistency condition that the market portfolio (and more generally the risk factors) is (are) constituted of the assets whose returns it is (they are) supposed to explain. As already reported in several articles, self-consistency implies correlations between the return disturbances. As a consequence, the alphas and betas of the factor model are unobservable. Self-consistency leads to renormalized betas with zero effective alphas, which are observable with standard OLS regressions. When the conditions derived from internal consistency are not met, the model is necessarily incomplete, which means that some sources of risk cannot be replicated (or hedged) by a portfolio of stocks traded on the market, even for infinite economies. Analytical derivations and numerical simulations show that, for arbitrary choices of the proxy which are different from the true market portfolio, a modified linear regression holds with a non-zero value αi at the origin between an asset i's return and the proxy's return. Self-consistency also introduces “orthogonality” and “normality” conditions linking the betas, alphas (as well as the residuals) and the weights of the proxy portfolio. Two diagnostics based on these orthogonality and normality conditions are implemented on a basket of 323 assets which have been components of the S&P500 in the period from January 1990 to February 2005. These two diagnostics show interesting departures from dynamical self-consistency starting about 2 years before the end of the Internet bubble. Assuming that the CAPM holds with the self-consistency condition, the OLS method automatically obeys the resulting orthogonality and normality conditions and therefore provides a simple way to self-consistently assess the parameters of the model by using proxy portfolios made only of the assets which are used in the CAPM regressions. Finally, the factor decomposition with the

  16. Physical Modelling of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozernoy, L. M.

    2001-01-01

    This review is based on an extensive work aimed at the physical modeling of the interplanetary dust (IPD) cloud, i.e. establishing a link between the observable characteristics of the zodiacal cloud and the dynamical and physical properties of the parent minor bodies of the Solar System, which has been done in collaboration with N. Gorkavyi, J. Mather, and T. Taidakova. We use a new computational approach proposed by the authors, which makes it possible to elaborate high-quality 3D models of the IPD cloud with the number of particle positions in each model as high as 1010-11. This approach enables us to simulate the distribution of the major sources of dust in the Solar System. In particular, they include 20-30 million cold comets gravitationally scattered by the four giant planets in cometary journey from the Kuiper belt inward in the Solar System. These comets are found to be distributed in the form of four `cometary belts' associated with the orbits of the giant planets. Our 3D physical model of the IPD cloud, which includes three dust components -- asteroidal, cometary, and kuiperoidal, explains three different kinds of data: (i) the distribution of sources of dust, both known and predicted to exist from computer simulations; (ii) zodiacal light distribution in the Solar System, which fits the COBE data with an average accuracy of 0.85%; and (iii) the experimental data of Pioneers and Voyagers dust detectors. Further improvements of our modeling and their importance for astronomy and cosmology are outlined.

  17. Dust emission analysis of multi-year dust events by inverse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, T.; Tanaka, T. Y.; Yumimoto, K.; Sekiyama, T. T.; Mikami, M.

    2014-12-01

    We estimated the amount of emission of Aeolian dust aerosol from the Gobi desert area using the inverse technique, an Aeolian dust model (MASIGNAR), and surface observation data shared in the Triplet Environmental Ministers Meeting (TEMM) joint research project. We analyzed during the dust and sand storm (DSS) event in the May 2008, March 2009, October 2009 and December 2009 cases. We modified our inverse model system to set a constant dust emission flux at a grid-point where there is not enough dust emission flux from MASINGAR. We used the high-temporal-resolution (three hours) dust-emission estimating system using the Bayesian synthesis inversion, PM observation data and MASINGAR. Our research shows that we could modify MASINGAR's Aeolian dust concentration to match the observation data with an increase or decrease in MASINGAR's Aeolian dust flux. The estimated total dust emissions are from 1 to 9 Tg in the four cases. The estimated dust fluxes are increased in December 2009 case and decreased in other cases. This study suggests that there was a greater Aeolian dust flux than that estimated by MASINGAR in the middle part of the Gobi desert on winter case and smaller Aeolian dust flux on other seasons. This may come from the imperfectness of soil treatment of the model especially soil water and ice. We also find that new dust source area at northern eastern part of China in some cases. The results are sensitive to the observational network, the prior flux uncertainty and the observational error as previous study. In addition, the time resolution and data uncertainty of the observation data are also important for precise analysis. To obtain a precise estimation of the Aeolian dust-emission flux, it is critically important to share quality-controlled observation data among neighboring countries. We consider that inverse technique will become a powerful tool for estimating dust aerosol flux more precisely.

  18. Towards Consistent Models of Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shustov, Boris; Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav; Shematovich, Valery; Wiebe, Dimitri; Henning, Thomas; Semenov, Dimitri; Launhardt, Ralf

    The complete theory of the earliest stages of star formation can be developed only on the basis of self-consistent coupled dynamical and chemical models for the evolution of protostellar clouds. The models including multidimensional geometry ""full"" chemistry and 2D/3D radiation transfer still do not exist. We analyze limitations of the existing approaches and main directions of the model improvements: revision of chemical reaction data bases reduction of chemical reaction network reasonable choice of model geometry radiation transfer. The most important goal of modeling of the real objects is to reveal unambiguous signatures of their evolutionary status. Starless cores are believed to be compact objects at very early stages of star formation. We use our results on 1D self-consistent evolution of starless cores to illustrate problems of modeling and interpretation. Special attention is drawn to the radiation transfer problem. New 2D code URAN(IA) for simulation of radiation transfer in molecular lines was developed. This code was used to analyze spectra of starless cores L1544 and CB17. The deduced parameters of these cores are discussed.

  19. Gassmann-Consistency of Inclusion Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, M.; Wollner, U.; Dvorkin, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Mathematical inclusion theories predict the effective elastic properties of a porous medium with idealized-shape inclusions as a function of the elastic moduli of the host matrix and those of the inclusions. These effective elastic properties depend on the volumetric concentration of the inclusions (the porosity of the host frame) and the aspect ratio of an inclusion (the ratio between the thickness and length). Seemingly, these models can solve the problem of fluid substitution and solid substitution: any numbers can be used for the bulk and shear moduli of the inclusions, including zero for empty inclusions (dry rock). In contrast, the most commonly used fluid substitution method is Gassmann's (1951) theory. We explore whether inclusion based fluid substitution is consistent with Gassmann's fluid substitution. We compute the effective bulk and shear moduli of a matrix with dry inclusions and then conduct Gassmann's fluid substitution, comparing these results to those from directly computing the bulk and shear moduli of the same matrix but with the inclusions having the bulk modulus of the fluid. A number of examples employing the differential effective medium (DEM) model and self-consistent (SC) approximation indicate that the wet-rock bulk moduli as predicted by DEM and SC are approximately Gassmann-consistent at high aspect ratio and small porosity. However, at small aspect ratios and high porosity, these inclusion models are not Gassmann-consistent. For all cases, the shear moduli are not Gassmann-consistent at all, meaning that the wet-rock shear modulus as given by DEM or SC is very different from the dry-rock moduli as predicted by the same theories. We quantify the difference between the two methods for a range of porosity and aspect ratio combinations.

  20. Lagrangian Trajectory Modeling of Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    Apollo landing videos shot from inside the right LEM window, provide a quantitative measure of the characteristics and dynamics of the ejecta spray of lunar regolith particles beneath the Lander during the final 10 [m] or so of descent. Photogrammetry analysis gives an estimate of the thickness of the dust layer and angle of trajectory. In addition, Apollo landing video analysis divulges valuable information on the regolith ejecta interactions with lunar surface topography. For example, dense dust streaks are seen to originate at the outer rims of craters within a critical radius of the Lander during descent. The primary intent of this work was to develop a mathematical model and software implementation for the trajectory simulation of lunar dust particles acted on by gas jets originating from the nozzle of a lunar Lander, where the particle sizes typically range from 10 micron to 500 micron. The high temperature, supersonic jet of gas that is exhausted from a rocket engine can propel dust, soil, gravel, as well as small rocks to high velocities. The lunar vacuum allows ejected particles to travel great distances unimpeded, and in the case of smaller particles, escape velocities may be reached. The particle size distributions and kinetic energies of ejected particles can lead to damage to the landing spacecraft or to other hardware that has previously been deployed in the vicinity. Thus the primary motivation behind this work is to seek a better understanding for the purpose of modeling and predicting the behavior of regolith dust particle trajectories during powered rocket descent and ascent.

  1. NHWAVE: Consistent boundary conditions and turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhti, Morteza; Kirby, James T.; Shi, Fengyan; Ma, Gangfeng

    2016-10-01

    Large-scale σ-coordinate ocean circulation models neglect the horizontal variation of σ in the calculation of stress terms and boundary conditions. Following this practice, the effects of surface and bottom slopes in the dynamic surface and bottom boundary conditions have been usually neglected in the available non-hydrostatic wave-resolving models using a terrain-following grid. In this paper, we derive consistent surface and bottom boundary conditions for the normal and tangential stress fields as well as a Neumann-type boundary condition for scalar fluxes. Further, we examine the role of surface slopes in the predicted near-surface velocity and turbulence fields in surface gravity waves. By comparing the predicted velocity field in a deep-water standing wave in a closed basin, we show that the consistent boundary conditions do not generate unphysical vorticity at the free surface, in contrast to commonly used, simplified stress boundary conditions developed by ignoring all contributions except vertical shear in the transformation of stress terms. In addition, it is shown that the consistent boundary conditions significantly improve predicted wave shape, velocity and turbulence fields in regular surf zone breaking waves, compared with the simplified case. A more extensive model-data comparison of various breaking wave properties in different types of surface breaking waves is presented in companion papers (Derakhti et al., 2016a,b).

  2. Kinematically consistent models of viscoelastic stress evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVries, Phoebe M. R.; Meade, Brendan J.

    2016-05-01

    Following large earthquakes, coseismic stresses at the base of the seismogenic zone may induce rapid viscoelastic deformation in the lower crust and upper mantle. As stresses diffuse away from the primary slip surface in these lower layers, the magnitudes of stress at distant locations (>1 fault length away) may slowly increase. This stress relaxation process has been used to explain delayed earthquake triggering sequences like the 1992 Mw = 7.3 Landers and 1999 Mw = 7.1 Hector Mine earthquakes in California. However, a conceptual difficulty associated with these models is that the magnitudes of stresses asymptote to constant values over long time scales. This effect introduces persistent perturbations to the total stress field over many earthquake cycles. Here we present a kinematically consistent viscoelastic stress transfer model where the total perturbation to the stress field at the end of the earthquake cycle is zero everywhere. With kinematically consistent models, hypotheses about the potential likelihood of viscoelastically triggered earthquakes may be based on the timing of stress maxima, rather than on any arbitrary or empirically constrained stress thresholds. Based on these models, we infer that earthquakes triggered by viscoelastic earthquake cycle effects may be most likely to occur during the first 50% of the earthquake cycle regardless of the assumed long-term and transient viscosities.

  3. Improving dust emission characterization in dust models using dynamic high-resolution geomorphic erodibility map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parajuli, S. P.; Yang, Z.; Kocurek, G.

    2013-12-01

    Dust is known to affect the earth radiation budget, biogeochemical cycle, precipitation, human health and visibility. Despite the increased research effort, dust emission modeling remains challenging because dust emission is affected by complex geomorphological processes. Existing dust models overestimate dust emission and rely on tuning and a static erodibility factor in order to make simulated results comparable to remote sensing and ground-based observations. In most of current models, dust emission is expressed in terms of threshold friction speed, which ultimately depends mainly upon the percentage clay content and soil moisture. Unfortunately, due to the unavailability of accurate and high resolution input data of the clay content and soil moisture, estimated threshold friction speed commonly does not represent the variability in field condition. In this work, we attempt to improve dust emission characterization by developing a high resolution geomorphic map of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), which is responsible for more than 50% of global dust emission. We develop this geomorphic map by visually examining high resolution satellite images obtained from Google Earth Pro and ESRI base map. Albeit subjective, our technique is more reliable compared to automatic image classification technique because we incorporate knowledge of geological/geographical setting in identifying dust sources. We hypothesize that the erodibility is unique for different geomorphic landforms and that it can be quantified by the correlation between observed wind speed and satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD). We classify the study area into several key geomorphological categories with respect to their dust emission potential. Then we quantify their dust emission potential using the correlation between observed wind speed and satellite retrieved AOD. The dynamic, high-resolution geomorphic erodibility map thus prepared will help to reduce the uncertainty in current

  4. Modeling dust emission in the Magellanic Clouds with Spitzer and Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastenet, Jérémy; Bot, Caroline; Gordon, Karl D.; Bocchio, Marco; Roman-Duval, Julia; Jones, Anthony P.; Ysard, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    Context. Dust modeling is crucial to infer dust properties and budget for galaxy studies. However, there are systematic disparities between dust grain models that result in corresponding systematic differences in the inferred dust properties of galaxies. Quantifying these systematics requires a consistent fitting analysis. Aims: We compare the output dust parameters and assess the differences between two dust grain models, the DustEM model and THEMIS. In this study, we use a single fitting method applied to all the models to extract a coherent and unique statistical analysis. Methods: We fit the models to the dust emission seen by Spitzer and Herschel in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC and LMC). The observations cover the infrared (IR) spectrum from a few microns to the sub-millimeter range. For each fitted pixel, we calculate the full n-D likelihood based on a previously described method. The free parameters are both environmental (U, the interstellar radiation field strength; αISRF, power-law coefficient for a multi-U environment; Ω∗, the starlight strength) and intrinsic to the model (Yi: abundances of the grain species i; αsCM20, coefficient in the small carbon grain size distribution). Results: Fractional residuals of five different sets of parameters show that fitting THEMIS brings a more accurate reproduction of the observations than the DustEM model. However, independent variations of the dust species show strong model-dependencies. We find that the abundance of silicates can only be constrained to an upper-limit and that the silicate/carbon ratio is different than that seen in our Galaxy. In the LMC, our fits result in dust masses slightly lower than those found in the literature, by a factor lower than 2. In the SMC, we find dust masses in agreement with previous studies.

  5. Reconstruction of global atmospheric dust concentrations using dust flux measurements in paleoclimatic archives and dust model variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, F.; Rojas, M.; Gallardo, L.; Mahowald, N. M.; Takemura, T.; KUG, J.; Winckler, G.; Park, R.; Abe-Ouchi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols are the second most potent agent affecting anthropogenic radiative forcing after greenhouse gases. However, despite some progress in the field, the uncertainty of aerosol impact on present and past climate remains much larger than for other species. The total atmospheric dust load is an important factor for the radiative budget of the atmosphere, and for the micronutrient supply to terrestrial and marine ecosystems. We have collected published dust flux (mass accumulation rate) measurements from marine sediment cores, ice cores, loess fields, and peat bogs. These measurements are interpolated to two global grids of average Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) climatic conditions. The interpolation is performed using a kriging algorithm and its uncertainty shows regions where new measurements are most needed. We have developed a new method that combines observational dust flux measurements with dust depositional variables from climate models to reconstruct average Holocene and LGM atmospheric dust concentrations. Here we use dust simulations from two different coupled GCMs (CAM3-CCSM3 and SPRINTARS-MIROC) to give an idea of the uncertainties due to model variables. Our reconstructions give a different perspective on Holocene and LGM atmospheric dust loads from pure model simulations. The discrepancies between modeled and reconstructed dust concentrations and radiative forcing gives insights on regions and variables that may be improved in the models. In addition, this method allows to follow the temporal and spatial evolution of dust loads (and the resulting changes in radiative forcing and iron fertilization) through the glacial-interglacial transition. Top row: Interpolated Mass Accumulation Rates (MAR) for average Holocene (left column) and Last Glacial Maximum (right column) climatic conditions. The second and third row show simulated MAR from two different coupled climate models.

  6. Force Balance in Interplanetary Field Enhancements: Consistency with Small Dust Particle Pickup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Lai, H. R.; Delzanno, G. L.; Luhmann, J. G.; Galvin, A. B.

    2010-05-01

    Interplanetary Field Enhancements appear as smoothly varying cusp-shaped enhancements in the interplanetary magnetic field that last minutes to many hours. These enhancements have been attributed to the pickup of charged dust by the solar wind, based on their associations with passage of asteroid, 2001 Oljato, near conjunction with the Pioneer Venus spacecraft during three successive apparitions and an association with comet De Vico. Since these disturbances travel at or near the solar wind speed, the physical dimensions of these disturbances are large. Therefore, the force exerted by the magnetic field increase on the plasma and the charged dust is very significant, enough to move a charged object of many kilograms mass outward through the gravitational potential. We have examined both the plasma pressure force and the magnetic force in a number of IFEs using the STEREO observations and find that the increase in magnetic pressure during an IFE is compensated by a decrease in plasma pressure, thus the apparent dilemma resulting from the strong forces is solved. The net force is small so the particle(s) must be small as well. Nevertheless we are left with the problem of how micron-sized dust particles can exert influence over perhaps 106 km and how the field and plasma pressure became anticorrelated. It is possible that these disturbances represent the pickup of charged dust clouds produced by collisions, but it is difficult to verify this through available observations.

  7. Modeled Estimates of Soil and Dust Ingestion Rates for Children

    EPA Science Inventory

    Daily soil/dust ingestion rates typically used in exposure and risk assessments are based on tracer element studies, which have a number of limitations and do not separate contributions from soil and dust. This article presents an alternate approach of modeling soil and dust inge...

  8. Modeled Estimates of Soil and Dust Ingestion Rates for Children

    EPA Science Inventory

    Daily soil/dust ingestion rates typically used in exposure and risk assessments are based on tracer element studies, which have a number of limitations and do not separate contributions from soil and dust. This article presents an alternate approach of modeling soil and dust inge...

  9. Mineral dust transport in the Arctic modelled with FLEXPART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groot Zwaaftink, Christine; Grythe, Henrik; Stohl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Aeolian transport of mineral dust is suggested to play an important role in many processes. For instance, mineral aerosols affect the radiation balance of the atmosphere, and mineral deposits influence ice sheet mass balances and terrestrial and ocean ecosystems. While many efforts have been done to model global dust transport, relatively little attention has been given to mineral dust in the Arctic. Even though this region is more remote from the world's major dust sources and dust concentrations may be lower than elsewhere, effects of mineral dust on for instance the radiation balance can be highly relevant. Furthermore, there are substantial local sources of dust in or close to the Arctic (e.g., in Iceland), whose impact on Arctic dust concentrations has not been studied in detail. We therefore aim to estimate contributions of different source regions to mineral dust in the Arctic. We have developed a dust mobilization routine in combination with the Lagrangian dispersion model FLEXPART to make such estimates. The lack of details on soil properties in many areas requires a simple routine for global simulations. However, we have paid special attention to the dust sources on Iceland. The mobilization routine does account for topography, snow cover and soil moisture effects, in addition to meteorological parameters. FLEXPART, driven with operational meteorological data from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, was used to do a three-year global dust simulation for the years 2010 to 2012. We assess the model performance in terms of surface concentration and deposition at several locations spread over the globe. We will discuss how deposition and dust load patterns in the Arctic change throughout seasons based on the source of the dust. Important source regions for mineral dust found in the Arctic are not only the major desert areas, such as the Sahara, but also local bare-soil regions. From our model results, it appears that total dust load in the

  10. Consistent quadrupole-octupole collective model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolski, A.; Mazurek, K.; Góźdź, A.

    2016-11-01

    Within this work we present a consistent approach to quadrupole-octupole collective vibrations coupled with the rotational motion. A realistic collective Hamiltonian with variable mass-parameter tensor and potential obtained through the macroscopic-microscopic Strutinsky-like method with particle-number-projected BCS (Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer) approach in full vibrational and rotational, nine-dimensional collective space is diagonalized in the basis of projected harmonic oscillator eigensolutions. This orthogonal basis of zero-, one-, two-, and three-phonon oscillator-like functions in vibrational part, coupled with the corresponding Wigner function is, in addition, symmetrized with respect to the so-called symmetrization group, appropriate to the collective space of the model. In the present model it is D4 group acting in the body-fixed frame. This symmetrization procedure is applied in order to provide the uniqueness of the Hamiltonian eigensolutions with respect to the laboratory coordinate system. The symmetrization is obtained using the projection onto the irreducible representation technique. The model generates the quadrupole ground-state spectrum as well as the lowest negative-parity spectrum in 156Gd nucleus. The interband and intraband B (E 1 ) and B (E 2 ) reduced transition probabilities are also calculated within those bands and compared with the recent experimental results for this nucleus. Such a collective approach is helpful in searching for the fingerprints of the possible high-rank symmetries (e.g., octahedral and tetrahedral) in nuclear collective bands.

  11. Dust deposition at the Mars Pathfinder landing site: observations and modeling of visible/near-infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Grundy, William M.; Lemmon, Mark T.

    2003-06-01

    Temporal variations in the visible/near-infrared reflectance spectra of the radiometric calibration targets on the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) lander obtained by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) camera reveal the effects of aeolian dust deposition at the MPF site throughout the mission. Sky brightness models in combination with two-layer radiative transfer models were used with these data to track changes in dust opacity on the radiometric calibration targets (RCTs) to constrain the dust deposition rate and the spectral properties of the deposited dust. Two-layer models were run assuming both linear and nonlinear dust accumulation rates, and suggest that RCT dust optical depth at the end of the 83-sol mission was 0.08 to 0.16, or on the order of 5- to 10-μm thickness for plausible values for dust porosity and grain size. These values correspond to dust fall rates of about 20-45 μm per Earth year, consistent with previous studies of dust deposition on Mars. The single scattering albedos of the dust derived from the models fall between those previously determined for atmospheric dust and bright soils. Comparisons of relative reflectance spectra calibrated using observed RCT radiances from late in the mission versus using radiances from modeled (dust-free) RCTs also reveal distinct spectral differences consistent with dust on the RCTs. Temporal variations in RCT dust opacity are not clearly linked to known passages of vortices at the MPF site, but overall suggest that deposition of dust onto the targets by local dust devils may be favored over erosion. Analyses of temporal changes in visible/near-infrared spectra will provide valuable information for future missions by constraining how dust deposition affects landed spacecraft operability (e.g., solar power availability), instrument calibration, and interpretations of surface mineralogy and composition.

  12. Regional Saharan dust modelling during the SAMUM 2006 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinold, Bernd; Tegen, Ina; Esselborn, Michael; Kandler, Konrad; Knippertz, Peter; Müller, Detlef; Schladitz, Alexander; Tesche, Matthias; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Ansmann, Albert; Althausen, Dietrich; Laurent, Benoit; Massling, Andreas; Müller, Thomas; Petzold, Andreas; Schepanski, Kerstin; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2009-02-01

    ABSTRACT The regional dust model system LM-MUSCAT-DES was developed in the framework of the SAMUM project. Using the unique comprehensive data set of near-source dust properties during the 2006 SAMUM field campaign, the performance of the model system is evaluated for two time periods in May and June 2006. Dust optical thicknesses, number size distributions and the position of the maximum dust extinction in the vertical profiles agree well with the observations. However, the spatio-temporal evolution of the dust plumes is not always reproduced due to inaccuracies in the dust source placement by the model. While simulated winds and dust distributions are well matched for dust events caused by dry synoptic-scale dynamics, they are often misrepresented when dust emissions are caused by moist convection or influenced by small-scale topography that is not resolved by the model. In contrast to long-range dust transport, in the vicinity of source regions the model performance strongly depends on the correct prediction of the exact location of sources. Insufficiently resolved vertical grid spacing causes the absence of inversions in the model vertical profiles and likely explains the absence of the observed sharply defined dust layers.

  13. Dust in tokamaks: An overview of the physical model of the dust in tokamaks code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacharis, Minas; Coppins, Michael; Allen, John E.

    2010-04-01

    The dynamical behavior of dust produced in tokamaks is an important issue for fusion. In this work, the current status of the dust in tokamaks (DTOKS) [J. D. Martin et al., Europhys Lett. 83, 65001 (2008)] dust transport code will be presented. A detailed description of the various elements of its underlying physical model will be given together with representative simulation results for the mega amp spherical tokamak (MAST) [A. Sykes et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1423 (2001)]. Furthermore, a brief description of the various components of the dust transport (DUSTT) [R. D. Smirnov et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 49, 347 (2007)] code will also be presented in comparison with DTOKS.

  14. Modeling of extreme dust pollution in the complex terrain of the Dead Sea Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishcha, Pavel; Rieger, Daniel; Metzger, Jutta; Starobinets, Boris; Bangert, Max; Vogel, Heike; Schaettler, Ulrich; Corsmeier, Ulrich; Alpert, Pinhas; Vogel, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The area of the Dead Sea valley is often affected by mineral dust. This study focuses on an extreme dust episode occurring on March 22, 2013, where near surface dust concentrations of up to 7000 μg m-3 were encountered in the Dead Sea region. This near surface dust concentration was two orders of magnitude higher than the annual averaged surface dust concentration in the Dead Sea valley. The event was driven by a Cyprus low and its frontal system, causing favorable conditions for long-range transport to the investigation area. It was accompanied by high wind speeds and a gust front that rapidly passed the Judean Mountains on 22 March 2013. Wind was even accelerated on the lee side of the Judean Mountains leading to a severe downslope wind. We simulated this situation with the comprehensive online-coupled weather forecast model COSMO-ART. Reasonable agreement was found between the simulated meteorological variables and the observations. The model also reproduced the spatio-temporal distribution of near surface dust concentration, consistent with available measurements, in the Dead Sea valley and the surrounding areas. With respect to the time of the maximum near surface dust concentration in the Dead Sea valley, the model captured it almost perfectly when compared with the observed TSP concentrations. COSMO-ART showed that the high near surface dust concentration in the Dead Sea valley was mainly determined by local emissions. These emissions were caused by strong winds on the lee side of the Judean Mts. The model showed that an ascending airflow in the Dead Sea valley lifted dust particles (originated mainly from the upwind side of the Judean Mts.) up to approximately 7 km. These dust particles contributed to the pronounced maximum in modeled dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) of approximately the value of three over the valley. This highlights an important point that the maximum dust AOD was reached in the eastern part of the Dead Sea valley, while the maximum

  15. Two-fluid models for stationary dust-driven winds. I. Momentum and energy balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, D.; Gauger, A.; Sedlmayr, E.

    1994-10-01

    Self-consistent two-fluid models of stationary dust driven winds around cool C-stars have been calculated. The dust and the gas component are coupled by the condensation of dust from the gas phase and grain-gas collisions and are described by separate sets of equations. It was found that in the regime of substantial mass loss where purely dust driven winds are possible the dust grains move with their equilibrium drift velocity relative to the gas. Compared to one-fluid models the dust component is dynamically diluted, leading to a decreased radiative acceleration of the wind in the outer region. We have included detailed energy exchange rates between gas and radiation field by vibrational transitions of CO and pure rotational transitions of dipolar molecules (CO, HCN, C_2_H, C_3_H, CS, SiS). Our models show that frictional heating by drifting dust grains raises the gas temperature considerably above its radiative equilibrium value. This leads to significant extension of the dust condensation zone. A sequence of models with increasing luminosities shows that the drift velocity of the dust decreases for higher luminosities. Consequently the drift related effects are more pronounced at lower luminosities.

  16. Polarization of cosmic dust simulated with the rough spheroid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Das, Himadri Sekhar; Dubovik, Oleg; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Yang, Ping

    2015-10-01

    Cosmic dust is a polydisperse mixture of irregular, often aggregated, particles. Previous attempts have tried to simulate polarimetric properties of this dust using aggregate dust models, but it has not been possible to consider particle sizes larger than a couple of microns due to limitations of computer memory and processing power. Attempts have also been made to replace aggregates by polydisperse regular particles (spheres, spheroids, cylinders), but those models could not consistently reproduce the observed photopolarimetric characteristics. In this study, we introduce to the astronomical community the software package developed by Dubovik et al. (2006) for modeling light scattering by a polydisperse mixture of randomly oriented smooth and rough spheroids of a variety of aspect ratios. The roughness of spheroids is defined by a normal distribution of the surface slopes, and its degree depends on the standard deviation of the distribution (which is zero for smooth surface and greater than zero for rough surface). The pre-calculated kernels in the software package allow for fast, accurate, and flexible modeling of different size and shape distributions. We present our results of a systematic investigation of polarization obtained with the rough and smooth spheroid models; we study differences in their phase angle dependence and how those differences change with the particle size distribution. We found that the difference between smooth and rough particles increases with increasing effective size parameter and affects mainly the value and position of the maximum polarization. Negative polarization was found to be typical only for silicate-like refractive indexes and only when the particles have size parameters within 2.5-25. As an example of an application of the rough spheroid model, we made computations for rough spheroids that have a size distribution and composition typical for cometary dust. We found that a mixture of porous rough spheroids made of absorbing

  17. A methodology for investigating dust model performance using synergistic EARLINET/AERONET dust concentration retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binietoglou, I.; Basart, S.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Amiridis, V.; Argyrouli, A.; Baars, H.; Baldasano, J. M.; Balis, D.; Belegante, L.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Burlizzi, P.; Carrasco, V.; Chaikovsky, A.; Comerón, A.; D'Amico, G.; Filioglou, M.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Ilic, L.; Kokkalis, P.; Maurizi, A.; Mona, L.; Monti, F.; Muñoz-Porcar, C.; Nicolae, D.; Papayannis, A.; Pappalardo, G.; Pejanovic, G.; Pereira, S. N.; Perrone, M. R.; Pietruczuk, A.; Posyniak, M.; Rocadenbosch, F.; Rodríguez-Gómez, A.; Sicard, M.; Siomos, N.; Szkop, A.; Terradellas, E.; Tsekeri, A.; Vukovic, A.; Wandinger, U.; Wagner, J.

    2015-09-01

    Systematic measurements of dust concentration profiles at a continental scale were recently made possible by the development of synergistic retrieval algorithms using combined lidar and sun photometer data and the establishment of robust remote-sensing networks in the framework of Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network (ACTRIS)/European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET). We present a methodology for using these capabilities as a tool for examining the performance of dust transport models. The methodology includes considerations for the selection of a suitable data set and appropriate metrics for the exploration of the results. The approach is demonstrated for four regional dust transport models (BSC-DREAM8b v2, NMMB/BSC-DUST, DREAMABOL, DREAM8-NMME-MACC) using dust observations performed at 10 ACTRIS/EARLINET stations. The observations, which include coincident multi-wavelength lidar and sun photometer measurements, were processed with the Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) to retrieve aerosol concentration profiles. The methodology proposed here shows advantages when compared to traditional evaluation techniques that utilize separately the available measurements such as separating the contribution of dust from other aerosol types on the lidar profiles and avoiding model assumptions related to the conversion of concentration fields to aerosol extinction values. When compared to LIRIC retrievals, the simulated dust vertical structures were found to be in good agreement for all models with correlation values between 0.5 and 0.7 in the 1-6 km range, where most dust is typically observed. The absolute dust concentration was typically underestimated with mean bias values of -40 to -20 μg m-3 at 2 km, the altitude of maximum mean concentration. The reported differences among the models found in this comparison indicate the benefit of the systematic use of the proposed approach in future dust model evaluation studies.

  18. A methodology for investigating dust model performance using synergistic EARLINET/AERONET dust concentration retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binietoglou, I.; Basart, S.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Amiridis, V.; Argyrouli, A.; Baars, H.; Baldasano, J. M.; Balis, D.; Belegante, L.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Burlizzi, P.; Carrasco, V.; Chaikovsky, A.; Comerón, A.; D'Amico, G.; Filioglou, M.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Ilic, L.; Kokkalis, P.; Maurizi, A.; Mona, L.; Monti, F.; Muñoz-Porcar, C.; Nicolae, D.; Papayannis, A.; Pappalardo, G.; Pejanovic, G.; Pereira, S. N.; Perrone, M. R.; Pietruczuk, A.; Posyniak, M.; Rocadenbosch, F.; Rodríguez-Gómez, A.; Sicard, M.; Siomos, N.; Szkop, A.; Terradellas, E.; Tsekeri, A.; Vukovic, A.; Wandinger, U.; Wagner, J.

    2015-04-01

    Systematic measurements of dust concentration profiles at continental scale were recently made possible by the development of synergistic retrieval algorithms using combined lidar and sun photometer data and the establishment of robust remote-sensing networks in the framework of Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network (ACTRIS)/European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET). We present a methodology for using these capabilities as a tool for examining the performance of dust transport models. The methodology includes considerations for the selection of a suitable dataset and appropriate metrics for the exploration of the results. The approach is demonstrated for four regional dust transport models (BSC-DREAM8b v2, NMMB/BSC-DUST, DREAMABOL, DREAM8-NMME-MACC) using dust observations performed at 10 ACTRIS/EARLINET stations. The observations, which include coincident multi-wavelength lidar and sun photometer measurements, were processed with the Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) to retrieve aerosol concentration profiles. The methodology proposed here shows advantages when compared to traditional evaluation techniques that utilize separately the available measurements such as separating the contribution of dust from other aerosol types on the lidar profiles and avoiding model assumptions related to the conversion of concentration fields to aerosol extinction values. When compared to LIRIC retrievals, the simulated dust vertical structures were found to be in good agreement for all models with correlation values between 0.5 and 0.7 in the 1 to 6 km range, where most of dust is typically observed. The absolute dust concentration was typically underestimated with mean bias values of -40 to -20 μg m-3 at 2 km, the altitude of maximum mean concentration. The reported differences among the models found in this comparison indicate the benefit of the systematic use of the proposed approach in future dust model evaluation studies.

  19. Interactive Soil Dust Aerosol Model in the GISS GCM. Part 1; Sensitivity of the Soil Dust Cycle to Radiative Properties of Soil Dust Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, Jan; Tegen, Ina; Miller, Ron L.

    2000-01-01

    The sensitivity of the soil dust aerosol cycle to the radiative forcing by soil dust aerosols is studied. Four experiments with the NASA/GISS atmospheric general circulation model, which includes a soil dust aerosol model, are compared, all using a prescribed climatological sea surface temperature as lower boundary condition. In one experiment, dust is included as dynamic tracer only (without interacting with radiation), whereas dust interacts with radiation in the other simulations. Although the single scattering albedo of dust particles is prescribed to be globally uniform in the experiments with radiatively active dust, a different single scattering albedo is used in those experiments to estimate whether regional variations in dust optical properties, corresponding to variations in mineralogical composition among different source regions, are important for the soil dust cycle and the climate state. On a global scale, the radiative forcing by dust generally causes a reduction in the atmospheric dust load corresponding to a decreased dust source flux. That is, there is a negative feedback in the climate system due to the radiative effect of dust. The dust source flux and its changes were analyzed in more detail for the main dust source regions. This analysis shows that the reduction varies both with the season and with the single scattering albedo of the dust particles. By examining the correlation with the surface wind, it was found that the dust emission from the Saharan/Sahelian source region and from the Arabian peninsula, along with the sensitivity of the emission to the single scattering albedo of dust particles, are related to large scale circulation patterns, in particular to the trade winds during Northern Hemisphere winter and to the Indian monsoon circulation during summer. In the other regions, such relations to the large scale circulation were not found. There, the dependence of dust deflation to radiative forcing by dust particles is probably

  20. Distant Comets Photometry and Dust Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittichova, Jana; Meech, K. J.; Bar-Nun, A.; Notesco, G.

    2008-09-01

    Several comets have been observed to develop coma on their in-bound leg at heliocentric distances from 5.84 to 11.49 AU. We will present the observational evidence for their activity and propose an explanation based on experiments carried out on amorphous, gas-laden ice samples that are 0.1 to 100 microns thick and formed by flowing water vapor and CO onto a cold surface. The considerable gas emission occurs when the amorphous ice anneals before 135K, where it transforms into a crystalline structure. This activity was found experimentally to be associated with gas release during annealing of the gas-laden amorphous ice. We observed and measured optical CCD photometry for two short-period and five long-period, dynamically new comets, that have enter the inner solar system directly from the Oort cloud for the first time. All of these comets have been observed pre-perihelion. Observations were done with the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope on Mauna Kea with the Tektronix 2x2K CCD camera through the Kron-Cousins B, V, R, I filter system. In order to observationally distinguish the physical causes of activity, not only is it important to observe comets at large heliocentric distances, but also those that are dynamically new and on the in-bound leg of their orbits at distances beyond where the amorphous to crystalline ice phase transition can occur. This research includes observations of the level of nucleus activity as a function of distance. We also would like to present Finson-Probstein (FP) dust modeling investigation on select comets. From the FP dust modeling of a cometary tail we can determine three basic parameters: the dust production rate, the particle distribution, and the emission velocity of the grains.

  1. Investigation of interplanetary dust from out-of-ecliptic space probes. [astronomical models of interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fechtig, H.; Giese, R. H.; Hanner, M. S.; Zook, H. A.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of interplanetary dust via zodiacal light observations and direct detection are discussed for an out-of-ecliptic space probe. Particle fluxes and zodiacal light brightnesses were predicted for three models of the dust distribution. These models predict that most of the information will be obtained at space probe distances less than 1 A.U. from the ecliptic plane. Joint interpretation of the direct particle measurements and the zodiacal light data can yield the best knowledge of the three-dimensional particle dynamics, spatial distribution, and physical characteristics of the interplanetary dust. Such measurements are important for an understanding of the origin and role of the dust in relation to meteoroids, asteroids, and comets, as well as the interaction of the dust with solar forces.

  2. Modeling of dust deposition in central Asia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The deposition of dust particles has a significant influence on the global bio-geochemical cycle. Currently, the lack of spatiotemporal data creates great uncertainty in estimating the global dust budget. To improve our understanding of the fate, transport and cycling of airborne dust, there is a ne...

  3. Comment on self-consistent model of black hole formation and evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Pei-Ming

    2015-08-01

    In an earlier work, Kawai et al. proposed a model of black-hole formation and evaporation, in which the geometry of a collapsing shell of null dust is studied, including consistently the back reaction of its Hawking radiation. In this note, we illuminate the implications of their work, focusing on the resolution of the information loss paradox and the problem of the firewall.

  4. Forecasting Dust Storms Using the CARMA-Dust Model and MM5 Weather Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, B. H.; Winstead, N. S.; Wesely, J.; Hakola, A.; Colarco, P.; Toon, O. B.; Ginoux, P.; Brooks, G.; Hasselbarth, L. M.; Toth, B.; Sterner, R.

    2002-12-01

    An operational model for the forecast of dust storms in Northern Africa, the Middle East and Southwest Asia has been developed for the United States Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA). The dust forecast model uses the 5th generation Penn State Mesoscale Meteorology Model (MM5), and a modified version of the Colorado Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA). AFWA conducted a 60 day evaluation of the dust model to look at the model's ability to forecast dust storms for short, medium and long range (72 hour) forecast periods. The study used satellite and ground observations of dust storms to verify the model's effectiveness. Each of the main mesoscale forecast theaters was broken down into smaller sub-regions for detailed analysis. The study found the forecast model was able to forecast dust storms in Saharan Africa and the Sahel region with an average Probability of Detection (POD)exceeding 68%, with a 16% False Alarm Rate (FAR). The Southwest Asian theater had average POD's of 61% with FAR's averaging 10%.

  5. A model to assess dust explosion occurrence probability.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Junaid; Khan, Faisal; Amyotte, Paul; Ferdous, Refaul

    2014-03-15

    Dust handling poses a potential explosion hazard in many industrial facilities. The consequences of a dust explosion are often severe and similar to a gas explosion; however, its occurrence is conditional to the presence of five elements: combustible dust, ignition source, oxidant, mixing and confinement. Dust explosion researchers have conducted experiments to study the characteristics of these elements and generate data on explosibility. These experiments are often costly but the generated data has a significant scope in estimating the probability of a dust explosion occurrence. This paper attempts to use existing information (experimental data) to develop a predictive model to assess the probability of a dust explosion occurrence in a given environment. The pro-posed model considers six key parameters of a dust explosion: dust particle diameter (PD), minimum ignition energy (MIE), minimum explosible concentration (MEC), minimum ignition temperature (MIT), limiting oxygen concentration (LOC) and explosion pressure (Pmax). A conditional probabilistic approach has been developed and embedded in the proposed model to generate a nomograph for assessing dust explosion occurrence. The generated nomograph provides a quick assessment technique to map the occurrence probability of a dust explosion for a given environment defined with the six parameters.

  6. Modeling of the Interplanetary Dust Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S. S.; Pyo, J.; Ueno, M.; Kwon, S. M.; Ishiguro, M.; Usui, F.; Ootsubo, T.; Ishihara, D.; Mukai, T.

    2009-12-01

    We have used the InfraRed Camera (IRC) on AKARI, to conduct a year long survey of the zodiacal emission (ZE) in the S9W and L18W mid-infrared bands. In survey mode, AKARI’s viewing direction was fixed, with respect to the Sun, at elongation 90°, but it covered the entire ranges of ecliptic longitude and latitude, producing all-sky ZE maps of high sensitivity and fine resolution. This review presents AKARI’s the first-cut view of the mid-infrared ZE in general. From the seasonal brightness variation of the south and north ecliptic poles, we located the symmetry plane’s ascending node accurately. Through a specially designed program of pointing observations, we directly measured, in five IRC bands, the mean volume emissivity of the IPDs near the Earth’s orbit. Most of the three-dimensional models of the IPD cloud are based on the brightness integral of single component dusts; however, we have shown in this review that the all-sky ZE maps, the mean volume emissivity of local IPDs, and the spectral energy distribution of the ZE from near- to far-infrared all indicate needs to generalize the assumption of single dust component.

  7. Modelling non-dust fluids in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Christopherson, Adam J.; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Malik, Karim A. E-mail: juan.hidalgo@port.ac.uk

    2013-01-01

    Currently, most of the numerical simulations of structure formation use Newtonian gravity. When modelling pressureless dark matter, or 'dust', this approach gives the correct results for scales much smaller than the cosmological horizon, but for scenarios in which the fluid has pressure this is no longer the case. In this article, we present the correspondence of perturbations in Newtonian and cosmological perturbation theory, showing exact mathematical equivalence for pressureless matter, and giving the relativistic corrections for matter with pressure. As an example, we study the case of scalar field dark matter which features non-zero pressure perturbations. We discuss some problems which may arise when evolving the perturbations in this model with Newtonian numerical simulations and with CMB Boltzmann codes.

  8. Physical consistency in modeling interplanetary magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Y.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    The validity of the Velli, Grappin and Mangeney (1989) model is evaluated. It is argued that the model is incorrect because it mixes different dynamical models, assumes weak nonlinearities, makes predictions that vary with observations, and violates causality. It is proposed that self-similar behavior in the coronal source region of the magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations cause the Kolmogorov-like spectra.

  9. Physical consistency in modeling interplanetary magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Y.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    The validity of the Velli, Grappin and Mangeney (1989) model is evaluated. It is argued that the model is incorrect because it mixes different dynamical models, assumes weak nonlinearities, makes predictions that vary with observations, and violates causality. It is proposed that self-similar behavior in the coronal source region of the magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations cause the Kolmogorov-like spectra.

  10. The Student Dust Counter: Updated Interplanetary Dust Measurements and Model Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquette, M. R.; Poppe, A. R.; Horanyi, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Student Dust Counter (SDC) is an impact-based dust detector onboard the New Horizons spacecraft, observing the dust density distribution since April 2006 across the Solar System. SDC is capable of measuring dust grains in the mass range of 10-12 < m < 10-9 g, covering an approximate size range of 0.5 - 5 μm in particle radius. The measurements can be compared to model predictions following the orbital evolution of dust grains originating from the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt (EKB) and migrating inward due to Poynting-Robertson drag. Constrained by SDC and Pioneer 10 measurements, the model provides an estimate of the mass production rate of grains in the EKB. Furthermore, the size distribution of dust grains as measured by SDC is compared with predictions from the model to offer a possible explanation for the lack of large grains (2 - 5 μm) in the SDC data set. Implications of the non-detected large grains, as well as the up-to-date in-situ measurements of the interplanetary dust flux and predictions for measurements in the EKB are also presented.

  11. Modeling of Plasma Irregularities in Expanding Ionospheric Dust Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, H.; Scales, W.; Mahmoudian, A.; Bordikar, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    Natural dust layers occur in the earth’s mesosphere (50km-85km). Plasma irregularities are associated with these natural dust layers that produce radar echoes. Recently, an Ionospheric sounding rocket experiment was performed to investigate the plasma irregularities in upper atmospheric dust layers. The Charged Aerosol Release Experiment (CARE) uses a rocket payload injection of particles in the ionosphere to determine the mechanisms for enhanced radar scatter from plasma irregularities embedded in artificial dusty plasma in space. A 2-D hybrid computational model is described that may be used to study a variety of irregularities in dusty space plasmas which may lead to radar echoes. In this model, the dust and ions are both treated with Particle-In-Cell method while the dust charge varies with time based on the standard dust Orbit Motion Limited charging model. A stochastic model is adopted to remove particle ions due to the dust charging process. Electrons are treated with a fluid model including the parallel dynamics of magnetic fields. Fourier spectral methods with a predictor-corrector time advance are used to solve it. This numerical model will be used to investigate the electrodynamics and several possible plasma irregularity generation mechanisms after the creation of an artificial dust layer. The first is the dust ion-acoustic instability due to the drift of dust relative to the plasma. The instability saturates by trapping some ions. The effects of dust radius and dust drift velocity on plasma irregularities will be analyzed further. Also, a shear- driven instability in expanding dusty clouds is investigated.

  12. Modeling a Typical Winter-time Dust Event over the Arabian Peninsula and the Red Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Kalenderski, S.; Stenchikov, G.; Zhao, Chun

    2013-02-20

    We used WRF-Chem, a regional meteorological model coupled with an aerosol-chemistry component, to simulate various aspects of the dust phenomena over the Arabian Peninsula and Red Sea during a typical winter-time dust event that occurred in January 2009. The model predicted that the total amount of emitted dust was 18.3 Tg for the entire dust outburst period and that the two maximum daily rates were ~2.4 Tg/day and ~1.5 Tg/day, corresponding to two periods with the highest aerosol optical depth that were well captured by ground- and satellite-based observations. The model predicted that the dust plume was thick, extensive, and mixed in a deep boundary layer at an altitude of 3-4 km. Its spatial distribution was modeled to be consistent with typical spatial patterns of dust emissions. We utilized MODIS-Aqua and Solar Village AERONET measurements of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) to evaluate the radiative impact of aerosols. Our results clearly indicated that the presence of dust particles in the atmosphere caused a significant reduction in the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface during the dust event. We also found that dust aerosols have significant impact on the energy and nutrient balances of the Red Sea. Our results showed that the simulated cooling under the dust plume reached 100 W/m2, which could have profound effects on both the sea surface temperature and circulation. Further analysis of dust generation and its spatial and temporal variability is extremely important for future projections and for better understanding of the climate and ecological history of the Red Sea.

  13. A new modeling of circumsolar dust distribution near the Earth revealed by the IKAROS-ALADDIN results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Takayuki; Yano, Hajime

    One of the primary scientific objectives of the dust detector ``ALADDIN'' onboard the solar sail spacecraft ``IKAROS'' is to shed light on spatial distribution of >10-mum-sized dust particles between 0.7-1 AU heliocentric distance. The ALADDIN dust impact data have successfully revealed the local structure of the circumsolar dust distribution composed of the dust clump at the trailing side of the Earth and the gap region in the vicinity of the Earth, for the first time of in-situ dust detection in the interplanetary space. Dust number density calculated by the ALADDIN flux data for >10-mum-sized dust obtained at the trailing side of the Earth was clearly higher than that by the existing dust flux model at 1 AU heliocentric distance (i.e., Grün model), which was mainly established with past in-situ dust impacts detection in the close vicinity of the Earth and with microcrater counting on lunar rock samples. The observed discrepancy suggests difficulty in use of the Grün model to estimate the number density of >10-mum-sized dust at 1 AU heliocentric distance other than the vicinity of the Earth. Furthermore, the discrepancy cannot be explained by existing numerical simulations of the circumsolar dust distribution, in which only an effect of dust capturing by Earth’s mean motion resonances (MMRs) is considered. In addition to such dust-planets MMRs, mutual collisions among these dust particles may play a crucial role in determining the structure of dust distribution not only in the present Solar System but also in any planetary systems with debris disks. However, there has not been, so far, a universal model to simulate the dust distribution in planetary systems with considerations of the effects from both dust-planets MMRs and dust-dust collisions. In this study, a new hybrid modeling for the circumsolar dust distribution near the Earth was developed by combining the existing MMRs-only simulation results and the collision-only model. The newly developed model

  14. A simple electrodynamic model of a dust devil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, William M.; Delory, Greg T.; Cummer, Steven A.; Marshall, John R.

    2003-10-01

    We present an electrodynamic model of a dust devil applying a similar methodology as performed previously for charging in terrestrial thunderstorms. While thunderstorm processes focus on inductive charging between large graupel and smaller ice and water droplets, we tailor the model to focus on the electric charge transfer between dust grains of different sizes and compositions. We specifically compare and contrast the triboelectric dust charging processes presented previously in Melnik and Parrot [1998] and Desch and Cuzzi [2000] in the development of macroscopic dust devil electric fields. We find that large vertical E-fields (~20 kV/m) can develop in the devil.

  15. A SELF-CONSISTENT DEUTSCHIAN ESP MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents a new version of the EPA I Southern Research Institute electrostatic precipitator (ESP) model. The primary difference between this and the standard (Revision 3) versions is in the treatment of the particulate space charge. Both models apply the Deutsch equatio...

  16. A SELF-CONSISTENT DEUTSCHIAN ESP MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents a new version of the EPA I Southern Research Institute electrostatic precipitator (ESP) model. The primary difference between this and the standard (Revision 3) versions is in the treatment of the particulate space charge. Both models apply the Deutsch equatio...

  17. Investigations of the variability of dust particle sizes in the martian atmosphere using the NASA Ames General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Haberle, Robert M.; Murphy, James R.

    2008-06-01

    We present a Mars General Circulation Model (GCM) numerical investigation of the physical processes (i.e., wind stress and dust devil dust lifting and atmospheric transport) responsible for temporal and spatial variability of suspended dust particle sizes. Measurements of spatial and temporal variations in airborne dust particles sizes in the martian atmosphere have been derived from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectral and emission phase function data [Wolff, M.J., Clancy, R.T., 2003. J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 108 (E9), doi:10.1029/2003JE002057. 1-1; Clancy, R.T., Wolff, M.J., Christensen, P.R., 2003. J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 108 (E9), doi:10.1029/2003JE002058. 2-1]. The range of dust particle sizes simulated by the NASA Ames GCM is qualitatively consistent with TES-derived observations of effective dust particle size variability. Model results suggest that the wind stress dust lifting scheme (which produces regionally confined dust lifting) is the process responsible for the majority of the dust particle size variability in the martian atmosphere. Additionally, model results suggest that atmospheric transport processes play an important role in the evolution of atmospheric dust particles sizes during substantial dust storms on Mars. Finally, we show that including the radiative effects of a spatially variable particle size distribution significantly influences thermal and dynamical fields during the dissipation phase of the simulated global dust storm.

  18. Interstellar Silicate Dust: Modeling and Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Indrajit

    We examine some aspects of the alignment of silicate dust grains with respect to the interstellar magnetic field. First, we consider possible observational constraints on the magnetic properties of the grains. Second, we investigate the role of collisions with gas atoms and the production of H2 molecules on the grain surface in the alignment process when the grain is drifting in the gaseous medium. Paramagnetism associated with Fe content in the dust is thought to play a critical role in alignment. Min et al (2007) claimed that the Fe content of the silicate dust can be constrained by the shape of the 10 μm extinction feature. They found low Fe abundances, potentially posing problems for grain alignment theories. We revisit this analysis modeling the grains with irregularly shaped Gaussian Random Sphere (GRS). We give a comprehensive review of all the relevant constraints researchers apply and discuss their effects on the inferred mineralogy. Also, we extend this analysis to examine whether constraints can be placed on the presence of Fe-rich inclusions which could yield "super-paramagnetism". This possibility has long been speculated, but so far observational constraints are lacking. Every time a gas atom collides with a grain, the grain's angular momentum is slightly modified. Likewise when an H2 molecule forms on the surface and is ejected. Here also we model the grain with GRS shape and considered various scenarios about how the colliding gas particles depart the grain. We develop theoretical and computational tools to estimate the torques associated with these aforementioned events for a range of grain drift speeds---from low subsonic to high supersonic speeds. Code results were verified with spherical grain for which analytical results were available. Finally, the above torque results were used to study the grain rotational dynamics. Solving dynamical equations we examine how these torques influence the grain alignment process. Our analysis suggests that

  19. Modeling gas-dust interactions in debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richert, Alex J. W.; Kuchner, Marc J.; Lyra, Wladimir

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of gas in debris disks has raised the question of whether gas-dust interactions can observably affect global disk structure. This has important implications for identifying planets in debris disks, as well as probing dust grain composition, which is key to understanding the habitability of planetary systems. In this dissertation talk, I present two-dimensional global hydrodynamical models of debris disks with gas and discuss the effects of the gas on the global distribution of the dust.

  20. Fully Self-Consistent Ion-Drag-Force Calculations for Dust in Collisional Plasmas with an External Electric Field

    SciTech Connect

    Patacchini, Leonardo; Hutchinson, Ian H.

    2008-07-11

    The ion drag force on a spherical dust particle immersed in a flowing plasma with an external electric field is self-consistently calculated using the particle-in-cell code SCEPTIC in the entire range of charge-exchange collisionality. Our results, not based on questionable approximations, extend prior analytic calculations valid only in a few limiting regimes. Particular attention is given to the force direction, shown never to be directed opposite to the flow except in the continuum limit, where other forces are of a much stronger magnitude.

  1. Identifying Errors in Dust Models from Data Assimilation over Northern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Richard J.; Marsham, John H.; Knippertz, Peter; Brooks, Malcolm; Roberts, Alex J.

    2016-04-01

    Airborne mineral dust is an important component of the Earth system (e.g. radiation balance, cloud microphysics). It is also relevant for many forecast applications (e.g. air quality) and is increasingly being predicted prognostically in weather and climate models. The recent development of data assimilation for remotely sensed aerosol optical depths (AODs) into models offers a new opportunity to better understand the characteristics and sources of model error. Here we examine data assimilation increments (DAI) from MODIS AODs over northern Africa in the Met Office global forecast model. Comparisons with unassimilated AERONET data from the region show that assimilation improves dust forecasts. We find that the model underestimates dust AOD under light winds and overestimates under strong winds. This is consistent with (sub-) mesoscale processes lifting dust in reality, but being missed by the model. Dust is over-predicted in the Sahara and under-predicted in the Sahel, which is potentially linked to the model's land surface. Using satellite observations of lighting and rainfall as a proxy for moist convection, we show that haboobs (cold pool outflows from moist convection) are an important dust source in reality, but the associated dust is missing in the model, since the parameterized convection in the model fails to represent haboobs. Results suggest that dust from haboobs may make 10-30 % of the summer time western Saharan-Sahelian dust emission. The approach shows promise to serve as a systematic framework for future model evaluation and development and highlights the importance of either parameterizing haboobs or resolving moist convection.

  2. Fugitive Dust Model (FDM) (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, P.

    1990-05-01

    The Fugitive Dust Model (FDM) is a computerized air quality model specifically designed for computing concentration and deposition impacts from fugitive dust sources. The sources may be point, line or area sources. The model has not been designed to compute the impacts of buoyant point sources, thus it contains no plume-rise algorithm. The model is generally based on the well-known Gaussian Plume formulation for computing concentrations, but the model has been specifically adapted to incorporate an improved gradient-transfer deposition algorithm. Emissions for each source are apportioned by the user into a series of particle size classes. A gravitational setting velocity and a deposition velocity are calculated by FDM for each class. Concentration and deposition are computed at all user selectable receptor locations...Software Description: The model is written in the Fortran programming language for implementation on an IBM PC compatible using the DOS operating system.

