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Sample records for dutch intensive care

  1. Prevalence and incidence of severe sepsis in Dutch intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    van Gestel, Aukje; Bakker, Jan; Veraart, Christiaan PWM; van Hout, Ben A

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Severe sepsis is a dreaded consequence of infection and necessitates intensive care treatment. Severe sepsis has a profound impact on mortality and on hospital costs, but recent incidence data from The Netherlands are not available. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence and incidence of severe sepsis occurring during the first 24 hours of admission in Dutch intensive care units (ICUs). Methods Forty-seven ICUs in The Netherlands participated in a point prevalence survey and included patients with infection at the time of ICU admission. Clinical symptoms of severe sepsis during the first 24 hours of each patient's ICU stay were recorded and the prevalence of severe sepsis was calculated. Then, the annual incidence of severe sepsis in The Netherlands was estimated, based on the prevalence, the estimated length of stay, and the capacity of the participating ICUs relative to the national intensive care capacity. Results The participating ICUs had 442 beds available for admissions, which was estimated to be 42% of the national ICU capacity. At the time of the survey, 455 patients were currently admitted and 151 were included in the analysis; 134 (29.5%) patients met criteria for severe sepsis. The most common failing organ system was the respiratory system (90%), and most patients were admitted following surgery (37%) and were admitted because of acute infection (62%). The most prevalent source of infection was the lung (47%). The estimated duration of ICU stay for severe sepsis patients was 13.3 ± 1.1 days. Conclusion The annual number of admissions for severe sepsis in Dutch ICUs was calculated at 8643 ± 929 cases/year, which is 0.054% of the population, 0.61% of hospital admissions and 11% of ICU admissions. PMID:15312213

  2. Intensive Care Unit Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Monks, Richard C.

    1984-01-01

    Patients who become psychotic in intensive care units are usually suffering from delirium. Underlying causes of delirium such as anxiety, sleep deprivation, sensory deprivation and overload, immobilization, an unfamiliar environment and pain, are often preventable or correctable. Early detection, investigation and treatment may prevent significant mortality and morbidity. The patient/physician relationship is one of the keystones of therapy. More severe cases may require psychopharmacological measures. The psychotic episode is quite distressing to the patient and family; an educative and supportive approach by the family physician may be quite helpful in patient rehabilitation. PMID:21279016

  3. Humidification in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Joynt, G M; Lipman, J

    1994-03-01

    The normal physiological function of the upper respiratory tract is to filter and humidify inspired air. In intensive care units the upper respiratory tract is frequently bypassed. The importance of humidifying and warming the dry, cold, piped gas is well documented. The results of lack of adequate humidification include endotracheal tube obstruction, impairment of the mucociliary elevator and altered pulmonary function. Optimal levels of humidification are as yet undefined and useful clinical markers of adequate humidification are not available. As a result there is a bewildering array of humidification devices available at present, the most recent of which are heat and moisture exchangers with or without specific filtration properties. This article reviews available data on these humidification devices, and recommends an approach to their appropriate use, based on the probable physiological needs of individual patients.

  4. Intensive Care, Intense Conflict: A Balanced Approach.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Erin Talati; Kolaitis, Irini N

    2015-01-01

    Caring for a child in a pediatric intensive care unit is emotionally and physically challenging and often leads to conflict. Skilled mediators may not always be available to aid in conflict resolution. Careproviders at all levels of training are responsible for managing difficult conversations with families and can often prevent escalation of conflict. Bioethics mediators have acknowledged the important contribution of mediation training in improving clinicians' skills in conflict management. Familiarizing careproviders with basic mediation techniques is an important step towards preventing escalation of conflict. While training in effective communication is crucial, a sense of fairness and justice that may only come with the introduction of a skilled, neutral third party is equally important. For intense conflict, we advocate for early recognition, comfort, and preparedness through training of clinicians in de-escalation and optimal communication, along with the use of more formally trained third-party mediators, as required.

  5. Choices in Dutch health care: mixing strategies and responsibilities.

    PubMed

    van der Grinten, T E; Kasdorp, J P

    1999-12-01

    In the light of experience that choices in health care appear to be not so much hindered by a lack of insight into how choices should be made in theory, as uncertainty as to how choices could be made in practice, this paper sets out to deepen our insight into the dynamics of health care policy making within the concrete socio-economic and political context. The paper examines how Dutch policy-makers have dealt with the priority issue in health care over the past 10 years by means of a gradual incremental approach. In this approach, use is made of a mix of strategies and shared responsibilities, with an important role for the actors at the meso and the micro levels; while at the same time, the government has not abandoned the tried and trusted policy of national rationing (i.e. keeping the production capacity limited and setting a ceiling on production in order to resist the pressure on the public system of Dutch health care). Looking at the declining percentage of Gross National Product assigned to health care annually, the broad accessibility and the good overall quality of Dutch health care, it may be concluded that the issue of choice has not come off badly under this mixed approach. The degree to which the system can respond adequately to likely developments, such as a recession, worsening waiting lists, further liberalisation (i.e. the application of market forces in health care) and, by way of extension, the ongoing integration of 'Europe' is questioned.

  6. Cultural Perspectives on Peer Conflicts in Multicultural Dutch Child Care Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rourou, Amina; Singer, Elly; Bekkema, Nienke; De Haan, Dorian

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a study of cultural perspectives on peer conflicts in multicultural child care centres. On the level of child behaviour we did not find differences between native Dutch. Moroccan-Dutch and Antillean-Dutch children with regard to occurrence, duration and actions to solve peer conflicts. On the level of mother' opinions…

  7. Contracting for intensive care services.

    PubMed

    Dorman, S

    1996-01-01

    Purchasers will increasingly expect clinical services in the NHS internal market to provide objective measures of their benefits and cost effectiveness in order to maintain or develop current funding levels. There is limited scientific evidence to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of intensive care services in terms of mortality/morbidity. Intensive care is a high-cost service and studies of cost-effectiveness need to take account of case-mix variations, differences in admission and discharge policies, and other differences between units. Decisions over development or rationalisation of intensive care services should be based on proper outcome studies of well defined patient groups. The purchasing function itself requires development in order to support effective contracting. PMID:9873335

  8. Rationing and competition in the Dutch health-care system.

    PubMed

    Schut, Frederik T; Van de Ven, Wynand P M M

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we examine the goals and effects of health-care policy in the Netherlands over the period 1980--2000. During this period Dutch health-care policy is marked by a peculiar combination of increasingly stringent cost-containment policies alongside a persistent pursuit of market-oriented reforms. The main goal of cost containment was to keep labour costs down under the restriction of universal equal access to health care. Supply and price control policies were quite successful in achieving cost containment, but in due course prolonged quantity rationing began to jeopardise universal physical access to health services. The main goal of market-oriented health-care reforms is to increase the system's efficiency and its responsiveness to patient's needs, while maintaining equal access. The feasibility of the reforms crucially hinges on the realisation of adequate methods of risk adjustment, product classification and quality measurement, an appropriate consumer information system and an effective competition policy. Realising these preconditions requires a lengthy and cautious implementation process. Although considerable progress has been made in setting the appropriate stage for regulated competition in Dutch health care, the role of the market is still limited. PMID:16161190

  9. A change of direction in the Dutch health care system?

    PubMed

    Lapré, R M

    1988-08-01

    The Dutch health care system seems to be undergoing a clear change of direction. The publication of the Report of the Committee of the Structure and Financing of the Health Care System is a prominent document which marks the emergence of a new trend. After an analysis of the characteristics of the Dutch health care system in the periods 1960-1975 and 1975-1985, an account is given of the most important proposals of the committee. The proposals clearly alter the trend towards more governmental involvement. They envisage a more market-oriented approach and freedom of operation while at the same time paying attention to aspects such as solidarity and social justice. The Committee's suggestions include the introduction of a basic insurance scheme for every citizen with a coverage determined by law, and in addition a voluntary supplementary insurance scheme in which the insured can decide what coverage he requires and that the insurer is obliged to accept him. The fact that there is a certain amount of agreement, at least over the direction that the strategy for change should take, justifies the expectation that many of the committee's proposals will be implemented. PMID:10288395

  10. [Family care for Moluccan ans Dutch elderly persons: a comparative study of readiness and expectations].

    PubMed

    Stevens, F C; ten Have, M L; Philipsen, H; Serpenti, L; Elmas, T

    1994-10-01

    Care expectations of Moluccan and Dutch elderly (n = 48), and the willingness of their children (n = 25) to provide care are explored. It appeared, that Moluccan elderly received more family care than the Dutch comparison group. Moluccan children were considered to be responsible for the care of the elderly as well as for arranging additional care. Dutch elder persons stressed that they didn't want to become a 'burden' to their children, and were more willing to call in professional help. However, all elderly persons were reluctant concerning the involvement of professional care. Dutch elder persons stressed their loss of independency. For Moluccan elderly, professional care did not fit in with their traditional (care) beliefs. In general, Moluccan children were more willing to provide care than Dutch children. However, many of them expected problems in combining family life, a job and the care of their parents. In this respect opinions of Moluccan and Dutch children were more alike than those of their parents. PMID:7974640

  11. Intensive Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Victoria A.; Walsh, Joan; Rudolf, Matthew; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell

    2007-01-01

    Context: Although critical access hospitals (CAHs) have limitations on number of acute care beds and average length of stay, some of them provide intensive care unit (ICU) services. Purpose: To describe the facilities, equipment, and staffing used by CAHs for intensive care, the types of patients receiving ICU care, and the perceived impact of…

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Madden, Kevin; Wolfe, Joanne; Collura, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    The chronicity of illness that afflicts children in Pediatric Palliative Care and the medical technology that has improved their lifespan and quality of life make prognostication extremely difficult. The uncertainty of prognostication and the available medical technologies make both the neonatal intensive care unit and the pediatric intensive care unit locations where many children will receive Pediatric Palliative Care. Health care providers in the neonatal intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care unit should integrate fundamental Pediatric Palliative Care principles into their everyday practice. PMID:26333755

  13. A new intensive care worksheet.

    PubMed

    Gurman, G; Steiner, Z; Kriemerman, S

    1988-01-01

    This article presents a new manual daily worksheet for recording data on a patient's status in an Intensive Care Unit. It permits a rapid view of the whole picture of the patient's condition at a certain hour since the system of recording is based on the time an event happened. Only one single page is used for each day. Space is provided for essential data, ventilatory parameters, laboratory results, fluid balance, drug therapy and special treatments. Attended staff, invited consultants as well as nurses add written notes which complete the picture provided by numbers. It does not replace the computerized interpretation, statistical analysis or storage of data, but it comes as an easy-to-use daily tool at the bedside.

  14. The Dutch Techcentre for Life Sciences: Enabling data-intensive life science research in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Eijssen, Lars; Evelo, Chris; Kok, Ruben; Mons, Barend; Hooft, Rob

    2015-01-01

    We describe the Data programme of the Dutch Techcentre for Life Sciences (DTL, www.dtls.nl). DTL is a new national organisation in scientific research that facilitates life scientists with technologies and technological expertise in an era where new projects often are data-intensive, multi-disciplinary, and multi-site. It is run as a lean not-for-profit organisation with research organisations (both academic and industrial) as paying members. The small staff of the organisation undertakes a variety of tasks that are necessary to perform or support modern academic research, but that are not easily undertaken in a purely academic setting. DTL Data takes care of such tasks related to data stewardship, facilitating exchange of knowledge and expertise, and brokering access to e-infrastructure. DTL also represents the Netherlands in ELIXIR, the European infrastructure for life science data. The organisation is still being fine-tuned and this will continue over time, as it is crucial for this kind of organisation to adapt to a constantly changing environment. However, already being underway for several years, our experiences can benefit researchers in other fields or other countries setting up similar initiatives.

  15. The Dutch Techcentre for Life Sciences: Enabling data-intensive life science research in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Eijssen, Lars; Evelo, Chris; Kok, Ruben; Mons, Barend; Hooft, Rob

    2016-01-01

    We describe the Data programme of the Dutch Techcentre for Life Sciences (DTL, www.dtls.nl). DTL is a new national organisation in scientific research that facilitates life scientists with technologies and technological expertise in an era where new projects often are data-intensive, multi-disciplinary, and multi-site. It is run as a lean not-for-profit organisation with research organisations (both academic and industrial) as paying members. The small staff of the organisation undertakes a variety of tasks that are necessary to perform or support modern academic research, but that are not easily undertaken in a purely academic setting. DTL Data takes care of such tasks related to data stewardship, facilitating exchange of knowledge and expertise, and brokering access to e-infrastructure. DTL also represents the Netherlands in ELIXIR, the European infrastructure for life science data. The organisation is still being fine-tuned and this will continue over time, as it is crucial for this kind of organisation to adapt to a constantly changing environment. However, already being underway for several years, our experiences can benefit researchers in other fields or other countries setting up similar initiatives. PMID:26913186

  16. [Treating pain in paediatric intensive care].

    PubMed

    Abderrahamn, Nadia; Beck, Nathalie; Fazilleau, Laura; Langlois, Claudette

    2014-01-01

    Pain is extremely present in paediatric intensive care units. It is caused both by the care procedures and by the pathology itself. Its assessment is essential and is based on scales adapted to the child.Treatment methods, pharmacological or not, depend on the type of pain and its intensity.

  17. Relationship-based care in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Faber, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    At St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center in Paterson, New Jersey, implementation of the Relationship-Based Care (RBC) model of care delivery and enculturation of the philosophy of care embodied in Jean Watson's Theory of Human Caring (Watson, 2007) improved patient outcomes and supported quality nursing care across the continuum of care in our organization. The ability of staff nurses to create an atmosphere of professional inquiry that places patients and families at the center of practice supported implementation of RBC in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

  18. Participation and coordination in Dutch health care policy-making. A network analysis of the system of intermediate organizations in Dutch health care.

    PubMed

    Lamping, Antonie J; Raab, Jörg; Kenis, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    This study explores the system of intermediate organizations in Dutch health care as the crucial system to understand health care policy-making in the Netherlands. We argue that the Dutch health care system can be understood as a system consisting of distinct but inter-related policy domains. In this study, we analyze four such policy domains: Finances, quality of care, manpower planning and pharmaceuticals. With the help of network analytic techniques, we describe how this highly differentiated system of >200 intermediate organizations is structured and coordinated and what (policy) consequences can be observed with regard to its particular structure and coordination mechanisms. We further analyze the extent to which this system of intermediate organizations enables participation of stakeholders in policy-making using network visualization tools. The results indicate that coordination between the different policy domains within the health care sector takes place not as one would expect through governmental agencies, but through representative organizations such as the representative organizations of the (general) hospitals, the health care consumers and the employers' association. We further conclude that the system allows as well as denies a large number of potential participants access to the policy-making process. As a consequence, the representation of interests is not necessarily balanced, which in turn affects health care policy. We find that the interests of the Dutch health care consumers are well accommodated with the national umbrella organization NPCF in the lead. However, this is no safeguard for the overall community values of good health care since, for example, the interests of the public health sector are likely to be marginalized.

  19. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  20. [Intensive care, a department where relational care counts].

    PubMed

    Novosad, Julien

    2016-03-01

    The intensive care unit is a department where the seriousness of the patients' condition requires a high level of technical skill. It is also a place where professionals need to demonstrate relational care in their practice. A nurse shares her experience of what she describes as an extremely rewarding role. PMID:26944645

  1. Intensive care unit nurses' opinions about euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Kumaş, Gülşah; Oztunç, Gürsel; Nazan Alparslan, Z

    2007-09-01

    This study was conducted to gain opinions about euthanasia from nurses who work in intensive care units. The research was planned as a descriptive study and conducted with 186 nurses who worked in intensive care units in a university hospital, a public hospital, and a private not-for-profit hospital in Adana, Turkey, and who agreed to complete a questionnaire. Euthanasia is not legal in Turkey. One third (33.9%) of the nurses supported the legalization of euthanasia, whereas 39.8% did not. In some specific circumstances, 44.1% of the nurses thought that euthanasia was being practiced in our country. The most significant finding was that these Turkish intensive care unit nurses did not overwhelmingly support the legalization of euthanasia. Those who did support it were inclined to agree with passive rather than active euthanasia (P = 0.011).

  2. A data model for intensive care.

    PubMed

    Leaning, M S; Yates, C E; Patterson, D L; Ambroso, C; Collinson, P O; Kalli, S T

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a model of clinical management data in a typical general intensive care unit, intended as a generic database specification for advanced intensive care computer systems. The data model was developed as part of the INFORM project. The INFORM project is summarised and the relevance of the data model to the objectives of the project are discussed. An object oriented extension to the entity relationship diagram methodology is presented. The methodology is illustrated with reference to some specific aspects of the data model including: the principle clinical entities; classification of patient state related data and the homogeneous patient group system. It is suggested that such a model will contribute to the better understanding of the data in the system, to the better design of future intensive care computer systems and to the setting of standards for medical data.

  3. [Coagulation disorders in the intensive care station].

    PubMed

    Hart, C; Spannagl, M

    2014-05-01

    Coagulation disorders are frequently encountered in the intensive care unit (ICU) and are challenging due to a variety of potential etiologies. Critically ill patients with coagulation abnormalities may present with an increased risk of bleeding, show coagulation activation resulting in thromboembolism, or have no specific symptoms. Hemostatic abnormalities observed in ICU patients range from isolated thrombocytopenia or prolonged global clotting tests to complex and life-threatening coagulation defects. Successful management of coagulation disorders requires prompt and accurate identification of the underlying cause. This review describes the most frequently occurring diagnoses found in intensive care patients with thrombocytopenia and coagulation test abnormalities and summarizes appropriate diagnostic interventions and current approaches to differential diagnosis.

  4. Preventing delirium in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Brummel, Nathan E; Girard, Timothy D

    2013-01-01

    Delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) is exceedingly common, and risk factors for delirium among the critically ill are nearly ubiquitous. Addressing modifiable risk factors including sedation management, deliriogenic medications, immobility, and sleep disruption can help to prevent and reduce the duration of this deadly syndrome. The ABCDE approach to critical care is a bundled approach that clinicians can implement for many patients treated in their ICUs to prevent the adverse outcomes associated with delirium and critical illness.

  5. Trends in Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care.

    PubMed

    Maree, Carin; Downes, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Family-centered care in neonatal intensive care changed over the last decades. Initially, parents and infants were separated and parents were even being blamed for cau-sing infections in their infants. The importance, though, of the parents being the constant in the infant's life emerged and with that the importance of early bonding and attachment for the parents to take on their role and responsibi-lities as primary caregivers. Facilitation of family-centered care includes involving the parents in daily care activities, kangaroo care, developmental care, interaction and communication with the infant, as well as involving grandparents and siblings. Implementation of family-centered care requires appropriate policies, facilities and resources, education of all involved, and a positive attitude. PMID:27465463

  6. Neonatal intensive care in the home.

    PubMed

    Sudia-Robinson, T M

    1998-12-01

    As the trend toward early discharge and home care of medically fragile neonates continues, parents find themselves thrust into a lifestyle for which they are unprepared. They must quickly adjust to a new daily routine and new home environment. They watch as part of their home is transformed into a mini intensive care unit with the kind of high-tech equipment and supplies once exclusively reserved for hospital settings. Parents also must learn to live with limited privacy because home care nurses and other providers become a visible presence and a daily reminder that their lives have been forever altered. PMID:10030204

  7. Ethics in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) is the most common place to die. Also, ethical conflicts among stakeholders occur frequently in the ICU. Thus, ICU clinicians should be competent in all aspects for ethical decision-making. Major sources of conflicts are behavioral issues, such as verbal abuse or poor communication between physicians and nurses, and end-of-life care issues including a lack of respect for the patient's autonomy. The ethical conflicts are significantly associated with the job strain and burn-out syndrome of healthcare workers, and consequently, may threaten the quality of care. To improve the quality of care, handling ethical conflicts properly is emerging as a vital and more comprehensive area. The ICU physicians themselves need to be more sensitive to behavioral conflicts and enable shared decision making in end-of-life care. At the same time, the institutions and administrators should develop their processes to find and resolve common ethical problems in their ICUs. PMID:26175769

  8. Behavioral assessment for pediatric intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, M F; Bessman, C A; Parker, L H; Pearson, J E; Rogers, M C

    1979-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to analyze behaviors of staff and patients on a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). In the first study, behavioral observation procedures were employed to assess patient state, physical position, affect, verbal behaviors, visual attention and activity engagement, and staff verbal behavior. On the average, one-third of the patients were judged to be conscious and alert but markedly nonengaged with their environment. In the second study, a member of the hospital staff provided alert patients with individual activities to determine whether a simple environmental manipulation could positively affect behavior of children in intensive care. Employing a reversal design, the activity intervention was found to increase attention and engagement and positive affect, and to decrease inappropriate behavior. Both studies demonstrate that behavioral assessment procedures can provide an empirical basis for designing PICU routines affecting children's psychosocial status, and, thus, complement current procedures designed to provide quality medical care.

  9. The use of long-term care services by the Dutch elderly.

    PubMed

    Portrait, F; Lindeboom, M; Deeg, D

    2000-09-01

    The main focus of this paper is the development of an appropriate framework to characterize the process of long-term care utilization by the Dutch elderly. Three broad categories of care services are considered, namely, informal care, formal care at home, and institutional care. The use of these care alternatives is modelled jointly, and stochastic dependence is allowed between the various care options. Special attention is given to the concept of health status and to the potential endogeneity of this variable in the model. We apply a flexible non-parametric method to summarize the multidimensional concept of health status into a limited set of interpretable indices. The model is applied on the Longitudinal Ageing Study Amsterdam (LASA). We find strong effects of health status, gender, socio-economic variables, and prices on the utilization of long-term care services.

  10. Prosodic marking, pitch and intensity in spontaneous lexical self-repair in dutch.

    PubMed

    Plug, Leendert; Carter, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results of a phonetic analysis of instances of lexical self-repair drawn from a corpus of spontaneous Dutch speech. The analysis addresses questions concerning the phonetic details of prosodic marking in self-repair and its conditioning factors. In particular, it examines the relevance of semantic, temporal and frequency-related factors in modelling f0 and intensity measures and auditory judgements of whether repairs are prosodically marked. It addresses the extent to which observations made in studies using experimentally-elicited speech can be expected to generalise to repairs drawn from uncontrolled spontaneous speech. The results suggest that prosodic marking is rare in spontaneous lexical self-repair, and that semantic, temporal and frequency factors play a limited role only in conditioning speakers' choices for or against prosodic marking, although several weak tendencies can be observed. PMID:24281064

  11. Negotiating natural death in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Seymour, J E

    2000-10-01

    Recent empirical evidence of barriers to palliative care in acute hospital settings shows that dying patients may receive invasive medical treatments immediately before death, in spite of evidence of their poor prognosis being available to clinicians. The difficulties of ascertaining treatment preferences, predicting the trajectory of dying in critically ill people, and assessing the degree to which further interventions are futile are well documented. Further, enduring ethical complexities attending end of life care mean that the process of withdrawing or withholding medical care is associated with significant problems for clinical staff. Specific difficulties attend the legitimation of treatment withdrawal, the perceived differences between 'killing' and 'letting die' and the cultural constraints which attend the orchestration of 'natural' death in situations where human agency is often required before death can follow dying. This paper draws on ethnographic research to examine the way in which these problems are resolved during medical work within intensive care. Building on insights from the literature, an analysis of observational case study data is presented which suggests that the negotiation of natural death in intensive care hinges upon four strategies. These, which form a framework with which to interpret social interaction between physicians during end of life decision-making in intensive care, are as follows: firstly, the establishment of a 'technical' definition of dying--informed by results of investigations and monitoring equipment--over and above 'bodily' dying informed by clinical experience. Secondly, the alignment of the trajectories of technical and bodily dying to ensure that the events of non-treatment have no perceived causative link to death. Thirdly, the balancing of medical action with non-action, allowing a diffusion of responsibility for death to the patient's body; and lastly, the incorporation of patient's companions and nursing staff

  12. Staff empowerment in Finnish intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Suominen, T; Leino-Kilpi, H; Merja, M; Doran, D I; Puukka, P

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe staff empowerment in Finnish intensive care units. The data were collected with a questionnaire comprising demographic background and empowerment items. The concept of empowerment was divided into three components: behavioural, verbal and outcome empowerment. The questionnaire was sent to all registered nurses at Finnish intensive care units (ICUs). Eight hundred and fourteen replied, giving a response rate of 77%. The ICU nurses demonstrated confidence in their own skills and competencies, although least so in the domain of outcome empowerment. Experience of behavioural, verbal and outcome empowerment increased linearly with age. The length of nursing experience was positively associated with behavioural, verbal and outcome empowerment. Experience in ICU nursing correlated positively with verbal and outcome empowerment. Motivation, job satisfaction, respect of job autonomy and the fact that the job of ICU nurses commanded respect in society were associated with behavioural, verbal, and outcome empowerment.

  13. Dutch perspectives on palliative care in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Almagor, Raphael

    2002-01-01

    This study reports data gathered via extensive interviews with some of the leading authorities on the euthanasia policy that were conducted in the Netherlands. They were asked: It has been argued that the policy and practice of euthanasia in the Netherlands is the result of undeveloped palliative care. What do you think? I also mentioned the fact that there are only a few hospices in the Netherlands. The responses were different and contradictory. Many interviewees agreed with the statement. Almost all of those agreeing with it said that only during the late 1990s were people beginning to admit that there was a need to improve palliative care. Some interviewees insisted that doctors first need to explore other options for helping the patient prior to choosing the course of euthanasia. Other interviewees thought that palliative care is well developed in the Netherlands and that euthanasia has actually paved the way for calling more attention to palliative care. PMID:12479156

  14. Intensive nursing care of kwashiorkor in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Manary, M J; Brewster, D R

    2000-02-01

    The case fatality rate for children with kwashiorkor in central hospitals in Malawi was 30.5% (275/901) in 1995. The purpose of this study was to determine whether improved case management with intensive nursing care could lower this case fatality rate. A total of 75 children admitted with kwashiorkor in Blantyre, Malawi, received intensive nursing care. This included nursing in individual clean beds with blankets, a nurse:child ratio of 1:3, supervised feedings every 2 h, a paediatrician with expertise in treating kwashiorkor always available for consultation, laboratory evaluation for systemic infection and empiric use of ceftriaxone. Nineteen of these children died (25%). The causes of death were life threatening electrolyte abnormalities (hypokalaemia, hyponatraemia, hypophosphataemia) in nine cases, overwhelming infection in eight cases and congestive heart failure in two children. Children infected with the human immunodeficiency virus were more likely to die (9/20), as were children with life threatening electrolyte abnormalities (9/15) and children with more severe wasting. When compared with 225 children treated in the same year at the same institution, who were carefully matched for severity of kwashiorkor, intensive nursing did not improve overall survival.

  15. Patient and Provider Perspectives on HIV and HIV-Related Stigma in Dutch Health Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sicking, Lenneke; Brands, Ronald; Baas, Ineke; Roberts, Hilde; van Brakel, Wim H.; Lechner, Lilian; Kok, Gerjo; Bos, Arjan E. R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Ensuring that people living with HIV (PLWH) feel accepted in health care settings is imperative. This mixed methods study explored the perspectives of PLWH and health professionals on their interactions. A total of 262 predominantly gay men of Dutch origin participated in a survey study of possible negative interactions with health professionals, and semi-structured interviews were subsequently conducted with 22 PLWH and 14 health professionals. Again, most PLWH were gay men of Dutch origin. All health professionals were Dutch. PLWH reported negative experiences with health professionals including awkward interactions, irrelevant questions, rude treatment, blame, pity, excessive or differential precautions, care refusal, unnecessary referrals, delayed treatment, poor support, and confidentiality breaches. They also reported positive experiences including equal treatment, being valued as a partner in one's health, social support provision, and confidentiality assurances. Health professionals reported having little experience with PLWH and only basic knowledge of HIV. They contended that PLWH are treated equally and that HIV is no longer stigmatized, but also reported fear of occupational infection, resulting in differential precautions. Additionally, they conveyed labeling PLWH's files to warn others, and curiosity regarding how patients acquired HIV. The findings suggest that there is a gap in perception between PLWH and health professionals regarding the extent to which negative interactions occur, and that these interactions should be improved. Implications for stigma reduction and care optimization are discussed. PMID:25459231

  16. [Intensive care. The means and the ends].

    PubMed

    Gherardi, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Medical technology applied to acute and severely ill patients allowed for the emergence of a differentiated area of care and the development of intensive care units. The means available to replace or assist vital organs' functions determined this crucial advance of high technology medicine in the last forty years. However, actual application of these methods in this case, life-sustaining therapy is not free from the technological imperative influencing all our contemporary culture. This pervasive influence adversely affects the chances to permanently remember the ends of medicine, which are not to avoid death or to consider life as the supreme value irrespectively of the patients' preferences. Final decisions in irreversible situations, where only a life in vegetative condition is possible, are to be taken by doctors and family members. PMID:22167733

  17. Rehabilitation in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Rochester, Carolyn L

    2009-12-01

    Critical illness has many devastating sequelae, including profound neuromuscular weakness and psychological and cognitive disturbances that frequently result in long-term functional impairments. Early rehabilitation begun in the intensive care unit (ICU) is emerging as an important strategy both to prevent and to treat ICU-acquired weakness, in an effort to facilitate and improve long-term recovery. Rehabilitation may begin with range of motion and bed mobility exercise, then may progress when the patient is fully alert and able to participate actively to include sitting and posture-based exercise, bed to chair transfers, strength and endurance exercises, and ambulation. Electrical muscle stimulation and inspiratory muscle training are additional techniques that may be employed. Studies conducted to date suggest that such ICU-based rehabilitation is feasible, safe, and effective for carefully selected patients. Further research is needed to identify the optimal patient candidates and procedures and for providing rehabilitation in the ICU.

  18. Ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Xin-Xin; Wang, Xin-Ling

    2016-01-01

    On one hand, advances in neonatal care and rescue technology allow for the healthy survival or prolonged survival time of critically ill newborns who, in the past, would have been non-viable. On the other hand, many of the surviving critically ill infants have serious long-term disabilities. If an infant eventually cannot survive or is likely to suffer severe disability after surviving, ethical issues in the treatment process are inevitable, and this problem arises not only in developed countries but is also becoming increasingly prominent in developing countries. In addition, ethical concerns cannot be avoided in medical research. This review article introduces basic ethical guidelines that should be followed in clinical practice, including respecting the autonomy of the parents, giving priority to the best interests of the infant, the principle of doing no harm, and consent and the right to be informed. Furthermore, the major ethical concerns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in China are briefly introduced.

  19. Pediatric Intensive Care Unit rounding improvements

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Kirsten; Albert, Elaine; Johnsen, Andrew; Newhouse, Courtney; McGuire, John

    2016-01-01

    Medical rounds in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) took about four hours each day to complete. The length of rounds was affecting the advancement of care of the patients, the engagement of sub-specialty providers who needed to be present on other rounds, and the engagement of the PICU faculty and staff due to overburdening waste created by the long duration of rounds. Specific interventions were identified aimed at reducing the duration of rounds each day, increasing engagement of the rounding team and satisfying the needs of the patients and families. Post-improvement results were that rounding times were reduced to two hours each day and were pre-scheduled for families, the burden of excess work was lifted for attending physicians, and the presentation expectations during rounds were specified by role. Quality and safety were improved through standard work and auditing. PMID:27752320

  20. Role of music in intensive care medicine

    PubMed Central

    Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The role of music in intensive care medicine is still unclear. However, it is well known that music may not only improve quality of life but also effect changes in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). Reactions to music are considered subjective, but studies suggest that cardio/cerebrovascular variables are influenced under different circumstances. It has been shown that cerebral flow was significantly lower when listening to “Va pensioero” from Verdi's “Nabucco” (70.4+3.3 cm/s) compared to “Libiam nei lieti calici” from Verdi's “La Traviata” (70.2+3.1 cm/s) (P<0,02) or Bach's Cantata No. 169 “Gott soll allein mein Herze haben” (70.9+2.9 cm/s) (P<0,02). There was no significant influence on cerebral flow in Beethoven's Ninth Symphony during rest (67.6+3.3 cm/s) or music (69.4+3.1 cm/s). It was reported that relaxing music plays an important role in intensive care medicine. Music significantly decreases the level of anxiety for patients in a preoperative setting (STAI-X-1 score 34) to a greater extent even than orally administered midazolam (STAI-X-1 score 36) (P<0.001). In addition, the score was better after surgery in the music group (STAI-X-1 score 30) compared to midazolam (STAI-X-1 score 34) (P<0.001). Higher effectiveness and absence of apparent adverse effects make relaxing, preoperative music a useful alternative to midazolam. In addition, there is sufficient practical evidence of stress reduction suggesting that a proposed regimen of listening to music while resting in bed after open-heart surgery is important in clinical use. After 30 min of bed rest, there was a significant difference in cortisol levels between the music (484.4 mmol/l) and the non-music group (618.8 mmol/l) (P<0.02). Vocal and orchestral music produces significantly better correlations between cardiovascular and respiratory signals in contrast to uniform emphasis (P<0.05). The most benefit on health in intensive care medicine patients is visible in

  1. Role of music in intensive care medicine.

    PubMed

    Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The role of music in intensive care medicine is still unclear. However, it is well known that music may not only improve quality of life but also effect changes in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). Reactions to music are considered subjective, but studies suggest that cardio/cerebrovascular variables are influenced under different circumstances. It has been shown that cerebral flow was significantly lower when listening to "Va pensioero" from Verdi's "Nabucco" (70.4+3.3 cm/s) compared to "Libiam nei lieti calici" from Verdi's "La Traviata" (70.2+3.1 cm/s) (P<0,02) or Bach's Cantata No. 169 "Gott soll allein mein Herze haben" (70.9+2.9 cm/s) (P<0,02). There was no significant influence on cerebral flow in Beethoven's Ninth Symphony during rest (67.6+3.3 cm/s) or music (69.4+3.1 cm/s). It was reported that relaxing music plays an important role in intensive care medicine. Music significantly decreases the level of anxiety for patients in a preoperative setting (STAI-X-1 score 34) to a greater extent even than orally administered midazolam (STAI-X-1 score 36) (P<0.001). In addition, the score was better after surgery in the music group (STAI-X-1 score 30) compared to midazolam (STAI-X-1 score 34) (P<0.001). Higher effectiveness and absence of apparent adverse effects make relaxing, preoperative music a useful alternative to midazolam. In addition, there is sufficient practical evidence of stress reduction suggesting that a proposed regimen of listening to music while resting in bed after open-heart surgery is important in clinical use. After 30 min of bed rest, there was a significant difference in cortisol levels between the music (484.4 mmol/l) and the non-music group (618.8 mmol/l) (P<0.02). Vocal and orchestral music produces significantly better correlations between cardiovascular and respiratory signals in contrast to uniform emphasis (P<0.05). The most benefit on health in intensive care medicine patients is visible in classical (Bach, Mozart or

  2. A randomised trial of the effect and cost-effectiveness of early intensive multifactorial therapy on 5-year cardiovascular outcomes in individuals with screen-detected type 2 diabetes: the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen-Detected Diabetes in Primary Care (ADDITION-Europe) study.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Rebecca K; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Lauritzen, Torsten; Rutten, Guy Ehm; Sandbæk, Annelli; van den Donk, Maureen; Black, James A; Tao, Libo; Wilson, Edward Cf; Davies, Melanie J; Khunti, Kamlesh; Sharp, Stephen J; Wareham, Nicholas J; Griffin, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intensive treatment (IT) of cardiovascular risk factors can halve mortality among people with established type 2 diabetes but the effects of treatment earlier in the disease trajectory are uncertain. OBJECTIVE To quantify the cost-effectiveness of intensive multifactorial treatment of screen-detected diabetes. DESIGN Pragmatic, multicentre, cluster-randomised, parallel-group trial. SETTING Three hundred and forty-three general practices in Denmark, the Netherlands, and Cambridge and Leicester, UK. PARTICIPANTS Individuals aged 40-69 years with screen-detected diabetes. INTERVENTIONS Screening plus routine care (RC) according to national guidelines or IT comprising screening and promotion of target-driven intensive management (medication and promotion of healthy lifestyles) of hyperglycaemia, blood pressure and cholesterol. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary end point was a composite of first cardiovascular event (cardiovascular mortality/morbidity, revascularisation and non-traumatic amputation) during a mean [standard deviation (SD)] follow-up of 5.3 (1.6) years. Secondary end points were (1) all-cause mortality; (2) microvascular outcomes (kidney function, retinopathy and peripheral neuropathy); and (3) patient-reported outcomes (health status, well-being, quality of life, treatment satisfaction). Economic analyses estimated mean costs (UK 2009/10 prices) and quality-adjusted life-years from an NHS perspective. We extrapolated data to 30 years using the UK Prospective Diabetes Study outcomes model [version 1.3; (©) Isis Innovation Ltd 2010; see www.dtu.ox.ac.uk/outcomesmodel (accessed 27 January 2016)]. RESULTS We included 3055 (RC, n = 1377; IT, n = 1678) of the 3057 recruited patients [mean (SD) age 60.3 (6.9) years] in intention-to-treat analyses. Prescription of glucose-lowering, antihypertensive and lipid-lowering medication increased in both groups, more so in the IT group than in the RC group. There were clinically important improvements

  3. A randomised trial of the effect and cost-effectiveness of early intensive multifactorial therapy on 5-year cardiovascular outcomes in individuals with screen-detected type 2 diabetes: the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen-Detected Diabetes in Primary Care (ADDITION-Europe) study.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Rebecca K; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Lauritzen, Torsten; Rutten, Guy Ehm; Sandbæk, Annelli; van den Donk, Maureen; Black, James A; Tao, Libo; Wilson, Edward Cf; Davies, Melanie J; Khunti, Kamlesh; Sharp, Stephen J; Wareham, Nicholas J; Griffin, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intensive treatment (IT) of cardiovascular risk factors can halve mortality among people with established type 2 diabetes but the effects of treatment earlier in the disease trajectory are uncertain. OBJECTIVE To quantify the cost-effectiveness of intensive multifactorial treatment of screen-detected diabetes. DESIGN Pragmatic, multicentre, cluster-randomised, parallel-group trial. SETTING Three hundred and forty-three general practices in Denmark, the Netherlands, and Cambridge and Leicester, UK. PARTICIPANTS Individuals aged 40-69 years with screen-detected diabetes. INTERVENTIONS Screening plus routine care (RC) according to national guidelines or IT comprising screening and promotion of target-driven intensive management (medication and promotion of healthy lifestyles) of hyperglycaemia, blood pressure and cholesterol. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary end point was a composite of first cardiovascular event (cardiovascular mortality/morbidity, revascularisation and non-traumatic amputation) during a mean [standard deviation (SD)] follow-up of 5.3 (1.6) years. Secondary end points were (1) all-cause mortality; (2) microvascular outcomes (kidney function, retinopathy and peripheral neuropathy); and (3) patient-reported outcomes (health status, well-being, quality of life, treatment satisfaction). Economic analyses estimated mean costs (UK 2009/10 prices) and quality-adjusted life-years from an NHS perspective. We extrapolated data to 30 years using the UK Prospective Diabetes Study outcomes model [version 1.3; (©) Isis Innovation Ltd 2010; see www.dtu.ox.ac.uk/outcomesmodel (accessed 27 January 2016)]. RESULTS We included 3055 (RC, n = 1377; IT, n = 1678) of the 3057 recruited patients [mean (SD) age 60.3 (6.9) years] in intention-to-treat analyses. Prescription of glucose-lowering, antihypertensive and lipid-lowering medication increased in both groups, more so in the IT group than in the RC group. There were clinically important improvements

  4. Cardiovascular Health and Related Health Care Use of Moluccan-Dutch Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Studies regularly show a higher incidence, prevalence and mortality of cardiovascular disease among immigrant groups from low-income countries. Despite residing in the Netherlands for over 60 years, the Moluccan-Dutch cardiovascular disease profile and health care use are still unknown. We aimed to compare (a) the clinical prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and (b) the use of health care services by cardiovascular disease patients of 5,532 Moluccan-Dutch to an age-sex matched control group of 55,320 native Dutch. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data of the Achmea health insurance company for the period of 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010. We collected information on health care use, including diagnostic information. Linear and logistic regression models were used for comparison. Results Moluccans had a higher clinical prevalence of ischemic heart diseases (odds ratio 1.26; 95% confidence interval 1.03–1.56), but tended to have a lower prevalence of cerebrovascular accidents (0.79; 0.56–1.11) and cardiac failure (0.67; 0.44–1.03). The clinical prevalence of cardiovascular diseases together tended to be lower among Moluccans (0.90; 0.80–1.00). Consultation of medical specialists did not differ. Angiotensin II inhibitors (1.42; 1.09–1.84), antiplatelet agents (1.27; 1.01–1.59) and statins (1.27; 1.00–1.60) were prescribed more frequently to Moluccans, as were cardiovascular agents in general (1.27; 0.94–1.71). Conclusion The experience of Moluccans in the Netherlands suggests that, in the long run, cardiovascular risk and related health care use of ethnic minority groups may converge towards that of the majority population. PMID:26393795

  5. Prevalence and characteristics of moral case deliberation in Dutch health care.

    PubMed

    Dauwerse, Linda; Stolper, Margreet; Widdershoven, Guy; Molewijk, Bert

    2014-08-01

    The attention for Moral case deliberation (MCD) has increased over the past years. Previous research on MCD is often written from the perspective of MCD experts or MCD participants and we lack a more distant view to the role of MCD in Dutch health care institutions in general. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the state of the art concerning MCD in the Netherlands. As part of a larger national study on clinical ethics support in the Netherlands, we will focus on the prevalence and characteristics of MCD in Dutch health. A mixed methods design was used in which we combined two survey questionnaires (sent to all health care institutions), two focus groups and 17 individual interviews with top managers or ethics support staff. The findings demonstrate that the prevalence of MCD is relatively high in Dutch health care (44 % has MCD), especially in mental health care (in which MCD is mentioned as present in the organization by 62 % of the respondents). Institutions with MCD differ from institutions without MCD concerning size, kind of problems and importance of ideological background. Characteristic of MCD is that it often exists for 3 years or more, has a high participation of health professionals and middle managers and is both organized scheduled as unscheduled. As well integration in existing policy as key persons emerge as important issues in relation to the positioning of MCD. We conclude that MCD is a part of an integrated ethics policy and serves as a (bottom up) catalyst for such an integrated ethics policy.