  3. Consistent Alignment of World Embedding Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-02

    capture rich contextual semantics based on their word co-occurrence patterns. While these word vectors can provide very effective features used in many NLP ...embeddings are able to capture complex semantic patterns such as linguistic analogies and have shown remarkable performance improvements across various NLP ...Topic Modeling with Large Corpora. In Proc. of LREC 2010 Workshop on New Challenges for NLP Frameworks, pp. 45–50, 2010. L.J.P. van der Maaten, E. O

  4. The Importance of Physical Models for Deriving Dust Masses and Grain Size Distributions in Supernova Ejecta. I. Radiatively Heated Dust in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Recent far-infrared (IR) observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) have revealed significantly large amounts of newly condensed dust in their ejecta, comparable to the total mass of available refractory elements. The dust masses derived from these observations assume that all the grains of a given species radiate at the same temperature, regardless of the dust heating mechanism or grain radius. In this paper, we derive the dust mass in the ejecta of the Crab Nebula, using a physical model for the heating and radiation from the dust. We adopt a power-law distribution of grain sizes and two different dust compositions (silicates and amorphous carbon), and calculate the heating rate of each dust grain by the radiation from the pulsar wind nebula. We find that the grains attain a continuous range of temperatures, depending on their size and composition. The total mass derived from the best-fit models to the observed IR spectrum is 0.019-0.13 Solar Mass, depending on the assumed grain composition. We find that the power-law size distribution of dust grains is characterized by a power-law index of 3.5-4.0 and a maximum grain size larger than 0.1 micron. The grain sizes and composition are consistent with what is expected for dust grains formed in a Type IIP supernova (SN). Our derived dust mass is at least a factor of two less than the mass reported in previous studies of the Crab Nebula that assumed more simplified two-temperature models. These models also require a larger mass of refractory elements to be locked up in dust than was likely available in the ejecta. The results of this study show that a physical model resulting in a realistic distribution of dust temperatures can constrain the dust properties and affect the derived dust masses. Our study may also have important implications for deriving grain properties and mass estimates in other SNRs and for the ultimate question of whether SNe are major sources of dust in the Galactic interstellar medium and in

  5. THE IMPORTANCE OF PHYSICAL MODELS FOR DERIVING DUST MASSES AND GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN SUPERNOVA EJECTA. I. RADIATIVELY HEATED DUST IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli

    2013-09-01

    Recent far-infrared (IR) observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) have revealed significantly large amounts of newly condensed dust in their ejecta, comparable to the total mass of available refractory elements. The dust masses derived from these observations assume that all the grains of a given species radiate at the same temperature, regardless of the dust heating mechanism or grain radius. In this paper, we derive the dust mass in the ejecta of the Crab Nebula, using a physical model for the heating and radiation from the dust. We adopt a power-law distribution of grain sizes and two different dust compositions (silicates and amorphous carbon), and calculate the heating rate of each dust grain by the radiation from the pulsar wind nebula. We find that the grains attain a continuous range of temperatures, depending on their size and composition. The total mass derived from the best-fit models to the observed IR spectrum is 0.019-0.13 M{sub Sun }, depending on the assumed grain composition. We find that the power-law size distribution of dust grains is characterized by a power-law index of 3.5-4.0 and a maximum grain size larger than 0.1 {mu}m. The grain sizes and composition are consistent with what is expected for dust grains formed in a Type IIP supernova (SN). Our derived dust mass is at least a factor of two less than the mass reported in previous studies of the Crab Nebula that assumed more simplified two-temperature models. These models also require a larger mass of refractory elements to be locked up in dust than was likely available in the ejecta. The results of this study show that a physical model resulting in a realistic distribution of dust temperatures can constrain the dust properties and affect the derived dust masses. Our study may also have important implications for deriving grain properties and mass estimates in other SNRs and for the ultimate question of whether SNe are major sources of dust in the Galactic interstellar medium and in

  6. Gravitational entropies in LTB dust models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Roberto A.; Larena, Julien

    2014-04-01

    We consider generic Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) dust models to probe the gravitational entropy proposals of Clifton, Ellis and Tavakol (CET) and of Hosoya and Buchert (HB). We also consider a variant of the HB proposal based on a suitable quasi-local scalar weighted average. We show that the conditions for entropy growth for all proposals are directly related to a negative correlation of similar fluctuations of the energy density and Hubble scalar. While this correlation is evaluated locally for the CET proposal, it must be evaluated in a non-local domain dependent manner for the two HB proposals. By looking at the fulfilment of these conditions at the relevant asymptotic limits we are able to provide a well grounded qualitative description of the full time evolution and radial asymptotic scaling of the three entropies in generic models. The following rigorous analytic results are obtained for the three proposals: (i) entropy grows when the density growing mode is dominant, (ii) all ever-expanding hyperbolic models reach a stable terminal equilibrium characterized by an inhomogeneous entropy maximum in their late time evolution; (iii) regions with decaying modes and collapsing elliptic models exhibit unstable equilibria associated with an entropy minimum (iv) near singularities the CET entropy diverges while the HB entropies converge; (v) the CET entropy converges for all models in the radial asymptotic range, whereas the HB entropies only converge for models asymptotic to a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker background. The fact that different independent proposals yield fairly similar conditions for entropy production, time evolution and radial scaling in generic LTB models seems to suggest that their common notion of a ‘gravitational entropy’ may be a theoretically robust concept applicable to more general spacetimes.

  7. Modeling of the interstellar dust distribution inside the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaev, Pavel; Katushkina, Olga; Alexashov, Dmitry; Izmodenov, Vladislav

    2016-07-01

    Interstellar dust penetrates into the heliosphere and it has been measured in the interplanetary medium by multiple spacecraft. The dust particles pass through the heliospheric boundary region, where the solar wind interacts with the interstellar medium. A part of them are filtered in the region. The filtration affects the dust distribution drastically. In this work we present the result of our modeling of the distribution of interstellar dust grains inside the heliosphere and at the boundary. A dust grain traveling from the interstellar medium to the inner heliosphere is affected by several forces. We take into account the solar gravitation force, the solar radiation repulsive force and the Lorentz force. In order to find the Lorentz force one has to know the distributions of the plasma velocity and the magnetic field. To obtain these distributions we use the 3D kinetic-MHD model of the heliosphere (Izmodenov, Alexashov, 2015). To calculate the distribution of the interstellar dust grains we employ the Lagrangian form of the continuity equation. We compare efficiency of this method and kinetic Monte-Carlo methods. The Lagrangian method provides us with possibility to find the surfaces where the model predicts infinite concentration of dust grains. In the physical reality these surfaces should correspond to the regions of dust grains accumulation.

  8. Validating Dust Storm Model Using Satellite Aerosol Retrievals and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YU, M.; Benedict, K. K.; Huang, Q.; Gui, Z.; XIA, J.; Chen, S.

    2013-12-01

    Dust storm is a meteorological phenomenon with high dust concentration and strong striking force affecting transportation and causing disease. Considering the negative impacts of dust storm, the accuracy of dust storm forecasting is critical for, especially, responding to the emergencies. However, it is challenge to validating the forecasting limited by availability of observation data. The complexity is partially caused by the inconsistency in spatial and temporal resolutions between model simulation and field observation. In addition, the accuracy and reliability of observation data are not guaranteed. Therefore, in order to complement observation data in terms of temporal resolution and enhance the accuracy of observation data, validation methods should be based on data assimilation between satellite and ground-based observations. The dust storm simulation and forecasting model, NMM-dust, coupling Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) and Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM) meteorological module, produces higher resolution results for weather forecasting and enabling executability in parallel mode on distributed systems. So far, NMM-dust has been validated in the southwestern US only by comparison with measurement from AIRNOW data and with barely acceptable results. Observation data used for validation includes MODIS and SeaWiFS Deep Blue aerosol products, and ground-based observations from EPA-AQS. Results from comparisons between satellite data and model output show similar dust distribution patterns. Besides, the temporal resolution of satellite data is improved by using both MODIS and SeaWiFS. Quantitative analysis including time-series analysis and diagnose analysis are also examined to investigate the stability and consistency of the model.

  9. Use of Combined A-Train Observations to Validate GEOS Model Simulated Dust Distributions During NAMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowottnick, E.

    2007-01-01

    During August 2006, the NASA African Multidisciplinary Analyses Mission (NAMMA) field experiment was conducted to characterize the structure of African Easterly Waves and their evolution into tropical storms. Mineral dust aerosols affect tropical storm development, although their exact role remains to be understood. To better understand the role of dust on tropical cyclogenesis, we have implemented a dust source, transport, and optical model in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) atmospheric general circulation model and data assimilation system. Our dust source scheme is more physically based scheme than previous incarnations of the model, and we introduce improved dust optical and microphysical processes through inclusion of a detailed microphysical scheme. Here we use A-Train observations from MODIS, OMI, and CALIPSO with NAMMA DC-8 flight data to evaluate the simulated dust distributions and microphysical properties. Our goal is to synthesize the multi-spectral observations from the A-Train sensors to arrive at a consistent set of optical properties for the dust aerosols suitable for direct forcing calculations.

  10. Use of Combined A-Train Observations to Validate GEOS Model Simulated Dust Distributions During NAMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowottnick, E.

    2007-01-01

    During August 2006, the NASA African Multidisciplinary Analyses Mission (NAMMA) field experiment was conducted to characterize the structure of African Easterly Waves and their evolution into tropical storms. Mineral dust aerosols affect tropical storm development, although their exact role remains to be understood. To better understand the role of dust on tropical cyclogenesis, we have implemented a dust source, transport, and optical model in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) atmospheric general circulation model and data assimilation system. Our dust source scheme is more physically based scheme than previous incarnations of the model, and we introduce improved dust optical and microphysical processes through inclusion of a detailed microphysical scheme. Here we use A-Train observations from MODIS, OMI, and CALIPSO with NAMMA DC-8 flight data to evaluate the simulated dust distributions and microphysical properties. Our goal is to synthesize the multi-spectral observations from the A-Train sensors to arrive at a consistent set of optical properties for the dust aerosols suitable for direct forcing calculations.

  11. Dust mobilization and transport modeling for loss of vacuum accidents

    SciTech Connect

    P.W. Humrickhouse; J.P. Sharpe

    2007-10-01

    We develop a general continuum fluid dynamic model for dust transport in loss of vacuum accidents in fusion energy systems. The relationship between this general approach and established particle transport methods is clarified, in particular the relationship between the seemingly disparate treatments of aerosol dynamics and Lagrangian particle tracking. Constitutive equations for granular flow are found to be inadequate for prediction of mobilization, as these models essentially impose a condition of flow from the outset. Experiments confirm that at low shear, settled dust piles behave more like a continuum solid, and suitable solid models will be required to predict the onset of dust mobilization.

  12. Self-Consistent Hydrodynamical Models For Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulangier, Jels; Homan, Ward; van Marle, Allard Jan; Decin, Leen; de Koter, Alex

    2016-07-01

    The physical and chemical conditions in the atmosphere of pulsating AGB stars are not well understood. In order to properly model this region, which is packed with shocks arisen from the pulsational behaviour of the star, we aim to understand the interplay between spatial and temporal changes in both the chemical composition and the hydro/thermodynamical behaviour inside these regions. Ideal models require the coupling of hydrodynamics, chemistry and radiative transfer, in three dimensions. As this is computationally not yet feasible, we aim to model this zone via a bottom-up approach. At first, we build correct 3D hydrodynamical set-up without any cooling or heating. Omitting cooling hampers the mass-loss of the AGB star within the reasonable confines of a realistic parameter space. Introducing cooling will decrease the temperature gradients in the atmosphere, counteracting the mass-loss even more. However, cooling also ensures the existence of regions where the temperature is low enough for the formation of dust to take place. This dust will absorb the momentum of the impacting photons from the AGB photosphere, accelerate outward and collide with the obstructing gas, dragging it along. Moreover, since chemistry, nucleation and dust formation depend critically on the temperature structure of the circumstellar environment, it is of utmost importance to include all relevant heating/cooling sources. Efforts to include cooling have been undertaken in the last decades, making use of different radiative cooling mechanisms for several chemical species, with some simplified radiative transfer. However, often the chemical composition of these 1D atmosphere models is fixed, implying the very strong assumption of chemical equilibrium, which is not at all true for a pulsating AGB atmosphere. We wish to model these atmospheres making as few assumptions as possible on equilibrium conditions. Therefore, as a first step, we introduce H2 dissociative cooling to the hydrodynamical

  13. User's guide for the Fugitive Dust Model (FDM). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Winges, K.D.

    1988-06-01

    This document provides a technical description and User's Instructions for the Fugitive Dust Model. The FDM is a Gaussian-plume base dispersion model specifically designed for computation of fugitive-dust concentrations and deposition rates. It's chief advantage over other models is an advance deposition algorithm. A validation study has been performed and is included as an appendix. The document also includes sample input and output printouts and a complete listing of the FORTRAN computer code.

  14. ULTRAVIOLET RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODELING OF NEARBY GALAXIES WITH EXTRAPLANAR DUSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Seon, Kwang-Il

    2015-12-20

    In order to examine their relation to the host galaxy, the extraplanar dusts of six nearby galaxies are modeled, employing a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The targets are from the highly inclined galaxies that show dust-scattered ultraviolet halos, and the archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV band images were fitted with the model. The observed images are generally well-reproduced by two dust layers and one light source layer, whose vertical and radial distributions have exponential profiles. We obtained several important physical parameters, such as star formation rate (SFR{sub UV}), face-on optical depth, and scale-heights. Three galaxies (NGC 891, NGC 3628, and UGC 11794) show clear evidence for the existence of an extraplanar dust layer. However, it is found that the remaining three targets (IC 5249, NGC 24, and NGC 4173) do not necessarily need a thick dust disk to model the ultraviolet (UV) halo, because its contribution is too small and the UV halo may be caused by the wing part of the GALEX point spread function. This indicates that the galaxy samples reported to have UV halos may be contaminated by galaxies with negligible extraplanar (halo) dust. The galaxies showing evidence of an extraplanar dust layer fall within a narrow range on the scatter plots between physical parameters such as SFR{sub UV} and extraplanar dust mass. Several mechanisms that could possibly produce the extraplanar dust are discussed. We also found a hint that the extraplanar dust scale-height might not be much different from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission characteristic height.

  15. Ultraviolet Radiative Transfer Modeling of Nearby Galaxies with Extraplanar Dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Seon, Kwang-Il

    2015-12-01

    In order to examine their relation to the host galaxy, the extraplanar dusts of six nearby galaxies are modeled, employing a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The targets are from the highly inclined galaxies that show dust-scattered ultraviolet halos, and the archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV band images were fitted with the model. The observed images are generally well-reproduced by two dust layers and one light source layer, whose vertical and radial distributions have exponential profiles. We obtained several important physical parameters, such as star formation rate (SFRUV), face-on optical depth, and scale-heights. Three galaxies (NGC 891, NGC 3628, and UGC 11794) show clear evidence for the existence of an extraplanar dust layer. However, it is found that the remaining three targets (IC 5249, NGC 24, and NGC 4173) do not necessarily need a thick dust disk to model the ultraviolet (UV) halo, because its contribution is too small and the UV halo may be caused by the wing part of the GALEX point spread function. This indicates that the galaxy samples reported to have UV halos may be contaminated by galaxies with negligible extraplanar (halo) dust. The galaxies showing evidence of an extraplanar dust layer fall within a narrow range on the scatter plots between physical parameters such as SFRUV and extraplanar dust mass. Several mechanisms that could possibly produce the extraplanar dust are discussed. We also found a hint that the extraplanar dust scale-height might not be much different from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission characteristic height.

  16. COLLISIONAL GROOMING MODELS OF THE KUIPER BELT DUST CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchner, Marc J.; Stark, Christopher C. E-mail: starkc@umd.ed

    2010-10-15

    We modeled the three-dimensional structure of the Kuiper Belt (KB) dust cloud at four different dust production rates, incorporating both planet-dust interactions and grain-grain collisions using the collisional grooming algorithm. Simulated images of a model with a face-on optical depth of {approx}10{sup -4} primarily show an azimuthally symmetric ring at 40-47 AU in submillimeter and infrared wavelengths; this ring is associated with the cold classical KB. For models with lower optical depths (10{sup -6} and 10{sup -7}), synthetic infrared images show that the ring widens and a gap opens in the ring at the location of Neptune; this feature is caused by trapping of dust grains in Neptune's mean motion resonances. At low optical depths, a secondary ring also appears associated with the hole cleared in the center of the disk by Saturn. Our simulations, which incorporate 25 different grain sizes, illustrate that grain-grain collisions are important in sculpting today's KB dust, and probably other aspects of the solar system dust complex; collisions erase all signs of azimuthal asymmetry from the submillimeter image of the disk at every dust level we considered. The model images switch from being dominated by resonantly trapped small grains ('transport dominated') to being dominated by the birth ring ('collision dominated') when the optical depth reaches a critical value of {tau} {approx} v/c, where v is the local Keplerian speed.

  17. Collisional Grooming Models of the Kuiper Belt Dust Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc J.; Stark, Christopher C.

    2010-01-01

    We modeled the three-dimensional structure of the Kuiper Belt (KB) dust cloud at four different dust production rates, incorporating both planet-dust interactions and grain-grain collisions using the collisional grooming algorithm. Simulated images of a model with a face-on optical depth of approximately 10 (exp -4) primarily show an azimuthally- symmetric ring at 40-47 AU in submillimeter and infrared wavelengths; this ring is associated with the cold classical KB. For models with lower optical depths (10 (exp -6) and 10 (exp-7)), synthetic infrared images show that the ring widens and a gap opens in the ring at the location of Neptune; this feature is caused by trapping of dust grains in Neptune's mean motion resonances. At low optical depths, a secondary ring also appears associated with the hole cleared in the center of the disk by Saturn. Our simulations, which incorporate 25 different grain sizes, illustrate that grain-grain collisions are important in sculpting today's KB dust, and probably other aspects of the solar system dust complex; collisions erase all signs of azimuthal asymmetry from the submillimeter image of the disk at every dust level we considered. The model images switch from being dominated by resonantly trapped small grains ("transport dominated") to being dominated by the birth ring ("collision dominated") when the optical depth reaches a critical value of r approximately v/c, where v is the local Keplerian speed.

  18. Collisional Grooming Models of the Kuiper Belt Dust Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc J.; Stark, Christopher C.

    2010-01-01

    We modeled the three-dimensional structure of the Kuiper Belt (KB) dust cloud at four different dust production rates, incorporating both planet-dust interactions and grain-grain collisions using the collisional grooming algorithm. Simulated images of a model with a face-on optical depth of approximately 10 (exp -4) primarily show an azimuthally- symmetric ring at 40-47 AU in submillimeter and infrared wavelengths; this ring is associated with the cold classical KB. For models with lower optical depths (10 (exp -6) and 10 (exp-7)), synthetic infrared images show that the ring widens and a gap opens in the ring at the location of Neptune; this feature is caused by trapping of dust grains in Neptune's mean motion resonances. At low optical depths, a secondary ring also appears associated with the hole cleared in the center of the disk by Saturn. Our simulations, which incorporate 25 different grain sizes, illustrate that grain-grain collisions are important in sculpting today's KB dust, and probably other aspects of the solar system dust complex; collisions erase all signs of azimuthal asymmetry from the submillimeter image of the disk at every dust level we considered. The model images switch from being dominated by resonantly trapped small grains ("transport dominated") to being dominated by the birth ring ("collision dominated") when the optical depth reaches a critical value of r approximately v/c, where v is the local Keplerian speed.

  19. Dust processing in photodissociation regions. Mid-IR emission modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compiègne, M.; Abergel, A.; Verstraete, L.; Habart, E.

    2008-12-01

    Context: Mid-infrared spectroscopy of dense illuminated ridges (or photodissociation regions, PDRs) suggests dust evolution. Such evolution must be reflected in the gas physical properties through processes like photo-electric heating or H2 formation. Aims: With Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) and ISOCAM data, we study the mid-IR emission of closeby, well known PDRs. Focusing on the band and continuum dust emissions, we follow their relative contributions and analyze their variations in terms of abundance of dust populations. Methods: In order to disentangle dust evolution and excitation effects, we use a dust emission model that we couple to radiative transfer. Our dust model reproduces extinction and emission of the standard interstellar medium that we represent with diffuse high galactic latitude clouds called Cirrus. We take the properties of dust in Cirrus as a reference to which we compare the dust emission from more excited regions, namely the Horsehead and the reflection nebula NGC 2023 North. Results: We show that in both regions, radiative transfer effects cannot account for the observed spectral variations. We interpret these variations in term of changes of the relative abundance between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, mid-IR band carriers) and very small grains (VSGs, mid-IR continuum carriers). Conclusions: We conclude that the PAH/VSG abundance ratio is 2.4 times smaller at the peak emission of the Horsehead nebula than in the Cirrus case. For NGC 2023 North where spectral evolution is observed across the northern PDR, we conclude that this ratio is ~5 times lower in the dense, cold zones of the PDR than in its diffuse illuminated part where dust properties seem to be the same as in Cirrus. We conclude that dust in PDRs seems to evolve from “dense” to “diffuse” properties at the small spatial scale of the dense illuminated ridge.

  20. Eolian Modeling System: Predicting Windblown Dust Hazards in Battlefield Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-03

    environments and to understand the implications of eolian transport for environmental processes such as soil and desert pavement formation. The...REPORT Final Report for Eolian Modeling System (EMS): Predicting Windblown Sand and Dust Hazards in Battlefield Environments 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...Predicting Windblown Sand and Dust Hazards in Battlefield Environments ." The objectives of the research were to 1) develop numerical models for the

  1. Possible Dust Models for C/2012 S1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) provided a great opportunity to study a dynamically new Oort-cloud comet on its initial and only passage through the inner solar system. Contrary to expectations, the comet's activity fluctuated from high through a quiescent phase, and a major outburst days before its perihelion passage, ending in a dramatic race to complete disintegration on perihelion day, 28 November 2013. Amateur observations to professional ground-based, sub-orbital telescopes indicate the various changes of visible factors such as Afrho, a proxy for dust activity, and the measured production rates for water, consistent with the disintegration of the nucleus. Hines et al. (2013; ApJ Lett. 780) detected positive polarization in the inner coma and negative polarization in the outer coma, indicative of a jet, independently confirmed by Li et al. (2013, ApJ Lett., 779). Thermal emission observations of the comet pre-perihelion from NAOJ/Subaru/COMICS, a mid-infrared spectrometer, indicated a body with an equivalent brightness temperature of 265K (Ootsubo et al., 2013, ACM, Helsinki,FI); thermal observations acquired at the NASA/Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) with The Aerospace Corporation spectrometer (BASS, PI. R. Russell), before and after the November 12, 2013 outburst observed by the CIOC_ISON amateur network, indicates a brightness temperature of 330K and the presence, albeit weak, of the 11.3-micron crystalline silicate feature (Sitko et al., 2014, LPI abstract 1537). A Monte Carlo comet dust tail model, applied to extract the dust environment parameters of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) from both Earth-based and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) calibrated observations, performed from about 6 AU (inbound), to right after perihelion passage, when just a small portion of the original comet nucleus survived in the form of a cloud of tiny particles, indicates that particles underwent disintegration and fragmentation (Moreno et al., 2014, ApJ Lett., 791). Ongoing work

  2. Global dust model intercomparison in AeroCom phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Huneeus, N.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Griesfeller, J.; Prospero, J.; Kinne, S.; Bauer, S.; Boucher, O.; Chin, M.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, S.; Ginoux, P.; Grini, A.; Horowitz, L.; Koch, D.; Krol, M. C.; Landing, W.; Liu, X.; Mahowald, N.; Miller, R.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, J.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Zender, C. S.

    2011-08-01

    This study presents the results of a broad intercomparison of a total of 15 global aerosol models within the AeroCom project. Each model is compared to observations related to desert dust aerosols, their direct radiative effect, and their impact on the biogeochemical cycle, i.e., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and dust deposition. Additional comparisons to Angström exponent (AE), coarse mode AOD and dust surface concentrations are included to extend the assessment of model performance and to identify common biases present in models. These data comprise a benchmark dataset that is proposed for model inspection and future dust model development. There are large differences among the global models that simulate the dust cycle and its impact on climate. In general, models simulate the climatology of vertically integrated parameters (AOD and AE) within a factor of two whereas the total deposition and surface concentration are reproduced within a factor of 10. In addition, smaller mean normalized bias and root mean square errors are obtained for the climatology of AOD and AE than for total deposition and surface concentration. Characteristics of the datasets used and their uncertainties may influence these differences. Large uncertainties still exist with respect to the deposition fluxes in the southern oceans. Further measurements and model studies are necessary to assess the general model performance to reproduce dust deposition in ocean regions sensible to iron contributions. Models overestimate the wet deposition in regions dominated by dry deposition. They generally simulate more realistic surface concentration at stations downwind of the main sources than at remote ones. Most models simulate the gradient in AOD and AE between the different dusty regions. However the seasonality and magnitude of both variables is better simulated at African stations than Middle East ones. The models simulate the offshore transport of West Africa throughout the year but they

  3. Dust modeling over Saudi Arabia using WRF-Chem: March 2009 severe dust case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongxin; Liu, Yubao; Kucera, Paul A.; Alharbi, Badr H.; Pan, Linlin; Ghulam, Ayman

    2015-10-01

    This paper documents the performance of the fully coupled WRF-Chem model at 21.6 km and 7.2 km resolution over Saudi Arabia in simulating a severe dust storm event that occurred in March 2009. The comparisons between the model simulations and the observed AOD at the Solar Village AERONET site and the MODIS measurements show that WRF-Chem satisfactorily resolves the arrival, evolution and spatial distributions of the dust storm over Saudi Arabia especially for the fine domain at 7.2 km resolution. The model simulated surface meteorological variables at Riyadh Airport, Hafr Al-Batin Airport, Dammam Airport and Gassim Airport follow the observations in terms of magnitude and temporal evolution although model biases such as deficiencies in simulating the amplitude of diurnal cycles are noted. Higher resolution and shorter initialization time improve the model performance in aerosol optical depth but for surface variables shorter initialization time improves correlation while higher horizontal resolution improves mean biases to some extent. The simulated dust plume is mainly confined between the surface and the 5-km height, with the peak concentrations located in the lowest 500 m. The vertical extent of the dust plume shows gradual decreases during the simulation period when averaged over the entire fine domain and an area centered around Solar Village, and also varies in accordance with the development and decay of the boundary layer.

  4. NMMB/BSC-DUST: an online mineral dust atmospheric model from meso to global scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, K.; Pérez, C.; Jorba, O.; Baldasano, J. M.; Janjic, Z.; Black, T.; Nickovic, S.

    2009-04-01

    While mineral dust distribution and effects are important at global scales, they strongly depend on dust emissions that are controlled on small spatial and temporal scales. Most global dust models use prescribed wind fields provided by meteorological centers (e.g., NCEP and ECMWF) and their spatial resolution is currently never better than about 1°×1°. Regional dust models offer substantially higher resolution (10-20 km) and are typically coupled with weather forecast models that simulate processes that GCMs either cannot resolve or can resolve only poorly. These include internal circulation features such as the low-level nocturnal jet which is a crucial feature for dust emission in several dust ‘hot spot' sources in North Africa. Based on our modeling experience with the BSC-DREAM regional forecast model (http://www.bsc.es/projects/earthscience/DREAM/) we are currently implementing an improved mineral dust model [Pérez et al., 2008] coupled online with the new global/regional NMMB atmospheric model under development in NOAA/NCEP/EMC [Janjic, 2005]. The NMMB is an evolution of the operational WRF-NMME extending from meso to global scales. The NMMB will become the next-generation NCEP model for operational weather forecast in 2010. The corresponding unified non-hydrostatic dynamical core ranges from meso to global scale allowing regional and global simulations. It has got an add-on non-hydrostatic module and it is based on the Arakawa B-grid and hybrid pressure-sigma vertical coordinates. NMMB is fully embedded into the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF), treating dynamics and physics separately and coupling them easily within the ESMF structure. Our main goal is to provide global dust forecasts up to 7 days at mesoscale resolutions. New features of the model include a physically-based dust emission scheme after White [1979], Iversen and White [1982] and Marticorena and Bergametti [1995] that takes the effects of saltation and sandblasting into account

  5. Dust Composition in Climate Models: Current Status and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.; Perlwitz, J. P.; Kok, J. F.; Scanza, R.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust created by wind erosion of soil particles is the dominant aerosol by mass in the atmosphere. It exerts significant effects on radiative fluxes, clouds, ocean biogeochemistry, and human health. Models that predict the lifecycle of mineral dust aerosols generally assume a globally uniform mineral composition. However, this simplification limits our understanding of the role of dust in the Earth system, since the effects of dust strongly depend on the particles' physical and chemical properties, which vary with their mineral composition. Hence, not only a detailed understanding of the processes determining the dust emission flux is needed, but also information about its size dependent mineral composition. Determining the mineral composition of dust aerosols is complicated. The largest uncertainty derives from the current atlases of soil mineral composition. These atlases provide global estimates of soil mineral fractions, but they are based upon massive extrapolation of a limited number of soil samples assuming that mineral composition is related to soil type. This disregards the potentially large variability of soil properties within each defined soil type. In addition, the analysis of these soil samples is based on wet sieving, a technique that breaks the aggregates found in the undisturbed parent soil. During wind erosion, these aggregates are subject to partial fragmentation, which generates differences on the size distribution and composition between the undisturbed parent soil and the emitted dust aerosols. We review recent progress on the representation of the mineral and chemical composition of dust in climate models. We discuss extensions of brittle fragmentation theory to prescribe the emitted size-resolved dust composition, and we identify key processes and uncertainties based upon model simulations and an unprecedented compilation of observations.

  6. Severe dust storms over the Arabian Peninsula: Observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    shalaby, ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Dust aerosols and dust storms have tremendous effects on human health and all development activities. Also atmospheric dust plays a major role in the Earth climate system by its interaction with radiation and clouds. Severe dust storms are considered the severest phenomena in the Arabian Peninsula, since they are occurring all the year round with maximum activity and frequency in Summer. The Regional Climate Model (RegCM4) has been used to simulate severe dust storms events in the Arabian Peninsula from 1998 up to 2011. This long period simulation shows a typical pattern and dynamical features of the large-scale severe dust storm in winter seasons and summer seasons. The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from the model outputs have been compared against ground--base observations of three AERONET stations (i.e., Kuwait, Mazeria and Solar-Village) and daily space--based observations of MISR, Deepblue and OMI. The dynamical analysis of the large—scale severe dust storms reveal the difference between winter time storms and summer time storm. Winter time storm occurs when the cold air front in the north is coupled with the extension of the Red Sea trough from the south. However, the summer time storm is associated with strong Shamal wind that extend from northern Kuwait to the southern Arabian Peninsula.

  7. An overview of mineral dust modeling over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Siyu; Huang, Jianping; Qian, Yun; Zhao, Chun; Kang, Litai; Yang, Ben; Wang, Yong; Liu, Yuzhi; Yuan, Tiangang; Wang, Tianhe; Ma, Xiaojun; Zhang, Guolong

    2017-08-01

    East Asian dust (EAD) exerts considerable impacts on the energy balance and climate/climate change of the earth system through its influence on solar and terrestrial radiation, cloud properties, and precipitation efficiency. Providing an accurate description of the life cycle and climate effects of EAD is therefore critical to better understanding of climate change and socioeconomic development in East Asia and even worldwide. Dust modeling has undergone substantial development since the late 1990s, associated with improved understanding of the role of EAD in the earth system. Here, we review the achievements and progress made in recent decades in terms of dust modeling research, including dust emissions, long-range transport, radiative forcing (RF), and climate effects of dust particles over East Asia. Numerous efforts in dust/EAD modeling have been directed towards furnishing more sophisticated physical and chemical processes into the models on higher spatial resolutions. Meanwhile, more systematic observations and more advanced retrieval methods for instruments that address EAD related science issues have made it possible to evaluate model results and quantify the role of EAD in the earth system, and to further reduce the uncertainties in EAD simulations. Though much progress has been made, large discrepancies and knowledge gaps still exist among EAD simulations. The deficiencies and limitations that pertain to the performance of the EAD simulations referred to in the present study are also discussed.

  8. IR photometry and models for the dust envelopes of two carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, M. B.; Taranova, O. G.

    2016-12-01

    The results of JHKLM photometry of two carbon stars are presented: the irregular variable NQ Cas and the Mira star BD Vul. Data on the mean fluxes supplemented with mid-IR observations with the IRAS, AKARI, andWISE satellites are used to compute spherically symmetrical model dust envelopes for the stars, consisting of particles of amorphous carbon and silicon carbide. The optical depth in the visible for the comparatively cool dust envelope of BD Vul, with a dust temperature at its inner boundary T 1 = 610 K, is fairly low: τ V = 0.13. The dust envelope of NQ Cas is appreciably hotter ( T 1 = 1550 K), and has τ V = 0.32. The estimated mass-loss rates are 1.5 × 10-7 M ⊙/yr for NQ Cas and 5.9 × 10-7 M ⊙/yr for BD Vul.

  9. Effects of nonspherical dust optical models on the VIIRS Deep Blue over-water aerosol product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Hsu, N. Y. C.; Sayer, A. M.; Bettenhausen, C.; Yang, P.

    2016-12-01

    Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)-based nonspherical dust optical models are developed for the Version 1 Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Deep Blue over-water algorithm (also known as Satellite Ocean Aerosol Retrieval algorithm). The optical models are created at six distinct AERONET sites influenced by frequent dust aerosols from different source regions. We assume the same spheroid shape distribution as used in the Version 2 AERONET inversion algorithm to account for the nonsphericity of dust, which makes the developed optical models consistent with the AERONET-retrieved microphysical and optical properties. For the initial data processing, the optical models representing the Capo Verde site are used due to the strong influence of Saharan dust over the global ocean. Comparisons of the VIIRS-retrieved aerosol data products against AERONET at three island/coastal sites suggest that the use of nonspherical dust optical models significantly mitigates the well-known, artificial scattering angle dependence of aerosol optical depth (AOD), which is observed when incorrectly assuming spherical dust. Ångström exponent is also greatly improved, showing a noticeable reduction of high biases as compared to the spherical assumption. The improvement in AOD results in a more natural AOD gradient of Saharan dust along the transport path to the Atlantic Ocean; i.e., AOD decreases with increasing distance transported, whereas the spherical model assumption leads to a strong wave pattern in AOD due to the artificial scattering angle dependence of AOD. Although further investigation is required, the present study can be applied to similar sensors such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) to produce a long-term, consistent aerosol data product.

  10. Dust pattern over Indian subcontinent based on NAAPS model, satellite and surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, R.; Husar, R. B.; Sethi, V.; Westphal, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    high values (greater than 1.0) during summer and monsoon consistent with the spatial pattern for dust AOT from NAAPS. OMI aerosol index is highest (1.0 to 1.2) over the dust source regions. Regional analysis of scale height index (SHI) computed as the ratio of MODIS AOT to surface RSPM concentrations showed high scale height (about 3-5 times that in winter) over India during monsoon season when the elevated dust layers have been suggested by NAAPS simulations. The surface RSPM patterns support the NAAPS surface dust patterns with surface mass concentrations being lowest (50- 25% of winter concentrations) during monsoon. The use of multi-sensory observations along with a data-assimilating model elucidates the dynamic spatio-temporal pattern of dust over the Indian subcontinent. The remaining challenges include the reconciliation of the existing satellite and surface observations, with the emissions and data-assimilating models.

  11. Hydrodynamic model of a self-gravitating optically thick gas and dust cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukova, E. V.; Zankovich, A. M.; Kovalenko, I. G.; Firsov, K. M.

    2015-10-01

    We propose an original mechanism of sustained turbulence generation in gas and dust clouds, the essence of which is the consistent provision of conditions for the emergence and maintenance of convective instability in the cloud. We considered a quasi-stationary one-dimensional model of a selfgravitating flat cloud with stellar radiation sources in its center. The material of the cloud is considered a two-component two-speed continuous medium, the first component of which, gas, is transparent for stellar radiation and is supposed to rest being in hydrostatic equilibrium, and the second one, dust, is optically dense and is swept out by the pressure of stellar radiation to the periphery of the cloud. The dust is specified as a set of spherical grains of a similar size (we made calculations for dust particles with radii of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.15 μm). The processes of scattering and absorption of UV radiation by dust particles followed by IR reradiation, with respect to which the medium is considered to be transparent, are taken into account. Dust-driven stellar wind sweeps gas outwards from the center of the cloud, forming a cocoon-like structure in the gas and dust. For the radiation flux corresponding to a concentration of one star with a luminosity of about 5 ×104 L ⊙ per square parsec on the plane of sources, sizes of the gas cocoon are equal to 0.2-0.4 pc, and for the dust one they vary from tenths of a parsec to six parsecs. Gas and dust in the center of the cavity are heated to temperatures of about 50-60 K in the model with graphite particles and up to 40 K in the model with silicate dust, while the background equilibrium temperature outside the cavity is set equal to 10 K. The characteristic dust expansion velocity is about 1-7 kms-1. Three structural elements define the hierarchy of scales in the dust cocoon. The sizes of the central rarefied cavity, the dense shell surrounding the cavity, and the thin layer inside the shell in which dust is settling provide

  12. Dust-acoustic solitary waves and double layers in dusty plasma consisting of cold dust particles and two-temperature isothermal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagare, S. G.

    1997-09-01

    It is found that a dusty plasma with inertial dust fluid and two-temperature isothermal ions admits both compressive and rarefactive solitary waves, as well as compressive and rarefactive double layers (depending on the concentration of low-temperature ions). In this paper, Korteweg-de Vries equation (KdV-type equations) with cubic and fourth-order nonlinearity at the critical density of low-temperature isothermal ions are derived to discuss properties of dust-acoustic solitary waves. In the vicinity of critical density of low-temperature ions, KdV-type equation with mixed nonlinearity is discussed. By using quasipotential analysis, critical Mach numbers M1c and M2c are obtained such that rarefactive dust-acoustic solitons exist when 1dust acoustic solitons exist when 1

  13. Dust in the small Magellanic Cloud. 2: Dust models from interstellar polarization and extinction data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, C. V.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Coyne, G. V.

    1995-01-01

    We study the dust in the Small Magellanic Cloud using our polarization and extinction data (Paper 1) and existing dust models. The data suggest that the monotonic SMC extinction curve is related to values of lambda(sub max), the wavelength of maximum polarization, which are on the average smaller than the mean for the Galaxy. On the other hand, AZV 456, a star with an extinction similar to that for the Galaxy, shows a value of lambda(sub max) similar to the mean for the Galaxy. We discuss simultaneous dust model fits to extinction and polarization. Fits to the wavelength dependent polarization data are possible for stars with small lambda(sub max). In general, they imply dust size distributions which are narrower and have smaller mean sizes compared to typical size distributions for the Galaxy. However, stars with lambda(sub max) close to the Galactic norm, which also have a narrower polarization curve, cannot be fit adequately. This holds true for all of the dust models considered. The best fits to the extinction curves are obtained with a power law size distribution by assuming that the cylindrical and spherical silicate grains have a volume distribution which is continuous from the smaller spheres to the larger cylinders. The size distribution for the cylinders is taken from the fit to the polarization. The 'typical', monotonic SMC extinction curve can be fit well with graphite and silicate grains if a small fraction of the SMC carbon is locked up in the grain. However, amorphous carbon and silicate grains also fit the data well. AZV456, which has an extinction curve similar to that for the Galaxy, has a UV bump which is too blue to be fit by spherical graphite grains.

  14. Comparison of dust transport modelling codes in a tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uccello, Andrea; Gervasini, Gabriele; Ghezzi, Francesco; Lazzaro, Enzo; Bacharis, Minas; Flanagan, Joanne; Matthews, Guy; Järvinen, Aaro; Sertoli, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Since the installation on the Joint European Torus of the ITER-like Wall (ILW), intense radiation spikes have been observed, especially in the discharges following a disruption, and have been associated with possible sudden injection of tungsten (W) impurities consequent to full ablation of W dust particles. The problem of dust production, mobilization, and interaction both with the plasma and the vessel tiles is therefore of great concern and requires the setting up of dedicated and validated numerical modeling tools. Among these, a useful role is played by the dust trajectory calculators, which can present in a relatively clear way the qualitative and quantitative description of the mobilization and fate of selected bunches of dust grains.

  15. A small animal model study of perlite and fir bark dust on guinea pig lungs.

    PubMed

    McMichael, R F; DiPalma, J R; Blumenstein, R; Amenta, P S; Freedman, A P; Barbieri, E J

    1983-05-01

    Fir bark (Abies) and perlite (noncrystalline silicate) dusts have been reported to cause pulmonary disease in humans. Guinea pigs were exposed to either fir bark or perlite dust in a special chamber. Severe pathologic changes occurred in the lungs, consisting of lymphoid aggregated and a perivascular inflammatory response. Both dusts caused similar changes although one was vegetable (fir bark) and the other mineral (perlite). Fir bark and perlite dust appeared to be more than just nuisance dusts.

  16. Modeling Dust Evolution in Galaxies with a Multiphase, Inhomogeneous ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovska, Svitlana; Dobbs, Clare; Jenkins, Edward B.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2016-11-01

    We develop a model of dust evolution in a multiphase, inhomogeneous interstellar medium (ISM) using hydrodynamical simulations of giant molecular clouds in a Milky Way-like spiral galaxy. We improve the treatment of dust growth by accretion in the ISM to investigate the role of the temperature-dependent sticking coefficient and ion-grain interactions. From detailed observational data on the gas-phase Si abundances [{{Si}}{gas}/{{H}}] measured in the local Galaxy, we derive a relation between the average [{{Si}}{gas}/{{H}}] and the local gas density n({{H}}) that we use as a critical constraint for the models. This relation requires a sticking coefficient that decreases with the gas temperature. The relation predicted by the models reproduces the slope of -0.5 for the observed relation in cold clouds, which is steeper than that for the warm medium and is explained by dust growth. We find that growth occurs in the cold medium for all adopted values of the minimum grain size a min from 1 to 5 nm. For the classical cutoff of {a}\\min =5 {nm}, the Coulomb repulsion results in slower accretion and higher [{{Si}}{gas}/{{H}}] than the observed values. For {a}\\min ≲ 3 {nm}, the Coulomb interactions enhance the growth rate, steepen the slope of the [{{Si}}{gas}/{{H}}]-n({{H}}) relation, and provide a better match to observations. The rates of dust re-formation in the ISM by far exceed the rates of dust production by stellar sources. After the initial 140 Myr, the cycle of matter in and out of dust reaches a steady state, in which the dust growth balances the destruction on a similar timescale of 350 Myr.

  17. Comparing two-zone models of dust exposure.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rachael M; Simmons, Catherine E; Boelter, Fred W

    2011-09-01

    The selection and application of mathematical models to work tasks is challenging. Previously, we developed and evaluated a semi-empirical two-zone model that predicts time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations (Ctwa) of dust emitted during the sanding of drywall joint compound. Here, we fit the emission rate and random air speed variables of a mechanistic two-zone model to testing event data and apply and evaluate the model using data from two field studies. We found that the fitted random air speed values and emission rate were sensitive to (i) the size of the near-field and (ii) the objective function used for fitting, but this did not substantially impact predicted dust Ctwa. The mechanistic model predictions were lower than the semi-empirical model predictions and measured respirable dust Ctwa at Site A but were within an acceptable range. At Site B, a 10.5 m3 room, the mechanistic model did not capture the observed difference between PBZ and area Ctwa. The model predicted uniform mixing and predicted dust Ctwa up to an order of magnitude greater than was measured. We suggest that applications of the mechanistic model be limited to contexts where the near-field volume is very small relative to the far-field volume.

  18. A mesoscale modeling study of wind blown dust on the Mexico City Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villasenor, Rafael; López-Villegas, M. T.; Eidels-Dubovoi, S.; Quintanar, Arturo; Gallardo, J. C.

    The latest phase of the program to improve the air quality in the Valley of Mexico, also known, as Pro Aire is about to go into effect for the next 10 years. Pro Aire puts emphasis on agricultural wind erosion and associated dust emissions impacting downwind air quality. The main objective of this investigation was to use an empirical USEPA erosion model coupled to a meteorological/transport-dispersion prediction model, CALMET/CALPUFF, to estimate dust emissions and concentrations in the Mexico City Basin. The model simulations for particulate matter (PM 10) are validated against observations taken at the most recent research field study, the IMADA-AVER field campaign, conducted during the spring of 1997 to provide information about high ozone, particulate matter concentrations and visibility impairment. The spatial and temporal PM distribution in the region is presented for a specific wind blown dust event consisting of two IMADA days, in order to understand how soil dust emissions from agricultural fallow land affect downwind areas during the dry season. Results show good agreement with the main spatial features of the local wind circulation and wind blown dust concentrations. A correlation coefficient of nearly 0.8 between predictions and observations for a modeled day suggests that an important portion of the total measured concentration had geological origin. This work constitutes an essential advancement on the mesoscale air quality problem on the MCMA due to wind erosion.

  19. Do4Models: Performance of current climate model dust emission schemes from a 1D box model perspective using field campaign data to constrain the simulated dust emission flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, Karsten; King, James; Wiggs, Giles; Washington, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Dust emission schemes in climate models are relatively simple and are often tuned to represent observed background aerosol concentrations many of which are thousands of kilometres from source regions. Parameterisations of dust emission in numerical models were developed from idealised experiments such as those conducted in wind tunnels. Improvement of current model dust emission schemes has been difficult to achieve because of the paucity of observations from key dust sources. The Dust Observations for Models project (DO4Models) aims to gather data from source regions at a scale appropriate to climate model grid box resolution. Here we present the results of 1D box model simulations in which three commonly used parameterisations for the horizontal and vertical dust emission flux (Marticorena and Bergametti 1995, Alfaro and Gomez 2001, Shao et al. 2004) are applied and compared with Do4Models field campaign data retrieved over a typical salt pan dust source (Sua Pan, Botswana). The sensitivity of the schemes to input parameters such as soil moisture content, aerodynamic surface roughness length, shear velocity, soil texture class, and particle size is tested with particular regard to the representation of horizontal-to-vertical-mass-flux ratio. The effects of spatial averaging over 11 field sites is evaluated as is the average dust emission flux of a typical 12x12km model grid box. It is analysed whether the full range of surface processes (temporal changes in roughness, moisture, and soil conditions) is represented sufficiently well after averaging yet. Furthermore, the application of the dispersed soil size distribution on the performance of the emission schemes compared to the typically used undisturbed soil size distribution provided from soil databases is examined. Preliminary results suggest that the current schemes do not describe the observed emission process well. The scheme after Shao et al. (2004) provides the most accurate horizontal flux estimate so far

  20. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Y.; Mahowald, N.; Scanza, R. A.; ...

    2015-10-12

    Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity, the quantification of which could be useful in determining the magnitude and sign of the biogeochemical feedback on radiative forcing. However, the impact of elemental deposition to remote ocean regions is not well understood and is not currently included in global climate models. In this study, emission inventories for eight elements primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si are determined based on a global mineral data set and a soil data set. The resulting elemental fractions are used to drive themore » desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions is evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Ca / Al ratio, which typically range from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soils, are consistent with observations, suggesting that this ratio is a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different; estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observations of elemental aerosol concentrations from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions range from 0.7 to 1.6, except for Mg and Mn (3.4 and 3.5, respectively). Using the soil database improves the correspondence of the spatial heterogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe) compared to observations. Total and soluble dust element fluxes to different ocean basins and ice sheet regions have been estimated, based on the model results. The annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using the mineral data set are

  1. Modeling the processing of mineral iron during dust transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelsberg, Ulrike; Wolke, Ralf; Tilgner, Andreas; Tegen, Ina; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2014-05-01

    The Saharan desert and the Gobi desert are the main contributors to Aeolian desert dust, which is a major source of micronutrients to the remote ocean regions. Micronutrients, such as transition metals like iron or copper, are regarded essential for biological processes of different marine species. In this context recent studies have shown that soluble iron, since it is generally the most abundant transition metal in dust particles, has the ability to control marine productivity and thereby likely influence the CO2- budget. Nevertheless, the processing of desert dust leading to the release of soluble iron still lacks sufficient understanding since several factors control the solubilization process. Especially anthropogenic emissions are regarded to significantly add to the amount of soluble iron by acidification of dust particles or by the direct emission of soluble iron comprised, e.g. in coal fly ash. For the investigation of the dissolution process of iron that takes place during dust transportation the spectral air parcel model SPACCIM is used. A mechanism describing the precipitation and dissolution of mineral particles by heterogeneous surface reactions has been implemented. Trajectory properties were derived from COSMO-MUSCAT simulations or from re-analysis data by HYSPLIT. Differences in the chemical composition and the amount of anthropogenic and naturally emitted species on the North African continent and the highly industrialized region of South-East Asia have considerable impact on the acidification of the desert dust. Under this aspect, special cases of dust outbreaks of the Saharan desert and the Gobi desert are investigated and compared with focus on soluble iron produced.

  2. Dust Morphology Of Comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1). II. Introduction Of A Working Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekanina, Z.; Boehnhardt, H.

    1997-07-01

    A Monte Carlo image simulation code for dust features in comets is applied to comet Hale-Bopp in order to model the object's persistent porcupine-like appearance on high-resolution images taken between May 11 and Nov. 2, 1996. A self-consistent fan model is proposed, with six isolated sources of dust emission assumed at various locations on the surface of the rotating nucleus and with the spin axis undergoing a complex motion in an inertial coordinate system. In the framework of this model, jet pairs represent boundaries of fan-shaped formations described by dust ejected from isolated sources during periods of time when the Sun is above the local horizon. The spin axis is found to have traveled through a field of 10° by 20° during the examined period of nearly six months. Still more successful is a fan model with large diurnal dust-emission fluctuations, which is consistent with an inertially fixed position of the spin axis and requires only three discrete sources. In this scenario, the dust-emission profile is dominated by several brief flare-ups, or “puffs”, in the production of dust from one of the sources. The results are insensitive to the spin rate, but the observed dust coma appearance is more typical of a rapidly rotating comet.

  3. Modelling of Dust Extinction through Dark Clouds: Small Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, D.; Lada, C.

    1993-12-01

    In order to understand some curious effects discovered in analyzing our deep JHK near-infrared survey of the background stars probing the IC 5146 dark cloud complex (Lada, Lada, Clemens, & Bally 1993), we have constructed a simple model of the dust extinction through a molecular cloud. The effect noticed involved a correlation between the dispersion of the E(H-K) based estimate of A_V, when the stellar estimates of E(H-K) were binned into arcmin sized bins, with the mean A_V computed for those bins. The sense of the correlation is that the dispersion of the extinction rises with the extinction in a nearly linear fashion. Further, the dispersion of the dispersion also rises with extinction. Our model was constructed to try to understand the origin of this unexpected behavior. The model consists of a Poisson generator to populate a bin with stars and various extinction generating functions to add extinction to each star. Additionally, measurement noise and varying amounts of foreground star contamination are added to simulate the actual observations. Remarkably, this simple model is able to rule out several cloud structure models, including uniform extinction across an arcmin sized bin and the case of dense clumplets (rocks) embedded in a low extinction medium. We show that a power law parameterization of the extinction variation with position across a bin is able to fully reproduce the observations for a fairly robust set of power law indices. We also show that foreground star contamination plus any simple extinction model cannot reproduce the observations, while foreground star contamination does not appreciably affect the power law extinction model for foreground stellar fractions less than 30 - 50% of the total stellar content.

  4. Dust particle dynamics in atmospheric dust devils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekova, Yulia; Popel, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Dust particle dynamics is modeled in the Dust Devils (DDs). DD is a strong, well-formed, and relatively long-lived whirlwind, ranging from small (half a meter wide and a few meters tall) to large (more than 100 meters wide and more than 1000 meters tall) in Earth's atmosphere. We develop methods for the description of dust particle charging in DDs, discuss the ionization processes in DDs, and model charged dust particle motion. Our conclusions are consistent with the fact that DD can lift a big amount of dust from the surface of a planet into its atmosphere. On the basis of the model we perform calculations and show that DDs are important mechanism for dust uplift in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars. Influence of DD electric field on dynamics of dust particles is investigated. It is shown that influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is significant near the ground. At some altitude (more then a quarter of the height of DD) influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is negligible. For the calculation of the dynamics of dust electric field can be approximated by effective dipole located at a half of the height of DD. This work was supported by the Russian Federation Presidential Program for State Support of Young Scientists (project no. MK-6935.2015.2).

  5. A model of the effect of dust on the emissivity of radiant barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Noboa, H.; O`Neal, D.; Turner, W.D.

    1994-12-31

    A model of the radiant heat transfer in attics containing dusty radiant barriers was developed. The geometrical model was a triangular enclosure in which the temperatures of the enclosing surfaces were known. The dust particles were simulated as areas of equal diameter with an emissivity of 0.85. Several shape factors were calculated using shape factor algebra, including a procedure to find the shape factor between a small rectangle and a triangular surface perpendicular to the rectangular plane. The thermal model was developed using the net radiation method where the net heat exchange between the surfaces surrounding the enclosure was found by solving a system of equations that had as many equations as the number of surfaces. A large system of equations had to be solved to account for the dust particles in a representative sample. The solution of the system of equations provided the heat flux for each element of the enclosure. Finally, replacing the radiant barrier and the dust particles for an equivalent surface corresponding to the dusty radiant barrier provided the means to estimate the emissivity of a dusty radiant barrier. The theoretical model was tested to assess its validity. Experimentation was carried out using a reflection emissometer to measure the increase of the emissivity of an aluminum radiant barrier when known quantities of dust were artificially applied to it. The experimental results showed good agreement with the theoretical model. The effective emissivity exhibited a linear relationship with dust coverage. This simple relationship was consistent with previous findings and can be used in determining effective emissivity with more sophisticated models to simulate the random location of random-size dust particles over the radiant barrier.

  6. Modeling Cosmic Dust: How to Use Optical "Constants"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, A.

    In order to determine the precise nature of cosmic dust, we use a combination of multi-wavelength ground- and space-based spectroscopy, imaging, laboratory data and modeling. Dust grains scatter, absorb and re-radiate light according to their optical properties, which are sensitive to e.g. the temperature, chemical composition, size, shape, and lattice structure of the dust grains. For example, graphite and diamond are both polymorphs of carbon, and will form under very similar conditions, but their interactions with light are very different. This work provides a primer on how to apply basic physics concepts to understanding how we measure and use the optical properties of candidate cosmic dust species. We discuss the way in which measurements are made, how simplifying assumptions commonly made in astronomy may cause problems and how measurable and calculable parameters from laboratory experiments can be directly or indirectly compared to parameters derived from astronomical observations. Finally, we examine the simplifying assumptions with the most commonly used “synthetic” optical properties for cosmic dust and highlight forthcoming laboratory data as a potential replacement.

  7. The Self-Consistency Model of Subjective Confidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koriat, Asher

    2012-01-01

    How do people monitor the correctness of their answers? A self-consistency model is proposed for the process underlying confidence judgments and their accuracy. In answering a 2-alternative question, participants are assumed to retrieve a sample of representations of the question and base their confidence on the consistency with which the chosen…

  8. High-performance speech recognition using consistency modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digalakis, Vassilios; Murveit, Hy; Monaco, Peter; Neumeyer, Leo; Sankar, Ananth

    1994-12-01

    The goal of SRI's consistency modeling project is to improve the raw acoustic modeling component of SRI's DECIPHER speech recognition system and develop consistency modeling technology. Consistency modeling aims to reduce the number of improper independence assumptions used in traditional speech recognition algorithms so that the resulting speech recognition hypotheses are more self-consistent and, therefore, more accurate. At the initial stages of this effort, SRI focused on developing the appropriate base technologies for consistency modeling. We first developed the Progressive Search technology that allowed us to perform large-vocabulary continuous speech recognition (LVCSR) experiments. Since its conception and development at SRI, this technique has been adopted by most laboratories, including other ARPA contracting sites, doing research on LVSR. Another goal of the consistency modeling project is to attack difficult modeling problems, when there is a mismatch between the training and testing phases. Such mismatches may include outlier speakers, different microphones and additive noise. We were able to either develop new, or transfer and evaluate existing, technologies that adapted our baseline genonic HMM recognizer to such difficult conditions.

  9. Study of interstellar extinction by aggregate dust model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, C.; Das, H. S.; Sen, A. K.

    Extinction generally occurs whenever electromagnetic radiation propagates through a medium containing small particles. The spectral dependence of extinction, or extinction curve, is a function of the composition, structure and size distribution of the particles. The study of interstellar extinction is important because they provide essential information for understanding the properties of the dust. In this work we have considered the aggregate dust model to interpret the extinction efficiency (Qext) of interstellar dust in the wavelength range 0.11-3.4 µm. Using Superposition T-matrix code with Ballistic Cluster-Cluster Aggregate (BCCA) aggregate having 64 number of monomers with graphite, astronomical silicates and amorphous carbon, the normalized extinction efficiency has been calculated for a well defined size distribution within a size range 0.001 to 0.077 micron of extinction near wavelength 2175 Å. The calculated normalized extinction efficiency curve is well matched with observed extinction efficiency.

  10. A High-resolution Dust Aerosol Model For Numerical Study of Asian Dust Storms in April 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Westphal, D. L.; Wang, S.; Sugimoto, N.; Shimizu, A.; Zhou, J.; Chen, Y.

    2002-12-01

    A comprehensive dust aerosol model is developed and fully coupled to the US Navy's operational Coupled Ocean/Atmospheric Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPSTM). The model is used to simulate the Asian dust storms of April 5th to 15th, 2001, at 27-km resolution with 10 particle bins. Dust is mainly generated from the Gobi and Takalamakan Deserts between the 6th and 9th and the dust plumes sweep over the vast areas of East Asia. The model performance is well verified by the observations at Lanzhou for surface PM10 concentrations, and at Beijing, Hefei, Tsukuba, and Nagasaki for vertical Lidar depolarization and extinction coefficients. The model simulates the right timing of dust events and predicts the boundary layer and elevated layer of dust plumes passing through these cities as observed. The numerical analyses show that the first Mongolia cyclone on the 6th and 7th and the cold front on the 8th and 9th (accompanied with a second Mongolia low) are the major dynamic forcing which mobilize, vertically redistribute and transport the dust. Both the cyclones entrain the dust into their inner cyclonic flow structures, reaching 6-8 km altitudes, while on the outer edges of cyclones, transport is anti-cyclonic and to the northeast. The prognostics of individual dynamic and microphysical processes in the model continuity equation reveal that the vertical advection by the resolved upward motion within the cyclones is a dominant component to the mass tendency. The mass budget calculations for the whole simulation period display the most portion of the dust production from Asian deserts falling onto the land by dry deposition and wet removal, indicating severe environment problems caused by dust storms.

  11. THE DUST PROPERTIES OF z {approx} 3 MIPS-LBGs FROM PHOTOCHEMICAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, X. L.; Pipino, A.; Matteucci, F.

    2013-05-10

    The stacked spectral energy distribution (SED) 24 {mu}m Lyman break galaxies (MIPS-LBGs) detected by the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) is fitted by means of the spectrophotometric model GRASIL with an ''educated'' fitting approach which benefits from the results of chemical evolution models. The star formation rate-age-metallicity degeneracies of SED modeling are broken by using star formation history (SFH) and chemical enrichment history suggested by chemical models. The dust mass, dust abundance, and chemical pattern of elements locked in the dust component are also directly provided by chemical models. Using our new ''fitting'' approach, we derive the total mass M{sub tot}, stellar mass M{sub *}, gas mass M{sub g} , dust mass M{sub d} , age, and star formation rate (SFR) of the stacked MIPS-LBG in a self-consistent way. Our estimate of M{sub *} = 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} of the stacked MIPS-LBG agrees with other works based on UV-optical SED fitting. We suggest that the MIPS-LBGs at z {approx} 3 are young (0.3-0.6 Gyr), massive (M{sub tot} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }), dusty (M{sub d} {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }), and metal-rich (Z {approx} Z{sub Sun }) progenitors of elliptical galaxies undergoing a strong burst of star formation (SFR {approx} 200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). Our estimate of M{sub d} = 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} of the stacked MIPS-LBG is about a factor of eight lower than the estimated value based on single temperature graybody fitting, suggesting that self-consistent SED models are needed to estimate dust mass. By comparing with Milky Way molecular cloud and dust properties, we suggest that denser and dustier environments and flatter dust size distribution are likely in high-redshift massive star-forming galaxies. These dust properties, as well as the different types of SFHs, can cause different SED shapes between high-redshift star-forming ellipticals and local starburst templates. This discrepancy

  12. The Dust Properties of z ~ 3 MIPS-LBGs from Photochemical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, X. L.; Pipino, A.; Matteucci, F.

    2013-05-01

    The stacked spectral energy distribution (SED) 24 μm Lyman break galaxies (MIPS-LBGs) detected by the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) is fitted by means of the spectrophotometric model GRASIL with an "educated" fitting approach which benefits from the results of chemical evolution models. The star formation rate-age-metallicity degeneracies of SED modeling are broken by using star formation history (SFH) and chemical enrichment history suggested by chemical models. The dust mass, dust abundance, and chemical pattern of elements locked in the dust component are also directly provided by chemical models. Using our new "fitting" approach, we derive the total mass M tot, stellar mass M *, gas mass Mg , dust mass Md , age, and star formation rate (SFR) of the stacked MIPS-LBG in a self-consistent way. Our estimate of M * = 8 × 1010 of the stacked MIPS-LBG agrees with other works based on UV-optical SED fitting. We suggest that the MIPS-LBGs at z ~ 3 are young (0.3-0.6 Gyr), massive (M tot ~ 1011 M ⊙), dusty (Md ~ 108 M ⊙), and metal-rich (Z ~ Z ⊙) progenitors of elliptical galaxies undergoing a strong burst of star formation (SFR ~ 200 M ⊙ yr-1). Our estimate of Md = 7 × 107 M ⊙ of the stacked MIPS-LBG is about a factor of eight lower than the estimated value based on single temperature graybody fitting, suggesting that self-consistent SED models are needed to estimate dust mass. By comparing with Milky Way molecular cloud and dust properties, we suggest that denser and dustier environments and flatter dust size distribution are likely in high-redshift massive star-forming galaxies. These dust properties, as well as the different types of SFHs, can cause different SED shapes between high-redshift star-forming ellipticals and local starburst templates. This discrepancy of SED shapes could in turn explain the non-detection at submillimeter wavelengths of IR luminous (L IR1012 L ⊙) MIPS-LBGs.

  13. Modelling the Dust Around Vega-Like Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sylvester, Roger J.; Skinner, C. J.; Barlow, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Models are presented of four Vega-like stars: main-sequence stars with infrared emission from circumstellar dust. The dusty environments of the four stars are rather diverse, as shown by their spectral energy distributions. Good fits to the observations were obtained for all four stars.

  14. Endotoxin and dust at respirable and nonrespirable particle sizes are not consistent between cage- and floor-housed poultry operations.

    PubMed

    Kirychuk, Shelley P; Reynolds, Stephen J; Koehncke, Niels K; Lawson, Joshua; Willson, Philip; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; Marciniuk, Darcy; Classen, Henry L; Crowe, Trever; Just, Natasha; Schneberger, David; Dosman, James A

    2010-10-01

    Individuals engaged in work in intensive animal houses experience some of the highest rates of occupationally related respiratory symptoms. Organic dust and in particular endotoxin has been most closely associated with respiratory symptoms and lung function changes in workers. It has previously been shown that for intensive poultry operations, type of poultry housing [cage-housed (CH) versus floor-housed (FH)] can influence the levels of environmental contaminants. The goal of the study was to determine the differences in endotoxin and dust levels at different size fractions between CH and FH poultry operations. Fifteen CH and 15 FH poultry operations were sampled for stationary measurements (area) of dust and associated endotoxin. Fractioned samples were collected utilizing Marple cascade impactors. Gravimetric and endotoxin analysis were conducted on each of the filters. When assessed by individual Marple stage, there was significantly greater airborne endotoxin concentration (endotoxin units per cubic meter) in the size fraction >9.8 μm for the FH operations whereas at the size fraction 1.6-3.5 μm, the CH operations had significantly greater airborne endotoxin concentration than the FH operations. Endotoxin concentration in the dust mass (endotoxin units per milligram) was significantly greater in the CH operations as compared to the FH operations for all size fractions >1.6 μm. As such, endotoxin in the respirable fraction accounted for 24% of the total endotoxin in the CH operations whereas it accounted for only 11% in the FH operations. There was significantly more dust in all size fractions in the FH operations as compared to the CH poultry operations. There is more endotoxin in the presence of significantly lower dust levels in the respirable particle size fractions in CH poultry operations as compared to the FH poultry operations. This difference in respirable endotoxin may be important in relation to the differential respiratory response experienced by

  15. Model consistency in large eddy simulation of turbulent channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Ferziger, Joel H.; Moin, Parviz

    1988-01-01

    Combinations of filters and subgrid scale stress models for large eddy simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are examined by a priori tests and numerical simulations. The structure of the subgrid scales is found to depend strongly on the type of filter used, and consistency between model and filter is essential to ensure accurate results. The implementation of consistent combinations of filter and model gives more accurate turbulence statistics than those obtained in previous investigations in which the models were chosen independently from the filter. Results and limitations of the a priori test are discussed. The effect of grid refinement is also examined.

  16. Model consistency in large eddy simulation of turbulent channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Ferziger, Joel H.; Moin, Parviz

    1988-01-01

    Combinations of filters and subgrid scale stress models for large eddy simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are examined by a priori tests and numerical simulations. The structure of the subgrid scales is found to depend strongly on the type of filter used, and consistency between model and filter is essential to ensure accurate results. The implementation of consistent combinations of filter and model gives more accurate turbulence statistics than those obtained in previous investigations in which the models were chosen independently from the filter. Results and limitations of the a priori test are discussed. The effect of grid refinement is also examined.

  17. Three models of dust layers on cometary nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brin, G. D.

    1980-04-01

    A previously developed 'loose lattice' model, describing the balance between gravity and the outward thrust of escaping gases on the particles of a surface mantle, is extended to show that short-period comets which exhibit secular decline in activity may do so owing to a buildup of an insulating layer. Further, a second model - the heavy mantle model - is developed in which gas velocity and its attendant effects are seen to depend on level within a dust layer; a technique for predicting the number and size distribution of grains entrained is proposed. Finally, a third model, the 'fluidized bed' model is proposed; according to this model a third type of dust layer, an agitated maelstrom of incompletely entrained particles, is probably present at some stages of a comet's life, particularly near perihelion for dusty comets.

  18. Modeling and simulation of dust behaviors behind a moving vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingfang

    Simulation of physically realistic complex dust behaviors is a difficult and attractive problem in computer graphics. A fast, interactive and visually convincing model of dust behaviors behind moving vehicles is very useful in computer simulation, training, education, art, advertising, and entertainment. In my dissertation, an experimental interactive system has been implemented for the simulation of dust behaviors behind moving vehicles. The system includes physically-based models, particle systems, rendering engines and graphical user interface (GUI). I have employed several vehicle models including tanks, cars, and jeeps to test and simulate in different scenarios and conditions. Calm weather, winding condition, vehicle turning left or right, and vehicle simulation controlled by users from the GUI are all included. I have also tested the factors which play against the physical behaviors and graphics appearances of the dust particles through GUI or off-line scripts. The simulations are done on a Silicon Graphics Octane station. The animation of dust behaviors is achieved by physically-based modeling and simulation. The flow around a moving vehicle is modeled using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. I implement a primitive variable and pressure-correction approach to solve the three dimensional incompressible Navier Stokes equations in a volume covering the moving vehicle. An alternating- direction implicit (ADI) method is used for the solution of the momentum equations, with a successive-over- relaxation (SOR) method for the solution of the Poisson pressure equation. Boundary conditions are defined and simplified according to their dynamic properties. The dust particle dynamics is modeled using particle systems, statistics, and procedure modeling techniques. Graphics and real-time simulation techniques, such as dynamics synchronization, motion blur, blending, and clipping have been employed in the rendering to achieve realistic appearing dust

  19. Assessment of Models of Galactic Thermal Dust Emission Using COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odegard, N.; Kogut, A.; Chuss, D. T.; Miller, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate modeling of the spectrum of thermal dust emission at millimeter wavelengths is important for improving the accuracy of foreground subtraction for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements, for improving the accuracy with which the contributions of different foreground emission components can be determined, and for improving our understanding of dust composition and dust physics. We fit four models of dust emission to high Galactic latitude COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE observations from 3 mm to 100 μm and compare the quality of the fits. We consider the two-level systems (TLS) model because it provides a physically motivated explanation for the observed long wavelength flattening of the dust spectrum and the anti-correlation between emissivity index and dust temperature. We consider the model of Finkbeiner et al. because it has been widely used for CMB studies, and the generalized version of this model that was recently applied to Planck data by Meisner and Finkbeiner. For comparison we have also fit a phenomenological model consisting of the sum of two graybody components. We find that the two-graybody model gives the best fit and the FDS model gives a significantly poorer fit than the other models. The Meisner and Finkbeiner model and the TLS model remain viable for use in Galactic foreground subtraction, but the FIRAS data do not have a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to provide a strong test of the predicted spectrum at millimeter wavelengths.

  20. Development of a GIS Based Dust Dispersion Modeling System.

    SciTech Connect

    Rutz, Frederick C.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Crandall, Duard W.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2004-08-12

    With residential areas moving closer to military training sites, the effects upon the environment and neighboring civilians due to dust generated by training exercises has become a growing concern. Under a project supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) of the Department of Defense, a custom application named DUSTRAN is currently under development that integrates a system of EPA atmospheric dispersion models with the ArcGIS application environment in order to simulate the dust dispersion generated by a planned training maneuver. This integration between modeling system and GIS application allows for the use of real world geospatial data such as terrain, land-use, and domain size as input by the modeling system. Output generated by the modeling system, such as concentration and deposition plumes, can then be displayed upon accurate maps representing the training site. This paper discusses the development of this integration between modeling system and Arc GIS application.

  1. Assessment of Models of Galactic Thermal Dust Emission Using COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, N.; Kogut, A.; Chuss, D. T.; Miller, N. J.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate modeling of the spectrum of thermal dust emission at millimeter wavelengths is important for improving the accuracy of foreground subtraction for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements, for improving the accuracy with which the contributions of different foreground emission components can be determined, and for improving our understanding of dust composition and dust physics. We fit four models of dust emission to high Galactic latitude COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE observations from 3 mm to 100m and compare the quality of the fits. We consider the two-level systems (TLS) model because it provides a physically motivated explanation for the observed long wavelength flattening of the dust spectrum and the anti-correlation between emissivity index and dust temperature. We consider the model of Finkbeiner et al. because it has been widely used for CMB studies, and the generalized version of this model that was recently applied to Planck data by Meisner and Finkbeiner. For comparison we have also fit a phenomenological model consisting of the sum of two-graybody components. We find that the two-graybody model gives the best fit and the FDS model gives a significantly poorer fit than the othermodels. The Meisner and Finkbeiner model and the TLS model remain viable for use in Galactic foreground subtraction, but the FIRAS data do not have a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to provide a strong test of the predicted spectrum at millimeter wavelengths.

  2. Regional modeling of Saharan dust events using the RegCM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santese, M.; Perrone, M. R.; Zakey, A.

    2009-04-01

    As one of the major components of the atmospheric aerosol, mineral dust plays an important role in the Earth's climate system. Dust has been found to redistribute the radiative energy from the surface to the dust loaded atmospheric column by cooling the surface while heating the dust layer. The resulting stabilizing effect on the vertical structure of the atmosphere can affect cloud formation and the dust production itself. In addition, dust may change the size number of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and thus the optical and precipitation properties of clouds. All these impacts are difficult to quantify due to the highly variable spatio-temporal distribution of mineral dust and uncertainties determining its optical and physicochemical properties (IPCC 2001). The distribution of dust has been modeled in many studies using general circulation models (GCMs). However, because the aerosol effects are especially important at the regional scale, the recent development of high-resolution regional climate models (RCMs) offers useful tools to assess the regional impacts of aerosols. Compared to global climate models (GCMs), the relatively high-resolution and detailed physical parameterizations by RCMs are particularly suitable to describe the complexity of aerosol processes (Solmon et al., 2006). Furthermore, the results from regional models are well suited for comparisons with measurements of individual events. Dust radiative effects on climate are likely to be especially important at the regional scale, thus RCMs can be particularly useful tools to investigate the regional climate effects of dust outbreaks (Zakey et al., 2006). In this work, we will use the regional climate model RegCM (Version 3.1), developed at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, to investigate dust event impacts over Mediterranean sites. The Sahara desert is the largest dust source on Earth, providing at least half of the emitted dust (Washington et al., 2003

  3. A new graph model and algorithms for consistent superstring problems†

    PubMed Central

    Na, Joong Chae; Cho, Sukhyeun; Choi, Siwon; Kim, Jin Wook; Park, Kunsoo; Sim, Jeong Seop

    2014-01-01

    Problems related to string inclusion and non-inclusion have been vigorously studied in diverse fields such as data compression, molecular biology and computer security. Given a finite set of positive strings and a finite set of negative strings , a string α is a consistent superstring if every positive string is a substring of α and no negative string is a substring of α. The shortest (resp. longest) consistent superstring problem is to find a string α that is the shortest (resp. longest) among all the consistent superstrings for the given sets of strings. In this paper, we first propose a new graph model for consistent superstrings for given and . In our graph model, the set of strings represented by paths satisfying some conditions is the same as the set of consistent superstrings for and . We also present algorithms for the shortest and the longest consistent superstring problems. Our algorithms solve the consistent superstring problems for all cases, including cases that are not considered in previous work. Moreover, our algorithms solve in polynomial time the consistent superstring problems for more cases than the previous algorithms. For the polynomially solvable cases, our algorithms are more efficient than the previous ones. PMID:24751868

  4. A new graph model and algorithms for consistent superstring problems.

    PubMed

    Na, Joong Chae; Cho, Sukhyeun; Choi, Siwon; Kim, Jin Wook; Park, Kunsoo; Sim, Jeong Seop

    2014-05-28

    Problems related to string inclusion and non-inclusion have been vigorously studied in diverse fields such as data compression, molecular biology and computer security. Given a finite set of positive strings P and a finite set of negative strings N, a string α is a consistent superstring if every positive string is a substring of α and no negative string is a substring of α. The shortest (resp. longest) consistent superstring problem is to find a string α that is the shortest (resp. longest) among all the consistent superstrings for the given sets of strings. In this paper, we first propose a new graph model for consistent superstrings for given P and N. In our graph model, the set of strings represented by paths satisfying some conditions is the same as the set of consistent superstrings for P and N. We also present algorithms for the shortest and the longest consistent superstring problems. Our algorithms solve the consistent superstring problems for all cases, including cases that are not considered in previous work. Moreover, our algorithms solve in polynomial time the consistent superstring problems for more cases than the previous algorithms. For the polynomially solvable cases, our algorithms are more efficient than the previous ones.

  5. Atmospheric dust modeling from meso to global scales with the online NMMB/BSC-Dust model - Part 1: Model description, annual simulations and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, C.; Haustein, K.; Janjic, Z.; Jorba, O.; Huneeus, N.; Baldasano, J. M.; Black, T.; Basart, S.; Nickovic, S.; Miller, R. L.; Perlwitz, J. P.; Schulz, M.; Thomson, M.

    2011-06-01

    We describe and evaluate the NMMB/BSC-Dust, a new dust aerosol cycle model embedded online within the NCEP Non-hydrostatic Multiscale Model (NMMB). NMMB is a further evolution of the operational Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (WRF-NMM), which together with other upgrades has been extended from meso to global scales. Its unified non-hydrostatic dynamical core is prepared for regional and global simulation domains. The new NMMB/BSC-Dust is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales and represents a first step towards the development of a unified chemical-weather model. This paper describes the parameterizations used in the model to simulate the dust cycle including sources, transport, deposition and interaction with radiation. We evaluate monthly and annual means of the global configuration of the model against the AEROCOM dust benchmark dataset for year 2000 including surface concentration, deposition and aerosol optical depth (AOD), and we evaluate the daily AOD variability in a regional domain at high resolution covering Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe against AERONET AOD for year 2006. The NMMB/BSC-Dust provides a good description of the horizontal distribution and temporal variability of the dust. Daily AOD correlations at the regional scale are around 0.6-0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. At the global scale the model lies within the top range of AEROCOM dust models in terms of performance statistics for surface concentration, deposition and AOD. This paper discusses the current strengths and limitations of the modeling system and points towards future improvements.

  6. Atmospheric dust modeling from meso to global scales with the online NMMB/BSC-Dust model - Part 1: Model description, annual simulations and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, C.; Haustein, K.; Janjic, Z.; Jorba, O.; Huneeus, N.; Baldasano, J. M.; Black, T.; Basart, S.; Nickovic, S.; Miller, R. L.; Perlwitz, J. P.; Schulz, M.; Thomson, M.

    2011-12-01

    We describe and evaluate the NMMB/BSC-Dust, a new dust aerosol cycle model embedded online within the NCEP Non-hydrostatic Multiscale Model (NMMB). NMMB is a further evolution of the operational Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (WRF-NMM), which together with other upgrades has been extended from meso to global scales. Its unified non-hydrostatic dynamical core is prepared for regional and global simulation domains. The new NMMB/BSC-Dust is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales and represents a first step towards the development of a unified chemical-weather model. This paper describes the parameterizations used in the model to simulate the dust cycle including sources, transport, deposition and interaction with radiation. We evaluate monthly and annual means of the global configuration of the model against the AEROCOM dust benchmark dataset for year 2000 including surface concentration, deposition and aerosol optical depth (AOD), and we evaluate the daily AOD variability in a regional domain at high resolution covering Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe against AERONET AOD for year 2006. The NMMB/BSC-Dust provides a good description of the horizontal distribution and temporal variability of the dust. Daily AOD correlations at the regional scale are around 0.6-0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. At the global scale the model lies within the top range of AEROCOM dust models in terms of performance statistics for surface concentration, deposition and AOD. This paper discusses the current strengths and limitations of the modeling system and points towards future improvements.

  7. Dust grain coagulation modelling : From discrete to continuous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruta, P.; Hendrix, T.; Keppens, R.

    2016-07-01

    In molecular clouds, stars are formed from a mixture of gas, plasma and dust particles. The dynamics of this formation is still actively investigated and a study of dust coagulation can help to shed light on this process. Starting from a pre-existing discrete coagulation model, this work aims to mathematically explore its properties and its suitability for numerical validation. The crucial step is in our reinterpretation from its original discrete to a well-defined continuous form, which results in the well-known Smoluchowski coagulation equation. This opens up the possibility of exploiting previous results in order to prove the existence and uniqueness of a mass conserving solution for the evolution of dust grain size distribution. Ultimately, to allow for a more flexible numerical implementation, the problem is rewritten as a non-linear hyperbolic integro-differential equation and solved using a finite volume discretisation. It is demonstrated that there is an exact numerical agreement with the initial discrete model, with improved accuracy. This is of interest for further work on dynamically coupled gas with dust simulations.

  8. Physical Dust Models for the Extinction toward Supernova 2014J in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen; Li, Jun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2015-07-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are powerful cosmological “standardizable candles” and the most precise distance indicators. However, a limiting factor in their use for precision cosmology rests on our ability to correct for the dust extinction toward them. SN 2014J in the starburst galaxy M82, the closest detected SN Ia in three decades, provides unparalleled opportunities to study the dust extinction toward an SN Ia. In order to derive the extinction as a function of wavelength, we model the color excesses toward SN 2014J, which are observationally derived over a wide wavelength range, in terms of dust models consisting of a mixture of silicate and graphite. The resulting extinction laws steeply, rise toward the far-ultraviolet, even steeper than that of the SMC. We infer a visual extinction of {A}V≈ 1.9 {mag}, a reddening of E(B-V)≈ 1.1 {mag}, and a total-to-selective extinction ratio of RV ≈ 1.7, consistent with that previously derived from photometric, spectroscopic, and polarimetric observations. The size distributions of the dust in the interstellar medium toward SN 2014J are skewed toward substantially smaller grains than that of the Milky Way and the SMC.

  9. Modeling of surface dust concentrations using neural networks and kriging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buevich, Alexander G.; Medvedev, Alexander N.; Sergeev, Alexander P.; Tarasov, Dmitry A.; Shichkin, Andrey V.; Sergeeva, Marina V.; Atanasova, T. B.

    2016-12-01

    Creating models which are able to accurately predict the distribution of pollutants based on a limited set of input data is an important task in environmental studies. In the paper two neural approaches: (multilayer perceptron (MLP)) and generalized regression neural network (GRNN)), and two geostatistical approaches: (kriging and cokriging), are using for modeling and forecasting of dust concentrations in snow cover. The area of study is under the influence of dust emissions from a copper quarry and a several industrial companies. The comparison of two mentioned approaches is conducted. Three indices are used as the indicators of the models accuracy: the mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE) and relative root mean square error (RRMSE). Models based on artificial neural networks (ANN) have shown better accuracy. When considering all indices, the most precision model was the GRNN, which uses as input parameters for modeling the coordinates of sampling points and the distance to the probable emissions source. The results of work confirm that trained ANN may be more suitable tool for modeling of dust concentrations in snow cover.

  10. Multiscale Parameter Regionalization for consistent global water resources modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanders, Niko; Wood, Eric; Pan, Ming; Samaniego, Luis; Thober, Stephan; Kumar, Rohini; Sutanudjaja, Edwin; van Beek, Rens; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2017-04-01

    Due to an increasing demand for high- and hyper-resolution water resources information, it has become increasingly important to ensure consistency in model simulations across scales. This consistency can be ensured by scale independent parameterization of the land surface processes, even after calibration of the water resource model. Here, we use the Multiscale Parameter Regionalization technique (MPR, Samaniego et al. 2010, WRR) to allow for a novel, spatially consistent, scale independent parameterization of the global water resource model PCR-GLOBWB. The implementation of MPR in PCR-GLOBWB allows for calibration at coarse resolutions and subsequent parameter transfer to the hyper-resolution. In this study, the model was calibrated at 50 km resolution over Europe and validation carried out at resolutions of 50 km, 10 km and 1 km. MPR allows for a direct transfer of the calibrated transfer function parameters across scales and we find that we can maintain consistent land-atmosphere fluxes across scales. Here we focus on the 2003 European drought and show that the new parameterization allows for high-resolution calibrated simulations of water resources during the drought. For example, we find a reduction from 29% to 9.4% in the percentile difference in the annual evaporative flux across scales when compared against default simulations. Soil moisture errors are reduced from 25% to 6.9%, clearly indicating the benefits of the MPR implementation. This new parameterization allows us to show more spatial detail in water resources simulations that are consistent across scales and also allow validation of discharge for smaller catchments, even with calibrations at a coarse 50 km resolution. The implementation of MPR allows for novel high-resolution calibrated simulations of a global water resources model, providing calibrated high-resolution model simulations with transferred parameter sets from coarse resolutions. The applied methodology can be transferred to other

  11. A model of a Martian Great dust storm.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gierasch, P. J.; Goody, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    The great Martian 1971 dust storm is described using Carrier's (1971) model of a terrestrial hurricane with a somewhat modified thermodynamic drive. The model predicts the course of development and the time elapsing in three different phases: growth, maturity, decay. All the predictions correspond reasonably well to the observed phenomena. Explanations are offered for the rarity of the storms and the time of year and location at which they most commonly commence.

  12. Emergent Dynamics of a Thermodynamically Consistent Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Seung-Yeal; Ruggeri, Tommaso

    2017-03-01

    We present a thermodynamically consistent particle (TCP) model motivated by the theory of multi-temperature mixture of fluids in the case of spatially homogeneous processes. The proposed model incorporates the Cucker-Smale (C-S) type flocking model as its isothermal approximation. However, it is more complex than the C-S model, because the mutual interactions are not only " mechanical" but are also affected by the "temperature effect" as individual particles may exhibit distinct internal energies. We develop a framework for asymptotic weak and strong flocking in the context of the proposed model.

  13. Simulation of iron/dust in the atmosphere by a regional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickovic, S.; Perez, C.

    2008-12-01

    of about 40 km to simulate an extensive marine bacterial bloom associated with a major dust deposition in the Canary Islands region. Results show that the model is able to reproduce the observed increase of iron solubility along the downwind distance. The model shows that the iron solubility behaves in the same way with respect to the vertical distribution as well - i.e. increases with height. Such findings are consistent with recent studies that showing that the link between atmospheric iron processing and solubility is primarily physical rather than chemical in nature.

  14. Modeling electrokinetic flows by consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wenxiao; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Parks, Michael L.

    2017-04-01

    We present a consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics (I2SPH) discretization of Navier-Stokes, Poisson-Boltzmann, and advection-diffusion equations subject to Dirichlet or Robin boundary conditions. It is applied to model various two and three dimensional electrokinetic flows in simple or complex geometries. The accuracy and convergence of the consistent I2SPH are examined via comparison with analytical solutions, grid-based numerical solutions, or empirical models. The new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in microfluidics and complex fluids with charged objects, such as colloids and biomolecules, in arbitrary complex geometries.

  15. Modeling electrokinetic flows by consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Wenxiao; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; ...

    2017-01-03

    In this paper, we present a consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics (I2SPH) discretization of Navier–Stokes, Poisson–Boltzmann, and advection–diffusion equations subject to Dirichlet or Robin boundary conditions. It is applied to model various two and three dimensional electrokinetic flows in simple or complex geometries. The accuracy and convergence of the consistent I2SPH are examined via comparison with analytical solutions, grid-based numerical solutions, or empirical models. Lastly, the new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in microfluidics and complex fluids with charged objects, such as colloids and biomolecules, in arbitrary complex geometries.

  16. The dust environment of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: results from Monte Carlo dust tail modelling applied to a large ground-based observation data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Fernando; Muñoz, Olga; Gutiérrez, Pedro J.; Lara, Luisa M.; Snodgrass, Colin; Lin, Zhong Y.; Della Corte, Vincenzo; Rotundi, Alessandra; Yagi, Masafumi

    2017-07-01

    We present an extensive data set of ground-based observations and models of the dust environment of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko covering a large portion of the orbital arc from about 4.5 au pre-perihelion through 3.0 au post-perihelion, acquired during the current orbit. In addition, we have also applied the model to a dust trail image acquired during this orbit, as well as to dust trail observations obtained during previous orbits, in both the visible and the infrared. The results of the Monte Carlo modelling of the dust tail and trail data are generally consistent with the in situ results reported so far by the Rosetta instruments Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System (OSIRIS) and Grain Impact Analyser and Dust Accumulator (GIADA). We found the comet nucleus already active at 4.5 au pre-perihelion, with a dust production rate increasing up to ˜3000 kg s-1 some 20 d after perihelion passage. The dust size distribution at sizes smaller than r = 1 mm is linked to the nucleus seasons, being described by a power law of index -3.0 during the comet nucleus southern hemisphere winter but becoming considerably steeper, with values between -3.6 and -4.3, during the nucleus southern hemisphere summer, which includes perihelion passage (from about 1.7 au inbound to 2.4 au outbound). This agrees with the increase of the steepness of the dust size distribution found from GIADA measurements at perihelion showing a power index of -3.7. The size distribution at sizes larger than 1 mm for the current orbit is set to a power law of index -3.6, which is near the average value of insitu measurements by OSIRIS on large particles. However, in order to fit the trail data acquired during past orbits previous to the 2009 perihelion passage, a steeper power-law index of -4.1 has been set at those dates, in agreement with previous trail modelling. The particle sizes are set at a minimum of r = 10 μm, and a maximum size, which increases with decreasing heliocentric

  17. Final Report Fermionic Symmetries and Self consistent Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Zamick

    2008-11-07

    In this final report in the field of theoretical nuclear physics we note important accomplishments.We were confronted with "anomoulous" magnetic moments by the experimetalists and were able to expain them. We found unexpected partial dynamical symmetries--completely unknown before, and were able to a large extent to expain them.The importance of a self consistent shell model was emphasized.

  18. CONSISTENCY UNDER SAMPLING OF EXPONENTIAL RANDOM GRAPH MODELS.

    PubMed

    Shalizi, Cosma Rohilla; Rinaldo, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    The growing availability of network data and of scientific interest in distributed systems has led to the rapid development of statistical models of network structure. Typically, however, these are models for the entire network, while the data consists only of a sampled sub-network. Parameters for the whole network, which is what is of interest, are estimated by applying the model to the sub-network. This assumes that the model is consistent under sampling, or, in terms of the theory of stochastic processes, that it defines a projective family. Focusing on the popular class of exponential random graph models (ERGMs), we show that this apparently trivial condition is in fact violated by many popular and scientifically appealing models, and that satisfying it drastically limits ERGM's expressive power. These results are actually special cases of more general results about exponential families of dependent random variables, which we also prove. Using such results, we offer easily checked conditions for the consistency of maximum likelihood estimation in ERGMs, and discuss some possible constructive responses.

  19. Dust Temperature Distribution in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium: Modeling the CMB Dust Foreground to Sub-Percent Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, Alan

    Measurements of the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide a critical test of the inflationary paradigm. Gravity waves excited during an inflationary epoch in the early universe interact with the CMB to impart a characteristic signal in linear polarization. The distinctive spatial pattern and frequency dependence of the inflationary signal provide a unique signature to characterize physics at energies approaching Grand Unification, a trillion times beyond the energies accessible to particle accelerators. At millimeter wavelengths where the CMB is brightest, the dominant foreground is thermal emission from interstellar dust. As highlighted by the recent BICEP2 and Planck results, dust emission is brighter than the anticipated inflationary signal even in the cleanest regions of the sky, and is 1-2 orders of magnitude brighter over most of the sky. Robust detection and characterization of the primordial signal requires subtracting the dust foreground to sub-percent accuracy. Despite the importance of dust to CMB measurements, far-IR dust emission is poorly constrained. Popular phenomenological models treat the dust as a superposition of components at one or two temperatures although the actual temperature distribution must be more complex. Disturbingly, use of these models can bias the inflationary CMB results at levels large compared to planned sensitivities, despite fitting the combined sky emission to sub-percent precision. Foreground models must be accurate as well as precise. We propose to use archival data at millimeter through far-IR wavelengths to improve models of far-IR dust emission, explicitly deriving the temperature distribution within the diffuse dust cirrus to separate temperature effects from intrinsic emission effects (spectral index). The proposed analysis is tightly focused and likely to succeed. Simple toy models demonstrate that far-IR data such as FIRAS can distinguish the temperature distribution within the diffuse

  20. A Combined Observational and Modeling Approach to Study Modern Dust Transport from the Patagonia Desert to East Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, S.; Stein, A.; Marino, F.; Castellano, E.; Udisti, R.; Ceratto, J.

    2010-01-01

    presence of dust at approx.1500 km SW of South Africa five days after, the limited capabilities of existing satellite platforms to differentiate between aerosol types do not permit a definitive conclusion. In addition, the model simulations show dust lifting to the free troposphere as it travels south but it could not be confirmed by the satellite observations due to cloudiness. This work demonstrates that complementary information from existing transport models, satellite and surface data can yield a consistent picture of the dust transport from the Patagonia desert to Antarctica. It also illustrates the limitation of using any of these approaches individually to characterize the transport of dust in a heavily cloudy area.

  1. Consistent two-lifetime model for spectral functions of superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, František; Hlubina, Richard

    2017-03-01

    Recently it has been found that models with at least two lifetimes have to be considered when analyzing the angle-resolved photoemission data in the nodal region of the cuprates [Kondo et al., Nat. Commun. 6, 7699 (2015), 10.1038/ncomms8699]. In this paper we compare two such models. First we show that the phenomenological model used by Kondo et al. violates the sum rule for the occupation number. Next we consider the recently proposed model of the so-called Dynes superconductors, wherein the two lifetimes measure the strengths of pair-conserving and pair-breaking processes. We demonstrate that the model of the Dynes superconductors is fully consistent with known exact results, and we study in detail the resulting spectral functions. Finally, we show that the spectral functions in the nodal region of the cuprates can be fitted well by the model of the Dynes superconductors.

  2. Thermodynamically consistent description of criticality in models of correlated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiš, Václav; Kauch, Anna; Pokorný, Vladislav

    2017-01-01

    Criticality in models of correlated electrons emerges in proximity of a low-temperature singularity in a two-particle Green function. Such singularities are generally related to a symmetry breaking of the one-particle self-energy. A consistent description demands that the symmetry breaking in the self-energy emerges at the critical point of the respective two-particle function. This cannot easily be achieved in models of correlated electrons, since there are two ways connecting one- and two-electron functions that cannot be made fully equivalent in approximations. We present a general construction of diagrammatic two-particle approximations consistent with the one-particle functions so that both produce qualitatively the same quantum critical behavior in thermodynamically equivalent descriptions. The general scheme is applied on the single-impurity Anderson model to derive qualitatively the same Kondo critical scale from the spectral function and the magnetic susceptibility.

  3. Self-consistent circuit model for plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Jung, Soon-Wook; Choe, Jae-Myung; Kim, Gon-Ho; Hwang, Y. S.

    2008-02-15

    A self-consistent circuit model which can describe the dynamic behavior of the entire pulsed system for plasma source ion implantation has been developed and verified with experiments. In the circuit model, one-dimensional fluid equations of plasma sheath have been numerically solved with self-consistent boundary conditions from the external circuit model including the pulsed power system. Experiments have been conducted by applying negative, high-voltage pulses up to -10 kV with a capacitor-based pulse modulator to the planar target in contact with low-pressure argon plasma produced by radio-frequency power at 13.56 MHz. The measured pulse voltage and current waveforms as well as the sheath motion have shown good agreements with the simulation results.

  4. Simplified Models for Dark Matter Face their Consistent Completions

    SciTech Connect

    Goncalves, Dorival; Machado, Pedro N.; No, Jose Miguel

    2016-11-14

    Simplified dark matter models have been recently advocated as a powerful tool to exploit the complementarity between dark matter direct detection, indirect detection and LHC experimental probes. Focusing on pseudoscalar mediators between the dark and visible sectors, we show that the simplified dark matter model phenomenology departs significantly from that of consistent ${SU(2)_{\\mathrm{L}} \\times U(1)_{\\mathrm{Y}}}$ gauge invariant completions. We discuss the key physics simplified models fail to capture, and its impact on LHC searches. Notably, we show that resonant mono-Z searches provide competitive sensitivities to standard mono-jet analyses at $13$ TeV LHC.

  5. Towards consistent nuclear models and comprehensive nuclear data evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Bouland, O; Hale, G M; Lynn, J E; Talou, P; Bernard, D; Litaize, O; Noguere, G; De Saint Jean, C; Serot, O

    2010-01-01

    The essence of this paper is to enlighten the consistency achieved nowadays in nuclear data and uncertainties assessments in terms of compound nucleus reaction theory from neutron separation energy to continuum. Making the continuity of theories used in resolved (R-matrix theory), unresolved resonance (average R-matrix theory) and continuum (optical model) rangcs by the generalization of the so-called SPRT method, consistent average parameters are extracted from observed measurements and associated covariances are therefore calculated over the whole energy range. This paper recalls, in particular, recent advances on fission cross section calculations and is willing to suggest some hints for future developments.

  6. An assessment of the impact of local processes on dust lifting in martian climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, David P.; Spiga, Aymeric; Listowski, Constantino; Read, Peter L.

    2015-05-01

    Simulation of the lifting of dust from the planetary surface is of substantially greater importance on Mars than on Earth, due to the fundamental role that atmospheric dust plays in the former's climate, yet the dust emission parameterisations used to date in martian global climate models (MGCMs) lag, understandably, behind their terrestrial counterparts in terms of sophistication. Recent developments in estimating surface roughness length over all martian terrains and in modelling atmospheric circulations at regional to local scales (less than O(100 km)) presents an opportunity to formulate an improved wind stress lifting parameterisation. We have upgraded the conventional scheme by including the spatially varying roughness length in the lifting parameterisation in a fully consistent manner (thereby correcting a possible underestimation of the true threshold level for wind stress lifting), and used a modification to account for deviations from neutral stability in the surface layer. Following these improvements, it is found that wind speeds at typical MGCM resolution never reach the lifting threshold at most gridpoints: winds fall particularly short in the southern midlatitudes, where mean roughness is large. Sub-grid scale variability, manifested in both the near-surface wind field and the surface roughness, is then considered, and is found to be a crucial means of bridging the gap between model winds and thresholds. Both forms of small-scale variability contribute to the formation of dust emission 'hotspots': areas within the model gridbox with particularly favourable conditions for lifting, namely a smooth surface combined with strong near-surface gusts. Such small-scale emission could in fact be particularly influential on Mars, due both to the intense positive radiative feedbacks that can drive storm growth and a strong hysteresis effect on saltation. By modelling this variability, dust lifting is predicted at the locations at which dust storms are frequently

  7. A new model for Mars atmospheric dust based upon analysis of ultraviolet through infrared observations from Mariner 9, Viking, and PHOBOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Lee, S. W.; Gladstone, G. R.; McMillan, W. W.; Rousch, T.

    1995-03-01

    We propose key modifications to the Toon et al. (1977) model of the particle size distribution and composition of Mars atmospheric dust, based on a variety of spacecraft and wavelength observations of the dust. A much broader (reff variance approximately 0.8 micrometers), smaller particle size (rmode approximately 0.02 micrometers) distribution coupled with a 'palagonite-like' composition is argued to fit the complete ultraviolet-to-30-micrometer absorption properties of the dust better than the montmorillonite-basalt, reff variance = 0.4 micrometers, rmode = 0.40 dust model of Toon et al. Mariner 9 (infrared interferometer spectrometer) IRIS spectra of high atmospheric dust opacities during the 1971-1972 Mars global dust storm are analyzed in terms of the Toon et al. dust model, and a Hawaiian palagonite sample (Rousch et al., 1991) with two different size distribution models incorporating smaller dust particle sizes. Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) emmission-phase-function (EPF) observations at 9 micrometers are analyzed to retrieve 9-micrometer dust opacities coincident with solar band dust opacities obtained from the same EPF sequences (Clancy and Lee, 1991). These EPF dust opacities provide an independent measurement of the visible/9-micrometer extinction opacity ratio (greater than or = 2) for Mars atmospheric dust, which is consistent with a previous measurement by Martin (1986). Model values for the visible/9-micrometer opacity ratio and the ultraviolet and visible single-scattering albedos are calculated for the palagonite model with the smaller particle size distributions compared to the same properties for the Toon et al. model of dust. The montmorillonite model of the dust is found to fit the detailed shape of the dust 9-micrometer absorption well. However, it predicts structured, deep absorptions at 20 micrometers which are not observed and requires a separate ultraviolet-visible absorbing component to match the observed behavior of the dust in

  8. A new model for Mars atmospheric dust based upon analysis of ultraviolet through infrared observations from Mariner 9, Viking, and Phobos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Lee, S. W.; Gladstone, G. R.; McMillan, W. W.; Rousch, T.

    1995-01-01

    We propose key modifications to the Toon et al. (1977) model of the particle size distribution and composition of Mars atmospheric dust, based on a variety of spacecraft and wavelength observations of the dust. A much broader (r(sub eff)variance-0.8 micron), smaller particle size (r(sub mode)-0.02 microns) distribution coupled with a "palagonite-like" composition is argued to fit the complete ultraviolet-to-30-micron absorption properties of the dust better than the montmorillonite-basalt r(sub eff)variance= 0.4 micron, r(sub mode)= 0.40 micron dust model of Toon et al. Mariner 9 (infrared interferometer spectrometer) IRIS spectra of high atmospheric dust opacities during the 1971 - 1972 Mars global dust storm are analyzed in terms of the Toon et al. dust model, and a Hawaiian palagonite sample with two different size distribution models incorporating smaller dust particle sizes. Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) emission-phase-function (EPF) observations at 9 microns are analyzed to retrieve 9-micron dust opacities coincident with solar band dust opacities obtained from the same EPF sequences. These EPF dust opacities provide an independent measurement of the visible/9-microns extinction opacity ratio (> or equal to 2) for Mars atmospheric dust, which is consistent with a previous measurement by Martin (1986). Model values for the visible/9-microns opacity ratio and the ultraviolet and visible single-scattering albedos are calculated for the palagonite model with the smaller particle size distributions and compared to the same properties for the Toon et al. model of dust. The montmorillonite model of the dust is found to fit the detailed shape of the dust 9-micron absorption well. However, it predicts structured, deep absorptions at 20 microns which are not observed and requires a separate ultraviolet-visible absorbing component to match the observed behavior of the dust in this wavelength region. The modeled palagonite does not match the 8- to 9-micron

  9. A new model for Mars atmospheric dust based upon analysis of ultraviolet through infrared observations from Mariner 9, Viking, and Phobos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Lee, S. W.; Gladstone, G. R.; Mcmillan, W. W.; Rousch, T.

    1995-01-01

    We propose key modifications to the Toon et al. (1977) model of the particle size distribution and composition of Mars atmospheric dust, based on a variety of spacecraft and wavelength observations of the dust. A much broader (r(sub eff) variance approximately 0.8 micrometers), smaller particle size (r(sub mode) approximately 0.02 micrometers) distribution coupled with a 'palagonite-like' composition is argued to fit the complete ultraviolet-to-30-micrometer absorption properties of the dust better than the montmorillonite-basalt, r(sub eff) variance = 0.4 micrometers, r(sub mode) = 0.40 dust model of Toon et al. Mariner 9 (infrared interferometer spectrometer) IRIS spectra of high atmospheric dust opacities during the 1971-1972 Mars global dust storm are analyzed in terms of the Toon et al. dust model, and a Hawaiian palagonite sample (Rousch et al., 1991) with two different size distribution models incorporating smaller dust particle sizes. Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) emmission-phase-function (EPF) observations at 9 micrometers are analyzed to retrieve 9-micrometer dust opacities coincident with solar band dust opacities obtained from the same EPF sequences (Clancy and Lee, 1991). These EPF dust opacities provide an independent measurement of the visible/9-micrometer extinction opacity ratio (greater than or = 2) for Mars atmospheric dust, which is consistent with a previous measurement by Martin (1986). Model values for the visible/9-micrometer opacity ratio and the ultraviolet and visible single-scattering albedos are calculated for the palagonite model with the smaller particle size distributions compared to the same properties for the Toon et al. model of dust. The montmorillonite model of the dust is found to fit the detailed shape of the dust 9-micrometer absorption well. However, it predicts structured, deep aborptions at 20 micrometers which are not observed and requires a separate ultraviolet-visible absorbing component to match the observed

  10. Dust Modeling with GEOS-Chem: Evidence for Acidic Uptake on Dust Surfaces during INTEX-B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairlie, T. Duncan

    2007-01-01

    We use measurements of aerosol ion composition and size made from the DC8 aircraft during the 2006 INTEX-B airborne campaign to identify mineral dust signatures, and look for evidence for interaction of dust with acidic components. Coating of dust with sulfate or nitrate favors the role of dust particles as cloud condensation nucleii, can promote further uptake of SO2 and N2O5, can impact NOx/HNO3 partitioning, and can shift sulfate or nitrate towards larger sizes, affecting atmospheric lifetimes for both aerosol and gas components. Mineral dust had a pervasive presence on flights made during the Northern Pacific deployment of the INTEX-B mission. We use scatter plots of ion mixing ratios with Na+ and Ca(2+) to distinguish sea salt and mineral components of the aerosol distribution, respectively. Positive correlations of non-sea-salt sulfate and nitrate with calcium indicate that the dusty air stream is associated with polluted air masses. Sulfate-ammonium scatter plots indicate sulfate to be primarily in the form of (NH4)2SO4. A positive correlation between Ca(2+) and NO-, but little evidence of NH4NO3, suggests that NO3- may be associated with mineral dust surfaces. 3-d model simulations conducted with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model indicate that transpacific transport from East Asia was principally responsible for the dust observed from the aircraft over the Pacific. We compare the aerosol component relationships in the model with those observed. Uptake of sulfate and nitrate on the dust is not yet represented in the model.

  11. Tucker core consistency for validation of restricted Tucker3 models.

    PubMed

    Kompany-Zareh, Mohsen; Akhlaghi, Yousef; Bro, Rasmus

    2012-04-20

    In Tucker3 analysis of three-way data array obtained from a chemical or biological system, it is sometimes possible to use a priori knowledge about the system to specify what is called a restricted Tucker3 model. Often, the restricted Tucker3 model is characterized by having some elements of the core forced to zero. As a simple example, an F-component PARAFAC model can be seen as a restricted (F, F, F) Tucker3 model in which only superdiagonal elements of the core are allowed to be nonzero. The core consistency diagnostic was previously introduced by Bro and Kiers for determining the proper number of components in PARAFAC analysis. In the current study, this diagnostic is extended to other restricted Tucker3 models to validate the appropriateness of the applied constraints. The new diagnostic is named Tucker core consistency (TuckCorCon). When the dimensionality and the pattern of the restricted core is valid, the simple core of restricted Tucker3 model and a corresponding unrestricted core will be similar and in this case the TuckCorCon will be close to maximum (100%). A simulated chemical equilibrium data set and two experimental data sets were used to evaluate the applicability of the TuckCorCon to decide about the appropriateness of dimensionality and pattern of the core nonzero elements in the restricted Tucker3 models. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling the Carbon Dust Around Evolved Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derby, John; Chiar, Jean E.; Povich, Matthew S.; Egan, Michael P.; Jones, Anthony P.; Tielens, Xander

    2015-01-01

    We used a 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to model the dust emission around the evolved carbon star, IRAS 07134+1005. We assume the axially symmetric superwind dust shell model as defined by Meixner et al. 1997 (ApJ, 482, 897). IRAS 07134+1005 is a '21 mm' object and is, thus, a carbon-rich, low metallicity star with a large infrared excess. In order to determine the characteristics of the circumstellar carbonaceous dust, we use a set of optical constants for carbonaceous materials computed over a range of H/C and band-gaps. This is the first study to use a set of known hydrocarbon types that covered a range of hydrogen atom fractions and thus a span of aromatic rich (low hydrogen atom fraction) to aliphatic rich (high hydrogen atom fraction) hydrocarbon materials. Our observational data (photometry and spectroscopy from the literature) cover the wavelength range from 0.352-100 mm. We compare our model spectrum and simulated mid-IR images to the observed spectral energy distribution and images to draw conclusions about the nature of the hydrocarbon dust around IRAS 07134+1005.Support for this work came from National Science Foundation under Award No. AST-1322432, a PAARE Grant for the California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE) and AST-1359346, an REU Site Grant at the SETI Institute, and by the John Templeton Foundation through its New Frontiers in Astronomy and Cosmology, administered by Don York of the University of Chicago.

  13. Existence and stability of alternative dust ion acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma consisting of nonthermal electrons having vortex-like velocity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardar, Sankirtan; Bandyopadhyay, Anup; Das, K. P.

    2017-06-01

    The recent work of Sardar et al. [Phys. Plasmas 23, 073703 (2016)] on the existence and stability of the small amplitude dust ion acoustic solitary waves in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions, static negatively charged dust grains, isothermal positrons, and nonthermal electrons due to Cairns et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett. 22, 2709 (1995)] has been extended by considering nonthermal electrons having a vortex-like velocity distribution due to Schamel [Plasma Phys. 13, 491 (1971); 14, 905 (1972)] instead of taking nonthermal electrons. This distribution takes care of both free and trapped electrons. A Schamel's modified Kadomtsev Petviashvili (SKP) equation describes the nonlinear behaviour of dust ion acoustic waves in this plasma system. The nonlinear behaviour of the dust ion acoustic wave is described by the same Kadomtsev Petviashvili (KP) equation of Sardar et al. [Phys. Plasmas 23, 073703 (2016)] when B = 0, where B is the coefficient of nonlinear term of the SKP equation. A combined SKP-KP equation more efficiently describes the nonlinear behaviour of dust ion acoustic waves when B → 0. The solitary wave solution of the SKP equation and the alternative solitary wave solution of the combined SKP-KP equation having profile different from both sech4 and sech2 are stable at the lowest order of the wave number. It is found that this alternative solitary wave solution of the combined SKP-KP equation and its lowest order stability analysis are exactly the same as those of the solitary wave solution of the KP equation when B → 0.

  14. Modeling self-consistent multi-class dynamic traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hsun-Jung; Lo, Shih-Ching

    2002-09-01

    In this study, we present a systematic self-consistent multiclass multilane traffic model derived from the vehicular Boltzmann equation and the traffic dispersion model. The multilane domain is considered as a two-dimensional space and the interaction among vehicles in the domain is described by a dispersion model. The reason we consider a multilane domain as a two-dimensional space is that the driving behavior of road users may not be restricted by lanes, especially motorcyclists. The dispersion model, which is a nonlinear Poisson equation, is derived from the car-following theory and the equilibrium assumption. Under the concept that all kinds of users share the finite section, the density is distributed on a road by the dispersion model. In addition, the dynamic evolution of the traffic flow is determined by the systematic gas-kinetic model derived from the Boltzmann equation. Multiplying Boltzmann equation by the zeroth, first- and second-order moment functions, integrating both side of the equation and using chain rules, we can derive continuity, motion and variance equation, respectively. However, the second-order moment function, which is the square of the individual velocity, is employed by previous researches does not have physical meaning in traffic flow. Although the second-order expansion results in the velocity variance equation, additional terms may be generated. The velocity variance equation we propose is derived from multiplying Boltzmann equation by the individual velocity variance. It modifies the previous model and presents a new gas-kinetic traffic flow model. By coupling the gas-kinetic model and the dispersion model, a self-consistent system is presented.

  15. A strain-consistent elastic plate model with surface elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, C. Q.

    2016-03-01

    A strain-consistent elastic plate model is formulated in which both initial surface tension and the induced residual stress are treated as finite values, and the exactly same strain expressions are consistently employed for both the surface and the bulk plate. Different than most of previous related models which follow the original Gurtin-Murdoch model and include some non-strain displacement gradient terms (which cannot be expressed in terms of the surface infinitesimal strains or the von Karman-type strains) in the surface stress-strain relations, the present model does not include any non-strain displacement gradient terms in the surface stress-strain relations. For a free elastic plate with in-plane movable edges, the present model predicts that initial surface tension exactly cancels out the induced residual compressive stress. On the other hand, if all edges are in-plane immovable, residual stress cannot develop in the plate and the initial surface tension causes a tensile net membrane force. In addition, the present model predicts that initial surface tension reduces the effective bending rigidity of the plate, while this reduction does not depend on Poisson ratio. In particular, self-buckling of a free elastic plate under tensile surface tension cannot occur unless the effective bending rigidity of plate vanishes or becomes negative.