  6. Hyperbaric intensive care technology and equipment.

    PubMed

    Millar, Ian L

    2015-03-01

    In an emergency, life support can be provided during recompression or hyperbaric oxygen therapy using very basic equipment, provided the equipment is hyperbaric-compatible and the clinicians have appropriate experience. For hyperbaric critical care to be provided safely on a routine basis, however, a great deal of preparation and specific equipment is needed, and relatively few facilities have optimal capabilities at present. The type, size and location of the chamber are very influential factors. Although monoplace chamber critical care is possible, it involves special adaptations and inherent limitations that make it inappropriate for all but specifically experienced teams. A large, purpose-designed chamber co-located with an intensive care unit is ideal. Keeping the critically ill patient on their normal bed significantly improves quality of care where this is possible. The latest hyperbaric ventilators have resolved many of the issues normally associated with hyperbaric ventilation, but at significant cost. Multi-parameter monitoring is relatively simple with advanced portable monitors, or preferably installed units that are of the same type as used elsewhere in the hospital. Whilst end-tidal CO₂ readings are changed by pressure and require interpretation, most other parameters display normally. All normal infusions can be continued, with several examples of syringe drivers and infusion pumps shown to function essentially normally at pressure. Techniques exist for continuous suction drainage and most other aspects of standard critical care. At present, the most complex life support technologies such as haemofiltration, cardiac assist devices and extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation remain incompatible with the hyperbaric environment. PMID:25964040

  7. Hyperbaric intensive care technology and equipment.

    PubMed

    Millar, Ian L

    2015-03-01

    In an emergency, life support can be provided during recompression or hyperbaric oxygen therapy using very basic equipment, provided the equipment is hyperbaric-compatible and the clinicians have appropriate experience. For hyperbaric critical care to be provided safely on a routine basis, however, a great deal of preparation and specific equipment is needed, and relatively few facilities have optimal capabilities at present. The type, size and location of the chamber are very influential factors. Although monoplace chamber critical care is possible, it involves special adaptations and inherent limitations that make it inappropriate for all but specifically experienced teams. A large, purpose-designed chamber co-located with an intensive care unit is ideal. Keeping the critically ill patient on their normal bed significantly improves quality of care where this is possible. The latest hyperbaric ventilators have resolved many of the issues normally associated with hyperbaric ventilation, but at significant cost. Multi-parameter monitoring is relatively simple with advanced portable monitors, or preferably installed units that are of the same type as used elsewhere in the hospital. Whilst end-tidal CO₂ readings are changed by pressure and require interpretation, most other parameters display normally. All normal infusions can be continued, with several examples of syringe drivers and infusion pumps shown to function essentially normally at pressure. Techniques exist for continuous suction drainage and most other aspects of standard critical care. At present, the most complex life support technologies such as haemofiltration, cardiac assist devices and extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation remain incompatible with the hyperbaric environment.

  8. Data privacy considerations in Intensive Care Grids.

    PubMed

    Luna, Jesus; Dikaiakos, Marios D; Kyprianou, Theodoros; Bilas, Angelos; Marazakis, Manolis

    2008-01-01

    Novel eHealth systems are being designed to provide a citizen-centered health system, however the even demanding need for computing and data resources has required the adoption of Grid technologies. In most of the cases, this novel Health Grid requires not only conveying patient's personal data through public networks, but also storing it into shared resources out of the hospital premises. These features introduce new security concerns, in particular related with privacy. In this paper we survey current legal and technological approaches that have been taken to protect a patient's personal data into eHealth systems, with a particular focus in Intensive Care Grids. However, thanks to a security analysis applied over the Intensive Care Grid system (ICGrid) we show that these security mechanisms are not enough to provide a comprehensive solution, mainly because the data-at-rest is still vulnerable to attacks coming from untrusted Storage Elements where an attacker may directly access them. To cope with these issues, we propose a new privacy-oriented protocol which uses a combination of encryption and fragmentation to improve data's assurance while keeping compatibility with current legislations and Health Grid security mechanisms.

  9. Creating the animated intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jesse B

    2010-10-01

    for control of pain that may accompany critical illness, it is now possible to block the peripheral actions of these medications with the μ-receptor antagonist methylnaltrexone. Other new drugs being introduced into the critical care unit such as dexmedetomidine may also provide a greater ability to achieve analgesia and anxiolysis without some of the adverse concomitant effects seen with more traditional drug regimens. The ultimate goal of this multipronged program to facilitate the maintenance of patients who are more interactive with their care providers, and the life support provided in the intensive care unit would be to speed the pace of recovery and to diminish the need for the protracted rehabilitation that often follows survival from critical illness.

  10. Rehabilitation starts in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Rozeboom, Nathan; Parenteau, Kathy; Carratturo, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Each year between 10 000 and 12 000 spinal cord injuries occur in the United States. Once injured, many of these patients will receive a portion of their care in an intensive care unit (ICU), where their treatment will begin. Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, Washington, provides comprehensive care to approximately 60 to 70 cervical spinal cord injuries each year. Because of many factors such as hemodynamic instability, pulmonary complications, and risk of infection, patients with cervical spinal cord injuries can spend up to 2 or more weeks in the ICU before they transfer to a rehabilitation unit. To achieve optimal outcomes, it is imperative that members of the interdisciplinary team work together in a consistent, goal-oriented, collaborative manner. This team includes physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, physical and occupational therapists, speech pathologists, dieticians, and rehabilitation psychologists. An individual plan is developed for each patient and rehabilitation starts in the ICU as soon as the patient is medically stable. This article will highlight the management strategies used in the neuroscience ICU at Harborview Medical Center and will include a case study as an example of the typical experience for our patients with high cervical cord injury.

  11. The Intensity of Intensive Care: A Patient’s Narrative

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Alida; Drenth, Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study involved action research to explore one woman’s narrative of awareness, emotions and thoughts during treatment in an intensive care unit (ICU). The overarching aim is to increase insight into the thoughts, feelings and bio-psychosocial needs of the patient receiving treatment in ICU. Data was collected by means of narrative discourse analysis. Literature on the psychosocial and spiritual implications of ICU treatment is limited, and often patients have no recall of their treatment in an ICU at all. Documenting the illness narrative of this individual case is valuable as the participant could recall a certain amount of awareness, thoughts and emotions. These experiences included delirium, anxiety, helplessness, frustration and uncertainty. Once sedation was decreased, the patient’s consciousness increased and she was confronted with thoughts and emotions that were unrealistic and frightening. It was found in this study that the opportunity to share a narrative on the emotions and awareness during treatment in an ICU had cathartic value and the participant suffered little symptoms of post traumatic stress syndrome, often associated with long term treatment in an ICU. Further research on this topic is necessary to improve ICU treatment, not only on a physical level, but with emphasis on the psychosocial and spiritual needs of the patient. PMID:22980374

  12. Factors that influence the provision of sexual health care by Dutch cancer nurses.

    PubMed

    Gamel, C; Hengeveld, M W; Davis, B; Van der Tweel, I

    1995-06-01

    A descriptive-correlational design was used with a sample of Dutch cancer nurses (n = 104) to describe provision of sexual health care (SHC) and to explore influential factors. This report is limited to the second goal. The Theory of Reasoned Action provided the conceptual framework for investigation of five previously identified factors and one unexplored factor. Knowledge, comfort, attitude (towards sexuality) and subjective norm were significantly related with provision of SHC. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that knowledge and comfort were significant explanatory variables, accounting for 37% of the variance. PMID:7665318

  13. [Dutch Health Care Inspectorate (IGZ) abuses its inspection authority in patient files].

    PubMed

    van Lessen Kloeke, Koosje

    2014-01-01

    For its investigation regarding the transfer of data after discharge of vulnerable elderly patients from hospital to nursing homes, care homes or home care, the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate (IGZ) demands access to patients' files, without their explicit consent. Doctors who do not cooperate run the risk of penalty payments. Since it concerns a limited number of patients per practice, it would not be unreasonably onerous for the Inspectorate to allow doctors to ask their patients' consent. Other reasons mentioned by the Inspectorate, such as possible "inappropriate correction" of data and the capability of vulnerable elderly patients to give their consent seem improper grounds to breach patients' right to privacy and to demand that doctors breach professional confidentiality. The legality of the Inspectorate's actions could be addressed in a test case and should be discussed more widely in light of the Inspectorate's work plan for 2014. PMID:24893819

  14. [Dutch Health Care Inspectorate (IGZ) abuses its inspection authority in patient files].

    PubMed

    van Lessen Kloeke, Koosje

    2014-01-01

    For its investigation regarding the transfer of data after discharge of vulnerable elderly patients from hospital to nursing homes, care homes or home care, the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate (IGZ) demands access to patients' files, without their explicit consent. Doctors who do not cooperate run the risk of penalty payments. Since it concerns a limited number of patients per practice, it would not be unreasonably onerous for the Inspectorate to allow doctors to ask their patients' consent. Other reasons mentioned by the Inspectorate, such as possible "inappropriate correction" of data and the capability of vulnerable elderly patients to give their consent seem improper grounds to breach patients' right to privacy and to demand that doctors breach professional confidentiality. The legality of the Inspectorate's actions could be addressed in a test case and should be discussed more widely in light of the Inspectorate's work plan for 2014.

  15. [Nosocomial infections in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Rafael; Ramírez, Paula; López-Pueyo, María Jesús

    2014-05-01

    Nosocomial infections (NI) still have a high incidence in intensive care units (ICUs), and are becoming one of the most important problems in these units. It is well known that these infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients, and are associated with increases in the length of stay and excessive hospital costs. Based on the data from the ENVIN-UCI study, the rates and aetiology of the main nosocomial infections have been described, and include ventilator-associated pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and both primary and catheter related bloodstream infections, as well as the incidence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. A literature review on the impact of different nosocomial infections in critically ill patients is also presented. Infection control programs such as zero bacteraemia and pneumonia have been also analysed, and show a significant decrease in NI rates in ICUs.

  16. Instruments for monitoring intensive care unit sedation

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Genís

    2000-01-01

    Although many promising objective methods (measuring systems) are available, there are no truly validated instruments for monitoring intensive care unit (ICU) sedation. Auditory evoked potentials can be used only for research in patients with a deep level of sedation. Other measuring systems require further development and validation to be useful in the ICU. Continuing research will provide an objective system to improve the monitoring and controlling of this essential treatment for ICU patients. Subjective methods (scoring systems) that are based on clinical observation have proven their usefulness in guiding sedative therapy. The Glasgow Coma Score modified by Cook and Palma (GCSC) achieves good face validity and reliability, which assures its clinical utility for routine practice and research. Other scales, in particular the Ramsay Scale, can be recommended preferably for clinical use. An accurate use of available instruments can improve the sedative treatment that we deliver to our patients. PMID:11094504

  17. Sleep in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Margaret A; Friese, Randall S; Gehlbach, Brian K; Schwab, Richard J; Weinhouse, Gerald L; Jones, Shirley F

    2015-04-01

    Sleep is an important physiologic process, and lack of sleep is associated with a host of adverse outcomes. Basic and clinical research has documented the important role circadian rhythm plays in biologic function. Critical illness is a time of extreme vulnerability for patients, and the important role sleep may play in recovery for intensive care unit (ICU) patients is just beginning to be explored. This concise clinical review focuses on the current state of research examining sleep in critical illness. We discuss sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities that occur in ICU patients and the challenges to measuring alterations in circadian rhythm in critical illness and review methods to measure sleep in the ICU, including polysomnography, actigraphy, and questionnaires. We discuss data on the impact of potentially modifiable disruptors to patient sleep, such as noise, light, and patient care activities, and report on potential methods to improve sleep in the setting of critical illness. Finally, we review the latest literature on sleep disturbances that persist or develop after critical illness.

  18. Choosing to limit choice: Self-binding directives in Dutch mental health care.

    PubMed

    Berghmans, Ron; van der Zanden, Marja

    2012-01-01

    In certain cases of chronic mental illness (for example bipolar disorder) a self-binding directive or Ulysses contract may be a helpful intervention to prevent harm to the person him- or herself and/or others. By choosing such an arrangement, the patient can indicate when and how mental health professionals may intervene against his or her will and provide indicated care which may lead to an improvement of the patient's mental condition. In the Netherlands, since 2008 the Compulsory Admissions Act has been amended and now includes a paragraph on self-binding. Starting from the Dutch debate and statutory regulation of self-binding in mental health care, a number of issues with broader relevance are discussed, particularly as these pertain to the legal regulation and juridification of self-binding. It is argued that too many detailed rules are a threat to increasing patient empowerment. PMID:22142895

  19. The governance of quality management in dutch health care: new developments and strategic challenges.

    PubMed

    Maarse, J A M; Ruwaard, D; Spreeuwenberg, C

    2013-01-01

    This article gives a brief sketch of quality management in Dutch health care. Our focus is upon the governance of guideline development and quality measurement. Governance is conceptualized as the structure and process of steering of quality management. The governance structure of guideline development in the Netherlands can be conceptualized as a network without central coordination. Much depends upon the self-initiative of stakeholders. A similar picture can be found in quality measurement. Special attention is given to the development of care standards for chronic disease. Care standards have a broader scope than guidelines and take an explicit patient perspective. They not only contain evidence-based and up-to-date guidelines for the care pathway but also contain standards for self-management. Furthermore, they comprise a set of indicators for measuring the quality of care of the entire pathway covered by the standard. The final part of the article discusses the mission, tasks and strategic challenges of the newly established National Health Care Institute (Zorginstituut Nederland), which is scheduled to be operative in 2013.

  20. Intensive care management of organophosphate insecticide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Sungur, Murat; Güven, Muhammed

    2001-01-01

    Introduction Organophosphate (OP) insecticides inhibit both cholinesterase and pseudo-cholinesterase activities. The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase causes accumulation of acetylcholine at synapses, and overstimulation of neurotransmission occurs as a result of this accumulation. The mortality rate of OP poisoning is high. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is often life saving. Treatment of OP poisoning consists of intravenous atropine and oximes. The clinical course of OP poisoning may be quite severe and may need intensive care management. We report our experience with the intensive care management of serious OP insecticide poisonings. Methods A retrospective study was performed on the patients with OP poisoning followed at our medical intensive care unit. Forty-seven patients were included. Diagnosis was performed from the history taken either from the patient or from the patient's relatives about the agent involved in the exposure. Diagnosis could not be confirmed with serum and red blood cell anticholinesterase levels because these are not performed at our institution. Intravenous atropine and pralidoxime was administered as soon as possible. Pralidoxime could not be given to 16 patients: 2 patients did not receive pralidoxime because they were late admissions and 14 did not receive pralidoxime because the Ministry of Health office was out of stock. Other measures for the treatment were gastric lavage and administration of activated charcoal via nasogastric tube, and cleansing the patient's body with soap and water. The patients were intubated and mechanically ventilated if the patients had respiratory failure, a depressed level of consciousness, which causes an inability to protect the airway, and hemodynamic instability. Mechanical ventilation was performed as synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation + pressure support mode, either as volume or pressure control. Positive end expiratory pressure was titrated to keep SaO2 above 94% with 40

  1. Factors Affecting Intensive Care Units Nursing Workload

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ravangard, Ramin; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Mosavi, Seyed Masod; Gholami Fesharaki, Mohammad; Mehrabian, Fardin

    2014-01-01

    Background: The nursing workload has a close and strong association with the quality of services provided for the patients. Therefore, paying careful attention to the factors affecting nursing workload, especially those working in the intensive care units (ICUs), is very important. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the factors affecting nursing workload in the ICUs of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional and analytical-descriptive study that has done in Iran. All nurses (n = 400) who was working in the ICUs of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2014 were selected and studied using census method. The required data were collected using a researcher–made questionnaire which its validity and reliability were confirmed through getting the opinions of experts and using composite reliability and internal consistency (α = 0.89). The collected data were analyzed through exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and using SPSS 18.0 and AMOS 18.0. Results: Twenty-five factors were divided into three major categories through EFA, including structure, process, and activity. The following factors among the structure, process and activity components had the greatest importance: lack of clear responsibilities and authorities and performing unnecessary tasks (by a coefficient of 0.709), mismatch between the capacity of wards and the number of patients (by a coefficient of 0.639), and helping the students and newly employed staff (by a coefficient of 0.589). Conclusions: The nursing workload is influenced by many factors. The clear responsibilities and authorities of nurses, patients' admission according to the capacity of wards, use of the new technologies and equipment, and providing basic training for new nurses can decrease the workload of nurses. PMID:25389493

  2. Neonatal intensive care: satisfaction measured from a parent's perspective.

    PubMed

    Conner, J M; Nelson, E C

    1999-01-01

    Health care systems today are complex, technically proficient, competitive, and market-driven. One outcome of this environment is the recent phenomenon in the health care field of "consumerism." Strong emphasis is placed on customer service, with organized efforts to understand, measure, and meet the needs of customers served. The purpose of this article is to describe the current understanding and measurement of parent needs and expectations with neonatal intensive care services from the time the expectant parents enter the health care system for the birth through the discharge process and follow-up care. Through literature review, 11 dimensions of care were identified as important to parents whose infants received neonatal intensive care: assurance, caring, communication, consistent information, education, environment, follow-up care, pain management, participation, proximity, and support. Five parent satisfaction questionnaires-the Parent Feedback Questionnaire, Neonatal Index of Parent Satisfaction, Inpatient Parent Satisfaction-Children's Hospital Minneapolis, Picker Institute-Inpatient Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Survey, and the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit-Parent Satisfaction Form-are critically reviewed for their ability to measure parent satisfaction within the framework of the neonatal care delivery process. An immense gap was found in our understanding about what matters most and when to parents going through the neonatal intensive care experience. Additional research is required to develop comprehensive parent satisfaction surveys that measure parent perceptions of neonatal care within the framework of the care delivery process. PMID:9917476

  3. Tissue oximetry in anaesthesia and intensive care.

    PubMed

    Biedrzycka, Aleksandra; Lango, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    Conventional monitoring during surgery and intensive care is not sufficiently sensitive to detect acute changes in vital organs perfusion, while its good quality is critical for maintaining their function. Disturbed vital organ perfusion may lead to the development of postoperative complications, including neurological sequel and renal failure. Near-infra-red spectroscopy (NIRS) represents one of up-to-date techniques of patient monitoring which is commonly used for the assessment of brain oximetry in thoracic aorta surgery, and - increasingly more often -in open-heart surgery. Algorithms for maintaining adequate brain saturation may result in a decrease of neurological complications and cognitive dysfunction following cardiac surgery. The assessment of kidney and visceral perfusion with tissue oximetry is gaining increasing interest during pediatric cardiac surgery. Attempts at decreasing complications by the use of brain oximetry during carotid endarterectomy, as well as thoracic and abdominal surgery demonstrated conflicting results. In recent years NIRS technique was proposed as a tool for muscle perfusion assessment under short term ischemia and reperfusion, referred to as vascular occlusion test (VOT). This monitoring extension allows for the identification of early disturbances in tissue perfusion. Results of recent studies utilizing VOT suggest that the muscle saturation decrease rate is reduced in septic shock patients, while decreased speed of saturation recovery on reperfusion is related to disturbed microcirculation. Being non-invasive and feasible technique, NIRS offers an improvement of preoperative risk assessment in cardiac surgery and promises more comprehensive intraoperative and ICU patient monitoring allowing for better outcome. PMID:26966109

  4. The craft of intensive care medicine.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Simon

    2013-06-01

    The practice of medicine is often represented as a dualism: is medicine a 'science' or an 'art'? This dualism has been long-lasting, with evident appeal for the medical profession. It also appears to have been rhetorically powerful, for example in enabling clinicians to resist the encroachment of 'scientific' evidence-based medicine into core areas of medical work such as individual clinical judgement. In this article I want to make the case for a more valid conceptualisation of medical practice: that it is a 'craft' activity. The case I make is founded on a theoretical synthesis of the concept of craft, combined with an analysis of ethnographic observations of routine medical practice in intensive care. For this context the craft aspects of medical work can be seen in how biomedical and other types of knowledge are used in practice, the embodied skills and practical judgement of practitioners and the technological and material environment. These aspects are brought together in two conceptual dimensions for 'craft': first, the application of knowledge; second, interaction with the material world. Some practical and political implications of a 'craft' metaphor for medical practice are noted.

  5. Antimicrobial therapy in neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Tzialla, Chryssoula; Borghesi, Alessandro; Serra, Gregorio; Stronati, Mauro; Corsello, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Severe infections represent the main cause of neonatal mortality accounting for more than one million neonatal deaths worldwide every year. Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed medications in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and in industrialized countries about 1% of neonates are exposed to antibiotic therapy. Sepsis has often nonspecific signs and symptoms and empiric antimicrobial therapy is promptly initiated in high risk of sepsis or symptomatic infants. However continued use of empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment in the setting of negative cultures especially in preterm infants may not be harmless.The benefits of antibiotic therapy when indicated are clearly enormous, but the continued use of antibiotics without any microbiological justification is dangerous and only leads to adverse events. The purpose of this review is to highlight the inappropriate use of antibiotics in the NICUs, to exam the impact of antibiotic treatment in preterm infants with negative cultures and to summarize existing knowledge regarding the appropriate choice of antimicrobial agents and optimal duration of therapy in neonates with suspected or culture-proven sepsis in order to prevent serious consequences. PMID:25887621

  6. Probiotics in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Lee E; Gogineni, Vijaya; Malesker, Mark A

    2012-04-01

    Probiotics are living microorganisms that, when ingested in adequate amounts, provide benefits to the host. The benefits include either a shortened duration of infections or decreased susceptibility to pathogens. Proposed mechanisms of beneficial effects include improving gastrointestinal barrier function, modification of the gut flora by inducing host cell antimicrobial peptides and/or local release of probiotic antimicrobial factors, competition for epithelial adherence, and immunomodulation. With increasing intensive care unit (ICU) antibacterial resistance rates and fewer new antibiotics in the research pipeline, focus has been shifted to non-antibiotic approaches for the prevention and treatment of nosocomial infections. Probiotics offer promise to ICU patients for the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile infections, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Our current understanding of probiotics is confounded by inconsistency in probiotic strains studied, optimal dosages, study durations, and suboptimal sample sizes. Although probiotics are generally safe in the critically ill, adverse event monitoring must be rigorous in these vulnerable patients. Delineation of clinical differences of various effective probiotic strains, their mechanisms of action, and optimal dosing regimens will better establish the role of probiotics in various disorders. However, probiotic research will likely be hindered in the future given a recent ruling by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  7. Infection control in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Chudleigh, J; Fletcher, M; Gould, D

    2005-10-01

    Healthcare-associated infection is a major problem in acute hospital settings. Hand decontamination is considered to be the most effective means of preventing healthcare-associated infection, but is poorly performed. Few studies have examined technique, which may be important in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) where clinical procedures are intricate and could result in contamination of many areas of the hand, resulting in cross-infection. This study examined technique in six NICUs. Eighty-eight nurses were observed. A scoring system was developed so that technique could be quantified and subjected to statistical testing. The mean score was 6.29 out of 11 when hands were washed and 3.87 out of 7 when alcohol hand rub was used, indicating that performance was not optimal. Scores for technique were not significantly different in each NICU. Senior nurses achieved higher scores for handwashing (P<0.01), as did nurses holding positive feelings about the atmosphere in their NICU (P=0.04). Junior nurses scored less well on a knowledge questionnaire than senior nurses (P<0.01). Nurses who had been employed in the neonatal unit for less than one year also scored less well (P<0.01). Differences in technique were noted when comparing the beginning and end of long shifts. These differences were not noted at the beginning and end of standard shifts.

  8. A new patient registration method for intensive care department management.

    PubMed

    Van Aken, P; Bossaert, L; Gilot, C; Tielemans, L

    1987-01-01

    A new method to describe intensive care department performance is presented. The method is a complication of available administrative and medical data, completed with a severity of illness measure (Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation, APACHE) and the registration of nursing care intensity. The development of this latter patient stratification system (Intensive Care Activity Score, INCAS) is described. The performance of the method is demonstrated by a study of 200 consecutive admissions.

  9. The role of neurosciences intensive care in neurological conditions.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Ahmed-Ramadan; Damian, Maxwell; Eynon, C Andy

    2013-10-01

    The neurosciences intensive care unit provides specialized medical and nursing care to both the neurosurgical and neurological patient. This second of two articles describes the role it plays in the management of patients with neurological conditions.

  10. Using Patient Experiences on Dutch Social Media to Supervise Health Care Services: Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, Lucien JLPG; Verhoef, Lise M; van der Weide, Marian JA; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Kool, Rudolf B

    2015-01-01

    Background Social media has become mainstream and a growing number of people use it to share health care-related experiences, for example on health care rating sites. These users’ experiences and ratings on social media seem to be associated with quality of care. Therefore, information shared by citizens on social media could be of additional value for supervising the quality and safety of health care services by regulatory bodies, thereby stimulating participation by consumers. Objective The objective of the study was to identify the added value of social media for two types of supervision by the Dutch Healthcare Inspectorate (DHI), which is the regulatory body charged with supervising the quality and safety of health care services in the Netherlands. These were (1) supervision in response to incidents reported by individuals, and (2) risk-based supervision. Methods We performed an exploratory study in cooperation with the DHI and searched different social media sources such as Twitter, Facebook, and healthcare rating sites to find additional information for these incidents and topics, from five different sectors. Supervision experts determined the added value for each individual result found, making use of pre-developed scales. Results Searches in social media resulted in relevant information for six of 40 incidents studied and provided relevant additional information in 72 of 116 cases in risk-based supervision of long-term elderly care. Conclusions The results showed that social media could be used to include the patient’s perspective in supervision. However, it appeared that the rating site ZorgkaartNederland was the only source that provided information that was of additional value for the DHI, while other sources such as forums and social networks like Twitter and Facebook did not result in additional information. This information could be of importance for health care inspectorates, particularly for its enforcement by risk-based supervision in care of

  11. Ten-Year Time Trends in Emotional and Behavioral Problems of Dutch Children Referred for Youth Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veerman, Jan Willem; De Meyer, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Emotional and behavioral problems assessed with the "Child Behavior Checklist" (CBCL) were analyzed from 2,739 Dutch children referred to Families First (FF) or Intensive Family Treatment (IFT) from 1999 to 2008, to examine time trends. From the year 2004 onward, six of the eight CBCL-syndrome scales yielded significant decreases from the…

  12. Procedure Intensity and the Cost of Care

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Serene I.; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Kim, Nancy; Strait, Kelly M.; Li, Shu-Xia; Safavi, Kyan C.; Lindenauer, Peter K.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Lagu, Tara

    2012-01-01

    Background Costs of care in high-procedure hospitals may be related to factors beyond procedures. We sought to determine how costs for patients with heart failure (HF) not receiving procedures compare between hospital groups defined by their overall use of procedures. Methods and Results We identified all 2009–2010 adult HF hospitalizations in hospitals capable of performing invasive procedures that had at least 25 HF hospitalizations in the Perspective® database from Premier, Inc. We divided hospitals into 2 groups by the proportion of HF patients receiving invasive percutaneous or surgical procedures: low (>0–10%) and high (at least 10%). The standard costs of hospitalizations at each hospital were risk adjusted using patient demographics and comorbidities. We used the Wilcoxon Rank Sum test to assess cost, length of stay, and mortality outcome differences between the 2 groups. Median risk-standardized standard costs among low-procedural HF hospitalizations were $5,259 ($4,683, $6,814) versus $6,965 ($5,981, $8,235) for hospitals with high procedure use (p<0.001). Median length of stay was 4 days for both groups. Risk-standardized mortality rates were 5.4% (low-procedure) and 5.0% (high-procedure) (p=0.009). We did not identify any single service area that explained the difference in costs between hospital groups, but these hospitals had higher costs for most service areas. Conclusion Among patients who do not receive invasive procedures, the cost of HF hospitalization is higher in more procedure-intense hospitals compared with hospitals that perform fewer procedures. PMID:22576844

  13. Muscle Atrophy in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koukourikos, Konstantinos; Tsaloglidou, Areti; Kourkouta, Labrini

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The muscle atrophy is one of the most important and frequent problems observed in patients in Intensive Care Units. The term describes the disorder in the structure and in the function of the muscle while incidence rates range from 25-90 % in patients with prolonged hospitalization. Purpose: This is a review containing all data related to the issue of muscle atrophy and is especially referred to its causes and risk factors. The importance of early diagnosis and early mobilization are also highlighted in the study. Material and methods: a literature review was performed on valid databases such as Scopus, PubMed, Cinhal for the period 2000-2013 in English language. The following keywords were used: loss of muscle mass, ICU patients, immobilization, bed rest. Results: From the review is concluded that bed rest and immobilization in order to reduce total energy costs, are the main causes for the appearance of the problem. The results of the reduction of the muscle mass mainly affect the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory system. The administration of the cortisone, the immobility, the sepsis and hyperglycemia are included in the risk factors. The prevention is the primary therapeutic agent and this is achieved due to the early mobilization of the patients, the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and the avoidance of exposure to risk factors. Conclusions: The prevention of muscle atrophy is a primary goal of treatment for the patients in the ICU, because it reduces the incidence of the disease, reduces the time spent in ICU and finally improves the quality of patients’ life. PMID:25684851

  14. Inpatient Transfers to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael P; Gooder, Valerie J; McBride, Karen; James, Brent; Fisher, Elliott S

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine if delayed transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU) after physiologic deterioration is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. DESIGN Inception cohort. SETTING Community hospital in Ogden, Utah. PATIENTS Ninety-one consecutive inpatients with noncardiac diagnoses at the time of emergent transfer to the ICU. We determined the time when each patient first met any of 11 pre-specified physiologic criteria. We classified patients as “slow transfer” when patients met a physiologic criterion 4 or more hours before transfer to the ICU. Patients were followed until discharge. INTERVENTIONS None. MEASUREMENTS In-hospital mortality, functional status at hospital discharge, hospital resources. MAIN RESULTS At the time when the first physiologic criterion was met on the ward, slow- and rapid-transfer patients were similar in terms of age, gender, diagnosis, number of days in hospital prior to ICU transfer, prehospital functional status, and APACHE II scores. By the time slow-transfer patients were admitted to the ICU, they had significantly higher APACHE II scores (21.7 vs 16.2; P = .002) and were more likely to die in-hospital (41% vs 11%; relative risk [RR], 3.5; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.4 to 9.5). Slow-transfer patients were less likely to have had their physician notified of deterioration within 2 hours of meeting physiologic criteria (59% vs 31%; P = .001) and less likely to have had a bedside physician evaluation within the first 3 hours after meeting criteria (23% vs 83%; P = .001). CONCLUSIONS Slow transfer to the ICU of physiologically defined high-risk hospitalized patients was associated with increased risk of death. Slow response to physiologic deterioration may explain these findings. PMID:12542581

  15. Glutamine Supplementation in Intensive Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Oldani, Massimo; Sandini, Marta; Nespoli, Luca; Coppola, Sara; Bernasconi, Davide Paolo; Gianotti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The role of glutamine (GLN) supplementation in critically ill patients is controversial. Our aim was to analyze its potential effect in patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU). We performed a systematic literature review through Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Scopus, Ovid, ISI Web of Science, and the Cochrane-Controlled Trials Register searching for randomized clinical trials (RCTs) published from 1983 to 2014 and comparing GLN supplementation to no supplementation in patients admitted to ICU. A random-effect meta-analysis for each outcome (hospital and ICU mortality and rate of infections) of interest was carried out. The effect size was estimated by the risk ratio (RR). Thirty RCTs were analyzed with a total of 3696 patients, 1825 (49.4%) receiving GLN and 1859 (50.6%) no GLN (control groups). Hospital mortality rate was 27.6% in the GLN patients and 28.6% in controls with an RR of 0.93 (95% CI = 0.81–1.07; P = 0.325, I2 = 10.7%). ICU mortality was 18.0 % in the patients receiving GLN and 17.6% in controls with an RR of 1.01 (95% CI = 0.86–1.19; P = 0.932, I2 = 0%). The incidence of infections was 39.7% in GLN group versus 41.7% in controls. The effect of GLN was not significant (RR = 0.88; 95% CI = 0.76–1.03; P = 0.108, I2 = 56.1%). These results do not allow to recommend GLN supplementation in a generic population of critically ills. Further RCTs are needed to explore the effect of GLN in more specific cohort of patients. PMID:26252319

  16. Does the presence of oral care guidelines affect oral care delivery by intensive care unit nurses? A survey of Saudi intensive care unit nurses.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Ahmed K; Alshayiqi, Mohammed; Ramalingam, Sundar

    2014-08-01

    Mechanically ventilated patients rely on nurses for their oral care needs, signifying the importance of nurses in intensive care units (ICUs). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of oral care guidelines on the oral care delivered to mechanically ventilated patients by ICU nurses. A total of 215 nurses were enrolled. Demographic data and oral care practices were recorded through a self-administered survey. Participants governed by oral care guidelines had significantly higher oral care practice scores than their counterparts from ICUs without similar guidelines (P = .034; t = 2.13). Oral care guidelines in ICUs can contribute to reduction of morbidity and mortality caused by ventilator-associated pneumonia.

  17. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    PubMed Central

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo JE; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Baan, Caroline A; Rutten, Guy EHM

    2016-01-01

    Background More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention. Methods This before–after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization’s quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%–100%) was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients’ access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients’ interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non) parametric tests. Results Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002), and on its subdomains “access to medical files” (from 42.0% to 49.4%), and “safeguarding patients’ interests” (from 58.1% to 66.2%). Outpatient clinics, which scored higher at baseline (66.7%) than care groups, did not improve on patient-centeredness (65.6%: P=0.54) or its subdomains. “Formal patient involvement” remained low in both care groups (23.2%) and

  18. Insulin therapy in the pediatric intensive care unit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in the intensive care unit. Insulin therapy has emerged in adult intensive care units, and several pediatric studies are currently being conducted. This review discusses hyperglycemia and the effects of insulin on metabolic a...

  19. Considerations for emergencies & disasters in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Ronni; Pouletsos, Cheryl; Combs, Adriann

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines outside principles of emergency and disaster planning for neonatal intensive care units and includes resources available to organizations to support planning and education, and considerations for nurses developing hospital-specific neonatal intensive care unit disaster plans. Hospital disaster preparedness programs and unit-specific policies and procedures are essential in facilitating an effective response to major incidents or disasters, whether they are man-made or natural. All disasters place extraordinary stress on existing resources, systems, and personnel. If nurses in neonatal intensive care units work collaboratively to identify essential services in disasters, the result could be safer care for vulnerable patients.

  20. Nursing workload in public and private intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Lilia de Souza; Koike, Karina Mitie; Sardinha, Débora Souza; Padilha, Katia Grillo; de Sousa, Regina Marcia Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study sought to compare patients at public and private intensive care units according to the nursing workload and interventions provided. Methods This retrospective, comparative cohort study included 600 patients admitted to 4 intensive care units in São Paulo. The nursing workload and interventions were assessed using the Nursing Activities Score during the first and last 24 hours of the patient's stay at the intensive care unit. Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, the Mann-Whitney test, and Student's t test were used to compare the patient groups. Results The average Nursing Activities Score upon admission to the intensive care unit was 61.9, with a score of 52.8 upon discharge. Significant differences were found among the patients at public and private intensive care units relative to the average Nursing Activities Score upon admission, as well as for 12 out of 23 nursing interventions performed during the first 24 hours of stay at the intensive care units. The patients at the public intensive care units exhibited a higher average score and overall more frequent nursing interventions, with the exception of those involved in the "care of drains", "mobilization and positioning", and "intravenous hyperalimentation". The groups also differed with regard to the evolution of the Nursing Activities Score among the total case series as well as the groups of survivors from the time of admission to discharge from the intensive care unit. Conclusion Patients admitted to public and private intensive care units exhibit differences in their nursing care demands, which may help managers with nursing manpower planning. PMID:24213086

  1. Internet and Social Media For Health-Related Information and Communication in Health Care: Preferences of the Dutch General Population

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, Lucien JLPG; Berben, Sivera AA; Teerenstra, Steven; Samsom, Melvin; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2013-01-01

    Background Health care is increasingly featured by the use of Web 2.0 communication and collaborative technologies that are reshaping the way patients and professionals interact. These technologies or tools can be used for a variety of purposes: to instantly debate issues, discover news, analyze research, network with peers, crowd-source information, seek support, and provide advice. Not all tools are implemented successfully; in many cases, the nonusage attrition rates are high. Little is known about the preferences of the Dutch general population regarding the use of the Internet and social media in health care. Objective To determine the preferences of the general population in the Netherlands regarding the use of the Internet and social media in health care. Methods A cross-sectional survey was disseminated via a popular Dutch online social network. Respondents were asked where they searched for health-related information, how they qualified the value of different sources, and their preferences regarding online communication with health care providers. Results were weighed for the Dutch population based on gender, age, and level of education using official statistics. Numbers and percentages or means and standard deviations were presented for different subgroups. One-way ANOVA was used to test for statistical differences. Results The survey was completed by 635 respondents. The Internet was found to be the number one source for health-related information (82.7%), closely followed by information provided by health care professionals (71.1%). Approximately one-third (32.3%) of the Dutch population search for ratings of health care providers. The most popular information topics were side effects of medication (62.5%) and symptoms (59.7%). Approximately one-quarter of the Dutch population prefer to communicate with a health care provider via social media (25.4%), and 21.2% would like to communicate via a webcam. Conclusions The Internet is the main source of health

  2. Translating the SLIM diabetes prevention intervention into SLIMMER: implications for the Dutch primary health care.

    PubMed

    Duijzer, Geerke; Jansen, Sophia C; Haveman-Nies, Annemien; van Bruggen, Rykel; Ter Beek, Josien; Hiddink, Gerrit J; Feskens, Edith J M

    2012-04-01

    All over the world, prevalence and incidence rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus are rising rapidly. Several trials have demonstrated that prevention by lifestyle intervention is (cost-) effective. This calls for translation of these trials to primary health care. This article gives an overview of the translation of the SLIM diabetes prevention intervention to a Dutch real-life setting and discusses the role of primary health care in implementing lifestyle intervention programmes. Currently, a 1-year pilot study, consisting of a dietary and physical activity part, performed by three GPs, three practice nurses, three dieticians and four physiotherapists is being conducted. The process of translating the SLIM lifestyle intervention to regular primary health care is measured by means of the process indicators: reach, acceptability, implementation integrity, applicability and key factors for success and failure of the intervention. Data will be derived from programme records, observations, focus groups and interviews. Based on these results, our programme will be adjusted to fit the role conception of the professionals and the organization structure in which they work.

  3. Telenursing in the intensive care unit: transforming nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lisa-Mae; Hubbard, Kenneth E; Daye, Olive; Barden, Connie

    2012-12-01

    In tele-intensive care units, informatics, telecommunication technology, telenursing, and telemedicine are merged to provide expert, evidence-based, and cutting-edge services to critically ill patients. Telenursing is an emerging subspecialty in critical care that is neither well documented in the extant literature nor well understood within the profession. Documentation and quantification of telenursing interventions help to clarify the impact of the telenurse's role on nursing practice, enhancement of patient care, patient safety, and outcomes. Tele-intensive care unit nursing will continue to transform how critical care nursing is practiced by enhancing/leveraging available resources through the use of technology. PMID:23203956

  4. [The coma awakening unit, between intensive care and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Mimouni, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    After intensive care and before classic neurological rehabilitation is possible, patients in an altered state of consciousness are cared for at early stages in so-called coma awakening units. The care involves, on the one hand, the complex support of the patient's awakening from coma as a neurological and existential process, and on the other, support for their families. PMID:26365640

  5. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth.

  6. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth. PMID:17242604

  7. Stuck in the middle?: A perspective on ongoing pro-competitive reforms in Dutch mental health care.

    PubMed

    Westra, Daan; Wilbers, Gloria; Angeli, Federica

    2016-04-01

    Pro-competitive reforms have been implemented in many Western healthcare systems, of which the Netherlands is a prominent example. While the pro-competitive reforms in the Dutch specialized care sector have drawn considerable academic attention, mental health care is often excluded. However, in line with other segments of specialized care, pro-competitive legislation has formed the core of mental health care reforms, albeit with several notable differences. Ever since mental health services were included in the Health Insurance Act in 2008, the Dutch mental healthcare sector has been in an ongoing state of reform. Numerous major and minor adaptations have continuously altered the services covered by the basic insurance package, the actors responsible for providing and contracting care, and definitions and measurements of quality. Most notably, insurers and municipalities, which are responsible for selectively contracting those providers that offer high value-for-money, seem insensitive to quality aspects. The question whether the Dutch mental health sector has inherited the best or the worst of a competitive and non-competitive system lingers and international policy makers contemplating reforming their mental health sector should take note. PMID:26994866

  8. [Long-haul intensive care transports by air].

    PubMed

    Graf, Jürgen; Seiler, Olivier; Pump, Stefan; Günther, Marion; Albrecht, Roland

    2013-03-01

    The need for inter-hospital transports over long distances aboard air ambulances or airlines has increased in recent years, both in the civil as well as the military sector. More often severely ill intensive care patients with multiple organ failure and appropriate supportive care (e.g. mechanical ventilation, catecholamines, dialysis, cardiac assist devices) are transported by air. Despite the fact that long-haul intensive care transports by air ambulance and airlines via Patient Transport Compartment (PTC) are considered established modes of transport they always provide a number of challenges. Both modes of transport have distinct logistical and medical advantages and disadvantages. These-as well as the principal risks of an air-bound long-haul intensive care transport -have to be included in the risk assessment and selection of means of transport. Very often long-haul intensive care transports are a combination of air ambulance and scheduled airlines utilizing the PTC.

  9. An audit of intensive care unit recyclable waste.

    PubMed

    McGain, F; Story, D; Hendel, S

    2009-12-01

    There is little known about recyclable intensive care unit waste. We tested the hypotheses that the intensive care unit produces a small proportion (< 10%) of hospital waste, that much waste (> 30%) is recyclable and that there is little (< 10%) cross-contamination of non-infectious with infectious waste. For seven consecutive days in an Australian 10-bedded intensive care unit, we prospectively sorted all waste. The total intensive care unit waste for the week was 540 kg, representing 5% of hospital waste. Of the 401 kg of intensive care unit general waste, recyclables were 230 kg (57%; 95% CI 53-61%), mainly plastics, cardboard and paper. There were 0.4 kg of infectious cross-contamination in the 401 kg of general waste. Intensive care unit waste was a small proportion of all hospital waste. However, there was minimal infectious waste cross-contamination and almost 60% of intensive care unit general waste could be recycled with appropriate safeguards, education and training.

  10. Anaesthesia for procedures in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Chollet-Rivier, M; Chioléro, R L

    2001-08-01

    Taking in charge severely ill patients in the intensive care environment to manage complex procedures is a performance requiring highly specific knowledge. Close collaboration between anaesthetists and intensive care specialists is likely to improve the safety and quality of medical care. Three forms of anaesthetic care should be considered in clinical practice: sedation and analgesia; monitored anaesthetic care; and general anaesthesia or conduction block anaesthesia. Even in the field of sedation and analgesia, the anaesthesiologist can offer expertise on new anaesthetic techniques like: the most recent concepts of balanced anaesthesia in terms of pharmacokinetics and dynamics, favouring the use of short-acting agents and of sedative-opioid combinations. New modes of administration and monitoring intravenous anaesthesia have been developed, with potential application in the intensive care unit. These include the use of target-controlled administration of intravenous drugs, and of electroencephalographic signals to monitor the level of sedation.

  11. A conceptual framework of clinical nursing care in intensive care1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção; Apostolidis, Thémistoklis; Brandão, Marcos Antônio Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to propose a conceptual framework for clinical nursing care in intensive care. Method: descriptive and qualitative field research, carried out with 21 nurses from an intensive care unit of a federal public hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic and lexical content analysis, supported by Alceste software. Results: the characteristics of clinical intensive care emerge from the specialized knowledge of the interaction, the work context, types of patients and nurses characteristic of the intensive care and care frameworks. Conclusion: the conceptual framework of the clinic's intensive care articulates elements characteristic of the dynamics of this scenario: objective elements regarding technology and attention to equipment and subjective elements related to human interaction, specific of nursing care, countering criticism based on dehumanization. PMID:26487133

  12. Telemedicine in the intensive care unit: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Scurlock, Corey; D'Ambrosio, Carolyn

    2015-04-01

    Critical care medicine is at a crossroads in which limited numbers of staff care for increasing numbers of patients as the population ages and use of ICUs increases. Also at this time health care spending must be curbed. The high-intensity intensivist staffing model has been linked to improved mortality, complications, and costs. Tele-ICU uses technology to implement this high-intensity staffing model in areas that are relatively underserved. When implemented correctly and in the right populations this technology has improved outcomes. Future studies regarding implementation, organization, staffing, and innovation are needed to determine the optimal use of this critical care professional enhanced technology. PMID:25814449

  13. Cost-analysis of neonatal intensive and special care.

    PubMed

    Tudehope, D I; Lee, W; Harris, F; Addison, C

    1989-04-01

    In the present economic climate and with increasing expenditure on neonatal intensive care, there has been a demand for economic evaluation and justification of neonatal intensive care programmes. This study assesses the inhospital costs of neonatal intensive care. Fixed and variable costs were calculated for services and uses of an Intensive/Special Care Nursery for the year 1985 and corrected to 1987 Australian dollar equivalents. Establishing a new neonatal intensive care unit of 43 costs in an existing hospital with available floor space including operating costs for a year were estimated in Australian dollars for 1987 at $6,408,000. Daily costs per baby for each were $1282 ventilator, $481 intensive, $293 transitional and $287 recovery, respectively. The cost per survivor managed in the Intensive/Special Care Nursery in 1985 showed the expected inverse relationship to birthweight being $2400 for greater than 2500 g, $4050 for 2000-2500 g, $9200 for 1500-1999 g, $23,900 for 1000-1499 g and $63,450 for less than 1000 g. Further analysis for extremely low birthweight infants managed in 1986 and 1987 demonstrated costs per survivor of $128,400 for infants less than 800 g birthweight and $43,950 for those 800-999 g. This methodology might serve as a basis for further accounting and cost-evaluation exercises.

  14. Patient stress in intensive care: comparison between a coronary care unit and a general postoperative unit

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Douglas de Sá; Resende, Mariane Vanessa; Diniz, Gisele do Carmo Leite Machado

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare stressors identified by patients of a coronary intensive care unit with those perceived by patients of a general postoperative intensive care unit. Methods This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted in the coronary intensive care and general postoperative intensive care units of a private hospital. In total, 60 patients participated in the study, 30 in each intensive care unit. The stressor scale was used in the intensive care units to identify the stressors. The mean score of each item of the scale was calculated followed by the total stress score. The differences between groups were considered significant when p < 0.05. Results The mean ages of patients were 55.63 ± 13.58 years in the coronary intensive care unit and 53.60 ± 17.47 years in the general postoperative intensive care unit. For patients in the coronary intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “being bored”. For patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “not being able to communicate”. The mean total stress scores were 104.20 ± 30.95 in the coronary intensive care unit and 116.66 ± 23.72 (p = 0.085) in the general postoperative intensive care unit. When each stressor was compared separately, significant differences were noted only between three items. “Having nurses constantly doing things around your bed” was more stressful to the patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit than to those in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.013). Conversely, “hearing unfamiliar sounds and noises” and “hearing people talk about you” were the most stressful items for the patients in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.046 and 0.005, respectively). Conclusion The perception of major stressors and the total stress score were similar between patients

  15. [Intensive dietary advice program in primary care].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Robles, Raquel; Gea-Lázaro, María Lourdes

    2012-01-01

    A sedentary lifestyle and inappropriate eating habits are the main causes of major diseases (cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, and certain types of cancers), as well as a high morbidity and mortality. The Dietary Advice program was designed by the Andalusian Health Department to promote healthy habits (i.e. physical exercise and a balanced diet) to prevent secondary diseases. This program is organised in two phases: Basic Dietary Advice and Intensive Dietary Advice. This paper aims to describe the interventions protocol on the intensive dietary phase of the program focused on the promotion on changes in people's lifestyles from a multi-factorial approach. The program consisted of two individual nurse visits, five workshops and nursing follow up clinics. The individual visits ensured that the team learned of each person needs; likewise, the group activities were aimed at improving the transmission of knowledge and the acquisition of skills, abilities and attitudes towards healthier lifestyles.

  16. Clinical Risk Assessment in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Asefzadeh, Saeed; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Nikpey, Ahmad; Atighechian, Golrokh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin's Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital) through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA). Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG) performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN) was in respiratory care “Ventilator's alarm malfunction (no alarm)” with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal “not washing the NG-Tube” with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care. PMID:23930171

  17. [Specialized neurological neurosurgical intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Kuramatsu, J B; Huttner, H B; Schwab, S

    2016-06-01

    In Germany dedicated neurological-neurosurgical critical care (NCC) is the fastest growing specialty and one of the five big disciplines integrated within the German critical care society (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin; DIVI). High-quality investigations based on resilient evidence have underlined the need for technical advances, timely optimization of therapeutic procedures, and multidisciplinary team-work to treat those critically ill patients. This evolution has repeatedly raised questions, whether NCC-units should be run independently or better be incorporated within multidisciplinary critical care units, whether treatment variations exist that impact clinical outcome, and whether nowadays NCC-units can operate cost-efficiently? Stroke is the most frequent disease entity treated on NCC-units, one of the most common causes of death in Germany leading to a great socio-economic burden due to long-term disabled patients. The main aim of NCC employs surveillance of structural and functional integrity of the central nervous system as well as the avoidance of secondary brain damage. However, clinical evaluation of these severely injured commonly sedated and mechanically ventilated patients is challenging and highlights the importance of neuromonitoring to detect secondary damaging mechanisms. This multimodal strategy not only requires medical expertise but also enforces the need for specialized teams consisting of qualified nurses, technical assistants and medical therapists. The present article reviews most recent data and tries to answer the aforementioned questions. PMID:27206707

  18. "It's intense, you know." Nurses' experiences in caring for patients requesting euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Denier, Yvonne; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; De Bal, Nele; Gastmans, Chris

    2010-02-01

    The Belgian Act on Euthanasia came into force on 23 September 2002, making Belgium the second country--after the Netherlands--to decriminalize euthanasia under certain due-care conditions. Since then, Belgian nurses have been increasingly involved in euthanasia care. In this paper, we report a qualitative study based on in-depth interviews with 18 nurses from Flanders (the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium) who have had experience in caring for patients requesting euthanasia since May 2002 (the approval of the Act). We found that the care process for patients requesting euthanasia is a complex and dynamic process, consisting of several stages, starting from the period preceding the euthanasia request and ending with the aftercare stage. When asked after the way in which they experience their involvement in the euthanasia care process, all nurses described it as a grave and difficult process, not only on an organizational and practical level, but also on an emotional level. "Intense" is the dominant feeling experienced by nurses. This is compounded by the presence of other feelings such as great concern and responsibility on the one hand, being content in truly helping the patient to die serenely, and doing everything in one's power to contribute to this; but also feeling unreal and ambivalent on the other hand, because death is arranged. Nurses feel a discrepancy, because although it is a nice death, which happens in dignity and with respect, it is also an unnatural death. The clinical ethical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:19381871

  19. Volume, outcome, and the organization of intensive care.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Jeremy M

    2007-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that high case volume is associated with improved outcomes in the intensive care unit (ICU). Potential explanations for the volume-outcome relationship include selective referral, clinical experience and organizational factors common to high-volume ICUs. Distinguishing between these explanations has important health policy implications, because outcomes at low-volume ICUs could be improved either by exporting best practices found at high-volume centers or by regionalizing adult critical care - two very different care strategies. Future research efforts should be directed at better characterizing the process of care in high-volume ICUs and exploring the feasibility of creating a regionalized system of care. PMID:17493293

  20. [The organization of a post-intensive care rehabilitation unit].

    PubMed

    Barnay, Claire; Luauté, Jacques; Tell, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    When a patient is admitted to a post-intensive care rehabilitation unit, the functional outcome is the main objective of the care. The motivation of the team relies on strong cohesion between professionals. Personalised support provides a heightened observation of the patient's progress. Listening and sharing favour a relationship of trust between the patient, the team and the families. PMID:26365639

  1. Receiving family of a patient in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Clavagnier, Isabelle

    2012-10-01

    Pierre is currently working in the intensive care unit (ICU). The rules for visitors are strict. Visiting time is short and only two persons are allowed at a time, in the patient's ward. Standards of hygiene have to be respected carefully. This evening Pierre accompanies the husband of a Japanese tourist whose health is in a critical condition. PMID:23092085

  2. Physical Therapy Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Eilish; Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these interventions is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  3. [Measuring the sources of discomfort in patients in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Haubertin, Carole; Crozes, Fanny; Le Page, Melody; Seailles, Severine

    2016-05-01

    A study carried out in 2014 in a hospital focused on the sources of discomfort of patients in intensive care. Resulting in raised awareness across all disciplines, it has enabled the actions to be undertaken to improve professional practices to be prioritised, in a culture of compassionate care. PMID:27157560

  4. Coping with Poor Prognosis in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, David A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The intensive care pediatrician who prophesies to parents that their child's illness is irreversible may encounter denial and hostility. Four cases are reported in which parents rejected their child's hopeless prognosis, counterprophesied miraculous cures, resolved to obtain exorcism, criticized the care, or accused nurses of neglect. Journal…

  5. Mothers of Pre-Term Infants in Neonate Intensive Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    In this study, eight mothers of pre-term infants under the care of nursing staff and neonatologists in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Children's Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, were observed and interviewed about their birth experience and their images of themselves as mothers during their stay. Patterns and themes in the…

  6. [The difficulties of staff retention in neonatal intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Deparis, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care units attract nurses due to the technical and highly specific nature of the work. However, there is a high turnover in these departments. Work-related distress and the lack of team cohesion are the two main causes of this problem. Support from the health care manager is essential in this context.

  7. [The difficulties of staff retention in neonatal intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Deparis, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care units attract nurses due to the technical and highly specific nature of the work. However, there is a high turnover in these departments. Work-related distress and the lack of team cohesion are the two main causes of this problem. Support from the health care manager is essential in this context. PMID:26183101

  8. Intensive Care in India: The Indian Intensive Care Case Mix and Practice Patterns Study

    PubMed Central

    Divatia, Jigeeshu V.; Amin, Pravin R.; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Kapadia, Farhad N.; Todi, Subhash; Sahu, Samir; Govil, Deepak; Chawla, Rajesh; Kulkarni, Atul P.; Samavedam, Srinivas; Jani, Charu K.; Rungta, Narendra; Samaddar, Devi Prasad; Mehta, Sujata; Venkataraman, Ramesh; Hegde, Ashit; Bande, BD; Dhanuka, Sanjay; Singh, Virendra; Tewari, Reshma; Zirpe, Kapil; Sathe, Prachee

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To obtain information on organizational aspects, case mix and practices in Indian Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Patients and Methods: An observational, 4-day point prevalence study was performed between 2010 and 2011 in 4209 patients from 124 ICUs. ICU and patient characteristics, and interventions were recorded for 24 h of the study day, and outcomes till 30 days after the study day. Data were analyzed for 4038 adult patients from 120 ICUs. Results: On the study day, mean age, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were 54.1 ± 17.1 years, 17.4 ± 9.2 and 3.8 ± 3.6, respectively. About 46.4% patients had ≥1 organ failure. Nearly, 37% and 22.2% patients received mechanical ventilation (MV) and vasopressors or inotropes, respectively. Nearly, 12.2% patients developed an infection in the ICU. About 28.3% patients had severe sepsis or septic shock (SvSpSS) during their ICU stay. About 60.7% patients without infection received antibiotics. There were 546 deaths and 183 terminal discharges (TDs) from ICU (including left against medical advice or discharged on request), with ICU mortality 729/4038 (18.1%). In 1627 patients admitted within 24 h of the study day, the standardized mortality ratio was 0.67. The APACHE II and SOFA scores, public hospital ICUs, medical ICUs, inadequately equipped ICUs, medical admission, self-paying patient, presence of SvSpSS, acute respiratory failure or cancer, need for a fluid bolus, and MV were independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions: The high proportion of TDs and the association of public hospitals, self-paying patients, and inadequately equipped hospitals with mortality has important implications for critical care in India. PMID:27186054

  9. [Guideline 'Incontinence urine and feces' of the Dutch Preventive Youth Health Care].

    PubMed

    Beltman, Maaike; Deurloo, Jacqueline A; van Leerdam, Frank J M; Wierenga-van der Hoeven, Catelijne J; Bulk-Bunschoten, Anneke M W; Kamphuis, Mascha

    2012-01-01

    Continence problems can occur during childhood. This guideline is for the Dutch Youth Health Care (JGZ) and gives recommendations for the prevention, early detection and treatment of these problems. As a preventative measure advices for potty training should be started in children aged 18-24 months. If incontinence is present, it is important to take a history and carry out physical examination. In children over the age of 5 who are incontinent of urine the following are recommended: taking child out of bed, calendar with reward system, bedwetting alarm or voiding diary; children over the age of 8 can follow dry bed training. Faecal incontinence is often associated with constipation. Incontinent children with constipation are given advice about normal eating and exercise patterns. If this is not successful then laxatives are prescribed. The JGZ should refer further if there are indications of an underlying condition; if children over the age of 5 are wet during the day; if children are incontinent of faeces at night; if children are incontinent of faeces but not constipated; if children persistently wet the bed; if there is faecal incontinence despite counselling, and if medication needs to be prescribed.

  10. Regional intensity of vascular care and lower extremity amputation rates

    PubMed Central

    Goodney, Philip P.; Holman, Kerianne; Henke, Peter K.; Travis, Lori L.; Dimick, Justin B.; Stukel, Therese A.; Fisher, Elliott. S.; Birkmeyer, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between the intensity of vascular care and population-based rate of major lower extremity amputation (above-or below-knee) from vascular disease. Background Because patient-level differences do not fully explain the variation in amputation rate across the United States, we hypothesized that variation in intensity of vascular care may also affect regional rates of amputation. Methods Intensity of vascular care was defined as the proportion of Medicare patients who underwent any vascular procedure in the year prior to amputation, calculated at the regional level (2003–2006), using the 306 hospital referral regions in the Dartmouth Atlas of Healthcare. We examined relationship between intensity of vascular care and major amputation rate, at the regional level, between 2007–2009. Results Amputation rates varied widely by region, from 1 to 27 per 10,000 Medicare patients. Compared to regions in the lowest quintile of amputation rate, patients in the highest quintile were commonly African American (50% versus 13%) and diabetic (38% versus 31%). Intensity of vascular care also varied across regions: fewer than 35% of patients underwent revascularization in the lowest quintile of intensity, while nearly 60% of patients underwent revascularization in the highest quintile. Overall, there was an inverse correlation between intensity of vascular care and amputation rate ranging from R= −0.36 for outpatient diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, to R= −0.87 for inpatient surgical revascularizations. In analyses adjusting for patient characteristics and socioeconomic status, patients in high vascular care regions were significantly less likely to undergo amputation without an antecedent attempt at revascularization (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.34–0.37, p<0.001). Conclusions The intensity of vascular care provided to patients at risk for amputation varies, and regions with the most intensive vascular care have the lowest amputation rate

  11. Quality indicators for pharmaceutical care: a comprehensive set with national scores for Dutch community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Teichert, Martina; Schoenmakers, Tim; Kylstra, Nico; Mosk, Berend; Bouvy, Marcel L; van de Vaart, Frans; De Smet, Peter A G M; Wensing, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Background The quality of pharmaceutical care in community pharmacies in the Netherlands has been assessed annually since 2008. The initial set has been further developed with pharmacists and patient organizations, the healthcare inspectorate, the government and health insurance companies. The set over 2012 was the first set of quality indicators for community pharmacies which was validated and supported by all major stakeholders. The aims of this study were to describe the validated set of quality indicators for community pharmacies and to report their scores over 2012. In subanalyses the score development over 5 years was described for those indicators, that have been surveyed before and remained unchanged. Methods Community pharmacists in the Netherlands were invited in 2013 to provide information for the set of 2012. Quality indicators were mapped by categories relevant for pharmaceutical care and defined for structures, processes and dispensing outcomes. Scores for categorically-measured quality indicators were presented as the percentage of pharmacies reporting the presence of a quality aspect. For numerical quality indicators, the mean of all reported scores was expressed. In subanalyses for those indicators that had been questioned previously, scores were collected from earlier measurements for pharmacies providing their scores in 2012. Multilevel analysis was used to assess the consistency of scores within one pharmacy over time by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Results For the set in 2012, 1739 Dutch community pharmacies (88 % of the total) provided information for 66 quality indicators in 10 categories. Indicator scores on the presence of quality structures showed relatively high quality levels. Scores for processes and dispensing outcomes were lower. Subanalyses showed that overall indicators scores improved within pharmacies, but this development differed between pharmacies. Conclusions A set of validated quality indicators provided

  12. The knowledge of intensive care professionals about diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Lordani, Cláudia Regina Felicetti; Eckert, Raquel Goreti; Tozetto, Altevir Garcia; Lordani, Tarcísio Vitor Augusto; Duarte, Péricles Almeida Delfino

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the opinions and practices of intensive care professionals with regard to diarrhea in critically ill patients. Methods A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted among health care professionals working at three adult intensive care units. Participants responded individually to a self-administered questionnaire about their length of work experience in intensive care; the definition, characterization, and causes of diarrhea; types of records in the patient's medical record; and training received. Results A total of 78 professionals participated in this study, of whom 59.0% were nurse technicians, 25.7% were nurses, and 15.3% were physicians; 77.0% of them had worked in intensive care for over 1 year. Only 37.2% had received training on this topic. Half of the interviewees defined diarrhea as "liquid and/or pasty stools" regardless of frequency, while the other 50.0% defined diarrhea based on the increased number of daily bowel movements. The majority of them mentioned diet as the main cause of diarrhea, followed by "use of medications" (p<0.001). Distinct nutritional practices were observed among the analyzed professionals regarding episodes of diarrhea, such as discontinuing, maintaining, or reducing the volume of enteral nutrition; physicians reported that they do not routinely communicate the problem to other professionals (for example, to a nutritionist) and do not routinely record and quantify diarrhea events in patients' medical records. Conclusion Different opinions and practices were observed in intensive care professionals with regard to diarrhea. PMID:25295825

  13. Newborn ethical dilemmas: intensive care and intermediate care nursing attitudes.

    PubMed

    Berseth, C L; Kenny, J D; Durand, R

    1984-06-01

    A self-administered questionnaire concerning various neonatal ethical issues was completed by 39 ICU and 36 intermediate care unit (INT) nurses. Guttman scale analysis indicated that ICU nurses were more reluctant than INT nurses to resuscitate certain high-risk newborn infants. Work experience and a stated religious preference accentuated an INT nurse's disinclination to resuscitate high-risk babies. ICU nurses were more likely than INT nurses to favor passive and active euthanasia. Further, ICU nurses were more likely than INT nurses to view termination of life support for a sick infant as a necessity. ICU nurses were less likely than INT nurses to favor physician intervention in the care of all acutely sick neonates. ICU and INT nurses agreed, however, that the decision to terminate a baby's life support should be made jointly by the child's parents and physicians. Although differences in ICU and INT nursing attitudes may reflect quantitative and qualitative differences in work experience, these findings suggest a common need for emotional support and continuing education programs for nurses who care for high-risk newborns.

  14. Measurement of muscle strength in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Edward A; Martyn, Jeevendra A; George, Edward; Frontera, Walter R; Eikermann, Matthias

    2009-10-01

    Traditional (indirect) techniques, such as electromyography and nerve conduction velocity measurement, do not reliably predict intensive care unit-acquired muscle weakness and its clinical consequences. Therefore, quantitative assessment of skeletal muscle force is important for diagnosis of intensive care unit-acquired motor dysfunction. There are a number of ways for assessing objectively muscle strength, which can be categorized as techniques that quantify maximum voluntary contraction force and those that assess evoked (stimulated) muscle force. Important factors that limit the repetitive evaluation of maximum voluntary contraction force in intensive care unit patients are learning effects, pain during muscular contraction, and alteration of consciousness.The selection of the appropriate muscle is crucial for making adequate predictions of a patient's outcome. The upper airway dilators are much more susceptible to a decrease in muscle strength than the diaphragm, and impairment of upper airway patency is a key mechanism of extubation failure in intensive care unit patients. Data suggest that the adductor pollicis muscle is an appropriate reference muscle to predict weakness of muscles that are typically affected by intensive care unit-acquired weakness, i.e., upper airway as well as extremity muscles. Stimulated (evoked) force of skeletal muscles, such as the adductor pollicis, can be assessed repetitively, independent of brain function, even in heavily sedated patients during high acuity of their disease. PMID:20046117

  15. The use of diaries in psychological recovery from intensive care.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Leanne M; Rattray, Janice; Hull, Alastair; Kenardy, Justin A; Le Brocque, Robyne; Ullman, Amanda J

    2013-01-01

    Intensive care patients frequently experience memory loss, nightmares, and delusional memories and some may develop symptoms of anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress. The use of diaries is emerging as a putative tool to 'fill the memory gaps' and promote psychological recovery. In this review, we critically analyze the available literature regarding the use and impact of diaries for intensive care patients specifically to examine the impact of diaries on intensive care patients' recovery. Diversity of practice in regard to the structure, content, and process elements of diaries for intensive care patients exists and emphasizes the lack of an underpinning psychological conceptualization. The use of diaries as an intervention to aid psychological recovery in intensive care patients has been examined in 11 studies, including two randomized controlled trials. Inconsistencies exist in sample characteristics, study outcomes, study methods, and the diary intervention itself, limiting the amount of comparison that is possible between studies. Measurement of the impact of the diary intervention on patient outcomes has been limited in both scope and time frame. Furthermore, an underpinning conceptualization or rationale for diaries as an intervention has not been articulated or tested. Given these significant limitations, although findings tend to be positive, implementation as routine clinical practice should not occur until a body of evidence is developed to inform methodological considerations and confirm proposed benefits. PMID:24351578

  16. Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Tahereh; Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sabet Sarvestani, Raheleh; Moattari, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The concept of family- centered care in neonatal intensive care unit has changed drastically in protracted years and has been used in various contexts differently. Since we require clarity in our understanding, we aimed to analyze this concept. Methods: This study was done on the basis of developmental approach of Rodgers’s concept analysis. We reviewed the existing literature in Science direct, PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Iran Medex databases from 1980 to 2012. The keywords were family-centered care, family-oriented care, and neonatal intensive care unit. After all, 59 out of 244 English and Persian articles and books (more than 20%) were selected. Results: The attributes of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit were recognized as care taking of family (assessment of family and its needs, providing family needs), equal family participation (participation in care planning, decision making, and providing care from routine to special ones), collaboration (inter-professional collaboration with family, family involvement in regulating and implementing care plans), regarding family’s respect and dignity (importance of families’ differences, recognizing families’ tendencies), and knowledge transformation (information sharing between healthcare workers and family, complete information sharing according to family learning style). Besides, the recognized antecedents were professional and management-organizational factors. Finally, the consequences included benefits related to neonate, family, and organization. Conclusion: The findings revealed that family centered-care was a comprehensive and holistic caring approach in neonatal intensive care. Therefore, it is highly recommended to change the current care approach and philosophy and provide facilities for conducting family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit.  PMID:25349870

  17. Current status of neonatal intensive care in India.

    PubMed

    Karthik Nagesh, N; Razak, Abdul

    2016-05-01

    Globally, newborn health is now considered as high-level national priority. The current neonatal and infant mortality rate in India is 29 per 1000 live births and 42 per 1000 live births, respectively. The last decade has seen a tremendous growth of neonatal intensive care in India. The proliferation of neonatal intensive care units, as also the infusion of newer technologies with availability of well-trained medical and nursing manpower, has led to good survival and intact outcomes. There is good care available for neonates whose parents can afford the high-end healthcare, but unfortunately, there is a deep divide and the poor rural population is still underserved with lack of even basic newborn care in few areas! There is increasing disparity where the 'well to do' and the 'increasingly affordable middle class' is able to get the most advanced care for their sick neonates. The underserved urban poor and those in rural areas still contribute to the overall high neonatal morbidity and mortality in India. The recent government initiative, the India Newborn Action Plan, is the step in the right direction to bridge this gap. A strong public-private partnership and prioritisation is needed to achieve this goal. This review highlights the current situation of neonatal intensive care in India with a suggested plan for the way forward to achieve better neonatal care. PMID:26944066

  18. Current status of neonatal intensive care in India.

    PubMed

    Karthik Nagesh, N; Razak, Abdul

    2016-05-01

    Globally, newborn health is now considered as high-level national priority. The current neonatal and infant mortality rate in India is 29 per 1000 live births and 42 per 1000 live births, respectively. The last decade has seen a tremendous growth of neonatal intensive care in India. The proliferation of neonatal intensive care units, as also the infusion of newer technologies with availability of well-trained medical and nursing manpower, has led to good survival and intact outcomes. There is good care available for neonates whose parents can afford the high-end healthcare, but unfortunately, there is a deep divide and the poor rural population is still underserved with lack of even basic newborn care in few areas! There is increasing disparity where the 'well to do' and the 'increasingly affordable middle class' is able to get the most advanced care for their sick neonates. The underserved urban poor and those in rural areas still contribute to the overall high neonatal morbidity and mortality in India. The recent government initiative, the India Newborn Action Plan, is the step in the right direction to bridge this gap. A strong public-private partnership and prioritisation is needed to achieve this goal. This review highlights the current situation of neonatal intensive care in India with a suggested plan for the way forward to achieve better neonatal care.

  19. Environmental sustainability in the intensive care unit: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Huffling, Katie; Schenk, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In acute care practice sites, the intensive care unit (ICU) is one of the most resource-intense environments. Replete with energy-intensive equipment, significant waste production, and multiple toxic chemicals, ICUs contribute to environmental harm and may inadvertently have a negative impact on the health of patients, staff, and visitors. This article evaluates the ICU on four areas of environmental sustainability: energy, waste, toxic chemicals, and healing environment and provides concrete actions ICU nurses can take to decrease environmental health risks in the ICU. Case studies of nurses making changes within their hospital practice are also highlighted, as well as resources for nurses starting to make changes at their health care institutions. PMID:24896556

  20. Severe hypernatremia associated catheter malposition in an intensive care patient.

    PubMed

    Silahli, Musa; Gökdemir, Mahmut; Duman, Enes; Gökmen, Zeynel

    2016-09-01

    We present a catheter related severe hypernatremia in a 2-month-old baby who was admitted to the pediatric intensive care. Imbalance of plasma sodium is commonly seen in pediatric intensive care patients. The water and sodium balance is a complex process. Especially, brain and kidneys are the most important organs that affect the water and sodium balance. Other mechanisms of the cellular structure include osmoreceptors, Na-K ATPase systems, and vasopressin. Hypernatremia is usually an iatrogenic condition in hospitalized patients due to mismanagement of water electrolyte imbalance. Central venous catheterization is frequently used in pediatric intensive care patients. Complications of central venous catheter placement still continue despite the usage of ultrasound guidance. Malposition of central venous catheter in the brain veins should be kept in mind as a rare cause of iatrogenic hypernatremia. PMID:27555161

  1. Environmental sustainability in the intensive care unit: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Huffling, Katie; Schenk, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In acute care practice sites, the intensive care unit (ICU) is one of the most resource-intense environments. Replete with energy-intensive equipment, significant waste production, and multiple toxic chemicals, ICUs contribute to environmental harm and may inadvertently have a negative impact on the health of patients, staff, and visitors. This article evaluates the ICU on four areas of environmental sustainability: energy, waste, toxic chemicals, and healing environment and provides concrete actions ICU nurses can take to decrease environmental health risks in the ICU. Case studies of nurses making changes within their hospital practice are also highlighted, as well as resources for nurses starting to make changes at their health care institutions.

  2. Selected methods of measuring workload among intensive care nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Kwiecień, Katarzyna; Wujtewicz, Maria; Mędrzycka-Dąbrowska, Wioletta

    2012-06-01

    Intensive care units and well-qualified medical staff are indispensable for the proper functioning of every hospital facility. Due to demographic changes and technological progress having extended the average life expectancy, the number of patients hospitalized in intensive care units increases every year [9,10]. Global shortages of nursing staff (including changes in their age structure) have triggered a debate on the working environment and workload the nursing staff are exposed to while performing their duties. This paper provides a critical review of selected methods for the measurement of the workload of intensive care nurses and points out their practical uses. The paper reviews Polish and foreign literature on workload and the measurement tools used to evaluate workload indicators.

  3. A German national prevalence study on the cost of intensive care: an evaluation from 51 intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Moerer, Onnen; Plock, Enno; Mgbor, Uchenna; Schmid, Alexandra; Schneider, Heinz; Wischnewsky, Manfred Bernd; Burchardi, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Intensive care unit (ICU) costs account for up to 20% of a hospital's costs. We aimed to analyse the individual patient-related cost of intensive care at various hospital levels and for different groups of disease. Methods Data from 51 ICUs all over Germany (15 primary care hospitals and 14 general care hospitals, 10 maximal care hospitals and 12 focused care hospitals) were collected in an observational, cross-sectional, one-day point prevalence study by two external study physicians (January–October 2003). All ICU patients (length of stay > 24 hours) treated on the study day were included. The reason for admission, severity of illness, surgical/diagnostic procedures, resource consumption, ICU/hospital length of stay, outcome and ICU staffing structure were documented. Results Altogether 453 patients were included. ICU (hospital) mortality was 12.1% (15.7%). The reason for admission and the severity of illness differed between the hospital levels of care, with a higher amount of unscheduled surgical procedures and patients needing mechanical ventilation in maximal care hospital and focused care hospital facilities. The mean total costs per day were €791 ± 305 (primary care hospitals, €685 ± 234; general care hospitals, €672 ± 199; focused care hospitals, €816 ± 363; maximal care hospitals, €923 ± 306), with the highest cost in septic patients (€1,090 ± 422). Differences were associated with staffing, the amount of prescribed drugs/blood products and diagnostic procedures. Conclusion The reason for admission, the severity of illness and the occurrence of severe sepsis are directly related to the level of ICU cost. A high fraction of costs result from staffing (up to 62%). Specialized and maximum care hospitals treat a higher proportion of the more severely ill and most expensive patients. PMID:17594475

  4. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A; Gupta, A; Singh, TK; Saxsena, A

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP. PMID:26955317

  5. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Gupta, A; Singh, T K; Saxsena, A

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP.

  6. The burden of paediatric intensive care: a South American perspective.

    PubMed

    Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Schnitzler, Eduardo; Garcia, Pedro Celiny; Branco, Ricardo Garcia

    2005-09-01

    Paediatric intensive care is a relatively new medical specialty that has shown a marked growing up around the world over the last three decades. The limits and the development of this new specialty are not uniform from country to country. Original articles relating to paediatric intensive care and some South American data bases of health care were evaluated and relevant results were selected. Using these data, we describe the main characteristics of paediatric intensive care in South America and discuss some associated factors (e.g. economic aspects, health systems, ethical aspects) that could interfere with the quality and extent of care. A strong relationship between the financial stability of each region and the complexity and quality of paediatric intensive care was seen. A better coverage and more sophisticated paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) are concentrated in the more developed countries (Brazil, Chile and Argentina). Compared to the northern hemisphere, children admitted to the South American PICUs have higher mortality and higher rates of intervention (mechanical ventilation and indwelling catheters). Medical paternalism has a strong influence in the decision-making process offered to terminally ill patients. This phenomenon increases the length of stay, reduces the number of available beds and increases costs. In conclusion, during the last 20 years PICUs have developed and increased their coverage in South America. However, the most sophisticated and well equipped PICUs are preferentially located in the more developed areas whereas those areas with higher infant mortality rates have few PICU beds. Improvements in the economical stability, regional health organisation as well as the rationale for PICU localisation are some of the important goals to be reached in the near future.

  7. Measuring technical efficiency of output quality in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Junoy, J P

    1997-01-01

    Presents some examples of the implications derived from imposing the objective of maximizing social welfare, subject to limited resources, on ethical care patients management in respect of quality performance of health services. Conventional knowledge of health economics points out that critically ill patients are responsible for increased use of technological resources and that they receive a high proportion of health care resources. Attempts to answer, from the point of view of microeconomics, the question: how do we measure comparative efficiency in the management of intensive care units? Analyses this question through data from an international empirical study using micro-economic measures of productive efficiency in public services (data envelopment analysis). Results show a 28.8 per cent level of technical inefficiency processing data from 25 intensive care units in the USA. PMID:10169231

  8. [Ethical challenge in palliative support of intensive care patients].

    PubMed

    Salomon, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Intensive care medicine and palliative care medicine were considered for a long time to be contrasting concepts in therapy. While intensive care medicine is directed towards prolonging life and tries to stabilize disordered body functions, palliative care medicine is focused upon the relief of disturbances to help patients in the face of death. Today both views have become congruent. Palliative aspects are equally important in curative therapy. In the course of illness or in respect of the patient's will, the aim of therapy may change from curative to palliative. Two examples are presented to illustrate the ethical challenges in this process. They follow from the medical indication, attention to the patient's will, different opinions in the team, truth at the bedside and from what must be done in the process of withdrawing therapy.

  9. Neonatal intensive care unit lighting: update and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Roberto G; Pattini, Andrea E

    2016-08-01

    Achieving adequate lighting in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge: in addition to the usual considerations of visual performance, cost, energy and aesthetics, there appear different biological needs of patients, health care providers and family members. Communicational aspects of light, its role as a facilitator of the visual function of doctors and nurses, and its effects on the newborn infant physiology and development were addressed in order to review the effects of light (natural and artificial) within neonatal care with a focus on development. The role of light in regulating the newborn infant circadian cycle in particular and the therapeutic use of light in general were also reviewed. For each aspect, practical recommendations were specified for a proper well-lit environment in neonatal intensive care units.

  10. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  11. Designing a low cost bedside workstation for intensive care units.

    PubMed Central

    Michel, A.; Zörb, L.; Dudeck, J.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes the design and implementation of a software architecture for a low cost bedside workstation for intensive care units. The development is fully integrated into the information infrastructure of the existing hospital information system (HIS) at the University Hospital of Giessen. It provides cost efficient and reliable access for data entry and review from the HIS database from within patient rooms, even in very space limited environments. The architecture further supports automatical data input from medical devices. First results from three different intensive care units are reported. PMID:8947771

  12. A Review of Visiting Policies in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghparast, Shiva; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Ghanbari, Behrooz; Maleki, Majid; Peyrovi, Hamid; Bahrani, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Admission to intensive care units is potentially stressful and usually goes together with disruption in physiological and emotional function of the patient. The role of the families in improving ill patients’ conditions is important. So this study investigates the strategies, potential challenges and also the different dimensions of visiting hours’ policies with a narrative review. The search was carried out in scientific information databases using keywords “visiting policy”, “visiting hours” and “intensive care unit” with no time limitation on accessing the published studies in English or Farsi. Of a total of 42 articles, 22 conformed to our study objectives from 1997 to 2013. The trajectory of current research shows that visiting in intensive care units has, since their inception in the 1960s, always considered the nurses’ perspectives, patients’ preferences and physiological responses, and the outlook for families. However, little research has been carried out and most of that originates from the United States, Europe and since 2010, a few from Iran. It seems that the need to use the research findings and emerging theories and practices is necessary to discover and challenge the beliefs and views of nurses about family-oriented care and visiting in intensive care units. PMID:26755480

  13. A Review of Visiting Policies in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Khaleghparast, Shiva; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Ghanbari, Behrooz; Maleki, Majid; Peyrovi, Hamid; Bahrani, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Admission to intensive care units is potentially stressful and usually goes together with disruption in physiological and emotional function of the patient. The role of the families in improving ill patients' conditions is important. So this study investigates the strategies, potential challenges and also the different dimensions of visiting hours' policies with a narrative review. The search was carried out in scientific information databases using keywords "visiting policy", "visiting hours" and "intensive care unit" with no time limitation on accessing the published studies in English or Farsi. Of a total of 42 articles, 22 conformed to our study objectives from 1997 to 2013. The trajectory of current research shows that visiting in intensive care units has, since their inception in the 1960s, always considered the nurses' perspectives, patients' preferences and physiological responses, and the outlook for families. However, little research has been carried out and most of that originates from the United States, Europe and since 2010, a few from Iran. It seems that the need to use the research findings and emerging theories and practices is necessary to discover and challenge the beliefs and views of nurses about family-oriented care and visiting in intensive care units. PMID:26755480

  14. [Splitting of supplemental revenues in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Sawatzki, T; Bauer, K; Stufler, M; Spies, C; Schuster, M

    2009-10-01

    In patient care several clinical departments are often involved in the treatment of a single case. Due to this shared work and internal patient transfer between departments the respective departments have to share the single reimbursement sum which is granted for each hospital case in the German DRG system. The intensive care unit in particular, at least if maintained as an independent department, has a high rate of internal transfers and most of the patients will be transferred back to the original department prior to discharge from hospital. Different models have been suggested regarding the splitting of DRG reimbursement between clinical departments, however, no research has been done on the splitting of supplemental revenues. The allocation of supplemental revenues is especially complex for revenues generated over many days of hospital care or for clustered revenues. In most cases the supplemental revenues are simply allocated to the department from which the patient is ultimately discharged. This would lead to a significant economic risk for the intensive care unit, as a considerable proportion of medical services which are eligible for triggering supplemental revenues are applied there. In this study all cases treated in two intensive care units in a university hospital in 2007 were analyzed in which supplemental revenue-related medical services were performed over a longer period of time or graduated according to different amounts. In a total of 385 cases, 691 supplemental revenues were analyzed. Three different methods of supplemental revenues allocation were analyzed regarding the financial impact on the intensive care unit: allocation to the department from which the patient is discharged, allocation according to the length of stay in a particular department (in this case the intensive care unit) and allocation based on actually documented medical services eligible for supplemental revenues. The supplemental revenues take up a considerable share of the

  15. The Living, Dynamic and Complex Environment Care in Intensive Care Unit1

    PubMed Central

    Backes, Marli Terezinha Stein; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Büscher, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to understand the meaning of the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care, experienced by professionals working in this unit, managers, patients, families and professional support services, as well as build a theoretical model about the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care. METHOD: Grounded Theory, both for the collection and for data analysis. Based on theoretical sampling, we carried out 39 in-depth interviews semi-structured from three different Adult Intensive Care Units. RESULTS: built up the so-called substantive theory "Sustaining life in the complex environment of care in the Intensive Care Unit". It was bounded by eight categories: "caring and continuously monitoring the patient" and "using appropriate and differentiated technology" (causal conditions); "Providing a suitable environment" and "having relatives with concern" (context); "Mediating facilities and difficulties" (intervenienting conditions); "Organizing the environment and managing the dynamics of the unit" (strategy) and "finding it difficult to accept and deal with death" (consequences). CONCLUSION: confirmed the thesis that "the care environment in the Intensive Care Unit is a living environment, dynamic and complex that sustains the life of her hospitalized patients". PMID:26155009

  16. Psychiatric aspects of a pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Woolston, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Although there is a growing body of literature about the medical problems which arise in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), rather little has been written about psychiatric issues characteristic of the critical care setting for children. This article will describe the PICU as a community made up of several sub-groups, the various psychosocial stresses, the reactions to stresses, and the interventions appropriate for the PICU and each of its sub-groups. PMID:6375167

  17. An experiment with regulated competition and individual mandates for universal health care: the new Dutch health insurance system.

    PubMed

    Rosenau, Pauline Vaillancourt; Lako, Christiaan J

    2008-12-01

    The 2006 Enthoven-inspired Dutch health insurance reform, based on regulated competition with a mandate for individuals to purchase insurance, will interest U.S. policy makers who seek universal coverage. This ongoing experiment includes guaranteed issue, price competition for a standardized basic benefits package, community rating, sliding-scale income-based subsidies for patients, and risk equalization for insurers. Our assessment of the first two years is based on Dutch Central Bank statistics, national opinion polls, consumer surveys, and qualitative interviews with policy makers. The first lesson for the United States is that the new Dutch health insurance model may not control costs. To date, consumer premiums are increasing, and insurance companies report large losses on the basic policies. Second, regulated competition is unlikely to make voters/citizens happy; public satisfaction is not high, and perceived quality is down. Third, consumers may not behave as economic models predict, remaining responsive to price incentives. Finally, policy makers should not underestimate the opposition from health care providers who define their profession as more than simply a job. If regulated competition with individual mandates performs poorly in auspicious circumstances such as the Netherlands, how will this model fare in the United States, where access, quality, and cost challenges are even greater? Might the assumptions of economic theory not apply in the health sector?

  18. [Point-of-care-testing--the intensive care laboratory].

    PubMed

    Müller, M M; Hackl, W; Griesmacher, A

    1999-01-01

    After successful centralization of laboratory analyses since more than 30 years, advances in biosensors, microprocessors, measurement of undiluted whole blood and miniaturization of laboratory analyzers are leading nowadays more and more to a re-decentralization in the laboratory medicine. Point-of-care-testing (POCT), which is defined as any laboratory test performed outside central or decentralized laboratories, is becoming more and more popular. The theoretical advantages of POCT are faster turn-around-times (TAT), more rapid medical decisions, avoidance of sample identification and sample transport problems and the need of only small specimen volumes. These advantages are frequently mentioned, but are not associated with a clear clinical benefit. The disadvantages of POCT such as incorrect handling and/or maintenance of the analyzers by nontrained clinical staff, inadequate or even absent calibrations and/or quality controls, lack of cost-effectiveness because of an increased number of analyzers and more expensive reagents, insufficient documentation and difficult comparability of the obtained POCT-results with routine laboratory results, are strongly evident. According to the authors' opinion the decision for the establishing of POCT has only to be made in a close co-operation between physicians and laboratorians in order to vouch for necessity and high quality of the analyses. Taking the local situation into consideration (24-h-central laboratory, etc.) the spectrum of parameters measured by means of POCT should be rigorously restricted to the vital functions. Such analytes should be: hemoglobin or hematocrit, activated whole blood clotting time, blood gases, sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, glucose, creatinine, ammonia and lactate.