  16. Modeling the number density distribution of interplanetary dust on the ecliptic plane within 5AU of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, H.

    2000-10-01

    We have used the relationship, consistent with observational data, between the radial dependence of the dust supply and the mass dependence of the number density distribution, to consider the parent bodies of interplanetary dust. We examine the number density distribution of the interplanetary dust within 5AU of the Sun on the ecliptic plane. For the model calculations, the number density equations for the ecliptic plane are solved directly by taking into account collisional destruction between particles and the Poynting-Robertson effect, and by assuming a state of equilibrium and axial symmetry in the interplanetary dust cloud. Typical models for the radial dependence of the dust input on the ecliptic plane are considered. For three typical dust groups that are characterized by their orbits-i.e., bound particles, hyperbolic particles of collisional origin, and interstellar particles-a variety of simple models of the physical parameters are considered. These include the particles' optical properties, the mean sweep-out velocities of the dust clouds, the power law distribution of mass in the collisional fragments, the maximum size of particles, and the inner/outer boundaries. From the model calculations, the existence of the three characteristic particle groups and their input radial dependencies are found to play important roles in determining the environmental conditions of interplanetary dust and the number density distribution of the particles. The roles played by comets and asteroids are estimated by analyzing the relationship between the radial dependence of the dust input and the resultant number density distribution at 1AU. To simulate the flux curve of interplanetary meteoroids at 1AU (e.g., Grün et al. \\cite{gru85}), a source that directly supplies the interplanetary dust is required. It is found that the simulated number density distribution fits that observed at 1AU well, if the mass production rate of dust sources outside 1AU increases with a radial

  17. Characterization of dust emission from alluvial sediments using aircraft observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepanski, K.; Flamant, C.; Chaboureau, J.; Kocha, C.; Banks, J.; Brindley, H. E.; Lavaysse, C.; Marnas, F.; Pelon, J.; Tulet, P.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies using satellite observations show that numerous dust sources are located in the foothills of arid and semi-arid mountain regions such as over North Africa. Alluvial sediments deposited on the valley bottoms and flood plains are very prone to wind erosion and frequently serve as dust source. High surface wind speeds related to the break-down of the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) during the morning hours are identified as a frequent driving mechanism for dust uplift. We investigate dust emission from alluvial dust sources located within the upland region in northern Mauritania and discuss the impact of valleys with regard to their role as dust source. Measures for local atmospheric dust burden were retrieved from airborne observations, MSG SEVIR dust AOD fields and MesoNH model simulations, and analyzed in order to provide complementary information on dust source activation and local dust transport at different horizontal scales. Vertical distribution of atmospheric mineral dust was obtained from the LNG backscatter lidar system flying aboard the French Falcon-20 aircraft. Lidar extinction coefficients were compared to topography, aerial photographs, and dust AOD fields to confirm the relevance of alluvial sediments at the valley bottoms as dust source. The observed dust emission event was further evaluated using the regional model MesoNH. A sensitivity study on the impact of the horizontal grid spacing highlights the importance of the spatial resolution on simulated dust loadings. The results further illustrate the importance of an explicit representation of alluvial dust sources in such models to better capture the spatial-temporal distribution of airborne dust concentrations.

  18. Effects of Non-Sphericity on Mineral Dust Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginoux, Paul; Torres, O.

    2003-01-01

    The dependency of non-sphericity on gravitational settling of mineral dust particles is parameterized for prolate ellipsoids and Reynolds number lower than 2. The settling speed is numerically solved from the momentum equation as a function of particle diameter and aspect ratio. The reduction of settling speed due to non-sphericity is included in the GO-CART model to simulate dust size distribution for April 2001. Two numerical schemes for solving sedimentation are compared. For particles of diameter greater than 5 micron the simulated size distribution is sensitive to the numerical sedimentation scheme. Changing the particle shape from spherical to non-spherical with lambda=2, makes little difference to the simulated surface concentration and size distribution except at the periphery of the dust sources. However, when very elongated particles (lambda=5) are simulated the differences between non-spherical and spherical particles are significant. With limited in-situ measurements reporting most frequent lambda around 1.5, the overall effects on global modeling is rather negligible and the essential benefit is to relax the CFL condition of Eulerian settling schemes.

  19. DEM Solutions Develops Answers to Modeling Lunar Dust and Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Carol Anne; Calle, Carlos; LaRoche, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    With the proposed return to the Moon, scientists like NASA-KSC's Dr. Calle are concerned for a number of reasons. We will be staying longer on the planet's surface, future missions may include dust-raising activities, such as excavation and handling of lunar soil and rock, and we will be sending robotic instruments to do much of the work for us. Understanding more about the chemical and physical properties of lunar dust, how dust particles interact with each other and with equipment surfaces and the role of static electricity build-up on dust particles in the low-humidity lunar environment is imperative to the development of technologies for removing and preventing dust accumulation, and successfully handling lunar regolith. Dr. Calle is currently working on the problems of the electrostatic phenomena of granular and bulk materials as they apply to planetary surfaces, particularly to those of Mars and the Moon, and is heavily involved in developing instrumentation for future planetary missions. With this end in view, the NASA Kennedy Space Center's Innovative Partnerships Program Office partnered with OEM Solutions, Inc. OEM Solutions is a global leader in particle dynamics simulation software, providing custom solutions for use in tackling tough design and process problems related to bulk solids handling. Customers in industries such as pharmaceutical, chemical, mineral, and materials processing as well as oil and gas production, agricultural and construction, and geo-technical engineering use OEM Solutions' EDEM(TradeMark) software to improve the design and operation of their equipment while reducing development costs, time-to-market and operational risk. EDEM is the world's first general-purpose computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool to use state-of-the-art discrete element modeling technology for the simulation and analysis of particle handling and manufacturing operations. With EDEM you'can quickly and easily create a parameterized model of your granular solids

  20. Consistency Across Standards or Standards in a New Business Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, Dane M.

    2010-01-01

    Presentation topics include: standards in a changing business model, the new National Space Policy is driving change, a new paradigm for human spaceflight, consistency across standards, the purpose of standards, danger of over-prescriptive standards, a balance is needed (between prescriptive and general standards), enabling versus inhibiting, characteristics of success-oriented standards, characteristics of success-oriented standards, and conclusions. Additional slides include NASA Procedural Requirements 8705.2B identifies human rating standards and requirements, draft health and medical standards for human rating, what's been done, government oversight models, examples of consistency from anthropometry, examples of inconsistency from air quality and appendices of government and non-governmental human factors standards.

  1. Blowing Dust on Highway Safety: Characterizing and Modeling of Dust Emission Hot Spots in the Southern Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, J., III; Li, J. J.; Kandakji, T.; Collins, J. D., Jr.; Lee, J.; Gill, T. E.

    2016-12-01

    Blowing dust and highway safety have become increasingly prevalent problems concerning human safety and welfare. Two factors precipitate wind-blown dust accidents: sudden loss of visibility, and loss of traction due to soil particles on the road surface. The project, using remote sensing and in situ measurements of surface and subsurface characteristics, will identify the location of dust emission "hotspots" and associated geomorphic features within the southwest region and panhandle (New Mexico, Texas, and Oklahoma), measure the threshold shear velocity and vegetative cover and model the results. The results of this study will provide critical information for land managers, policy makers, and highway authorities when making timely and informed potentially life-saving decisions and modifications here, in the southwest region and panhandle, as well as, anywhere else in the world where blowing dust is a hazard to highway safety.

  2. Dust emission from different sol types and geomorphic units in the Sahara - implications for modeling dust emission and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouvi, Onn; Schepanski, Kerstin; Amit, Rivka; Gillespie, Alan; Enzel, Yehouda

    2014-05-01

    . This study has the potential to improve regional scale dust-transport models that aim to assess future effects of dust on the climate.

  3. A consistent collinear triad approximation for operational wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, J. E.; Smit, P. B.; Janssen, T. T.; Holthuijsen, L. H.

    2016-08-01

    In shallow water, the spectral evolution associated with energy transfers due to three-wave (or triad) interactions is important for the prediction of nearshore wave propagation and wave-driven dynamics. The numerical evaluation of these nonlinear interactions involves the evaluation of a weighted convolution integral in both frequency and directional space for each frequency-direction component in the wave field. For reasons of efficiency, operational wave models often rely on a so-called collinear approximation that assumes that energy is only exchanged between wave components travelling in the same direction (collinear propagation) to eliminate the directional convolution. In this work, we show that the collinear approximation as presently implemented in operational models is inconsistent. This causes energy transfers to become unbounded in the limit of unidirectional waves (narrow aperture), and results in the underestimation of energy transfers in short-crested wave conditions. We propose a modification to the collinear approximation to remove this inconsistency and to make it physically more realistic. Through comparison with laboratory observations and results from Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed modified collinear model is consistent, remains bounded, smoothly converges to the unidirectional limit, and is numerically more robust. Our results show that the modifications proposed here result in a consistent collinear approximation, which remains bounded and can provide an efficient approximation to model nonlinear triad effects in operational wave models.

  4. Quantification and Modelling of Fugitive Dust Emissions From Nickel Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, R. S.; McKenna Neuman, C.

    2009-05-01

    Mining and smelting operations in Northern Ontario, and indeed worldwide, introduce a number of unique sources of fugitive dust and other aerosol pollutants into the surrounding environment from smokestacks, tailings, and slag dumps exposed to wind erosion. Fugitive dust represents a potential health hazard, and as such, mining companies are required to maintain inventories of dust emissions associated with their operations. The purpose of this study was to fully characterize the wind-induced fugitive dust emission rates of nickel slag collected from a slag dump at a smelting facility in Northern Ontario, as dependent on wind speed, surface roughness, duration of weathering, effects of mechanical disturbance, and exposure to rain. PM10 flux rates were measured through combined field monitoring and wind tunnel simulation. In both settings, airborne dust concentrations downwind of the source were measured using four vertically distributed DustTrak aerosol monitors. Wind speed was measured in the wind tunnel using a micro-pitot tube mounted on a programmable traversing slide, and in the field, using five vertically distributed cup anemometers mounted on a mast. The profiles of PM10 and wind speed were used to compute the vertical emission rate (Fv) using a finite difference method. The PM10 emission rates simulated in the laboratory were found to directly overlap those measured on site at the smelting facility over a range of wind speeds, suggesting that Fv values measured in wind tunnel simulations can be used in dispersion modelling with a reasonable degree of confidence. Although showing a strong positive correlation with wind speed, PM10 emissions from nickel slag were found to demonstrate an exponential, temporal decay immediately following any form of mechanical disturbance that resulted in exposure of the silt fraction of the material. Winnowing of this fraction left behind an armoured surface of coarse, non-erodible clasts. It was further determined that

  5. Consistent regularization and renormalization in models with inhomogeneous phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Prabal; Andersen, Jens O.

    2017-02-01

    In many models in condensed matter and high-energy physics, one finds inhomogeneous phases at high density and low temperature. These phases are characterized by a spatially dependent condensate or order parameter. A proper calculation requires that one takes the vacuum fluctuations of the model into account. These fluctuations are ultraviolet divergent and must be regularized. We discuss different ways of consistently regularizing and renormalizing quantum fluctuations, focusing on momentum cutoff, symmetric energy cutoff, and dimensional regularization. We apply these techniques calculating the vacuum energy in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in 1 +1 dimensions in the large-Nc limit and in the 3 +1 dimensional quark-meson model in the mean-field approximation both for a one-dimensional chiral-density wave.

  6. Development of a dust deposition forecast model for a mine tailings impoundment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovern, Michael

    that influence deposition. Simulation results indicated that particles preferentially deposit in regions of topographic upslope. In addition, turbulent wind fields enhanced deposition in the wake region downwind of the tailings. This study also describes a deposition forecasting model (DFM) that can be used to forecast the transport and deposition of windblown dust originating from a mine tailings impoundment. The DFM uses in situ observations from the tailings and theoretical simulations of aerosol transport to parameterize the model. The model was verified through the use of inverted-disc deposition samplers. The deposition forecasting model was initialized using data from an operational Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the forecast deposition patterns were compared to the inverted-disc samples through gravimetric, chemical composition and lead isotopic analysis. The DFM was verified over several month-long observing periods by comparing transects of arsenic and lead tracers measured by the samplers to the DFM PM27 forecast. Results from the sampling periods indicated that the DFM was able to accurately capture the regional deposition patterns of the tailings dust up to 1 km. Lead isotopes were used for source apportionment and showed spatial patterns consistent with the DFM and the observed weather conditions. By providing reasonably accurate estimates of contaminant deposition rates, the DFM can improve the assessment of human health impacts caused by windblown dust from the Iron King tailings impoundment.

  7. Radiative Transfer Model of Dust Attenuation Curves in Clumpy, Galactic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Kwang-Il; Draine, Bruce T.

    2016-12-01

    The attenuation of starlight by dust in galactic environments is investigated through models of radiative transfer in a spherical, clumpy interstellar medium (ISM). We show that the attenuation curves are primarily determined by the wavelength dependence of absorption rather than by the underlying extinction (absorption+scattering) curve; the observationally derived attenuation curves cannot constrain a unique extinction curve unless the absorption or scattering efficiency is specified. Attenuation curves consistent with the “Calzetti curve” are found by assuming the silicate-carbonaceous dust model for the Milky Way (MW), but with the 2175 Å bump suppressed or absent. The discrepancy between our results and previous work that claimed the Small Magellanic Cloud dust to be the origin of the Calzetti curve is ascribed to the difference in adopted albedos; we use the theoretically calculated albedos, whereas the previous works adopted albedos derived empirically from observations of reflection nebulae. It is found that the attenuation curves calculated with the MW dust model are well represented by a modified Calzetti curve with a varying slope and UV bump strength. The strong correlation between the slope and UV bump strength, as found in star-forming galaxies at 0.5\\lt z\\lt 2.0, is well reproduced when the abundance of the UV bump carriers is assumed to be 30%-40% of that of the MW dust; radiative transfer effects lead to shallower attenuation curves with weaker UV bumps as the ISM is more clumpy and dustier. We also argue that some local starburst galaxies have a UV bump in their attenuation curves, albeit very weak.

  8. Asian dust transport during the springtime of year 2001 and 2002 with a nested version of dust transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, I.; Satake, S.; Hara, Y.; Takemura, T.; Wang, Z.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2002-12-01

    Number of yellow sand (Kosa) observation has been surprisingly increasing in Japan and Korea since 2000. Especially extremely high PM10 concentration (exceeding 0.5mg/m3) was observed in Japan several times in 2002, so we have an urgent scientific and political need to forecast/reproduce the detailed dust emission, transport and deposition processes. Intensive modeling studies have already been conducted to examine transport of Sahara dust and its impact on global radiation budget. One of the important differences between the Sahara desert and the Asian desert (mainly Gobi Desert and Takla Makan Desert) is the elevation of the dust source. The averaged elevation of Gobi Desert is approximately 1500 to 2500 m. These deserts are surrounded by high mountains. Furthermore advance of the recent manmade desertification made complicated land use patches for the arid region in Inner Mongolia. Therefore the development of a high horizontal resolution dust model is highly required. In this study, we will report a newly developed nested version of the dust transport model (as a part of Chemical weather FORecasting System; CFORS) in order to have a better understanding of Asian springtime heady dust episode. Here, CFORS is a multi-tracer, on-line, system built within the RAMS mesoscale meteorological model. A unique feature of nested CFORS is that multiple tracers are run on-line in RAMS under the two-way nesting, so that all the fine-scale on-line meteorological information such as 3-D winds, boundary-layer turbulence, surface fluxes and precipitation amount are directly used by the dust emission and transport at every time step. As a result, nested-CFORS produces with high time resolution 3-dimensional fields of dust distributions and major meteorological parameters under the nesting capability of RAMS. In this work, the dust transport model simulation with the nested-CFORS was conducted between March and April of the years 2001 and 2002, respectively. The sensititivy

  9. Consistency analysis of a nonbirefringent Lorentz-violating planar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casana, Rodolfo; Ferreira, Manoel M.; Moreira, Roemir P. M.

    2012-07-01

    In this work analyze the physical consistency of a nonbirefringent Lorentz-violating planar model via the analysis of the pole structure of its Feynman propagators. The nonbirefringent planar model, obtained from the dimensional reduction of the CPT-even gauge sector of the standard model extension, is composed of a gauge and a scalar fields, being affected by Lorentz-violating (LIV) coefficients encoded in the symmetric tensor κ μν . The propagator of the gauge field is explicitly evaluated and expressed in terms of linear independent symmetric tensors, presenting only one physical mode. The same holds for the scalar propagator. A consistency analysis is performed based on the poles of the propagators. The isotropic parity-even sector is stable, causal and unitary mode for 0≤ κ 00<1. On the other hand, the anisotropic sector is stable and unitary but in general noncausal. Finally, it is shown that this planar model interacting with a λ| φ|4-Higgs field supports compactlike vortex configurations.

  10. Development of a Consistent and Reproducible Porcine Scald Burn Model

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Margit; Kimble, Roy; Cuttle, Leila

    2016-01-01

    There are very few porcine burn models that replicate scald injuries similar to those encountered by children. We have developed a robust porcine burn model capable of creating reproducible scald burns for a wide range of burn conditions. The study was conducted with juvenile Large White pigs, creating replicates of burn combinations; 50°C for 1, 2, 5 and 10 minutes and 60°C, 70°C, 80°C and 90°C for 5 seconds. Visual wound examination, biopsies and Laser Doppler Imaging were performed at 1, 24 hours and at 3 and 7 days post-burn. A consistent water temperature was maintained within the scald device for long durations (49.8 ± 0.1°C when set at 50°C). The macroscopic and histologic appearance was consistent between replicates of burn conditions. For 50°C water, 10 minute duration burns showed significantly deeper tissue injury than all shorter durations at 24 hours post-burn (p ≤ 0.0001), with damage seen to increase until day 3 post-burn. For 5 second duration burns, by day 7 post-burn the 80°C and 90°C scalds had damage detected significantly deeper in the tissue than the 70°C scalds (p ≤ 0.001). A reliable and safe model of porcine scald burn injury has been successfully developed. The novel apparatus with continually refreshed water improves consistency of scald creation for long exposure times. This model allows the pathophysiology of scald burn wound creation and progression to be examined. PMID:27612153

  11. PICACS: self-consistent modelling of galaxy cluster scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maughan, B. J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce Physically motivated, Internally Consistent Analysis of Cluster Scaling (PICACS), a detailed model of scaling relations between galaxy cluster masses and their observable properties. This model can be used to constrain simultaneously the form, scatter (including its covariance) and evolution of the scaling relations, as well as the masses of the individual clusters. In this framework, scaling relations between observables (such as that between X-ray luminosity and temperature) are modelled explicitly in terms of the fundamental mass-observable scaling relations, and so are fully constrained without being fit directly. We apply the PICACS model to two observational data sets, and show that it performs as well as traditional regression methods for simply measuring individual scaling relation parameters, but reveals additional information on the processes that shape the relations while providing self-consistent mass constraints. Our analysis suggests that the observed combination of slopes of the scaling relations can be described by a deficit of gas in low-mass clusters that is compensated for by elevated gas temperatures, such that the total thermal energy of the gas in a cluster of given mass remains close to self-similar expectations. This is interpreted as the result of AGN feedback removing low entropy gas from low-mass systems, while heating the remaining gas. We deconstruct the luminosity-temperature (L-T) relation and show that its steepening compared to self-similar expectations can be explained solely by this combination of gas depletion and heating in low-mass systems, without any additional contribution from a mass dependence of the gas structure. Finally, we demonstrate that a self-consistent analysis of the scaling relations leads to an expectation of self-similar evolution of the L-T relation that is significantly weaker than is commonly assumed.

  12. An improved model for interplanetary dust fluxes in the outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    We present an improved model for interplanetary dust grain fluxes in the outer Solar System constrained by in situ dust density observations. A dynamical dust grain tracing code is used to establish relative dust grain densities and three-dimensional velocity distributions in the outer Solar System for four main sources of dust grains: Jupiter-family comets, Halley-type comets, Oort-Cloud comets, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt objects. Model densities are constrained by in situ dust measurements by the New Horizons Student Dust Counter, the Pioneer 10 meteoroid detector, and the Galileo Dust Detection System (DDS). The model predicts that Jupiter-family comet grains dominate the interplanetary dust grain mass flux inside approximately 10 AU, Oort-Cloud cometary grains may dominate between 10 and 25 AU, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt grains are dominant outside 25 AU. The model also predicts that while the total interplanetary mass flux at Jupiter roughly matches that inferred by the analysis of the Galileo DDS measurements, mass fluxes to Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are at least one order-of-magnitude lower than that predicted by extrapolations of dust grain flux models from 1 AU. Finally, we compare the model predictions of interplanetary dust oxygen influx to the giant planet atmospheres with various observational and photochemical constraints and generally find good agreement, with the exception of Jupiter, which suggests the possibility of additional chemical pathways for exogenous oxygen in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  13. Simulating Mars' Dust Cycle with a Mars General Circulation Model: Effects of Water Ice Cloud Formation on Dust Lifting Strength and Seasonality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Haberle, Robert; Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is critically important for the current climate of Mars. The radiative effects of dust impact the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere [1,2,3]. Although dust is present in the Martian atmosphere throughout the year, the level of dustiness varies with season. The atmosphere is generally the dustiest during northern fall and winter and the least dusty during northern spring and summer [4]. Dust particles are lifted into the atmosphere by dust storms that range in size from meters to thousands of kilometers across [5]. Regional storm activity is enhanced before northern winter solstice (Ls200 degrees - 240 degrees), and after northern solstice (Ls305 degrees - 340 degrees ), which produces elevated atmospheric dust loadings during these periods [5,6,7]. These pre- and post- solstice increases in dust loading are thought to be associated with transient eddy activity in the northern hemisphere with cross-equatorial transport of dust leading to enhanced dust lifting in the southern hemisphere [6]. Interactive dust cycle studies with Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) have included the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Although the predicted global dust loadings from these simulations capture some aspects of the observed dust cycle, there are marked differences between the simulated and observed dust cycles [8,9,10]. Most notably, the maximum dust loading is robustly predicted by models to occur near northern winter solstice and is due to dust lifting associated with down slope flows on the flanks of the Hellas basin. Thus far, models have had difficulty simulating the observed pre- and post- solstice peaks in dust loading.

  14. Thermodynamically consistent model of brittle oil shales under overpressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    The concept of dual porosity is a common way for simulation of oil shale production. In the frame of this concept the porous fractured media is considered as superposition of two permeable continua with mass exchange. As a rule the concept doesn't take into account such as the well-known phenomenon as slip along natural fractures, overpressure in low permeability matrix and so on. Overpressure can lead to development of secondary fractures in low permeability matrix in the process of drilling and pressure reduction during production. In this work a new thermodynamically consistent model which generalizes the model of dual porosity is proposed. Particularities of the model are as follows. The set of natural fractures is considered as permeable continuum. Damage mechanics is applied to simulation of secondary fractures development in low permeability matrix. Slip along natural fractures is simulated in the frame of plasticity theory with Drucker-Prager criterion.

  15. Which sources of dust contribute more to tropospheric dust aerosols over the Tibetan Plateau ? Assessment from five years modeling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, R.; Zhao, C.; Hu, Z.; Gong, D.; Wang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Dust aerosol over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) not only impacts local climate by cooling the atmosphere near the surface and by heating the atmosphere aloft, but also exerts influences on regional climate such as the onset and intensity of South Asian monsoon through modifying thermal forcing. It is known that the dust aerosol over the TP originates from local and remote sources such as the Taklimakan Desert to the north of the TP, the Middle East to the southwest of the TP, and the North Africa. However, relative significance of these dust sources and their seasonal changes are not clear. In this study, a Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was employed to clarify the relative contribution of different sources to the dust aerosols over the TP and their seasonal variations. Results show that the North Africa and the Middle East are the main sources to the dust column mass over the TP with respective contribution ratios of 40%. The Taklimakan Desert contributes nearly 20% of dust column mass over the TP. The North Africa contributes more during spring and the Middle East and the Taklimakan Desert contribute more during summer. In the troposphere, the North Africa and the Middle East are comparable with contribution ratios of 30% to the dust concentration in the mid troposphere over the TP. The Taklimakan Desert contributes a bit more as compared to other sources with a contribution ratio of 40%. In the high troposphere, the North Africa and Mid East are the main sources of the dust concentration in the atmosphere over the TP, because the contribution of the Taklimakan Desert is less than 10%.

  16. Two-component Thermal Dust Emission Model: Application to the Planck HFI Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2014-06-01

    We present full-sky, 6.1 arcminute resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature derived by fitting the Finkbeiner et al. (1999) two-component dust emission model to the Planck HFI and IRAS 100 micron maps. This parametrization of the far infrared thermal dust SED as the sum of two modified blackbodies serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single modified blackbody dust emission model. We expect our Planck-based maps of dust temperature and optical depth to form the basis for a next-generation, high-resolution extinction map which will additionally incorporate small-scale detail from WISE imaging.

  17. Self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Baimbetov, F. B.; Davletov, A. E.

    2011-01-15

    A simple renormalization theory of plasma particle interactions is proposed. It primarily stems from generic properties of equilibrium distribution functions and allows one to obtain the so-called generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation for an effective interaction potential of two chosen particles in the presence of a third one. The same equation is then strictly derived from the Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy for equilibrium distribution functions in the pair correlation approximation. This enables one to construct a self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas, correctly accounting for the close interrelation of charged and neutral components thereof. Minimization of the system free energy provides ionization equilibrium and, thus, permits one to study the plasma composition in a wide range of its parameters. Unlike standard chemical models, the proposed one allows one to study the system correlation functions and thereby to obtain an equation of state which agrees well with exact results of quantum-mechanical activity expansions. It is shown that the plasma and neutral components are strongly interrelated, which results in the short-range order formation in the corresponding subsystem. The mathematical form of the results obtained enables one to both firmly establish this fact and to determine a characteristic length of the structure formation. Since the cornerstone of the proposed self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas is an effective pairwise interaction potential, it immediately provides quite an efficient calculation scheme not only for thermodynamical functions but for transport coefficients as well.

  18. A self-consistent model of an isothermal tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Steven; Lilley, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    Continued progress in liquid lithium coating technologies have made the development of a beam driven tokamak with minimal edge recycling a feasibly possibility. Such devices are characterised by improved confinement due to their inherent stability and the suppression of thermal conduction. Particle and energy confinement become intrinsically linked and the plasma thermal energy content is governed by the injected beam. A self-consistent model of a purely beam fuelled isothermal tokamak is presented, including calculations of the density profile, bulk species temperature ratios and the fusion output. Stability considerations constrain the operating parameters and regions of stable operation are identified and their suitability to potential reactor applications discussed.

  19. A long Saharan dust event over the western Mediterranean: Lidar, Sun photometer observations, and regional dust modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PéRez, C.; Nickovic, S.; Baldasano, J. M.; Sicard, M.; Rocadenbosch, F.; Cachorro, V. E.

    2006-08-01

    A long Saharan dust event affected the western Mediterranean in the period 12-28 June 2002. Dust was present mainly between 1- and 5-km height affecting most parts of the Iberian Peninsula and reaching western/central Europe. Intensive backscatter lidar observations over Barcelona (Spain) and Sun photometer data from two stations (El Arenosillo, Spain, and Avignon, France) are used to evaluate different configurations the Dust Regional Atmospheric Modeling (DREAM) system. DREAM currently operates dust forecasts over the Mediterranean region (http://www.bsc.es/projects/earthscience/DREAM/) considering four particle size bins while only the first two are relevant for long-range transport analysis since their life time is larger than 12 hours. A more detailed bin method is implemented, and two different dust distributions at sources are compared to the operational version. Evaluations are performed at two wavelengths (532 and 1064 nm). The dust horizontal and vertical structure simulated by DREAM shows very good qualitative agreement when compared to SeaWIFS satellite images and lidar height-time displays over Barcelona. When evaluating the modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) against Sun photometer data, significant improvements are achieved with the use of the new detailed bin method. In general, the model underpredicts the AOD for increasing Ångström exponents because of the influence of anthropogenic pollution in the boundary layer. In fact, the modeled AOD is highly anticorrelated with the observed Ångström exponents. Avignon shows higher influence of small anthropogenic aerosols which explains the better results of the model at the wavelength of 1064 nm over this location. The uncertainties of backscatter lidar inversions (20-30%) are in the same order of magnitude as the differences between the model experiments. Better model results are obtained when comparing to lidar because most of the anthropogenic effect is removed.

  20. Top-down Estimate of Dust Emissions Through Integration of MODIS and MISR Aerosol Retrievals With the Geos-chem Adjoint Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang; Henze, Daven K.; Zeng, Jing; Ji, Qiang; Tsay, Si-Chee; Huang, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the influences of dust on atmospheric composition, climate, and human health requires accurate knowledge of dust emissions, but large uncertainties persist in quantifying mineral sources. This study presents a new method for combined use of satellite-measured radiances and inverse modeling to spatially constrain the amount and location of dust emissions. The technique is illustrated with a case study in May 2008; the dust emissions in Taklimakan and Gobi deserts are spatially optimized using the GEOSChem chemical transport model and its adjoint constrained by aerosol optical depth (AOD) that are derived over the downwind dark-surface region in China from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) reflectance with the aerosol single scattering properties consistent with GEOS-chem. The adjoint inverse modeling yields an overall 51% decrease in prior dust emissions estimated by GEOS-Chem over the Taklimakan-Gobi area, with more significant reductions south of the Gobi Desert. The model simulation with optimized dust emissions shows much better agreement with independent observations from MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) AOD and MODIS Deep Blue AOD over the dust source region and surface PM10 concentrations. The technique of this study can be applied to global multi-sensor remote sensing data for constraining dust emissions at various temporal and spatial scales, and hence improving the quantification of dust effects on climate, air quality, and human health.

  1. Consistency of the tachyon warm inflationary universe models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao-Min; Zhu, Jian-Yang E-mail: zhujy@bnu.edu.cn

    2014-02-01

    This study concerns the consistency of the tachyon warm inflationary models. A linear stability analysis is performed to find the slow-roll conditions, characterized by the potential slow-roll (PSR) parameters, for the existence of a tachyon warm inflationary attractor in the system. The PSR parameters in the tachyon warm inflationary models are redefined. Two cases, an exponential potential and an inverse power-law potential, are studied, when the dissipative coefficient Γ = Γ{sub 0} and Γ = Γ(φ), respectively. A crucial condition is obtained for a tachyon warm inflationary model characterized by the Hubble slow-roll (HSR) parameter ε{sub H}, and the condition is extendable to some other inflationary models as well. A proper number of e-folds is obtained in both cases of the tachyon warm inflation, in contrast to existing works. It is also found that a constant dissipative coefficient (Γ = Γ{sub 0}) is usually not a suitable assumption for a warm inflationary model.

  2. A self-consistent spin-diffusion model for micromagnetics.

    PubMed

    Abert, Claas; Ruggeri, Michele; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Manchon, Aurelien; Praetorius, Dirk; Suess, Dieter

    2016-12-01

    We propose a three-dimensional micromagnetic model that dynamically solves the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation coupled to the full spin-diffusion equation. In contrast to previous methods, we solve for the magnetization dynamics and the electric potential in a self-consistent fashion. This treatment allows for an accurate description of magnetization dependent resistance changes. Moreover, the presented algorithm describes both spin accumulation due to smooth magnetization transitions and due to material interfaces as in multilayer structures. The model and its finite-element implementation are validated by current driven motion of a magnetic vortex structure. In a second experiment, the resistivity of a magnetic multilayer structure in dependence of the tilting angle of the magnetization in the different layers is investigated. Both examples show good agreement with reference simulations and experiments respectively.

  3. Source apportionment of dust over the North Atlantic using surface measurements and GFDL dust model with tagged sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginoux, Paul; Prospero, Joseph; Collard, François-Xavier; jeannot, Alexis; Molinié, Jack; Marticorena, Beatrice; Bergametti, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    Decades of aerosol measurements on Barbados have yielded a detailed picture of African mineral dust transport to the Caribbean Basin that shows a strong seasonal cycle with a maximum in boreal summer and a minimum in winter. Recently Prospero et al. (Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 2014) presented 10 years of aerosol measurements made at Cayenne, French Guiana, along with concurrent dust measurements on Barbados. Various lines of evidence suggest that the sources that impact on Cayenne in spring are mainly in the Sahel region, including the Bodele Depression. In summer transport to Barbados is believed to be most affected primarily by emissions that lie in more northerly regions. In the framework of the AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) International Program, Marticorena et al. (Atm. Chem. Phys., 2010) have obtained since 2006 quantitative information on the mineral dust content and its variability at 3 stations over the Sahel. Here we attempt to link the measurements at Cayenne and Barbados to specific source regions using the GFDL global climate model (Donner et al., 2011). African dust emission is analyzed with AMMA data. The various hypothesized source regions are tagged and the day-by-day transport is depicted in color-coded images. The model accurately depicts the strong seasonal contrast in dust transport to these two sites and shows the changing impact of African sources over the course of the year. In our presentation we will examine the model results and compare them to the measurements at the source and receptor sites.

  4. Use of MODIS Satellite Images and an Atmospheric Dust Transport Model to Evaluate Juniperus spp. Pollen Phenology and Dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, J. C.; Sprigg, W. A.; Levetin, E.; Huete, A.; Nickovic, S.; Pejanovic, G. A.; Vukovic, A.; VandeWater, P. K.; Myers, O. B.; Budge, A. M.; Zelicoff, A. P.; Bunderson, L.; Crimmins, T. M.

    2011-01-01

    Pollen can be transported great distances. Van de Water et. al. reported Juniperus spp. pollen was transported 200-600 km. Hence local observations of plant phenology may not be consistent with the timing and source of pollen collected by pollen sampling instruments. The DREAM (Dust REgional Atmospheric Model) is a verified model for atmospheric dust transport modeling using MODIS data products to identify source regions and quantities of dust. We are modifying the DREAM model to incorporate pollen transport. Pollen release will be estimated based on MODIS derived phenology of Juniperus spp. communities. Ground based observational records of pollen release timing and quantities will be used as verification. This information will be used to support the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and the State of New Mexico environmental public health decision support for asthma and allergies alerts.

  5. Use of MODIS Satellite Images and an Atmospheric Dust Transport Model To Evaluate Juniperus spp. Pollen Phenology and Dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, J. C.; Sprigg, W. A.; Levetin, Estelle; Huete, Alfredo; Nickovic, S.; Pejanovic, G. A.; Vukovic, A.; VandeWater, P. K.; Myers, O. B.; Budge, A. M.; Zelicoff, A. P.; Bunderson, L.; Crimmins, T. M.

    2011-01-01

    Pollen can be transported great distances. Van de Water et. al., 2003 reported Juniperus spp. pollen was transported 200-600 km. Hence local observations of plant phenology may not be consistent with the timing and source of pollen collected by pollen sampling instruments. The DREAM (Dust REgional Atmospheric Model, Nickovic et al. 2001) is a verified model for atmospheric dust transport modeling using MODIS data products to identify source regions and quantities of dust. We are modifying the DREAM model to incorporate pollen transport. Pollen release will be estimated based on MODIS derived phenology of Juniperus spp. communities. Ground based observational records of pollen release timing and quantities will be used as verification. This information will be used to support the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and the State of New Mexico environmental public health decision support for asthma and allergies alerts.

  6. Use of MODIS Satellite Images and an Atmospheric Dust Transport Model to Evaluate Juniperus spp. Pollen Phenology and Dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    Pollen can be transported great distances. Van de Water et. al. reported Juniperus spp. pollen was transported 200-600 km. Hence local obse rvations of plant phenology may not be consistent with the timing and source of pollen collected by pollen sampling instruments. The DREAM (Dust REgional Atmospheric Model, Nickovic et al. 2001) is a verified model for atmospheric dust transport modeling using MODIS data produ cts to identify source regions and quantities of dust. We are modifyi ng the DREAM model to incorporate pollen transport. Pollen release wi ll be estimated based on MODIS derived phenology of Juniperus spp. communities. Ground based observations records of pollen release timing and quantities will be used as verification. This information will be used to support the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention?s Nat ional Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and the State of New Mexico environmental public health decision support for asthma and allergies alerts.

  7. Modeling of atmospheric iron processing carried by mineral dust and its deposition to ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Vukovic, Ana; Vujadinovic, Mirjam

    2014-05-01

    Relatively insoluble iron in dust originating from desert soils increases its solubility after Fe carried by mineral dust is chemically processed by the atmosphere. After dust is deposited deposition to the ocean, soluble Fe as a nutrient could enhance the marine primary production. The atmospheric dust cycle is driven by the atmospheric processes often of smaller, meso-scales. The soil mineralogy of dust emitted from sources determines also how much Fe in the aerosol will be finding. Once Fe is exposed to the atmospheric processes, the atmospheric radiation, clouds and polluted air will chemically affect the iron in dust. Global dust-iron models, having typical horizontal resolutions of 100-300 km which are mostly used to numerically simulate the fate of iron in the atmosphere can provide rather global picture of the dust and iron transport, but not details. Such models often introduce simplistic approximation on the Fe content in dust-productive soils. To simulate the Fe processing we instead implemented a high resolution regional atmospheric dust-iron model with detailed 1km global map for the geographic distribution of Fe content in soil. We also introduced a parameterization of the Fe processing caused by dust mineralogy, cloud processes and solar radiation. We will present results from simulation experiments in order to explore the model capability to reproduce major observed patterns of deposited Fe into the Atlantic cruises.

  8. MODIS Aerosol Observations used to Constrain Dust Distributions and Lifecycle in the NASA GEOS-5 Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, P.; Nowottnick, E.; daSilva, A.

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 240 Tg of mineral dust aerosol are transported annually from Saharan Africa to the Atlantic Ocean. Dust affects the Earth radiation budget, and plays direct (through scattering and absorption of radiation) and indirect (through modification of cloud properties and environment) roles in climate. Deposition of dust to the surface provides an important nutrient source to terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems. Dust is additionally a contributor to adverse air quality. Among the tools toward understanding the lifecycle and impacts of mineral dust aerosols are numerical models. Important constraints on these models come from quantitative satellite observations, like those from the space-based Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). In particular, Kauhan et al. [2005] used MODIS aerosol observations to infer transport and deposition fluxes of Saharan dust over the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Amazonian basins. Those observations are used here to constrain the transport of dust and its interannual variability simulated in the NASA GEOS-5 general circulation model and data assimilation system. Significant uncertainty exists in the MODIS-derived fluxes, however, due to uncertainty in the wind fields provided by meteorological analyses in this region. That same uncertainty in the wind fields is manifest in our GEOS-5 simulations of dust distributions. Here we use MODIS observations to investigate the seasonality and location of the Saharan dust plume and explore through sensitivity analysis of our model the meteorological controls on the dust distribution, including dust direct radiative effects and sub-gridscale source and sink processes.

  9. Consistent generation of magnetic fields in axion inflation models

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Namba, Ryo; Tada, Yuichiro; Takeda, Naoyuki; Tashiro, Hiroyuki E-mail: ryo.namba@ipmu.jp E-mail: takedan@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-05-01

    There has been a growing evidence for the existence of magnetic fields in the extra-galactic regions, while the attempt to associate their origin with the inflationary epoch alone has been found extremely challenging. We therefore take into account the consistent post-inflationary evolution of the magnetic fields that are originated from vacuum fluctuations during inflation. In the model of our interest, the electromagnetic (EM) field is coupled to a pseudo-scalar inflaton φ through the characteristic term φ  F-tilde  F, breaking the conformal invariance. This interaction dynamically breaks the parity and enables a continuous production of only one of the polarization states of the EM field through tachyonic instability. The produced magnetic fields are thus helical. We find that the dominant contribution to the observed magnetic fields in this model comes from the modes that leave the horizon near the end of inflation, further enhanced by the tachyonic instability right after the end of inflation. The EM field is subsequently amplified by parametric resonance during the period of inflaton oscillation. Once the thermal plasma is formed (reheating), the produced helical magnetic fields undergo a turbulent process called inverse cascade, which shifts their peak correlation scales from smaller to larger scales. We consistently take all these effects into account within the regime where the perturbation of φ is negligible and obtain B{sub eff} ∼ 10{sup −19} G, indicating the necessity of additional mechanisms to accommodate the observations.

  10. Gas And Dust Evolution In Protoplanetary Disks: Models Vs. Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Recent powerful facilities as ALMA and VLT/SPHERE, with their unprecedented sensitivity and spatial resolution, have revealed fascinating structures in protoplanetary disks at different wavelengths, such as: multiple rings, vortices, asymmetries, dips, and spiral arms. In this talk, I will compare these observations with theoretical models that combine hydrodynamical simulations of gas evolution and dust growth, which include the coagulation and fragmentation of particles. I will present how these detailed observations are providing significant insights about different parameters that play an important role in the evolution of protoplanetary disks such as snow lines, potential embedded planets, and viscosity.

  11. A pulsation phase-dependent dust shell model of OH 26.5 + 0.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Kyung-Won; Jones, Terry Jay; Bowen, G. H.

    1990-01-01

    The spectral energy distribution of the radio-luminous OH/IR star 26.5 + 0.6 was modeled as a function of pulsation phase, using standard radiative-transfer techniques but with more self-consistent input parameters based partly on pulsation model calculations. The changes in spectral shape and overall intensity are easily explained in terms of the radial movement of the dust condensation radius with the changing luminosity of the star. The derived amplitude of the bolometric light curve is only 1.2 mag, considerably less than expected.

  12. Evaluation of a Mineral Dust Simulation in the Atmospheric-Chemistry General Circulation Model-EMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Kader, M.; Astitha, M.; Lelieveld, J.

    2012-04-01

    This study presents an evaluation of the atmospheric mineral dust cycle in the Atmospheric Chemistry General Circulation Model (AC-GCM) using new developed dust emissions scheme. The dust cycle, as an integral part of the Earth System, plays an important role in the Earth's energy balance by both direct and indirect ways. As an aerosol, it significantly impacts the absorption and scattering of radiation in the atmosphere and can modify the optical properties of clouds and snow/ice surfaces. In addition, dust contributes to a range of physical, chemical and bio-geological processes that interact with the cycles of carbon and water. While our knowledge of the dust cycle, its impacts and interactions with the other global-scale bio-geochemical cycles has greatly advanced in the last decades, large uncertainties and knowledge gaps still exist. Improving the dust simulation in global models is essential to minimize the uncertainties in the model results related to dust. In this study, the results are based on the ECHAM5 Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) AC-GCM simulations using T106L31 spectral resolution (about 120km ) with 31 vertical levels. The GMXe aerosol submodel is used to simulate the phase changes of the dust particles between soluble and insoluble modes. Dust emission, transport and deposition (wet and dry) are calculated on-line along with the meteorological parameters in every model time step. The preliminary evaluation of the dust concentration and deposition are presented based on ground observations from various campaigns as well as the evaluation of the optical properties of dust using AERONET and satellite (MODIS and MISR) observations. Preliminarily results show good agreement with observations for dust deposition and optical properties. In addition, the global dust emissions, load, deposition and lifetime is in good agreement with the published results. Also, the uncertainties in the dust cycle that contribute to the overall model performance

  13. Modelling Convective Dust Storms in Large-Scale Weather and Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantillon, F.; Knippertz, P.; Marsham, J. H.; Panitz, H. J.; Bischoff-Gauss, I.

    2015-12-01

    Recent field campaigns have shown that convective dust storms - also known as haboobs or cold pool outflows - contribute a significant fraction of dust uplift over the Sahara and Sahel in summer. However, in-situ observations are sparse and convective dust storms are frequently concealed by clouds in satellite imagery. Therefore numerical models are often the only available source of information over the area. Here a regional climate model with explicit representation of convection delivers the first full seasonal cycle of convective dust storms over North Africa. The model suggests that they contribute one fifth of the annual dust uplift over North Africa, one fourth between May and October, and one third over the western Sahel during this season. In contrast, most large-scale weather and climate models do not explicitly represent convection and thus lack such storms.A simple parameterization of convective dust storms has recently been developed, based on the downdraft mass flux of convection schemes. The parameterization is applied here to a set of regional climate runs with different horizontal resolutions and convection schemes, and assessed against the explicit run and against sparse station observations. The parameterization succeeds in capturing the geographical distribution and seasonal cycle of convective dust storms. It can be tuned to different horizontal resolutions and convection schemes, although the details of the geographical distribution and seasonal cycle depend on the representation of the monsoon in the parent model. Different versions of the parameterization are further discussed with respect to differences in the frequency of extreme events. The results show that the parameterization is reliable and can therefore solve a long-standing problem in simulating dust storms in large-scale weather and climate models.

  14. An improved model for interplanetary dust grain fluxes to the outer planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present an improved model for interplanetary dust grain fluxes in the outer solar system constrained by in-situ dust density observations. A dynamical dust grain tracing code is used to establish relative dust grain densities and three-dimensional velocity distributions in the outer solar system for four main sources of dust grains: Jupiter-family comets, Halley-type comets, Oort-Cloud comets, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt objects. Model densities are constrained by in-situ dust measurements by the New Horizons Student Dust Counter, the Pioneer 10 meteoroid detector, and the Galileo Dust Detection System (DDS). The model predicts that Jupiter-family comet grains dominate the interplanetary dust grain mass flux inside approximately 10 AU, Oort-Cloud cometary grains may dominate between 10 and 25 AU, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt grains are dominant outside 25 AU. The model also predicts that while the total interplanetary mass flux at Jupiter roughly matches that inferred by the analysis of the Galileo DDS measurements, mass fluxes to Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are at least one order-of-magnitude lower than that predicted by extrapolations of dust grain flux models from 1 AU. We present modeled mass fluxes to various moons, atmospheres, and ring systems of the outer planets.

  15. MODELING GALACTIC EXTINCTION WITH DUST AND 'REAL' POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mulas, Giacomo; Casu, Silvia; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Zonca, Alberto E-mail: silvia@oa-cagliari.inaf.it E-mail: azonca@oa-cagliari.inaf.it

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the remarkable apparent variety of galactic extinction curves by modeling extinction profiles with core-mantle grains and a collection of single polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Our aim is to translate a synthetic description of dust into physically well-grounded building blocks through the analysis of a statistically relevant sample of different extinction curves. All different flavors of observed extinction curves, ranging from the average galactic extinction curve to virtually 'bumpless' profiles, can be described by the present model. We prove that a mixture of a relatively small number (54 species in 4 charge states each) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons can reproduce the features of the extinction curve in the ultraviolet, dismissing an old objection to the contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the interstellar extinction curve. Despite the large number of free parameters (at most the 54 Multiplication-Sign 4 column densities of each species in each ionization state included in the molecular ensemble plus the 9 parameters defining the physical properties of classical particles), we can strongly constrain some physically relevant properties such as the total number of C atoms in all species and the mean charge of the mixture. Such properties are found to be largely independent of the adopted dust model whose variation provides effects that are orthogonal to those brought about by the molecular component. Finally, the fitting procedure, together with some physical sense, suggests (but does not require) the presence of an additional component of chemically different very small carbonaceous grains.

  16. Modeling Saharan dust emission and transport: sensitivity to emission parameterization schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Martin; Cavazos, Carolina; Chenglai, Wu; Wang, Yi; Lin, Zhaohui; Washington, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Mineral dust aerosols are an important component on the Earth System. Increasingly, the dust 'cycle' processes are being incorporated into numerical weather prediction models and Earth System models for climate analyses, to provide fully coupled aerosol-climate models. Dust emission is the fundamental process in the dust cycle but parameterising this in weather and climate models is challenging due to (i) the disparity in scale between the micro-scale emission processes and model grid cell resolution (ii) the lack of detailed soil and surface data over many desert regions (iii) the lack of adequate data for model validation. Previous studies indicate high uncertainty in model emission estimates. The project 'Fennec : the Saharan Climate System' provides a valuable test bed for comparing and validating model dust cycle processes. In this study an intercomparison of five widely-used dust emission parameterisations was conducted. The Marticorena & Bergametti (1995), Shao et al. (1996), Lu & Shao (1999), Shao (2001), and Shao (2004) schemes were coded into the WRF-CHEM model system. WRF-CHEM was configured over the Saharan domain with 3 nests of 27km-9km-3km grid resolution and run over the period June 2011 coincident with the Fennec Intensive Observation Period. We test the sensitivity of various dust cycle quantities (including dust emission, atmospheric load and continental scale dust budgets) to the emission scheme parameterisation. Based on the multi-scale model nesting this sensitivity assessment is analysed relation to the scale of the meteorological driving processes.

  17. The Mars Dust Cycle: Investigating the Effects of Radiatively Active Water Ice Clouds on Surface Stresses and Dust Lifting Potential with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Hollingsworth, Jeffery

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is a critically important component of Mars' current climate system. Dust is present in the atmosphere of Mars year-round but the dust loading varies with season in a generally repeatable manner. Dust has a significant influence on the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly affects atmospheric circulation. The dust cycle is the most difficult of the three climate cycles (CO2, water, and dust) to model realistically with general circulation models. Until recently, numerical modeling investigations of the dust cycle have typically not included the effects of couplings to the water cycle through cloud formation. In the Martian atmosphere, dust particles likely provide the seed nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation of water ice clouds. As ice coats atmospheric dust grains, the newly formed cloud particles exhibit different physical and radiative characteristics. Thus, the coupling between the dust and water cycles likely affects the distributions of dust, water vapor and water ice, and thus atmospheric heating and cooling and the resulting circulations. We use the NASA Ames Mars GCM to investigate the effects of radiatively active water ice clouds on surface stress and the potential for dust lifting. The model includes a state-of-the-art water ice cloud microphysics package and a radiative transfer scheme that accounts for the radiative effects of CO2 gas, dust, and water ice clouds. We focus on simulations that are radiatively forced by a prescribed dust map, and we compare simulations that do and do not include radiatively active clouds. Preliminary results suggest that the magnitude and spatial patterns of surface stress (and thus dust lifting potential) are substantial influenced by the radiative effects of water ice clouds.

  18. Mechanical behavior in living cells consistent with the tensegrity model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Naruse, K.; Stamenovic, D.; Fredberg, J. J.; Mijailovich, S. M.; Tolic-Norrelykke, I. M.; Polte, T.; Mannix, R.; Ingber, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    Alternative models of cell mechanics depict the living cell as a simple mechanical continuum, porous filament gel, tensed cortical membrane, or tensegrity network that maintains a stabilizing prestress through incorporation of discrete structural elements that bear compression. Real-time microscopic analysis of cells containing GFP-labeled microtubules and associated mitochondria revealed that living cells behave like discrete structures composed of an interconnected network of actin microfilaments and microtubules when mechanical stresses are applied to cell surface integrin receptors. Quantitation of cell tractional forces and cellular prestress by using traction force microscopy confirmed that microtubules bear compression and are responsible for a significant portion of the cytoskeletal prestress that determines cell shape stability under conditions in which myosin light chain phosphorylation and intracellular calcium remained unchanged. Quantitative measurements of both static and dynamic mechanical behaviors in cells also were consistent with specific a priori predictions of the tensegrity model. These findings suggest that tensegrity represents a unified model of cell mechanics that may help to explain how mechanical behaviors emerge through collective interactions among different cytoskeletal filaments and extracellular adhesions in living cells.

  19. A consistent model for tsunami actions on buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, A.; Rossetto, T.; Eames, I.; Chandler, I.; Allsop, W.

    2016-12-01

    The Japan (2011) and Indian Ocean (2004) tsunami resulted in significant loss of life, buildings, and critical infrastructure. The tsunami forces imposed upon structures in coastal regions are initially due to wave slamming, after which the quasi-steady flow of the sea water around buildings becomes important. An essential requirement in both design and loss assessment is a consistent model that can accurately predict these forces. A model suitable for predicting forces in the in the quasi-steady range has been established as part of a systematic programme of research by the UCL EPICentre to understand the fundamental physical processes of tsunami actions on buildings, and more generally their social and economic consequences. Using the pioneering tsunami generator at HR Wallingford, this study considers the influence of unsteady flow conditions on the forces acting upon a rectangular building occupying 10-80% of a channel for 20-240 second wave periods. A mathematical model based upon basic open-channel flow principles is proposed, which provides empirical estimates for drag and hydrostatic coefficients. A simple force prediction equation, requiring only basic flow velocity and wave height inputs is then developed, providing good agreement with the experimental results. The results of this study demonstrate that the unsteady forces from the very long waves encountered during tsunami events can be predicted with a level of accuracy and simplicity suitable for design and risk assessment.

  20. Dynamically consistent parameterization of mesoscale eddies. Part I: Simple model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berloff, Pavel

    2015-03-01

    This work aims at developing a framework for dynamically consistent parameterization of mesoscale eddy effects for use in non-eddy-resolving ocean circulation models. The proposed eddy parameterization framework is successfully tested on the classical, wind-driven double-gyre model, which is solved both with explicitly resolved vigorous eddy field and in the non-eddy-resolving configuration with the eddy parameterization replacing the eddy effects. The parameterization locally approximates transient eddy flux divergence by spatially localized and temporally periodic forcing, referred to as the plunger, and focuses on the linear-dynamics flow solution induced by it. The nonlinear self-interaction of this solution, referred to as the footprint, characterizes and quantifies the induced cumulative eddy forcing exerted on the large-scale flow. We find that spatial pattern and amplitude of the footprint strongly depend on the underlying large-scale and the corresponding relationships provide the basis for the eddy parameterization and its closure on the large-scale flow properties. Dependencies of the footprints on other important parameters of the problem are also systematically analyzed. The parameterization utilizes the local large-scale flow information, constructs and scales the corresponding footprints, and then sums them up over the gyres to produce the resulting eddy forcing field, which is interactively added to the model as an extra forcing. The parameterization framework is implemented in the simplest way, but it provides a systematic strategy for improving the implementation algorithm.

  1. Mechanical behavior in living cells consistent with the tensegrity model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Naruse, K.; Stamenovic, D.; Fredberg, J. J.; Mijailovich, S. M.; Tolic-Norrelykke, I. M.; Polte, T.; Mannix, R.; Ingber, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    Alternative models of cell mechanics depict the living cell as a simple mechanical continuum, porous filament gel, tensed cortical membrane, or tensegrity network that maintains a stabilizing prestress through incorporation of discrete structural elements that bear compression. Real-time microscopic analysis of cells containing GFP-labeled microtubules and associated mitochondria revealed that living cells behave like discrete structures composed of an interconnected network of actin microfilaments and microtubules when mechanical stresses are applied to cell surface integrin receptors. Quantitation of cell tractional forces and cellular prestress by using traction force microscopy confirmed that microtubules bear compression and are responsible for a significant portion of the cytoskeletal prestress that determines cell shape stability under conditions in which myosin light chain phosphorylation and intracellular calcium remained unchanged. Quantitative measurements of both static and dynamic mechanical behaviors in cells also were consistent with specific a priori predictions of the tensegrity model. These findings suggest that tensegrity represents a unified model of cell mechanics that may help to explain how mechanical behaviors emerge through collective interactions among different cytoskeletal filaments and extracellular adhesions in living cells.