  19. Education of trainees in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Croley, W Christopher; Rothenberg, David M

    2007-02-01

    The focus on improving education in critical care medicine must begin early in medical school training and further be promoted during residency if there is to be an increase in intensivists in the hospital workforce. This is "critical" to healthcare reform movements that are endorsing full-time critical care coverage in U.S. urban intensive care units. There is, therefore, a need for more novel approaches in educating trainees in critical care medicine to better prepare future physicians to manage acutely ill patients and improve patient safety. This article will review methods to improve educational designs in teaching critical care medicine to medical students, residents, and fellows, including the use of simulation technology to enhance cognition and procedural skills. PMID:17242600

  20. [Principles and challenges of mobilisation in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Simons, Julien; Thévoz, David; Piquilloud, Lise

    2016-06-01

    The harmful consequences of bed rest and inactivity in patients in intensive care have been widely described. The point at which these patients should be mobilised and the methods used however still remain unclear. It is nevertheless important that the mobilisation is implemented early and often, adapted to the condition of the patient and overseen by a cross-disciplinary team. PMID:27338680

  1. Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Nursing 205.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varton, Deborah M.

    A description is provided of a course, "Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit," offered for senior-level baccalaureate degree nursing students. The first section provides information on the place of the course within the curriculum, the allotment of class time, and target student populations. The next section looks at course content in…

  2. Intensive care unit nutrition – nonsense or neglect?

    PubMed Central

    Wernerman, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Systematic undernutrition of intensive care unit patients is common and neglected. Is this inevitable or can better routines and protocols make a difference? The necessity of feeding may be regarded as self-evident, but more evidence is obviously needed to strengthen this issue. In rich countries it should be a human right not to be hungry. PMID:15987414

  3. Correlates of perceived self-care activities and diabetes control among Dutch type 1 and type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, Lieke G M; Martens, Marloes K; Bagchus, Charlotte; de Weerdt, Inge; de Vries, Nanne K; Kremers, Stef P J

    2015-06-01

    This study examined how Dutch type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients' perceived autonomy support, as well as their perceived competence and treatment self-regulation, are associated with their diabetes self-care activities (healthy diet, physical activity, monitoring blood glucose, medication use) and general diabetes control. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted among 143 type 1 diabetics and 384 type 2 diabetics. Overall, participants felt competent, supported in their autonomy, and perceived to autonomously self-regulate their diabetes. Our results underline the importance of perceived competence in type 1 and 2 diabetics, as this was strongly associated with adhering to a healthy diet and general diabetes control. Our findings also emphasize the need for autonomy supportive health care professionals in diabetes care. Interestingly, perceived competence partially mediated the influence of autonomy support on general diabetes control. PMID:25627667

  4. Review of noise in neonatal intensive care units regional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Abril, A.; Terrón, A.; Boschi, C.; Gómez, M.

    2007-11-01

    This work is about the problem of noise in neonatal incubators and in the environment in the neonatal intensive care units. Its main objective is to analyse the impact of noise in hospitals of Mendoza and La Rioja. Methodology: The measures were taken in different moments in front of higher or lower severity level in the working environment. It is shown that noise produces severe damages and changes in the behaviour and the psychological status of the new born babies. Results: The noise recorded inside the incubators and the neonatal intensive care units together have many components but the noise of motors, opening and closing of access gates have been considered the most important ones. Values above 60 db and and up to 120 db in some cases were recorded, so the need to train the health staff in order to manage the new born babies, the equipment and the instruments associated with them very carefully is revealed.

  5. Neurorehabilitation after neonatal intensive care: evidence and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Maitre, Nathalie L

    2016-01-01

    Neonatologists and paediatric providers of developmental care have documented poor neurodevelopmental outcomes of infants who have received neonatal intensive care due to prematurity, perinatal neurological insults such as asphyxia or congenital anomalies such as congenital heart disease. In parallel, developmental specialists have researched treatment options in these high-risk children. The goal of this review is connect the main categories of poor outcomes (sensory and motor function, cognition, communication, behaviour) studied by neonatal intensive care follow-up specialists to the research focused on improving these outcomes. We summarise challenges in designing diagnostic and interventional approaches in infants <2 years of age and review the evidence for existing therapies and future treatments aimed at improving functionality. PMID:25710178

  6. International standard of quality in the pediatric intensive care unit: a model for pediatric intensive care units in South America.

    PubMed

    Garcia, P C

    1993-09-01

    Investments in critical care in South America have been postponed so that more pressing primary care needs may be funded. Poor underlying health, a lack of organized health care delivery systems, a lack of critical care beds, and regional epidemics, however, result in patients being admitted to pediatric intensive care units (ICUs) late in their illnesses. Pediatric ICU mortality rates are approximately 20%. Hospital problems include insufficient interdepartmental coordination, lack of care protocols, too few pediatric intensivists, inferior quality equipment, and a lack of qualified technicians. Pediatric nurses are poorly paid, have no special pediatric ICU training, and receive no special professional recognition. The few trained ICU nurses are often assigned administrative roles, while pediatric ICUs often employ auxiliary nurses who have the equivalent of 1 high school year of nurse's training. South America needs a model of pediatric intensive care which is different from that implemented in the US. In this model, resources must be optimized, difficulties minimized, and continuous and stable growth permitted until the state of the art is reached. ICUs must improve relationships and coordinate services interregionally, especially with emergency medical care systems, and they should be located in large medical centers. Intermediate care areas could also be developed to smooth the transition out of the pediatric ICU. Intensivists with appropriate training and certification should direct patient care, perform administrative tasks, and train residents on a full-time basis. Further, pediatric ICU nurses should be specially trained and participate in administration, while auxiliary nurses should be better trained to help ease the nursing shortage. Finally, equipment must be upgraded, but invasive, advanced hemodynamic monitoring is presently not a priority.

  7. Encouraging dialogue and autonomy in the burn intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Imbus, S H; Zawacki, B E

    1986-01-01

    Developing a systematic, rigorous approach to one major ethical issue--autonomous decision making by patients--as part of a standardized burn protocol ensures that the ill and injured persons we care for are given respect and a sense of control over their destiny. We cannot document a clinical, physiologic benefit to this particular approach but do find that early, frank discussions with patients, when combined with careful, active listening, help form strong care-giver-patient bonds. The patient's designation of a spokesperson to be consulted if the patient becomes unable to speak for himself prevents a great deal of anguish should the patient become comatose. The patient's wishes concerning limitations, if any, of maximal treatment are noted and respected. We believe that our approach is legally and ethically sound and can serve as one model for establishing informed consent in an intensive care setting.

  8. Delirium in Prolonged Hospitalized Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Saadat, Soheil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged hospitalization in the intensive care unit (ICU) can impose long-term psychological effects on patients. One of the most significant psychological effects from prolonged hospitalization is delirium. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prolonged hospitalization of patients and subsequent delirium in the intensive care unit. Patients and Methods: This conventional content analysis study was conducted in the General Intensive Care Unit of the Shariati Hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, from the beginning of 2013 to 2014. All prolonged hospitalized patients and their families were eligible participants. From the 34 eligible patients and 63 family members, the final numbers of actual patients and family members were 9 and 16, respectively. Several semi-structured interviews were conducted face-to-face with patients and their families in a private room and data were gathered. Results: Two main themes from two different perspectives emerged, 'patients' perspectives' (experiences during ICU hospitalization) and 'family members' perspectives' (supportive-communicational experiences). The main results of this study focused on delirium, Patients' findings were described as pleasant and unpleasant, factual and delusional experiences. Conclusions: Family members are valuable components in the therapeutic process of delirium. Effective use of family members in the delirium caring process can be considered to be one of the key non-medical nursing components in the therapeutic process. PMID:26290854

  9. The challenge of admitting the very elderly to intensive care.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Yên-Lan; Angus, Derek C; Boumendil, Ariane; Guidet, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    The aging of the population has increased the demand for healthcare resources. The number of patients aged 80 years and older admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) increased during the past decade, as has the intensity of care for such patients. Yet, many physicians remain reluctant to admit the oldest, arguing a "squandering" of societal resources, that ICU care could be deleterious, or that ICU care may not actually be what the patient or family wants in this instance. Other ICU physicians are strong advocates for admission of a selected elderly population. These discrepant opinions may partly be explained by the current lack of validated criteria to select accurately the patients (of any age) who will benefit most from ICU hospitalization. This review describes the epidemiology of the elderly aged 80 years and older admitted in the ICU, their long-term outcomes, and to discuss some of the solutions to cope with the burden of an aging population receiving acute care hospitalization. PMID:21906383

  10. A new neurological focus in neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Sonia L; Glass, Hannah C; Peloquin, Susan; Ferriero, Donna M

    2011-09-01

    Advances in the care of high-risk newborn babies have contributed to reduced mortality rates for premature and term births, but the surviving neonates often have increased neurological morbidity. Therapies aimed at reducing the neurological sequelae of birth asphyxia at term have brought hypothermia treatment into the realm of standard care. However, this therapy does not provide complete protection from neurological complications and a need to develop adjunctive therapies for improved neurological outcomes remains. In addition, the care of neurologically impaired neonates, regardless of their gestational age, clearly requires a focused approach to avoid further injury to the brain and to optimize the neurodevelopmental status of the newborn baby at discharge from hospital. This focused approach includes, but is not limited to, monitoring of the patient's brain with amplitude-integrated and continuous video EEG, prevention of infection, developmentally appropriate care, and family support. Provision of dedicated neurocritical care to newborn babies requires a collaborative effort between neonatologists and neurologists, training in neonatal neurology for nurses and future generations of care providers, and the recognition that common neonatal medical problems and intensive care have an effect on the developing brain. PMID:21808297

  11. Competence of nurses in the intensive cardiac care unit

    PubMed Central

    Nobahar, Monir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Competence of nurses is a complex combination of knowledge, function, skills, attitudes, and values. Delivering care for patients in the Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU) requires nurses’ competences. This study aimed to explain nurses’ competence in the ICCU. Methods This was a qualitative study in which purposive sampling with maximum variation was used. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 23 participants during 2012–2013. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by using the content-analysis method. Results The main categories were “clinical competence,” comprising subcategories of ‘routine care,’ ‘emergency care,’ ‘care according to patients’ needs,’ ‘care of non-coronary patients’, as well as “professional competence,” comprising ‘personal development,’ ‘teamwork,’ ‘professional ethics,’ and ‘efficacy of nursing education.’ Conclusion The finding of this study revealed dimensions of nursing competence in ICCU. Benefiting from competence leads to improved quality of patient care and satisfaction of patients and nurses and helps elevate nursing profession, improve nursing education, and clinical nursing. PMID:27382450

  12. The Leapfrog initiative for intensive care unit physician staffing and its impact on intensive care unit performance: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Gasperino, James

    2011-10-01

    The field of critical care has changed markedly in recent years to accommodate a growing population of chronically critically ill patients. New administrative structures have evolved to include divisions, departments, and sections devoted exclusively to the practice of critical care medicine. On an individual level, the ability to manage complex multisystem critical illnesses and to introduce invasive monitoring devices defines the intensivist. On a systems level, critical care services managed by an intensivist-led multidisciplinary team are now recognized by their ability to efficiently utilize hospital resources and improve patient outcomes. Due to the numerous cost and quality issues related to the delivery of critical care medicine, intensive care unit physician staffing (IPS) has become a charged subject in recent years. Although the federal government has played a large role in regulating best practices by physicians, other third parties have entered the arena. Perhaps the most influential of these has been The Leapfrog Group, a consortium representing 130 employers and 65 Fortune 500 companies that purchase health care for their employees. This group has proposed specific regulatory guidelines for IPS that are purported to result in substantial cost containment and improved quality of care. This narrative review examines the impact of The Leapfrog Group's recommendations on critical care delivery in the United States.

  13. Caring for dying infants: experiences of neonatal intensive care nurses in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yam, B M; Rossiter, J C; Cheung, K Y

    2001-09-01

    Ten registered nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit in Hong Kong were interviewed to explore their experiences of caring for infants whose disease is not responsive to curative treatment, their perceptions of palliative care, and factors influencing their care. Eight categories emerged from the content analysis of the interviews: disbelieving; feeling ambivalent and helpless; protecting emotional self; providing optimal physical care to the infant; providing emotional support to the family; expressing empathy; lack of knowledge and counselling skills; and conflicting values in care. The subtle cultural upbringing and socialization in nurse training and workplace environment also contributed to their moral distress. Hospital and nurse administrators should consider different ways of facilitating palliative care in their acute care settings. For example, by culture-specific death education, peer support groups, bereavement teams, modification of departmental policies, and a supportive work environment. Future research could include the identification of family needs and coping as well as ethical decision-making among nurses.

  14. A Laptop Computer Application for Neonatal Intensive Care

    PubMed Central

    Stoeckeler, Joel S.; Ellis, Lynda B.M.

    1989-01-01

    A laptop computer system has been developed for the acquisition, calculation, and reporting of pediatric health care maintenance parameters used to assess fluid and caloric metabolic balance in ward and intensive care environments. A pilot study with inexperienced users of the system demonstrated shorter calculation and report generation times at all but the least complex test cases. More importantly, the system significantly reduces the proportion of errors made at all levels of complexity (p < 0.001). This system has proved to be a valuable bedside companion.

  15. Different research designs and their characteristics in intensive care

    PubMed Central

    Nedel, Wagner Luis; da Silveira, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Different research designs have various advantages and limitations inherent to their main characteristics. Knowledge of the proper use of each design is of great importance to understanding the applicability of research findings to clinical epidemiology. In intensive care, a hierarchical classification of designs can often be misleading if the characteristics of the design in this context are not understood. One must therefore be alert to common problems in randomized clinical trials and systematic reviews/meta-analyses that address clinical issues related to the care of the critically ill patient.

  16. Improving intensive care unit quality using collaborative networks.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sam R; Scales, Damon C

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative networks of intensive care units can help promote a quality-improvement agenda across an entire system or region. Proposed advantages include targeting a greater number of patients, sharing of resources, and common measurement systems for audit and feedback or benchmarking. This review focuses on elements that are essential for the success and sustainability of these collaborative networks, using as examples networks in Michigan and Ontario. More research is needed to understand the mechanisms through which collaborative networks lead to improved care delivery and to demonstrate their cost-effectiveness in comparison with other approaches to system-level quality improvement.

  17. Giving a nutritional fast hug in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Monares Zepeda, Enrique; Galindo Martín, Carlos Alfredo

    2015-05-01

    Implementing a nutrition support protocol in critical care is a complex and dynamic process that involves the use of evidence, education programs and constant monitoring. To facilitate this task we developed a mnemonic tool called the Nutritional FAST HUG (F: feeding, A: analgesia, S: stools, T: trace elements, H: head of bed, U: ulcers, G: glucose control) with a process also internally developed (both modified from the mnemonic proposed by Jean Louis Vincent) called MIAR (M: measure, I: interpret, A: act, R: reanalysis) showing an easy form to perform medical rounds at the intensive care unit using a systematic process.

  18. Sedation options for intubated intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Lacoske, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    A common requirement for intubated patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) is sedation and pain management to facilitate patient safety and timely, atraumatic healing. The Society of Critical Care Medicine guidelines for management of pain, sedation, and delirium in adult ICU patients provide assessment scales for pain, sedation, and delirium; medications for sedation and pain management, and protocols for weaning sedation, are discussed. Proficient assessment skills, pharmacologic knowledge of medications administered to provide sedation, and an understanding of the importance of nonpharmacologic interventions can help the registered nurse provide patient advocacy, safety, and improved outcomes.

  19. Limitation to Advanced Life Support in patients admitted to intensive care unit with integrated palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Mazutti, Sandra Regina Gonzaga; Nascimento, Andréia de Fátima; Fumis, Renata Rego Lins

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence of limitations to Advanced Life Support in critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit with integrated palliative care. Methods This retrospective cohort study included patients in the palliative care program of the intensive care unit of Hospital Paulistano over 18 years of age from May 1, 2011, to January 31, 2014. The limitations to Advanced Life Support that were analyzed included do-not-resuscitate orders, mechanical ventilation, dialysis and vasoactive drugs. Central tendency measures were calculated for quantitative variables. The chi-squared test was used to compare the characteristics of patients with or without limits to Advanced Life Support, and the Wilcoxon test was used to compare length of stay after Advanced Life Support. Confidence intervals reflecting p ≤ 0.05 were considered for statistical significance. Results A total of 3,487 patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, of whom 342 were included in the palliative care program. It was observed that after entering the palliative care program, it took a median of 2 (1 - 4) days for death to occur in the intensive care unit and 4 (2 - 11) days for hospital death to occur. Many of the limitations to Advanced Life Support (42.7%) took place on the first day of hospitalization. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (96.8%) and ventilatory support (73.6%) were the most adopted limitations. Conclusion The contribution of palliative care integrated into the intensive care unit was important for the practice of orthothanasia, i.e., the non-extension of the life of a critically ill patient by artificial means. PMID:27626949

  20. [Organ replacement therapy - renal replacement therapy in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Kraus, Daniel; Wanner, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Critically ill patients who are treated in an intensive care unit are at increased risk of developing acute renal failure. Every episode of renal failure decreases life expectancy. However, acute renal failure is no longer an immediate cause of death because renal function can be substituted medically and mechanically, by the use of renal replacement therapy. Hemodialysis and hemofiltration are the 2 fundamental modalities of renal replacement therapy and may be performed intermittently or continuously. The decision for one particular therapy has to be made for each patient individually. Peritoneal dialysis is an alternative treatment for acute renal failure, but is not available for immediate use in most centers. Contrast media and rhabdomyolysis are 2 common causes of toxic renal failure in the intensive care unit. However, they cannot be prevented by hemodialysis. PMID:27631449

  1. [Quality assurance and quality management in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Notz, K; Dubb, R; Kaltwasser, A; Hermes, C; Pfeffer, S

    2015-11-01

    Treatment success in hospitals, particularly in intensive care units, is directly tied to quality of structure, process, and outcomes. Technological and medical advancements lead to ever more complex treatment situations with highly specialized tasks in intensive care nursing. Quality criteria that can be used to describe and correctly measure those highly complex multiprofessional situations have only been recently developed and put into practice.In this article, it will be shown how quality in multiprofessional teams can be definded and assessed in daily clinical practice. Core aspects are the choice of a nursing theory, quality assurance measures, and quality management. One possible option of quality assurance is the use of standard operating procedures (SOPs). Quality can ultimately only be achieved if professional groups think beyond their boundaries, minimize errors, and establish and live out instructions and SOPs.

  2. Smart infusion technology: a minimum safety standard for intensive care?

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Linda J; Cameron, Victoria L

    There is overwhelming evidence that medication errors present a risk to patients. This risk is highest in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting and even greater when medications are administered via an infusion pump. Standard pumps will not alert for, or prevent, drug calculation, drug unit, button push, or multiple of ten errors when medication delivery data is inputted. However, the literature suggests that smart pumps programmed with hard (unchangeable) limits can significantly reduce drug errors at the point of administration. Staff at St George's Hospital paediatric ICU wanted to implement an infusion pump system that would be immediately effective in reducing medication errors at the point of administration. This article presents an overview of the relevant literature together with clinical examples from the authors' ICU, which demonstrates their experiences with smart pumps. It is the authors' firm belief that smart infusion technology sets a new minimum safety standard for intensive care.

  3. The obese child in the Intensive Care Unit. Update.

    PubMed

    Donoso Fuentes, Alejandro; Córdova L, Pablo; Hevia J, Pilar; Arriagada S, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Given that childhood obesity is an epidemic, the frequency of critically-ill patients who are overweight or obese seen at intensive care units has increased rapidly. Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ that secretes a number of protein hormones, including leptin, which stands out because it regulates adipose tissue mass. The presence of arterial hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, respiratory disease and chronic kidney disease may become apparent and complicate the course of obese pediatric patients in the Intensive Care Unit. Obesity management is complex and should involve patients, their families and the medical community. It should be coordinated with comprehensive government health policies and implemented in conjunction with a change in cultural context.

  4. The obese child in the Intensive Care Unit. Update.

    PubMed

    Donoso Fuentes, Alejandro; Córdova L, Pablo; Hevia J, Pilar; Arriagada S, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Given that childhood obesity is an epidemic, the frequency of critically-ill patients who are overweight or obese seen at intensive care units has increased rapidly. Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ that secretes a number of protein hormones, including leptin, which stands out because it regulates adipose tissue mass. The presence of arterial hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, respiratory disease and chronic kidney disease may become apparent and complicate the course of obese pediatric patients in the Intensive Care Unit. Obesity management is complex and should involve patients, their families and the medical community. It should be coordinated with comprehensive government health policies and implemented in conjunction with a change in cultural context. PMID:27164340

  5. Antimicrobial stewardship of β-lactams in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Cotta, Menino Osbert; Roberts, Jason A; Tabah, Alexis; Lipman, Jeffrey; Vogelaers, Dirk; Blot, Stijn

    2014-05-01

    Stewardship of all antimicrobials, including β-lactam antibiotics, has gained in prominence over the last decade. Appropriate use of these agents has become vitally important; especially in the treatment and management of the critically ill. Opportunities therefore exist to develop innovations to optimise the use of antimicrobials in places like the intensive care unit. The next few years represent an important window in which routine antimicrobial stewardship principles such as surveillance of local ecology, minimising overlap of spectrum of activity and prompt de-escalation upon review of cultures can be integrated with new technologies including improved diagnostic techniques, individualised dosing strategies and computerised decision support. It is important though, that these measures to improve stewardship in the intensive care unit continue to be critically evaluated in the literature.

  6. Intensive care patients' evaluations of the informed consent process.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul Alexander

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the informed consent process from the perspective of intensive care patients. Using the largest single-method database of patient-derived information in the United States, we systematically outlined and tested several key factors that influence patient evaluations of the intensive care unit (ICU) informed consent process. Measures of information, understanding, and decision-making involvement were found to predict overall patient satisfaction and patient loyalty intentions. Specific actions supportive of ICU informed consent, such as giving patients information on advance directives, patient's rights, and organ donation, resulted in significantly higher patient evaluation scores with large effect sizes. This research suggests that the effectiveness of the informed consent process in the ICU from the patient's perspective can be measured and evaluated and that ICU patients place a high value on the elements of the informed consent process. PMID:17704678

  7. [DRESS in intensive care unit: a challenging diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Derlon, V; Audibert, G; Barbaud, A; Mertes, P M

    2014-12-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia ans systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a severe medication-induced adverse reaction, which can threaten patient's life. Clinical symptoms and organ failures present wide variability. Furthermore, the latency period is long, so that diagnosis could be a real challenge in the intensive care unit. We report the case of a woman developing a DRESS after neurosurgery complicated by a nosocomial infection. PMID:25450727

  8. Mobility decline in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Fábio Santos; Paim, Daniel de Macedo; Brito, Juliana de Oliveira; Barros, Idiel de Araujo; Nogueira, Thiago Barbosa; Martinez, Bruno Prata; Pires, Thiago Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the variation in mobility during hospitalization in an intensive care unit and its association with hospital mortality. Methods This prospective study was conducted in an intensive care unit. The inclusion criteria included patients admitted with an independence score of ≥ 4 for both bed-chair transfer and locomotion, with the score based on the Functional Independence Measure. Patients with cardiac arrest and/or those who died during hospitalization were excluded. To measure the loss of mobility, the value obtained at discharge was calculated and subtracted from the value obtained on admission, which was then divided by the admission score and recorded as a percentage. Results The comparison of these two variables indicated that the loss of mobility during hospitalization was 14.3% (p < 0.001). Loss of mobility was greater in patients hospitalized for more than 48 hours in the intensive care unit (p < 0.02) and in patients who used vasopressor drugs (p = 0.041). However, the comparison between subjects aged 60 years or older and those younger than 60 years indicated no significant differences in the loss of mobility (p = 0.332), reason for hospitalization (p = 0.265), SAPS 3 score (p = 0.224), use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.117), or hospital mortality (p = 0.063). Conclusion There was loss of mobility during hospitalization in the intensive care unit. This loss was greater in patients who were hospitalized for more than 48 hours and in those who used vasopressors; however, the causal and prognostic factors associated with this decline need to be elucidated. PMID:27410406

  9. Procalcitonin use in a pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Cies, Jeffrey J; Chopra, Arun

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated whether procalcitonin (PCT) might aid diagnosing serious bacterial infections in a general pediatric intensive care unit population. Two-hundred and one patients accounted for 332 PCT samples. A PCT ≥1.45 ng/mL had a positive predictive value of 30%, a negative predictive value of 93% and a sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 75%. These data suggest PCT can assist in identifying patients without serious bacterial infections and limit antimicrobial use.

  10. Sleep in the Intensive Care Unit: A Review.

    PubMed

    Pulak, Lisa M; Jensen, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are susceptible to sleep deprivation. Disrupted sleep is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the critically ill patients. The etiology of sleep disruption is multifactorial. The article reviews the literature on sleep in the ICU, the effects of sleep deprivation, and strategies to promote sleep in the ICU. Until the impact of disrupted sleep is better explained, it is appropriate to provide critically ill patients with consolidated, restorative sleep.

  11. Potentially Preventable Deaths by Intensive Care Medicine in Mongolian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Begzjav, Tsolmon; Lundeg, Ganbold; Dünser, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the portion of hospitalized patients dying without prior intensive care unit (ICU) admission and assess whether death could have been prevented by intensive care. Methods. In this prospective, observational, multicenter study, data of adults dying in and outside the ICU in 5 tertiary and 14 secondary hospitals were collected during six months. A group of experts categorized patients dying without prior ICU admission as whether their death was potentially preventable or not. Results. 617 patients died (72.9% in and 27.1% outside the ICU) during the observation period. In 54/113 patients (32.3%) dying in the hospital without prior ICU admission, death was considered potentially preventable. The highest number of these deaths was seen in patients aged 16–30 years and those who suffered from an infection (83.3%), underwent surgery (58.3%), or sustained trauma (52%). Potentially preventable deaths resulted in a total number of 1,078 years of life lost and 709 productive years of life lost. Conclusions. Twenty-seven percent of adults dying in Mongolian secondary and tertiary level hospitals do so without prior ICU admission. One-third, mostly young patients suffering from acute reversible conditions, may have potentially been saved by intensive care medicine. PMID:27795857

  12. Ethical intensive care research: development of an ethics handbook.

    PubMed

    Rischbieth, A; Blythe, D

    2005-12-01

    Conduct of research involving humans in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting is complex and challenging. The vulnerable nature of critically ill patients raises issues of patient safety, and informed consent is difficult. With an increasing global interest in human research ethics, broadened government mandates have targeted improvements in research participant protection and research governance. A parallel rise in health consumerism and advocacy for privacy and protection of personal health information requires a clear understanding of the research participant role and importance of risk disclosure. In addition, the potential for conflicts of interest in a climate of increasingly competitive research funding, requires caution and transparency in related financial and contractual arrangements. The Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Clinical Trials Group (ANZICS CTG) fosters collaborative ICU research activity. We have developed An Ethics Handbook for Researchers (EH) for the ANZICS CTG for intended use by researchers in Australian and New Zealand ICUs. The purpose of the EH is to act as a practical advisory guide/supplement; to add clarification regarding ethical issues specific to intensive care research, to assist in the expedition of ethics committee research submission and to summarise available useful resources. This article introduces a précis of key issues from the EH including specific ethical difficulties pertaining to ICU research, a summary of the process by which ethics committee decisions in Australia and New Zealand are informed, and the use of ethical checklists to assist researchers. PMID:16539587

  13. Ethical intensive care research: development of an ethics handbook.

    PubMed

    Rischbieth, A; Blythe, D

    2005-12-01

    Conduct of research involving humans in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting is complex and challenging. The vulnerable nature of critically ill patients raises issues of patient safety, and informed consent is difficult. With an increasing global interest in human research ethics, broadened government mandates have targeted improvements in research participant protection and research governance. A parallel rise in health consumerism and advocacy for privacy and protection of personal health information requires a clear understanding of the research participant role and importance of risk disclosure. In addition, the potential for conflicts of interest in a climate of increasingly competitive research funding, requires caution and transparency in related financial and contractual arrangements. The Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Clinical Trials Group (ANZICS CTG) fosters collaborative ICU research activity. We have developed An Ethics Handbook for Researchers (EH) for the ANZICS CTG for intended use by researchers in Australian and New Zealand ICUs. The purpose of the EH is to act as a practical advisory guide/supplement; to add clarification regarding ethical issues specific to intensive care research, to assist in the expedition of ethics committee research submission and to summarise available useful resources. This article introduces a précis of key issues from the EH including specific ethical difficulties pertaining to ICU research, a summary of the process by which ethics committee decisions in Australia and New Zealand are informed, and the use of ethical checklists to assist researchers.

  14. [Safety in intensive care medicine. Can we learn from aviation?].

    PubMed

    Graf, J; Pump, S; Maas, W; Stüben, U

    2012-05-01

    Safety is of extraordinary value in commercial aviation. Therefore, sophisticated and complex systems have been developed to ensure safe operation. Within this system, the pilots are of specific concern: they form the human-machine interface and have a special responsibility in controlling and monitoring all aircraft systems. In order to prepare pilots for their challenging task, specific selection of suitable candidates is crucial. In addition, for every commercial pilot regulatory requirements demand a certain number of simulator training sessions and check flights to be completed at prespecified intervals. In contrast, career choice for intensive care medicine most likely depends on personal reasons rather than eligibility or aptitude. In intensive care medicine, auditing, licensing, or mandatory training are largely nonexistent. Although knowledge of risk management and safety culture in aviation can be transferred to the intensive care unit, the diversity of corporate culture and tradition of leadership and training will represent a barrier for the direct transfer of standards or procedures. To accomplish this challenging task, the analysis of appropriate fields of action with regard to structural requirements and the process of change are essential. PMID:22526119

  15. Postpartum depression on the neonatal intensive care unit: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tahirkheli, Noor N; Cherry, Amanda S; Tackett, Alayna P; McCaffree, Mary Anne; Gillaspy, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    As the most common complication of childbirth affecting 10%–15% of women, postpartum depression (PPD) goes vastly undetected and untreated, inflicting long-term consequences on both mother and child. Studies consistently show that mothers of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) experience PPD at higher rates with more elevated symptomatology than mothers of healthy infants. Although there has been increased awareness regarding the overall prevalence of PPD and recognition of the need for health care providers to address this health issue, there has not been adequate attention to PPD in the context of the NICU. This review will focus on an overview of PPD and psychological morbidities, the prevalence of PPD in mothers of infants admitted to NICU, associated risk factors, potential PPD screening measures, promising intervention programs, the role of NICU health care providers in addressing PPD in the NICU, and suggested future research directions. PMID:25473317

  16. Meeting the needs of patients' families in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Khalaila, Rabia

    2014-07-01

    A review of articles published between 2000 and 2013, retrieved from several databases, was conducted to identify research findings regarding nursing interventions intended to meet the needs of the family members of patients in the intensive care unit. The dimensions of need identified were support, comfort, reassurance, information and closeness, with reassurance, information and closeness being the most important. Overall, the needs of patients' family members were unmet. The results of studies revealed that providing families with proactive communication strategies and information via brochures or leaflets, developing education programmes and establishing family-centred care may be effective in increasing family members' satisfaction, improving their understanding of the patient's condition and decreasing anxiety and depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Consequently, nurses should promote comprehensive family-centred care by using the best evidence to meet families' needs. However, more experimental studies are required to determine the effectiveness of specific interventions. PMID:25159786

  17. Human error in daily intensive nursing care1

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Sabrina da Costa Machado; Queiroz, Ana Beatriz Azevedo; Büscher, Andreas; Stipp, Marluci Andrade Conceição

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to identify the errors in daily intensive nursing care and analyze them according to the theory of human error. Method: quantitative, descriptive and exploratory study, undertaken at the Intensive Care Center of a hospital in the Brazilian Sentinel Hospital Network. The participants were 36 professionals from the nursing team. The data were collected through semistructured interviews, observation and lexical analysis in the software ALCESTE(r). Results: human error in nursing care can be related to the approach of the system, through active faults and latent conditions. The active faults are represented by the errors in medication administration and not raising the bedside rails. The latent conditions can be related to the communication difficulties in the multiprofessional team, lack of standards and institutional routines and absence of material resources. Conclusion: the errors identified interfere in nursing care and the clients' recovery and can cause damage. Nevertheless, they are treated as common events inherent in daily practice. The need to acknowledge these events is emphasized, stimulating the safety culture at the institution. PMID:26625998

  18. MRSA Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors among Health-Care Workers in Non-outbreak Situations in the Dutch-German EUREGIO.

    PubMed

    Sassmannshausen, Ricarda; Deurenberg, Ruud H; Köck, Robin; Hendrix, Ron; Jurke, Annette; Rossen, John W A; Friedrich, Alexander W

    2016-01-01

    Preventing the spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in healthcare facilities is a major infection control target. However, only a few studies have assessed the potential role of healthcare workers (HCWs) for MRSA dissemination. To investigate the MRSA prevalence and the risk factors for MRSA colonization among HCWs, nasopharyngeal swabs were taken between June 2010 and January 2011 from 726 employees from nine acute care hospitals with different care levels within the German part of a Dutch-German border region (EUREGIO). The isolated MRSA strains were investigated using spa typing. The overall MRSA prevalence among HCWs in a non-outbreak situation was 4.6% (33 of 726), and was higher in nurses (5.6%, 29 of 514) than in physicians (1.2%, 1 of 83). Possible risk factors associated with MRSA colonization were a known history of MRSA carriage and the presence of acne. Intensive contact with patients may facilitate MRSA transmission between patients and HCWs. Furthermore, an accumulation of risk factors was accompanied by an increased MRSA prevalence in HCW. PMID:27597843

  19. MRSA Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors among Health-Care Workers in Non-outbreak Situations in the Dutch-German EUREGIO

    PubMed Central

    Sassmannshausen, Ricarda; Deurenberg, Ruud H.; Köck, Robin; Hendrix, Ron; Jurke, Annette; Rossen, John W. A.; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2016-01-01

    Preventing the spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in healthcare facilities is a major infection control target. However, only a few studies have assessed the potential role of healthcare workers (HCWs) for MRSA dissemination. To investigate the MRSA prevalence and the risk factors for MRSA colonization among HCWs, nasopharyngeal swabs were taken between June 2010 and January 2011 from 726 employees from nine acute care hospitals with different care levels within the German part of a Dutch-German border region (EUREGIO). The isolated MRSA strains were investigated using spa typing. The overall MRSA prevalence among HCWs in a non-outbreak situation was 4.6% (33 of 726), and was higher in nurses (5.6%, 29 of 514) than in physicians (1.2%, 1 of 83). Possible risk factors associated with MRSA colonization were a known history of MRSA carriage and the presence of acne. Intensive contact with patients may facilitate MRSA transmission between patients and HCWs. Furthermore, an accumulation of risk factors was accompanied by an increased MRSA prevalence in HCW.

  20. MRSA Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors among Health-Care Workers in Non-outbreak Situations in the Dutch-German EUREGIO

    PubMed Central

    Sassmannshausen, Ricarda; Deurenberg, Ruud H.; Köck, Robin; Hendrix, Ron; Jurke, Annette; Rossen, John W. A.; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2016-01-01

    Preventing the spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in healthcare facilities is a major infection control target. However, only a few studies have assessed the potential role of healthcare workers (HCWs) for MRSA dissemination. To investigate the MRSA prevalence and the risk factors for MRSA colonization among HCWs, nasopharyngeal swabs were taken between June 2010 and January 2011 from 726 employees from nine acute care hospitals with different care levels within the German part of a Dutch-German border region (EUREGIO). The isolated MRSA strains were investigated using spa typing. The overall MRSA prevalence among HCWs in a non-outbreak situation was 4.6% (33 of 726), and was higher in nurses (5.6%, 29 of 514) than in physicians (1.2%, 1 of 83). Possible risk factors associated with MRSA colonization were a known history of MRSA carriage and the presence of acne. Intensive contact with patients may facilitate MRSA transmission between patients and HCWs. Furthermore, an accumulation of risk factors was accompanied by an increased MRSA prevalence in HCW. PMID:27597843

  1. Connection versus disconnection: examining culturally competent care in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, David B; Hendson, Leonora; Reis, Misty D

    2014-01-01

    Culturally competent health care is of critical importance; however, it is presented as a frequent challenge in health care settings. This study explored cross-cultural care from the health care provider perspective within two tertiary level Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs). Fifty eight inter-professional health care providers (HCP) participated in focus groups. Participants identified perceived care-related experiences of newly immigrated parents whose infant received care in the NICU as well as health care provider perspectives on delivering that care. Results identified core processes of "connection" and "disconnection," which appeared to have a substantial bearing on NICU experience and interaction. Connection comprised congruity, synergy, and "fit," and resulted in an enhanced relationship between the family and HCP. Disconnection, in contrast, entailed a lack of "fit" and in some cases, misunderstanding and/or conflict between the family and a member or members of the health care team. Connection and disconnection occurred at various junctures of NICU care. These junctures reflected interaction between the family and HCP at the bedside and/or at the level of the unit, hospital, or community at large. Implications for practice, policy, and research are discussed. PMID:24483333

  2. Paediatric intensive care in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: a developing subspecialty.

    PubMed

    Goh, A Y; Lum, L C; Chan, P W

    1999-12-01

    Paediatric intensive care in Malaysia is a developing subspecialty with an increasing number of specialists with a paediatric background being involved in the care of critically ill children. A part prospective and part retrospective review of 118 consecutive non-neonatal ventilated patients in University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur was carried out from 1 June 1995 to 31 December 1996 to study the clinical epidemiology and outcome in our paediatric intensive case unit (PICU). The mean age of the patients was 33.9 +/- 6.0 months (median 16 months). The main mode of admission was emergency (96.6 per cent) with an overall mortality rate of 42 per cent (50/118). The mean paediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) score was 20 +/- 0.98 SEM, with 53 per cent of patients having a score of over 30 per cent. Multiorgan dysfunction (MODS) was identified in 71 per cent of patients. Admission efficiency (mortality risk > 1 per cent) was 97 per cent. Standardized mortality rate using PRISM was an acceptable 1.06. The main diagnostic categories were respiratory (32 per cent), neurology (22 per cent), haematology-oncology (18 per cent); the aetiology of dysfunction was mainly infective. Non-survivors were older (29.5 vs. 13.8 months, p < 0.0001), had more severe illness (mean PRISM score 30 vs. 14, p < 0.0001), were more likely to develop MODS (96 vs. 53 per cent, p < 0.0001) and required more intervention and monitoring. Paediatric intensive care in Malaysia differs widely from that in developed countries in patient characteristics, severity of illness, and care modalities provided.

  3. Iranian nurses’ experiences of brain dead donors care in intensive care units: A phenomenological study

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Shayesteh; Kanani, Tahereh; Abedi, Heidarali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Care of brain dead donors is complex, critical, and sensitive and has a direct and positive impact on the end result of organ and tissue transplantation process. This study describes the nurses’ experiences of care of brain dead donors in intensive care units (ICU). Materials and Methods: This research was performed by phenomenological method that is a qualitative approach. Purposive sampling was used to gather the data. The researcher reached to data saturation by deep interviews conducted with eight participants from ICU nurses in Isfahan hospitals who cooperated in care of brain dead donors. Data analysis was performed according to Colaizzi analysis method. Results: Interviews were analyzed and the results of analysis led to “Excruciating tasks” as the main theme formed by psychological effects of facing the situation, heavy and stressful care, defect of scientific knowledge, conflict between feeling and duty, outcome of attitude change in behavior, emotional responses to perceived psychological afflictions, doubt to medical diagnosis, spiritual perceptions, and biological responses when faced with the situation. Conclusion: Caring of brain dead organ donors is difficult and stressful for intensive care nurses and can be a threat for nurses’ health and quality of nursing care. So, providing suitable physical, mental, and working conditions is necessary to make suitable background to maintain and increase nurses’ health and quality of care and effective cooperation of this group of health professionals in organ procurement process. PMID:24554946

  4. Intensive care unit research ethics and trials on unconscious patients.

    PubMed

    Gillett, G R

    2015-05-01

    There are widely acknowledged ethical issues in enrolling unconscious patients in research trials, particularly in intensive care unit (ICU) settings. An analysis of those issues shows that, by and large, patients are better served in units where research is actively taking place for several reasons: i) they do not fall prey to therapeutic prejudices without clear evidential support, ii) they get a chance of accessing new and potentially beneficial treatments, iii) a climate of careful monitoring of patients and their clinical progress is necessary for good clinical research and affects the care of all patients and iv) even those not in the treatment arm of a trial of a new intervention must receive best current standard care (according to international evidence-based treatment guidelines). Given that we have discovered a number of 'best practice' regimens of care that do not optimise outcomes in ICU settings, it is of great benefit to all patients (including those participating in research) that we are constantly updating and evaluating what we do. Therefore, the practice of ICU-based clinical research on patients, many of whom cannot give prospective informed consent, ticks all the ethical boxes and ought to be encouraged in our health system. It is very important that the evaluation of protocols for ICU research should not overlook obvious (albeit probabilistic) benefits to patients and the acceptability of responsible clinicians entering patients into well-designed trials, even though the ICU setting does not and cannot conform to typical informed consent procedures and requirements.