  2. Spatial distribution of mineral dust single scattering albedo based on DREAM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmanoski, Maja; Ničković, Slobodan; Ilić, Luka

    2016-04-01

    Mineral dust comprises a significant part of global aerosol burden. There is a large uncertainty in estimating role of dust in Earth's climate system, partly due to poor characterization of its optical properties. Single scattering albedo is one of key optical properties determining radiative effects of dust particles. While it depends on dust particle sizes, it is also strongly influenced by dust mineral composition, particularly the content of light-absorbing iron oxides and the mixing state (external or internal). However, an assumption of uniform dust composition is typically used in models. To better represent single scattering albedo in dust atmospheric models, required to increase accuracy of dust radiative effect estimates, it is necessary to include information on particle mineral content. In this study, we present the spatial distribution of dust single scattering albedo based on the Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) with incorporated particle mineral composition. The domain of the model covers Northern Africa, Middle East and the European continent, with horizontal resolution set to 1/5°. It uses eight particle size bins within the 0.1-10 μm radius range. Focusing on dust episode of June 2010, we analyze dust single scattering albedo spatial distribution over the model domain, based on particle sizes and mineral composition from model output; we discuss changes in this optical property after long-range transport. Furthermore, we examine how the AERONET-derived aerosol properties respond to dust mineralogy. Finally we use AERONET data to evaluate model-based single scattering albedo. Acknowledgement We would like to thank the AERONET network and the principal investigators, as well as their staff, for establishing and maintaining the AERONET sites used in this work.

  3. Creation of Consistent Burn Wounds: A Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Elijah Zhengyang; Ang, Chuan Han; Raju, Ashvin; Tan, Kong Bing; Hing, Eileen Chor Hoong; Loo, Yihua; Wong, Yong Chiat; Lee, Hanjing; Lim, Jane; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Hauser, Charlotte AE

    2014-01-01

    Background Burn infliction techniques are poorly described in rat models. An accurate study can only be achieved with wounds that are uniform in size and depth. We describe a simple reproducible method for creating consistent burn wounds in rats. Methods Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and dorsum shaved. A 100 g cylindrical stainless-steel rod (1 cm diameter) was heated to 100℃ in boiling water. Temperature was monitored using a thermocouple. We performed two consecutive toe-pinch tests on different limbs to assess the depth of sedation. Burn infliction was limited to the loin. The skin was pulled upwards, away from the underlying viscera, creating a flat surface. The rod rested on its own weight for 5, 10, and 20 seconds at three different sites on each rat. Wounds were evaluated for size, morphology and depth. Results Average wound size was 0.9957 cm2 (standard deviation [SD] 0.1845) (n=30). Wounds created with duration of 5 seconds were pale, with an indistinct margin of erythema. Wounds of 10 and 20 seconds were well-defined, uniformly brown with a rim of erythema. Average depths of tissue damage were 1.30 mm (SD 0.424), 2.35 mm (SD 0.071), and 2.60 mm (SD 0.283) for duration of 5, 10, 20 seconds respectively. Burn duration of 5 seconds resulted in full-thickness damage. Burn duration of 10 seconds and 20 seconds resulted in full-thickness damage, involving subjacent skeletal muscle. Conclusions This is a simple reproducible method for creating burn wounds consistent in size and depth in a rat burn model. PMID:25075351

  4. Mechanisms of particle-induced pulmonary inflammation in a mouse model: exposure to wood dust.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Juha; Lehto, Maili; Leino, Marina; Tillander, Sari; Haapakoski, Rita; Majuri, Marja-Leena; Wolff, Henrik; Rautio, Sari; Welling, Irma; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Savolainen, Kai; Alenius, Harri

    2006-09-01

    Repeated airway exposure to wood dust has long been known to cause adverse respiratory effects such as asthma and chronic bronchitis and impairment of lung function. However, the mechanisms underlying the inflammatory responses of the airways after wood dust exposure are poorly known. We used a mouse model to elucidate the mechanisms of particle-induced inflammatory responses to fine wood dust particles. BALB/c mice were exposed to intranasally administered fine (more than 99% of the particles had a particle size of < or = 5 microm, with virtually identical size distribution) birch or oak dusts twice a week for 3 weeks. PBS, LPS, and titanium dioxide were used as controls. Intranasal instillation of birch or oak dusts elicited influx of inflammatory cells to the lungs in mice. Enhancement of lymphocytes and neutrophils was seen after oak dust exposure, whereas eosinophil infiltration was higher after birch dust exposure. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was associated with an increase in the mRNA levels of several cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in lung tissue. Oak dust appeared to be a more potent inducer of these inflammatory mediators than birch dust. The results from our in vivo mouse model show that repeated airway exposure to wood dust can elicit lung inflammation, which is accompanied by induction of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Oak and birch dusts exhibited quantitative and qualitative differences in the elicitation of pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that the inflammatory responses induced by the wood species may rise via different cellular mechanisms.

  5. A self-consistent dynamo model for fully convective stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Rakesh Kumar; Christensen, Ulrich; Morin, Julien; Gastine, Thomas; Reiners, Ansgar; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Wolk, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    The tachocline region inside the Sun, where the rigidly rotating radiative core meets the differentially rotating convection zone, is thought to be crucial for generating the Sun's magnetic field. Low-mass fully convective stars do not possess a tachocline and were originally expected to generate only weak small-scale magnetic fields. Observations, however, have painted a different picture of magnetism in rapidly-rotating fully convective stars: (1) Zeeman broadening measurements revealed average surface field of several kiloGauss (kG), which is similar to the typical field strength found in sunspots. (2) Zeeman-Doppler-Imaging (ZDI) technique discovered large-scale magnetic fields with a morphology often similar to the Earth's dipole-dominated field. (3) Comparison of Zeeman broadening and ZDI results showed that more than 80% of the magnetic flux resides at small scales. So far, theoretical and computer simulation efforts have not been able to reproduce these features simultaneously. Here we present a self-consistent global model of magnetic field generation in low-mass fully convective stars. A distributed dynamo working in the model spontaneously produces a dipole-dominated surface magnetic field of the observed strength. The interaction of this field with the turbulent convection in outer layers shreds it, producing small-scale fields that carry most of the magnetic flux. The ZDI technique applied to synthetic spectropolarimetric data based on our model recovers most of the large-scale field. Our model simultaneously reproduces the morphology and magnitude of the large-scale field as well as the magnitude of the small-scale field observed on low-mass fully convective stars.

  6. Three-dimensional kinetic modeling of the neutral and charged dust in the coma of Rosetta’s target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenishev, Valeriy; Borovikov, Dmitry; Combi, Michael R.; Fougere, Nicolas; Huang, Zhenguang; Bieler, Andre; Hansen, Kenneth; Toth, Gabor; Jia, Xianzhe; Shou, Yinsi; Gombosi, Tamas; Rubin, Martin; Rotundi, Alessandra; Della Corte, Vincenzo

    2015-11-01

    Rosetta is the first mission that escorts a comet along its way through the Solar System for an extended amount of time. As a result, the target of the mission, comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, is an object of great scientific interest.Dust ejected from the nucleus is entrained into the coma by the escaping gas. Interacting with the ambient plasma the dust particles are charged by the electron and ion collection currents. The photo and secondary emission currents can also change the particle charge. The resulting Lorentz force together with the gas drag, gravity, and radiation pressure define the dust particle trajectories.At altitudes comparable to those of the Rosetta trajectory, direction of a dust particle velocity can be significantly different from that in the innermost vicinity of the coma near the nucleus. At such altitudes the angular distribution of the dust grains velocity has a pronounced tail-like structure. This is consistent with Rosetta’s GIADA dust observations showing dust grains moving in the anti-sunward direction.Here, we present results of our model study of the neutral and charged dust in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, combining the University of Michigan AMPS kinetic particle model and the BATSRUS MHD model. Trajectories of dust particles within the observable size range of Rosetta’s GIADA dust instrument have been calculated accounting for the radiation pressure, gas drag, the nucleus gravity, the Lorentz force, and the effect of the nucleus rotation. The dust grain electric charge is calculated by balancing the collection currents at the grain’s location. We present angular velocity distribution maps of these charged dust grains for a few locations representative of Rosetta's trajectory around the comet.This work was supported by US Rosetta project contracts JPL-1266313 and JPL-1266314 and NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX14AG84G

  7. Pluralistic and stochastic gene regulation: examples, models and consistent theory

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Elisa N.; Shu, Jiang; Cserhati, Matyas F.; Weeks, Donald P.; Ladunga, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    We present a theory of pluralistic and stochastic gene regulation. To bridge the gap between empirical studies and mathematical models, we integrate pre-existing observations with our meta-analyses of the ENCODE ChIP-Seq experiments. Earlier evidence includes fluctuations in levels, location, activity, and binding of transcription factors, variable DNA motifs, and bursts in gene expression. Stochastic regulation is also indicated by frequently subdued effects of knockout mutants of regulators, their evolutionary losses/gains and massive rewiring of regulatory sites. We report wide-spread pluralistic regulation in ≈800 000 tightly co-expressed pairs of diverse human genes. Typically, half of ≈50 observed regulators bind to both genes reproducibly, twice more than in independently expressed gene pairs. We also examine the largest set of co-expressed genes, which code for cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Numerous regulatory complexes are highly significant enriched in ribosomal genes compared to highly expressed non-ribosomal genes. We could not find any DNA-associated, strict sense master regulator. Despite major fluctuations in transcription factor binding, our machine learning model accurately predicted transcript levels using binding sites of 20+ regulators. Our pluralistic and stochastic theory is consistent with partially random binding patterns, redundancy, stochastic regulator binding, burst-like expression, degeneracy of binding motifs and massive regulatory rewiring during evolution. PMID:26823500

  8. Self-Consistent and Time-Dependent Solar Wind Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, K. K.; Musielak, Z. E.; Rosner, R.; Suess, S. T.; Sulkanen, M. E.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the first results from a self-consistent study of Alfven waves for the time-dependent, single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solar wind equations, using a modified version of the ZEUS MHD code. The wind models we examine are radially symmetrical and magnetized; the initial outflow is described by the standard Parker wind solution. Our study focuses on the effects of Alfven waves on the outflow and is based on solving the full set of the ideal nonlinear MHD equations. In contrast to previous studies, no assumptions regarding wave linearity, wave damping, and wave-flow interaction are made; thus, the models naturally account for the back-reaction of the wind on the waves, as well as for the nonlinear interaction between different types of MHD waves. Our results clearly demonstrate when momentum deposition by Alfven waves in the solar wind can be sufficient to explain the origin of fast streams in solar coronal holes; we discuss the range of wave amplitudes required to obtained such fast stream solutions.

  9. Formation of nanocavities in dielectrics: A self-consistent modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mezel, C.; Hallo, L.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Chimier, B.; Schurtz, G.; Travaille, G.; Bourgeade, A.; Hebert, D.; Nkonga, B.

    2008-09-15

    Tight focusing of a subpicosecond laser pulse in transparent dielectrics is an efficient way to release laser energy and to produce plasma. A micro-explosion results in a submicrometer cavity formation if the deposited laser energy exceeds a threshold. A self-consistent model is developed that describes this process. The energy deposition is described by a full set of Maxwell's equations in the three-dimensional geometry and it accounts for nonlinear propagation phenomena in the femtosecond time scale. The calculated energy deposition is transferred to a hydrodynamic code that describes the cavity formation. Numerical simulations show that cavity size in silica depends strongly on the latent heat of sublimation. An equation of state is developed and introduced into the hydrodynamic model that takes into account the influence of such material parameters as the binding energy, the bulk modulus, and the Grueneisen coefficient. The cavity and shock-affected region sizes are compared to experimental data. This comparison suggests that laser micro-explosions might allow to tune the parameters of equations of state in the domain of phase transitions in a cold dense matter.

  10. Modelling dust-drought interactions in the U.S Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koven, C. D.; Fung, I.

    2006-12-01

    We examine the possible role of mineral dust in amplifying summertime drought over the US Great Plains, specifically addressing the question of whether dust released during the 1930s drought could have acted as a drought feedback. We use the NCAR CAM3.0 atmospheric GCM, forced with drought-inducing SSTs as boundary conditions. We compare model runs with and without specified monthly-mean dust forcings centered over the southern US Great Plains, which was the center of the 1930s "dust-bowl". We specify multiple dust single-scattering albedos to explore the relative roles of scattering and absorption in enhancing drought. We also compare the role of dust in amplifying drought with the role of land surface perturbation, by running the GCM with climatological and desert vegetation over the Great Plains region. We find that all dust and land surface modification scenarios lead to decreased precipitation over the region, on top of the SST- induced precipitation reduction.

  11. Modeling the Solar Probe Plus Dust Environment: Comparison with MESSENGER Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, S. B.; Strikwerda, T.

    2009-12-01

    NASA’s Solar Probe Plus mission will be the first to approach the Sun as close as 9 solar radii from the surface. This mission will provide the only in-situ observations of the Sun’s corona. In the absence of observational data (e.g. Helios, Pioneer), specifically at distances less than 0.4 AU, the precise ambient dust distributions at these distances remain unknown and limited to extrapolative models for distances < 1 AU (e.g. Mann et al. 2004). For the Solar Probe Plus mission, it has become critical to characterize the inner solar system dust environment in order to examine potential impacts on spacecraft health and attitude. We have implemented the Mann et al. (2004) and Grün et al. (1985) dust distribution theory along with Mie scattering effects to determine the magnitude of solar irradiance scattered towards an optical sensor such as a star tracker as a function of ecliptic latitude and longitude for distances 0.05 to 1 AU. Background irradiance data from NASA’s MESSENGER mission (down to 0.3 AU) reveal trends consistent with our model predictions, potentially validating Mann et al. (2004) and Grün et al. (1985) theory, but perhaps suggesting an enhancement of dust density short ward of 0.3 AU. This paper will present the scattering model and analysis of MESSENGER data gathered to date, during the phasing orbits, and includes star tracker background irradiance, irradiance distribution over the sky, and effects on star magnitude sensitivity and position accuracy.

  12. Self-consistent Modeling of Reionization in Cosmological Hydrodynamical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oñorbe, Jose; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Lukić, Zarija

    2017-03-01

    The ultraviolet background (UVB) emitted by quasars and galaxies governs the ionization and thermal state of the intergalactic medium (IGM), regulates the formation of high-redshift galaxies, and is thus a key quantity for modeling cosmic reionization. The vast majority of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations implement the UVB via a set of spatially uniform photoionization and photoheating rates derived from UVB synthesis models. We show that simulations using canonical UVB rates reionize and, perhaps more importantly, spuriously heat the IGM, much earlier (z˜ 15) than they should. This problem arises because at z> 6, where observational constraints are nonexistent, the UVB amplitude is far too high. We introduce a new methodology to remedy this issue, and we generate self-consistent photoionization and photoheating rates to model any chosen reionization history. Following this approach, we run a suite of hydrodynamical simulations of different reionization scenarios and explore the impact of the timing of reionization and its concomitant heat injection on the thermal state of the IGM. We present a comprehensive study of the pressure smoothing scale of IGM gas, illustrating its dependence on the details of both hydrogen and helium reionization, and argue that it plays a fundamental role in interpreting Lyα forest statistics and the thermal evolution of the IGM. The premature IGM heating we have uncovered implies that previous work has likely dramatically overestimated the impact of photoionization feedback on galaxy formation, which sets the minimum halo mass able to form stars at high redshifts. We make our new UVB photoionization and photoheating rates publicly available for use in future simulations.

  13. Self-consistent Modeling of Reionization in Cosmological Hydrodynamical Simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Oñorbe, Jose; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Lukić, Zarija

    2017-03-08

    The ultraviolet background (UVB) emitted by quasars and galaxies governs the ionization and thermal state of the intergalactic medium (IGM), regulates the formation of high-redshift galaxies, and is thus a key quantity for modeling cosmic reionization. The vast majority of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations implement the UVB via a set of spatially uniform photoionization and photoheating rates derived from UVB synthesis models. In this paper, we show that simulations using canonical UVB rates reionize and, perhaps more importantly, spuriously heat the IGM, much earlier (more » $$z\\sim 15$$) than they should. This problem arises because at $$z\\gt 6$$, where observational constraints are nonexistent, the UVB amplitude is far too high. We introduce a new methodology to remedy this issue, and we generate self-consistent photoionization and photoheating rates to model any chosen reionization history. Following this approach, we run a suite of hydrodynamical simulations of different reionization scenarios and explore the impact of the timing of reionization and its concomitant heat injection on the thermal state of the IGM. We present a comprehensive study of the pressure smoothing scale of IGM gas, illustrating its dependence on the details of both hydrogen and helium reionization, and argue that it plays a fundamental role in interpreting Lyα forest statistics and the thermal evolution of the IGM. The premature IGM heating we have uncovered implies that previous work has likely dramatically overestimated the impact of photoionization feedback on galaxy formation, which sets the minimum halo mass able to form stars at high redshifts. Finally, we make our new UVB photoionization and photoheating rates publicly available for use in future simulations.« less

  14. Polarimetric Models of Circumstellar Discs Including Aggregate Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Mahesh

    The work conducted in this thesis examines the nature of circumstellar discs by investigating irradiance and polarization of scattered light. Two circumstellar discs are investigated. Firstly, H-band high contrast imaging data on the transitional disc of the Herbig Ae/Be star HD169142 are presented. The images were obtained through the polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) technique on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) using the adaptive optics system NACO. Our observations use longer exposure times, allowing us to examine the edges of the disc. Analysis of the observations shows distinct signs of polarization due to circumstellar material, but due to excessive saturation and adaptive optics errors further information on the disc could not be inferred. The HD169142 disc is then modelled using the 3D radiative transfer code Hyperion. Initial models were constructed using a two disc structure, however recent PDI has shown the existence of an annular gap. In addition to this the annular gap is found not to be devoid of dust. This then led to the construction of a four-component disc structure. Estimates of the mass of dust in the gap (2.10E-6 Msun) are made as well as for the planet (1.53E-5 Msun (0.016 Mjupiter)) suspected to be responsible for causing the gap. The predicted polarization was also estimated for the disc, peaking at ~14 percent. The use of realistic dust grains (ballistic aggregate particles) in Monte Carlo code is also examined. The fortran code DDSCAT is used to calculate the scattering properties for aggregates which are used to replace the spherical grain models used by the radiative transfer code Hyperion. Currently, Hyperion uses four independent elements to define the scattering matrix, therefore the use of rotational averaging and a 50/50 percent population of grains and their enantiomers were explored to reduce the number of contributing scattering elements from DDSCAT. A python script was created to extract the scattering data from the DDSCAT

  15. Impact of Radiatively Interactive Dust Aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 Climate Model: Sensitivity to Dust Particle Shape and Refractive Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter R.; Nowottnick, Edward Paul; Randles, Cynthia A.; Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Smith, Jamison A.; Bardeen, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the radiative effects of dust aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model. GEOS-5 is improved with the inclusion of a sectional aerosol and cloud microphysics module, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA). Into CARMA we introduce treatment of the dust and sea salt aerosol lifecycle, including sources, transport evolution, and sinks. The aerosols are radiatively coupled to GEOS-5, and we perform a series of multi-decade AMIP-style simulations in which dust optical properties (spectral refractive index and particle shape distribution) are varied. Optical properties assuming spherical dust particles are from Mie theory, while those for non-spherical shape distributions are drawn from a recently available database for tri-axial ellipsoids. The climatologies of the various simulations generally compare well to data from the MODIS, MISR, and CALIOP space-based sensors, the ground-based AERONET, and surface measurements of dust deposition and concentration. Focusing on the summertime Saharan dust cycle we show significant variability in our simulations resulting from different choices of dust optical properties. Atmospheric heating due to dust enhances surface winds over important Saharan dust sources, and we find a positive feedback where increased dust absorption leads to increased dust emissions. We further find that increased dust absorption leads to a strengthening of the summertime Hadley cell circulation, increasing dust lofting to higher altitudes and strengthening the African Easterly Jet. This leads to a longer atmospheric residence time, higher altitude, and generally more northward transport of dust in simulations with the most absorbing dust optical properties. We find that particle shape, although important for radiance simulations, is a minor effect compared to choices of refractive index, although total atmospheric forcing is enhanced by greater than 10 percent for simulations incorporating a

  16. Consistent implementation of phase changes into geodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetényi, György; Connolly, James A. D.; Godard, Vincent; Cattin, Rodolphe

    2010-05-01

    Numerical modelling of geodynamic processes occurring on geologic timescales is a rapidly evolving field of research. Despite this rapid growth, one of the initial simplifying assumptions of early numerical models is still overlooked, as the continuity equation regarding mass is mostly left out of consideration. In fluid dynamics this is known as the Boussinesq approximation. In visco-elastic models of the lithosphere this manifests in using phase equilibria calculations to modify the density of rocks without considering any volumetric effect. We explore the consequences of this simplification by developing an approach that allows us to obtain rigorously correct solutions for continuity. In technical terms, we use the finite element thermo-mechanical modelling tool Cast3M. This tool was previously developed for geodynamic applications, and handles elastic and visco-elastic rheology, erosion laws, as well as remeshing. We further develop the numerical code to incorporate the volumetric changes due to mineralogic phase transformations through modification of the regional stress-field. Exact density values are derived from petrogenetic grid calculated by software Perple_X. Our application focuses on mountain range evolution. We study the evolution of its deformation at surface as well as at depth, with and without different modelling conditions to evaluate their respective importance: elastic vs. visco-elastic behaviour; erosion; horizontal convergence; hydration level of the mafic lower crust; and consistent application of phase changes. We focus on the metamorphic reactions occurring in the lower crust, as this is where the largest density and hence volumetric effects are expected to occur in the lithosphere. The results after 4 Myr simulation time show that, when enforcing continuity, metamorphic reactions play an important role on the deformation of the orogen: the effects on the evolution of topography are of the same order of magnitude as effects resulting from

  17. Application of aerosol speciation data as an in situ dust proxy for validation of the Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Patrick

    The Dust REgional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) predicts concentrations of mineral dust aerosols in time and space, but validation is challenging with current in situ particulate matter (PM) concentration measurements. Measured levels of ambient PM often contain anthropogenic components as well as windblown mineral dust. In this study, two approaches to model validation were performed with data from preexisting air quality monitoring networks: using hourly concentrations of total PM with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM 2.5); and using a daily averaged speciation-derived soil component. Validation analyses were performed for point locations within the cities of El Paso (TX), Austin (TX), Phoenix (AZ), Salt Lake City (UT) and Bakersfield (CA) for most of 2006. Hourly modeled PM 2.5 did not validate at all with hourly observations among the sites (combined R < 0.00, N = 24,302 hourly values). Aerosol chemical speciation data distinguished between mineral (soil) dust from anthropogenic ambient PM. As expected, statistically significant improvements in correlation among all stations (combined R = 0.16, N = 343 daily values) were found when the soil component alone was used to validate DREAM. The validation biases that result from anthropogenic aerosols were also reduced using the soil component. This is seen in the reduction of the root mean square error between hourly in situ versus hourly modeled (RMSE hourly = 18.6 μg m -3) and 24-h in situ speciation values versus daily averaged observed (RMSE soil = 12.0 μg m -3). However, the lack of a total reduction in RMSE indicates there is still room for improvement in the model. While the soil component is the theoretical proxy of choice for a dust transport model, the current sparse and infrequent sampling is not ideal for routine hourly air quality forecast validation.

  18. Modeling of transient dust events in fusion edge plasmas with DUSTT-UEDGE code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that dust can be produced in fusion devices due to various processes involving structural damage of plasma exposed materials. Recent computational and experimental studies have demonstrated that dust production and associated with it plasma contamination can present serious challenges in achieving sustained fusion reaction in future fusion devices, such as ITER. To analyze the impact, which dust can have on performance of fusion plasmas, modeling of coupled dust and plasma transport with DUSTT-UEDGE code is used by the authors. In past, only steady-state computational studies, presuming continuous source of dust influx, were performed due to iterative nature of DUSTT-UEDGE code coupling. However, experimental observations demonstrate that intermittent injection of large quantities of dust, often associated with transient plasma events, may severely impact fusion plasma conditions and even lead to discharge termination. In this work we report on progress in coupling of DUSTT-UEDGE codes in time-dependent regime, which allows modeling of transient dust-plasma transport processes. The methodology and details of the time-dependent code coupling, as well as examples of simulations of transient dust-plasma transport phenomena will be presented. These include time-dependent modeling of impact of short out-bursts of different quantities of tungsten dust in ITER divertor on the edge plasma parameters. The plasma response to the out-bursts with various duration, location, and ejected dust sizes will be analyzed.

  19. DO4 Models: A new generation of model dust emission schemes based on source area process data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J.; Wiggs, G. F. S.; Eckardt, F. D.; Thomas, D. S. G.; Bryant, R. G.; Washington, R.

    2012-04-01

    Numerical models need to include dust in order to avoid large radiative and associated dynamical errors as these are the only tools we have to predict future weather and climate. The simulation of the dust cycle depends on a wide range of earth system components but begins with realistic representation of source areas. At a global scale, attention to source areas has improved modeling, despite most of the improvements have come through simple, large-scale, source area representation that is likely highly parameterized and generalized. Notable is the absence of any real source area observations at model resolution in almost any previous studies. This research outlines the beginnings of the DO4 project, which through the novel approach of using the regional model as a test-bed for global high resolution models aims to undo the enduring problem of lack of suitable dust source area data. From July to October, 2011 the source area was chosen as a 12 km by 12 km area within the Makgadikgadi Pans, Botswana to be ultimately characterized as one grid cell within the HadGEM3 model. A deployment of 11 meteorological stations consisting of anemometry, sediment transport traps and detectors, high-frequency dust monitors, soil moisture meters, net radiometers, shallow well networks, and photometers in addition to on-site surface characteristic monitoring throughout the field campaign resulted in 90 days of source area data. The temporal and spatial variation of erodibility amongst these sites and the whole grid cell exceeded any previous expectation. A combination of surface moisture, surface roughness created through salt crystal formation, antecedent rainfall, and prior flooding history describes the majority of the variation in surface erodibility. Surface salt crust development is hypothesized as having a distinct time line and continuity combined into a cyclical model governed by moisture availability, radiation, and chemistry that for this area could predict potential

  20. Evaluating the hazard from Siding Spring dust: Models and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christou, A.

    2014-12-01

    Long-period comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will pass at a distance of ~140 thousand km (9e-4 AU) - about a third of a lunar distance - from the centre of Mars, closer to this planet than any known comet has come to the Earth since records began. Closest approach is expected to occur at 18:30 UT on the 19th October. This provides an opportunity for a ``free'' flyby of a different type of comet than those investigated by spacecraft so far, including comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko currently under scrutiny by the Rosetta spacecraft. At the same time, the passage of the comet through Martian space will create the opportunity to study the reaction of the planet's upper atmosphere to a known natural perturbation. The flip-side of the coin is the risk to Mars-orbiting assets, both existing (NASA's Mars Odyssey & Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and ESA's Mars Express) and in transit (NASA's MAVEN and ISRO's Mangalyaan) by high-speed cometary dust potentially impacting spacecraft surfaces. Much work has already gone into assessing this hazard and devising mitigating measures in the precious little warning time given to characterise this object until Mars encounter. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of how the meteoroid stream and comet coma dust impact models evolved since the comet's discovery and discuss lessons learned should similar circumstances arise in the future.

  1. TEM analysis of the internal structures and mineralogy of Asian dust particles and the implications for optical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, G. Y.; Nousiainen, T.

    2014-07-01

    Mineral dust interacts with incoming/outgoing electromagnetic radiation in the atmosphere. This interaction depends on the microphysical properties of the dust particles, including size, mineral composition, external morphology, and internal structure. Ideally all of these properties should be accounted for in the remote sensing of dust, the modeling of single-scattering properties, and radiative effect assessment. There have been many reports on the microphysical characterizations of mineral dust, but no investigations of the internal structures of individual dust particles. We explored the interiors of Asian dust particles using the combined application of focused ion beam thin-slice preparation and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that individual dust particles consisted of numerous mineral grains, which were organized into several types of internal structure: single and polycrystalline cores of quartz, feldspars, calcite, and amphibole often with oriented clay coatings; individual clay agglomerates of nano-thin clay platelets showing preferred to random orientations common with coarser mineral inclusions; and platy coarse phyllosilicates (muscovite, biotite, and chlorite). Micron to submicron pores were scattered throughout the interior of particles. Clays in the coatings and agglomerates were dominated by nano-thin platelets of the clay minerals of illite-smectite series including illite, smectite, and their mixed layers with subordinate kaolinite and clay-sized chlorite. Submicron iron oxide grains, dominantly goethite, were distributed throughout the clay agglomerates and coatings. Unlike the common assumptions and simplifications, we found that the analyzed dust particles were irregularly shaped with birefringent, polycrystalline, and polymineralic heterogeneous compositions. Accounting for this structural and mineralogical makeup may improve the remote sensing retrieval of dust and the evaluation of radiation effects

  2. TEM analysis of the internal structures and mineralogy of Asian dust particles and the implications for optical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, G. Y.; Nousiainen, T.

    2014-03-01

    Mineral dust interacts with incoming/outgoing electromagnetic radiation in the atmosphere. This interaction depends on the microphysical properties of the dust particles, including size, mineral composition, external morphology, and internal structure. Ideally all these properties should be accounted for in dust remote sensing, the modeling of single-scattering properties, and radiative effect assessment. There have been many reports on the microphysical characterizations of mineral dust, but no investigations of the internal structures or mineral composition of individual dust particles. We explored the interiors of Asian dust particles using the combined application of focused ion beam thin-slice preparation and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that individual dust particles consisted of numerous mineral grains, which were organized into several types of internal structure: single and polycrystalline cores of quartz, feldspars, calcite, and amphibole often with oriented clay coatings; individual clay agglomerates of nano-thin clay platelets showing preferred to random orientations commonly with coarser mineral inclusions; and platy coarse phyllosilicates (muscovite, biotite, and chlorite). Micron to submicron pores were scattered throughout the interior of particles. Clays in the coatings and agglomerates were dominated by nano-thin platelets of the clay minerals of illite-smectite series including illite, smectite, and their mixed layers with subordinate kaolinite and clay-size chlorite. Submicron iron oxide grains, dominantly goethite, were distributed throughout the clay agglomerates and coatings. Unlike the common assumptions and simplifications, we found that the analyzed dust particles were irregularly shaped with birefringent, polycrystalline, and polymineralic heterogeneous compositions. Accounting for this structural and mineralogical makeup may improve the remote sensing retrieval of dust and the evaluation of

  3. Modelling and Observation of Mineral Dust Optical Properties over Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilinski, Michał T.; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Zawadzka, Olga; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Kumala, Wojciech; Petelski, Tomasz; Makuch, Przemysław; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zagajewski, Bogdan

    2016-12-01

    This paper is focused on Saharan dust transport to Central Europe/Poland; we compare properties of atmospheric Saharan dust using data from NAAPS, MACC, AERONET as well as observations obtained during HyMountEcos campaign in June 2012. Ten years of dust climatology shows that long-range transport of Saharan dust to Central Europe is mostly during spring and summer. HYSPLIT back-trajectories indicate airmass transport mainly in November, but it does not agree with modeled maxima of dust optical depth. NAAPS model shows maximum of dust optical depth ( 0.04-0.05, 550 nm) in April-May, but the MACC modeled peak is broader ( 0.04). During occurrence of mineral dust over Central-Europe for 14% (NAAPS) / 12% (MACC) of days dust optical depths are above 0.05 and during 4% (NAAPS) / 2.5% (MACC) of days dust optical depths exceed 0.1. The HyMountEcos campaign took place in June-July 2012 in the mountainous region of Karkonosze. The analysis includes remote sensing data from lidars, sun-photometers, and numerical simulations from NAAPS, MACC, DREAM8b models. Comparison of simulations with observations demonstrates the ability of models to reasonably reproduce aerosol vertical distributions and their temporal variability. However, significant differences between simulated and measured AODs were found. The best agreement was achieved for MACC model.

  4. Atmospheric dust modeling from meso to global scales with the online NMMB/BSC-Dust model - Part 2: Experimental campaigns in Northern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, K.; Pérez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.; Jorba, O.; Basart, S.; Miller, R. L.; Janjic, Z.; Black, T.; Nickovic, S.; Todd, M. C.; Washington, R.; Müller, D.; Tesche, M.; Weinzierl, B.; Esselborn, M.; Schladitz, A.

    2012-03-01

    The new NMMB/BSC-Dust model is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales. It is an online model in which the dust aerosol dynamics and physics are solved at each model time step. The companion paper (Pérez et al., 2011) develops the dust model parameterizations and provides daily to annual evaluations of the model for its global and regional configurations. Modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) was evaluated against AERONET Sun photometers over Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe with correlations around 0.6-0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. In this paper we analyze in detail the behavior of the model using data from the Saharan Mineral dUst experiment (SAMUM-1) in 2006 and the Bodélé Dust Experiment (BoDEx) in 2005. AOD from satellites and Sun photometers, vertically resolved extinction coefficients from lidars and particle size distributions at the ground and in the troposphere are used, complemented by wind profile data and surface meteorological measurements. All simulations were performed at the regional scale for the Northern African domain at the expected operational horizontal resolution of 25 km. Model results for SAMUM-1 generally show good agreement with satellite data over the most active Saharan dust sources. The model reproduces the AOD from Sun photometers close to sources and after long-range transport, and the dust size spectra at different height levels. At this resolution, the model is not able to reproduce a large haboob that occurred during the campaign. Some deficiencies are found concerning the vertical dust distribution related to the representation of the mixing height in the atmospheric part of the model. For the BoDEx episode, we found the diurnal temperature cycle to be strongly dependant on the soil moisture, which is underestimated in the NCEP analysis used for model initialization. The low level jet (LLJ) and the dust AOD over the Bodélé are well reproduced

  5. Atmospheric Dust Modeling from Meso to Global Scales with the Online NMMB/BSC-Dust Model Part 2: Experimental Campaigns in Northern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haustein, K.; Perez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.; Jorba, O.; Basart, S.; Miller, R. L.; Janjic, Z.; Black, T.; Nickovic, S.; Todd, M. C.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The new NMMB/BSC-Dust model is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales. It is an online model in which the dust aerosol dynamics and physics are solved at each model time step. The companion paper (Perez et al., 2011) develops the dust model parameterizations and provides daily to annual evaluations of the model for its global and regional configurations. Modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) was evaluated against AERONET Sun photometers over Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe with correlations around 0.6-0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. In this paper we analyze in detail the behavior of the model using data from the Saharan Mineral dUst experiment (SAMUM-1) in 2006 and the Bodele Dust Experiment (BoDEx) in 2005. AOD from satellites and Sun photometers, vertically resolved extinction coefficients from lidars and particle size distributions at the ground and in the troposphere are used, complemented by wind profile data and surface meteorological measurements. All simulations were performed at the regional scale for the Northern African domain at the expected operational horizontal resolution of 25 km. Model results for SAMUM-1 generally show good agreement with satellite data over the most active Saharan dust sources. The model reproduces the AOD from Sun photometers close to sources and after long-range transport, and the dust size spectra at different height levels. At this resolution, the model is not able to reproduce a large haboob that occurred during the campaign. Some deficiencies are found concerning the vertical dust distribution related to the representation of the mixing height in the atmospheric part of the model. For the BoDEx episode, we found the diurnal temperature cycle to be strongly dependant on the soil moisture, which is underestimated in the NCEP analysis used for model initialization. The low level jet (LLJ) and the dust AOD over the Bodélé are well reproduced

  6. Signatures of massive collisions in debris discs. A self-consistent numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Q.; Thébault, P.; Augereau, J.-C.; Boccaletti, A.; Charnoz, S.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Violent stochastic collisional events have been invoked as a possible explanation for some debris discs displaying pronounced azimuthal asymmetries or having a luminosity excess exceeding that expected for systems at collisional steady-state. So far, no thorough modelling of the consequences of such stochastic events has been carried out, mainly because of the extreme numerical challenge of coupling the dynamical and collisional evolution of the released dust. Aims: We perform the first fully self-consistent modelling of the aftermath of massive breakups in debris discs. We follow the collisional and dynamical evolution of dust released after the breakup of a Ceres-sized body at 6 AU from its central star. We investigate the duration, magnitude, and spatial structure of the signature left by such a violent event, as well as its observational detectability. Methods: We use the recently developed LIDT-DD code, which handles the coupled collisional and dynamical evolution of debris discs. The main focus is placed on the complex interplay between destructive collisions, Keplerian dynamics, and radiation pressure forces. We use the GRaTer package to estimate the system's luminosity at different wavelengths. Results: The breakup of a Ceres-sized body at 6 AU creates an asymmetric dust disc that is homogenized by the coupled action of collisions and dynamics on a timescale of a few 105 years. After a transient period where it is very steep, the particle size distribution in the system relaxes to a collisional steady-state law after ~104 years. The luminosity excess in the breakup's aftermath should be detectable by mid-IR photometry, from a 30 pc distance, over a period of ~106 years that exceeds the duration of the asymmetric phase of the disc (a few 105 years). As for the asymmetric structures, we derive synthetic images for the VLT/SPHERE and JWST/MIRI instruments, showing that they should be clearly visible and resolved from a 10 pc distance. Images at 1.6

  7. Gas clumping in self-consistent reionization models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlator, Kristian; Oh, S. Peng; Özel, Feryal; Davé, Romeel

    2012-12-01

    We use a suite of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations including a self-consistent treatment for inhomogeneous reionization to study the impact of galactic outflows and photoionization heating on the volume-averaged recombination rate of the intergalactic medium (IGM). By incorporating an evolving ionizing escape fraction and a treatment for self-shielding within Lyman limit systems, we have run the first simulations of 'photon-starved' reionization scenarios that simultaneously reproduce observations of the abundance of galaxies, the optical depth to electron scattering of cosmic microwave background photons τes and the effective optical depth to Lyα absorption at z = 5. We confirm that an ionizing background reduces the clumping factor C by more than 50 per cent by smoothing moderately overdense (Δ = 1-100) regions. Meanwhile, outflows increase clumping only modestly. The clumping factor of ionized gas is much lower than the overall baryonic clumping factor because the most overdense gas is self-shielded. Photoionization heating further suppresses recombinations if reionization heats gas above the canonical 10 000 K. Accounting for both effects within our most realistic simulation, C rises from <1 at z > 10 to 3.3 at z = 6. We show that incorporating temperature- and ionization-corrected clumping factors into an analytical reionization model reproduces the numerical simulation's τes to within 10 per cent. Finally, we explore how many ionizing photons are absorbed during the process of heating filaments by considering the overall photon cost of reionization in analytical models that assume that the IGM is heated at different redshifts. For reionization redshifts of 9-10, cold filaments boost the reionization photon budget by ˜1 photon per hydrogen atom.

  8. Why Is Improvement of Earth System Models So Elusive? Challenges and Strategies From Dust Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. L.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Perlwitz, J. P.; Ginoux, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Past decades have seen an accelerating increase in computing efficiency,while climate models are representing a rapidly widening set ofphysical processes. Yet simulations of some fundamental aspects ofclimate like precipitation or aerosol forcing remain highly uncertainand resistent to progress. Dust aerosol modeling of soil particleslofted by wind erosion has seen a similar conflict between increasingmodel sophistication and remaining uncertainty. Dust aerosols perturbthe energy and water cycles by scattering radiation and acting as icenuclei, while mediating atmospheric chemistry and marinephotosynthesis (and thus the carbon cycle). These effects take placeacross scales from the dimensions of an ice crystal to theplanetary-scale circulation that disperses dust far downwind of itsparent soil. Representing this range leads to several modelingchallenges. Should we limit complexity in our model, which consumescomputer resources and inhibits interpretation? How do we decide if aprocess involving dust is worthy of inclusion within our model? Canwe identify a minimal representation of a complex process that isefficient yet retains the physics relevant to climate? Answeringthese questions about the appropriate degree of representation isguided by model evaluation, which presents several more challenges.How do we proceed if the available observations do not directlyconstrain our process of interest? (This could result from competingprocesses that influence the observed variable and obscure thesignature of our process of interest.) Examples will be presentedfrom dust modeling, with lessons that might be more broadlyapplicable. The end result will either be clinical depression or thereassuring promise of continued gainful employment as the communityconfronts these challenges.

  9. A generalised model for traffic induced road dust emissions. Model description and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Janne; Denby, Bruce

    2011-07-01

    This paper concerns the development and evaluation of a new and generalised road dust emission model. Most of today's road dust emission models are based on local measurements and/or contain empirical emission factors that are specific for a given road environment. In this study, a more generalised road dust emission model is presented and evaluated. We have based the emissions on road, tyre and brake wear rates and used the mass balance concept to describe the build-up of road dust on the road surface and road shoulder. The model separates the emissions into a direct part and a resuspension part, and treats the road surface and road shoulder as two different sources. We tested the model under idealized conditions as well as on two datasets in and just outside of Oslo in Norway during the studded tyre season. We found that the model reproduced the observed increase in road dust emissions directly after drying of the road surface. The time scale for the build-up of road dust on the road surface is less than an hour for medium to heavy traffic density. The model performs well for temperatures above 0 °C and less well during colder periods. Since the model does not yet include salting as an additional mass source, underestimations are evident under dry periods with temperatures around 0 °C, under which salting occurs. The model overestimates the measured PM 10 (particulate matter less than 10 μm in diameter) concentrations under heavy precipitation events since the model does not take the amount of precipitation into account. There is a strong sensitivity of the modelled emissions to the road surface conditions and the current parameterisations of the effect of precipitation, runoff and evaporation seem inadequate.

  10. Self-consistent discharge growing model of helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isayama, Shogo; Hada, Tohru; Shinohara, Shunjiro; Tanikawa, Takao

    2015-11-01

    Helicon plasma is a high-density and low-temperature plasma generated by the electromagnetic (Helicon) wave excited in the plasma. It is thought to be useful for various applications including electric thrusters. Physics of helicon plasma production involves such fundamental processes as the wave propagation (dispersion relation), collisional and non-collisional wave damping, plasma heating, ionization/recombination of neutral particles, and modification of the dispersion relation by newly ionized plasma. There remain a number of unsolved physical issues such as, how the Helicon and the TG modes influence the plasma density, electron temperature and their spatial profiles. While the Helicon mode is absorbed in the bulk plasma, the TG mode is mostly absorbed near the edge of the plasma. The local power deposition in the helicon plasma is mostly balanced by collisional loss. This local power balance can give rise to the inhomogeneous electron temperature profile that leads to time evolution of density profile and dispersion relation. In our study, we construct a self-consistent model of the discharge evolution that includes the wave excitation, electron heat transfer, and diffusion of charged particles.

  11. High-resolution dust modelling over complex terrains in West Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, S.; Vendrell, L.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The present work demonstrates the impact of model resolution in dust propagation in a complex terrain region such as West Asia. For this purpose, two simulations using the NMMB/BSC-Dust model are performed and analysed, one with a high horizontal resolution (at 0.03° × 0.03°) and one with a lower horizontal resolution (at 0.33° × 0.33°). Both model experiments cover two intense dust storms that occurred on 17-20 March 2012 as a consequence of strong northwesterly Shamal winds that spanned over thousands of kilometres in West Asia. The comparison with ground-based (surface weather stations and sunphotometers) and satellite aerosol observations (Aqua/MODIS and MSG/SEVIRI) shows that despite differences in the magnitude of the simulated dust concentrations, the model is able to reproduce these two dust outbreaks. Differences between both simulations on the dust spread rise on regional dust transport areas in south-western Saudi Arabia, Yemen and Oman. The complex orography in south-western Saudi Arabia, Yemen and Oman (with peaks higher than 3000 m) has an impact on the transported dust concentration fields over mountain regions. Differences between both model configurations are mainly associated to the channelization of the dust flow through valleys and the differences in the modelled altitude of the mountains that alters the meteorology and blocks the dust fronts limiting the dust transport. These results demonstrate how the dust prediction in the vicinity of complex terrains improves using high-horizontal resolution simulations.

  12. Foreground Bias from Parametric Models of Far-IR Dust Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    We use simple toy models of far-IR dust emission to estimate the accuracy to which the polarization of the cosmic microwave background can be recovered using multi-frequency fits, if the parametric form chosen for the fitted dust model differs from the actual dust emission. Commonly used approximations to the far-IR dust spectrum yield CMB residuals comparable to or larger than the sensitivities expected for the next generation of CMB missions, despite fitting the combined CMB plus foreground emission to precision 0.1 percent or better. The Rayleigh-Jeans approximation to the dust spectrum biases the fitted dust spectral index by (Delta)(Beta)(sub d) = 0.2 and the inflationary B-mode amplitude by (Delta)(r) = 0.03. Fitting the dust to a modified blackbody at a single temperature biases the best-fit CMB by (Delta)(r) greater than 0.003 if the true dust spectrum contains multiple temperature components. A 13-parameter model fitting two temperature components reduces this bias by an order of magnitude if the true dust spectrum is in fact a simple superposition of emission at different temperatures, but fails at the level (Delta)(r) = 0.006 for dust whose spectral index varies with frequency. Restricting the observing frequencies to a narrow region near the foreground minimum reduces these biases for some dust spectra but can increase the bias for others. Data at THz frequencies surrounding the peak of the dust emission can mitigate these biases while providing a direct determination of the dust temperature profile.

  13. A new galactic chemical evolution model with dust: results for dwarf irregular galaxies and DLA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioannini, L.; Matteucci, F.; Vladilo, G.; Calura, F.

    2017-01-01

    We present a galactic chemical evolution model which adopts updated prescriptions for all the main processes governing the dust cycle. We follow in detail the evolution of the abundances of several chemical species (C, O, S, Si, Fe and Zn) in the gas and dust of a typical dwarf irregular galaxy. The dwarf irregular galaxy is assumed to evolve with a low but continuous level of star formation and experience galactic winds triggered by supernova (SN) explosions. We predict the evolution of the gas to dust ratio in such a galaxy and discuss critically the main processes involving dust, such as dust production by asymptotic giant branch stars and Type II SNe, destruction and accretion (gas condensation in clouds). We then apply our model to damped Lyman α (DLA) systems which are believed to be dwarf irregulars, as witnessed by their abundance patterns. Our main conclusions are the following. (i) We can reproduce the observed gas to dust ratio in dwarf galaxies. (ii) We find that the process of dust accretion plays a fundamental role in the evolution of dust and in certain cases it becomes the dominant process in the dust cycle. On the other hand, dust destruction seems to be a negligible process in irregulars. (iii) Concerning DLA systems, we show that the observed gas-phase abundances of silicon, normalized to volatile elements (zinc and sulfur), are in agreement with our model. (iv) The abundances of iron and silicon in DLA systems suggest that the two elements undergo a different history of dust formation and evolution. Our work casts light on the nature of iron-rich dust: the observed depletion pattern of iron is well reproduced only when an additional source of iron dust is considered. Here we explore the possibility of a contribution from Type Ia SNe as well as an efficient accretion of iron nanoparticles.

  14. Foreground Bias from Parametric Models of Far-IR Dust Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    We use simple toy models of far-IR dust emission to estimate the accuracy to which the polarization of the cosmic microwave background can be recovered using multi-frequency fits, if the parametric form chosen for the fitted dust model differs from the actual dust emission. Commonly used approximations to the far-IR dust spectrum yield CMB residuals comparable to or larger than the sensitivities expected for the next generation of CMB missions, despite fitting the combined CMB plus foreground emission to precision 0.1 percent or better. The Rayleigh-Jeans approximation to the dust spectrum biases the fitted dust spectral index by (Delta)(Beta)(sub d) = 0.2 and the inflationary B-mode amplitude by (Delta)(r) = 0.03. Fitting the dust to a modified blackbody at a single temperature biases the best-fit CMB by (Delta)(r) greater than 0.003 if the true dust spectrum contains multiple temperature components. A 13-parameter model fitting two temperature components reduces this bias by an order of magnitude if the true dust spectrum is in fact a simple superposition of emission at different temperatures, but fails at the level (Delta)(r) = 0.006 for dust whose spectral index varies with frequency. Restricting the observing frequencies to a narrow region near the foreground minimum reduces these biases for some dust spectra but can increase the bias for others. Data at THz frequencies surrounding the peak of the dust emission can mitigate these biases while providing a direct determination of the dust temperature profile.

  15. Global transport of Asian dust revealed by NASA/CALIPSO and a global aerosol transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, K.; Yumimoto, K.; Uno, I.; Takemura, T.

    2009-12-01

    Trans-Pacific transport of mineral dust and air pollutants originating from Asia to North America is well known. Eguchi et al. (2009, ACP) pointed out that the Taklimakan Desert supplies mineral dust for upper troposphere and can play an important role in intercontinental-scale dust transport. Asian dust is also detected from ice cores on Greenland and French Alps. The effects of Asian dust on cloud systems and the associated radiative forcing can extend over the Northern Hemisphere. In this study, we report the detailed structure of Asian dust during the global transport using integrated analysis of observations by CALIOP on-boarded NASA/CALIPSO satellite and a glocal aerosol transport model. We used the CALIOP Level 1B data products (ver. 2.01), containing the total attenuated backscatter coefficients at 532/1064 nm and the volume depolarization ratio at 532 nm. Dust extinction coefficients are then derived from the Fernald’s inversion method by setting the lidar ratio to S1=50 sr. As for a global aerosol transport model, we used the Spectral Radiation Transport Model for the Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS; Takemura et al., 2005, JGR). We performed a sensitivity experiment that aims at an analysis specified for a single dust event originating from the Taklimakan. The simulation was performed over May 2007. A sever dust storm occurred on 8-9 May 2007 in Taklimakan Desert. Dust cloud emitted during this dust storm is uplifted to altitude of 8-10 km and starts the travel of full circuit around the globe. It has a meridional width of 100-200 km. About one tenth of the original uplifted dust mass (8.1 Gg) is encircling the globe taking about 2 weeks. Because of its high transport height, the dust cloud almost unaffected by wet removal so that the decay of its concentration level is small. Over the western North Pacific of 2nd circuit, the dust cloud pulls down to the lower troposphere by anticyclonic down draft, and finally it settles on North Pacific because of wet

  16. Observations and modeling of the dust emission from the H2-bright galaxy-wide shock in Stephan's Quintet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillard, P.; Boulanger, F.; Cluver, M. E.; Appleton, P. N.; Pineau Des Forêts, G.; Ogle, P.

    2010-07-01

    Context. Spitzer Space Telescope observations have detected powerful mid-infrared (mid-IR) H2 rotational line emission from the X-ray emitting large-scale shock (~15 × 35 kpc2) associated with a galaxy collision in Stephan's Quintet (SQ). Because H2 forms on dust grains, the presence of H2 is physically linked to the survival of dust, and we expect some dust emission to originate in the molecular gas. Aims: To test this interpretation, IR observations and dust modeling are used to identify and characterize the thermal dust emission from the shocked molecular gas. Methods: The spatial distribution of the IR emission allows us to isolate the faint PAH and dust continuum emission associated with the molecular gas in the SQ shock. We model the spectral energy distribution (SED) of this emission, and fit it to Spitzer observations. The radiation field is determined with GALEX UV, HST V-band, and ground-based near-IR observations. We consider two limiting cases for the structure of the H2 gas: it is either diffuse and penetrated by UV radiation, or fragmented into clouds that are optically thick to UV. Results: Faint PAH and dust continuum emission are detected in the SQ shock, outside star-forming regions. The 12/24 μm flux ratio in the shock is remarkably close to that of the diffuse Galactic interstellar medium, leading to a Galactic PAH/VSG abundance ratio. However, the properties of the shock inferred from the PAH emission spectrum differ from those of the Galaxy, which may be indicative of an enhanced fraction of large and neutrals PAHs. In both models (diffuse or clumpy H2 gas), the IR SED is consistent with the expected emission from dust associated with the warm (> 150 K) H2 gas, heated by a UV radiation field of intensity comparable to that of the solar neighborhood. This is in agreement with GALEX UV observations that show that the intensity of the radiation field in the shock is GUV = 1.4±0.2 [Habing units]. Conclusions: The presence of PAHs and dust

  17. The spatial distribution of mineral dust and its shortwave radiative forcing over North Africa. Modeling sensitivities to dust emissions and aerosol size treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Johnson, Ben; McFarlane, Sally A.; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.

    2010-09-20

    A fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model (WRF-Chem) with the implementation of two dust emission schemes (GOCART and DUSTRAN) into two aerosol models (MADE/SORGAM and MOSAIC) is applied over North Africa to investigate the modeling sensitivities to dust emissions and aerosol size treatments in simulating mineral dust and its shortwave (SW) radiative forcing. Model results of the spatial distribution of mineral dust and its radiative forcing are evaluated using measurements from the AMMA SOP0 campaign in January and February of 2006 over North Africa. Our study suggests that the size distribution of emitted dust can result in significant differences (up to 100%) in simulating mineral dust and its SW radiative forcing. With the same dust emission and dry deposition processes, two aerosol models, MADE/SORGAM and MOSAIC, can yield large difference in size distributions of dust particles due to their different aerosol size treatments using modal and sectional approaches respectively. However, the difference between the two aerosol models in simulating the mass concentrations and the SW radiative forcing of mineral dust is small (< 10%). The model simulations show that mineral dust increases AOD by a factor of 2, heats the lower atmosphere (1-3 km) with a maximum rate of 0.7±0.5 K day-1 below 1 km, and reduces the downwelling SW radiation by up to 25 W m-2 on 24-hour average at surface, highlighting the importance of including dust radiative impact in understanding the regional climate of North Africa. When compared to the available measurements, WRF-Chem simulations can generally capture the measured features of mineral dust and its radiative properties over North Africa, suggesting that the model can be used to perform more extensive simulations of regional climate over North Africa.

  18. Global sand and dust storms in 2008: Observation and HYSPLIT model verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaqiang; Stein, Ariel F.; Draxler, Roland R.; de la Rosa, Jesús D.; Zhang, Xiaoye

    2011-11-01

    The HYSPLIT model has been applied to simulate the global dust distribution for 2008 using two different dust emission schemes. The first one assumes that emissions could occur from any land-use grid cell defined in the model as desert. The second emission approach uses an empirically derived algorithm based on satellite observations. To investigate the dust storm features and verify the model performance, a global dataset of Integrated Surface Hourly (ISH) observations has been analyzed to map the spatial distribution and seasonal variation of sand and dust storms. Furthermore, the PM 10 concentration data at four stations in Northern China and two stations in Southern Spain, and the AOD data from a station located at the center of the Sahara Desert have been compared with the model results. The spatial distribution of observed dust storm frequency from ISH shows the known high frequency areas located in North Africa, the Middle East, Mongolia and Northwestern China. Some sand and dust storms have also been observed in Australia, Mexico, Argentina, and other sites in South America. Most of the dust events in East Asia occur in the spring, however this seasonal feature is not so evident in other dust source regions. In general, the model reproduces the dust storm frequency for most of the regions for the two emission approaches. Also, a good quantitative performance is achieved at the ground stations in Southern Spain and Western China when using the desert land-use based emissions, although HYSPLIT overestimates the dust concentration at downwind areas of East Asia and underestimates the column in the center of the Saharan Desert. On the other hand, the satellite based emission approach improves the dust forecast performance in the Sahara, but underestimates the dust concentrations in East Asia.

  19. The potential of the synergistic use of passive and active remote sensing measurements for the validation of a regional dust model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiridis, V.; Kafatos, M.; Perez, C.; Kazadzis, S.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Mamouri, R. E.; Papayannis, A.; Kokkalis, P.; Giannakaki, E.; Basart, S.; Daglis, I.; Zerefos, C.

    2009-08-01

    A long-lasting Saharan dust event affected Europe on 18-23 May 2008. Dust was present in the free troposphere over Greece, in height ranges between the surface and approximately 4-5 km above sea level. The event was monitored by ground-based CIMEL sunphotometric and multi-wavelength combined backscatter/Raman lidar measurements over Athens, Greece. The dust event had the maximum of its intensity on 20 May. Three-dimensional dust spatial distribution over Greece on that day is presented through satellite synergy of passive and active remote sensing using MODIS and CALIPSO data, respectively. For the period under study, the ground-based measurements are used to characterize the dust event and evaluate the latest version of the BSC Dust Regional Atmospheric Modeling (BSC-DREAM) system. Comparisons of modeled and measured aerosol optical depths over Athens show that the Saharan dust outbreak is fairly well captured by BSC-DREAM simulations. Evaluation of BSC-DREAM using Raman lidar measurements on 20 May shows that the model consistently reproduces the dust vertical distribution over Athens.

  20. Homogeneized modeling of mineral dust emissions over Europe and Africa using the CHIMERE model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briant, R.; Menut, L.; Siour, G.; Prigent, C.

    2014-05-01

    In the region including Africa and Europe, the main part of mineral dust emissions is observed in Africa. The particles are thus transported towards Europe and constitute a non-negligible part of the surface aerosols measured and controlled in the framework of the European air quality legislation. The modelling of these African dust emissions fluxes and transport is widely studied and complex parameterizations are already used in regional to global model for this Sahara-Sahel region. In a lesser extent, mineral dust emissions occur locally in Europe, mainly over agricultural areas. Their modelling is generally poorly done or just ignored. But in some cases, this contribution may be important and may impact the European air quality budget. In this study, we propose an homogeneized calculations of mineral dust fluxes for Europe and Africa. For that, we extended the CHIMERE dust production model (DPM) by using new soil and surface datasets, and the global aeolian roughness length dataset provided by GARLAP from microwave and visible satellite observations. This DPM is detailed along with academic tests case results and simulation on a real case results.

  1. util_2comp: Planck-based two-component dust model utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, Aaron

    2014-11-01

    The util_2comp software utilities generate predictions of far-infrared Galactic dust emission and reddening based on a two-component dust emission model fit to Planck HFI, DIRBE and IRAS data from 100 GHz to 3000 GHz. These predictions and the associated dust temperature map have angular resolution of 6.1 arcminutes and are available over the entire sky. Implementations in IDL and Python are included.

  2. Development of a Windbreak Dust Predictive Model and Mitigation Planning Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Hwy 81 and US Interstate 84 to mitigate the effects of dust storms in the summer and snow drifts in the winter on the nearby highways. The windbreaks...FINAL REPORT Development of a Windbreak Dust Predictive Model and Mitigation Planning Tool SERDP Project RC-1730 DECEMBER 2013 Eric...From - To) 04-09-2010 To 10-09-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER RC-1730 Development of a Windbreak Dust

  3. Atmospheric dust modeling from meso to global scales with the online NMMB/BSC-Dust model - Part 2: Experimental campaigns in Northern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, K.; Pérez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.; Jorba, O.; Basart, S.; Miller, R. L.; Janjic, Z.; Black, T.; Nickovic, S.; Todd, M. C.; Washington, R.

    2011-11-01

    The new online NMMB/BSC-Dust model is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales. The companion paper Pérez et al., 2011 develops the dust model parameterizations and provides daily to annual evaluations of the model for its global and regional configurations. Modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) was evaluated against AERONET Sun photometers over Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe with correlations around 0.6-0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. In this paper we analyze in detail the behavior of the model using data from the Saharan Mineral dUst experiment (SAMUM-1) in 2006 and the Bodélé Dust Experiment (BoDEx) in 2005. AOD from satellites and Sun photometers, vertically resolved extinction coefficients from lidars and particle size distributions at the ground and in the troposphere are used, complemented by wind profile data and surface meteorological measurements. All simulations were performed at the regional scale for the Northern African domain at the expected operational resolution of 25 km. Model results for SAMUM-1 generally show good agreement with satellite data over the most active Saharan dust sources. The model reproduces the AOD from Sun photometers close to sources and after long-range transport, and the dust size spectra at different height levels. At this resolution, the model is not able to reproduce a large haboob occurred during the campaign. Some deficiencies are found concerning the vertical distribution. The mixing height is underestimated which may be attributed to poor soil initial conditions. For the BoDEx period, particular attention is paid to understand the dust model behavior in relation with the low level jet (LLJ) in the Bodélé. The diurnal temperature cycle depends strongly on the soil moisture, which is underestimated in the NCEP analysis used for model initialization. The daily maximum surface wind speeds are underestimated up to 50% in some days even

  4. Development of a high resolution interstellar dust engineering model - overview of the project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, V. J.; Strub, P.; Soja, R. H.; Srama, R.; Krüger, H.; Grün, E.

    2013-09-01

    Beyond 3 AU heliocentric distance, the flow of interstellar dust through the solar system is a dominant component of the total dust population. The modulation of this flux with the solar cycle and the position in the solar system has been predicted by theoretical studies since the seventies. The modulation was proven to exist by matching dust trajectory simulations with real spacecraft data from Ulysses in 1998. The modulations were further analyzed and studies in detail in 2012. The current ESA interplanetary meteoroid model IMEM includes an interstellar dust component, but this component was modelled only with straight line trajectories through the solar system. For the new ESA IMEX model, a high-resolution interstellar dust component is implemented separately from a dust streams module. The dust streams module focuses on dust in streams that was released from comets (cf. Abstract R. Soja). Parallel processing techniques are used to improve computation time (cf. Abstract P. Strub). The goal is to make predictions for the interstellar dust flux as close to the Sun as 1 AU or closer, for future space mission design.

  5. Uncertainty in Modeling Dust Mass Balance and Radiative Forcing from Size Parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Chen, Siyu; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun; Kok, Jasper; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Huang, J.

    2013-11-05

    This study examines the uncertainties in simulating mass balance and radiative forcing of mineral dust due to biases in the aerosol size parameterization. Simulations are conducted quasi-globally (180oW-180oE and 60oS-70oN) using the WRF24 Chem model with three different approaches to represent aerosol size distribution (8-bin, 4-bin, and 3-mode). The biases in the 3-mode or 4-bin approaches against a relatively more accurate 8-bin approach in simulating dust mass balance and radiative forcing are identified. Compared to the 8-bin approach, the 4-bin approach simulates similar but coarser size distributions of dust particles in the atmosphere, while the 3-mode pproach retains more fine dust particles but fewer coarse dust particles due to its prescribed og of each mode. Although the 3-mode approach yields up to 10 days longer dust mass lifetime over the remote oceanic regions than the 8-bin approach, the three size approaches produce similar dust mass lifetime (3.2 days to 3.5 days) on quasi-global average, reflecting that the global dust mass lifetime is mainly determined by the dust mass lifetime near the dust source regions. With the same global dust emission (~6000 Tg yr-1), the 8-bin approach produces a dust mass loading of 39 Tg, while the 4-bin and 3-mode approaches produce 3% (40.2 Tg) and 25% (49.1 Tg) higher dust mass loading, respectively. The difference in dust mass loading between the 8-bin approach and the 4-bin or 3-mode approaches has large spatial variations, with generally smaller relative difference (<10%) near the surface over the dust source regions. The three size approaches also result in significantly different dry and wet deposition fluxes and number concentrations of dust. The difference in dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) (a factor of 3) among the three size approaches is much larger than their difference (25%) in dust mass loading. Compared to the 8-bin approach, the 4-bin approach yields stronger dust absorptivity, while the 3-mode

  6. A proposal for a consistent parametrization of earth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbriger, Thomas; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2005-08-01

    The current way to parametrize earth models in terms of real-valued seismic velocities and quality factors is incomplete as it does not specify how complex-valued viscoelastic moduli or complex velocities should be computed from them. Various ways to do this can be found in the literature. Depending on the context they may specify (1) the real part of the viscoelastic modulus, (2) the absolute value of the viscoelastic modulus, (3) the real part of complex velocity or (4) the phase velocity of a propagating plane wave. We propose here to exclusively use the first alternative because it is the only one which allows both a flexible choice of elastic parameters and a mathematically rigorous evaluation of the complex-valued viscoelastic moduli. The other definitions only permit an evaluation of viscoelastic moduli if the tabulated quality factors are directly associated with the listed velocities. Ignoring the subtle differences between the three definitions leads to variations in viscoelastic moduli which are second order in 1/Q where Q is a quality factor. This may be the reason why the topic has never been discussed in the literature. In case of shallow seismic media, however, where quality factors may assume values of less than 10, the subtle differences become noticeable in synthetic seismograms. It is then essential to use the same definition in all algorithms to make results comparable. Matters become worse for anisotropic media, which are commonly specified in terms of real elastic moduli and quality factors for effective isotropic moduli. In that case, the complex-valued viscoelastic moduli cannot be determined uniquely. However, interpreting the tabulated constants as the real parts of the complex-valued viscoelastic moduli at least allows a consistent definition, which respects the relative magnitude of the anelastic and anisotropic parts compared to the elastic parts. It should be noted that all these considerations apply to complex-valued viscoelastic

  7. Self-consistent Modeling of Elastic Anisotropy in Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitpanyacharoen, W.; Wenk, H.; Matthies, S.; Vasin, R.

    2012-12-01

    Elastic anisotropy in clay-rich sedimentary rocks has increasingly received attention because of significance for prospecting of petroleum deposits, as well as seals in the context of nuclear waste and CO2 sequestration. The orientation of component minerals and pores/fractures is a critical factor that influences elastic anisotropy. In this study, we investigate lattice and shape preferred orientation (LPO and SPO) of three shales from the North Sea in UK, the Qusaiba Formation in Saudi Arabia, and the Officer Basin in Australia (referred to as N1, Qu3, and L1905, respectively) to calculate elastic properties and compare them with experimental results. Synchrotron hard X-ray diffraction and microtomography experiments were performed to quantify LPO, weight proportions, and three-dimensional SPO of constituent minerals and pores. Our preliminary results show that the degree of LPO and total amount of clays are highest in Qu3 (3.3-6.5 m.r.d and 74vol%), moderately high in N1 (2.4-5.6 m.r.d. and 70vol%), and lowest in L1905 (2.3-2.5 m.r.d. and 42vol%). In addition, porosity in Qu3 is as low as 2% while it is up to 6% in L1605 and 8% in N1, respectively. Based on this information and single crystal elastic properties of mineral components, we apply a self-consistent averaging method to calculate macroscopic elastic properties and corresponding seismic velocities for different shales. The elastic model is then compared with measured acoustic velocities on the same samples. The P-wave velocities measured from Qu3 (4.1-5.3 km/s, 26.3%Ani.) are faster than those obtained from L1905 (3.9-4.7 km/s, 18.6%Ani.) and N1 (3.6-4.3 km/s, 17.7%Ani.). By making adjustments for pore structure (aspect ratio) and single crystal elastic properties of clay minerals, a good agreement between our calculation and the ultrasonic measurement is obtained.

  8. Utilizing Model Interoperability and High Performance Computing to Enhance Dust Storm Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Q.; Yang, C.; Xie, J.; Wu, H.; Li, J.

    2009-12-01

    The simulations of dust storm and potential forecasting are of significant interest to public health, environment sciences, and global Earth observation system of systems (GEOSS). To support improved decision making of public health with higher resolution of dust storm forecasting. Model interoperability and high performance computing need to be leveraged to increase the resolution to the zip code level. This poses significant computational challenge for dust storm simulations. This presentation reports our research in utilizing interoperability technologies and high performance computing to enhance dust storm forecasting by facilitating model integration, data discovery, data access, and data utilization in a HPC (High performance computing) environment for a) reducing the computing time, b)lengthening the period of forecast, and c) ingesting large amount of geospatial datasets.DREAM-eta-8p and NMM-dust dust storm simulation models are utilized for the exploration of utilizing Model Interoperability and High Performance Computing to Enhance Dust Storm Forecasting. In our approach, the coarse model (DREAM-eta 8p) is used to identify hotspots of higher predicted dust concentration, and the output results are served as the input for the fine-grain model (NMM-dust) on the hotspot areas. After ingesting the DREAM-eta output the NMM-dust can start simulation. Experimental results demonstrates promising towards a forecasting system of dust storm forecasting. Acknowledgements: We would like to thank Drs. Karl Benedict, Bill Hudspeth of Univ. from New Mexico, Drs. William Sprigg, Goran Pejanovic, Slobodan Nickovic from UofArizona, and Dr. John D. Evans, and Ms. Myra J. Bambacus from NASA GSFC for the collaboration

  9. Classical Novae Blow Smoke Rings: A DIRTY Approach to Modeling Dust Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornak, Jillian; Harrison, T. E.; Gordon, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    Classical novae (CNe) are convenient objects for studying dust formation. While they are not the dust-producing workhorses that AGB stars are, CNe provide a way to study a single epoch of dust formation. Estimates of dust masses in some novae have implied a large portion (if not all!) of the gas is turned into dust, which is not physical. We propose for these objects the problem lies in estimating the dust mass. We present a new approach using the dust radiative transfer code DIRTY. We chose this code for its ability to model various geometries and for including the effects of scattered light and transient heating of small grains. We have an extensive and unpublished time series of OIR photometry with select nights of spectroscopy for the dusty nova V868 Cen (Nova Cen 91). Our work is innovative for simultaneously modeling the optical (central engine) emission and the IR (dust shell) emission, whereas previous studies have only modeled the IR emission, allowing us to account for ``contamination" of short-wavelength IR by scattered optical light. Our initial models used the simplest geometry, a spherical shell either homogeneous or ``clumpy". While the spherical shell model could fit individual nights, it could not match the temporal evolution of the nova. Multiple studies of gas emission line profiles indicate that CNe ejecta shells have an ellipsoidal geometry with equatorial, tropical, and polar overdensities. We find that a torus model is a better fit for single nights of data as well as matching the temporal evolution of the nova. We present our results showing the formation, growth, and destruction of dust grains. We show importance of geometry on dust mass estimates and take the first steps to determine the physical location of dust formation in CNe.

  10. Regional Modeling of Dust Mass Balance and Radiative Forcing over East Asia using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Siyu; Zhao, Chun; Qian, Yun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, J.; Huang, Zhongwei; Bi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wu; Shi, Jinsen; Yang, Lei; Li, Deshuai; Li, Jinxin

    2014-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to investigate the seasonal and annual variations of mineral dust over East Asia during 2007-2011, with a focus on the dust mass balance and radiative forcing. A variety of measurements from in-stu and satellite observations have been used to evaluate simulation results. Generally, WRF-Chem reproduces not only the column variability but also the vertical profile and size distribution of mineral dust over and near the dust source regions of East Asia. We investigate the dust lifecycle and the factors that control the seasonal and spatial variations of dust mass balance and radiative forcing over the seven sub-regions of East Asia, i.e. source regions, the Tibetan Plateau, Northern China, Southern China, the ocean outflow region, and Korea-Japan regions. Results show that, over the source regions, transport and dry deposition are the two dominant sinks. Transport contributes to ~30% of the dust sink over the source regions. Dust results in a surface cooling of up to -14 and -10 W m-2, atmospheric warming of up to 20 and 15 W m-2, and TOA cooling of -5 and -8 W m-2 over the two major dust source regions of East Asia, respectively. Over the Tibetan Plateau, transport is the dominant source with a peak in summer. Over identified outflow regions, maximum dust mass loading in spring is contributed by the transport. Dry and wet depositions are the comparably dominant sinks, but wet deposition is larger than dry deposition over the Korea-Japan region, particularly in spring (70% versus 30%). The WRF-Chem simulations can generally capture the measured features of dust aerosols and its radaitve properties and dust mass balance over East Asia, which provides confidence for use in further investigation of dust impact on climate over East Asia.

  11. The Type Ia Supernova Color-Magnitude Relation and Host Galaxy Dust: A Simple Hierarchical Bayesian Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Scolnic, Daniel M.; Shariff, Hikmatali; Foley, Ryan J.; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2017-06-01

    Conventional Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) cosmology analyses currently use a simplistic linear regression of magnitude versus color and light curve shape, which does not model intrinsic SN Ia variations and host galaxy dust as physically distinct effects, resulting in low color-magnitude slopes. We construct a probabilistic generative model for the dusty distribution of extinguished absolute magnitudes and apparent colors as the convolution of an intrinsic SN Ia color-magnitude distribution and a host galaxy dust reddening-extinction distribution. If the intrinsic color-magnitude (M B versus B - V) slope {β }{int} differs from the host galaxy dust law R B , this convolution results in a specific curve of mean extinguished absolute magnitude versus apparent color. The derivative of this curve smoothly transitions from {β }{int} in the blue tail to R B in the red tail of the apparent color distribution. The conventional linear fit approximates this effective curve near the average apparent color, resulting in an apparent slope {β }{app} between {β }{int} and R B . We incorporate these effects into a hierarchical Bayesian statistical model for SN Ia light curve measurements, and analyze a data set of SALT2 optical light curve fits of 248 nearby SNe Ia at z< 0.10. The conventional linear fit gives {β }{app}≈ 3. Our model finds {β }{int}=2.3+/- 0.3 and a distinct dust law of {R}B=3.8+/- 0.3, consistent with the average for Milky Way dust, while correcting a systematic distance bias of ˜0.10 mag in the tails of the apparent color distribution. Finally, we extend our model to examine the SN Ia luminosity-host mass dependence in terms of intrinsic and dust components.

  12. Evaluation of atmospheric dust prediction models using ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terradellas, Enric; María Baldasano, José; Cuevas, Emilio; Basart, Sara; Huneeus, Nicolás; Camino, Carlos; Dundar, Cinhan; Benincasa, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    An important step in numerical prediction of mineral dust is the model evaluation aimed to assess its performance to forecast the atmospheric dust content and to lead to new directions in model development and improvement. The first problem to address the evaluation is the scarcity of ground-based routine observations intended for dust monitoring. An alternative option would be the use of satellite products. They have the advantage of a large spatial coverage and a regular availability. However, they do have numerous drawbacks that make the quantitative retrievals of aerosol-related variables difficult and imprecise. This work presents the use of different ground-based observing systems for the evaluation of dust models in the Regional Center for Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System (SDS-WAS). The dust optical depth at 550 nm forecast by different models is regularly compared with the AERONET measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) for 40 selected stations. Photometric measurements are a powerful tool for remote sensing of the atmosphere allowing retrieval of aerosol properties, such as AOD. This variable integrates the contribution of different aerosol types, but may be complemented with spectral information that enables hypotheses about the nature of the particles. Comparison is restricted to cases with low Ångström exponent values in order to ensure that coarse mineral dust is the dominant aerosol type. Additionally to column dust load, it is important to evaluate dust surface concentration and dust vertical profiles. Air quality monitoring stations are the main source of data for the evaluation of surface concentration. However they are concentrated in populated and industrialized areas around the Mediterranean. In the present contribution, results of different models are compared with observations of PM10 from the Turkish air quality network for

  13. Dust environment of an airless object: A phase space study with kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallio, E.; Dyadechkin, S.; Fatemi, S.; Holmström, M.; Futaana, Y.; Wurz, P.; Fernandes, V. A.; Álvarez, F.; Heilimo, J.; Jarvinen, R.; Schmidt, W.; Harri, A.-M.; Barabash, S.; Mäkelä, J.; Porjo, N.; Alho, M.

    2016-01-01

    The study of dust above the lunar surface is important for both science and technology. Dust particles are electrically charged due to impact of the solar radiation and the solar wind plasma and, therefore, they affect the plasma above the lunar surface. Dust is also a health hazard for crewed missions because micron and sub-micron sized dust particles can be toxic and harmful to the human body. Dust also causes malfunctions in mechanical devices and is therefore a risk for spacecraft and instruments on the lunar surface. Properties of dust particles above the lunar surface are not fully known. However, it can be stated that their large surface area to volume ratio due to their irregular shape, broken chemical bonds on the surface of each dust particle, together with the reduced lunar environment cause the dust particles to be chemically very reactive. One critical unknown factor is the electric field and the electric potential near the lunar surface. We have developed a modelling suite, Dusty Plasma Environments: near-surface characterisation and Modelling (DPEM), to study globally and locally dust environments of the Moon and other airless bodies. The DPEM model combines three independent kinetic models: (1) a 3D hybrid model, where ions are modelled as particles and electrons are modelled as a charged neutralising fluid, (2) a 2D electrostatic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model where both ions and electrons are treated as particles, and (3) a 3D Monte Carlo (MC) model where dust particles are modelled as test particles. The three models are linked to each other unidirectionally; the hybrid model provides upstream plasma parameters to be used as boundary conditions for the PIC model which generates the surface potential for the MC model. We have used the DPEM model to study properties of dust particles injected from the surface of airless objects such as the Moon, the Martian moon Phobos and the asteroid RQ36. We have performed a (v0, m/q)-phase space study where the

  14. Modeling of the Dust and Gas Outflows from OH 26.5+0.6: The Superwind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justtanont, K.; Skinner, C. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Meixner, M.; Baas, F.

    1996-01-01

    We have observed the extreme OH/IR star, OH 26.5+0.6, in the infrared dust continuum and in the sub- millimeter rotational lines of CO. Mid-infrared images reveal the compact nature of the circumstellar shell (less than 0.5 sec). A deep 9.7 microns absorption feature and an absorption at 18 microns show that the dust mass-loss rate is very high. However, the low antenna temperatures of CO J = 1-0 and 2-1 lines suggest that the outer part of the circumstellar shell is much more tenuous. In order to resolve this discrepancy, we have observed the J = 3-2 and 4-3 CO rotational transitions. We have developed a model for the circumstellar shell for OH 26.5 + 0.6 which is consistent with the infrared and submillimeter observations. The dust and gas data are well fitted by a two-shell model, consisting of a dense shell surrounded by a more tenuous shell. The former we identify with the superwind (M = 5.5 x 10(exp -4) solar mass/ yr), and the latter we identify with mass loss on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) (M = 10(exp -6) solar mass/ yr). The transition between the two mass-loss phases is shown to be rather abrupt ((Delta)t less than 150 yr). Depending on the mass of the progenitor, this superwind phase may be the last thermal pulse (for M(sub *) less than 1.5 solar mass), or the first of a series of the superwind phases (for up to 8 solar mass), punctuated by a period of low mass-loss rates, before the star evolves off the AGB.

  15. A scaling theory for the size distribution of emitted dust aerosols suggests climate models underestimate the size of the global dust cycle.

    PubMed

    Kok, Jasper F

    2011-01-18

    Mineral dust aerosols impact Earth's radiation budget through interactions with clouds, ecosystems, and radiation, which constitutes a substantial uncertainty in understanding past and predicting future climate changes. One of the causes of this large uncertainty is that the size distribution of emitted dust aerosols is poorly understood. The present study shows that regional and global circulation models (GCMs) overestimate the emitted fraction of clay aerosols (< 2 μm diameter) by a factor of ∼2-8 relative to measurements. This discrepancy is resolved by deriving a simple theoretical expression of the emitted dust size distribution that is in excellent agreement with measurements. This expression is based on the physics of the scale-invariant fragmentation of brittle materials, which is shown to be applicable to dust emission. Because clay aerosols produce a strong radiative cooling, the overestimation of the clay fraction causes GCMs to also overestimate the radiative cooling of a given quantity of emitted dust. On local and regional scales, this affects the magnitude and possibly the sign of the dust radiative forcing, with implications for numerical weather forecasting and regional climate predictions in dusty regions. On a global scale, the dust cycle in most GCMs is tuned to match radiative measurements, such that the overestimation of the radiative cooling of a given quantity of emitted dust has likely caused GCMs to underestimate the global dust emission rate. This implies that the deposition flux of dust and its fertilizing effects on ecosystems may be substantially larger than thought.

  16. Consistency between 2D-3D Sediment Transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaret, Catherine; Jodeau, Magali

    2017-04-01

    Sediment transport models have been developed and applied by the engineering community to estimate transport rates and morphodynamic bed evolutions in river flows, coastal and estuarine conditions. Environmental modelling systems like the open-source Telemac modelling system include a hierarchy of models from 1D (Mascaret), 2D (Telemac-2D/Sisyphe) and 3D (Telemac-3D/Sedi-3D) and include a wide range of processes to represent sediment flow interactions under more and more complex situations (cohesive, non-cohesive and mixed sediment). Despite some tremendous progresses in the numerical techniques and computing resources, the quality/accuracy of model results mainly depend on the numerous choices and skills of the modeler. In complex situations involving stratification effects, complex geometry, recirculating flows… 2D model assumptions are no longer valid. A full 3D turbulent flow model is then required in order to capture the vertical mixing processes and to represent accurately the coupled flow/sediment distribution. However a number of theoretical and numerical difficulties arise when dealing with sediment transport modelling in 3D which will be high-lighted : (1) Dependency of model results to the vertical grid refinement and choice of boundary conditions and numerical scheme (2) The choice of turbulence model determines also the sediment vertical distribution which is governed by a balance between the downward settling term and upward turbulent diffusion. (3) The use of different numerical schemes for both hydrodynamics (mean and turbulent flow) and sediment transport modelling can lead to some inconsistency including a mismatch in the definition of numerical cells and definition of boundary conditions. We discuss here those present issues and present some detailed comparison between 2D and 3D simulations on a set of validation test cases which are available in the Telemac 7.2 release using both cohesive and non-cohesive sediments.

  17. Biological effects of desert dust in respiratory epithelial cells and a murine model.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract As a result of the challenge of recent dust storms to public health, we tested the postulate that desert dust collected in the southwestern United States could impact a biological effect in respiratory epithelial cells and an animal model. Two samples of surface sedime...

  18. Biological effects of desert dust in respiratory epithelial cells and a murine model.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract As a result of the challenge of recent dust storms to public health, we tested the postulate that desert dust collected in the southwestern United States could impact a biological effect in respiratory epithelial cells and an animal model. Two samples of surface sedime...

  19. Critical parameters of consistent relativistic mean-field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, O.; Dutra, M.; Menezes, D. P.

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, the critical temperature, critical pressure, and critical density, known as the critical parameters related to the liquid-gas phase transition are calculated for 34 relativistic mean-field models, which were shown to satisfy nuclear matter constraints in a comprehensive study involving 263 models. The compressibility factor was calculated and all 34 models present values lower than the one obtained with the van der Waals equation of state. The critical temperatures were compared with experimental data and just two classes of models can reach values close to them. A correlation between the critical parameters and the incompressibility was obtained.

  20. Modelling observations of the inner gas and dust coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko using ROSINA/COPS and OSIRIS data: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, R.; Su, C. C.; Liao, Y.; Thomas, N.; Altwegg, K.; Sierks, H.; Ip, W.-H.; Keller, H. U.; Knollenberg, J.; Kührt, E.; Lai, I. L.; Rubin, M.; Skorov, Y.; Wu, J. S.; Jorda, L.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Gracia-Berná, A.; Gicquel, A.; Naletto, G.; Shi, X.; Vincent, J.-B.

    2016-05-01

    Context. This paper describes the initial modelling of gas and dust data acquired in August and September 2014 from the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft when it was in close proximity to the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Aims: This work is an attempt to provide a self-consistent model of the innermost gas and dust coma of the comet, as constrained by the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) data set for the gas and by the Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System (OSIRIS) data set for the dust. Methods: The model uses a previously developed shape model for the nucleus, and from this the water sublimation rate and gas temperatures at the surface are computed with a simple thermal model. The gas expansion is modelled with a 3D parallel implementation of a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo algorithm. A dust drag algorithm is then used to produce dust densities in the coma, which are then converted to brightnesses using Mie theory and a line-of-sight integration. Results: We show that a purely insolation-driven model for surface outgassing does not produce a reasonable fit to ROSINA/COPS data. A stronger source in the "neck" region of the nucleus (region Hapi) is needed to match the observed modulation of the gas density in detail. This agrees with OSIRIS data, which shows that the dust emission from the "neck" was dominant in the August-September 2014 time frame. The current model matches this observation reasonably if a power index of 2-3 for the dust size distribution is used. A better match to the OSIRIS data is seen by using a single large particle size for the coma. Conclusions: We have shown possible solutions to the gas and dust distributions in the inner coma, which are consistent with ROSINA and OSIRIS data.

  1. Climatic controls on the interannual to decadal variability in Saudi Arabian dust activity: Toward the development of a seasonal dust prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Wang, Fuyao; Alkolibi, Fahad; Fadda, Eyad; Bakhrjy, Fawzieh

    2015-03-01

    The observed climatic controls on springtime and summertime Saudi Arabian dust activities during 1975-2012 are analyzed, leading to development of a seasonal dust prediction model. According to empirical orthogonal function analysis, dust storm frequency exhibits a dominantly homogeneous pattern across Saudi Arabia, with distinct interannual and decadal variability. The previously identified positive trend in remotely sensed aerosol optical depth since 2000 is shown to be a segment of the decadal oscillation in dust activity, according to long-duration station record. Regression and correlation analyses reveal that the interannual variability in Saudi Arabian dust storm frequency is regulated by springtime rainfall across the Arabian Peninsula and summertime Shamal wind intensity. The key drivers of Saudi Arabian dust storm variability are identified. Winter-to-spring La Niña enhances subsequent spring dust activity by decreasing rainfall across the country's primary dust source region, the Rub' al Khali Desert. A relatively cool tropical Indian Ocean favors frequent summer dust storms by producing an anomalously anticyclonic circulation over the central Arabian Peninsula, which enhances the Shamal wind. Decadal variability in Saudi Arabian dust storm frequency is associated with North African rainfall and Sahel vegetation, which regulate African dust emissions and transport to Saudi Arabia. Mediterranean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) also regulate decadal dust variability, likely through their influence on Sahel rainfall and Shamal intensity. Using antecedent-accumulated rainfall over the Arabian Peninsula and North Africa, and Mediterranean SSTs, as low-frequency predictors, and tropical eastern Pacific and tropical Indian Ocean SSTs as high-frequency predictors, Saudi Arabia's seasonal dust activity is well predicted.

  2. A New Kinetic Simulation Model with Self-Consistent Calculation of Regolith Layer Charging for Moon-Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, D.; Wang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The moon-plasma interactions and the resulting surface charging have been subjects of extensive recent investigations. While many particle-in-cell (PIC) based simulation models have been developed, all existing PIC simulation models treat the surface of the Moon as a boundary condition to the plasma flow. In such models, the surface of the Moon is typically limited to simple geometry configurations, the surface floating potential is calculated from a simplified current balance condition, and the electric field inside the regolith layer cannot be resolved. This paper presents a new full particle PIC model to simulate local scale plasma flow and surface charging. A major feature of this new model is that the surface is treated as an "interface" between two mediums rather than a boundary, and the simulation domain includes not only the plasma but also the regolith layer and the bedrock underneath it. There are no limitations on the surface shape. An immersed-finite-element field solver is applied which calculates the regolith surface floating potential and the electric field inside the regolith layer directly from local charge deposition. The material property of the regolith layer is also explicitly included in simulation. This new model is capable of providing a self-consistent solution to the plasma flow field, lunar surface charging, the electric field inside the regolith layer and the bedrock for realistic surface terrain. This new model is applied to simulate lunar surface-plasma interactions and surface charging under various ambient plasma conditions. The focus is on the lunar terminator region, where the combined effects from the low sun elevation angle and the localized plasma wake generated by plasma flow over a rugged terrain can generate strongly differentially charged surfaces and complex dust dynamics. We discuss the effects of the regolith properties and regolith layer charging on the plasma flow field, dust levitation, and dust transport.

  3. Mechanistically Consistent Reduced Models of Synthetic Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mier-y-Terán-Romero, Luis; Silber, Mary; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2013-01-01

    Designing genetic networks with desired functionalities requires an accurate mathematical framework that accounts for the essential mechanistic details of the system. Here, we formulate a time-delay model of protein translation and mRNA degradation by systematically reducing a detailed mechanistic model that explicitly accounts for the ribosomal dynamics and the cleaving of mRNA by endonucleases. We exploit various technical and conceptual advantages that our time-delay model offers over the mechanistic model to probe the behavior of a self-repressing gene over wide regions of parameter space. We show that a heuristic time-delay model of protein synthesis of a commonly used form yields a notably different prediction for the parameter region where sustained oscillations occur. This suggests that such heuristics can lead to erroneous results. The functional forms that arise from our systematic reduction can be used for every system that involves transcription and translation and they could replace the commonly used heuristic time-delay models for these processes. The results from our analysis have important implications for the design of synthetic gene networks and stress that such design must be guided by a combination of heuristic models and mechanistic models that include all relevant details of the process. PMID:23663853

  4. Why Is Improvement of Earth System Models so Elusive? Challenges and Strategies from Dust Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ronald L.; Garcia-Pando, Carlos Perez; Perlwitz, Jan; Ginoux, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Past decades have seen an accelerating increase in computing efficiency, while climate models are representing a rapidly widening set of physical processes. Yet simulations of some fundamental aspects of climate like precipitation or aerosol forcing remain highly uncertain and resistant to progress. Dust aerosol modeling of soil particles lofted by wind erosion has seen a similar conflict between increasing model sophistication and remaining uncertainty. Dust aerosols perturb the energy and water cycles by scattering radiation and acting as ice nuclei, while mediating atmospheric chemistry and marine photosynthesis (and thus the carbon cycle). These effects take place across scales from the dimensions of an ice crystal to the planetary-scale circulation that disperses dust far downwind of its parent soil. Representing this range leads to several modeling challenges. Should we limit complexity in our model, which consumes computer resources and inhibits interpretation? How do we decide if a process involving dust is worthy of inclusion within our model? Can we identify a minimal representation of a complex process that is efficient yet retains the physics relevant to climate? Answering these questions about the appropriate degree of representation is guided by model evaluation, which presents several more challenges. How do we proceed if the available observations do not directly constrain our process of interest? (This could result from competing processes that influence the observed variable and obscure the signature of our process of interest.) Examples will be presented from dust modeling, with lessons that might be more broadly applicable. The end result will either be clinical depression or there assuring promise of continued gainful employment as the community confronts these challenges.

  5. Testing the performance of current dust emission schemes from a box and climate model perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, Karsten; King, James; Wiggs, Giles; Thomas, David; Washington, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Dust emission schemes in climate models are relatively simple and are tuned to represent observed background aerosol concentrations many of which are many thousands of kilometres from source regions. Representations of dust emission in the models were developed from idealised experiments such as those conducted in wind tunnels. Improvement of current model dust emission schemes is hampered by a paucity of observations from key dust sources. The Dust Observations for Models project (DO4Models) was aiming on gathering data from source regions at a scale appropriate to climate model grid box resolution. Here we present (1) the results of 1D box model simulations using three commonly used parameterizations for the horizontal and vertical dust emission flux, and (2) HadGEM3 regional climate model simulations using the current model setup for dust emissions. We are comparing both models with Do4Model field campaign data retrieved over a typical dust source. The box model performance is tested using observed soil moisture content, aerodynamic surface roughness, shear velocity, and soil properties. Results for the first part of the field campaign suggest that all current dust emission schemes do not capture the observed emission flux well. The saltation flux is hugely overestimated, whereas the vertical flux is moderately overestimated. The choice of the sand transport, soil moisture correction and roughness correction scheme is important but insufficient to bring modeled fluxes into agreement with observed dust fluxes. Potential reasons for the diagnosed mismatch are discussed and the impact of spatial averaging over the 11 field sites within the g12x12km grid is evaluated. Furthermore, it is tried to answer the question whether the application of the dispersed soil size distribution increases the performance of the emission schemes over the typically used undisturbed soil size distribution provided from soil database HadGEM3 is tested with regard to its capability to

  6. Modeling Mineral Dust and Accessing Its Impact on Radiative Forcing over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X.

    2015-12-01

    East Asia dust storm has been investigated with revised WRF/CMAQ modeling system in this study. Taklamkan and Gobi deserts in China and Mongolia are the major contributors for East Asia dust storm, which significantly affect air quality and regional climate over downwind areas in China, Japan and Korea. Understanding the mixing of dust and intensive anthropogenic emissions would require a regional chemistry transport model which can simulate both the emission and transport of the natural and anthropogenic particles, and also their chemical interactions as well as the particles evolutions. In this study, we conducted model development of the WRF/CMAQ modeling system by revising the dust emission scheme and implementing source-dependent speciation profiles of dust aerosol and heterogeneous chemistry. With the revised modeling system, East Asia dust impact on atmospheric chemistry and regional climate has been investigated for the period of March and April from 2006 to 2010. The revised modeling system has been demonstrated to greatly improve model's capability of reproducing dust emission and transport over East Asia by comparing with surface measurements and satellite observations.

  7. Microwave thermal emission from the zodiacal dust cloud predicted with contemporary meteoroid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikarev, Valery V.; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    2015-12-01

    Predictions of the microwave thermal emission from the zodiacal dust cloud are made using several contemporary meteoroid models to construct the distributions of the cross-section area of dust in space, and by applying the Mie light-scattering theory to estimate the temperatures and emissivities of dust particles in a wide range of sizes and heliocentric distances. In particular, the Kelsall model of the zodiacal light emission based on COBE infrared observations is extrapolated to the microwaves with assistance from fits to selected IRAS and Planck data. Furthermore, the five populations of interplanetary meteoroids by Divine and the Interplanetary Meteoroid Engineering Model (IMEM) based on a variety of remote and in situ observations of dust are used in combination with the optical properties of olivine, carbonaceous, and iron spherical particles. The Kelsall model has been accepted by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) community for subtraction of the zodiacal cloud's foreground emission. We show, however, that the Kelsall model predicts microwave emission from interplanetary dust that is remarkably different from the results obtained by applying the meteoroid engineering models. We make maps and spectra of the microwave emission predicted by all three models assuming different compositions of dust particles. The predictions can be used to look for the emission from interplanetary dust in CMB experiments and to plan new observations.

  8. A Thermodynamically Consistent Damage Model for Advanced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maimi, Pere; Camanho, Pedro P.; Mayugo, Joan-Andreu; Davila, Carlos G.

    2006-01-01

    A continuum damage model for the prediction of damage onset and structural collapse of structures manufactured in fiber-reinforced plastic laminates is proposed. The principal damage mechanisms occurring in the longitudinal and transverse directions of a ply are represented by a damage tensor that is fixed in space. Crack closure under load reversal effects are taken into account using damage variables established as a function of the sign of the components of the stress tensor. Damage activation functions based on the LaRC04 failure criteria are used to predict the different damage mechanisms occurring at the ply level. The constitutive damage model is implemented in a finite element code. The objectivity of the numerical model is assured by regularizing the dissipated energy at a material point using Bazant's Crack Band Model. To verify the accuracy of the approach, analyses of coupon specimens were performed, and the numerical predictions were compared with experimental data.

  9. Investigating Massive Dust Events Using a Coupled Weather-Chemistry Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, A.; Arellano, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Prediction of local to regional scale dust events is challenging due to the complex nature of key processes driving emission, transport, and deposition of mineral dust. In particular, it is difficult to map precisely the sources of mineral dust across heterogeneous land surface properties and land-use changes. This is especially true for Arizona haboobs. These dust storm events are typically driven by thunderstorms and down-bursts over arid regions generating high atmospheric loading of dust in the order of hundreds to thousands of microgram per cubic meter. Modeling and prediction of these events are further complicated by the limitations in satellite-derived and in-situ measurements of dust and related geophysical variables. Here, we investigate the capability of a coupled weather-chemistry model in predicting Arizona haboobs. In particular, this research focuses on the simulation of July 5, 2011 Phoenix haboob using Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) and Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport Model (GOCART) dust scheme. We evaluate the ability of WRF-Chem in simulating the haboob using satellite retrievals of aerosol extinction properties and mass concentrations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO) and high resolution SEVIRI false color dust product, in conjunction with in-situ PM10 and PM2.5 measurements. The study uses a nested modeling domain covering Utah, California and Arizona at a horizontal resolution of 5.4 km (outer) and 1.8 km (inner). Boundary conditions for the model are obtained from NOAA Global Forecasting System six-hourly forecast. We present results illustrating the key features of the haboobs, such as the cold pools and surface wind speeds driving the horizontal and vertical structure of the dust, as well as the patterns of dust transport and deposition. Although the spatio-temporal patterns of the haboob

  10. Is scalar-tensor gravity consistent with polytropic stellar models?

    SciTech Connect

    Henttunen, K.; Vilja, I. E-mail: vilja@utu.fi

    2015-05-01

    We study the scalar field potential V(φ) in the scalar-tensor gravity with self-consistent polytropic stellar configurations. Without choosing a particular potential, we numerically derive the potential inside various stellar objects. We restrict the potential to conform to general relativity or to f(R) gravity inside and require the solution to arrive at SdS vacuum at the surface. The studied objects are required to obtain observationally valid masses and radii corresponding to solar type stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars. We find that the resulting scalar-tensor potential V(φ) for the numerically derived polytrope that conforms to general relativity, in each object class, is highly dependent on the matter configuration as well as on the vacuum requirement at the boundary. As a result, every stellar configuration arrives at a potential V(φ) that is not consistent with the other stellar class potentials. Therefore, a general potential that conforms to all these polytropic stellar classes could not be found.

  11. Self-consistent modeling of multiscale gyrokinetics and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jeffrey; Lodestro, Lynda; Told, Daniel; Jenko, Frank

    2016-10-01

    In the core of tokamak plasmas, a separation of timescales between turbulence and transport makes direct simulation of both processes computationally expensive. A workable, practical method to exploit the separation of timescales will be a key component in enabling the self-consistent solution of macroscopic profiles of density and temperature. We report on progress to implement the LoDestro scheme coupled with the gyrokinetic code GENE to perform for the first time coupled turbulence and transport simulations using a global gyrokinetic code. One of the advantages of the LoDestro scheme, which is essentially a method of solving an implicitly advanced nonlinear transport problem, is that it does not use Newton iteration and hence avoids difficulties that arise from calculating Jacobians or Jacobian-vector products in the presence of noisy fluxes. Instead, the implicit timestep equation is solved with an iteration scheme by representing the turbulent flux as the sum of diffusive and convective pieces, after which Picard iteration is used to converge to the self-consistent solution. Preliminary results will be presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Dust formation in Milky Way-like galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, Ryan; Torrey, Paul; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a dust model for cosmological simulations implemented in the moving-mesh code AREPO and present a suite of cosmological hydrodynamical zoom-in simulations to study dust formation within galactic haloes. Our model accounts for the stellar production of dust, accretion of gas-phase metals on to existing grains, destruction of dust through local supernova activity, and dust driven by winds from star-forming regions. We find that accurate stellar and active galactic nuclei feedback is needed to reproduce the observed dust-metallicity relation and that dust growth largely dominates dust destruction. Our simulations predict a dust content of the interstellar medium which is consistent with observed scaling relations at z = 0, including scalings between dust-to-gas ratio and metallicity, dust mass and gas mass, dust-to-gas ratio and stellar mass, and dust-to-stellar mass ratio and gas fraction. We find that roughly two-thirds of dust at z = 0 originated from Type II supernovae, with the contribution from asymptotic giant branch stars below 20 per cent for z ≳ 5. While our suite of Milky Way-sized galaxies forms dust in good agreement with a number of key observables, it predicts a high dust-to-metal ratio in the circumgalactic medium, which motivates a more realistic treatment of thermal sputtering of grains and dust cooling channels.

  13. A 100-3000 GHz model of thermal dust emission observed by Planck, DIRBE and IRAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    We apply the Finkbeiner et al. (1999) two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck HFI maps. This parametrization of the far-infrared dust spectrum as the sum of two modified blackbodies serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single modified blackbody (MBB) dust emission model. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. (1999) based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We also derive full-sky 6.1' resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting the two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100μm data. Because our two-component model matches the dust spectrum near its peak, accounts for the spectrum's flattening at millimeter wavelengths, and specifies dust temperature at 6.1' FWHM, our model provides reliable, high-resolution thermal dust emission foreground predictions from 100 to 3000 GHz. We find that, in diffuse sky regions, our two-component 100-217 GHz predictions are on average accurate to within 2.2%, while extrapolating the Planck Collaboration (2013) single-MBB model systematically underpredicts emission by 18.8% at 100 GHz, 12.6% at 143 GHz and 7.9% at 217 GHz. We calibrate our two-component optical depth to reddening, and compare with reddening estimates based on stellar spectra. We find the dominant systematic problems in our temperature/reddening maps to be zodiacal light on large angular scales and the cosmic infrared background anistropy on small angular scales. We have recently released maps and associated software utilities for obtaining thermal dust emission and reddening predictions using our Planck-based two-component model.

  14. Dust Emissions, Transport, and Deposition Simulated with the NASA Finite-Volume General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter; daSilva, Arlindo; Ginoux, Paul; Chin, Mian; Lin, S.-J.

    2003-01-01

    Mineral dust aerosols have radiative impacts on Earth's atmosphere, have been implicated in local and regional air quality issues, and have been identified as vectors for transporting disease pathogens and bringing mineral nutrients to terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems. We present for the first time dust simulations using online transport and meteorological analysis in the NASA Finite-Volume General Circulation Model (FVGCM). Our dust formulation follows the formulation in the offline Georgia Institute of Technology-Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport Model (GOCART) using a topographical source for dust emissions. We compare results of the FVGCM simulations with GOCART, as well as with in situ and remotely sensed observations. Additionally, we estimate budgets of dust emission and transport into various regions.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Dust-destruction Models Using Laser-generated Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, Mario; Drake, R. Paul

    2015-08-01

    Proper modeling of dust distributions is of paramount importance in the analysis of astronomical data, as most recently demonstrated by the highly publicized BICEP2 results. The final distribution of dust grain sizes that reach the interstellar medium depends on many processes including sputtering, accretion, coagulation, and grain-grain collisions. Additionally, shock waves from supernovae provide a periodic driving force for the evolution of the distribution. These kinds of dramatic events greatly alter the distribution of dust grains through collisions. Theoretical attempts have been made to describe the alteration of dust grains due to collisions induced by supernova-driven shock waves, but experimental verification is often difficult to attain. We describe here an experimental platform to investigate and test dust-destruction models in the laboratory using laser-generated shock waves. Potential target designs, achievable experimental parameters, and possible diagnostic techniques will be discussed.

  16. Dust Emissions, Transport, and Deposition Simulated with the NASA Finite-Volume General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter; daSilva, Arlindo; Ginoux, Paul; Chin, Mian; Lin, S.-J.

    2003-01-01

    Mineral dust aerosols have radiative impacts on Earth's atmosphere, have been implicated in local and regional air quality issues, and have been identified as vectors for transporting disease pathogens and bringing mineral nutrients to terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems. We present for the first time dust simulations using online transport and meteorological analysis in the NASA Finite-Volume General Circulation Model (FVGCM). Our dust formulation follows the formulation in the offline Georgia Institute of Technology-Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport Model (GOCART) using a topographical source for dust emissions. We compare results of the FVGCM simulations with GOCART, as well as with in situ and remotely sensed observations. Additionally, we estimate budgets of dust emission and transport into various regions.

  17. Biological effects of desert dust in respiratory epithelial cells and a murine model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ghio, Andrew J.; Kummarapurugu, Suryanaren T.; Tong, Haiyan; Soukup, Joleen M.; Dailey, Lisa A.; Boykin, Elizabeth; Gilmour, M. Ian; Ingram, Peter; Roggli, Victor L.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Reynolds, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the challenge of recent dust storms to public health, we tested the postulate that desert dust collected in the southwestern United States imparts a biological effect in respiratory epithelial cells and an animal model. Two samples of surface sediment were collected from separate dust sources in northeastern Arizona. Analysis of the PM20 fraction demonstrated that the majority of both dust samples were quartz and clay minerals (total SiO2 of 52 and 57%). Using respiratory epithelial and monocytic cell lines, the two desert dusts increased oxidant generation, measured by Amplex Red fluorescence, along with carbon black (a control particle), silica, and NIST 1649 (an ambient air pollution particle). Cell oxidant generation was greatest following exposures to silica and the desert dusts. Similarly, changes in RNA for superoxide dismutase-1, heme oxygenase-1, and cyclooxygenase-2 were also greatest after silica and the desert dusts supporting an oxidative stress after cell exposure. Silica, desert dusts, and the ambient air pollution particle NIST 1649 demonstrated a capacity to activate the p38 and ERK1/2 pathways and release pro-inflammatory mediators. Mice, instilled with the same particles, showed the greatest lavage concentrations of pro-inflammatory mediators, neutrophils, and lung injury following silica and desert dusts. We conclude that, comparable to other particles, desert dusts have a capacity to (1) influence oxidative stress and release of pro-inflammatory mediators in respiratory epithelial cells and (2) provoke an inflammatory injury in the lower respiratory tract of an animal model. The biological effects of desert dusts approximated those of silica.

  18. Biological effects of desert dust in respiratory epithelial cells and a murine model.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Andrew J; Kummarapurugu, Suryanaren T; Tong, Haiyan; Soukup, Joleen M; Dailey, Lisa A; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ian Gilmour, M; Ingram, Peter; Roggli, Victor L; Goldstein, Harland L; Reynolds, Richard L

    2014-04-01

    As a result of the challenge of recent dust storms to public health, we tested the postulate that desert dust collected in the southwestern United States imparts a biological effect in respiratory epithelial cells and an animal model. Two samples of surface sediment were collected from separate dust sources in northeastern Arizona. Analysis of the PM20 fraction demonstrated that the majority of both dust samples were quartz and clay minerals (total SiO₂ of 52 and 57%). Using respiratory epithelial and monocytic cell lines, the two desert dusts increased oxidant generation, measured by Amplex Red fluorescence, along with carbon black (a control particle), silica, and NIST 1649 (an ambient air pollution particle). Cell oxidant generation was greatest following exposures to silica and the desert dusts. Similarly, changes in RNA for superoxide dismutase-1, heme oxygenase-1, and cyclooxygenase-2 were also greatest after silica and the desert dusts supporting an oxidative stress after cell exposure. Silica, desert dusts, and the ambient air pollution particle NIST 1649 demonstrated a capacity to activate the p38 and ERK1/2 pathways and release pro-inflammatory mediators. Mice, instilled with the same particles, showed the greatest lavage concentrations of pro-inflammatory mediators, neutrophils, and lung injury following silica and desert dusts. We conclude that, comparable to other particles, desert dusts have a capacity to (1) influence oxidative stress and release of pro-inflammatory mediators in respiratory epithelial cells and (2) provoke an inflammatory injury in the lower respiratory tract of an animal model. The biological effects of desert dusts approximated those of silica.

  19. Towards a self-consistent dynamical nuclear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Niu, Y. F.; Colò, G.; Bortignon, P. F.

    2017-04-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is a powerful and accurate tool, exploited in nuclear physics to investigate the ground-state and some of the collective properties of nuclei along the whole nuclear chart. Models based on DFT are not, however, suitable for the description of single-particle dynamics in nuclei. Following the field theoretical approach by A Bohr and B R Mottelson to describe nuclear interactions between single-particle and vibrational degrees of freedom, we have taken important steps towards the building of a microscopic dynamic nuclear model. In connection with this, one important issue that needs to be better understood is the renormalization of the effective interaction in the particle-vibration approach. One possible way to renormalize the interaction is by the so-called subtraction method. In this contribution, we will implement the subtraction method in our model for the first time and study its consequences.

  20. Consistency of f(R) gravity models around solar polytropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henttunen, K.; Vilja, I.

    2014-04-01

    It is stated that a class of f(R) gravity models seem to obtain ΛCDM behavior for high redshifts and general relativistic behavior locally at high curvatures. In the present Letter, we numerically study polytropic configurations that resemble stars like young sun with Hu and Sawicki's f(R) gravity field equations and compare the spacetime at the boundary to the general relativistic counterpart. These polytropes are stationary spherically symmetric configurations and have regular metrics at the origin. Since Birkhoff's theorem does not apply for modified gravity, the solution outside may deviate from Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime. At the boundary, Post-Newtonian parametrization was used to determine how much the studied model deviates from the general relativistic ΛCDM model.

  1. An energy-consistent fracture model for ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Hongchen; Li, Faxin

    2017-02-01

    The fracture behavior of ferroelectrics has been intensively studied in recent decades, though currently a widely accepted fracture mechanism is still lacking. In this work, enlightened by previous experimental observations that crack propagation in ferroelectrics is always accompanied by domain switching, we propose a micromechanical model in which both crack propagation and domain switching are controlled by energy-based criteria. Both electric energy and mechanical energy can induce domain switching, while only mechanical energy can drive crack propagation. Furthermore, constrained domain switching is considered in this model, leading to the gradient domain switching zone near the crack tip. Analysis results show that stress-induced ferroelastic switching always has a toughening effect as the mechanical energy release rate serves as the driving force for both fracture and domain switching. In comparison, the electric-field-induced switching may have either a toughening or detoughening effect. The proposed model can qualitatively agree with the existing experimental results.

  2. Dust Models Paint Alien's View of Solar System

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Dust in the Kuiper Belt, the cold-storage zone that includes Pluto, creates a faint infrared disk potentially visible to alien astronomers looking for planets around the sun. Neptune's gravitationa...

  3. The Role of Deep Convection and Low-Level Jets Forcing Dust Emissions in West Africa: A High-Resolution Regional Dust Modelling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinold, B.; Knippertz, P.; Fiedler, S.; Marsham, J. H.; Tegen, I.

    2012-04-01

    West Africa is the world's most important source of atmospheric mineral dust, which impacts weather and climate through its contribution to the direct and indirect aerosol effects. Mineral dust also has an impact on the biogeochemical and hydrological cycle, and affects human health and air quality. Quantitative estimates of the various effects require an adequate representation of modelled peak-wind generating mechanisms that cause dust emissions. Daytime downward mixing of momentum from nocturnal low-level jets (LLJs) and convective cold pools (haboobs) have been identified as important meteorological drivers of dust emissions in the Sahel and Sahara. Previous work using 10-day continental-scale convection-permitting simulations of summertime West Africa, performed using the UK Met Office Unified model as part of the Cascade project, has shown that these processes dominate the modelled dust-generating winds, with haboobs being very poorly represented in models with parameterised deep convection. This previous work did not, however, model dust emission explicitly. As part of the "Desert Storms" project (funded by the European Research Council), we expand on this work here using newly available 40-day Cascade runs with dust emissions calculated in an offline model driven with the modelled surface winds at 40, 12, 4 and 1.5-km horizontal grid-spacings (6 days only at 1.5 km). These calculations include different versions of dust emission parameterisations and soil surface properties, allowing separation of meteorological and land-surface effects. A major focus is on the statistical analysis of the diurnal cycle of wind speed and dust emission, for which the long simulation period provides a robust basis. The diurnal cycle gives insight into the role of different meteorological processes and is expected to affect the subsequent dust transport in the boundary layer. The high-resolution results show dust emission patterns in fascinating detail. For the first time it

  4. Consistency of Rasch Model Parameter Estimation: A Simulation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Wollenberg, Arnold L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The unconditional--simultaneous--maximum likelihood (UML) estimation procedure for the one-parameter logistic model produces biased estimators. The UML method is inconsistent and is not a good alternative to conditional maximum likelihood method, at least with small numbers of items. The minimum Chi-square estimation procedure produces unbiased…

  5. Consistency of Rasch Model Parameter Estimation: A Simulation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Wollenberg, Arnold L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The unconditional--simultaneous--maximum likelihood (UML) estimation procedure for the one-parameter logistic model produces biased estimators. The UML method is inconsistent and is not a good alternative to conditional maximum likelihood method, at least with small numbers of items. The minimum Chi-square estimation procedure produces unbiased…

  6. Self-consistent Models of Strong Interaction with Chiral Symmetry

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Nambu, Y.; Pascual, P.