  5. International comparisons of intensive care: informing outcomes and improving standards

    PubMed Central

    Prin, Meghan; Wunsch, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Interest in international comparisons of critical illness is growing, but the utility of these studies is questionable. This review examines the challenges of international comparisons and highlights areas where international data provide information relevant to clinical practice and resource allocation. Recent findings International comparisons of ICU resources demonstrate that definitions of critical illness and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds vary due to differences in ability to provide organ support and variable staffing. Despite these limitations, recent international data provide key information to understand the pros and cons of different availability of ICU beds on patient flow and outcomes, and also highlight the need to ensure long-term follow-up due to heterogeneity in discharge practices for critically ill patients. With increasing emphasis on curbing costs of healthcare, systems that deliver lower cost care provide data on alternative options, such as regionalization, flexible allocation of beds, and bed rationing. Summary Differences in provision of critical care can be leveraged to inform decisions on allocation of ICU beds, improve interpretation of clinical outcomes, and assess ways to decrease costs of care. International definitions of key components of critical care are needed to facilitate research and ensure rigorous comparisons. PMID:22954664

  6. Discussing dying in the diaspora: attitudes towards advance care planning among first generation Dutch and Italian migrants in rural Australia.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Craig; Smith, Jessica; Toussaint, Yann; Auret, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Western cultural practices and values have largely shaped advance care planning (ACP) policies across the world. Low uptake of ACP among ethnic minority groups in Western countries has been interpreted with reference to cultural differences. This paper adopts a life-history approach to explore attitudes towards ACP among older, first-generation Dutch-Australian and Italian-Australian migrants. Thirty people participated in extended ethnographic interviews (N = 17) and group discussions (N = 13) during 2012. Transcripts were thematically analyzed and interpreted using a Foucauldian perspective on knowledge and power. Migration experiences, ongoing contact with the native country and participation in migrant community support networks influenced attitudes towards ACP. Dutch participants framed ACP discussions with reference to euthanasia, and adopted a more individualist approach to medical decision-making. Italian participants often spoke of familial roles and emphasized a family-based decision making style. The importance of migrant identity has been neglected in previous discussions of cultural factors influencing ACP uptake among ethnic minority groups. The unique migration experience should be considered alongside culturally appropriate approaches to decision-making, in order to ensure equitable access to ACP among migrant groups. PMID:24560228

  7. Innovation in Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care: An Exponential Convergence Toward Transformation of Care.

    PubMed

    Maher, Kevin O; Chang, Anthony C; Shin, Andrew; Hunt, Juliette; Wong, Hector R

    2015-10-01

    The word innovation is derived from the Latin noun innovatus, meaning renewal or change. Although companies such as Google and Apple are nearly synonymous with innovation, virtually all sectors in our current lives are imbued with yearn for innovation. This has led to organizational focus on innovative strategies as well as recruitment of chief innovation officers and teams in a myriad of organizations. At times, however, the word innovation seems like an overused cliché, as there are now more than 5,000 books in print with the word "innovation" in the title. More recently, innovation has garnered significant attention in health care. The future of health care is expected to innovate on a large scale in order to deliver sustained value for an overall transformative care. To date, there are no published reports on the state of the art in innovation in pediatric health care and in particular, pediatric cardiac intensive care. This report will address the issue of innovation in pediatric medicine with relevance to cardiac intensive care and delineate possible future directions and strategies in pediatric cardiac intensive care. PMID:26467873

  8. Innovation in Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care: An Exponential Convergence Toward Transformation of Care.

    PubMed

    Maher, Kevin O; Chang, Anthony C; Shin, Andrew; Hunt, Juliette; Wong, Hector R

    2015-10-01

    The word innovation is derived from the Latin noun innovatus, meaning renewal or change. Although companies such as Google and Apple are nearly synonymous with innovation, virtually all sectors in our current lives are imbued with yearn for innovation. This has led to organizational focus on innovative strategies as well as recruitment of chief innovation officers and teams in a myriad of organizations. At times, however, the word innovation seems like an overused cliché, as there are now more than 5,000 books in print with the word "innovation" in the title. More recently, innovation has garnered significant attention in health care. The future of health care is expected to innovate on a large scale in order to deliver sustained value for an overall transformative care. To date, there are no published reports on the state of the art in innovation in pediatric health care and in particular, pediatric cardiac intensive care. This report will address the issue of innovation in pediatric medicine with relevance to cardiac intensive care and delineate possible future directions and strategies in pediatric cardiac intensive care.

  9. What neonatal intensive care nurses need to know about neonatal palliative care.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Kathy

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and prioritize topics for a professional development program in neonatal palliative care. A total of 276 nurses and midwives who work in an Australian neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and 26 international healthcare professionals working in NICU and palliative care served as participants. A Delphi technique was used, consisting of a series of rounds of data collection via interview and questionnaire, to identify and consolidate opinions of nurses and other healthcare professionals who work in neonatal intensive care units. The main outcome measures were: (1) Topics to be included in a professional development program for nurses working in neonatal intensive care units and (2) the preferred format of the program. Twenty-three high-priority topics were identified, which included preparing families when death is imminent, how to provide emotional support to grieving parents, advocating for a dying baby, and assessing and managing pain in a dying baby. Care of a dying infant requires the same skill set as caring for older terminally ill children internationally. A combination of face-to-face lectures and interactive workshops using case studies and audiovisual examples is the preferred format.

  10. [The caring of family members in the intensive care units from the Jean Watson perspective].

    PubMed

    Vázquez Calatayud, M; Eseverri Azcoiti, M C

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a brief reflection on the caring of families in the Intensive Care Units. To address this issue, Jean Watson, one of the most important theoreticians on nursing of our days, has been taken as a reference. Watson was chosen because it is possible to understand perfectly the need to contemplate the family within the holistic care of critical patients from his theory. Thus, it is proposed to carry out an investigation that studies the care of the family members of the critical patient based on the idea of Watson's caring theory. To understand this approach, the theory of caring is analyzed and evaluated according to the guide produced by McEwen in 2007.

  11. End-of-life care in the neonatal intensive care unit: applying comfort theory.

    PubMed

    Marchuk, Allison

    2016-07-01

    The provision of quality end-of-life care is essential when a neonate is dying. End-of-life care delivered in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) must consider the needs of both the newborn and their family. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how comfort theory and its associated taxonomic structure can be used as a conceptual framework for nurses and midwives providing end-of-life care to neonates and their families. Comfort theory and its taxonomic structure are presented and issues related to end-of-life care in the NICU are highlighted. A case study is used to illustrate the application of comfort theory and issues related to implementation are discussed. The delivery of end-of-life care in the NICU can be improved through the application of comfort.

  12. Breaking bad news and discussing goals of care in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hollyday, Sheryl L; Buonocore, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The intensive care unit is a high-stakes environment in which nurses, including advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), often assist patients and families to navigate life and death situations. These high-stakes situations often require discussions that include bad news and discussions about goals of care or limiting aggressive care, and APRNs must develop expertise and techniques to be skilled communicators for conducting these crucial conversations. This article explores the art of communication, the learned skill of delivering bad news in the health care setting, and the incorporation of this news into a discussion about goals of care for patients. As APRNs learn to incorporate effective communication skills into practice, patient care and communication will ultimately be enhanced.

  13. [Nurses' perspective on interprofessional communication on an intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Knoll, Martin; Lendner, Ilka

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore experience in nurses' interdisciplinary/interprofessional communication on an intensive care unit. The structure of communication and influencing factors were shown and interpreted from the perspective of the nurses. Nurses working on an internal medical intensive care unit at a teaching facility in central Germany were questioned by means of semi-structured interviews. One main result was that for nurses the culture of communication in the investigation unit was characterized primarily by hierarchical structures imposed by the physicians. This dominance was identified in all nursing activities resulting in a considerable adverse effect on the flow of information concerning the patient between nurses and physicians. Especially within the context of daily rounds nurses were confronted with barriers to participate actively with their knowledge and professional competence in the process of decision-making. The problems described are well known in everyday nursing practice and have been dealt with in the English research literature. However, this study's aim is to present and summarize the gained insights and to transfer them in a practice-oriented way into a selected field of work. Possible solutions for the problems of inter-professional communication are suggested in subsequent work steps in order to optimize patient care. PMID:18850538

  14. A Business Case for Tele-Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Coustasse, Alberto; Deslich, Stacie; Bailey, Deanna; Hairston, Alesia; Paul, David

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: A tele-intensive care unit (tele-ICU) uses telemedicine in an intensive care unit (ICU) setting, applying technology to provide care to critically ill patients by off-site clinical resources. The purpose of this review was to examine the implementation, adoption, and utilization of tele-ICU systems by hospitals to determine their efficiency and efficacy as identified by cost savings and patient outcomes. Methods: This literature review examined a large number of studies of implementation of tele-ICU systems in hospitals. Results: The evidence supporting cost savings was mixed. Implementation of a tele-ICU system was associated with cost savings, shorter lengths of stay, and decreased mortality. However, two studies suggested increased hospital cost after implementation of tele-ICUs is initially expensive but eventually results in cost savings and better clinical outcomes. Conclusions: Intensivists working these systems are able to more effectively treat ICU patients, providing better clinical outcomes for patients at lower costs compared with hospitals without a tele-ICU. PMID:25662529

  15. The Use of Modafinil in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Michal; Weinhouse, Gerald

    2016-02-01

    As patients recover from their critical illness, the focus of intensive care unit (ICU) care becomes rehabilitation. Fatigue, excessive daytime somnolence (EDS), and depression can delay their recovery and potentially worsen outcomes. Psychostimulants, particularly modafinil (Provigil), have been shown to alleviate some of these symptoms in various patient populations, and as clinical trials are underway exploring this novel use of the drug, we present a case series of 3 patients in our institution's Thoracic Surgery Intensive Care Unit. Our 3 patients were chosen as a result of their fatigue, EDS, and/or depression, which prolonged their ICU stay and precluded them from participating in physical therapy, an integral component of the rehabilitative process. The patients were given 200 mg of modafinil each morning to increase patient wakefulness, encourage their participation, and enable a more restful sleep during the night. Although the drug was undoubtedly not the sole reason why our patients became more active, the temporal relationship between starting the drug and our patients' clinical improvement makes it likely that it contributed. Based on our observations with these patients, the known effects of modafinil, its safety profile, and the published experiences of others, we believe that modafinil has potential benefits when utilized in some critically ill patients and that the consequences of delayed patient recovery and a prolonged ICU stay may outweigh the risks of potential modafinil side effects.

  16. Effects of stress management program on the quality of nursing care and intensive care unit nurses

    PubMed Central

    Pahlavanzadeh, Saied; Asgari, Zohreh; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: High level of stress in intensive care unit nurses affects the quality of their nursing care. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of a stress management program on the quality of nursing care of intensive care unit nurses. Materials and Methods: This study is a randomized clinical trial that was conducted on 65 nurses. The samples were selected by stratified sampling of the nurses working in intensive care units 1, 2, 3 in Al-Zahra Hospital in Isfahan, Iran and were randomly assigned to two groups. The intervention group underwent an intervention, including 10 sessions of stress management that was held twice a week. In the control group, placebo sessions were held simultaneously. Data were gathered by demographic checklist and Quality Patient Care Scale before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention in both groups. Then, the data were analyzed by Student's t-test, Mann–Whitney, Chi-square, Fisher's exact test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) through SPSS software version 18. Results: Mean scores of overall and dimensions of quality of care in the intervention group were significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to pre-intervention (P < 0.001). The results showed that the quality of care in the intervention group was significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: As stress management is an effective method to improve the quality of care, the staffs are recommended to consider it in improvement of the quality of nursing care. PMID:27186196

  17. Outpatient costs in pharmaceutically treated diabetes patients with and without a diagnosis of depression in a Dutch primary care setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To assess differences in outpatient costs among pharmaceutically treated diabetes patients with and without a diagnosis of depression in a Dutch primary care setting. Methods A retrospective case control study over 3 years (2002-2004). Data on 7128 depressed patients and 23772 non-depressed matched controls were available from the electronic medical record system of 20 general practices organized in one large primary care organization in the Netherlands. A total of 393 depressed patients with diabetes and 494 non-depressed patients with diabetes were identified in these records. The data that were extracted from the medical record system concerned only outpatient costs, which included GP care, referrals, and medication. Results Mean total outpatient costs per year in depressed diabetes patients were €1039 (SD 743) in the period 2002-2004, which was more than two times as high as in non-depressed diabetes patients (€492, SD 434). After correction for age, sex, type of insurance, diabetes treatment, and comorbidity, the difference in total annual costs between depressed and non-depressed diabetes patients changed from €408 (uncorrected) to €463 (corrected) in multilevel analyses. Correction for comorbidity had the largest impact on the difference in costs between both groups. Conclusions Outpatient costs in depressed patients with diabetes are substantially higher than in non-depressed patients with diabetes even after adjusting for confounders. Future research should investigate whether effective treatment of depression among diabetes patients can reduce health care costs in the long term. PMID:22361361

  18. Current status of intensive care units registered as critical care subspecialty training hospitals in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Sang-Hyun; Jeong, Cheol-Won; Lee, Seong-Heon; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Koh, Younsuck

    2014-03-01

    There is a lack of information on critical care in Korea. The aim of this study was to determine the current status of Korean intensive care units (ICUs), focusing on the organization, characteristics of admitted patients, and nurse and physician staffing. Critical care specialists in charge of all 105 critical care specialty training hospitals nationwide completed a questionnaire survey. Among the ICUs, 56.4% were located in or near the capital city. Only 38 ICUs (17.3%) had intensive care specialists with a 5-day work week. The average daytime nurse-to-patient ratio was 1:2.7. Elderly people ≥ 65 yr of age comprised 53% of the adult patients. The most common reasons for admission to adult ICUs were respiratory insufficiency and postoperative management. Nurse and physician staffing was insufficient for the appropriate critical care in many ICUs. Staffing was worse in areas outside the capital city. Much effort, including enhanced reimbursement of critical care costs, must be made to improve the quality of critical care at the national level.

  19. The changing face of critical care medicine: nurse practitioners in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Molitor-Kirsch, Shirley; Thompson, Lisa; Milonovich, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, healthcare has undergone countless changes. Some of the important changes in recent years have been budget cuts, decreased resident work hours, and increased patient acuity. The need for additional clinical expertise at the bedside has resulted in nurse practitioners becoming an integral part of the healthcare delivery team. To date, little has been published regarding the role of the nurse practitioners in intensive care units. This article outlines how one pediatric hospital has successfully utilized nurse practitioners in the intensive care unit. PMID:15876885

  20. Patient's self-determination in intensive care-from an action- and confirmation theoretical perspective. The intensive care nurse view.

    PubMed

    Meijers, Katarina E; Gustafsson, Barbro

    2008-08-01

    When becoming an intensive care patient life changes dramatically. In order to save life, different actions are performed by the caregivers and the patient's ability to exercise self-determination is non-existent. After the acute phase the patient is more awake and the possibilities for self-determination change. The purpose of this study was to describe intensive care nurses' (ICNs) views of patient's self-determination in an intensive care unit and to systematize ICNs' nursing actions for supporting patient's self-determination from an action- and confirmation-theoretic perspective. In order to answer these questions, 17 interviews with ICNs were conducted by the use of the Critical Incident Technique (CIT). The transcripts were then analysed using a hermeneutic analysis method and structured by the SAUC model for confirming nursing. The main findings were that the ICN thought that the ICU patient's self-determination was low and restricted. It was more common that the ICN acted to strengthen the patient's self-determination in nursing care, but there were no specific nursing goals for patient's self-determination. The most common actions for supporting self-determination were supplying the patient with information and engaging the patient in making a day plan. The nursing implications are that the ICN's view of human being as an acting subject is important for the ICN's awareness to recognise the patient's own personal resources to handle the critically ill situation and that the ICN's competence to manifest qualified nursing is necessary for strengthening patient's self-determination.

  1. [Principles of intensive care in severe acute pancreatitis in 2008].

    PubMed

    Darvas, Katalin; Futó, Judit; Okrös, Ilona; Gondos, Tibor; Csomós, Akos; Kupcsulik, Péter

    2008-11-23

    Acute pancreatitis is a dynamic, often progressive disease; 14-20% require intensive care in its severe form due to multiorgan dysfunction and/or failure. This review was created using systematic literature review of articles published on this subject in the last 5 years. The outcome of severe acute pancreatitis is determined by the inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction - the prognostic scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, Glasgow Prognostic Index, Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, Multi Organ Dysfunction Syndrome Scale, Ranson Scale) can be used to determine outcome. Clinical signs (age, coexisting diseases, confusion, obesity) and biochemistry values (serum amylase, lipase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, creatinine, urea, calcium) have important prognostic roles as well. Early organ failure increases the risk of late abdominal complications and mortality. Intensive care can provide appropriate multi-function patient monitoring which helps in early recognition of complications and appropriate target-controlled treatment. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis aims at reducing systemic inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction and, on the other side, at increasing the anti-inflammatory response. Oral starvation for 24-48 hours is effective in reducing the exocrine activity of the pancreas; the efficacy of protease inhibitors is questionable. Early intravascular volume resuscitation and stable haemodynamics improve microcirculation. Early oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation provide adequate oxygenation. Electrolyte and acid-base control can be as important as tight glucose control. Adequate pain relief can be achieved by thoracic epidural catheterization. Early enteral nutrition with immunonutrition should be used. There is evidence that affecting the coagulation cascade by activated protein C can play a role in reducing the inflammatory response. The complex therapy of acute pancreatitis includes appropriate

  2. [Principles of intensive care in severe acute pancreatitis in 2008].

    PubMed

    Darvas, Katalin; Futó, Judit; Okrös, Ilona; Gondos, Tibor; Csomós, Akos; Kupcsulik, Péter

    2008-11-23

    Acute pancreatitis is a dynamic, often progressive disease; 14-20% require intensive care in its severe form due to multiorgan dysfunction and/or failure. This review was created using systematic literature review of articles published on this subject in the last 5 years. The outcome of severe acute pancreatitis is determined by the inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction - the prognostic scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, Glasgow Prognostic Index, Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, Multi Organ Dysfunction Syndrome Scale, Ranson Scale) can be used to determine outcome. Clinical signs (age, coexisting diseases, confusion, obesity) and biochemistry values (serum amylase, lipase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, creatinine, urea, calcium) have important prognostic roles as well. Early organ failure increases the risk of late abdominal complications and mortality. Intensive care can provide appropriate multi-function patient monitoring which helps in early recognition of complications and appropriate target-controlled treatment. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis aims at reducing systemic inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction and, on the other side, at increasing the anti-inflammatory response. Oral starvation for 24-48 hours is effective in reducing the exocrine activity of the pancreas; the efficacy of protease inhibitors is questionable. Early intravascular volume resuscitation and stable haemodynamics improve microcirculation. Early oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation provide adequate oxygenation. Electrolyte and acid-base control can be as important as tight glucose control. Adequate pain relief can be achieved by thoracic epidural catheterization. Early enteral nutrition with immunonutrition should be used. There is evidence that affecting the coagulation cascade by activated protein C can play a role in reducing the inflammatory response. The complex therapy of acute pancreatitis includes appropriate

  3. Frequency and duration of handwashing in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Graham, M

    1990-04-01

    The effects on hand decontamination of the introduction of an antiseptic handrub lotion in an intensive care unit was studied. To obtain baseline data, nursing, medical, physiotherapy, radiology, and orderly staff members were observed. Further observations were carried out after the introduction of the handrub lotion. Patient care activities were classified as high or low, according to the degree of contact with the patients or their equipment. A total of 884 patient contacts and 341 hand decontamination episodes was observed: 440 contacts and 140 handwashes in stage one (32%) and 444 contacts and 201 handwashes in stage two (45%). There was an increase of 13% in hand decontamination frequency after the introduction of the handrub lotion. The data indicate that the frequency of hand decontamination is below levels recommended by infection control authorities. Increasing the accessibility of hand decontamination facilities did result in a slight increase in handwashing compliance.

  4. [Information system at Department of Cardiac Surgery Intensive Care Unit].

    PubMed

    Dokozić, Josipa

    2014-03-01

    This paper analyzes the aspects of using computer technology in nursing practice. Transfer and managing of data, information and knowledge in nursing is enabled by using modern technology and suitable applications. Cardio applications at the Intensive Care Unit of Department of Cardiac Surgery in Osijek enables nurses/technicians to gain insight into patient personal data, medical history, microbiological findings, interventions that have been made as well as those scheduled in the field of health care, all this by using a few simple connections. Nurses/technicians are those who enter patient data into his/her Electronic Health Record. There are multiple contributions of cardiac system. In comparison with previous paper-based managing of nursing documentation, this program has considerably facilitated and improved nursing practice.

  5. Intravenous Medication Administration in Intensive Care: Opportunities for Technological Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jacqueline; Berner, Eta; Bothe, Olaf; Rymarchuk, Irina

    2008-01-01

    Medication administration errors have been shown to be frequent and serious. Error is particularly prevalent in highly technical specialties such as critical care. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of intravenous medication administration in five intensive care units. These data were used within the context of a larger study to design information system decision support to decrease medication administration errors in these settings. Nurses were observed during the course of their work and their intravenous medication administration process, medication order source, references used, calculation method, number of medications prepared simultaneously, and any interruptions occurring during the preparation and delivery phases of the administration event were recorded. In addition, chart reviews of medication administration records were completed and nurses were asked to complete an anonymous drop-box questionnaire regarding their experiences with medication administration error. The results of this study are discussed in terms of potential informatics solutions for reducing medication administration error. PMID:18998790

  6. Early mobility and walking program for patients in intensive care units: creating a standard of care.

    PubMed

    Perme, Christiane; Chandrashekar, Rohini

    2009-05-01

    New technologies in critical care and mechanical ventilation have led to long-term survival of critically ill patients. An early mobility and walking program was developed to provide guidelines for early mobility that would assist clinicians working in intensive care units, especially clinicians working with patients who are receiving mechanical ventilation. Prolonged stays in the intensive care unit and mechanical ventilation are associated with functional decline and increased morbidity, mortality, cost of care, and length of hospital stay. Implementation of an early mobility and walking program could have a beneficial effect on all of these factors. The program encompasses progressive mobilization and walking, with the progression based on a patient's functional capability and ability to tolerate the prescribed activity. The program is divided into 4 phases. Each phase includes guidelines on positioning, therapeutic exercises, transfers, walking reeducation, and duration and frequency of mobility sessions. Additionally, the criteria for progressing to the next phase are provided. Use of this program demands a collaborative effort among members of the multidisciplinary team in order to coordinate care for and provide safe mobilization of patients in the intensive care unit.

  7. Lighting for caregivers in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Rea, Mark

    2004-06-01

    The primary aim of this article is to define good lighting for caregivers(both medical staff and families) working in the hospital neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and other areas associated with the critical care environment. Defining good lighting requires understanding that lighting is not only important for the infants in the NICU but that it also plays significant roles for adults in the NICU. First, lighting supports visual processes (eg, acuity, color vision, visual performance). Second, lighting affects circadian regulation (eg, alertness, sleeping, hormone production). Finally,lighting communicates a message to professional staff as well as parents and visitors about the level of care and sophistication provided by the hospital. By thoughtfully addressing all three roles, the lighted environment in the NICU can support the productivity and well-being of the professional staff, the health and safety of patients, as well as the profitability of the NICU. A secondary aim of this chapter is to provide practical guidance to health care professionals on how to articulate good lighting objectives to application engineers and designers responsible for the lighting in the NICU.

  8. Intermittent Demand Forecasting in a Tertiary Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chen-Yang; Chiang, Kuo-Liang; Chen, Meng-Yin

    2016-10-01

    Forecasts of the demand for medical supplies both directly and indirectly affect the operating costs and the quality of the care provided by health care institutions. Specifically, overestimating demand induces an inventory surplus, whereas underestimating demand possibly compromises patient safety. Uncertainty in forecasting the consumption of medical supplies generates intermittent demand events. The intermittent demand patterns for medical supplies are generally classified as lumpy, erratic, smooth, and slow-moving demand. This study was conducted with the purpose of advancing a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit's efforts to achieve a high level of accuracy in its forecasting of the demand for medical supplies. On this point, several demand forecasting methods were compared in terms of the forecast accuracy of each. The results confirm that applying Croston's method combined with a single exponential smoothing method yields the most accurate results for forecasting lumpy, erratic, and slow-moving demand, whereas the Simple Moving Average (SMA) method is the most suitable for forecasting smooth demand. In addition, when the classification of demand consumption patterns were combined with the demand forecasting models, the forecasting errors were minimized, indicating that this classification framework can play a role in improving patient safety and reducing inventory management costs in health care institutions. PMID:27562485

  9. Intermittent Demand Forecasting in a Tertiary Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chen-Yang; Chiang, Kuo-Liang; Chen, Meng-Yin

    2016-10-01

    Forecasts of the demand for medical supplies both directly and indirectly affect the operating costs and the quality of the care provided by health care institutions. Specifically, overestimating demand induces an inventory surplus, whereas underestimating demand possibly compromises patient safety. Uncertainty in forecasting the consumption of medical supplies generates intermittent demand events. The intermittent demand patterns for medical supplies are generally classified as lumpy, erratic, smooth, and slow-moving demand. This study was conducted with the purpose of advancing a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit's efforts to achieve a high level of accuracy in its forecasting of the demand for medical supplies. On this point, several demand forecasting methods were compared in terms of the forecast accuracy of each. The results confirm that applying Croston's method combined with a single exponential smoothing method yields the most accurate results for forecasting lumpy, erratic, and slow-moving demand, whereas the Simple Moving Average (SMA) method is the most suitable for forecasting smooth demand. In addition, when the classification of demand consumption patterns were combined with the demand forecasting models, the forecasting errors were minimized, indicating that this classification framework can play a role in improving patient safety and reducing inventory management costs in health care institutions.

  10. Intensive care sedation: the past, present and the future.

    PubMed

    Shehabi, Yahya; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Mehta, Sangeeta; Riker, Richard; Takala, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    Despite the universal prescription of sedative drugs in the intensive care unit (ICU), current practice is not guided by high-level evidence. Landmark sedation trials have made significant contributions to our understanding of the problems associated with ICU sedation and have promoted changes to current practice. We identified challenges and limitations of clinical trials which reduced the generalizability and the universal adoption of key interventions. We present an international perspective regarding current sedation practice and a blueprint for future research, which seeks to avoid known limitations and generate much-needed high-level evidence to better guide clinicians' management and therapeutic choices of sedative agents.

  11. [Hospital infection during postoperative intensive care (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kalmar, P; Horatz, K; Rodewald, G; Schassan, H H; Schassek, S

    1976-11-15

    Since 1970 all postoperative bacteriological findings recorded in surgical patients have been analyzed and compared with the postoperative course. There are also regular checks of bacterial invasion in the operating suites and in the intensive care units. By such means as systems of double lock for personnel and equipment, regular surface disinfection, frequent hand disinfection, cleaning of the respirators with antiseptics, etc., the authors have been able to reduce the incidence of hospital infection very drastically. These measures also almost eliminated cross-infections in patients on long-term ventilation and complications with long-term indwelling catheters.

  12. Neurosciences intensive care medicine in initial neurosurgical training.

    PubMed

    Pereira, E A C; Madder, H; Millo, J; Kearns, C F

    2009-04-01

    The authors describe a novel 4-month clinical placement in neurosciences intensive care medicine (NICM) undertaken in the first specialty registrar (ST1) year of neurosurgical training as part of a clinical neurosciences themed training year. Neurosurgery is unique among British surgical specialties in having pioneered themed early years in run-through training to replace basic surgical training in general surgical specialties as part of Modernising Medical Careers. After describing events leading to the new neurosurgical training, the knowledge, skills and attitudes acquired in NICM are highlighted alongside discussion of logistic aspects and future directions from an inaugural experience.

  13. Clostridium difficile Infection in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, David J.; Dubberke, Erik R.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is becoming more common worldwide. The morbidity and mortality associated with C. difficile is also increasing at an alarming rate. Critically ill patients are at particularly high risk for this disease due to the prevalence of multiple risk factors in the patient population. Treatment of C. difficile continues to be a difficult problem in patients with severe or recurrent disease. This article seeks to provide a broad understanding of CDI in the intensive care unit, with special emphasis on risk factor identification, treatment options, and disease prevention. PMID:19665092

  14. Antimicrobial stewardship in the intensive care unit: advances and obstacles.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Kevin L; Kollef, Marin H

    2009-03-15

    Antimicrobial stewardship involves a multifaceted approach that strives to combat the emergence of resistance, improve clinical outcomes, and control costs by improving antimicrobial use. Therefore, stewardship is of great importance and relevance in the intensive care unit. Clinical decision support systems, biomarker-derived treatment algorithms, and improved knowledge regarding the different components of antimicrobial therapy represent some of the advances that have been made in stewardship. Yet, significant obstacles have prevented the full achievement of stewardship's goals, and approaches to confronting these obstacles should be appreciated. Clinicians should realize that antimicrobials are important therapeutic agents and strive to use them wisely.

  15. [Interventional Patient Hygiene Model. A critical reflection on basic nursing care in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Bambi, Stefano; Lucchini, Alberto; Solaro, Massimo; Lumini, Enrico; Rasero, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Interventional Patient Hygiene Model. A critical reflection on basic nursing care in intensive care units. Over the past 15 years, the model of medical and nursing care changed from being exclusively oriented to the diagnosis and treatment of acute illness, to the achievement of outcomes by preventing iatrogenic complications (Hospital Acquired Conditions). Nursing Sensitive Outcomes show as nursing is directly involved in the development and prevention of these complications. Many of these complications, including falls from the bed, use of restraints, urinary catheter associated urinary infections and intravascular catheter related sepsis, are related to basic nursing care. Ten years ago in critical care, a school of thought called get back to the basics, was started for the prevention of errors and risks associated with nursing. Most of these nursing practices involve hygiene and mobilization. On the basis of these reflections, Kathleen Vollman developed a model of nursing care in critical care area, defined Interventional Patient Hygiene (IPH). The IPH model provides a proactive plan of nursing interventions to strengthen the patients' through the Evidence-Based Nursing Care. The components of the model include interventions of oral hygiene, mobilization, dressing changes, urinary catheter care, management of incontinence and bed bath, hand hygiene and skin antisepsis. The implementation of IPH model follows the steps of Deming cycle, and requires a deep reflection on the priorities of nursing care in ICU, as well as the effective teaching of the importance of the basic nursing to new generations of nurses.

  16. Barriers to provision of developmental care in the neonatal intensive care unit: neonatal nursing perceptions.

    PubMed

    Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D; Prendergast, Carol C

    2007-02-01

    The role of the neonatal nurse is vital for the successful implementation of developmental care and the provision of an optimal neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment. The goal was to identify nurses' perceived barriers to implementation or improving developmental care in their NICUs. Nursing perceptions related to barriers for implementing developmental care were assessed using a 12-point questionnaire during two New York City Neonatal Nursing regional conferences. One hundred forty-six (86%) of 170 nurses representing 24 regional hospitals returned the survey. Developmental care was viewed as essential by 136 nurses (93%), yet 125 nurses (86%) believed that their NICU was not providing optimal developmental care. Light and sound standards were viewed as important to providing care by 71% and 91% of respondents, respectively, yet only four NICUs (3%) had light and sound meters to identify or standardize this environmental source of pain. As a group, the perceived barriers to provision of optimal developmental care in order of decreasing importance were staff nurses and staff physicians (53%) > NICU funds (42%) > physician leadership (37%) > facility limitations (31%) > registered nurse leadership (25%). In contrast, 90% of nurses whose NICU did not use developmental multidisciplinary team meetings or developmental care champions or advocates were significantly more likely to identify nursing or physician colleagues as barriers to implementing or improving developmental care, compared with 38% of nurses whose NICU used such activities ( P < 0.001). Developmental care is perceived by the neonatal nurse as a vital component to the care provided in the NICU. Use of simple light and sound measures may enhance perception of providing an optimal NICU environment. Neonatal nurses perceived barriers to care are often attributed to neonatal staff nursing and physician colleagues. This perception is decreased considerably in those NICUs in which multidisciplinary

  17. End-of-life care in the intensive care unit: Report from the Task Force of World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, John; Abillama, Fayez; Chiumello, Davide; Dobb, Geoff; Jacobe, Stephen; Kleinpell, Ruth; Koh, Younsuk; Martin, Claudio; Michalsen, Andej; Pelosi, Paolo; Torra, Lluis Blanch; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Yeager, Susan; Zimmerman, Janice

    2016-08-01

    End-of-life care in the intensive care unit (ICU) was identified as an objective in a series of Task Forces developed by the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine Council in 2014. The objective was to develop a generic statement about current knowledge and to identify challenges relevant to the global community that may inform regional and local initiatives. An updated summary of published statements on end-of-life care in the ICU from national Societies is presented, highlighting commonalities and differences within and between international regions. The complexity of end-of-life care in the ICU, particularly relating to withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatment while ensuring the alleviation of suffering, within different ethical and cultural environments is recognized. Although no single statement can therefore be regarded as a criterion standard applicable to all countries and societies, the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine endorses and encourages the role of Member Societies to lead the debate regarding end-of-life care in the ICU within each country and to take a leading role in developing national guidelines and recommendations within each country.

  18. Antibiotics and steroids for exacerbations of COPD in primary care: compliance with Dutch guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Roede, Berendina M; Bindels, Patrick JE; Brouwer, Henk J; Bresser, Paul; de Borgie, Corianne AJM; Prins, Jan M

    2006-01-01

    Background The Dutch College of General Practitioners' guidelines specify that antibiotics should only be used for severe cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, GPs tend to administer antibiotics rather than a short course of steroid treatment regardless of severity. Aim The aim of this study was to determine how GPs use current guidelines in treating exacerbations of COPD, in particular whether short courses of oral steroids and antibiotics are prescribed in accordance with the Dutch guidelines for COPD. Design of study Retrospective analysis of medical records. Setting Primary healthcare centres. Method Medical records of patients registered at four primary healthcare centres in the Netherlands were retrospectively analysed for the period March 2001–March 2003. Results Of 35 589 patients, 1.3% were registered as having a diagnosis of COPD. In 2 years, 47% of the patients had no exacerbation, 35% had one or two exacerbations, and 18% had three or more exacerbations. Of 536 exacerbations, GPs prescribed a short course of oral steroids in 30% of cases, antibiotics in 29%, steroids combined with an antibiotic in 23%, and no oral steroid course or antibiotic was prescribed in 18%. Prescriptions for patients with three or more exacerbations differed significantly from those for patients with one or two exacerbations. Conclusions Treatment is often not in accordance with current guidelines; in particular, antibiotics are prescribed more often than recommended. PMID:16953997

  19. Radiation control in the intensive care unit for high intensity iridium-192 brain implants

    SciTech Connect

    Sewchand, W.; Drzymala, R.E.; Amin, P.P.; Salcman, M.; Salazar, O.M.

    1987-04-01

    A bedside lead cubicle was designed to minimize the radiation exposure of intensive care unit staff during routine interstitial brain irradiation by removable, high intensity iridium-192. The cubicle shields the patient without restricting intensive care routines. The design specifications were confirmed by exposure measurements around the shield with an implanted anthropomorphic phantom simulating the patient situation. The cubicle reduces the exposure rate around an implant patient by as much as 90%, with the exposure level not exceeding 0.1 mR/hour/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir. Evaluation of data accumulated for the past 3 years has shown that the exposure levels of individual attending nurses are 0.12 to 0.36 mR/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per 12-hour shift. The corresponding range for entire nursing teams varies between 0.18 and 0.26. A radiation control index (exposure per mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per nurse-hour) is thus defined for individual nurses and nursing teams; this index is a significant guide to the planning of nurse rotations for brain implant patients with various /sup 192/Ir loads. The bedside shield reduces exposure from /sup 192/Ir implants by a factor of about 20, as expected, and the exposure from the lower energy radioisotope iodine-125 is barely detectable.

  20. Radiation control in the intensive care unit for high intensity iridium-192 brain implants.

    PubMed

    Sewchand, W; Drzymala, R E; Amin, P P; Salcman, M; Salazar, O M

    1987-04-01

    A bedside lead cubicle was designed to minimize the radiation exposure of intensive care unit staff during routine interstitial brain irradiation by removable, high intensity iridium-192. The cubicle shields the patient without restricting intensive care routines. The design specifications were confirmed by exposure measurements around the shield with an implanted anthropomorphic phantom simulating the patient situation. The cubicle reduces the exposure rate around an implant patient by as much as 90%, with the exposure level not exceeding 0.1 mR/hour/mg of radium-equivalent 192Ir. Evaluation of data accumulated for the past 3 years has shown that the exposure levels of individual attending nurses are 0.12 to 0.36 mR/mg of radium-equivalent 192Ir per 12-hour shift. The corresponding range for entire nursing teams varies between 0.18 and 0.26. A radiation control index (exposure per mg of radium-equivalent 192Ir per nurse-hour) is thus defined for individual nurses and nursing teams; this index is a significant guide to the planning of nurse rotations for brain implant patients with various 192Ir loads. The bedside shield reduces exposure from 192Ir implants by a factor of about 20, as expected, and the exposure from the lower energy radioisotope iodine-125 is barely detectable.

  1. How do patients with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease experience care in the intensive care unit?

    PubMed Central

    Torheim, Henny; Kvangarsnes, Marit

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to gain insight into how patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience care in the acute phase. The study has a qualitative design with a phenomenological approach. The empirics consist of qualitative in-depth interviews with ten patients admitted to the intensive care units in two Norwegian hospitals. The interviews were carried out from November 2009 to June 2011. The data have been analysed through meaning condensation, in accordance with Amadeo Giorgi's four-step method. Kari Martinsen's phenomenological philosophy of nursing has inspired the study. An essential structure of the patients' experiences of care in the intensive care unit by acute COPD-exacerbation may be described as: Feelings of being trapped in a life-threatening situation in which the care system assumes control over their lives. This experience is conditioned not only by the medical treatment, but also by the entire interaction with the caregivers. The essence of the phenomenon is presented through three themes which describe the patient's lived experience: preserving the breath of life, vulnerable interactions and opportunities for better health. Acute COPD-exacerbation is a traumatic experience and the patients become particularly vulnerable when they depend on others for breathing support. The phenomenological analysis shows that the patients experience good care during breath of life preservation when the care is performed in a way that gives patients more insight into their illness and gives new opportunities for the future. PMID:24313779

  2. Health care-acquired infections in neonatal intensive care units: risk factors and etiology.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Zorana M; Markovic-Denic, Ljiljana; Folic, Marko M; Igrutinovic, Zoran; Jankovic, Slobodan M

    2015-01-01

    A 1-year prospective cohort study of health care-acquired infections was conducted at the neonatal intensive care unit of the University Clinical Centre Kragujevac, Serbia. The incidence rate of neonates with health care-acquired infections was 18.6%, and the incidence rate of the infections themselves was 19.4%. The incidence density of the health care-acquired infections was 9.1 per 1,000 patient days. The independent risk factors for health care-acquired infections were birth weight, length of hospitalization, duration of mechanical ventilation, and Apgar score. More than half of all isolated microorganisms were Klebsiella-Enterobacter (39.3%) and Escherichia coli (25.0%).

  3. The role of neurosciences intensive care in trauma and neurosurgical conditions.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Ahmed-Ramadan; Eynon, C Andy

    2013-10-01

    The creation of neurosciences intensive care units was born out of the awareness that a group of neurological and neurosurgical patients required specialized intensive medical and nursing care. This first of two articles describes the role of neurosciences intensive care in the management of trauma and neurosurgical conditions.

  4. The Planning and Operation of an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Grundy, Eric C.

    1964-01-01

    It is desirable that every hospital of 100 beds or more should have an intensive care unit. An attempt is made to outline the more important features to be considered, including the physical aspects, when planning and establishing such a unit. The unit should contain 2-4% of the total number of hospital beds. It should be separate, centrally located and self-contained. Direct observation of all patients must be possible at all times. Efficient and specially trained personnel using modern and special equipment are required. Orientation lectures and demonstrations must be carried out frequently and regularly. The types of patients to be admitted to the unit are discussed, as well as the governing rules and regulations. All doctors should have a right to admit and look after their own patients in the unit; an Intensive Care Unit Committee made up of representatives of the major services is suggested as a means of controlling admissions and discharges and for general administration. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:14175876

  5. Data-centric privacy protocol for intensive care grids.

    PubMed

    Luna, Jesus; Dikaiakos, Marios; Marazakis, Manolis; Kyprianou, Theodoros

    2010-11-01

    Modern e-Health systems require advanced computing and storage capabilities, leading to the adoption of technologies like the grid and giving birth to novel health grid systems. In particular, intensive care medicine uses this paradigm when facing a high flow of data coming from intensive care unit's (ICU) inpatients just like demonstrated by the ICGrid system prototyped by the University of Cyprus. Unfortunately, moving an ICU patient's data from the traditionally isolated hospital's computing facilities to data grids via public networks (i.e., the Internet) makes it imperative to establish an integral and standardized security solution to avoid common attacks on the data and metadata being managed. Particular emphasis must be put on the patient's personal data, the protection of which is required by legislations in many countries of the European Union and the world in general. In this paper, we extend our previous research with the following contributions: 1) a mandatory access control model to protect patient's metadata; 2) a major security revision to our previously proposed privacy protocol by contributing with a "quality of security" quantitative metric to improve fragmented data's assurance; and finally, 3) a set of early results to demonstrate that our protocol not only improves a patient personal data's security and privacy but also achieves a performance comparable with existing approaches.

  6. Experiences of administering and receiving therapeutic touch in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Cox, C; Hayes, J

    1998-10-01

    This article describes the experiences of a practitioner who administered therapeutic touch (TT) to two patients in an intensive care unit and the experiences of the two patients who received TT. The experiences are presented as two case studies. Each of the patients presented in the case studies received either five or ten treatments of TT lasting five minutes each. Following each administration of TT the practitioner described what she sensed verbally and in writing. However, owing to the medical conditions of the patients, only brief interviews were conducted in which the patients were asked to describe their experiences of receiving TT. The experiences, which have been reflected in the case studies, indicate TT assists patients to relax, brings comfort and a sense of peace. Much like meditation, TT helps patients become more in touch with themselves. They come to understand more about themselves and reality. TT is recommended as a practice which could contribute to the psychological well-being of patients in intensive care as it promotes relaxation, comfort and a sense of peace.

  7. Cognitive Workload of Computerized Nursing Process in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Dal Sasso, Grace Marcon; Barra, Daniela Couto Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was to measure the cognitive workload to complete printed nursing process versus computerized nursing process from International Classification Practice of Nursing in intensive care units. It is a quantitative, before-and-after quasi-experimental design, with a sample of 30 participants. Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index. Six cognitive categories were measured. The "temporal demand" was the largest contributor to the cognitive workload, and the role of the nursing process in the "performance" category has excelled that of computerized nursing process. It was concluded that computerized nursing process contributes to lower cognitive workload of nurses for being a support system for decision making based on the International Classification Practice of Nursing. The computerized nursing process as a logical structure of the data, information, diagnoses, interventions and results become a reliable option for health improvement of healthcare, because it can enhance nurse safe decision making, with the intent to reduce damage and adverse events to patients in intensive care. PMID:26061562

  8. Tetanus and the evolution of intensive care in Australia.

    PubMed

    Gilligan, John E Fred; Lawrence, James R; Clayton, David; Rowland, Robert

    2012-12-01

    A review of two series of patients with tetanus from the Royal Adelaide Hospital provides a historical perspective on the evolution of intensive care in Australia. Nine consecutive severe cases presenting in 1957 constituted one of the first series published. Four patients died. The second series of 38 severe cases, among a total of 56 cases presenting between 1967 and 1985, included two deaths, comparing favourably with survival in other contemporary series. The specialty of intensive care evolved considerably during this time. Neuromuscular blockade introduced in the first series produced radical changes in management. Supportive measures that were not then widely practised, involving intermittent positive pressure ventilation, were used in the second series for up to 46 days and evolved into standard ICU practice. The option of using a tank respirator was rejected. Older patients were susceptible to complications commonly related to respiratory, cardiovascular and diabetic comorbidities, but most returned to their previous lifestyle. Severe tetanus often resulted from mild injuries in patients who were incompletely immunised. Four patients developed tetanus following surgical procedures. The use of nitrous oxide in the first series was abandoned owing to adverse effects on bone marrow function. Complications reported in early literature, such as fractures and myositis ossificans, presumably related to unrelieved spasm, are no longer seen. Clinicians are now likely to see the condition only if working with counter-disaster teams overseas.