    1963-04-01

    Some simple models of (renormalizable) meson-nucleon interaction are examined in which the nucleon mass is entirely due to interaction and the chiral ( gamma {sub 5}) symmetry is "broken'' to become a hidden symmetry. It is found that such a scheme is possible provided that a vector meson is introduced as an elementary field. (auth)

  7. Characterization of dust emission from alluvial sources using aircraft observations and high-resolution modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepanski, Kerstin; Flamant, Cyrille; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Kocha, Cecile; Banks, Jamie; Brindley, Helen; Lavaysse, Christophe; Marnas, Fabien; Pelon, Jacques; Tulet, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    We investigate mineral dust emission from alluvial sediments within the upland region in northern Mauritania in the vicinity of a decaying nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ). For the first time, the impact of valleys that are embedded in a rather homogeneous surrounding is investigated with regard to their role as dust source. Measures for local atmospheric dust burden were retrieved from airborne observations, satellite observations, and model simulations and analyzed in order to provide complementary information at different horizontal scales. Observations by the LNG backscatter lidar system flying aboard the SAFIRE Falcon 20 aircraft were taken along five parallel flight legs perpendicular to the orientation of the main valley system dominating the topography of the study area. Results from a comparison of lidar-derived extinction coefficients with topography and aerial photographs confirm the relevance of (1) alluvial sediments at the valley bottoms as a dust source, and (2) the break-down of the nocturnal LLJ as a trigger for dust emission in this region. An evaluation of the AROME regional model, forecasting dust at high resolution (5 km grid), points towards an underrepresentation of alluvial dust sources in this region. This is also evident from simulations by the MesoNH research model. Although MesoNH simulations show higher dust loadings than AROME which are more comparable to the observations, both models understimate the dust concentrations within the boundary layer compared to lidar observations. A sensitivity study on the impact of horizontal grid spacing (5 km versus 1 km) highlights the importance of spatial resolution on simulated dust loadings.

  8. Modeling Optical Properties of Polluted Dust and its Morphological Effects by T-Matrix Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Yang, P.; Brooks, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Dust storms largely contribute to regional or global aerosol loads, influence radiative energy budget, and air quality, and cause atmospheric environmental, public health problems. As dusts are transported long distances, aerosols such as black carbon can pollute the air mass along the transport path. Two mixing processes, externally and semi-externally (sticking) mixing may substantially affect the single-scattering and radiative properties of polluted dust particles compared to the unpolluted counterparts. This study focuses on quantifying the changes in the optical properties of dust aerosols due to black carbon contamination. The dust model we use is an irregular polyhedron, which is in good agreement with the laboratory measurement. The black carbon model is spherules aggregate defined with a cluster-cluster aggregation algorithm. Specifically, we define the degree of pollution in terms of two variables, the adhesion degree of pollutants and their mixing ratios, since both can alter the optical properties of polluted dust in different ways. By applying the Invariant Imbedding T-matrix Method (II-TM), we obtain the scattering phase matrix and other optical properties of dust aerosols with different degrees of contamination. Furthermore, the morphological effects on the optical properties of polluted dust are quantified by considering different fractal dimensions of black carbon as particles age. The overall changes due to different degrees of pollution by black carbon are investigated at various wavelengths.

  9. Comparison of Radiative Forcing Calculations Due to Mineral Dust from a Transport Model, Satellite Measurements and an Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Clark J.; Ginoux, Paul; Hsu, Christina; Joiner, Joanna; Chou, Ming-Dah

    1999-01-01

    This study uses information on mineral aerosol from a transport model to calculate global radiative forcing values. The transport model is driven by assimilated meteorology and outputs three-dimensional dust spatial information for various size ranges. The dust fields are input to an off-line radiative transfer calculation to obtain the direct radiative forcing due to the dust fields. During June, July and August of 1988 presence of dust 1) reduces the global net incoming radiation at the top of atmosphere (TOA) by 0.3 to 0.7 W/sq m and 2) reduces net incoming radiation at the earth's surface by 1.3 to 2.0 W/sq m. Over Africa our estimates of the reduction of radiation at the top of atmosphere compare well with TOA reductions derived from ERBE and TOMS satellite data. However, our heating rates are not consistent with analysis temperature increments produced by the assimilation system over regions of high aerosol loading. These increments are based on differences between temperature observations and temperatures from the assimilation general circulation model. One explanation is that the lower tropospheric temperatures retrieved by TOVS are being contaminated by mineral aerosol.

  10. A seismologically consistent compositional model of Earth’s core

    PubMed Central

    Badro, James; Côté, Alexander S.; Brodholt, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Earth’s core is less dense than iron, and therefore it must contain “light elements,” such as S, Si, O, or C. We use ab initio molecular dynamics to calculate the density and bulk sound velocity in liquid metal alloys at the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's outer core. We compare the velocity and density for any composition in the (Fe–Ni, C, O, Si, S) system to radial seismological models and find a range of compositional models that fit the seismological data. We find no oxygen-free composition that fits the seismological data, and therefore our results indicate that oxygen is always required in the outer core. An oxygen-rich core is a strong indication of high-pressure and high-temperature conditions of core differentiation in a deep magma ocean with an FeO concentration (oxygen fugacity) higher than that of the present-day mantle. PMID:24821817

  11. A seismologically consistent compositional model of Earth's core.

    PubMed

    Badro, James; Côté, Alexander S; Brodholt, John P

    2014-05-27

    Earth's core is less dense than iron, and therefore it must contain "light elements," such as S, Si, O, or C. We use ab initio molecular dynamics to calculate the density and bulk sound velocity in liquid metal alloys at the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's outer core. We compare the velocity and density for any composition in the (Fe-Ni, C, O, Si, S) system to radial seismological models and find a range of compositional models that fit the seismological data. We find no oxygen-free composition that fits the seismological data, and therefore our results indicate that oxygen is always required in the outer core. An oxygen-rich core is a strong indication of high-pressure and high-temperature conditions of core differentiation in a deep magma ocean with an FeO concentration (oxygen fugacity) higher than that of the present-day mantle.

  12. A more consistent intraluminal rhesus monkey model of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Shang, Guowei; Chen, Jian; Geng, Xiaokun; Ye, Xin; Xu, Guoxun; Wang, Ju; Zheng, Jiasheng; Li, Hongjun; Akbary, Fauzia; Li, Shengli; Lu, Jing; Ling, Feng; Ji, Xunming

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular surgery is advantageous in experimentally induced ischemic stroke because it causes fewer cranial traumatic lesions than invasive surgery and can closely mimic the pathophysiology in stroke patients. However, the outcomes are highly variable, which limits the accuracy of evaluations of ischemic stroke studies. In this study, eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomized into two groups with four monkeys in each group: middle cerebral artery occlusion at origin segment (M1) and middle cerebral artery occlusion at M2 segment. The blood flow in the middle cerebral artery was blocked completely for 2 hours using the endovascular microcoil placement technique (1 mm × 10 cm) (undetachable), to establish a model of cerebral ischemia. The microcoil was withdrawn and the middle cerebral artery blood flow was restored. A reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion model was identified by hematoxylin-eosin staining, digital subtraction angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and neurological evaluation. The results showed that the middle cerebral artery occlusion model was successfully established in eight adult healthy rhesus monkeys, and ischemic lesions were apparent in the brain tissue of rhesus monkeys at 24 hours after occlusion. The rhesus monkeys had symptoms of neurological deficits. Compared with the M1 occlusion group, the M2 occlusion group had lower infarction volume and higher neurological scores. These experimental findings indicate that reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion can be produced with the endovascular microcoil technique in rhesus monkeys. The M2 occluded model had less infarction and less neurological impairment, which offers the potential for application in the field of brain injury research. PMID:25657726

  13. Flood damage: a model for consistent, complete and multipurpose scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menoni, Scira; Molinari, Daniela; Ballio, Francesco; Minucci, Guido; Mejri, Ouejdane; Atun, Funda; Berni, Nicola; Pandolfo, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    Effective flood risk mitigation requires the impacts of flood events to be much better and more reliably known than is currently the case. Available post-flood damage assessments usually supply only a partial vision of the consequences of the floods as they typically respond to the specific needs of a particular stakeholder. Consequently, they generally focus (i) on particular items at risk, (ii) on a certain time window after the occurrence of the flood, (iii) on a specific scale of analysis or (iv) on the analysis of damage only, without an investigation of damage mechanisms and root causes. This paper responds to the necessity of a more integrated interpretation of flood events as the base to address the variety of needs arising after a disaster. In particular, a model is supplied to develop multipurpose complete event scenarios. The model organizes available information after the event according to five logical axes. This way post-flood damage assessments can be developed that (i) are multisectoral, (ii) consider physical as well as functional and systemic damage, (iii) address the spatial scales that are relevant for the event at stake depending on the type of damage that has to be analyzed, i.e., direct, functional and systemic, (iv) consider the temporal evolution of damage and finally (v) allow damage mechanisms and root causes to be understood. All the above features are key for the multi-usability of resulting flood scenarios. The model allows, on the one hand, the rationalization of efforts currently implemented in ex post damage assessments, also with the objective of better programming financial resources that will be needed for these types of events in the future. On the other hand, integrated interpretations of flood events are fundamental to adapting and optimizing flood mitigation strategies on the basis of thorough forensic investigation of each event, as corroborated by the implementation of the model in a case study.

  14. A more consistent intraluminal rhesus monkey model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Shang, Guowei; Chen, Jian; Geng, Xiaokun; Ye, Xin; Xu, Guoxun; Wang, Ju; Zheng, Jiasheng; Li, Hongjun; Akbary, Fauzia; Li, Shengli; Lu, Jing; Ling, Feng; Ji, Xunming

    2014-12-01

    Endovascular surgery is advantageous in experimentally induced ischemic stroke because it causes fewer cranial traumatic lesions than invasive surgery and can closely mimic the pathophysiology in stroke patients. However, the outcomes are highly variable, which limits the accuracy of evaluations of ischemic stroke studies. In this study, eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomized into two groups with four monkeys in each group: middle cerebral artery occlusion at origin segment (M1) and middle cerebral artery occlusion at M2 segment. The blood flow in the middle cerebral artery was blocked completely for 2 hours using the endovascular microcoil placement technique (1 mm × 10 cm) (undetachable), to establish a model of cerebral ischemia. The microcoil was withdrawn and the middle cerebral artery blood flow was restored. A reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion model was identified by hematoxylin-eosin staining, digital subtraction angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and neurological evaluation. The results showed that the middle cerebral artery occlusion model was successfully established in eight adult healthy rhesus monkeys, and ischemic lesions were apparent in the brain tissue of rhesus monkeys at 24 hours after occlusion. The rhesus monkeys had symptoms of neurological deficits. Compared with the M1 occlusion group, the M2 occlusion group had lower infarction volume and higher neurological scores. These experimental findings indicate that reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion can be produced with the endovascular microcoil technique in rhesus monkeys. The M2 occluded model had less infarction and less neurological impairment, which offers the potential for application in the field of brain injury research.

  15. Interannual Variability of Martian Global Dust Storms: Simulations with a Low-Order Model of the General Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankine, A. A.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-01-01

    We present simulations of the interannual variability of martian global dust storms (GDSs) with a simplified low-order model (LOM) of the general circulation. The simplified model allows one to conduct computationally fast long-term simulations of the martian climate system. The LOM is constructed by Galerkin projection of a 2D (zonally averaged) general circulation model (GCM) onto a truncated set of basis functions. The resulting LOM consists of 12 coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations describing atmospheric dynamics and dust transport within the Hadley cell. The forcing of the model is described by simplified physics based on Newtonian cooling and Rayleigh friction. The atmosphere and surface are coupled: atmospheric heating depends on the dustiness of the atmosphere, and the surface dust source depends on the strength of the atmospheric winds. Parameters of the model are tuned to fit the output of the NASA AMES GCM and the fit is generally very good. Interannual variability of GDSs is possible in the IBM, but only when stochastic forcing is added to the model. The stochastic forcing could be provided by transient weather systems or some surface process such as redistribution of the sand particles in storm generating zones on the surface. The results are sensitive to the value of the saltation threshold, which hints at a possible feedback between saltation threshold and dust storm activity. According to this hypothesis, erodable material builds up its a result of a local process, whose effect is to lower the saltation threshold until a GDS occurs. The saltation threshold adjusts its value so that dust storms are barely able to occur.

  16. Interannual Variability of Martian Global Dust Storms: Simulations with a Low-Order Model of the General Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankine, A. A.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-01-01

    We present simulations of the interannual variability of martian global dust storms (GDSs) with a simplified low-order model (LOM) of the general circulation. The simplified model allows one to conduct computationally fast long-term simulations of the martian climate system. The LOM is constructed by Galerkin projection of a 2D (zonally averaged) general circulation model (GCM) onto a truncated set of basis functions. The resulting LOM consists of 12 coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations describing atmospheric dynamics and dust transport within the Hadley cell. The forcing of the model is described by simplified physics based on Newtonian cooling and Rayleigh friction. The atmosphere and surface are coupled: atmospheric heating depends on the dustiness of the atmosphere, and the surface dust source depends on the strength of the atmospheric winds. Parameters of the model are tuned to fit the output of the NASA AMES GCM and the fit is generally very good. Interannual variability of GDSs is possible in the IBM, but only when stochastic forcing is added to the model. The stochastic forcing could be provided by transient weather systems or some surface process such as redistribution of the sand particles in storm generating zones on the surface. The results are sensitive to the value of the saltation threshold, which hints at a possible feedback between saltation threshold and dust storm activity. According to this hypothesis, erodable material builds up its a result of a local process, whose effect is to lower the saltation threshold until a GDS occurs. The saltation threshold adjusts its value so that dust storms are barely able to occur.

  17. Controlling reactive behavior with consistent world modeling and reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bou-Ghannam, Akram A.

    1992-03-01

    Based on the philosophical view of reflexive behaviors and cognitive modules working in a complementary fashion, this paper proposes a hybrid decomposition of the control architecture for an intelligent, fully autonomous mobile robot. This architecture follows a parallel distributed decomposition and supports a hierarchy of control with lower-level reflexive type behaviors working in parallel with higher-level planning and map building modules. The behavior-based component of the system provides the basic instinctive competences for the robot while the cognitive part performs higher machine intelligence functions such as planning. The interface between the two components utilizes motivated behaviors implemented as part of the behavior-based system. A motivated behavior is one whose response is dictated mainly by the internal state (or the motivation state) of the robot. Thus, the cognitive planning activity can execute its plans by merely setting the motivation state of the robot and letting the behavior-based subsystem worry about the details of plan execution. The goal of such a hybrid architecture is to gain the real-time performance of a behavior-based system without losing the effectiveness of a general purpose world model and planner. We view world models as essential to intelligent interaction with the environment, providing a `bigger picture' for the robot when reactive behaviors encounter difficulty. We describe a live experimental run of our robot under hybrid control in an unknown and unstructured lab environment. This experiment demonstrated the validity of the proposed hybrid control architecture and the sensory knowledge integrator (the underlying model for the map-builder module) for the task of mapping the environment. Results of the emergent robot behavior and different map representations of the environment are presented and discussed.

  18. A SELF-CONSISTENT MODEL OF THE CIRCUMSTELLAR DEBRIS CREATED BY A GIANT HYPERVELOCITY IMPACT IN THE HD 172555 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, H. J.; Lisse, C. M.; Chen, C. H.; Wyatt, M. C.; Thebault, P.; Henning, W. G.; Gaidos, E.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Bridges, J. C.; Morlok, A.

    2012-12-10

    Spectral modeling of the large infrared excess in the Spitzer IRS spectra of HD 172555 suggests that there is more than 10{sup 19} kg of submicron dust in the system. Using physical arguments and constraints from observations, we rule out the possibility of the infrared excess being created by a magma ocean planet or a circumplanetary disk or torus. We show that the infrared excess is consistent with a circumstellar debris disk or torus, located at {approx}6 AU, that was created by a planetary scale hypervelocity impact. We find that radiation pressure should remove submicron dust from the debris disk in less than one year. However, the system's mid-infrared photometric flux, dominated by submicron grains, has been stable within 4% over the last 27 years, from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (1983) to WISE (2010). Our new spectral modeling work and calculations of the radiation pressure on fine dust in HD 172555 provide a self-consistent explanation for this apparent contradiction. We also explore the unconfirmed claim that {approx}10{sup 47} molecules of SiO vapor are needed to explain an emission feature at {approx}8 {mu}m in the Spitzer IRS spectrum of HD 172555. We find that unless there are {approx}10{sup 48} atoms or 0.05 M{sub Circled-Plus} of atomic Si and O vapor in the system, SiO vapor should be destroyed by photo-dissociation in less than 0.2 years. We argue that a second plausible explanation for the {approx}8 {mu}m feature can be emission from solid SiO, which naturally occurs in submicron silicate ''smokes'' created by quickly condensing vaporized silicate.

  19. A Self-consistent Model of the Circumstellar Debris Created by a Giant Hypervelocity Impact in the HD 172555 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Lisse, C. M.; Chen, C. H.; Melosh, H. J.; Wyatt, M. C.; Thebault, P.; Henning, W. G.; Gaidos, E.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Bridges, J. C.; Morlok, A.

    2012-12-01

    Spectral modeling of the large infrared excess in the Spitzer IRS spectra of HD 172555 suggests that there is more than 1019 kg of submicron dust in the system. Using physical arguments and constraints from observations, we rule out the possibility of the infrared excess being created by a magma ocean planet or a circumplanetary disk or torus. We show that the infrared excess is consistent with a circumstellar debris disk or torus, located at ~6 AU, that was created by a planetary scale hypervelocity impact. We find that radiation pressure should remove submicron dust from the debris disk in less than one year. However, the system's mid-infrared photometric flux, dominated by submicron grains, has been stable within 4% over the last 27 years, from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (1983) to WISE (2010). Our new spectral modeling work and calculations of the radiation pressure on fine dust in HD 172555 provide a self-consistent explanation for this apparent contradiction. We also explore the unconfirmed claim that ~1047 molecules of SiO vapor are needed to explain an emission feature at ~8 μm in the Spitzer IRS spectrum of HD 172555. We find that unless there are ~1048 atoms or 0.05 M ⊕ of atomic Si and O vapor in the system, SiO vapor should be destroyed by photo-dissociation in less than 0.2 years. We argue that a second plausible explanation for the ~8 μm feature can be emission from solid SiO, which naturally occurs in submicron silicate "smokes" created by quickly condensing vaporized silicate.

  20. Full self-consistency versus quasiparticle self-consistency in diagrammatic approaches: Exactly solvable two-site Hubbard model

    DOE PAGES

    Kutepov, A. L.

    2015-07-22

    Self-consistent solutions of Hedin's equations (HE) for the two-site Hubbard model (HM) have been studied. They have been found for three-point vertices of increasing complexity (Γ = 1 (GW approximation), Γ₁ from the first-order perturbation theory, and the exact vertex ΓE). Comparison is made between the cases when an additional quasiparticle (QP) approximation for Green's functions is applied during the self-consistent iterative solving of HE and when QP approximation is not applied. Results obtained with the exact vertex are directly related to the present open question—which approximation is more advantageous for future implementations, GW + DMFT or QPGW + DMFT.more » It is shown that in a regime of strong correlations only the originally proposed GW + DMFT scheme is able to provide reliable results. Vertex corrections based on Perturbation Theory systematically improve the GW results when full self-consistency is applied. The application of QP self-consistency combined with PT vertex corrections shows similar problems to the case when the exact vertex is applied combined with QP sc. An analysis of Ward Identity violation is performed for all studied in this work's approximations and its relation to the general accuracy of the schemes used is provided.« less

  1. Full self-consistency versus quasiparticle self-consistency in diagrammatic approaches: Exactly solvable two-site Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Kutepov, A. L.

    2015-07-22

    Self-consistent solutions of Hedin's equations (HE) for the two-site Hubbard model (HM) have been studied. They have been found for three-point vertices of increasing complexity (Γ = 1 (GW approximation), Γ₁ from the first-order perturbation theory, and the exact vertex ΓE). Comparison is made between the cases when an additional quasiparticle (QP) approximation for Green's functions is applied during the self-consistent iterative solving of HE and when QP approximation is not applied. Results obtained with the exact vertex are directly related to the present open question—which approximation is more advantageous for future implementations, GW + DMFT or QPGW + DMFT. It is shown that in a regime of strong correlations only the originally proposed GW + DMFT scheme is able to provide reliable results. Vertex corrections based on Perturbation Theory systematically improve the GW results when full self-consistency is applied. The application of QP self-consistency combined with PT vertex corrections shows similar problems to the case when the exact vertex is applied combined with QP sc. An analysis of Ward Identity violation is performed for all studied in this work's approximations and its relation to the general accuracy of the schemes used is provided.

  2. Sensitivity of Sahelian Precipitation to Desert Dust under ENSO variability: a regional modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2016-12-01

    Mineral dust is estimated to comprise over half the total global aerosol burden, with a majority coming from the Sahara and Sahel region. Bounded by the Sahara Desert to the north and the Sahelian Savannah to the south, the Sahel experiences high interannual rainfall variability and a short rainy season during the boreal summer months. Observation-based data for the past three decades indicates a reduced dust emission trend, together with an increase in greening and surface roughness within the Sahel. Climate models used to study regional precipitation changes due to Saharan dust yield varied results, both in sign convention and magnitude. Inconsistency of model estimates drives future climate projections for the region that are highly varied and uncertain. We use the NASA-Unified Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) model to quantify the interaction and feedback between desert dust aerosol and Sahelian precipitation. Using nested domains at fine spatial resolution we resolve changes to mesoscale atmospheric circulation patterns due to dust, for representative phases of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The NU-WRF regional earth system model offers both advanced land surface data and resolvable detail of the mechanisms of the impact of Saharan dust. Results are compared to our previous work assessed over the Western Sahel using the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) CM2Mc global climate model, and to other previous regional climate model studies. This prompts further research to help explain the dust-precipitation relationship and recent North African dust emission trends. This presentation will offer a quantitative analysis of differences in radiation budget, energy and moisture fluxes, and atmospheric dynamics due to desert dust aerosol over the Sahel.

  3. Modeling Dust Emission of HL Tau Disk Based on Planet-Disk Interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Jin, Sheng; Li, Shengtai; Isella, Andrea; ...

    2016-02-09

    In this paper, we use extensive global two-dimensional hydrodynamic disk gas+dust simulations with embedded planets, coupled with three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations, to model the dust ring and gap structures in the HL Tau protoplanetary disk observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). We include the self-gravity of disk gas and dust components and make reasonable choices of disk parameters, assuming an already settled dust distribution and no planet migration. We can obtain quite adequate fits to the observed dust emission using three planets with masses of 0.35, 0.17, and 0.26 MJup at 13.1, 33.0, and 68.6 AU, respectively. Finally,more » implications for the planet formation as well as the limitations of this scenario are discussed.« less

  4. MODELING DUST EMISSION OF HL TAU DISK BASED ON PLANET–DISK INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Sheng; Ji, Jianghui; Li, Shengtai; Li, Hui; Isella, Andrea

    2016-02-10

    We use extensive global two-dimensional hydrodynamic disk gas+dust simulations with embedded planets, coupled with three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations, to model the dust ring and gap structures in the HL Tau protoplanetary disk observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). We include the self-gravity of disk gas and dust components and make reasonable choices of disk parameters, assuming an already settled dust distribution and no planet migration. We can obtain quite adequate fits to the observed dust emission using three planets with masses of 0.35, 0.17, and 0.26 M{sub Jup} at 13.1, 33.0, and 68.6 AU, respectively. Implications for the planet formation as well as the limitations of this scenario are discussed.

  5. Modeling Dust Emission of HL Tau Disk Based on Planet-Disk Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Sheng; Li, Shengtai; Isella, Andrea; Li, Hui; Ji, Jianghui

    2016-02-09

    In this paper, we use extensive global two-dimensional hydrodynamic disk gas+dust simulations with embedded planets, coupled with three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations, to model the dust ring and gap structures in the HL Tau protoplanetary disk observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). We include the self-gravity of disk gas and dust components and make reasonable choices of disk parameters, assuming an already settled dust distribution and no planet migration. We can obtain quite adequate fits to the observed dust emission using three planets with masses of 0.35, 0.17, and 0.26 MJup at 13.1, 33.0, and 68.6 AU, respectively. Finally, implications for the planet formation as well as the limitations of this scenario are discussed.

  6. Numerical model for the acceleration of a dust cloud by the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.-D.; Russell, C. T.; Lai, H. R.; Wei, H. Y.

    2015-10-01

    In this study we investigate the behavior of two massive fluids: protons in the solar wind and charged dust. For simplification we temporarily ignore the charging process of dust particles. The mass of charged dust can be 103 amu to grams, but we only model the lighter ones because the behavior of grains more massive than 105 are similar. A multi-fluid MHD code is used to simulate the large scale structure formed around a dust cloud released into the solar wind, and its evolution. Dust clouds as we are simulating can be made by meteoroid-meteoroid collisions with size from 1 to 100 m in diameter. These are dangerous if they hit the Earth's atmosphere. Detecting them in space can help detect where such objects are in near Earth space.

  7. Response of the climatic temperature to dust forcing, inferred from total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) aerosol index and the NASA assimilation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, P.; Herman, J.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Carmona, I.

    Recently, Alpert et al. (Alpert, P., Shay-El, Y., Kaufman, Y.J., Tanre, D., DaSilva, A., Schubert, S., Joseph, J.H., 1998. Quantification of dust-forced heating of the lower troposphere, Nature 395 (6700), 367-370, (24 September).) suggested an indirect measure of the tropospheric temperature response to dust aerosols by using model updates — roughly speaking model errors — of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version No. 1 (GEOS-1) data assimilation system. They have shown that these updates, which provide information about missing physical processes not included in the predictive model, have monthly mean patterns, which bear a striking similarity to patterns of dust over the Atlantic. This similarity in the number of dusty days was used to estimate the atmospheric response to dust. Here, the study is extended for all the major subtropical deserts over Africa and Asia using the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) aerosol index ( AI) for dust recently derived by Herman et al. (Herman, J.R., Bhartia, P.K., Torres, O., Hsu, C., Seftor, C., Celarier, E., 1997. Global distribution of UV-absorbing aerosols from Nimbus 7/TOMS data, J. Geophys. Res. 102, 16911-16922.). It is shown that the TOMS dust is highly correlated with the model errors with a maximum at the altitude of about 580 hPa and for the month of June with average correlation coefficient of 0.69 reaching up to 0.8 for specific months. In contrast to the previous study where only dust over ocean was employed, here, much higher dust concentrations are detected and the linear heating for weak dust becomes quickly saturated for AI above 1.5, then drops for very high values of AI that exceed about 3. This result is consistent with the theoretical predictions.

  8. Forecasting the northern African dust outbreak towards Europe in April 2011: A model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Huneeus, N.; Fiedler, S.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Benedetti, A.; Mulcahy, J.; Terradellas, E.; Garcia-Pando, C. Perez; Pejanovic, G.; Nickovic, S.; Arsenovic, P.; Schulz, M.; Cuevas, E.; Baldasano, J. M.; Pey, J.; Remy, S.

    2016-04-21

    In the framework of the World Meteorological Organisation's Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System, we evaluated the predictions of five state-of-the-art dust forecast models during an intense Saharan dust outbreak affecting western and northern Europe in April 2011. We assessed the capacity of the models to predict the evolution of the dust cloud with lead times of up to 72 h using observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and dust surface concentrations from a ground-based measurement network. In addition, the predicted vertical dust distribution was evaluated with vertical extinction profiles from the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). To assess the diversity in forecast capability among the models, the analysis was extended to wind field (both surface and profile), synoptic conditions, emissions and deposition fluxes. Models predict the onset and evolution of the AOD for all analysed lead times. On average, differences among the models are larger than differences among lead times for each individual model. In spite of large differences in emission and deposition, the models present comparable skill for AOD. In general, models are better in predicting AOD than near-surface dust concentration over the Iberian Peninsula. Models tend to underestimate the long-range transport towards northern Europe. In this paper, our analysis suggests that this is partly due to difficulties in simulating the vertical distribution dust and horizontal wind. Differences in the size distribution and wet scavenging efficiency may also account for model diversity in long-range transport.

  9. Forecasting the Northern African Dust Outbreak Towards Europe in April 2011: A Model Intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneeus, N.; Basart, S.; Fiedler, S.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Benedetti, A.; Mulcahy, J.; Terradellas, E.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Pejanovic, G.; Nickovic, S.

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the World Meteorological Organisation's Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System, we evaluated the predictions of five state-of-the-art dust forecast models during an intense Saharan dust outbreak affecting western and northern Europe in April 2011. We assessed the capacity of the models to predict the evolution of the dust cloud with lead times of up to 72 hours using observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and dust surface concentrations from a ground-based measurement network. In addition, the predicted vertical dust distribution was evaluated with vertical extinction profiles from the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). To assess the diversity in forecast capability among the models, the analysis was extended to wind field (both surface and profile), synoptic conditions, emissions and deposition fluxes. Models predict the onset and evolution of the AOD for all analysed lead times. On average, differences among the models are larger than differences among lead times for each individual model. In spite of large differences in emission and deposition, the models present comparable skill for AOD. In general, models are better in predicting AOD than near-surface dust concentration over the Iberian Peninsula. Models tend to underestimate the long-range transport towards northern Europe. Our analysis suggests that this is partly due to difficulties in simulating the vertical distribution dust and horizontal wind. Differences in the size distribution and wet scavenging efficiency may also account for model diversity in long-range transport.

  10. Forecasting the northern African dust outbreak towards Europe in April 2011: a model intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneeus, N.; Basart, S.; Fiedler, S.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Benedetti, A.; Mulcahy, J.; Terradellas, E.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Pejanovic, G.; Nickovic, S.; Arsenovic, P.; Schulz, M.; Cuevas, E.; Baldasano, J. M.; Pey, J.; Remy, S.; Cvetkovic, B.

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the World Meteorological Organisation's Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System, we evaluated the predictions of five state-of-the-art dust forecast models during an intense Saharan dust outbreak affecting western and northern Europe in April 2011. We assessed the capacity of the models to predict the evolution of the dust cloud with lead times of up to 72 h using observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and dust surface concentrations from a ground-based measurement network. In addition, the predicted vertical dust distribution was evaluated with vertical extinction profiles from the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). To assess the diversity in forecast capability among the models, the analysis was extended to wind field (both surface and profile), synoptic conditions, emissions and deposition fluxes. Models predict the onset and evolution of the AOD for all analysed lead times. On average, differences among the models are larger than differences among lead times for each individual model. In spite of large differences in emission and deposition, the models present comparable skill for AOD. In general, models are better in predicting AOD than near-surface dust concentration over the Iberian Peninsula. Models tend to underestimate the long-range transport towards northern Europe. Our analysis suggests that this is partly due to difficulties in simulating the vertical distribution dust and horizontal wind. Differences in the size distribution and wet scavenging efficiency may also account for model diversity in long-range transport.

  11. Forecasting the Northern African Dust Outbreak Towards Europe in April 2011: A Model Intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneeus, N.; Basart, S.; Fiedler, S.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Benedetti, A.; Mulcahy, J.; Terradellas, E.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Pejanovic, G.; Nickovic, S.

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the World Meteorological Organisation's Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System, we evaluated the predictions of five state-of-the-art dust forecast models during an intense Saharan dust outbreak affecting western and northern Europe in April 2011. We assessed the capacity of the models to predict the evolution of the dust cloud with lead times of up to 72 hours using observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and dust surface concentrations from a ground-based measurement network. In addition, the predicted vertical dust distribution was evaluated with vertical extinction profiles from the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). To assess the diversity in forecast capability among the models, the analysis was extended to wind field (both surface and profile), synoptic conditions, emissions and deposition fluxes. Models predict the onset and evolution of the AOD for all analysed lead times. On average, differences among the models are larger than differences among lead times for each individual model. In spite of large differences in emission and deposition, the models present comparable skill for AOD. In general, models are better in predicting AOD than near-surface dust concentration over the Iberian Peninsula. Models tend to underestimate the long-range transport towards northern Europe. Our analysis suggests that this is partly due to difficulties in simulating the vertical distribution dust and horizontal wind. Differences in the size distribution and wet scavenging efficiency may also account for model diversity in long-range transport.

  12. Forecasting the northern African dust outbreak towards Europe in April 2011: A model intercomparison

    DOE PAGES

    Huneeus, N.; Basart, S.; Fiedler, S.; ...

    2016-04-21

    In the framework of the World Meteorological Organisation's Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System, we evaluated the predictions of five state-of-the-art dust forecast models during an intense Saharan dust outbreak affecting western and northern Europe in April 2011. We assessed the capacity of the models to predict the evolution of the dust cloud with lead times of up to 72 h using observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and dust surface concentrations from a ground-based measurement network. In addition, the predicted vertical dust distributionmore » was evaluated with vertical extinction profiles from the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). To assess the diversity in forecast capability among the models, the analysis was extended to wind field (both surface and profile), synoptic conditions, emissions and deposition fluxes. Models predict the onset and evolution of the AOD for all analysed lead times. On average, differences among the models are larger than differences among lead times for each individual model. In spite of large differences in emission and deposition, the models present comparable skill for AOD. In general, models are better in predicting AOD than near-surface dust concentration over the Iberian Peninsula. Models tend to underestimate the long-range transport towards northern Europe. In this paper, our analysis suggests that this is partly due to difficulties in simulating the vertical distribution dust and horizontal wind. Differences in the size distribution and wet scavenging efficiency may also account for model diversity in long-range transport.« less

  13. Mineral dust transport and deposition to Antarctica: a climate model perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Maggi, V.; Delmonte, B.

    2009-04-01

    Windblown mineral dust is a useful proxy for paleoclimates. Its life cycle is determined by climate conditions in the source areas, and following the hydrological cycle, and the intensity and dynamics of the atmospheric circulation. In addition aeolian dust itself is an active component of the climate system, influencing the radiative balance of the atmosphere through its interaction with incoming solar radiation and outgoing planetary radiation. The mineral aerosols also have indirect effects on climate, and are linked to interactions with cloud microphysics and atmospheric chemistry as well as to dust's role of carrier of iron and other elements that constitute limitating nutrients for phytoplancton to remote ocean areas. We use climate model (CCSM) simulations that include a scheme for dust mobilization, transport and deposition in order to describe the evolution of dust deposition in some Antarctic ice cores sites where mineral dust records are available. Our focus is to determine the source apportionment for dust deposited to Antarctica under current and Last Glacial Maximum climate conditions, as well as to give an insight in the spatial features of transport patterns. The understanding of spatial and temporal representativeness of an ice core record is crucial to determine its value as a proxy of past climates and a necessary step in order to produce a global picture of how the dust component of the climate system has changed through time.

  14. On the internal consistency of holographic dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Horvat, R

    2008-10-15

    Holographic dark energy (HDE) models, underpinned by an effective quantum field theory (QFT) with a manifest UV/IR connection, have become convincing candidates for providing an explanation of the dark energy in the universe. On the other hand, the maximum number of quantum states that a conventional QFT for a box of size L is capable of describing relates to those boxes which are on the brink of experiencing a sudden collapse to a black hole. Another restriction on the underlying QFT is that the UV cut-off, which cannot be chosen independently of the IR cut-off and therefore becomes a function of time in a cosmological setting, should stay the largest energy scale even in the standard cosmological epochs preceding a dark energy dominated one. We show that, irrespective of whether one deals with the saturated form of HDE or takes a certain degree of non-saturation in the past, the above restrictions cannot be met in a radiation dominated universe, an epoch in the history of the universe which is expected to be perfectly describable within conventional QFT.

  15. An online mineral dust model within the global/regional NMMB: current progress and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, C.; Haustein, K.; Janjic, Z.; Jorba, O.; Baldasano, J. M.; Black, T.; Nickovic, S.

    2008-12-01

    While mineral dust distribution and effects are important on global scales, they strongly depend on dust emissions that are occurring on small spatial and temporal scales. Indeed, the accuracy of surface wind speed used in dust models is crucial. Due to the high-order power dependency on wind friction velocity and the threshold behaviour of dust emissions, small errors in surface wind speed lead to large dust emission errors. Most global dust models use prescribed wind fields provided by major meteorological centres (e.g., NCEP and ECMWF) and their spatial resolution is currently about 1 degree x 1 degree . Such wind speeds tend to be strongly underestimated over arid and semi-arid areas and do not account for mesoscale systems responsible for a significant fraction of dust emissions regionally and globally. Other significant uncertainties in dust emissions resulting from such approaches are related to the misrepresentation of high subgrid-scale spatial heterogeneity in soil and vegetation boundary conditions, mainly in semi-arid areas. In order to significantly reduce these uncertainties, the Barcelona Supercomputing Center is currently implementing a mineral dust model coupled on-line with the new global/regional NMMB atmospheric model using the ESMF framework under development in NOAA/NCEP/EMC. The NMMB is an evolution of the operational WRF-NMME extending from meso to global scales, and including non-hydrostatic option and improved tracer advection. This model is planned to become the next-generation NCEP mesoscale model for operational weather forecasting in North America. Current implementation is based on the well established regional dust model and forecast system Eta/DREAM (http://www.bsc.es/projects/earthscience/DREAM/). First successful global simulations show the potentials of such an approach and compare well with DREAM regionally. Ongoing developments include improvements in dust size distribution representation, sedimentation, dry deposition, wet

  16. WRF-Chem model simulations of a dust outbreak over the central Mediterranean and comparison with multi-sensor desert dust observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizza, Umberto; Barnaba, Francesca; Marcello Miglietta, Mario; Mangia, Cristina; Di Liberto, Luca; Dionisi, Davide; Costabile, Francesca; Grasso, Fabio; Gobbi, Gian Paolo

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting model with online coupled chemistry (WRF-Chem) is applied to simulate an intense Saharan dust outbreak event that took place over the Mediterranean in May 2014. Comparison of a simulation using a physics-based desert dust emission scheme with a numerical experiment using a simplified (minimal) emission scheme is included to highlight the advantages of the former. The model was found to reproduce well the synoptic meteorological conditions driving the dust outbreak: an omega-like pressure configuration associated with a cyclogenesis in the Atlantic coasts of Spain. The model performances in reproducing the atmospheric desert dust load were evaluated using a multi-platform observational dataset of aerosol and desert dust properties, including optical properties from satellite and ground-based sun photometers and lidars, plus in situ particulate matter mass concentration (PM) data. This comparison allowed us to investigate the model ability in reproducing both the horizontal and the vertical displacement of the dust plume, as well as its evolution in time. The comparison with satellite (MODIS-Terra) and sun photometers (AERONET) showed that the model is able to reproduce well the horizontal field of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) and its evolution in time (temporal correlation coefficient with AERONET of 0.85). On the vertical scale, the comparison with lidar data at a single site (Rome, Italy) confirms that the desert dust advection occurs in several, superimposed "pulses" as simulated by the model. Cross-analysis of the modeled AOD and desert dust emission fluxes further allowed for the source regions of the observed plumes to be inferred. The vertical displacement of the modeled dust plume was in rather good agreement with the lidar soundings, with correlation coefficients among aerosol extinction profiles up to 1 and mean discrepancy of about 50 %. The model-measurement comparison for PM10 and PM2.5 showed a

  17. Modelling of Lunar Dust and Electrical Field for Future Lunar Surface Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yunlong

    Modelling of the lunar dust and electrical field is important to future human and robotic activities on the surface of the moon. Apollo astronauts had witnessed the maintaining of micron- and millimeter sized moon dust up to meters level while walked on the surface of the moon. The characterizations of the moon dust would enhance not only the scientific understanding of the history of the moon but also the future technology development for the surface operations on the moon. It has been proposed that the maintaining and/or settlement of the small-sized dry dust are related to the size and weight of the dust particles, the level of the surface electrical fields on the moon, and the impaction and interaction between lunar regolith and the solar particles. The moon dust distributions and settlements obviously affected the safety of long term operations of future lunar facilities. For the modelling of the lunar dust and the electrical field, we analyzed the imaging of the legs of the moon lander, the cover and the footwear of the space suits, and the envelope of the lunar mobiles, and estimated the size and charges associated with the small moon dust particles, the gravity and charging effects to them along with the lunar surface environment. We also did numerical simulation of the surface electrical fields due to the impaction of the solar winds in several conditions. The results showed that the maintaining of meters height of the micron size of moon dust is well related to the electrical field and the solar angle variations, as expected. These results could be verified and validated through future on site and/or remote sensing measurements and observations of the moon dust and the surface electrical field.

  18. Planck intermediate results. XXIX. All-sky dust modelling with Planck, IRAS, and WISE observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Aniano, G.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Draine, B. T.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present all-sky modelling of the high resolution Planck, IRAS, and WISE infrared (IR) observations using the physical dust model presented by Draine & Li in 2007 (DL, ApJ, 657, 810). We study the performance and results of this model, and discuss implications for future dust modelling. The present work extends the DL dust modelling carried out on nearby galaxies using Herschel and Spitzer data to Galactic dust emission. We employ the DL dust model to generate maps of the dust mass surface density ΣMd, the dust optical extinction AV, and the starlight intensity heating the bulk of the dust, parametrized by Umin. The DL model reproduces the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) satisfactorily over most of the sky, with small deviations in the inner Galactic disk and in low ecliptic latitude areas, presumably due to zodiacal light contamination. In the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the present dust mass estimates agree remarkably well (within 10%) with DL estimates based on independent Spitzer and Herschel data. We compare the DL optical extinction AV for the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) with optical estimates for approximately 2 × 105 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) observed inthe Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The DL AV estimates are larger than those determined towards QSOs by a factor of about 2, which depends on Umin. The DL fitting parameter Umin, effectively determined by the wavelength where the SED peaks, appears to trace variations in the far-IR opacity of the dust grains per unit AV, and not only in the starlight intensity. These results show that some of the physical assumptions of the DL model will need to be revised. To circumvent the model deficiency, we propose an empirical renormalization of the DL AV estimate, dependent of Umin, which compensates for the systematic differences found with QSO observations. This renormalization, made to match the AV estimates towards QSOs, also brings into agreement the DL AV estimates with those derived for

  19. Planck intermediate results: XXIX. All-sky dust modelling with Planck, IRAS, and WISE observations

    DOE PAGES

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; ...

    2016-02-09

    In this paper, we present all-sky modelling of the high resolution Planck, IRAS, and WISE infrared (IR) observations using the physical dust model presented by Draine & Li in 2007 (DL, ApJ, 657, 810). We study the performance and results of this model, and discuss implications for future dust modelling. The present work extends the DL dust modelling carried out on nearby galaxies using Herschel and Spitzer data to Galactic dust emission. We employ the DL dust model to generate maps of the dust mass surface density ΣMd, the dust optical extinction AV, and the starlight intensity heating the bulkmore » of the dust, parametrized by Umin. The DL model reproduces the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) satisfactorily over most of the sky, with small deviations in the inner Galactic disk and in low ecliptic latitude areas, presumably due to zodiacal light contamination. In the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the present dust mass estimates agree remarkably well (within 10%) with DL estimates based on independent Spitzer and Herschel data. We compare the DL optical extinction AV for the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) with optical estimates for approximately 2 × 105 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) observed inthe Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The DL AV estimates are larger than those determined towards QSOs by a factor of about 2, which depends on Umin. The DL fitting parameter Umin, effectively determined by the wavelength where the SED peaks, appears to trace variations in the far-IR opacity of the dust grains per unit AV, and not only in the starlight intensity. These results show that some of the physical assumptions of the DL model will need to be revised. To circumvent the model deficiency, we propose an empirical renormalization of the DL AV estimate, dependent of Umin, which compensates for the systematic differences found with QSO observations. This renormalization, made to match the AV estimates towards QSOs, also brings into agreement the DL AV estimates

  20. A Comparative Study of Mesoscale Modeling of Smoke and Dust Direct Radiative Effects over Northern Sub-Saharan African Region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Y.; Wang, J.; Ichoku, C. M.; Zhang, F.

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the radiative effects of smoke and dust aerosols and of the underlying surface in the Northern Sub-Saharan African (NSSA) region using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem). We performed a yearlong (from September 2009 to September 2010) WRF-Chem simulation using hourly emissions from the Fire Energetics and Emissions Research (FEER) emission dataset derived by multiplying emission coefficients based on aerosol and fire observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments aboard Terra and Aqua with fire radiative energy (FRE) measurements from the geostationary Meteosat Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI). The geographic distribution and vertical profiles of simulated dust and smoke aerosols were evaluated with MODIS true color images and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar data with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIPSO) total attenuated backscatter, aerosol extinction coefficient and depolarization data. We found that simulated aerosol vertical concentration profiles are consistent with the above CALIPSO data. Surface albedo and columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) sensitivity to smoke and dust simulations are performed with WRF-Chem. The simulated surface albedo and AOD were compared with MODIS albedo product (MODIS43) and AOD measurements from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The modeled smoke/dust clear-sky and all-sky radiative impacts were analyzed in this study and reveal interesting results that will be discussed.

  1. Development of high-resolution dynamic dust source function - A case study with a strong dust storm in a regional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongchul; Chin, Mian; Kemp, Eric M.; Tao, Zhining; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Ginoux, Paul

    2017-06-01

    A high-resolution dynamic dust source has been developed in the NASA Unified-Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) model to improve the existing coarse static dust source. In the new dust source map, topographic depression is in 1-km resolution and surface bareness is derived using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The new dust source better resolves the complex topographic distribution over the Western United States where its magnitude is higher than the existing, coarser resolution static source. A case study is conducted with an extreme dust storm that occurred in Phoenix, Arizona in 02-03 UTC July 6, 2011. The NU-WRF model with the new high-resolution dynamic dust source is able to successfully capture the dust storm, which was not achieved with the old source identification. However the case study also reveals several challenges in reproducing the time evolution of the short-lived, extreme dust storm events.

  2. The cosmic dust analyzer: Experimental evaluation of an impact ionization model. [considering thermal equilibrium plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friichtenicht, J. F.; Roy, N. L.; Becker, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    A thermal equilibrium plasma model is used to process data from an impact ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer in order to convert the raw ion data to relative abundances of the elemental constituents of cosmic dust particles.

  3. Modelling Dust Processing and Evolution in Extreme Environments as seen by Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchio, Marco

    2014-09-01

    The main goal of my PhD study is to understand the dust processing that occurs during the mixing between the galactic interstellar medium and the intracluster medium. This process is of particular interest in violent phenomena such as galaxy-galaxy interactions or the ``Ram Pressure Stripping'' due to the infalling of a galaxy towards the cluster centre.Initially, I focus my attention to the problem of dust destruction and heating processes, re-visiting the available models in literature. I particularly stress on the cases of extreme environments such as a hot coronal-type gas (e.g., IGM, ICM, HIM) and supernova-generated interstellar shocks. Under these conditions small grains are destroyed on short timescales and large grains are heated by the collisions with fast electrons making the dust spectral energy distribution very different from what observed in the diffuse ISM.In order to test our models I apply them to the case of an interacting galaxy, NGC 4438. Herschel data of this galaxy indicates the presence of dust with a higher-than-expected temperature.With a multi-wavelength analysis on a pixel-by-pixel basis we show that this hot dust seems to be embedded in a hot ionised gas therefore undergoing both collisional heating and small grain destruction.Furthermore, I focus on the long-standing conundrum about the dust destruction and dust formation timescales in the Milky Way. Based on the destruction efficiency in interstellar shocks, previous estimates led to a dust lifetime shorter than the typical timescale for dust formation in AGB stars. Using a recent dust model and an updated dust processing model we re-evaluate the dust lifetime in our Galaxy. Finally, I turn my attention to the phenomenon of ``Ram Pressure Stripping''. The galaxy ESO 137-001 represents one of the best cases to study this effect. Its long H2 tail embedded in a hot and ionised tail raises questions about its possible stripping from the galaxy or formation downstream in the tail. Based on

  4. Pinwheels in the sky, with dust: 3D modelling of the Wolf-Rayet 98a environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Tom; Keppens, Rony; van Marle, Allard Jan; Camps, Peter; Baes, Maarten; Meliani, Zakaria

    2016-08-01

    The Wolf-Rayet 98a (WR 98a) system is a prime target for interferometric surveys, since its identification as a `rotating pinwheel nebulae', where infrared images display a spiral dust lane revolving with a 1.4 yr periodicity. WR 98a hosts a WC9+OB star, and the presence of dust is puzzling given the extreme luminosities of Wolf-Rayet stars. We present 3D hydrodynamic models for WR 98a, where dust creation and redistribution are self-consistently incorporated. Our grid-adaptive simulations resolve details in the wind collision region at scales below one percent of the orbital separation (˜4 au), while simulating up to 1300 au. We cover several orbital periods under conditions where the gas component alone behaves adiabatic, or is subject to effective radiative cooling. In the adiabatic case, mixing between stellar winds is effective in a well-defined spiral pattern, where optimal conditions for dust creation are met. When radiative cooling is incorporated, the interaction gets dominated by thermal instabilities along the wind collision region, and dust concentrates in clumps and filaments in a volume-filling fashion, so WR 98a must obey close to adiabatic evolutions to demonstrate the rotating pinwheel structure. We mimic Keck, ALMA or future E-ELT observations and confront photometric long-term monitoring. We predict an asymmetry in the dust distribution between leading and trailing edge of the spiral, show that ALMA and E-ELT would be able to detect fine-structure in the spiral indicative of Kelvin-Helmholtz development, and confirm the variation in photometry due to the orientation. Historic Keck images are reproduced, but their resolution is insufficient to detect the details we predict.

  5. DO4Models: Testing the Performance of Current Dust Emission Schemes from a Box and Climate Model Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, K.; Washington, R.; King, J.; Wiggs, G.; Thomas, D. S. G.; Menut, L.

    2014-12-01

    Dust emission schemes in climate models are relatively simple and are tuned to represent observed background aerosol concentrations. Representations of dust emission in the models were developed from idealized experiments such as those conducted in wind tunnels. Improvement of current model dust emission schemes is hampered by a paucity of observations from key dust sources. The Dust Observations for Models project (DO4Models) was aiming on gathering data from source regions at a scale appropriate to climate model grid box resolution. Here we present (1) the results of 1D box model simulations using three commonly used parameterizations for the horizontal and vertical dust emission flux, (2) using a newly proposed stochastic dust emission scheme for turbulent wind conditions, and (3) HadGEM3 regional climate model simulations using the current model setup for dust emissions. We are comparing box and RCM model results with DO4Models field campaign data retrieved over a typical dust source in Botswana during two consecutive dry seasons (2011 and 2012). The box model performance is further tested using observed soil moisture content, aerodynamic surface stress, shear velocity, and soil size properties. The results suggest that current dust emission schemes do not capture the observed emission flux well. The saltation flux is hugely overestimated, whereas the vertical flux is moderately overestimated. The choice of the sand transport, soil moisture and roughness correction scheme is important but insufficient to bring modeled fluxes into agreement with observed dust fluxes. The stochastic scheme does not suffer from this flux disparity, but cannot be used in cases of strong surface saltation. Potential reasons for the diagnosed mismatch are discussed and the impact of spatial averaging over the 11 field sites within the 12x12km grid is evaluated. HadGEM3 is tested with regard to its capability to reproduce the observed meteorological conditions. Very good agreement

  6. MODELING THERMAL DUST EMISSION WITH TWO COMPONENTS: APPLICATION TO THE PLANCK HIGH FREQUENCY INSTRUMENT MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P. E-mail: dfinkbeiner@cfa.harvard.edu

    2015-01-10

    We apply the Finkbeiner et al. two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck High Frequency Instrument maps. This parameterization of the far-infrared dust spectrum as the sum of two modified blackbodies (MBBs) serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single-MBB dust emission model. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We also derive full-sky 6.'1 resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting the two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100 μm data. Because our two-component model matches the dust spectrum near its peak, accounts for the spectrum's flattening at millimeter wavelengths, and specifies dust temperature at 6.'1 FWHM, our model provides reliable, high-resolution thermal dust emission foreground predictions from 100 to 3000 GHz. We find that, in diffuse sky regions, our two-component 100-217 GHz predictions are on average accurate to within 2.2%, while extrapolating the Planck Collaboration et al. single-MBB model systematically underpredicts emission by 18.8% at 100 GHz, 12.6% at 143 GHz, and 7.9% at 217 GHz. We calibrate our two-component optical depth to reddening, and compare with reddening estimates based on stellar spectra. We find the dominant systematic problems in our temperature/reddening maps to be zodiacal light on large angular scales and the cosmic infrared background anisotropy on small angular scales.

  7. A Coupled Ice-Atmosphere-Dust Model for a Neoproterozoic "Mudball Earth"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, J. C.; Strom, D.

    2010-12-01

    The Neoproterozoic "Snowball Earth" glaciations remain a subject of intense debate. While many have used field data to argue for either a totally or partially ice-covered Earth, fewer efforts have been made to establish the basic physical climate state and internal dynamics of these alternatives. Description of feedbacks is especially important: how does a globally ice-covered Earth reinforce itself as a stable climate system, and/or sow the seeds for its own destruction? In previous work, we investigated the flow properties of thick floating global ice sheets, and found that flow from pole to equator tends to eliminate regions of thin ice in the tropics. We briefly mentioned that ice flow and sublimation could lead to a "lag deposit" of dust on top of the tropical ice. The consequences of this were explored in detail by Dorian Abbott and others, who found that the accumulation of dust atop tropical ice causes a strong warming effect, which strongly promotes deglaciation of a Snowball climate. However, Abbott et al specified a dust layer ab initio in their GCM simulations, leaving aside the processes which produce it. Here, we present the results of our efforts to add dust processes to an earlier coupled atmosphere/ocean/ice model originally developed by David Pollard and Jim Kasting. Their model includes energy balance equations for the atmosphere and an ice mechanics model for glacial flow. To this we have added variables tracking the fraction of dust incorporated into snow and ice; the transport and accumulation of this dust through ice flow; the effects of dust on albedo and penetration of sunlight into the ice; restriction of evaporation from dust-covered surfaces; and density and buoyancy effects of dusty ice. Dust is added to the surface globally at a fixed rate, and is removed by meltwater runoff. We find that ice in tropical regions of net evaporation quickly develops a surface dust layer which drastically lowers its albedo. This dust layer develops

  8. Thermal conductivity measurements of porous dust aggregates: I. Technique, model and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, M.; Blum, J.; Skorov, Yu. V.; Trieloff, M.

    2011-07-01

    We present a non-invasive technique for measuring the thermal conductivity of fragile and sensitive materials. In the context of planet-formation research, the investigation of the thermal conductivity of porous dust aggregates provide important knowledge about the influence of heating processes, like internal heating by radioactive decay of short-lived nuclei, e.g. 26Al, on the evolution and growth of planetesimals. The determination of the thermal conductivity was performed by a combination of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. An IR camera measured the temperature distribution of the sample surface heated by a well-characterized laser beam. The thermal conductivity as free parameter in the model calculations, exactly emulating the experiment, was varied until the experimental and numerical temperature distributions showed best agreement. Thus, we determined for three types of porous dust samples, consisting of spherical, 1.5 μm-sized SiO 2 particles, with volume filling factors in the range of 15-54%, the thermal conductivity to be 0.002-0.02 W m -1 K -1, respectively. From our results, we can conclude that the thermal conductivity mainly depends on the volume filling factor. Further investigations, which are planned for different materials and varied contact area sizes (produced by sintering), will prove the appropriate dependencies in more detail.