  9. Ethical publishing in intensive care medicine: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Wiedermann, Christian J

    2016-01-01

    Ethical standards in the context of scientific publications are increasingly gaining attention. A narrative review of the literature concerning publication ethics was conducted as found in PubMed, Google Scholar, relevant news articles, position papers, websites and other sources. The Committee on Publication Ethics has produced guidelines and schedules for the handling of problem situations that have been adopted by professional journals and publishers worldwide as guidelines to authors. The defined requirements go beyond the disclosure of conflicts of interest or the prior registration of clinical trials. Recommendations to authors, editors and publishers of journals and research institutions were formulated with regard to issues of authorship, double publications, plagiarism, and conflicts of interest, with special attention being paid to unethical research behavior and data falsification. This narrative review focusses on ethical publishing in intensive care medicine. As scientific misconduct with data falsification damage patients and society, especially if fraudulent studies are considered important or favor certain therapies and downplay their side effects, it is important to ensure that only studies are published that have been carried out with highest integrity according to predefined criteria. For that also the peer review process has to be conducted in accordance with the highest possible scientific standards and making use of available modern information technology. The review provides the current state of recommendations that are considered to be most relevant particularly in the field of intensive care medicine. PMID:27652208

  10. Ethical publishing in intensive care medicine: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Wiedermann, Christian J

    2016-01-01

    Ethical standards in the context of scientific publications are increasingly gaining attention. A narrative review of the literature concerning publication ethics was conducted as found in PubMed, Google Scholar, relevant news articles, position papers, websites and other sources. The Committee on Publication Ethics has produced guidelines and schedules for the handling of problem situations that have been adopted by professional journals and publishers worldwide as guidelines to authors. The defined requirements go beyond the disclosure of conflicts of interest or the prior registration of clinical trials. Recommendations to authors, editors and publishers of journals and research institutions were formulated with regard to issues of authorship, double publications, plagiarism, and conflicts of interest, with special attention being paid to unethical research behavior and data falsification. This narrative review focusses on ethical publishing in intensive care medicine. As scientific misconduct with data falsification damage patients and society, especially if fraudulent studies are considered important or favor certain therapies and downplay their side effects, it is important to ensure that only studies are published that have been carried out with highest integrity according to predefined criteria. For that also the peer review process has to be conducted in accordance with the highest possible scientific standards and making use of available modern information technology. The review provides the current state of recommendations that are considered to be most relevant particularly in the field of intensive care medicine.

  11. Ethical publishing in intensive care medicine: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, Christian J

    2016-08-01

    Ethical standards in the context of scientific publications are increasingly gaining attention. A narrative review of the literature concerning publication ethics was conducted as found in PubMed, Google Scholar, relevant news articles, position papers, websites and other sources. The Committee on Publication Ethics has produced guidelines and schedules for the handling of problem situations that have been adopted by professional journals and publishers worldwide as guidelines to authors. The defined requirements go beyond the disclosure of conflicts of interest or the prior registration of clinical trials. Recommendations to authors, editors and publishers of journals and research institutions were formulated with regard to issues of authorship, double publications, plagiarism, and conflicts of interest, with special attention being paid to unethical research behavior and data falsification. This narrative review focusses on ethical publishing in intensive care medicine. As scientific misconduct with data falsification damage patients and society, especially if fraudulent studies are considered important or favor certain therapies and downplay their side effects, it is important to ensure that only studies are published that have been carried out with highest integrity according to predefined criteria. For that also the peer review process has to be conducted in accordance with the highest possible scientific standards and making use of available modern information technology. The review provides the current state of recommendations that are considered to be most relevant particularly in the field of intensive care medicine. PMID:27652208

  12. Palliative care for patients with HIV/AIDS admitted to intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Paola Nóbrega; de Miranda, Erique José Peixoto; Cruz, Ronaldo; Forte, Daniel Neves

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the characteristics of patients with HIV/AIDS and to compare the therapeutic interventions and end-of-life care before and after evaluation by the palliative care team. Methods This retrospective cohort study included all patients with HIV/AIDS admitted to the intensive care unit of the Instituto de Infectologia Emílio Ribas who were evaluated by a palliative care team between January 2006 and December 2012. Results Of the 109 patients evaluated, 89% acquired opportunistic infections, 70% had CD4 counts lower than 100 cells/mm3, and only 19% adhered to treatment. The overall mortality rate was 88%. Among patients predicted with a terminally ill (68%), the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy decreased from 50.0% to 23.1% (p = 0.02), the use of antibiotics decreased from 100% to 63.6% (p < 0.001), the use of vasoactive drugs decreased from 62.1% to 37.8% (p = 0.009), the use of renal replacement therapy decreased from 34.8% to 23.0% (p < 0.0001), and the number of blood product transfusions decreased from 74.2% to 19.7% (p < 0.0001). Meetings with the family were held in 48 cases, and 23% of the terminally ill patients were discharged from the intensive care unit. Conclusion Palliative care was required in patients with severe illnesses and high mortality. The number of potentially inappropriate interventions in terminally ill patients monitored by the palliative care team significantly decreased, and 26% of the patients were discharged from the intensive care unit. PMID:27737420

  13. Some pain, no gain: experiences with the no-claim rebate in the Dutch health care system.

    PubMed

    Holland, J; Van Exel, N J A; Schut, F T; Brouwer, W B F

    2009-10-01

    To contain expenditures in an increasingly demand driven health care system, in 2005 a no-claim rebate was introduced in the Dutch health insurance system. Since demand-side cost sharing is a very controversial issue, the no-claim rebate was launched as a consumer friendly bonus system to reward prudent utilization of health services. Internationally, the introduction of a mandatory no-claim rebate in a social health insurance scheme is unprecedented. Consumers were entitled to an annual rebate of 255 eruos if no claims were made. During the year, all health care expenses except for GP visits and maternity care were deducted from the rebate until the rebate became zero. In this article, we discuss the rationale of the no-claim rebate and the available evidence of its effect. Using a questionnaire in a convenience sample, we examined people's knowledge, attitudes, and sensitivity to the incentive scheme. We find that only 4% of respondents stated that they would reduce consumption because of the no-claim rebate. Respondents also indicated that they were willing to accept a high loss of rebate in order to use a medical treatment. However, during the last month of the year many respondents seemed willing to postpone consumption until the next year in order to keep the rebate of the current year intact. A small majority of respondents considered the no-claim rebate to be unfair. Finally, we briefly discuss why in 2008 the no-claim rebate was replaced by a mandatory deductible.

  14. [Neonatal intensive care unit--therapeutical success and what next?].

    PubMed

    Swietliński, Janusz; Sitko-Rudnicka, Magdalena; Maruniak-Chudek, Iwona

    2004-01-01

    The increasing number of successfully treated newborns with disturbances of the adaptive period can measure effectiveness of neonatal intensive care units (NICU). The authors summarized some health problems of the former NICU patients. Central nervous system (CNS) of the premature, especially low (LBW) and very low birth weight (VLBW) infant, is in serious danger of improper development. The lack of neurological disturbances in early infancy does not exclude further pathological events and such patients require long-term observation and follow-up. High-risk newborns are of great need of precise imaging and diagnosis of CNS, which should be performed before discharge. Early stimulation and developmental care program are the crucial points in the management of newborns with neurological abnormalities. Sensorial problems, especially the rate of vision and hearing impairments, can be significantly reduced when prophylactic schedule is applied. Both, etiological factors leading to respiratory insufficiency and some iatrogenic effects of the therapy, can influence respiratory system. Symptoms of different intensity--from sneezing caused by nasal mucous membrane edema to the severe forms of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD)--may last for a long time and influence the child's general condition. The surgical closure of Botall's duct (persistent ductus arteriosus--PDA) usually normalizes the circulatory system. In serious heart defects or isolated shunt-type defects, the compensation of the circulatory system can easily be disturbed. Digestive tract problems belong to the two main groups: first--connected with the prematurity and immature interstitial functioning (necrotizing enterocolitis, digestive and absorption abnormalities, hepatic cholestasis), and second--caused by congenital defects requiring immediate surgical intervention. Despite different types of the diseases, the treatment and care have to be focused on necessary for the growing organism, optimal nutrients and

  15. Child Care under Pressure: The Quality of Dutch Centers in 1995 and in 2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deynoot-Schaub, Mirjam J. J. M. Gevers; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, the authors assessed the quality of care provided to children in 51 care groups from 39 child-care centers in The Netherlands using the Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale (T. Harms, D. Cryer, & R. M. Clifford, 1990) and compared the results with the quality of child care assessed in 1995 (M. H. van IJzendoorn, L. W. C. Tavecchio, G.…

  16. [Incidence of decubitus ulcers in an intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Ignacio García, E; Herreros Rubiales, M; Delgado Pacheco, J; Alvarez Vega, D; Salvador Valencia, H; García Vela, M; Moreno Peralta, J

    1997-01-01

    Decubitus ulcers are an important problem which must be known by health professionals in general and by nurses in particular. Its prevention is one of the basic care in Nursing. This care becomes especially relevant in patients who are admitted into Intensive Care Units. The objectives of the study are to know the incidence rate of patients who develop decubitus ulcers during their stay in the Unit and the proposal to introduce measures aiming to decrease its incidence. In general, the study proves that 17% of patients develop decubitus ulcers during their hospitalization and that 31.8% of patients who are catalogued as risk patients develop ulcers. The preventive measures introduced are the reassessment and application of prevention and treatment of decubitus ulcers protocols, the creation of improvement groups where these problems are approached, perfecting courses about decubitus ulcers, clinical sessions where strategies are unified, graphic divulging measures (notices, etc.) and antiscaric materials such as heelers, small cushions for head support, pillows, etc.

  17. [Treatment in the Intensive Care Unit: continue or withdraw?].

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, Claudia; de Graeff, Nienke; Kompanje, Erwin J O; Tjan, Dave H T

    2016-01-01

    End-of-life decision-making in the Intensive Care Unit is a common and complex process. The step-by-step process of decision-making leading to withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment is illustrated in this paper by a clinical case. A variety of factors influences the decision to adjust the initial curative treatment policy towards withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy and the pursuit of comfort care. For a smooth decision-making process, it is necessary to make a prognosis and obtain consensus amongst the healthcare team. Withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment is ultimately a medical decision and a consensual decision should be reached by all medical staff and nurses, and preferably also by the patient and family. Timely involvement of a legal representative of the patient is essential for an uncomplicated decision-making process. Advance care planning and advance directives provide opportunities for patients to express their preferences beforehand. It is important to realise that end-of-life decisions are significantly influenced by personal and cultural values. PMID:27050494

  18. Recognizing, naming, and measuring a family intensive care unit syndrome.

    PubMed

    Netzer, Giora; Sullivan, Donald R

    2014-03-01

    Most major decisions in the intensive care unit (ICU) regarding goals of care are shared by clinicians and someone other than the patient. Multicenter clinical trials focusing on improved communication between clinicians and these surrogate decision makers have not reported consistently improved outcomes. We suggest that acquired maladaptive reasoning may contribute importantly to failure of the intervention strategies tested to date. Surrogate decision makers often suffer significant psychological morbidity in the form of stress, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Family members in the ICU also suffer cognitive blunting and sleep deprivation. Their decision-making abilities are eroded by anticipatory grief and cognitive biases, while personal and family conflicts further impact their decision making. We propose recognizing a family ICU syndrome to describe the morbidity and associated decision-making impairment experienced by many family members of patients with acute critical illness (in the ICU) and chronic critical illness (in the long-term, acute care hospital). Research rigorously using models of compromised decision making may help elucidate both mechanisms of impairment and targets for intervention. Better quantifying compromised decision making and its relationship to poor outcomes will allow us to formulate and advance useful techniques. The use of decision aids and improving ICU design may provide benefit now and in the near future. In measuring interventions targeting cognitive barriers, clinically significant outcomes, such as time to decision, should be considered. Statistical approaches, such as survival models and rank statistic testing, will increase our power to detect differences in our interventions.

  19. Implementing quality indicators in intensive care units: exploring barriers to and facilitators of behaviour change

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Quality indicators are increasingly used in healthcare but there are various barriers hindering their routine use. To promote the use of quality indicators, an exploration of the barriers to and facilitating factors for their implementation among healthcare professionals and managers of intensive care units (ICUs) is advocated. Methods All intensivists, ICU nurses, and managers (n = 142) working at 54 Dutch ICUs who participated in training sessions to support future implementation of quality indicators completed a questionnaire on perceived barriers and facilitators. Three types of barriers related to knowledge, attitude, and behaviour were assessed using a five-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree to 5 = strongly agree). Results Behaviour-related barriers such as time constraints were most prominent (Mean Score, MS = 3.21), followed by barriers related to knowledge and attitude (MS = 3.62; MS = 4.12, respectively). Type of profession, age, and type of hospital were related to knowledge and behaviour. The facilitating factor perceived as most important by intensivists was administrative support (MS = 4.3; p = 0.02); for nurses, it was education (MS = 4.0; p = 0.01), and for managers, it was receiving feedback (MS = 4.5; p = 0.001). Conclusions Our results demonstrate that healthcare professionals and managers are familiar with using quality indicators to improve care, and that they have positive attitudes towards the implementation of quality indicators. Despite these facts, it is necessary to lower the barriers related to behavioural factors. In addition, as the barriers and facilitating factors differ among professions, age groups, and settings, tailored strategies are needed to implement quality indicators in daily practice. PMID:20594312

  20. Achieving equilibrium within a culture of stability? Cultural knowing in nursing care on psychiatric intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin; L Tz N, Kim; Ivarsson, Ann-Britt; Eriksson, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This article presents intensive psychiatric nurses' work and nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe expressions of cultural knowing in nursing care in psychiatric intensive care units (PICU). Spradley's ethnographic methodology was applied. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care in psychiatric intensive care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest.

  1. Measuring the quality of therapeutic apheresis care in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Sussmane, Jeffrey B; Torbati, Dan; Gitlow, Howard S

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to measure the quality of care provided in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) during Therapeutic Apheresis (TA). We described the care as a step by step process. We designed a flow chart to carefully document each step of the process. We then defined each step with a unique clinical indictor (CI) that represented the exact task we felt provided quality care. These CIs were studied and modified for 1 year. We measured our performance in this process by the number of times we accomplished the CI vs. the total number of CIs that were to be performed. The degree of compliance, with these clinical indicators, was analyzed and used as a metric for quality by calculating how close the process is running exactly as planned or "in control." The Apheresis Process was in control (compliance) for 47% of the indicators, as measured in the aggregate for the first observational year. We then applied the theory of Total Quality Management (TQM) through our Design, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control (DMAIC) model. We were able to improve the process and bring it into control by increasing the compliance to > 99.74%, in the aggregate, for the third and fourth quarter of the second year. We have implemented TQM to increase compliance, thus control, of a highly complex and multidisciplinary Pediatric Intensive Care therapy. We have shown a reproducible and scalable measure of quality for a complex clinical process in the PICU, without additional capital expenditure. PMID:22095668

  2. [Integration of the Principles of Palliative Care In Intensive Care Medicine].

    PubMed

    Girbau Campo, M Begoña; Monedero Rodríguez, Pablo; Centeno Cortés, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Recent scientific literature has shown a growing interest to integrate palliative medicine principles into the daily workflow in the intensive care unit (ICU). This article reviews this trend with the goal that its application might provide more understanding in the resolution of some current ethical issues. Patients with an advanced disease process and at the end of life who are admitted in the intensive care unit are in such a profound level of suffering and vulnerability that only an holistic and comprehensive approach can provide adequate relief to them. Nevertheless, the reality of the clinical care of these patients in the ICU is far beyond that ideal. Our primary end point is the improvement in the clinical care provided, especially when the patient is dying. It is indeed very complex to make progress in this field, but an effort has to be made. The project is to turn to palliative medicine as a role model for end of life care and as an holistic approach, and introduce palliative medicine principles in the ICU. The goal of this article is to reveal a practical approach to accomplish this, and make it functional in order to improve our patients' clinical and ethical care. PMID:27637192

  3. Measuring the quality of therapeutic apheresis care in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Sussmane, Jeffrey B; Torbati, Dan; Gitlow, Howard S

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to measure the quality of care provided in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) during Therapeutic Apheresis (TA). We described the care as a step by step process. We designed a flow chart to carefully document each step of the process. We then defined each step with a unique clinical indictor (CI) that represented the exact task we felt provided quality care. These CIs were studied and modified for 1 year. We measured our performance in this process by the number of times we accomplished the CI vs. the total number of CIs that were to be performed. The degree of compliance, with these clinical indicators, was analyzed and used as a metric for quality by calculating how close the process is running exactly as planned or "in control." The Apheresis Process was in control (compliance) for 47% of the indicators, as measured in the aggregate for the first observational year. We then applied the theory of Total Quality Management (TQM) through our Design, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control (DMAIC) model. We were able to improve the process and bring it into control by increasing the compliance to > 99.74%, in the aggregate, for the third and fourth quarter of the second year. We have implemented TQM to increase compliance, thus control, of a highly complex and multidisciplinary Pediatric Intensive Care therapy. We have shown a reproducible and scalable measure of quality for a complex clinical process in the PICU, without additional capital expenditure.

  4. Nurses’ Experiences of Futile Care at Intensive Care Units: A Phenomenological Study

    PubMed Central

    Yekefallah, Leili; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Manoochehri, Houman; Hamid, Alavi Majd

    2015-01-01

    The concept and meaning of futile care depends on the existing culture, values, religion, beliefs, medical achievements and emotional status of a country. We aimed to define the concept of futile care in the viewpoints of nurses working in intensive care units (ICUs). In this phenomenological study, the experiences of 25 nurses were explored in 11 teaching hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization in Ghazvin province in the northwest of Iran. Personal interviews and observations were used for data collection. All interviews were recorded as well as transcribed and codes, subthemes and themes were extracted using Van Manen’s analysis method. Initially, 191 codes were extracted. During data analysis and comparison, the codes were reduced to 178. Ultimately, 9 sub-themes and four themes emerged: uselessness, waste of resources, torment, and aspects of futility. Nurses defined futile care as “useless, ineffective care giving with wastage of resources and torment of both patients and nurses having nursing and medical aspects” As nurses play a key role in managing futile care, being aware of their experiences in this regard could be the initial operational step for providing useful care as well as educational programs in ICUs. Moreover, the results of this study could help nursing managers adopt supportive approaches to reduce the amount of futile care which could in turn resolve some of the complications nurses face at these wards such as burnout, ethical conflicts, and leave. PMID:25946928

  5. Nurses' experiences of futile care at intensive care units: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Yekefallah, Leili; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Manoochehri, Houman; Hamid, Alavi Majd

    2015-01-01

    The concept and meaning of futile care depends on the existing culture, values, religion, beliefs, medical achievements and emotional status of a country. We aimed to define the concept of futile care in the viewpoints of nurses working in intensive care units (ICUs). In this phenomenological study, the experiences of 25 nurses were explored in 11 teaching hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization in Ghazvin province in the northwest of Iran. Personal interviews and observations were used for data collection. All interviews were recorded as well as transcribed and codes, subthemes and themes were extracted using Van Manen's analysis method. Initially, 191 codes were extracted. During data analysis and comparison, the codes were reduced to 178. Ultimately, 9 sub-themes and four themes emerged: uselessness, waste of resources, torment, and aspects of futility.Nurses defined futile care as "useless, ineffective care giving with wastage of resources and torment of both patients and nurses having nursing and medical aspects" As nurses play a key role in managing futile care, being aware of their experiences in this regard could be the initial operational step for providing useful care as well as educational programs in ICUs. Moreover, the results of this study could help nursing managers adopt supportive approaches to reduce the amount of futile care which could in turn resolve some of the complications nurses face at these wards such as burnout, ethical conflicts, and leave. PMID:25946928

  6. Confronting youth gangs in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    Youth gang violence has continued its upward trend nationwide. It was once thought that gangs convened only in selected areas, which left churches, schools, and hospitals as "neutral" territory. Unfortunately, this is a fallacy. The results of gang violence pour into hospitals and into intensive care units regularly. The media portrays California as having a gang violence problem; however, throughout the United States, gang violence has risen more than 35% in the past year. Youth gang violence continues to rise dramatically with more and more of our youth deciding to join gangs each day. Sadly, every state has gangs, and the problem is getting much worse in areas that would never have thought about gangs a year ago. These "new generation" of gang members is younger, much more violent, and staying in the gang longer. Gangs are not just an urban problem. Gang activity is a suburban and rural problem too. There are more than 25 500 gangs in the United States, with a total gang membership of 850 000. Ninety-four percent of gang members are male and 6% are female. The ethnic composition nationwide includes 47% Latino, 31% African American, 13% White, 7% Asian, and 2% "mixed," according to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention of the U.S. Department of Justice. As a result of the ongoing proliferation of youth street gangs in our communities, it is imperative that critical care nurses and others involved with the direct care become educated about how to identify gang members, their activities, and understand their motivations. Such education and knowledge will help provide solutions to families and the youth themselves, help eradicate the problem of gang violence, and keep health care professionals safe.

  7. [Evaluation of respiratory intensive care units at pneumology services].

    PubMed

    Vergnenègre, A

    2001-10-01

    Audits should be conducted in respiratory intensive care units (ICU) as in all other ICU using patient-specific indicators to assess medical activity and quality of care. However, other criteria, such as those developed by the SRLF ("Société de Réanimation de Langue Française"), should also be used. These criteria include the description of the patients previous health status, prognosis of underlying diseases, the SAPS I or SAPS II severity score at admission, the omega or TISS therapeutic scores, and the PRN index of health care burden. Medial and administrative audits are conducted using diagnosis-related groups (DRG) and case mix classification. The DRGs are used to establish an aggregate index of activity (ISA points) which contribute to the complex mechanism of budget allowance. Unfortunately, the French DRG case mix system does not provide an appropriate description of the costs of ICU stays. One of the special features of respiratory ICUs is related to patient flow. Patients are referred from a respiratory unit and discharged to a respiratory unit or a respiratory rehabilitation center. Readmissions are frequent. Many patients are also admitted only for diagnosis or a respiratory procedure requiring close surveillance. The SRLF criteria, which take into consideration all of these features, should always be used for the evaluation of quality of care. The French Society of Lung Disease (SPLF) has proposed specific standards of quality for respiratory ICU. We present here examples issuing for the ICU of the Hôtel-Dieu Hospital in Paris. The results show that non-specific national indicators, in combination with other indicators specific for respiratory ICU, provide appropriate audit data.

  8. [Evaluation of respiratory intensive care units at pneumology services].

    PubMed

    Vergnenègre, A

    2001-10-01

    Audits should be conducted in respiratory intensive care units (ICU) as in all other ICU using patient-specific indicators to assess medical activity and quality of care. However, other criteria, such as those developed by the SRLF ("Société de Réanimation de Langue Française"), should also be used. These criteria include the description of the patients previous health status, prognosis of underlying diseases, the SAPS I or SAPS II severity score at admission, the omega or TISS therapeutic scores, and the PRN index of health care burden. Medial and administrative audits are conducted using diagnosis-related groups (DRG) and case mix classification. The DRGs are used to establish an aggregate index of activity (ISA points) which contribute to the complex mechanism of budget allowance. Unfortunately, the French DRG case mix system does not provide an appropriate description of the costs of ICU stays. One of the special features of respiratory ICUs is related to patient flow. Patients are referred from a respiratory unit and discharged to a respiratory unit or a respiratory rehabilitation center. Readmissions are frequent. Many patients are also admitted only for diagnosis or a respiratory procedure requiring close surveillance. The SRLF criteria, which take into consideration all of these features, should always be used for the evaluation of quality of care. The French Society of Lung Disease (SPLF) has proposed specific standards of quality for respiratory ICU. We present here examples issuing for the ICU of the Hôtel-Dieu Hospital in Paris. The results show that non-specific national indicators, in combination with other indicators specific for respiratory ICU, provide appropriate audit data. PMID:11887768

  9. Point of Care Cardiac Ultrasound Applications in the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Arntfield, Robert T; Millington, Scott J

    2012-01-01

    The use of point of care echocardiography by non-cardiologist in acute care settings such as the emergency department (ED) or the intensive care unit (ICU) is very common. Unlike diagnostic echocardiography, the scope of such point of care exams is often restricted to address the clinical questions raised by the patient’s differential diagnosis or chief complaint in order to inform immediate management decisions. In this article, an overview of the most common applications of this focused echocardiography in the ED and ICU is provided. This includes but is not limited to the evaluation of patients experiencing hypotension, cardiac arrest, cardiac trauma, chest pain and patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:22894759

  10. [The integrality of care and communicative actions in the cross-discipline practice in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Pirolo, Sueli Moreira; Ferraz, Clarice Aparecida; Gomes, Romeu

    2011-12-01

    Cross-disciplinary work in health is an important element to deliver comprehensive health care actions. The present study analyzed cross-disciplinary actions in intensive care according to Habermas. This case study was performed using a qualitative approach. The empiric material capture was collected by observing the setting and using semi-structured interviews with health workers. The information was analyzed using the meaning interpretation technique. The analysis revealed two thematic lines: individual instrumental care in view of the clinical inconstancy, and the collective care fragmented by functions. This result weakens the worker/worker and the worker/patient interactions and compromises the association between health actions. As it does not favor communicative actions, it becomes fragile and the strategic/instrumental action is evinced.

  11. Acute renal failure in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Weisbord, Steven D; Palevsky, Paul M

    2006-06-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common complication in critically ill patients, with ARF requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) developing in approximately 5 to 10% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that ARF is an independent risk factor for mortality. Interventions to prevent the development of ARF are currently limited to a small number of settings, primarily radiocontrast nephropathy and rhabdomyolysis. There are no effective pharmacological agents for the treatment of established ARF. Renal replacement therapy remains the primary treatment for patients with severe ARF; however, the data guiding selection of modality of RRT and the optimal timing of initiation and dose of therapy are inconclusive. This review focuses on the epidemiology and diagnostic approach to ARF in the ICU and summarizes our current understanding of therapeutic approaches including RRT.

  12. MRSA infection in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Giuffrè, Mario; Bonura, Celestino; Cipolla, Domenico; Mammina, Caterina

    2013-05-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is well known as one of the most frequent etiological agents of healthcare-associated infections. The epidemiology of MRSA is evolving with emergence of community-associated MRSA, the clonal spread of some successful clones, their spillover into healthcare settings and acquisition of antibacterial drug resistances. Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients are at an especially high risk of acquiring colonization and infection by MRSA. Epidemiology of MRSA in NICU can be very complex because outbreaks can overlap endemic circulation and make it difficult to trace transmission routes. Moreover, increasing prevalence of community-associated MRSA can jeopardize epidemiological investigation, screening and effectiveness of control policies. Surveillance, prevention and control strategies and clinical management have been widely studied and are still the subject of scientific debate. More data are needed to determine the most cost-effective approach to MRSA control in NICU in light of the local epidemiology.

  13. Supporting Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Parents Through Social Media.

    PubMed

    Dzubaty, Dolores R

    2016-01-01

    Parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit may often find themselves seeking healthcare information from online and social media sources. Social media applications are available to healthcare consumers and their families, as well as healthcare providers, in a variety of formats. Information that parents gather on their own, and information that is explained by providers, is then used when parents make healthcare decisions regarding their infants. Parents also seek support from peers and family while making healthcare decisions. The combination of knowledge obtained and social support given may empower the parent to feel more confident in their decision making. Healthcare professionals can guide parents to credible resources. The exchange of information between providers and parents can occur using a variety of communication methods. Misperceptions can be corrected, support given, open sharing of information occurs, and parent empowerment may result. PMID:27465452

  14. Intensive care medicine and organ donation: exploring the last frontiers?

    PubMed

    Escudero, D; Otero, J

    2015-01-01

    The main, universal problem for transplantation is organ scarcity. The gap between offer and demand grows wider every year and causes many patients in waiting list to die. In Spain, 90% of transplants are done with organs taken from patients deceased in brain death but this has a limited potential. In order to diminish organ shortage, alternative strategies such as donations from living donors, expanded criteria donors or donation after circulatory death, have been developed. Nevertheless, these types of donors also have their limitations and so are not able to satisfy current organ demand. It is necessary to reduce family denial and to raise donation in brain death thus generalizing, among other strategies, non-therapeutic elective ventilation. As intensive care doctors, cornerstone to the national donation programme, we must consolidate our commitment with society and organ transplantation. We must contribute with the values proper to our specialization and try to reach self-sufficiency by rising organ obtainment.

  15. Unexplained neuropsychiatric symptoms in intensive care: A Fahr Syndrome case.

    PubMed

    Calili, Duygu Kayar; Mutlu, Nevzat Mehmet; Mutlu Titiz, Ayse Pinar; Akcaboy, Zeynep Nur; Aydin, Eda Macit; Turan, Isil Ozkocak

    2016-08-01

    Fahr Syndrome is a rare disease where calcium and other minerals are stored bilaterally and symmetrically in the basal ganglia, cerebellar dentate nucleus and white matter. Fahr Syndrome is associated with various metabolic disorders, mainly parathyroid disorders. The presented case discusses a 64-year old male patient admitted to the intensive care unit of our hospital diagnosed with aspiration pneumonia and urosepsis. The cranial tomography examination to explain his nonspecific neurological symptoms showed bilateral calcifications in the temporal, parietal, frontal, occipital lobes, basal ganglia, cerebellar hemisphere and medulla oblongata posteriorly. His biochemical test results also indicated parathormone-calcium metabolic abnormalities. Fahr Syndrome must be considered for a definitive diagnosis in patients with nonspecific neuropsychiatric symptoms and accompanying calcium metabolism disorders in order to control serious morbidity and complications because of neurological damage. PMID:27524543

  16. Optimal physicians schedule in an Intensive Care Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidri, L.; Labidi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we consider a case study for the problem of physicians scheduling in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The objective is to minimize the total overtime under complex constraints. The considered ICU is composed of three buildings and the physicians are divided accordingly into six teams. The workload is assigned to each team under a set of constraints. The studied problem is composed of two simultaneous phases: composing teams and assigning the workload to each one of them. This constitutes an additional major hardness compared to the two phase's process: composing teams and after that assigning the workload. The physicians schedule in this ICU is used to be done manually each month. In this work, the studied physician scheduling problem is formulated as an integer linear program and solved optimally using state of the art software. The preliminary experimental results show that 50% of the overtime can be saved.

  17. Target value design: applications to newborn intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Rybkowski, Zofia K; Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Ballard, H Glenn

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for greater understanding of the health impact of various design elements in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) as well as cost-benefit information to make informed decisions about the long-term value of design decisions. This is particularly evident when design teams are considering the transition from open-bay NICUs to single-family-room (SFR) units. This paper introduces the guiding principles behind target value design (TVD)-a price-led design methodology that is gaining acceptance in healthcare facility design within the Lean construction methodology. The paper also discusses the role that set-based design plays in TVD and its application to NICUs.

  18. [Disorders of intestinal flora in intensive care patients].

    PubMed

    Graninger, W

    1985-09-01

    The intestinal flora under normal conditions prevents colonisation of the intestinal mucosa with pathogenic bacteria. Various diseases as well as antibiotics may disturb the host/bacteria balance. If patients are in addition immunocompromised, otherwise commensal bacteria may cause life threatening infections. Treatment of intensive care patients with antibiotics thus should account for preservation of resistance against colonization. Antibiotics active against anaerobes or poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, or excreted in the bile should be avoided. In patients with colitis induced by antibiotics the number of clostridium difficile with subsequent toxin production are greatly increased as a consequence of the killing of the normal anaerobic colon bacterial flora; in these patients vancomycin has to be applied. Mostly "dysbiosis" caused by antibiotics does not need any treatment. Therapeutic adjuncts like the administration of bacterial preparations e.g. lactobacilli are of no value.

  19. Living the situation stress-experiences among intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Fredriksen, Sven-Tore D; Ringsberg, Karin C

    2007-06-01

    The study is about the types of stress that patients in intensive care units experience. Ten reviewed articles selected from Cinahl and Pubmed between 1994 and 2003 constitute the data. The paper is a literature review, and the data is analysed from the phenomenological-hermeneutical point of view. Stress related to the body, room and relationships is discussed. Experiences of stress that are related to the body include bodily stress reactions, deprivation of control, emotions related to technical equipment, procedures and loss of meaning. Stress related to the room highlights the environment and the situation in which the patient finds him/herself. The ethical relations of professionals and separation of patients from their significant others constitute stress related to relationships.

  20. Assessing distress in pediatric intensive care environments: the COMFORT scale.

    PubMed

    Ambuel, B; Hamlett, K W; Marx, C M; Blumer, J L

    1992-02-01

    Managing psychological distress is a central treatment goal in Pediatric Intensive Care Units (PICUs), with medical and psychological implications. However, there is no objective measure for assessing efficacy of pharmacologic and psychological interventions used to reduce distress. Development of the COMFORT scale is described, a nonintrusive measure for assessing distress in PICU patients. Eight dimensions were selected based upon a literature review and survey of PICU nurses. Interrater agreement and internal consistency were high. Criterion validity, assessed by comparison with concurrent global ratings of PICU nurses, was also high. Principal components analysis revealed 2 correlated factors, behavioral and physiologic, accounting for 84% of variance. An ecological-developmental model is presented for further study of children's distress and coping in the PICU.

  1. Error in medicine: adverse events in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Hart, G K

    1999-10-30

    Human error occurs in all walks of life, including medicine. Numerous studies demonstrate that iatrogenic complications account for many deaths, long-term disabilities and unnecessary expense. The study of these adverse events can be formalized in various ways in order to minimise the frequency and severity of complications. Incident monitoring borrows its methodology from the well proven airline, scuba diving and similar fields where "near miss" events are treated as seriously as actual events, because the near miss is often a pointer to a systematic problem which should be corrected. The areas of human performance psychology and the analysis of complex systems are of increasing relevance to the avoidance of error. These techniques have been incorporated into the Australian Incident Monitoring Program which developed in the anaesthetic forum but which has now been taken up by intensive care units and indeed hospital wide in many parts of Australia and New Zealand.

  2. Epidemiology of nosocomial infections in adult intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Trilla, A

    1994-07-01

    Patients in intensive care units (ICUs) are a small subgroup of all hospitalized patients, but they account for approximately 25% of all hospital infections. Nosocomial infection rates among ICU patients are 5-10 times higher than among general ward patients. ICU infection rates are higher due to complex interactions between the patients' underlying disease, severity of illness, type of ICU, duration of stay, and invasive devices used. Antimicrobial resistance is a major clinical problem despite potent and newer antibiotics. Organisms that pose a clinically significant resistance problem among ICU patients include methicillin-resistant staphylococci, enterococci, a wide variety of enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas cepacia, Xanthomonas maltophila, Acinetobacter and Candida species. Traditional infection control measures include identification of reservoirs, halting transmission between patients, stopping progression from colonization to infection and modifying host risk. In addition, sound selection procedures and guidelines for antibiotic usage are necessary to control the spread of multi-resistant micro-organisms.

  3. Strategies for appropriate antibiotic use in intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Camila Delfino Ribeiro; Silva, Moacyr

    2015-01-01

    The comsumption of antibiotics is high, mainly in intensive care units. Unfortunately, most are inappropriately used leading to increased multi-resistant bacteria. It is well known that initial empirical therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce mortality rates. However the prolonged and irrational use of antimicrobials may also increase the risk of toxicity, drug interactions and diarrhea due to Clostridium difficile. Some strategies to rational use of antimicrobial agents include avoiding colonization treatment, de-escalation, monitoring serum levels of the agents, appropriate duration of therapy and use of biological markers. This review discusses the effectiveness of these strategies, the importance of microbiology knowledge, considering there are agents resistant to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae, and reducing antibiotic use and bacterial resistance, with no impact on mortality. PMID:26132360

  4. [MELAS: diagnostic keys and treatment in the Intensive Care Unit].

    PubMed

    Gómez Seijo, A; Castro Orjales, M J; Pastor Benavent, J A

    2008-04-01

    Cerebrovascular accident in young adults is not rare and the most common causes are: cardiac embolism, arterial dissection and migraine. The unknown etiology, in spite of extensive studies, is described in the literature in about one third of patients under 45 years of age. The mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) may occur with symptoms that simulate a stroke. The episodes generally affect the posterior part of the brain and the basic insult mechanisms may be metabolic more than ischemic. We describe the case of an 18-year old patient who was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit due to a sudden picture of blindness. The ophthalmologic study was normal and the neuroimaging studies showed infarction in both occipital lobules. We explain the different clinical features, diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic methods of the disease.

  5. Target value design: applications to newborn intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Rybkowski, Zofia K; Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Ballard, H Glenn

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for greater understanding of the health impact of various design elements in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) as well as cost-benefit information to make informed decisions about the long-term value of design decisions. This is particularly evident when design teams are considering the transition from open-bay NICUs to single-family-room (SFR) units. This paper introduces the guiding principles behind target value design (TVD)-a price-led design methodology that is gaining acceptance in healthcare facility design within the Lean construction methodology. The paper also discusses the role that set-based design plays in TVD and its application to NICUs. PMID:23224803

  6. Adolescent mothers' perceptions of the neonatal intensive care unit environment.

    PubMed

    Bell, P L

    1997-06-01

    The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment has been found to be a major source of distress for older parents, but what about adolescent mothers? A prospective, descriptive study was conducted to describe adolescent mothers' perceptions of the stressors found in the NICU environment. Data were collected using the NICU Parental Stress Scale and a demographic data form. These 46 mothers found that the most stressful aspects of the NICU were parental role alterations and the infant's appearance and behavior. Less stressful were the sights and sounds of the NICU and communication with staff. Nurses should continue to identify and alleviate stressors that can compromise the parenting experience of mothers of all age groups.

  7. Intensive care medicine and organ donation: exploring the last frontiers?

    PubMed

    Escudero, D; Otero, J

    2015-01-01

    The main, universal problem for transplantation is organ scarcity. The gap between offer and demand grows wider every year and causes many patients in waiting list to die. In Spain, 90% of transplants are done with organs taken from patients deceased in brain death but this has a limited potential. In order to diminish organ shortage, alternative strategies such as donations from living donors, expanded criteria donors or donation after circulatory death, have been developed. Nevertheless, these types of donors also have their limitations and so are not able to satisfy current organ demand. It is necessary to reduce family denial and to raise donation in brain death thus generalizing, among other strategies, non-therapeutic elective ventilation. As intensive care doctors, cornerstone to the national donation programme, we must consolidate our commitment with society and organ transplantation. We must contribute with the values proper to our specialization and try to reach self-sufficiency by rising organ obtainment. PMID:25841298

  8. Unexplained neuropsychiatric symptoms in intensive care: A Fahr Syndrome case.

    PubMed

    Calili, Duygu Kayar; Mutlu, Nevzat Mehmet; Mutlu Titiz, Ayse Pinar; Akcaboy, Zeynep Nur; Aydin, Eda Macit; Turan, Isil Ozkocak

    2016-08-01

    Fahr Syndrome is a rare disease where calcium and other minerals are stored bilaterally and symmetrically in the basal ganglia, cerebellar dentate nucleus and white matter. Fahr Syndrome is associated with various metabolic disorders, mainly parathyroid disorders. The presented case discusses a 64-year old male patient admitted to the intensive care unit of our hospital diagnosed with aspiration pneumonia and urosepsis. The cranial tomography examination to explain his nonspecific neurological symptoms showed bilateral calcifications in the temporal, parietal, frontal, occipital lobes, basal ganglia, cerebellar hemisphere and medulla oblongata posteriorly. His biochemical test results also indicated parathormone-calcium metabolic abnormalities. Fahr Syndrome must be considered for a definitive diagnosis in patients with nonspecific neuropsychiatric symptoms and accompanying calcium metabolism disorders in order to control serious morbidity and complications because of neurological damage.

  9. Heart rate dynamics preceding hemorrhage in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Moss, Travis J; Clark, Matthew T; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall; Calland, J Forrest

    2015-01-01

    Occult hemorrhage in surgical/trauma intensive care unit (STICU) patients is common and may lead to circulatory collapse. Continuous electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring may allow for early identification and treatment, and could improve outcomes. We studied 4,259 consecutive admissions to the STICU at the University of Virginia Health System. We collected ECG waveform data captured by bedside monitors and calculated linear and non-linear measures of the RR interbeat intervals. We tested the hypothesis that a transfusion requirement of 3 or more PRBC transfusions in a 24 hour period is preceded by dynamical changes in these heart rate measures and performed logistic regression modeling. We identified 308 hemorrhage events. A multivariate model including heart rate, standard deviation of the RR intervals, detrended fluctuation analysis, and local dynamics density had a C-statistic of 0.62. Earlier detection of hemorrhage might improve outcomes by allowing earlier resuscitation in STICU patients.

  10. Midazolam for sedation in the paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Rosen, D A; Rosen, K R

    1991-01-01

    This retrospective study examines data from 55 patients sedated in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with midazolam. Midazolam sedation was initiated with a bolus of 0.25 mg.kg-1 followed by a continuous infusion of 0.4-4 micrograms.kg-1.min-1. Physiological and metabolic parameters, infusion rates, duration, and sedation scores were monitored. Midazolam infusions were effective in sedating all the children studied during all or part of their PICU admission. The median duration of sedation was 74 h with a range of 4 to 1272 h. Haemodynamics were unchanged. Of the patients 46% were effectively alimented by the enteral route, and enteral alimentation was successful in all patients in whom it was attempted. Unassisted ventilation occurred in 44% of the patients during infusion. Oxygen consumption was 28% lower than in the control. Disadvantages of midazolam infusion have included inability to sedate during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and development of acute tolerance.

  11. Characteristics of Dutch and Swiss primary care COPD patients – baseline data of the ICE COLD ERIC study

    PubMed Central

    Siebeling, Lara; Puhan, Milo A; Muggensturm, Patrick; Zoller, Marco; ter Riet, Gerben

    2011-01-01

    Introduction International Collaborative Effort on Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease: Exacerbation Risk Index Cohorts (ICE COLD ERIC) is a prospective cohort study with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients from Switzerland and The Netherlands designed to develop and validate practical COPD risk indices that predict the clinical course of COPD patients in primary care. This paper describes the characteristics of the cohorts at baseline. Material and methods Standardized assessments included lung function, patient history, self-administered questionnaires, exercise capacity, and a venous blood sample for analysis of biomarkers and genetics. Results A total of 260 Dutch and 151 Swiss patients were included. Median age was 66 years, 57% were male, 38% were current smokers, 55% were former smokers, and 76% had at least one and 40% had two or more comorbidities with cardiovascular disease being the most prevalent one. The use of any pulmonary and cardiovascular drugs was 84% and 66%, respectively. Although lung function results (median forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] was 59% of predicted) were similar across the two cohorts, Swiss patients reported better COPD-specific health-related quality of life (Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire) and had higher exercise capacity. Discussion COPD patients in the ICE COLD ERIC study represent a wide range of disease severities and the prevalence of multimorbidity is high. The rich variation in these primary care cohorts offers good opportunities to learn more about the clinical course of COPD. PMID:22135502

  12. In their own words: Patients and families define high-quality palliative care in the intensive care unit*

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Judith E.; Puntillo, Kathleen A.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Walker, Amy S.; McAdam, Jennifer L.; Ilaoa, Debra; Penrod, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Objective Although the majority of hospital deaths occur in the intensive care unit and virtually all critically ill patients and their families have palliative needs, we know little about how patients and families, the most important “stakeholders,” define high-quality intensive care unit palliative care. We conducted this study to obtain their views on important domains of this care. Design Qualitative study using focus groups facilitated by a single physician. Setting A 20-bed general intensive care unit in a 382-bed community hospital in Oklahoma; 24-bed medical–surgical intensive care unit in a 377-bed tertiary, university hospital in urban California; and eight-bed medical intensive care unit in a 311-bed Veterans’ Affairs hospital in a northeastern city. Patients Randomly-selected patients with intensive care unit length of stay ≥5 days in 2007 to 2008 who survived the intensive care unit, families of survivors, and families of patients who died in the intensive care unit. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Focus group facilitator used open-ended questions and scripted probes from a written guide. Three investigators independently coded meeting transcripts, achieving consensus on themes. From 48 subjects (15 patients, 33 family members) in nine focus groups across three sites, a shared definition of high-quality intensive care unit palliative care emerged: timely, clear, and compassionate communication by clinicians; clinical decision-making focused on patients’ preferences, goals, and values; patient care maintaining comfort, dignity, and personhood; and family care with open access and proximity to patients, interdisciplinary support in the intensive care unit, and bereavement care for families of patients who died. Participants also endorsed specific processes to operationalize the care they considered important. Conclusions Efforts to improve intensive care unit palliative care quality should focus on domains and processes that

  13. Ethics of drug research in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kleiber, Niina; Tromp, Krista; Mooij, Miriam G; van de Vathorst, Suzanne; Tibboel, Dick; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2015-02-01

    Critical illness and treatment modalities change pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of medications used in critically ill children, in addition to age-related changes in drug disposition and effect. Hence, to ensure effective and safe drug therapy, research in this population is urgently needed. However, conducting research in the vulnerable population of the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) presents with ethical challenges. This article addresses the main ethical issues specific to drug research in these critically ill children and proposes several solutions. The extraordinary environment of the PICU raises specific challenges to the design and conduct of research. The need for proxy consent of parents (or legal guardians) and the stress-inducing physical environment may threaten informed consent. The informed consent process is challenging because emergency research reduces or even eliminates the time to seek consent. Moreover, parental anxiety may impede adequate understanding and generate misconceptions. Alternative forms of consent have been developed taking into account the unpredictable reality of the acute critical care environment. As with any research in children, the burden and risk should be minimized. Recent developments in sample collection and analysis as well as pharmacokinetic analysis should be considered in the design of studies. Despite the difficulties inherent to drug research in critically ill children, methods are available to conduct ethically sound research resulting in relevant and generalizable data. This should motivate the PICU community to commit to drug research to ultimately provide the right drug at the right dose for every individual child.

  14. Preliminary noise reduction efforts in a medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Nannapaneni, Srikant; Lee, Sarah J; Kashiouris, Markos; Elmer, Jennifer L; Thakur, Lokendra K; Nelson, Sarah B; Bowron, Catherine T; Danielson, Richard D; Surani, Salim; Ramar, Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Noise is a significant contributor to sleep disruption in the intensive care unit (ICU) that may result in increased patient morbidity such as delirium and prolonged length of stay in ICU. We conducted a pre-post intervention study in a 24-bed tertiary care academic medical ICU to reduce the mean noise levels. Baseline dosimeter recordings of ICU noise levels demonstrated a mean noise level of 54.2 A-weighted decibels (dBA) and peak noise levels of 109.9 dBA, well above the Environmental Protection Agency's recommended levels. There were 1735 episodes of "defects" (maximum noise levels > 60 dBA). Following implementation of multipronged interventions, although the mean noise levels did not change significantly between pre- and post-intervention (54.2 vs 53.8 dBA; p = 0.96), there was a significant reduction in the number of "defects" post-intervention (1735 vs 1289, p ≤ 0.000), and the providers felt that the patients were sleeping longer in the ICU post-intervention.

  15. Bedside Diagnosis in the Intensive Care Unit. Is Looking Overlooked?

    PubMed

    Metkus, Thomas S; Kim, Bo Soo

    2015-10-01

    Bedside diagnosis, including but not limited to the physical examination, can be lifesaving in the setting of critical illness and is a core competency in both medical school and at the postgraduate level. Data as to the clinical usefulness of bedside diagnosis in the modern intensive care unit (ICU) is sparse, however, and there are no clinical guidelines addressing performance, interpretation, and usefulness of the bedside assessment in critically ill patients. Bedside assessment and physical examination are used in a heterogeneous manner across institutions and even across ICUs within the same institution, which has implications for medical education, patient care, and the overuse/misuse of diagnostic testing. In this commentary, we review the existing data addressing bedside diagnosis in the ICU, describe various models of bedside assessment use in the ICU based on our clinical practice and on the limited evidence base, share our practical "checklist-based" approach to bedside assessment in the critically ill patient, and advocate for more formal study of physical examination and bedside assessment in the ICU to enhance clinical practice. PMID:26389653

  16. Bedside Diagnosis in the Intensive Care Unit. Is Looking Overlooked?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo Soo

    2015-01-01

    Bedside diagnosis, including but not limited to the physical examination, can be lifesaving in the setting of critical illness and is a core competency in both medical school and at the postgraduate level. Data as to the clinical usefulness of bedside diagnosis in the modern intensive care unit (ICU) is sparse, however, and there are no clinical guidelines addressing performance, interpretation, and usefulness of the bedside assessment in critically ill patients. Bedside assessment and physical examination are used in a heterogeneous manner across institutions and even across ICUs within the same institution, which has implications for medical education, patient care, and the overuse/misuse of diagnostic testing. In this commentary, we review the existing data addressing bedside diagnosis in the ICU, describe various models of bedside assessment use in the ICU based on our clinical practice and on the limited evidence base, share our practical “checklist-based” approach to bedside assessment in the critically ill patient, and advocate for more formal study of physical examination and bedside assessment in the ICU to enhance clinical practice. PMID:26389653

  17. Ethics of drug research in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kleiber, Niina; Tromp, Krista; Mooij, Miriam G; van de Vathorst, Suzanne; Tibboel, Dick; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2015-02-01

    Critical illness and treatment modalities change pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of medications used in critically ill children, in addition to age-related changes in drug disposition and effect. Hence, to ensure effective and safe drug therapy, research in this population is urgently needed. However, conducting research in the vulnerable population of the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) presents with ethical challenges. This article addresses the main ethical issues specific to drug research in these critically ill children and proposes several solutions. The extraordinary environment of the PICU raises specific challenges to the design and conduct of research. The need for proxy consent of parents (or legal guardians) and the stress-inducing physical environment may threaten informed consent. The informed consent process is challenging because emergency research reduces or even eliminates the time to seek consent. Moreover, parental anxiety may impede adequate understanding and generate misconceptions. Alternative forms of consent have been developed taking into account the unpredictable reality of the acute critical care environment. As with any research in children, the burden and risk should be minimized. Recent developments in sample collection and analysis as well as pharmacokinetic analysis should be considered in the design of studies. Despite the difficulties inherent to drug research in critically ill children, methods are available to conduct ethically sound research resulting in relevant and generalizable data. This should motivate the PICU community to commit to drug research to ultimately provide the right drug at the right dose for every individual child. PMID:25354987

  18. Short acting insulin analogues in intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilotta, Federico; Guerra, Carolina; Badenes, Rafael; Lolli, Simona; Rosa, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Blood glucose control in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, addressed to actively maintain blood glucose concentration within defined thresholds, is based on two major therapeutic interventions: to supply an adequate calories load and, when necessary, to continuously infuse insulin titrated to patients needs: intensive insulin therapy (IIT). Short acting insulin analogues (SAIA) have been synthesized to improve the chronic treatment of patients with diabetes but, because of the pharmacokinetic characteristics that include shorter on-set and off-set, they can be effectively used also in ICU patients and have the potential to be associated with a more limited risk of inducing episodes of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. Medical therapies carry an intrinsic risk for collateral effects; this can be more harmful in patients with unstable clinical conditions like ICU patients. To minimize these risks, the use of short acting drugs in ICU patients have gained a progressively larger room in ICU and now pharmaceutical companies and researchers design drugs dedicated to this subset of medical practice. In this article we report the rationale of using short acting drugs in ICU patients (i.e., sedation and treatment of arterial hypertension) and we also describe SAIA and their therapeutic use in ICU with the potential to minimize iatrogenic hypoglycemia related to IIT. The pharmacodynamic and pharmachokinetic characteristics of SAIA will be also discussed. PMID:24936244

  19. [Psychiatric issues during and after intensive care (ICU) stays].

    PubMed

    Pochard, Frédéric

    2011-02-01

    Stays in intensive care units (ICUs) are a source of psychological and physical stress, sometimes resulting in psychological disorders that may persist after ICU discharge. ICU stressors include exhaustion, drug-induced sleep privation, intubation, pain, noise, and a disrupted light-dark cycle. Patients remember traumatic experiences, such as a fear of being killed or abandoned, nightmares, and panic attacks. Depression is frequent but difficult to detect. Psychiatric disorders such as delirium and confusion (hallucinations, agitation, stupor) occur in almost half of all ICU patients. Simple measures can reduce the risk of such disorders, including noise reduction, less intense lighting (especially at night), individual rooms, visible clocks to reduce confusion, frequent family visits, verbal contact, reassurance, and anxiolytics. Anxiety and depression are frequent after ICU stays, and may be mixed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which can include fear, feelings of horror, helplessness, avoidance, neurovegetative symptoms, and intrusive thoughts. New techniques are being tested to prevent these disorders, such as logbooksfor families and team members to note events during and after the ICU stay, and end-of-stay psychological OK? consultations for both the patient and the family. PMID:22096876

  20. Transfer Delays From the Neurologic Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Ayush; Biffi, Alessandro; Cohen, Adam B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Neurocritical care beds are a scarce, valuable resource. The purpose of this pilot study was to quantify discharge delays from the neurologic intensive care unit (NICU) at a tertiary-care teaching hospital and to examine the impact on overall hospital length of stay (LOS). Secondary goals were to evaluate (1) the effect of NICU delays on patient physical/occupational therapy services and (2) the accuracy of clinician estimates of NICU discharge date and hospital LOS. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of consecutive patients discharged over 1 month from NICU. A patient was defined to have experienced a delay when deemed medically ready for NICU discharge (ie, floor transfer) but without actual NICU discharge within 8 hours of the ready time. Results: Sixty-five patients were discharged from the NICU with an average delay of 25 hours 51 minutes (median 13 hours 3 minutes), of which 60% (39 of 65) of patients were delayed at least 8 hours, while 25% (16 of 65) were delayed at least 48 hours. The primary reason for delay was lack of floor bed availability. NICU admissions that experienced a delay did not have a significantly longer hospital LOS. Clinician estimates on admission of NICU discharge date were within 24 hours for 63% of admissions. Conclusion: Discharge delays from the NICU were common but did not significantly increase hospital LOS in this cohort. Delays did not have a significant impact on total physical therapy or occupational therapy duration. Clinician estimates of NICU discharge dates were relatively accurate. PMID:27053982

  1. Paediatric cardiac intensive care unit: current setting and organization in 2010.

    PubMed

    Fraisse, Alain; Le Bel, Stéphane; Mas, Bertrand; Macrae, Duncan

    2010-10-01

    Over recent decades, specialized paediatric cardiac intensive care has emerged as a central component in the management of critically ill, neonatal, paediatric and adult patients with congenital and acquired heart disease. The majority of high-volume centres (dealing with over 300 surgical cases per year) have dedicated paediatric cardiac intensive care units, with the smallest programmes more likely to care for paediatric cardiac patients in mixed paediatric or adult intensive care units. Specialized nursing staff are also a crucial presence at the patient's bedside for quality of care. A paediatric cardiac intensive care programme should have patients (preoperative and postoperative) grouped together geographically, and should provide proximity to the operating theatre, catheterization laboratory and radiology department, as well as to the regular ward. Age-appropriate medical equipment must be provided. An optimal strategy for running a paediatric cardiac intensive care programme should include: multidisciplinary collaboration and involvement with paediatric cardiology, anaesthesia, cardiac surgery and many other subspecialties; a risk-stratification strategy for quantifying perioperative risk; a personalized patient approach; and anticipatory care. Finally, progressive withdrawal from heavy paediatric cardiac intensive care management should be institutionalized. Although the countries of the European Union do not share any common legislation on the structure and organization of paediatric intensive care or paediatric cardiac intensive care, any paediatric cardiac surgery programme in France that is agreed by the French Health Ministry must perform at least '150 major procedures per year in children' and must provide a 'specialized paediatric intensive care unit'.

  2. Two decades of external peer review of cancer care in general hospitals; the Dutch experience.

    PubMed

    Kilsdonk, Melvin J; Siesling, Sabine; Otter, Rene; van Harten, Wim H

    2016-03-01

    External peer review was introduced in general hospitals in the Netherlands in 1994 to assess and improve the multidisciplinary team approach in cancer care. This paper aims to explore the value, perceived impact, and (future) role of external peer review in cancer care. Semistructured interviews were held with clinicians, oncology nurses, and managers from fifteen general hospitals that participated in three rounds of peer review over a period of 16 years. Interviewees reflected on the goals and expectations, experiences, perceived impact, and future role of external peer review. Transcriptions of the interviews were coded to discover recurrent themes. Improving clinical care and organization were the main motives for participation. Positive impact was perceived on multiple aspects of care such as shared responsibilities, internal prioritization of cancer care, improved communication, and a clear structure and position of cancer care within general hospitals. Establishing a direct relationship between the external peer review and organizational or clinical impact proved to be difficult. Criticism was raised on the content of the program being too theoretical and organization-focussed after three rounds. According to most stakeholders, external peer review can improve multidisciplinary team work in cancer care; however, the acceptance is threatened by a perceived disbalance between effort and visible clinical impact. Leaner and more clinically focused programs are needed to keep repeated peer reviews challenging and worthwhile. PMID:26714788

  3. Labour supply in the home care industry: A case study in a Dutch region.

    PubMed

    Breedveld, Elly J; Meijboom, Bert R; de Roo, Aad A

    2006-04-01

    Health organizations have started to become more market-driven. Therefore, it is important for health organizations to analyse the competitive dynamics of their industrial structure. However, relevant theories and models have mainly been developed for organizations acting in the profit sector. In this paper, we adapt Porter's 'five forces model' to the home care industry. In particular, we modify the (determinants of the) bargaining power of labour suppliers. We then apply the modified Porter-model to the home care industry in the Netherlands for the period of 1987-1997 with special attention for labour supply. The new instrument clarifies the complexity of the supply chains and value systems of the home care industry. As can be illustrated by developments in the home care industry in the province of North Brabant during the 1990s, competition between home care providers has influenced labour market relations, but so do other factors as well. Between 1987 and 1997, the bargaining power of labour suppliers was relatively limited. After 1997, however, the demand for home care personnel has increased strongly. In spite of the present economic recession, scarcity on this labour market seems to prevail in the longer term due to a growing demand for home care services. PMID:16011857

  4. Health care seeking behavior and perceptions of the medical profession among pre- and post-retirement age Dutch dancers.

    PubMed

    Air, Mamie

    2009-01-01

    A cross-sectional, descriptive survey and a medical chart review of 154 pre- and post-retirement age injured Dutch dancers were performed. The purpose was to examine dancers' health care seeking behavior and perceptions of the medical profession in context of the current health care system in The Netherlands, which includes both universal access and expertise in performing arts medicine. No logistical or perceptual restrictions to health care were reported by the dancers in this study. Only three younger dancers (< 35 years) lacked a primary care physician. No dancer reported monetary or insurance hindrances to acquiring an appointment or fear of going to the doctor. A small percentage of the younger group (18%), but none of the older dancers, reported that they felt the doctor would not understand them (chi(2) = 2.2, df = 1, p = 0.14). Dancers in both age groups most often sought first treatment from either a physiotherapist (36% to 40%) or a medical doctor (38.8% to 40.8%). When a physician was not consulted first, the primary reason was that dancers had already seen a physiotherapist and thought this treatment was sufficient. Approximately one-third of dancers expected their medical problem to go away on its own. Dutch dancers were additionally found to have a positive relationship with the medical profession, including high satisfaction and confidence. The majority of dancers were satisfied or very satisfied with their medical treatment prior to presenting to the dance medicine specialist (67% older dancers, 52% younger, chi(2) = 1.19, df = 1, p = 0.2). Nearly every dancer was satisfied or very satisfied after treatment by the specialist (100% older dancers, 93% younger dancers, chi(2) = 1.46, df = 1, p = 0.2), and moderately or completely confident of full recovery (80%, each group). Differences in older and younger dancers' perceptions and behaviors were nevertheless found. Older dancers were significantly more likely to continue to dance when injured than

  5. Family support and family-centered care in the neonatal intensive care unit: origins, advances, impact.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Judith S; Cooper, Liza G; Blaine, Arianna I; Franck, Linda S; Howse, Jennifer L; Berns, Scott D

    2011-02-01

    Family-centered care (FCC) has been increasingly emphasized as an important and necessary element of neonatal intensive care. FCC is conceptualized as a philosophy with a set of guiding principles, as well as a cohort of programs, services, and practices that many hospitals have embraced. Several factors drive the pressing need for family-centered care and support of families of infants in NICUs, including the increase in the number of infants in NICUs; growth in diversity of the population and their concurrent needs; identification of parental and familial stress and lack of parenting confidence; and gaps in support for families, as identified by parents and NICU staff. We explore the origins of and advances in FCC in the NICU and identify various delivery methods and aspects of FCC and family support in the NICU. We examine the research and available evidence supporting FCC in the NICU and offer recommendations for increased dissemination and for future study.

  6. [Nursing care systematization at the intensive care unit (ICU) based on Wanda Horta's theory].

    PubMed

    Amante, Lúcia Nazareth; Rossetto, Annelise Paula; Schneider, Dulcinéia Ghizoni

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement the Nursing Care Systematization--Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem (SAE)--with Wanda Aguiar Horta's Theory of Basic Human Necessities and the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association's (NANDA) Nursing Diagnosis as its references. The starting point was the evaluation of the knowledge of the nursing team about the SAE, including their participation in this process. This is a qualitative study, performed in the Intensive Care Unit in a hospital in the city of Brusque, Santa Catarina, from October, 2006 to March, 2007. It was observed that the nursing professionals know little about SAE, but they are greatly interested in learning and developing it in their daily practice. In conclusion, it was possible to execute the healthcare systematization in an easy way, with the use of simple brochures that provided all the necessary information for the qualified development of nursing care.

  7. [The SIAARTI document in preparation: recommendations on admission and discharge from intensive care units and on limits of treatments in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Orsi, L

    2002-04-01

    The document in progress is intended to help the health care professionals in bioethical decision-making process in ICU. It will be probably written as Recommendations because it is a conceptual framework for making decision about intensive care, consensually derived from an Ad Hoc Sub-Committee of SIAARTI Ethics Committee. These guidelines can, however, be considered as general principles and not as specific instructions. These guidelines do not relieve health care professionals involved from their personal responsibility for decisions and action taken in individual cases. These guidelines are in line with the general ethical principles for the care of critically ill patients as formulated, as examples, in the following declarations and deontological codes: Declaration of Helsinki, Ethical Principles in Intensive Care (World Federation of Society of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine), Italian Medical Association's Deontological Code (3/10/98), European Convention of Bioethics Oviedo and in many others international consensus statements and guidelines.

  8. Association of Early Patient-Physician Care Planning Discussions and End-of-Life Care Intensity in Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tisnado, Diana M.; Walling, Anne M.; Dy, Sydney M.; Asch, Steven M.; Ettner, Susan L.; Kim, Benjamin; Pantoja, Philip; Schreibeis-Baum, Hannah C.; Lorenz, Karl A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Early patient-physician care planning discussions may influence the intensity of end-of-life (EOL) care received by veterans with advanced cancer. Objective: The study objective was to evaluate the association between medical record documentation of patient-physician care planning discussions and intensity of EOL care among veterans with advanced cancer. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study. Subjects were 665 veteran decedents diagnosed with stage IV colorectal, lung, or pancreatic cancer in 2008, and followed till death or the end of the study period in 2011. We estimated the effect of patient-physician care planning discussions documented within one month of metastatic diagnosis on the intensity of EOL care measured by receipt of acute care, intensive interventions, chemotherapy, and hospice care, using multivariate logistic regression models. Results: Veterans in our study were predominantly male (97.1%), white (74.7%), with an average age at diagnosis of 66.4 years. Approximately 31% received some acute care, 9.3% received some intensive intervention, and 6.5% had a new chemotherapy regimen initiated in the last month of life. Approximately 41% of decedents received no hospice or were admitted within three days of death. Almost half (46.8%) had documentation of a care planning discussion within the first month after diagnosis and those who did were significantly less likely to receive acute care at EOL (OR: 0.67; p=0.025). Documented discussions were not significantly associated with intensive interventions, chemotherapy, or hospice care. Conclusion: Early care planning discussions are associated with lower rates of acute care use at the EOL in a system with already low rates of intensive EOL care. PMID:26186553

  9. Mechanisms and prevention of secondary brain damage during intensive care.

    PubMed

    Dearden, N M

    1998-01-01

    The injured brain may be damaged by primary impact, secondary injury from secondary damage due to initiation of destructive inflammatory and biochemical cascades by the primary injury or secondary ischemic injury following secondary insults that initiate or augment these immunological and biochemical cascades. Cerebral ischemia will arise whenever delivery of oxygen and substrates to the brain fall below metabolic needs. Many factors lead to the development of secondary insults to the injured brain during initial resuscitation, transport, surgery, and subsequent intensive care. Continuous monitoring of cerebral oxygenation (jugular oximetry, brain tissue PO2) and cerebral blood flow velocity (transcranial Doppler ultrasonography) in patients with brain trauma reveals multiple episodes of transient hypoperfusion with an adverse relationship between incidence and outcome. Secondary brain insults arise through systemic or intracranial mechanisms that reduce cerebral blood flow from compromised CPP, vascular distortion or cerebrovascular narrowing or lower oxygen delivery from hypoxemia associated with airway obstruction, pulmonary pathology, or anemia. Secondary brain ischemia remains a common pathway to secondary brain damage in most critically ill neurosurgical patients. In the future prevention of secondary brain injury may well hinge on giving a cocktail of novel agents that modify destructive biochemical and inflammatory pathways, each having a potential therapeutic window possibly in a subgroup of patients. To date, phase 3 clinical trials of several agents including PEGSOD and tyrilizad mesylate have failed to show relevant efficacy after brain trauma or subarachnoid hemorrhage. The therapeutic role of calcium channel blockers in traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage is currently under investigation following the results of subgroup metaanalysis. Several phase 3, NMDA receptor antagonist studies are underway in brain trauma with results expected soon. Although we

  10. [Continuous monitoring of temperature in anesthesia and intensive care].

    PubMed

    Laborit, G; Roujas, F; Girardey, A; Bertrand, C; Lang, G; Rivet, P; Dufeu, N

    1980-01-01

    Continuous surveillance of both regional and general temperatures is of great interest in anaesthesia and intensive care. After a brief review of temperature regulation and the value of temperature control, the authors suggest a simple and reliable method of surveillance. This uses Chromel/Alumel thermocouples connected to a central device used to store the information. An experimental clinical study involved the assessment of 3 different anaesthetic protocols: Taractan-Palfium; Droleptan-Phenoperidine, Fentanyl only. These measurements were made in 30 young subjects undergoing a maxillofacial surgical procedure under identical conditions. The parameters studied were central temperature (rectal) and skin temperature of the index finger. With regard to peripheral temperature curves the results showed a first phase consisting of fall followed by a second phase characterised by a sudden increase up to a plateau. This plateau (3rd phase) persisted as long as the subject slept. The 4th phase, when peripheral temperature fell suddenly to a level sometimes lower than the initial temperature represented one of the first signs of awakening. As far as central temperature was concerned it fell in a linear fashion for all curves. Comparing the different curves obtained, the authors conclude by noting that the more vasoplegic the anaesthetic protocol, the higher the induction peak of the second phase of peripheral temperature pattern, but also that the fall in central temperature was marked. The authors feel that an anaesthetic which is biologically satisfactory and at the same time produces an overall fall in the production of heat without causing chills avoids the development of vasoconstrictor reactions between the care and the surface which are reflected by a decrease in the gradient between central and peripheral temperatures.

  11. Caval filters in intensive care: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, F; Di Gennaro, TL; Torino, A; Petruzzi, J; d’Elia, A; Fusco, P; Marfella, R; Lettieri, B

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of a caval vein filter (CVF) peri-implant monitoring protocol in order to reduce pulmonary embolism (PE) mortality and CVF-related morbidity. Background The reduction in mortality from PE associated with the use of CVF is affected by the risk of increase in morbidity. Therefore, CVF implant is a challenging prophylactic or therapeutic option. Nowadays, we have many different devices whose rational use, by applying a strict peri-implant monitoring protocol, could be safe and effective. Materials and methods We retrospectively studied 62 patients of a general Intensive Care Unit (ICU) scheduled for definitive, temporary, or optional bedside CVF implant. A peri-implant monitoring protocol including a phlebocavography, an echo-Doppler examination, and coagulation tests was adopted. Results In our study, no thromboembolic recurrence was registered. We implanted 48 retrievable and only 20 definitive CVFs. Endothelial adhesion (18%), residual clot (5%), cranial or caudal migration (6%), microbial colonization of the filter in the absence of clinical signs of infection (1%), caval thrombosis (1%), and pneumothorax (1%) were reported. Deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) was reported (8%) as early complication. All patients with DVT had a temporary or optional filter implanted. However, in our cohort, definitive CVFs were reserved only to 32% of patients and they were not associated with DVT as complication. Conclusion CVF significantly reduces iatrogenic PE without affecting mortality. Generally, ICU patients have a transitory thromboembolic risk, and so the temporary CVF has been proved to be a first-line option to our cohort. A careful monitoring may contribute to a satisfactory outcome in order to promote CVF implant as a safe prophylaxis option. PMID:25395837

  12. Developing a Simulation to Study Conflict in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Chiarchiaro, Jared; Schuster, Rachel A.; Ernecoff, Natalie C.; Barnato, Amber E.; Arnold, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Although medical simulation is increasingly being used in healthcare education, there are few examples of how to rigorously design a simulation to evaluate and study important communication skills of intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians. Objectives: To use existing best practice recommendations to develop a medical simulation to study conflict management in ICUs, then assess the feasibility, acceptability, and realism of the simulation among ICU clinicians. Methods: The setting was a medical ICU of a tertiary care, university hospital. Participants were 36 physicians who treat critically ill patients: intensivists, palliative medicine specialists, and trainees. Using best-practice guidelines and an iterative, multidisciplinary approach, we developed and refined a simulation involving a critically ill patient, in which the patient had a clear advance directive specifying no use of life support, and a surrogate who was unwilling to follow the patient’s preferences. ICU clinicians participated in the simulation and completed surveys and semistructured interviews to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and realism of the simulation. Measurements and Main Results: All participants successfully completed the simulation, and all perceived conflict with the surrogate (mean conflict score, 4.2 on a 0–10 scale [SD, 2.5; range, 1–10]). Participants reported high realism of the simulation across a range of criteria, with mean ratings of greater than 8 on a 0 to 10 scale for all domains assessed. During semistructured interviews, participants confirmed a high degree of realism and offered several suggestions for improvements. Conclusions: We used existing best practice recommendations to develop a simulation model to study physician–family conflict in ICUs that is feasible, acceptable, and realistic. PMID:25643166

  13. [Awakening of intensive care patients after prolonged continuous sedation].

    PubMed

    Acosta Mejuto, B; Delgado Hito, P; Mirabete Rodríguez, I; Sola Prado, A

    1998-01-01

    A study was made of the degree of orientation, cooperation, and anxiety of patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (level III), at the conclusion of prolonged continuous sedation. Recovery time was evaluated, understood as the time required to achieve orientation in time, place, and person. The study was descriptive. An analysis was made of 37 patients who met inclusion criteria between July 1995 and March 1996. After discontinuing sedation, the Glasgow assessment was carried out (modified by Cook and Palma) every four hours until a score of > or = 14 was obtained. From then on, the degree of anxiety, using the Hamilton scale, and cooperation and orientation, using our own scales, were evaluated four times a day. The assessment concluded when the patient was oriented in time, space, and person. We recorded age, sex, disease, disease severity, previous admissions, type of sedation, need for additional bolus injections, and the state of anxiety as perceived by family members. Mean age of patients was 65.1 +/- 13.3 years; 81.1% were men. Respiratory disease was the most common pathology, mean SAPS was 10.7 +/- 2.6, and the most frequently administered drug was midazolam (81%). Patients required an average of 15 hours (164-0) to awaken and tended to taken longer to awake with midazolam. Once the were awake, the required 10 hours (48-0) hours before the were completely oriented. The degree of anxiety was mild and cooperation was regular during all measurements. No relation was found between variables. Our results suggest that a care plan designed to shorten temporal disorientation and promote cooperation would improve the quality of awakening.

  14. Evaluation of forensic cases admitted to pediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Duramaz, Burcu Bursal; Yıldırım, Hamdi Murat; Kıhtır, Hasan Serdar; Yeşilbaş, Osman; Şevketoğlu, Esra

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to determine the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of pediatric forensic cases to contribute to the literature and to preventive health care services. Material and Methods: Pediatric forensic cases hospitalized in our pediatric intensive care unit below the age of 17 years were reviewed retrospectively (January 2009–June 2014) . The patients were evaluated in two groups as physical traumas (Group A) and poisonings (Group B). The patients’ age, gender, complaints at presentation, time of presentation and referral (season, time) and, mortality rates were determined. Cases of physical trauma (Group A) were classified as traffic accidents, falling down from height, falling of device, drowning, electric shock, burns and child abuse. Poisonings (Group B) were classified as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, other chemicals and unknown drug poisonings. Results: Two hundred twenthy cases were included. The mean age was 5.1+3.1 years. One hundred fifteen (%52.5) of the cases were male and 105 (%47.5) were female. Group A consisted of 62 patients and Group B consisted of 158 patients. The patients presented most frequently in summer months. The most common reason for presentation was falling down from height (12.7%) in Group A and accidental drug poisoning (most frequently antidepressants) in Group B. The mortality rate was 5%. Conclusion: Forensic cases in the pediatric population (physical trauma and poisoning) are preventable health problems. Especially, preventive approach to improve the environment for falling down from height must be a priority. Increasing the awareness of families and the community on this issue, in summer months during which forensic cases are observed most frequently can contribute to a reduction in the number of cases. PMID:26568689

  15. Attitude of resident doctors towards intensive care units' alarm settings.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rakesh; Bhalotra, Anju R; Goel, Nitesh; Pruthi, Amit; Bhadoria, Poonam; Anand, Raktima

    2010-11-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) monitors have alarm options to intimate the staff of critical incidents but these alarms needs to be adjusted in every patient. With this objective in mind, this study was done among resident doctors, with the aim of assessing the existing attitude among resident doctors towards ICU alarm settings. This study was conducted among residents working at ICU of a multispeciality centre, with the help of a printed questionnaire. The study involved 80 residents. All residents were in full agreement on routine use of ECG, pulse oximeter, capnograph and NIBP monitoring. 86% residents realised the necessity of monitoring oxygen concentration, apnoea monitoring and expired minute ventilation monitoring. 87% PGs and 70% SRs routinely checked alarm limits for various parameters. 50% PGs and 46.6% SRs set these alarm limits. The initial response to an alarm among all the residents was to disable the alarm temporarily and try to look for a cause. 92% of PGs and 98% of SRs were aware of alarms priority and colour coding. 55% residents believed that the alarm occurred due to patient disturbance, 15% believed that alarm was due to technical problem with monitor/sensor and 30% thought it was truly related to patient's clinical status. 82% residents set the alarms by themselves, 10% believed that alarms should be adjusted by nurse, 4% believed the technical staff should take responsibility of setting alarm limits and 4% believed that alarm levels should be pre-adjusted by the manufacturer. We conclude that although alarms are an important, indispensable, and lifesaving feature, they can be a nuisance and can compromise quality and safety of care by frequent false positive alarms. We should be familiar of the alarm modes, check and reset the alarm settings at regular interval or after a change in clinical status of the patient. PMID:21224968

  16. The provision of adult intensive care in Northern Ireland with reference to the role of high dependency care.

    PubMed

    Morrow, B C; Lavery, G G; Blackwood, B M; Ball, I M; McLeod, H N; Fee, J P

    1996-05-01

    In 1991 an audit of Intensive Care Services was carried out by the Northern Ireland Intensive Care Group. In conjunction with this regional overview, all patients in the Regional Intensive Care Unit, (RICU) in the Royal Victoria Hospital were assessed daily, over a 10 month period in 1990-91 and classified as conforming to either intensive care or high dependency status. These data were then used to compare adult intensive care service in Northern Ireland with recent national and international recommendations on intensive care. Ten units in Northern Ireland were surveyed. In regard to national or international guidelines, all ten were deficient to some degree. Four units had significant deficiencies; small patient numbers, lack of 'dedicated' 24 hr medical cover and or deficiencies in the provision of appropriate monitoring and or equipment. There was a large diversity in casemix among the ten units surveyed which suggested differing admission criteria. The bed occupancy of RICU was 100%. Refused admissions constituted a further 13% of unresourced workload. The lack of physically separate, dedicated high dependency unit facilities meant that 26% of bed days were devoted to HDU care (usually for "improved" intensive care unit patients not yet ready for discharge to a general ward. Achieving nationally recommended intensive care standards (on a regional basis) is probably only possible if a number of the smaller intensive care units are redesignated as high dependency units, and patients requiring intensive care are concentrated in a smaller number of larger ICUs. This will increase the frequency of interhospital transfer of critically ill patients.

  17. [Dutch Preventive Youth Health Care Service guideline on children born too early and/or too small for gestational age].

    PubMed

    van der Pal, Sylvia M; Heerdink, Nen; Kamphuis, Mascha; Pols, Margreet A

    2014-01-01

    In children who are born prematurely or whose birth weight is too low for gestational age (small for gestational age (SGA)) intensive care and follow up are desirable.However, obstacles include the shared care of children born very preterm (< 32 weeks of gestation) by paediatricians, general practitioners, youth health care service (and other professionals) and the identification of possible late onset health problems in children born late preterm (32-37 weeks of gestation). This guideline is multidisciplinary and evidence based and is relevant to all professionals involved in the care of this group of children. The main recommendations are: (a) timely and complete transfer of information after discharge from hospital; (b) structured exchange of information in aftercare; (c) assigning a case manager to each child; (d) monitoring growth and development by adjusting age for preterm birth, and (e) using special growth charts for children born preterm to evaluate growth and development.

  18. [Aspects worth knowing about intensive care medicine in the United States].

    PubMed

    Vázquez Guillamet, R

    2013-01-01

    There exist profound differences in the training and professional duties of intensive care physicians and the way intensive care units are managed between the United States and Europe and particularly Spain. Some of the remarkable characteristics of intensive care medicine in the united states include the application process for residency, continuing evaluation during training, phased training with employability at every level, competency based training, scientific research as a core value during training and medical practice, and clinical activity reaching beyond the intensive care unit to include regular hospital wards and ambulatory clinics. The characteristics of intensive care units and the role of intensive care physicians are flexible and change according to the needs of the hospitals where they are located.

  19. [DEVELOPMENTAL CARE IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT ACCORDING TO NEWBORN INDIVIDUALIZED DEVELOPMENTAL CARE AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (NIDCAP)].

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Dalia; Litmanovitz, Ita

    2016-01-01

    During hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), the brain of the preterm infant undergoes a particularly vulnerable and sensitive period of development. Brain development might be negatively influenced by direct injury as well as by complications of prematurity. Over the past few years, stress has come to be increasingly recognized as a potential risk factor. The NICU environment contains numerous stress factors due to maternal deprivation and over-stimulation, such as light, sound and pain, which conflict with the brain's developmental requirements. Developmental care is a caregiving approach that addresses the early developmental needs of the preterm infant as an integral component of quality neonatal care. NIDCAP (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program) is a comprehensive program that aims to reduce environmental stress, to support the infant's neuro-behavioral maturation and organization, and to promote early parent-infant relationships. The implementation of developmental care based on NIDCAP principles is a gradual, in-depth systems change process, which affects all aspects of care in the NICU. This review describes the theoretical basis of the NIDCAP approach, summarizes the scientific evidence and addresses some of the implications of the transition from a traditional to a developmental care NICU.

  20. [Intensive care medicine from the viewpoint of patients, their family and nursing personnel].

    PubMed

    Wahl, W; Küchle, R; Schrapers, S; Junginger, T

    1998-01-01

    We wanted to know how our intensive care unit would be graded by the patients, their family members and the staff, as well as the impression that intensive care medicine made on them. A total of 82% of the patients and 90% of the family members were of the opinion that they owed their lives to intensive care medicine, and 100% of the patients and 96% of family members deemed intensive care medicine significant. The patients and their family members judged the medical and nursing care, the medical technology, the care of basic needs and their accommodation altogether positive. The nursing staff held a contrary opinion and were more critical. Competent explanation and transmission of information represented the most important factor in forming a positive opinion of intensive care medicine. PMID:9931723

  1. Preterm gut microbiota and metabolome following discharge from intensive care.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Christopher J; Skeath, Tom; Nelson, Andrew; Fernstad, Sara J; Marrs, Emma C L; Perry, John D; Cummings, Stephen P; Berrington, Janet E; Embleton, Nicholas D

    2015-01-01

    The development of the preterm gut microbiome is important for immediate and longer-term health following birth. We aimed to determine if modifications to the preterm gut on the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) impacted the gut microbiota and metabolome long-term. Stool samples were collected from 29 infants ages 1-3 years post discharge (PD) from a single NICU. Additional NICU samples were included from 14/29 infants. Being diagnosed with disease or receiving increased antibiotics while on the NICU did not significantly impact the microbiome PD. Significant decreases in common NICU organisms including K. oxytoca and E. faecalis and increases in common adult organisms including Akkermansia sp., Blautia sp., and Bacteroides sp. and significantly different Shannon diversity was shown between NICU and PD samples. The metabolome increased in complexity, but while PD samples had unique bacterial profiles we observed comparable metabolomic profiles. The preterm gut microbiome is able to develop complexity comparable to healthy term infants despite limited environmental exposures, high levels of antibiotic administration, and of the presence of serious disease. Further work is needed to establish the direct effect of weaning as a key event in promoting future gut health.

  2. [Limitation of the therapeutic effort in pediatric intensive care].

    PubMed

    Morales, V Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric intensive care is a relatively new medical specialty, which has experienced significant technological advances in recent years. These developments have led to a prolongation of the dying process, with additional suffering for patients and their families, creating complex situations, and often causing a painful life extension. The term, limitation of the therapeutic effort refers to the adequacy and/or proportionality of the treatment, trying to avoid obstinacy and futility. The English literature does not talk about limitation of treatments, but instead the terms, withholding or withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment, are used. The removal or the non-installation of certain life support measures and the absence of CPR are the types of limitation most used. Also, there is evidence of insufficient medical training in bioethics, which is essential, as most doctors in the PICU discuss and make decisions regarding the end of life without the opinion of bioethicists. This article attempts to review the current status of knowledge concerning the limitation of therapeutic efforts to support pediatric clinical work.

  3. Prevention of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Paolo; De Luca, Daniele; Stronati, Mauro; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Ruffinazzi, Giulia; Luparia, Martina; Tavella, Elena; Boano, Elena; Castagnola, Elio; Mostert, Michael; Farina, Daniele

    2013-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis causes a huge burden of morbidity and mortality and includes bloodstream, urine, cerebrospinal, peritoneal, and lung infections as well as infections starting from burns and wounds, or from any other usually sterile sites. It is associated with cytokine - and biomediator-induced disorders of respiratory, hemodynamic, and metabolic processes. Neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit feature many specific risk factors for bacterial and fungal sepsis. Loss of gut commensals such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli spp., as occurs with prolonged antibiotic treatments, delayed enteral feeding, or nursing in incubators, translates into proliferation of pathogenic microflora and abnormal gut colonization. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment do not protect septic neonates form the risk of late neurodevelopmental impairment in the survivors. Thus prevention of bacterial and fungal infection is crucial in these settings of unique patients. In this view, improving neonatal management is a key step, and this includes promotion of breast-feeding and hygiene measures, adoption of a cautious central venous catheter policy, enhancement of the enteric microbiota composition with the supplementation of probiotics, and medical stewardship concerning H2 blockers with restriction of their use. Additional measures may include the use of lactoferrin, fluconazole, and nystatin and specific measures to prevent ventilator associated pneumonia. PMID:23292914

  4. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    PubMed

    Suh, Robert D; Genshaft, Scott J; Kirsch, Jacobo; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Chung, Jonathan H; Donnelly, Edwin F; Ginsburg, Mark E; Heitkamp, Darel E; Henry, Travis S; Kazerooni, Ella A; Ketai, Loren H; McComb, Barbara L; Ravenel, James G; Saleh, Anthony G; Shah, Rakesh D; Steiner, Robert M; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H

    2015-11-01

    Portable chest radiography is a fundamental and frequently utilized examination in the critically ill patient population. The chest radiograph often represents a timely investigation of new or rapidly evolving clinical findings and an evaluation of proper positioning of support tubes and catheters. Thoughtful consideration of the use of this simple yet valuable resource is crucial as medical cost containment becomes even more mandatory. This review addresses the role of chest radiography in the intensive care unit on the basis of the existing literature and as formed by a consensus of an expert panel on thoracic imaging through the American College of Radiology. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:26439890

  5. Handwashing technique in a pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Donowitz, L G

    1987-06-01

    A one-year prospective study of 454 patients in a pediatric intensive care unit was performed to determine whether the rate of breaks in handwashing technique was different between medical professionals and to determine whether these rates were altered by the use of the overgown. A handwashing break in technique was defined as not washing your hands after direct contact with either patients or support equipment before contact with another patient or departure from the unit. Ninety-four two-hour sessions were monitored by a research nurse during four cross-over periods of gown and no-gown use. Physicians did not wash their hands in 834 (79%) of 1056 contacts, nurses in 1073 (63%) of 1714 cases, occupational therapists in 21 (62%) of 34 cases, respiratory therapists in 269 (78%) of 346 cases, and radiology technicians in 59 (78%) of 76 cases. Nurses used significantly better technique when compared with physicians, respiratory therapists, and radiology technicians. Gown usage overall did not affect these breaks in handwashing technique rates. Physicians did not wash their hands 75% of the time when gowns were not used and 82% of the time when gowns were used. Handwashing rates were unaffected by gown use in all other professionals. Handwashing remains an important but neglected method of interrupting the transmission of hospital pathogens.