  9. The Challenge of Modeling the Meteorology of Dust Emission: Lessons Learned from the Desert Storms Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippertz, P.; Marsham, J. H.; Cowie, S. M.; Fiedler, S.; Heinold, B.; Jemmett-Smith, B. C.; Pantillon, F.; Schepanski, K.; Roberts, A. J.; Pope, R.; Gilkeson, C. A.; Hubel, E.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust plays an important role in the Earth system, but a reliable quantification of the global dust budget is still not possible due to a lack of observations and insufficient representation of relevant processes in climate and weather models. Five years ago, the Desert Storms project funded by the European Research Council set out to reduce these uncertainties. Its aims were to (1) improve the understanding of key meteorological mechanisms of peak wind generation in dust emission regions (particularly in northern Africa), (2) assess their relative importance, (3) evaluate their representation in models, (4) determine model sensitivities with respect to resolution and model physics, and (5) explore the usefulness of new approaches for model improvements. Here we give an overview of the most significant findings: (1) The morning breakdown of nocturnal low-level jets is an important emission mechanism, but details depend crucially on nighttime stability, which is often badly handled by models. (2) Convective cold pools are a key control on summertime dust emission over northern Africa, directly and through their influence on the heat low; they are severely misrepresented by models using parameterized convection. A new scheme based on downdraft mass flux has been developed that can mitigate this problem. (3) Mobile cyclones make a relatively unimportant contribution, except for northeastern Africa in spring. (4) A new global climatology of dust devils identifies local hotspots but suggests a minor contribution to the global dust budget in contrast to previous studies. A new dust-devil parameterization based on data from large-eddy simulations will be presented. (5) The lack of sufficient observations and misrepresentation of physical processes lead to a considerable uncertainty and biases in (re)analysis products. (6) Variations in vegetation-related surface roughness create small-scale wind variability and support long-term dust trends in semi-arid areas.

  10. The Challenge of Modelling the Meteorology of Dust Emission: Lessons Learned from the Desert Storms Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippertz, Peter; Marsham, John H.; Cowie, Sophie; Fiedler, Stephanie; Heinold, Bernd; Jemmett-Smith, Bradley; Pantillon, Florian; Schepanski, Kerstin; Roberts, Alexander; Pope, Richard; Gilkeson, Carl; Hubel, Eva

    2016-04-01

    Mineral dust plays an important role in the Earth system, but a reliable quantification of the global dust budget is still not possible due to a lack of observations and insufficient representation of relevant processes in climate and weather models. Five years ago, the Desert Storms project funded by the European Research Council set out to reduce these uncertainties. Its aims were to (1) improve the understanding of key meteorological mechanisms of peak wind generation in dust emission regions (particularly in northern Africa), (2) assess their relative importance, (3) evaluate their representation in models, (4) determine model sensitivities with respect to resolution and model physics, and (5) explore the usefulness of new approaches for model improvements. Here we give an overview of the most significant findings: (1) The morning breakdown of nocturnal low-level jets is an important emission mechanism, but details depend crucially on nighttime stability, which is often badly handled by models. (2) Convective cold pools are a key control on summertime dust emission over northern Africa, directly and through their influence on the heat low; they are severely misrepresented by models using parameterized convection. A new scheme based on downdraft mass flux has been developed that can mitigate this problem. (3) Mobile cyclones make a relatively unimportant contribution, except for northeastern Africa in spring. (4) A new global climatology of dust devils identifies local hotspots but suggests a minor contribution to the global dust budget in contrast to previous studies. A new dust-devil parameterization based on data from large-eddy simulations will be presented. (5) The lack of sufficient observations and misrepresentation of physical processes lead to a considerable uncertainty and biases in (re)analysis products. (6) Variations in vegetation-related surface roughness create small-scale wind variability and support long-term dust trends in semi-arid areas.

  11. Dust Plume Modeling at Fort Bliss: Full Training Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Elaine G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Seiple, Timothy E.; Newsom, Rob K.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2006-09-26

    The potential for air quality impacts from heavy mechanized vehicles operating in the training ranges and on the unpaved main supply routes at Fort Bliss is being investigated. The investigation uses the atmospheric modeling system DUSTRAN to simulate fugitive dust emission and dispersion from typical activities occurring on the installation. This report conveys the results of DUSTRAN simulations conducted using a “Full Training” scenario developed by Fort Bliss personnel. he Full Training scenario includes simultaneous off-road activities of two full Heavy Brigade Combat Teams (HCBTs) and one HCBT battalion on three training ranges. Simulations were conducted for the six-day period, April 25-30, 2005, using previously archived meteorological records. Simulation results are presented in the form of 24-hour average PM10 plots and peak 1-hour PM10 concentration plots, where the concentrations represent contributions resulting from the specified military vehicular activities, not total ambient PM10 concentrations. Results indicate that the highest PM10 contribution concentrations occurred on April 30 when winds were light and variable. Under such conditions, lofted particulates generated by vehicular movement stay in the area of generation and are not readily dispersed. The effect of training duration was investigated by comparing simulations with vehicular activity extending over a ten hour period (0700 to 1700 MST) with simulations where vehicular activity was compressed into a one hour period (0700 to 0800 MST). Compressing all vehicular activity into one hour led to higher peak one-hour and 24-hour average concentration contributions, often substantially higher.

  12. Modelling ripples in Orion with coupled dust dynamics and radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, T.; Keppens, R.; Camps, P.

    2015-03-01

    Aims: In light of the recent detection of direct evidence for the formation of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the Orion nebula, we expand upon previous modelling efforts by numerically simulating the shear-flow driven gas and dust dynamics in locations where the Hii region and the molecular cloud interact. We aim to directly confront the simulation results with the infrared observations. Methods: To numerically model the onset and full nonlinear development of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability we take the setup proposed to interpret the observations, and adjust it to a full 3D hydrodynamical simulation that includes the dynamics of gas as well as dust. A dust grain distribution with sizes between 5-250 nm is used, exploiting the gas+dust module of the MPI-AMRVAC code, in which the dust species are represented by several pressureless dust fluids. The evolution of the model is followed well into the nonlinear phase. The output of these simulations is then used as input for the SKIRT dust radiative transfer code to obtain infrared images at several stages of the evolution, which can be compared to the observations. Results: We confirm that a 3D Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is able to develop in the proposed setup, and that the formation of the instability is not inhibited by the addition of dust. Kelvin-Helmholtz billows form at the end of the linear phase, and synthetic observations of the billows show striking similarities to the infrared observations. It is pointed out that the high density dust regions preferentially collect on the flanks of the billows. To get agreement with the observed Kelvin-Helmholtz ripples, the assumed geometry between the background radiation, the billows and the observer is seen to be of critical importance.

  13. Linkages between observed, modeled Saharan dust loading and meningitis in Senegal during 2012 and 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diokhane, Aminata Mbow; Jenkins, Gregory S.; Manga, Noel; Drame, Mamadou S.; Mbodji, Boubacar

    2016-04-01

    The Sahara desert transports large quantities of dust over the Sahelian region during the Northern Hemisphere winter and spring seasons (December-April). In episodic events, high dust concentrations are found at the surface, negatively impacting respiratory health. Bacterial meningitis in particular is known to affect populations that live in the Sahelian zones, which is otherwise known as the meningitis belt. During the winter and spring of 2012, suspected meningitis cases (SMCs) were with three times higher than in 2013. We show higher surface particular matter concentrations at Dakar, Senegal and elevated atmospheric dust loading in Senegal for the period of 1 January-31 May during 2012 relative to 2013. We analyze simulated particulate matter over Senegal from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model during 2012 and 2013. The results show higher simulated dust concentrations during the winter season of 2012 for Senegal. The WRF model correctly captures the large dust events from 1 January-31 March but has shown less skill during April and May for simulated dust concentrations. The results also show that the boundary conditions are the key feature for correctly simulating large dust events and initial conditions are less important.

  14. Dust transport model validation using satellite- and ground-based methods in the southwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Anna-Britt; Thome, Kurt; Yin, Dazhong; Sprigg, William A.

    2006-08-01

    Dust is known to aggravate respiratory diseases. This is an issue in the desert southwestern United States, where windblown dust events are common. The Public Health Applications in Remote Sensing (PHAiRS) project aims to address this problem by using remote-sensing products to assist in public health decision support. As part of PHAiRS, a model for simulating desert dust cycles, the Dust Regional Atmospheric Modeling (DREAM) system is employed to forecast dust events in the southwestern US. Thus far, DREAM has been validated in the southwestern US only in the lower part of the atmosphere by comparison with measurement and analysis products from surface synoptic, surface Meteorological Aerodrome Report (METAR), and upper-air radiosonde. This study examines the validity of the DREAM algorithm dust load prediction in the desert southwestern United States by comparison with satellite-based MODIS level 2 and MODIS Deep Blue aerosol products, and ground-based observations from the AERONET network of sunphotometers. Results indicate that there are difficulties obtaining MODIS L2 aerosol optical thickness (AOT) data in the desert southwest due to low AOT algorithm performance over areas with high surface reflectances. MODIS Deep Blue aerosol products show improvement, but the temporal and vertical resolution of MODIS data limit its utility for DREAM evaluation. AERONET AOT data show low correlation to DREAM dust load predictions. The potential contribution of space- or ground-based lidar to the PHAiRS project is also examined.

  15. Linkages between observed, modeled Saharan dust loading and meningitis in Senegal during 2012 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Diokhane, Aminata Mbow; Jenkins, Gregory S; Manga, Noel; Drame, Mamadou S; Mbodji, Boubacar

    2016-04-01

    The Sahara desert transports large quantities of dust over the Sahelian region during the Northern Hemisphere winter and spring seasons (December-April). In episodic events, high dust concentrations are found at the surface, negatively impacting respiratory health. Bacterial meningitis in particular is known to affect populations that live in the Sahelian zones, which is otherwise known as the meningitis belt. During the winter and spring of 2012, suspected meningitis cases (SMCs) were with three times higher than in 2013. We show higher surface particular matter concentrations at Dakar, Senegal and elevated atmospheric dust loading in Senegal for the period of 1 January-31 May during 2012 relative to 2013. We analyze simulated particulate matter over Senegal from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model during 2012 and 2013. The results show higher simulated dust concentrations during the winter season of 2012 for Senegal. The WRF model correctly captures the large dust events from 1 January-31 March but has shown less skill during April and May for simulated dust concentrations. The results also show that the boundary conditions are the key feature for correctly simulating large dust events and initial conditions are less important.

  16. The implications for dust emission modeling of spatial and vertical variations in horizontal dust flux and particle size in the Bodélé Depression, Northern Chad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, Adrian; Warren, Andrew; O'Donoghue, Alice; Robinson, Andrea; Thomas, Andrew; Bristow, Charlie

    2008-02-01

    The Bodélé Depression has been confirmed as the single largest source of atmospheric mineral dust on Earth. It is a distinctive source because of its large exposure of diatomite and the presence of mega-barchan dunes. Direct measurements of horizontal dust flux and particle size were made to investigate dust emission processes and for comparison with mechanisms of emission assumed in current dust models. More than 50 masts, with traps mounted on each, were located across and downwind of three barchans in 56 km2 study area of the eastern Bodélé. The size-distribution of surface material is bi-modal; there are many fine dust modes and a mixed mineralogy with a particle density three times smaller than quartz. Horizontal fluxes (up to 70 m above the playa) of particles, up to 1000 μm in diameter, are produced frequently from the accelerated flow over and around the barchans, even in below-threshold shear conditions on the diatomite playa. Our data on dust sizes do not conform to retrievals of dust size distributions from radiance measurements made in the same area. Dust emission models for the region may need to be revised to account for: saltators in the Bodélé, which are a mixture of quartz sand and diatomite flakes; the great spatial and vertical variation in the abundance, mass and density of dust and abraders; and the patterns of surface erodibility. All of these have important local effects on the vertical dust flux and its particle sizes.

  17. Comparative Benchmark Dose Modeling as a Tool to Make the First Estimate of Safe Human Exposure Levels to Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-wing; Scully, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Brief exposures of Apollo Astronauts to lunar dust occasionally elicited upper respiratory irritation; however, no limits were ever set for prolonged exposure ot lunar dust. Habitats for exploration, whether mobile of fixed must be designed to limit human exposure to lunar dust to safe levels. We have used a new technique we call Comparative Benchmark Dose Modeling to estimate safe exposure limits for lunar dust collected during the Apollo 14 mission.

  18. A model of dust fragmentation in near-nucleus jet-like features on Comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konno, Ichishiro; Huebner, W. F.; Boice, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    A model for dusty gas flows and dust fragmentation in cometary atmospheres is developed and applied to interpret the dust intensity profiles near the nucleus of Comet P/Halley. It is found that fragmentation is not the only physical mechanism for explaining the dust intensity profiles from the 1/z dependence in the region about 1 to 40 km from the nucleus. A combination of the geometric effect and dust fragmentation is a likely explanation for the profiles.

  19. Characterization and Modeling of Dust Emissions from an Instrumented Mine Tailings Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betterton, E. A.; Stovern, M.; Saez, A.; Csavina, J. L.; Felix Villar, O. I.; Field, J. P.; Rine, K. P.; Russell, M. R.; Saliba, P.

    2012-12-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of contaminants from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic. We report on the chemical characterization of atmospheric dust and aerosol sampled near the mine tailings. Instrumented eddy flux towers were also setup on the mine tailings to give both spatial and temporal dust observations. The eddy flux towers have multiple DUSTTRAK monitors as well as weather stations. These in situ observations allow us to assess spatial distribution of suspended particulate. Using the DUSTTRAK flux tower observations at 10-second resolution in conjunction with a computational fluid dynamics model, we have been able to model dust transport from the mine tailings to downwind areas. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations.

  20. Analytical model of particle and heat flux collection by dust immersed in dense magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignitchouk, L.; Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.

    2017-10-01

    A comprehensive analytical description is presented for the particle and heat fluxes collected by dust in dense magnetized plasmas. Compared to the widely used orbital motion limited theory, the suppression of cross-field transport leads to a strong reduction of the electron fluxes, while ion collection is inhibited by thin-sheath effects and the formation of a potential overshoot along the field lines. As a result, the incoming heat flux loses its sensitivity to the floating potential, thereby diminishing the importance of electron emission processes in dust survivability. Numerical simulations implementing the new model for ITER-like detached divertor plasmas predict a drastic enhancement of the dust lifetime.

  1. Investigating Sensitivity to Saharan Dust in Tropical Cyclone Formation Using Nasa's Adjoint Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdaway, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As tropical cyclones develop from easterly waves coming of the coast of Africa they interact with dust from the Sahara desert. There is a long standing debate over whether this dust inhibits or advances the developing storm and how much influence it has. Dust can surround the storm and absorb incoming solar radiation, cooling the air below. As a result an energy source for the system is potentially diminished, inhibiting growth of the storm. Alternatively dust may interact with clouds through micro-physical processes, for example by causing more moisture to condense, potentially increasing the strength. As a result of climate change, concentrations and amount of dust in the atmosphere will likely change. It it is important to properly understand its effect on tropical storm formation. The adjoint of an atmospheric general circulation model provides a very powerful tool for investigating sensitivity to initial conditions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently developed an adjoint version of the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) dynamical core, convection scheme, cloud model and radiation schemes. This is extended so that the interaction between dust and radiation is also accounted for in the adjoint model. This provides a framework for examining the sensitivity to dust in the initial conditions. Specifically the set up allows for an investigation into the extent to which dust affects cyclone strength through absorption of radiation. In this work we investigate the validity of using an adjoint model for examining sensitivity to dust in hurricane formation. We present sensitivity results for a number of systems that developed during the Atlantic hurricane season of 2006. During this period there was a significant outbreak of Saharan dust and it is has been argued that this outbreak was responsible for the relatively calm season. This period was also covered by an extensive observation campaign. It is shown that the

  2. Investigating sensitivity to Saharan dust in tropical cyclone formation using NASA's adjoint model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdaway, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    As tropical cyclones develop from easterly waves coming off the coast of Africa they interact with dust from the Sahara desert. There is a long standing debate over whether this dust inhibits or advances the developing storm and how much influence it has. Dust can surround the storm and absorb incoming solar radiation, cooling the air below. As a result an energy source for the system is potentially diminished, inhibiting growth of the storm. Alternatively dust may interact with clouds through micro-physical processes, for example by causing more moisture to condense, potentially increasing the strength. As a result of climate change, concentrations and amount of dust in the atmosphere will likely change. It it is important to properly understand its effect on tropical storm formation. The adjoint of an atmospheric general circulation model provides a very powerful tool for investigating sensitivity to initial conditions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently developed an adjoint version of the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) dynamical core, convection scheme, cloud model and radiation schemes. This is extended so that the interaction between dust and radiation is also accounted for in the adjoint model. This provides a framework for examining the sensitivity to dust in the initial conditions. Specifically the set up allows for an investigation into the extent to which dust affects cyclone strength through absorption of radiation. In this work we investigate the validity of using an adjoint model for examining sensitivity to dust in hurricane formation. We present sensitivity results for a number of systems that developed during the Atlantic hurricane season of 2006. During this period there was a significant outbreak of Saharan dust and it is has been argued that this outbreak was responsible for the relatively calm season. This period was also covered by an extensive observation campaign. It is shown that the

  3. Modeling photopolarimetric characteristics of comet dust as a polydisperse mixture of polyshaped rough spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, L.; Das, H.; Dubovik, O.; Lapyonok, T.

    2013-12-01

    It is widely recognized now that the main component of comet dust is aggregated particles that consist of submicron grains. It is also well known that cometary dust obey a rather wide size distribution with abundant particles whose size reaches dozens of microns. However, numerous attempts of computer simulation of light scattering by comet dust using aggregated particles have not succeeded to consider particles larger than a couple of microns due to limitations in the memory and speed of available computers. Attempts to substitute aggregates by polydisperse solid particles (spheres, spheroids, cylinders) could not consistently reproduce observed angular and spectral characteristics of comet brightness and polarization even in such a general case as polyshaped (i.e. containing particles of a variety of aspect ratios) mixture of spheroids (Kolokolova et al., In: Photopolarimetry in Remote Sensing, Kluwer Acad. Publ., 431, 2004). In this study we are checking how well cometary dust can be modeled using modeling tools for rough spheroids. With this purpose we use the software package described in Dubovik et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 111, D11208, doi:10.1029/2005JD006619d, 2006) that allows for a substantial reduction of computer time in calculating scattering properties of spheroid mixtures by means of using pre-calculated kernels - quadrature coefficients employed in the numerical integration of spheroid optical properties over size and shape. The kernels were pre-calculated for spheroids of 25 axis ratios, ranging from 0.3 to 3, and 42 size bins within the size parameter range 0.01 - 625. This software package has been recently expanded with the possibility of simulating not only smooth but also rough spheroids that is used in present study. We consider refractive indexes of the materials typical for comet dust: silicate, carbon, organics, and their mixtures. We also consider porous particles accounting on voids in the spheroids through effective medium approach. The

  4. Mineral dust aerosol from Saharan desert by means of atmospheric, emission, dispersion modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnieri, F.; Calastrini, F.; Busillo, C.; Pasqui, M.; Becagli, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Calzolai, G.; Nava, S.; Udisti, R.

    2011-07-01

    The application of Numerical Prediction Models to mineral dust cycle is considered of prime importance for the investigation of aerosol and non-CO2 greenhouse gases contributions in climate variability and change. In this framework, a modelling system was developed in order to provide a regional characterization of Saharan dust intrusions over Mediterranean basin. The model chain is based on three different modules: the atmospheric model, the dust emission model and transport/deposition model. Numerical simulations for a selected case study, June 2006, were performed in order to evaluate the modelling system effectiveness. The comparison of the results obtained in such a case study shows a good agreement with those coming from GOCART model. Moreover a good correspondence was found in the comparison with in-situ measurements regarding some specific crustal markers in the PM10 fraction.

  5. Mineral Dust Aerosol from Saharan Desert by Means of Atmospheric, Emission, Dispersion Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busillo, C.; Calastrini, F.; Guarnieri, F.; Pasqui, M.; Becagli, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Udisti, R.

    2011-01-01

    The application of Numerical Prediction Models to mineral dust cycle is considered of prime importance in climate change due to aerosol and non-CO2 greenhouse gases. In this framework, a comprehensive atmospheric, emission, dispersion modelling system was developed in order to provide a regional characterization of Saharan dust intrusions over Mediterranean basin. The model is based on three different modules: the atmospheric model, the dust emission model and transport/deposition model. Numerical modelling simulations for a selected case study, June 2006, was carried out to test the modelling system. The evaluation of the performed analysis shows a good agreement with the in-situ measurements of some specific crustal markers in the PM10 fraction.

  6. Modeling the Dust Properties of z ~ 6 Quasars with ART2—All-Wavelength Radiative Transfer with Adaptive Refinement Tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuexing; Hopkins, Philip F.; Hernquist, Lars; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Cox, Thomas J.; Springel, Volker; Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Yoshida, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    The detection of large quantities of dust in z ~ 6 quasars by infrared and radio surveys presents puzzles for the formation and evolution of dust in these early systems. Previously, Li et al. showed that luminous quasars at zgtrsim 6 can form through hierarchical mergers of gas-rich galaxies, and that these systems are expected to evolve from starburst through quasar phases. Here, we calculate the dust properties of simulated quasars and their progenitors using a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code, ART2 (All-wavelength Radiative Transfer with Adaptive Refinement Tree). ART2 incorporates a radiative equilibrium algorithm which treats dust emission self-consistently, an adaptive grid method which can efficiently cover a large dynamic range in both spatial and density scales, a multiphase model of the interstellar medium which accounts for the observed scaling relations of molecular clouds, and a supernova-origin model for dust which can explain the existence of dust in cosmologically young objects. By applying ART2 to the hydrodynamic simulations of Li et al., we reproduce the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) and inferred dust properties of SDSS J1148+5251, the most distant Sloan quasar. We find that the dust and infrared emission are closely associated with the formation and evolution of the quasar host. The system evolves from a cold to a warm ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) owing to heating and feedback from stars and the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Furthermore, the AGN activity has significant implications for the interpretation of observation of the hosts. Our results suggest that vigorous star formation in merging progenitors is necessary to reproduce the observed dust properties of z ~ 6 quasars, supporting a merger-driven origin for luminous quasars at high redshifts and the starburst-to-quasar evolutionary hypothesis.

  7. The retrieval of optical properties from terrestrial dust devil vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Jonathon P.; Patel, Manish R.; Lewis, Stephen R.

    2014-03-01

    The retrieval of the optical properties of desert aerosols in suspension within terrestrial dust devils is presented with possible future application for martian dust devils. The transmission of light through dust devil vortices was measured in situ to obtain the wavelength-dependent attenuation by the aerosols. A Monte Carlo model was applied to each dust devil with the retrieved optical properties corresponding to the set of parameters which lead to the best model representation of the observed transmission spectra. The retrieved optical properties agree well with single scattering theory and are consistent with previous studies of dust aerosols. The enhanced absorption observed for dust devils with a higher tangential wind speed, and in comparison to atmospheric aerosol studies, suggests that larger dust particles are lofted and suspended around dust devil vortices. This analysis has shown that the imaginary refractive indices (and thus the optical properties of the suspended dust) are generally overestimated when these larger dust grains entrained by dust devils are neglected. This will lead to an overestimation of the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the small particles that remain in suspension after the dust devil terminates. It is also demonstrated that a 10% uncertainty in the particle size distribution of the dust entrained in the dust devils can result in a 50% increase in the predicted amount of incident solar radiation absorbed by the dust particles once the dust devil has terminated. The method used here provides the capability to retrieve the optical properties of the dust entrained in martian dust devils by taking advantage of transits over surface spacecraft which are capable of making optical measurements at ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. Our results suggest that we would observed higher absorption at all wavelengths for dust particles entrained in dust devil vortices compared to the ubiquitous dust haze.

  8. Modelling polarized light from dust shells surrounding asymptotic giant branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, E.; Bladh, S.; Höfner, S.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Winds of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are commonly assumed to be driven by radiative acceleration of dust grains. For M-type AGB stars, the nature of the wind-driving dust species has been a matter of intense debate. A proposed source of the radiation pressure triggering the outflows is photon scattering on Fe-free silicate grains. This wind-driving mechanism requires grain radii of about 0.1-1 micron in order to make the dust particles efficient at scattering radiation around the stellar flux maximum. Grain size is therefore an important parameter for understanding the physics behind the winds of M-type AGB stars. Aims: We seek to investigate the diagnostic potential of scattered polarized light for determining dust grain sizes. Methods: We have developed a new tool for computing synthetic images of scattered light in dust and gas shells around AGB stars, which can be applied to detailed models of dynamical atmospheres and dust-driven winds. Results: We present maps of polarized light using dynamical models computed with the DARWIN code. The synthetic images clearly show that the intensity of the polarized light, the position of the inner edge of the dust shell, and the size of the dust grains near the inner edge are all changing with the luminosity phase. Non-spherical structures in the dust shells can also have an impact on the polarized light. We simulate this effect by combining different pulsation phases into a single 3D structure before computing synthetic images. An asymmetry of the circumstellar envelope can create a net polarization, which can be used as diagnostics for the grain size. The ratio between the size of the scattering particles and the observed wavelength determines at what wavelengths net polarization switches direction. If observed, this can be used to constrain average particle sizes.

  9. Operational Regional Dust Forecast and Satellite Monitoring With the NCEP/ETA Model in the North African and Mediterranean Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderman, J.; Faramawi, U. A.; Dulac, F.; Moulin, C.

    2002-12-01

    The NCEP/ETA numerical weather prediction model is a comprehensive and mature model used successfully world-wide for synoptic scale regional forecasting up to three days ahead. The desert cycle is implemented in the NCEP/ETA model by means of the following major components: 1. Dust uptake, using surface characteristics and low level atmospheric turbulence; 2. Dust transport and distribution (horizontal and vertical advection and diffusion); 3. Dust removal (dry and wet deposition). The model was used quasi-operationally for daily dust forecast and dust alert service in the Mediterranean area between March 1997 and March 1998, in the frame of the EU-funded Mediterranean Dust Experiment (MEDUSE). Dust simulations were enhanced by operational daily monitoring of the dust load over Africa and seawater, based on Meteosat satellite data. Not a single dust event of significance was missed out by the model forecasts, and dust alerts allowed a number of complementary dust ground-based and airborne observations. MEDUSE simulations and more recent cases with different synoptic characteristics, tested against satellite images, visibility measurements and in situ observations as available, will be presented. Special emphasis will be given on the effect of the horizontal resolution on the model results through a detailed case study.

  10. Modelling of mineral dust for interglacial and glacial climate conditions with a focus on Antarctica

    DOE PAGES

    Sudarchikova, Natalia; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Timmreck, C.; ...

    2015-05-19

    The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distances. These cores are a palaeoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol–climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission,more » atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret palaeodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time slices: the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP; hereafter referred to as \\"6 kyr\\"), last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"115 kyr\\") and Eemian (126 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"126 kyr\\"). One glacial time interval, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"21 kyr\\"), was simulated as well to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase in mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two-thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one-third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change in dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times

  11. Modelling of mineral dust for interglacial and glacial climate conditions with a focus on Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Sudarchikova, Natalia; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Timmreck, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Schurgers, G.; Sein, Dmitry; Zhang, Kai

    2015-05-19

    The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distances. These cores are a palaeoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol–climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission, atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret palaeodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time slices: the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP; hereafter referred to as \\"6 kyr\\"), last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"115 kyr\\") and Eemian (126 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"126 kyr\\"). One glacial time interval, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"21 kyr\\"), was simulated as well to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase in mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two-thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one-third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change in dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times higher

  12. Nature of the gas and dust around 51 Ophiuchi. Modelling continuum and Herschel line observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi, W. F.; Ménard, F.; Meeus, G.; Carmona, A.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Augereau, J.-C.; Kamp, I.; Woitke, P.; Pinte, C.; Mendigutía, I.; Eiroa, C.; Montesinos, B.; Britain, S.; Dent, W.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Circumstellar disc evolution is paramount for the understanding of planet formation. The gas in protoplanetary discs large program (GASPS) aims at determining the circumstellar gas and solid mass around ~250 pre-main-sequence Herbig Ae and T Tauri stars. Aims: We aim to understand the origin and nature of the circumstellar matter orbiting 51 Oph, a young (<1 Myr) luminous B9.5 star. Methods: We obtained continuum and line observations with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory and continuum data at 1.2 mm with the IRAM 30 m telescope. The spectral energy distribution and line fluxes were modelled using the physico-chemo radiative transfer code ProDiMo to constrain the gas and solid mass of the disc around 51 Oph. The disc vertical hydrostatic structure was computed self-consistently together with the gas thermal balance. Results: We detected a strong emission by atomic oxygen [O i] at 63 microns using the Herschel Space Observatory. The [O i] emission at 145 microns, the [C ii] emission at 158 microns, the high-J CO emissions, and the warm water emissions were not detected. Continuum emission was detected at 1.2 mm. The continuum from the near- to the far-infrared and the [O i] emission are well explained by the emission from a compact (Rout = 10-15 AU) hydrostatic disc model with a gas mass of 5 × 10-6 M⊙, 100 times that of the solid mass. However, this model fails to match the continuum millimeter flux, which hints at a cold outer disc with a mass in solids of ~10-6 M⊙ or free-free emission from a photoevaporative disc wind. This outer disc can either be devoid of gas and/or is too cold to emit in the [O i] line. A very flat extended disc model (Rout = 400 AU) with a fixed vertical structure and dust settling matches all photometric points and most of the [O i] flux. Conclusions: The observations can be explained by an extended flat disc where dust grains have settled. However, a flat gas disc cannot be reproduced by

  13. Source apportionment for African dust outbreaks over the Western Mediterranean using the HYSPLIT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, M.; Stein, A. F.; Draxler, R. R.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Castillo, S.; Avila, A.

    2011-03-01

    A source apportionment technique has been applied to determine the geographical distribution of emissions in Northern Africa contributing to dust outbreaks that yield high PM10 levels at Spanish regional background stations. Seven dust episodes have been analyzed in this study. Total suspended particles have been sampled and chemically analyzed for these events at La Castanya background station (Montseny, NE Spain) and differences in the composition of airborne dust have been studied. The dominant role of northern and western source areas (Tunisia, Algeria, Mauritania and the Western Sahara) contrasted with the negligible contribution of major emission source areas such as the Bodelé depression, Libya, Niger, and Sudan. During the simulated events using the dust module of the HYSPLIT model, material from the latter regions is persistently transported across the Atlantic but not towards Western Europe. As a consequence, the composition of the dust turned out to be quite homogeneous since the mixing of dust occurs from various source areas with similar chemical composition. However, differences in Ca/Al ratios have been found in a number of samples that are mainly explained by vertical transport segregation of clay minerals (relatively richer in Al) from coarser dust particles (Ca-carbonate).

  14. Satellite and Ground-based Radiometers Reveal Much Lower Dust Absorption of Sunlight than Used in Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Dubovik, O.; Karnieli, A.; Remer, L. A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The ability of dust to absorb solar radiation and heat the atmosphere is one of the main uncertainties in climate modeling and the prediction of climate change. Dust absorption is not well known due to limitations of in situ measurements. New techniques to measure dust absorption are needed in order to assess the impact of dust on climate. Here we report two new independent remote sensing techniques that provide sensitive measurements of dust absorption. Both are based on remote sensing. One uses satellite spectral measurements, the second uses ground based sky measurements from the AERONET network. Both techniques demonstrate that Saharan dust absorption of solar radiation is several times smaller than the current international standards. Dust cooling of the earth system in the solar spectrum is therefore significantly stronger than recent calculations indicate. We shall also address the issue of the effects of dust non-sphericity on the aerosol optical properties.

  15. Satellite and Ground-based Radiometers Reveal Much Lower Dust Absorption of Sunlight than Used in Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Dubovik, O.; Karnieli, A.; Remer, L. A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The ability of dust to absorb solar radiation and heat the atmosphere is one of the main uncertainties in climate modeling and the prediction of climate change. Dust absorption is not well known due to limitations of in situ measurements. New techniques to measure dust absorption are needed in order to assess the impact of dust on climate. Here we report two new independent remote sensing techniques that provide sensitive measurements of dust absorption. Both are based on remote sensing. One uses satellite spectral measurements, the second uses ground based sky measurements from the AERONET network. Both techniques demonstrate that Saharan dust absorption of solar radiation is several times smaller than the current international standards. Dust cooling of the earth system in the solar spectrum is therefore significantly stronger than recent calculations indicate. We shall also address the issue of the effects of dust non-sphericity on the aerosol optical properties.

  16. A scaling theory for the size distribution of emitted dust aerosols suggests climate models underestimate the size of the global dust cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Jasper F.

    2011-01-01

    Mineral dust aerosols impact Earth’s radiation budget through interactions with clouds, ecosystems, and radiation, which constitutes a substantial uncertainty in understanding past and predicting future climate changes. One of the causes of this large uncertainty is that the size distribution of emitted dust aerosols is poorly understood. The present study shows that regional and global circulation models (GCMs) overestimate the emitted fraction of clay aerosols (< 2 μm diameter) by a factor of ∼2–8 relative to measurements. This discrepancy is resolved by deriving a simple theoretical expression of the emitted dust size distribution that is in excellent agreement with measurements. This expression is based on the physics of the scale-invariant fragmentation of brittle materials, which is shown to be applicable to dust emission. Because clay aerosols produce a strong radiative cooling, the overestimation of the clay fraction causes GCMs to also overestimate the radiative cooling of a given quantity of emitted dust. On local and regional scales, this affects the magnitude and possibly the sign of the dust radiative forcing, with implications for numerical weather forecasting and regional climate predictions in dusty regions. On a global scale, the dust cycle in most GCMs is tuned to match radiative measurements, such that the overestimation of the radiative cooling of a given quantity of emitted dust has likely caused GCMs to underestimate the global dust emission rate. This implies that the deposition flux of dust and its fertilizing effects on ecosystems may be substantially larger than thought. PMID:21189304

  17. Dust Studies in DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D L; West, W P; Groth, M; Yu, J H; Boedo, J A; Bray, B D; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Hollmann, E M; Hyatt, A W; Krasheninnikov, S I; Lasnier, C J; Moyer, R A; Pigarov, A Y; Smirnov, R; Solomon, W M; Wong, C C

    2008-04-15

    Studies of submicron dust using Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers and video data of micron to sub-millimeter sized dust on DIII-D tokamak have provided the first data of dust sources and transport during tokamak discharges. During normal operation on DIII-D dust observation rates are low, a few events per discharge or less. The net carbon content of the dust corresponds to a carbon atom density a few orders of magnitude below the core impurity density. Statistical analysis of Mie data collected over months of operation reveal correlation of increased dust rate with increased heating power and impulsive wall loading due to edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions. Generation of significant amounts of dust by disruptions is confirmed by the camera data. However, dust production by disruptions alone is insufficient to account for estimated in-vessel dust inventory in DIII-D. After an extended entry vent, thousands of dust particles are observed by cameras in the first 2-3 plasma discharges. Individual particles moving at velocities up to {approx}300 m/s, breakup of larger particles into pieces, and collisions of particles with walls are observed. After {approx}70 discharges, dust levels are reduced to a few events per discharge. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark modeling, milligram amounts of micron-sized carbon dust have been injected into DIII-D discharges, leading to the core carbon density increase by a factor of 2-3. Following injection, dust trajectories in the divertor are mostly in the toroidal direction, consistent with the ion drag force. Dust from the injection is observed in the outboard midplane by a fast framing camera. The observed trajectories and velocities of the dust particles are in qualitative agreement with modeling by the 3D DustT code.

  18. Mineral dust aerosols over the Sahara: Meteorological controls on emission and transport and implications for modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippertz, Peter; Todd, Martin C.

    2012-02-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust has recently become an important research field in Earth system science because of its impacts on radiation, clouds, atmospheric dynamics and chemistry, air quality, and biogeochemical cycles. Studying and modeling dust emission and transport over the world's largest source region, the Sahara, is particularly challenging because of the complex meteorology and a very sparse observational network. Recent advances in satellite retrievals together with ground- and aircraft-based field campaigns have fostered our understanding of the spatiotemporal variability of the dust aerosol and its atmospheric drivers. We now have a more complete picture of the key processes in the atmosphere associated with dust emission. These cover a range of scales from (1) synoptic scale cyclones in the northern sector of the Sahara, harmattan surges and African easterly waves, through (2) low-level jets and cold pools of mesoscale convective systems (particularly over the Sahel), to (3) microscale dust devils and dusty plumes, each with its own pronounced diurnal and seasonal characteristics. This paper summarizes recent progress on monitoring and analyzing the dust distribution over the Sahara and discusses implications for numerical modeling. Among the key challenges for the future are a better quantification of the relative importance of single processes and a more realistic representation of the effects of the smaller-scale meteorological features in dust models. In particular, moist convection has been recognized as a major limitation to our understanding because of the inability of satellites to observe dust under clouds and the difficulties of numerical models to capture convective organization.

  19. Automatic identification of sources and trajectories of atmospheric Saharan dust aerosols with Latent Gaussian Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbe, Christoph; Bachl, Fabian

    2013-04-01

    Dust transported from the Sahara across the ocean has a high impact on radiation fluxes and marine nutrient cycles. Significant progress has been made in characterising Saharan dust properties (Formenti et al., 2011) and its radiative effects through the 'SAharan Mineral dUst experiMent' (SAMUM) (Ansmann et al., 2011). While the models simulating Saharan dust transport processes have been considerably improved in recent years, it is still an open question which meteorological processes and surface characteristics are mainly responsible for dust transported to the Sub-Tropical Atlantic (Schepanski et al., 2009; Tegen et al., 2012). Currently, there exists a large discrepancy between modelled dust emission events and those observed from satellites. In this contribution we present an approach for classifying and tracking dust plumes based on a Bayesian hierarchical model. Recent developments in computational statistics known as Integrated Nested Laplace Approximations (INLA) have paved the way for efficient inference in a respective subclass, the Generalized Linear Model (GLM) (Rue et al., 2009). We present the results of our approach based on data from the SIVIRI instrument on board the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite. We demonstrate the accuracy for automatically detecting sources of dust and aerosol concentrations in the atmosphere. The trajectories of aerosols are also computed very efficiently. In our framework, we automatically identify optimal parameters for the computation of atmospheric aerosol motion. The applicability of our approach to a wide range of conditions will be discussed, as well as the ground truthing of our results and future directions in this field of research.

  20. The new surface and radiative transfer parameterization in the SKIRON/Dust modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallos, G.; Spyrou, C.; Mitsakou, C.; Vlastou, G.

    2008-12-01

    Major contributors of PM in the atmosphere are the dust areas and mainly Sahara. The impacts of dust in the atmosphere are many and especially in radiation, clouds and precipitation. It is a considerable climate modifier. The impacts to land and marine ecosystems are considerable as well in humans. Modeling the dust cycle in the atmosphere at the University of Athens started in the mid-nineties with the development of the SKIRON/Dust atmospheric modeling system. The main purpose was the development of an analysis and forecasting tool that will provide early warning of Saharan dust outbreaks. The dust cycle module is directly coupled with the meteorological model and in its early development was called DREAM. Continuous development of the entire system led to a model version where inaccuracies have been reduced and extra features have been added. Some of these are log-normal particle size distribution (eight bins), calculation of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), radiative transfer corrections by utilizing look up tables (shading effect), new dust source identification and utilization of rocky soil characterization, replacement of the dry and wet deposition schemes with more accurate ones, in-cloud scavenging, etc. The new model version replaced the previous four-size bins system in the operations of the University of Athens. Recently, the old radiative transfer scheme from GFDL has been replaced by the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model - RRTM for both short and long wave radiation. The new radiative transfer scheme has many properties that allow the description of dust impacts in the atmosphere on a more accurate way. Mid and low tropospheric warming by dust is one of the new features that the model can describe. In this presentation we discuss the new model characteristics and especially the dust radiative properties as described by both: lookup tables and empirical formulation as well as the new approach by utilizing RRTM. The model results are compared with lidar and

  1. Application of ICTP RegCM3's New Dust Model to Modern N. America: Challenges and Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, T. A.; Hutchison, K. A.; Sloan, L. C.; Solmon, F.

    2008-12-01

    Comparison of results from the new ICTP Regional Climate Model (RCM) dust module to observational data from the IMPROVE network shows that the RCM correctly predicts emission sources and the spatial distribution of dust, but it overestimates the concentration of dust by a factor of one hundred. We show that this overestimation of dust emission is essentially independent of the soil-moisture-effect scheme, threshold velocity scheme, and model resolution (vertical and horizontal). We find that modification of soil properties in the RCM's saltation/sandblasting parametrization can reduce emissions and put dust concentrations in the right order of magnitude. Lack of size resolved dust data for North America make it difficult to asses whether this modification affects the validity of the model in terms of size distributions and indirectly in terms of dust optical effects.

  2. Dust emission modelling around a stockpile by using computational fluid dynamics and discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhshani, S. M.; Schott, D. L.; Lodewijks, G.

    2013-06-01

    Dust emissions can have significant effects on the human health, environment and industry equipment. Understanding the dust generation process helps to select a suitable dust preventing approach and also is useful to evaluate the environmental impact of dust emission. To describe these processes, numerical methods such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are widely used, however nowadays particle based methods like Discrete Element Method (DEM) allow researchers to model interaction between particles and fluid flow. In this study, air flow over a stockpile, dust emission, erosion and surface deformation of granular material in the form of stockpile are studied by using DEM and CFD as a coupled method. Two and three dimensional simulations are respectively developed for CFD and DEM methods to minimize CPU time. The standard κ-ɛ turbulence model is used in a fully developed turbulent flow. The continuous gas phase and the discrete particle phase link to each other through gas-particle void fractions and momentum transfer. In addition to stockpile deformation, dust dispersion is studied and finally the accuracy of stockpile deformation results obtained by CFD-DEM modelling will be validated by the agreement with the existing experimental data.

  3. Mathematical model of formation of Kordylewski cosmic dust clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sal'nikova, T. V.; Stepanov, S. Ya.

    2015-07-01

    The question of occurrence of cosmic dust clouds, which were found by Kordylewski in 1961 in the vicinity of libration point L 5 of the Earth-Moon system, still causes debates and concern. We explain theoretically the phenomenon of the apparent vanishing and appearance of the Kordylewski cosmic dust clouds in the vicinity of triangular libration points L 4 and L 5 of the Earth-Moon system. The possibility of occurrence of two such clouds rotating around libration points L 4 and two clouds rotating around point L 5 is shown and optimal times for their observation from the Earth are determined. The investigation is performed based on analysis of a stable periodic motion in a planar restricted circular problem of three bodies, Earth-Moon—Particle, allowing for perturbations from the Sun under the assumption that the orbits of the Earth and Moon are circular and lie in one plane.

  4. Improving the modeling of road dust levels for Barcelona at urban scale and street level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Fulvio; Zandveld, Peter; Keuken, Menno; Jonkers, Sander; Querol, Xavier; Reche, Cristina; Denier van der Gon, Hugo A. C.; Schaap, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Road dust emission is an emerging issue in air quality due to the lack of remediation measures in contrast to vehicle exhaust emissions. The evidence of receptor modeling studies allows for quantifying impact on a few receptors, but the high cost of PM chemical speciation data and the questionable representativeness of single monitoring sites, limit considerably the development of population exposure estimates and epidemiologic studies based on georeferenced data. This study attempts to initiate and promote urban-scale dispersion modeling for road dust emissions, which will allow for a more robust estimate of population exposure and health outcomes. The TNO URBIS (URBan Information System) model was applied in the city of Barcelona, implementing a Gaussian line source and a street canyon dispersion model, together with new experimental estimates of road dust emission factors and algorithm to describe the time variability. Annual, daily and hourly road dust contributions were simulated and validated against observation of PM10, mineral dust and hourly PM2.5-10 concentrations. Results show that road dust contributed 9-15% to PM10 levels at background sites, and 23-44% at traffic sites. Highest contributions were modeled in the commercial/residential district where most of population live and work (Eixample) structured by 120 m wide square blocks, separated by roads with >10,000 vehicles per day. Street level contributions rise up to 20 μg/m3 (96% of roads) and an additional 3% of roads within 20-40 μg/m3. Hourly simulations of road dust contributions revealed to benefit from the implementation of the new emission module (Amato et al., 2012), able to describe the exponential recovery of road dust emission potential after rain events, when compared to common approach such as the use of constant emission factor or an ON/OFF approach. Correlation coefficients with observed data varied from 0.61, 0.58 and 0.43 for annual, daily and hourly means, respectively, revealing

  5. Simulation of windblown dust transport from a mine tailings impoundment using a computational fluid dynamics model

    PubMed Central

    Stovern, Michael; Felix, Omar; Csavina, Janae; Rine, Kyle P.; Russell, MacKenzie R.; Jones, Robert M.; King, Matt; Betterton, Eric A.; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of dust and aerosol from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport is used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations, both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations. Results show that local topography and wind velocity profiles are the major factors that control deposition. PMID:25621085

  6. Simulation of windblown dust transport from a mine tailings impoundment using a computational fluid dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovern, Michael; Felix, Omar; Csavina, Janae; Rine, Kyle P.; Russell, MacKenzie R.; Jones, Robert M.; King, Matt; Betterton, Eric A.; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of dust and aerosol from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport is used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations, both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations. Results show that local topography and wind velocity profiles are the major factors that control deposition.

  7. Andromeda's dust

    SciTech Connect

    Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G.; Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian; Braun, Robert; Leroy, Adam E-mail: ganiano@ias.u-psud.fr

    2014-01-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance, out to R ≈ 25 kpc. The global dust mass is M {sub d} = 5.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, the global dust/H mass ratio is M {sub d}/M {sub H} = 0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is (q {sub PAH}) = 0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R = 5.6 kpc, a maximum at R = 11.2 kpc, and an outer ring at R ≈ 15.1 kpc. The dust/gas ratio varies from M {sub d}/M {sub H} ≈ 0.026 at the center to ∼0.0027 at R ≈ 25 kpc. From the dust/gas ratio, we estimate the interstellar medium metallicity to vary by a factor ∼10, from Z/Z {sub ☉} ≈ 3 at R = 0 to ∼0.3 at R = 25 kpc. The dust heating rate parameter (U) peaks at the center, with (U) ≈ 35, declining to (U) ≈ 0.25 at R = 20 kpc. Within the central kiloparsec, the starlight heating intensity inferred from the dust modeling is close to what is estimated from the stars in the bulge. The PAH abundance reaches a peak q {sub PAH} ≈ 0.045 at R ≈ 11.2 kpc. When allowance is made for the different spectrum of the bulge stars, q {sub PAH} for the dust in the central kiloparsec is similar to the overall value of q {sub PAH} in the disk. The silicate-graphite-PAH dust model used here is generally able to reproduce the observed dust spectral energy distribution across M31, but overpredicts 500 μm emission at R ≈ 2-6 kpc, suggesting that at R = 2-6 kpc, the dust opacity varies more steeply with frequency (with β ≈ 2.3 between 200 and 600 μm) than in the model.

  8. Interstellar Dust: Contributed Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M. (Editor); Allamandola, Louis J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    A coherent picture of the dust composition and its physical characteristics in the various phases of the interstellar medium was the central theme. Topics addressed included: dust in diffuse interstellar medium; overidentified infrared emission features; dust in dense clouds; dust in galaxies; optical properties of dust grains; interstellar dust models; interstellar dust and the solar system; dust formation and destruction; UV, visible, and IR observations of interstellar extinction; and quantum-statistical calculations of IR emission from highly vibrationally excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules.

  9. High particulate iron(II) content in glacially sourced dusts enhances productivity of a model diatom

    PubMed Central

    Shoenfelt, Elizabeth M.; Sun, Jing; Winckler, Gisela; Kaplan, Michael R.; Borunda, Alejandra L.; Farrell, Kayla R.; Moreno, Patricio I.; Gaiero, Diego M.; Recasens, Cristina; Sambrotto, Raymond N.; Bostick, Benjamin C.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the bioavailability of iron (Fe) in natural dusts and the impact of dust mineralogy on Fe utilization by photosynthetic organisms. Variation in the supply of bioavailable Fe to the ocean has the potential to influence the global carbon cycle by modulating primary production in the Southern Ocean. Much of the dust deposited across the Southern Ocean is sourced from South America, particularly Patagonia, where the waxing and waning of past and present glaciers generate fresh glaciogenic material that contrasts with aged and chemically weathered nonglaciogenic sediments. We show that these two potential sources of modern-day dust are mineralogically distinct, where glaciogenic dust sources contain mostly Fe(II)-rich primary silicate minerals, and nearby nonglaciogenic dust sources contain mostly Fe(III)-rich oxyhydroxide and Fe(III) silicate weathering products. In laboratory culture experiments, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, a well-studied coastal model diatom, grows more rapidly, and with higher photosynthetic efficiency, with input of glaciogenic particulates compared to that of nonglaciogenic particulates due to these differences in Fe mineralogy. Monod nutrient accessibility models fit to our data suggest that particulate Fe(II) content, rather than abiotic solubility, controls the Fe bioavailability in our Fe fertilization experiments. Thus, it is possible for this diatom to access particulate Fe in dusts by another mechanism besides uptake of unchelated Fe (Fe′) dissolved from particles into the bulk solution. If this capability is widespread in the Southern Ocean, then dusts deposited to the Southern Ocean in cold glacial periods are likely more bioavailable than those deposited in warm interglacial periods. PMID:28691098

  10. Models of millimeter-wave emission from dust in the coma of Comet 67P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kareta, Theodore R.; Schloerb, F. Peter

    2017-01-01

    The spacecraft Rosetta ended its mission on September 30th, 2016 after spending more than 2 years studying Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The comet is constantly emitting gas and ejecting dust as it moves through the inner solar system, and understanding the properties of the gas and dust can help us better understand the comet and its origins. We present the results of a Monte Carlo simulation of dust production developed for comparison with millimeter and submillimeter data obtained by the Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO). The MIRO instrument measures the millimeter-wave continuum emission from the comet at two wavelengths, 0.53 mm and 1.59 mm. During the months around the August 2015 perihelion of the comet, a small emission excess was observed above the sunlit limb of the comet. The excess emission extends many beam widths off the dayside limb and is a persistent feature for months of observations. No excess is observed above the nightside limb, and given the known strong day-night asymmetry of gas production from the nucleus, we interpret the observed continuum excess on the day side to result from thermal emission from dust. A full treatment of the millimeter-wave emission from the large dust particles observed by MIRO must include many effects, including acceleration of dust particles by outflowing gas and the integration of millimeter-wave emission from a broad range of particle sizes. Our model also incorporates an accurate cometary shape model to demonstrate how dust production might vary with solar illumination over the surface. We find that the complex shape of 67P can lead to asymmetric structures in the distribution of the coma dust, with significant enhancements occurring where large areas of the nucleus have similar orientations with respect to the Sun.

  11. Secondary production of toxic nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon during the Asian dust event: approached by model simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Y.; Kajino, M.; Sato, K.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) are one of toxic compounds in the atmospheric particles. NPAHs are emitted in the atmosphere through the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and diesel. Furthermore, it is produced by heterogeneous reactions such as the surface on the mineral dust aerosols. 1-nitoropyrene (1-NP) is one of the most abundant NPAHs and considered as a probable carcinogen. It is found that the production of 1-NP occurred during the heavy Asian dust event in Beijing and Japan. In this study, we estimated production of 1-NP by heterogeneous reactions by using model simulations in Northeast Asia. The model was three dimensional chemical transport model, Regional Air Quality Model for POPs version. The model performance was investigated the comparison with the observations. We focused on heavy Asian dust event observed in Beijing on 18-20 March 2010. Several sensitivity calculations are conducted under the existence of Asian dust in order to investigate the effect of relative humidity and photolysis. On 18-20 March 2010, primary 1-NP concentrations are about 50 fg/m3. Under the existence of the Asian dust, secondary production of 1-NP is estimated to 7 times against the concentrations of primary emission. Horizontal distributions indicate that decrease of Pyr and increase of 1-NP is significant around Beijing in this Asian dust event. Secondary production of 1-NP was large in this area as well as the downwind region such as the East China Sea. It is found that secondary production of 1-NP is minor in dessert region because of lower concentrations of Pyrene (Pyr). Distribution of secondary produced 1-NP varied with concentrations of Pyr, transport of Asian dust. Secondary production of 1-NP in March 2010 was larger than the primary emission of 1-NP, whereas the secondary production was smaller than those of the primary emission in April and May, 2011.

  12. Numerical Modeling of an RF Argon-Silane Plasma with Dust Particle Nucleation and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girshick, Steven; Agarwal, Pulkit

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a 1-D numerical model of an RF argon-silane plasma in which dust particles nucleate and grow. This model self-consistently couples a plasma module, a chemistry module and an aerosol module. The plasma module solves population balance equations for electrons and ions, the electron energy equation under the assumption of a Maxwellian velocity distribution, and Poisson's equation for the electric field. The chemistry module treats silane dissociation and reactions of silicon hydrides containing up to two silicon atoms. The aerosol module uses a sectional method to model particle size and charge distributions. The nucleation rate is equated to the rates of formation of anions containing two Si atoms, and a heterogeneous reaction model is used to model particle surface growth. Aerosol effects considered include particle charging, coagulation, and particle transport by neutral drag, ion drag, electric force, gravity and Brownian diffusion. Simulation results are shown for the case of a 13.56 MHz plasma at a pressure of 13 Pa and applied RF voltage of 100 V (amplitude), with flow through a showerhead electrode. These results show the strong coupling between the plasma and the spatiotemporal evolution of the nanoparticle cloud.

  13. The lunar dust environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, Eberhard; Horanyi, Mihaly; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2011-11-01

    associated with the passage of the terminator, which swamped any signature of primary impactors of interplanetary origin. It was suggested that the LEAM events are consistent with the sunrise/sunset-triggered levitation and transport of charged lunar dust particles. Currently no theoretical model explains the formation of a dust cloud above the lunar surface but recent laboratory experiments indicate that the interaction of dust on the lunar surface with solar UV and plasma is more complex than previously thought.

  14. Regional dust storm modeling for health services: The case of valley fever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprigg, William A.; Nickovic, Slobodan; Galgiani, John N.; Pejanovic, Goran; Petkovic, Slavko; Vujadinovic, Mirjam; Vukovic, Ana; Dacic, Milan; DiBiase, Scott; Prasad, Anup; El-Askary, Hesham

    2014-09-01

    On 5 July 2011, a massive dust storm struck Phoenix, Arizona (USA), raising concerns for increased cases of valley fever (coccidioidomycosis, or, cocci). A quasi-operational experimental airborne dust forecast system predicted the event and provides model output for continuing analysis in collaboration with public health and air quality communities. An objective of this collaboration was to see if a signal in cases of valley fever in the region could be detected and traced to the storm - an American haboob. To better understand the atmospheric life cycle of cocci spores, the DREAM dust model (also herein, NMME-DREAM) was modified to simulate spore emission, transport and deposition. Inexact knowledge of where cocci-causing fungus grows, the low resolution of cocci surveillance and an overall active period for significant dust events complicate analysis of the effect of the 5 July 2011 storm. In the larger context of monthly to annual disease surveillance, valley fever statistics, when compared against PM10 observation networks and modeled airborne dust concentrations, may reveal a likely cause and effect. Details provided by models and satellites fill time and space voids in conventional approaches to air quality and disease surveillance, leading to land-atmosphere modeling and remote sensing that clearly mark a path to advance valley fever epidemiology, surveillance and risk avoidance.

  15. Radiative transfer modeling of dust-coated Pancam calibration target materials: Laboratory visible/near-infrared spectrogoniometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Sohl-Dickstein, J.; Grundy, W.M.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J.F.; Christensen, P.R.; Graff, T.; Guinness, E.A.; Kinch, K.; Morris, Robert; Shepard, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory visible/near-infrared multispectral observations of Mars Exploration Rover Pancam calibration target materials coated with different thicknesses of Mars spectral analog dust were acquired under variable illumination