  6. [Modern drug therapy in cardiovascular intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Lemm, H; Dietz, S; Janusch, M; Buerke, M

    2015-06-01

    Vasoactive drugs and inotropes are important in the hemodynamic management of patients with cardiogenic shock despite modest volume administration. Currently, the concept of cardiac relief is pursued in the treatment of acute heart failure. In this article we present the use of different drugs in the intensive care unit for acute heart failure and cardiogenic shock. In acute heart failure catecholamines are only used during the transition from heart failure to cardiogenic shock. Here, the therapeutic concept of ventricular unloading is more sought after. This can be achieved by the use of diuretics, nitrates, levosimendan (inodilatator), or in the future serelaxin. The hemodynamic management in cardiogenic shock occurs after moderate volume administration with dobutamine to increase inotropy. If no adequate perfusion pressures are achieved, norepinephrine can be administered as a vasopressor. If there is still no sufficient increase in cardiac output, the inodilatator levosimendan can be used. Levosimendan instead of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in this case is preferable. The maxim of hemodynamic management in cardiogenic shock is the transient use of inotropes and vasopressors in the lowest dose possible and only for as long as necessary. This means that one should continuously check whether the dose can be reduced. There are no mortality data demonstrating the utility of hemodynamic monitoring based on objective criteria—but it makes sense to use inotropes and vasopressors sparingly.

  7. Burnout and personality in intensive care: an empirical study.

    PubMed

    Bühler, K E; Land, Tatjana

    2003-01-01

    Previous research into the causes of burnout has mainly been concerned with external triggers, such as onerous work criteria or organizational or social influences. Factors such as individual reactions and personality have largely been ignored as a possible etiology of burnout. In preparation for a long-term study, this general cross-sectional study investigates the relationship between burnout and personality variables. Different personality variables that have a possible impact on burnout were determined in a number of prestudies. The data were gathered from 119 people working in intensive care units. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used as well as certain subscales of the following personality questionnaires: Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI), Inventory of Aggressivity (IA), Trier Personality Questionnaire (TPQ), Scales of Control (SC), Locus of Control (LC), and the Logo-test (LOGO). The scales of mental health, respectively Psychoprotection, external locus of control, and neuroticism, were confirmed as being statistically relevant concerning burnout. The application and significance of this study for future burnout research are discussed.

  8. Delivering Perinatal Psychiatric Services in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Susan Hatters; Kessler, Ann; Yang, Sarah Nagle; Parsons, Sarah; Friedman, Harriet; Martin, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To describe characteristics of mothers who would likely benefit from on-site short-term psychiatric services while their infant is in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Methods For 150 consecutive mothers who were referred for psychiatric evaluation and psychotherapeutic intervention in an innovative NICU mental health program, baseline information was collected. Data regarding their referrals, diagnosis, treatments, and their infants was analyzed. Results Most mothers were referred because of depression (43%), anxiety (44%), and/ or difficulty coping with their infant's medical problems and hospitalization (60%). Mothers of VLBW infants were disproportionately more likely to be referred. A majority of mothers accepted the referral and were treated; most only required short-term psychotherapy. A minority resisted or refused psychiatric assessment; a quarter of these had more difficult interactions with staff or inappropriate behaviors. In these cases the role of the psychiatrist was to work with staff to promote healthy interactions and to foster maternal-infant bonding. Conclusion Overall, on-site psychiatric services have been accepted by a majority of referred NICU mothers, and most did not require long-term treatment. A considerable need exists for psychiatric services in the NICU to promote optimal parenting and interactions. PMID:23772977

  9. Drug fever caused by propofol in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Yatabe, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Koichi; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have reported that fever is caused by intravenous sedative drugs even though these agents are widely used. We present a case of propofol-induced drug fever. A 57-year-old woman underwent hepatic segmentectomy. Although she was diagnosed with type I glycogen storage disease when in her twenties, her liver function was normal. As the operative hemorrhage was high, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU). Her temperature at ICU admission was 35.8 °C, and sedation with propofol and dexmedetomidine was initiated. Two hours after admission to the ICU, the patient had a fever of 38-39.5 °C. Remittent fever persisted until day 5 after surgery. Because of her persistent fever, pneumonia was suspected and antibiotics were initiated on day 4 after surgery. As the fever persisted after the initiation of antibiotics, drug fever was suspected. On day 5 after surgery, propofol infusion was discontinued and the patient was extubated. Her temperature of 37.7 °C at the discontinuation of propofol infusion, and rapidly decreased to 36.1 °C in the following 3 h. Propofol-induced drug fever must be considered in cases of fever of unknown origin when patients receive propofol and appear inappropriately well for the degree of fever that they have.

  10. Planning the acoustic environment of a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Philbin, M Kathleen

    2004-06-01

    This article addresses general principles of designing a quiet neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and describes basic aspects of room acoustics as these apply to the NICU. Recommended acoustical criteria for walls, background noise, vibration, and reverberation are included as appendices. Crowding in open, multiple-bed NICUs is the major factor in designs that inevitably produce noisy nurseries with limited space for parents. Quiet infant spaces with appropriate sound sources rely on isolation of the infant from facility and operational noise sources (eg, adult work spaces, supply delivery, and travel paths) and extended contact with family members.However, crowding has been an important influence on the clinical practice and social context of neonatology. It allows clinicians to rely on wide visual and auditory access to many patients for monitoring their well-being. It also allows immediate social contact with other adults, both staff and families. Giving up this wide access and relying on other forms of communication in order to provide for increased quiet and privacy for staff, infants, and parents is a challenge for some design teams. Studies of the effects of various nursery designs on infants, parents, clinicians, and the delivery of services are proposed as a means of advancing the field of design.

  11. Preterm gut microbiota and metabolome following discharge from intensive care

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Christopher J.; Skeath, Tom; Nelson, Andrew; Fernstad, Sara J.; Marrs, Emma C. L.; Perry, John D.; Cummings, Stephen P.; Berrington, Janet E.; Embleton, Nicholas D.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the preterm gut microbiome is important for immediate and longer-term health following birth. We aimed to determine if modifications to the preterm gut on the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) impacted the gut microbiota and metabolome long-term. Stool samples were collected from 29 infants ages 1–3 years post discharge (PD) from a single NICU. Additional NICU samples were included from 14/29 infants. Being diagnosed with disease or receiving increased antibiotics while on the NICU did not significantly impact the microbiome PD. Significant decreases in common NICU organisms including K. oxytoca and E. faecalis and increases in common adult organisms including Akkermansia sp., Blautia sp., and Bacteroides sp. and significantly different Shannon diversity was shown between NICU and PD samples. The metabolome increased in complexity, but while PD samples had unique bacterial profiles we observed comparable metabolomic profiles. The preterm gut microbiome is able to develop complexity comparable to healthy term infants despite limited environmental exposures, high levels of antibiotic administration, and of the presence of serious disease. Further work is needed to establish the direct effect of weaning as a key event in promoting future gut health. PMID:26598071

  12. Optimizing nutrition in intensive care units: empowering critical care nurses to be effective agents of change.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Andrea P; Cahill, Naomi E; Gramlich, Leah; MacDonald, Gwynne; Alberda, Cathy; Heyland, Daren K

    2012-05-01

    Observational studies have consistently revealed wide variation in nutritional practices across intensive care units and indicated that the provision of adequate nutrition to critically ill patients is suboptimal. To date, the potential role of critical care nurses in implementing nutritional guideline recommendations and improving nutritional therapy has received little consideration. Factors that influence nurses' nutritional practices include the lack of guidelines or conflicting evidence-based recommendations pertaining to nurses' practice, strategies for implementing guidelines that are not tailored to barriers nurses face when feeding patients, strategies to communicate best evidence that do not capitalize on nurses' preference for seeking information through social interaction, prioritization of nutrition in initial and continuing nursing education, and a lack of interdisciplinary team collaboration in the intensive care unit when decisions on how to feed patients are made. Future research and quality improvement strategies are required to correct these deficits and successfully empower nurses to become nutritional champions at the bedside. Using nurses as agents of change will help standardize nutritional practices and ensure that critically ill patients are optimally fed. PMID:22549575

  13. Dutch care innovation units in elderly care: A qualitative study into students' perspectives and workplace conditions for learning.

    PubMed

    Snoeren, Miranda; Volbeda, Patricia; Niessen, Theo J H; Abma, Tineke A

    2016-03-01

    To promote workplace learning for staff as well as students, a partnership was formed between a residential care organisation for older people and several nursing faculties in the Netherlands. This partnership took the form of two care innovation units; wards where qualified staff, students and nurse teachers collaborate to integrate care, education, innovation and research. In this article, the care innovation units as learning environments are studied from a student perspective to deepen understandings concerning the conditions that facilitate learning. A secondary analysis of focus groups, held with 216 nursing students over a period of five years, revealed that students are satisfied about the units' learning potential, which is formed by various inter-related and self-reinforcing affordances: co-constructive learning and working, challenging situations and activities, being given responsibility and independence, and supportive and recognisable learning structures. Time constraints had a negative impact on the units' learning potential. It is concluded that the learning potential of the care innovation units was enhanced by realising certain conditions, like learning structures and activities. The learning potential was also influenced, however, by the non-controllable and dynamic interaction of various elements within the context. Suggestions for practice and further research are offered. PMID:26694313

  14. Dutch care innovation units in elderly care: A qualitative study into students' perspectives and workplace conditions for learning.

    PubMed

    Snoeren, Miranda; Volbeda, Patricia; Niessen, Theo J H; Abma, Tineke A

    2016-03-01

    To promote workplace learning for staff as well as students, a partnership was formed between a residential care organisation for older people and several nursing faculties in the Netherlands. This partnership took the form of two care innovation units; wards where qualified staff, students and nurse teachers collaborate to integrate care, education, innovation and research. In this article, the care innovation units as learning environments are studied from a student perspective to deepen understandings concerning the conditions that facilitate learning. A secondary analysis of focus groups, held with 216 nursing students over a period of five years, revealed that students are satisfied about the units' learning potential, which is formed by various inter-related and self-reinforcing affordances: co-constructive learning and working, challenging situations and activities, being given responsibility and independence, and supportive and recognisable learning structures. Time constraints had a negative impact on the units' learning potential. It is concluded that the learning potential of the care innovation units was enhanced by realising certain conditions, like learning structures and activities. The learning potential was also influenced, however, by the non-controllable and dynamic interaction of various elements within the context. Suggestions for practice and further research are offered.

  15. Interprofessional Rhetoric and Operational Realities: An Ethnographic Study of Rounds in Four Intensive Care Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paradis, Elise; Leslie, Myles; Gropper, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Morning interprofessional rounds (MIRs) are used in critical care medicine to improve team-based care and patient outcomes. Given existing evidence of conflict between and dissatisfaction among rounds participants, this study sought to better understand how the operational realities of care delivery in the intensive care unit (ICU) impact the…

  16. The epidemiology of intensive care unit-acquired hyponatraemia and hypernatraemia in medical-surgical intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Stelfox, Henry Thomas; Ahmed, Sofia B; Khandwala, Farah; Zygun, David; Shahpori, Reza; Laupland, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Although sodium disturbances are common in hospitalised patients, few studies have specifically investigated the epidemiology of sodium disturbances in the intensive care unit (ICU). The objectives of this study were to describe the incidence of ICU-acquired hyponatraemia and hypernatraemia and assess their effects on outcome in the ICU. Methods We identified 8142 consecutive adults (18 years of age or older) admitted to three medical-surgical ICUs between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2006 who were documented to have normal serum sodium levels (133 to 145 mmol/L) during the first day of ICU admission. ICU acquired hyponatraemia and hypernatraemia were respectively defined as a change in serum sodium concentration to below 133 mmol/L or above 145 mmol/L following day one in the ICU. Results A first episode of ICU-acquired hyponatraemia developed in 917 (11%) patients and hypernatraemia in 2157 (26%) patients with an incidence density of 3.1 and 7.4 per 100 days of ICU admission, respectively, during 29,142 ICU admission days. The incidence of both ICU-acquired hyponatraemia (age, admission diagnosis, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, length of ICU stay, level of consciousness, serum glucose level, body temperature, serum potassium level) and ICU-acquired hypernatraemia (baseline creatinine, APACHE II score, mechanical ventilation, length of ICU stay, body temperature, serum potassium level, level of care) varied according to patients' characteristics. Compared with patients with normal serum sodium levels, hospital mortality was increased in patients with ICU-acquired hyponatraemia (16% versus 28%, p < 0.001) and ICU-acquired hypernatraemia (16% versus 34%, p < 0.001). Conclusions ICU-acquired hyponatraemia and hypernatraemia are common in critically ill patients and are associated with increased risk of hospital mortality. PMID:19094227

  17. Care of the gut in the surgical intensive care unit: fact or fashion?

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, O K; Meakins, J L

    1991-06-01

    The traditional approach to the care of the gastrointestinal tract in the intensive care unit has been one of neglect. However, recent evidence has linked enteric flora to the generation of clinical sepsis in the absence of other infectious foci. The role of the bowel as an efficient barrier to the invasion of its own flora is addressed in this paper. A variety of insults disrupt the integrity of the barrier function of the gut, allowing the entry of bowel organisms or endotoxins, or both, into the portal and systemic circulatory systems. In animal and early clinical studies, a number of interventions, aimed at altering the enteric flora and enhancing the bowel's barrier function, have been shown to modulate the host's resistance to different insults and may even improve clinical outcome. Such interventions include maintenance of enteral feeding, glutamine supplementation of hyperalimentation solutions and selective bacterial decontamination of the bowel.

  18. The intensive care unit psychosocial care scale: Development and initial validation.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Meena; Chivukula, Usha; Rana, Suvashisa

    2015-12-01

    The main objective of the current study was to construct a new self-report scale - ICU-PC Scale - to measure the psychosocial care (PC) of patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and examine different psychometric issues in the development and initial validation of this scale. The findings indicate that the ICU-PC Scale has established high internal consistency. A three-factor structure - protection of human dignity and rights, transparency for decision making and care continuity and sustained patient, family orientation - has been identified with a substantial number of subjects (N=250) in hospital settings. The three oblique factor solutions are found to be interrelated and interdependent with good indices of internal consistency and content validity. This new instrument is the first of its kind to measure the psychosocial care to be provided to patients in the ICU. The present findings indicate that the ICU-PC scale, with additional factor analytic research, could become an established and clinical tool. PMID:26321092

  19. Intensive Care Society's APACHE II study in Britain and Ireland--I: Variations in case mix of adult admissions to general intensive care units and impact on outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, K M; Kerr, J H; Major, E; McPherson, K; Short, A; Vessey, M P

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To describe the extent of variation in the case mix of adult admissions to general intensive care units in Britain and Ireland and investigate the impact of such variation on outcome. DESIGN--Prospective, cohort study of consecutive admissions to intensive care units. SETTING--26 general intensive care units in Britain and Ireland. SUBJECTS--9099 admissions to the intensive care units studied. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Death or survival at discharge before and after adjustment of case mix (age, history of chronic conditions, surgical status, diagnosis, and severity of illness) according to the APACHE II method. RESULTS--Important differences in case mix were found, with large variations between the units. Hospital mortality was significantly associated with most of the case mix factors investigated. CONCLUSIONS--Comparing crude death rates in hospital between intensive care units may be misleading indicators of performance. The collection of data on case mix needs to be standardised and differences in case mix adjusted for when comparing outcome between different intensive care units. PMID:8241908

  20. [Nursing care in fever--a literature study and intensive care nurses' viewpoint on nursing care and treatment of fever].

    PubMed

    Emmoth, U; Månsson, M E

    1997-01-01

    Fever is a symptom of a disease which has caused people inconvenience since ancient times. The view upon fever, what it is and how to treat it, has been changing from time to time. Today there is at debate whether fever is friend or foe. Patients in an intensive care unit almost always has an increased body temperature. The Intensive Care Unit (ICU)-staff look upon fever as a natural response to an infection but they have different opinions about what treatment should be used. The purpose of this study was to investigate what was written about fever and compare to the knowledge and nursing care among nurses working in a specific ICU. Thirty-six questionnaires were distributed and 28 were answered. We have found that the nurses, among themselves, have different ways of caring for the feverish patient. Administration of antipyretics, fluids, nutrition and furthermore cooling and warming measures differ between nursing and literature. Particularly concerning the cooling measures nurses take without previous administration of antipyretics. This is something that the literature definitely dissuades from because of the risk of initiating a chill and perhaps rise the temperature instead. We can also conclude that the nurses do not describe their patients feverish conditions in similar words which can lead to misunderstandings. Finding a similar language in nursing documentation is therefore essential.

  1. Trauma intensive care unit 'bouncebacks': identifying risk factors for unexpected return admission to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Christmas, A Britton; Freeman, Elizabeth; Chisolm, Angela; Fischer, Peter E; Sachdev, Gaurav; Jacobs, David G; Sing, Ronald F

    2014-08-01

    Return transfer (RT) to the intensive care unit (ICU) negatively impacts patient outcomes, length of stay (LOS), and hospital costs. This study assesses the most common events necessitating RT in trauma patients. We performed a retrospective chart review of ICU RT from 2004 to 2008. Patient demographics, injuries and injury severity, reason for transfer, LOS, interventions, and outcomes data were collected. Overall, 158 patients required readmission to the ICU. Respiratory insufficiency/failure (48%) was the most common reason for RT followed by cardiac (16%) and neurological (13%) events. The most commonly associated injuries were traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) (32%), rib fractures (30%), and pulmonary contusions (20%). Initial ICU LOS was 6.6 ± 8 days (range, 1 to 44 days) with 4.4 ± 7.8 ventilator days. Mean floor time before ICU RT was 5.7 ± 6.3 days (range, 0 to 33 days). Forty-nine patients (31%) required intubation and mechanical ventilation on RT. ICU RT incurred an additional ICU LOS of 8 ± 8.5 days (range, 1 to 40 days) and 5.2 ± 7.5 ventilator days. Mortality after a single RT was 10 per cent (n = 16). RT to the ICU most often occurs as a result of respiratory compromise, and patients with TBI are particularly vulnerable. Trauma pulmonary hygiene practices should be evaluated to determine strategies that could decrease RT. PMID:25105397

  2. Trauma intensive care unit 'bouncebacks': identifying risk factors for unexpected return admission to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Christmas, A Britton; Freeman, Elizabeth; Chisolm, Angela; Fischer, Peter E; Sachdev, Gaurav; Jacobs, David G; Sing, Ronald F

    2014-08-01

    Return transfer (RT) to the intensive care unit (ICU) negatively impacts patient outcomes, length of stay (LOS), and hospital costs. This study assesses the most common events necessitating RT in trauma patients. We performed a retrospective chart review of ICU RT from 2004 to 2008. Patient demographics, injuries and injury severity, reason for transfer, LOS, interventions, and outcomes data were collected. Overall, 158 patients required readmission to the ICU. Respiratory insufficiency/failure (48%) was the most common reason for RT followed by cardiac (16%) and neurological (13%) events. The most commonly associated injuries were traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) (32%), rib fractures (30%), and pulmonary contusions (20%). Initial ICU LOS was 6.6 ± 8 days (range, 1 to 44 days) with 4.4 ± 7.8 ventilator days. Mean floor time before ICU RT was 5.7 ± 6.3 days (range, 0 to 33 days). Forty-nine patients (31%) required intubation and mechanical ventilation on RT. ICU RT incurred an additional ICU LOS of 8 ± 8.5 days (range, 1 to 40 days) and 5.2 ± 7.5 ventilator days. Mortality after a single RT was 10 per cent (n = 16). RT to the ICU most often occurs as a result of respiratory compromise, and patients with TBI are particularly vulnerable. Trauma pulmonary hygiene practices should be evaluated to determine strategies that could decrease RT.

  3. Developing a Diary Program to Minimize Patient and Family Post-Intensive Care Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Locke, Meaghan; Eccleston, Sarah; Ryan, Claire N; Byrnes, Tiffany J; Mount, Cristin; McCarthy, Mary S

    2016-01-01

    A series of evidence-based interventions beginning with an intensive care unit diary and a patient/family educational pamphlet were implemented to address the long-term consequences of critical illness after discharge from the intensive care unit, bundled as post-intensive care syndrome and post-intensive care syndrome-family. An extensive literature review and nursing observations of the phenomenon highlighted the potential for this project to have a favorable impact on patients, their families, and the health care team. The goal of this article is to explain the education of all stakeholders; the introduction of the diary, video, and educational pamphlet; and the evaluation of the acceptance of these interventions. This process began with an informal evaluation of the educational products and overall perception of the usefulness of the diary by patients, family members, and staff. The efforts described contribute to the evidence base supporting diaries as an adjunct to intensive care. PMID:27153310

  4. Delirium as a complication of the surgical intensive care

    PubMed Central

    Horacek, Rostislav; Krnacova, Barbora; Prasko, Jan; Latalova, Klara

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the impact of somatic illnesses, electrolyte imbalance, red blood cell count, hypotension, and antipsychotic and opioid treatment on the duration of delirium in Central Intensive Care Unit for Surgery. Patients and methods Patients who were admitted to the Department of Central Intensive Care Unit for Surgery in the University Hospital Olomouc from February 2004 to November 2008 were evaluated using Riker sedation–agitation scale. Their blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and peripheral blood oxygen saturation were measured continually, and body temperature was monitored once in an hour. The laboratory blood tests including sodium, potassium, chlorides, phosphorus, urea and creatinine, hemoglobin, hematocrit, red and white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein, albumin levels and laboratory markers of renal and liver dysfunction were done every day. All measurements were made at least for ten consecutive days or longer until the delirium resolved. Results The sample consisted of 140 consecutive delirious patients with a mean age of 68.21±12.07 years. Delirium was diagnosed in 140 of 5,642 patients (2.48%) admitted in CICUS in the last 5 years. The median duration of delirium was 48 hours with a range of 12–240 hours. Statistical analysis showed that hyperactive subtype of delirium and treatment with antipsychotics were associated with prolonged delirium duration (hyperactive 76.15±40.53 hours, hypoactive 54.46±28.44 hours, mixed 61.22±37.86 hours; Kruskal–Wallis test: 8.022; P<0.05). The duration of delirium was significantly correlated also with blood potassium levels (Pearson’s r=0.2189, P<0.05), hypotension (hypotension 40.41±30.23 hours versus normotension 70.47±54.98 hours; Mann–Whitney U=1,512; P<0.05), administration of antipsychotics compared to other drugs (antipsychotics 72.83±40.6, benzodiazepines 42.00±20.78, others drugs, mostly piracetam 46.96±18.42 hours; Kruskal

  5. Training in intensive care medicine. A challenge within reach.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Ortega, A; Rothen, H U; Franco, N; Rayo, L A; Martín-Loeches, I; Ramírez, P; Cuñat de la Hoz, J

    2014-01-01

    The medical training model is currently immersed in a process of change. The new paradigm is intended to be more effective, more integrated within the healthcare system, and strongly oriented towards the direct application of knowledge to clinical practice. Compared with the established training system based on certification of the completion of a series or rotations and stays in certain healthcare units, the new model proposes a more structured training process based on the gradual acquisition of specific competences, in which residents must play an active role in designing their own training program. Training based on competences guarantees more transparent, updated and homogeneous learning of objective quality, and which can be homologated internationally. The tutors play a key role as the main directors of the process, and institutional commitment to their work is crucial. In this context, tutors should receive time and specific formation to allow the evaluation of training as the cornerstone of the new model. New forms of objective summative and training evaluation should be introduced to guarantee that the predefined competences and skills are effectively acquired. The free movement of specialists within Europe is very desirable and implies that training quality must be high and amenable to homologation among the different countries. The Competency Based training in Intensive Care Medicine in Europe program is our main reference for achieving this goal. Scientific societies in turn must impulse and facilitate all those initiatives destined to improve healthcare quality and therefore specialist training. They have the mission of designing strategies and processes that favor training, accreditation and advisory activities with the government authorities.

  6. Intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Heller, Axel R

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids contained in fish oils have shown efficacy in the treatment of chronic and acute inflammatory diseases due to their pleiotropic effects on inflammatory cell signalling pathways. In a variety of experimental and clinical studies, omega-3 fatty acids attenuated hyperinflammatory conditions and induced faster recovery. This chapter will shed light on the effects of intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients and will discuss clinical data and recent meta-analyses on the topic. While significant beneficial effects on infection rates and the lengths of ICU and hospital stays have concordantly been identified in three recent meta-analyses on non-ICU surgical patients, the level of evidence is not so clear for critically ill patients. Three meta-analyses published in 2012 or 2013 explored data on the ICU population. Although the present data suggest the consideration of enteral nutrition enriched with fish oil, borage oil and antioxidants in mild to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, only one of the three meta-analyses found a trend (p = 0.08) of lower mortality in ICU patients receiving intravenous omega-3 fatty acids. Two of the meta-analyses indicated a significantly shorter hospital stay (5.17-9.49 days), and one meta-analysis found a significant reduction in ICU days (1.92). As a result of these effects, cost savings were postulated. Unlike in surgical patients, the effects of fish oil on infection rates were not found to be statistically significant in ICU patients, and dose-effect relationships were not established for any cohort. Thus, obvious positive secondary outcome effects with intravenous fish oil have not yet been shown to transfer to lower mortality in critically ill patients. There is a need for adequately powered, well-planned and well-conducted randomized trials to give clear recommendations on the individual utility and dosage of intravenous omega-3 fatty acids in critical illness. PMID:25471809

  7. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AMONG INTENSIVE CARE NURSES: AN ETHNOGRAPHIC STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Abbas; Najar, Ali Vafaee; Bakhshi, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nurses are the main users of supplies and equipment applied in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) which are high-priced and costly. Therefore, understanding ICU nurses’ experiences about resource management contributes to the better control of the costs. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the culture of nurses’ working environment regarding the resource management in the ICUs in Iran. Patients and Methods: In this study, a focused ethnographic method was used. Twenty-eight informants among ICU nurses and other professional individuals were purposively selected and interviewed. As well, 400 hours of ethnographic observations as a participant observer was used for data gathering. Data analysis was performed using the methods described by Miles and Huberman (1994). Results: Two main themes describing the culture of ICU nurses regarding resource management included (a) consumption monitoring and auditing, and (b) prudent use. The results revealed that the efforts for resource management are conducted in the conditions of scarcity and uncertainty in supply. ICU nurses had a sense of futurism in the supply and use of resources in the unit and do the planning through taking the rules and guidelines as well as the available resources and their values into account. Improper storage of some supplies and equipment was a reaction to this uncertain condition among nurses. Conclusions: To manage the resources effectively, improvement of supply chain management in hospital seems essential. It is also necessary to hold educational classes in order to enhance the nurses’ awareness on effective supply chain and storage of the items in the unit stock. PMID:26889097

  8. Oral care practices for patients in Intensive Care Units: A pilot survey

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Alexandre Franco; de Paula, Renata Monteiro; de Castro Piau, Cinthia Gonçalves Barbosa; Costa, Priscila Paganini; Bezerra, Ana Cristina Barreto

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the level of knowledge and difficulties concerning hospitalized patients regarding preventive oral health measures among professionals working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Study Population and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 71 health professionals working in the ICU. A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine the methods used, frequency, and attitude toward oral care provided to patients in Brazilian ICUs. The variables were analyzed using descriptive statistics (percentages). A one-sample t-test between proportions was used to assess significant differences between percentages. t-statistics were considered statistically significant for P < 0.05. Bonferroni correction was applied to account for multiple testing. Results: Most participants were nursing professionals (80.3%) working 12-h shifts in the ICU (70.4%); about 87.3% and 66.2% reported having knowledge about coated tongue and nosocomial pneumonia, respectively (P < 0.05). Most reported using spatulas, gauze, and toothbrushes (49.3%) or only toothbrushes (28.2%) with 0.12% chlorhexidine (49.3%) to sanitize the oral cavity of ICU patients (P < 0.01). Most professionals felt that adequate time was available to provide oral care to ICU patients and that oral care was a priority for mechanically ventilated patients (80.3% and 83.1%, respectively, P < 0.05). However, most professionals (56.4%) reported feeling that the oral cavity was difficult to clean (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The survey results suggest that additional education is necessary to increase awareness among ICU professionals of the association between dental plaque and systemic conditions of patients, to standardize oral care protocols, and to promote the oral health of patients in ICUs. PMID:27275074

  9. Relational Communications Strategies to Support Family-Centered Neonatal Intensive Care.

    PubMed

    Benzies, Karen M

    2016-01-01

    The philosophy of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care units is intended to facilitate parental involvement, shared decision-making, and improved outcomes for infants and families. To support family-centered care, there are multiple interventions with different components and associated outcomes that have been described in the research literature. This evidence leaves many unanswered questions about how best to implement and evaluate strategies to enhance family-centered care. This article provides a brief overview of interventions designed to support family-centered care in neonatal intensive care units and offers an evidence-informed staff education strategy to enhance family-centered care. The evidence-informed relational communications strategies of circular pattern diagrams, questioning, and commendations are described, along with specific examples of how nurses can use them in in their day-to-day practice in neonatal intensive care units. PMID:27465456

  10. Antibiogram of Medical Intensive Care Unit at Tertiary Care Hospital Setting of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Qadeer, Aayesha; Akhtar, Aftab; Ain, Qurat Ul; Saadat, Shoab; Mansoor, Salman; Ishtiaq, Wasib; Ilyas, Abid; Khan, Ali Y; Ajam, Yousaf

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of micro-organisms causing sepsis as well as to determine the antibiotic susceptibility and resistance of microorganisms isolated in a medical intensive care unit. Materials and methods: This is a cross-sectional analysis of 802 patients from a medical intensive care unit (ICU) of Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan over a one-year period from August 2015 to August 2016. Specimens collected were from blood, urine, endotracheal secretions, catheter tips, tissue, pus swabs, cerebrospinal fluid, ascites, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and pleural fluid. All bacteria were identified by standard microbiological methods, and antibiotic sensitivity/resistance was performed using the disk diffusion technique, according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Data was collected using a critical care unit electronic database and data analysis was done by using  the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), version 20 (IBM SPSS Statistics, Armonk, NY). Results: Gram-negative bacteria were more frequent as compared to gram-positive bacteria. Most common bacterial isolates were Acinetobacter (15.3%), Escherichia coli (15.3%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (10.2%), whereas Enterococcus (7%) and methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (6.2%) were the two most common gram-positive bacteria. For Acinetobacter, colistin was the most effective antibiotic (3% resistance). For E.coli, colistin (0%), tigecycline (0%), amikacin (7%), and carbapenems (10%) showed low resistance. Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed low resistance to colistin (7%). For Klebsiella pneumoniae, low resistance was seen for tigecycline (0%) and minocycline (16%). Overall, ICU mortality was 31.3%, including miscellaneous cases. Conclusion: Gram-negative infections, especially by multidrug-resistant organisms, are on the rise in ICUs. Empirical antibiotics should be used according to the local

  11. Neonatal Intensive Care for Low Birthweight Infants: Costs and Effectiveness. Health Technology Case Study 38.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    After a brief introduction delineating the scope of the case study, chapter 1 summarizes findings and conclusions about the costs and effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in the United States. Chapter 2 inventories the national supply of neonatal intensive care units and describes recent trends in use and costs. Chapter 3 reviews mortality and…

  12. [Hygienic requirements for the architectural-functional design of intensive care units (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rüden, H; Fischer, P; Botzenhart, K

    1978-05-01

    Three standard variants of intensive care units are described. The hygienic-microbiological examinations of the patients' surrounding show in how fat architectural factors influence the propagation of germs responsible for nosocomial infections. The results are hygienic requirements concerning the architectural functional structure of intensive care units to facilitate the maintenance of anti- and asepsis for the nursing personal.

  13. Sleeping on a problem: the impact of sleep disturbance on intensive care patients - a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Lori J; Van Haren, Frank; Lopez, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is commonly encountered amongst intensive care patients and has significant psychophysiological effects, which protract recovery and increases mortality. Bio-physiological monitoring of intensive care patients reveal alterations in sleep architecture, with reduced sleep quality and continuity. The etiological causes of sleep disturbance are considered to be multifactorial, although environmental stressors namely, noise, light and clinical care interactions have been frequently cited in both subjective and objective studies. As a result, interventions are targeted towards modifiable factors to ameliorate their impact. This paper reviews normal sleep physiology and the impact that sleep disturbance has on patient psychophysiological recovery, and the contribution that the clinical environment has on intensive care patients' sleep.

  14. The immediate impact of opening an adult high dependency unit on intensive care unit occupancy.

    PubMed

    Fox, A J; Owen-Smith, O; Spiers, P

    1999-03-01

    We assessed the hourly occupancy of our intensive care and high dependency units over an 8-week period commencing on the day our high dependency unit opened. Using criteria established by the working group on 'Guidelines on Admission to and Discharge from Intensive Care and High Dependency Units' published by the National Health Service Executive, we defined each patient daily as intensive care or high dependency status. Compared with hourly occupancy figures obtained before the high dependency unit opened, occupancy of the intensive care unit by high dependency patients has been shown to decrease significantly from 21.6% to 11.2%. Use of intensive care beds became more appropriate, their occupancy increasing significantly from 63.7% to 73.4%. A significant decrease in readmissions occurred, supporting the hypothesis that having high dependency beds reduces the number of patients discharged prematurely to the wards.

  15. Intensive care in Australia and New Zealand. No nonsense "down under".

    PubMed

    Dobb, G J

    1997-04-01

    The year 1996 was the 21st birthday of the Australian and New Zealand Annual Scientific Meeting on Intensive Care. With this maturity many of the issues that were so troublesome to intensive care in the early years relating to identity, training, recognition, and standards have largely resolved. There are, however, no signs of complacency. We need to improve the image of a career in intensive care to trainees, expand research opportunities, and respond to the ever-changing challenges coming from administrative reorganization, budgeting constraints, and increasing public expectations. I believe the foundations have been well laid to ensure a continuing contribution by Australian and New Zealand intensivists to clinical intensive care, their hospitals, ANZICS, and a place in the global research effort in intensive care. PMID:9107509

  16. Relevance of non-albumin colloids in intensive care medicine.

    PubMed

    Ertmer, Christian; Rehberg, Sebastian; Van Aken, Hugo; Westphal, Martin

    2009-06-01

    Current guidelines on initial haemodynamic stabilization in shock states suggest infusion of either natural or artificial colloids or crystalloids. However, as the volume of distribution is much larger for crystalloids than for colloids, resuscitation with crystalloids alone requires more fluid and results in more oedema, and may thus be inferior to combination therapy with colloids. This chapter describes the currently available synthetic colloid solutions [i.e., dextran, gelatin and hydroxyethyl starch (HES)] in detail, and critically discusses their specific effects including potential adverse effects. Literature was selected from medical databases (including Medline and the Cochrane library), as well as references extracted from the available publications. Dextrans appear to have the most unfavourable risk/benefit ratio among the currently available synthetic colloids due to their relevant anaphylactoid potential, risk of renal failure and, particularly, their major impact on haemostasis. The effects of gelatin on kidney function are currently unclear, but potential disadvantages of gelatin include a high anaphylactoid potential and a limited volume effect compared with dextrans and HESs. Modern HES preparations have the lowest risk of anaphylactic reactions among the synthetic colloids. Older HES preparations (hetastarch, hexastarch and pentastarch) have repeatedly been reported to impair renal function and hemostasis, especially when the dose limit provided by the manufacturer is exceeded, but no such effects have been reported to date for modern tetrastarches compared with gelatin and albumin. However, no large-scale clinical studies have investigated the impact of tetrastarches on the incidence of renal failure in critically ill patients. When considering the efficacy and risk/benefit profile of synthetic colloids, modern tetrastarches appear to be most suitable for intensive care medicine, given their high volume effect, low anaphylactic potential and

  17. Intensive care in an unusual setting: management of pneumonia in a chimpanzee.

    PubMed

    Psirides, Alex J; Hicks, Peter R

    2008-03-01

    We report a case in which intensive care doctors and nurses became involved in the care of a young chimpanzee who required ventilation for pneumonia at Wellington Zoo, New Zealand. This required staff to work outside the usual protected environment of a hospital intensive care unit. The chimpanzee, Bahati, was ventilated for 3 days, replicating intensive care practice, but died. Logistical challenges included equipment procurement, environment, electrical safety, gas supply and infection control. Other difficulties included differences in physiology, nursing care and therapeutics. End-of-life processes were similar, with zoo staff responding as if they were immediate family. Euthanasia was an unfamiliar process to ICU staff. Bahati's death received national media attention and some criticism of the involvement of intensive care staff. The zoo staff were overwhelmed and grateful that everything possible was done for Bahati. PMID:18304020

  18. The Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry - II (ASAP-II): a comparative study of psychiatric intensive care units in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Schoevers, Robert; van Wijk, Cecile Gijsbers; Mulder, Wijnand; Hornbach, Annett; Barkhof, Emile; Klaassen, André; van Egmond, Marieke; van Venrooij, Janine; Bijpost, Yan; Nusselder, Hans; van Herrewaarden, Marjan; Maksimovic, Igor; Achilles, Alexander; Dekker, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Background The number of patients in whom mental illness progresses to stages in which acute, and often forced treatment is warranted, is on the increase across Europe. As a consequence, more patients are involuntarily admitted to Psychiatric Intensive Care Units (PICU). From several studies and reports it has become evident that important dissimilarities exist between PICU's. The current study seeks to describe organisational as well as clinical and patient related factors across ten PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region, adjusted for or stratified by level of urbanization. Method/Design This paper describes the design of the Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry II (ASAP-II). This study is a prospective observational cohort study comparing PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region on various patient characteristics, treatment aspects and recovery related variables. Dissimilarities were measured by means of collecting standardized forms which were filled out in the framework of care as usual, by means of questionnaires filled out by mental health care professionals and by means of extracting data from patient files for every consecutive patient admitted at participating PICU's during a specific time period. Urbanization levels for every PICU were calculated conform procedures as proposed by the Dutch Central Bureau for Statistics (CBS). Discussion The current study may provide a deeper understanding of the differences between psychiatric intensive care units that can be used to promote best practice and benchmarking procedures, and thus improve the standard of care. PMID:19725981

  19. Usual care and management of fall risk increasing drugs in older dizzy patients in Dutch general practice

    PubMed Central

    Stam, Hanneke; Harting, Thomas; van der Sluijs, Marjolijn; van Marum, Rob; van der Horst, Henriëtte; van der Wouden, Johannes C.; Maarsingh, Otto R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective For general practitioners (GPs) dizziness is a challenging condition to deal with. Data on the management of dizziness in older patients are mostly lacking. Furthermore, it is unknown whether GPs attempt to decrease Fall Risk Increasing Drugs (FRIDs) use in the management of dizziness in older patients. The aim of this study is to gain more insight into GP’s management of dizziness in older patients, including FRID evaluation and adjustment. Design Data were derived from electronic medical records, obtained over a 12-month period in 2013. Setting Forty-six Dutch general practices. Patients The study sample comprised of 2812 older dizzy patients of 65 years and over. Patients were identified using International Classification of Primary Care codes and free text. Main outcome measures Usual care was categorized into wait-and-see strategy (no treatment initiated); education and advice; additional testing; medication adjustment; and referral. Results Frequently applied treatments included a wait-and-see strategy (28.4%) and education and advice (28.0%). Additional testing was performed in 26.8%; 19.0% of the patients were referred. Of the patients 87.2% had at least one FRID prescription. During the observation period, GPs adjusted the use of one or more FRIDs for 11.7% of the patients. Conclusion This study revealed a wide variety in management strategies for dizziness in older adults. The referral rate for dizziness was high compared to prior research. Although many older dizzy patients use at least one FRID, FRID evaluation and adjustment is scarce. We expect that more FRID adjustments may reduce dizziness and dizziness-related impairment. Key PointsIt is important to know how general practitioners manage dizziness in older patients in order to assess potential cues for improvement.This study revealed a wide variety in management strategies for dizziness in older patients.There was a scarcity in Fall Risk Increasing Drug (FRID) evaluation and adjustment

  20. Combatting resistance in intensive care: the multimodal approach of the Spanish ICU "Zero Resistance" program.

    PubMed

    Montero, José Garnacho; Lerma, Francisco Álvarez; Galleymore, Paula Ramírez; Martínez, Mercedes Palomar; Rocha, Luis Álvarez; Gaite, Fernando Barcenilla; Rodríguez, Joaquín Álvarez; González, Mercedes Catalán; Moreno, Inmaculada Fernández; Baño, Jesús Rodríguez; Campos, José; Andrés, Jesús Ma Aranaz; Varela, Yolanda Agra; Gay, Carolina Rodríguez; García, Miguel Sánchez

    2015-03-16

    This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2015 and co-published as a series in Critical Care. Other articles in the series can be found online at http://ccforum.com/series/annualupdate2015. Further information about the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from http://www.springer.com/series/8901.

  1. Parent Perspectives of Neonatal Intensive Care at the End-of-Life.

    PubMed

    Currie, Erin R; Christian, Becky J; Hinds, Pamela S; Perna, Samuel J; Robinson, Cheryl; Day, Sara; Meneses, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive qualitative study explored parent experiences related to their infant's neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization, end-of-life care, and palliative care consultation. "Life and death in the NICU environment" emerged as the primary theme with the following categories: ups and downs of parenting in the NICU, decision-making challenges in the NICU, and parent support. Parents encountered challenges with areas for improvement for end-of-life and palliative care in the NICU. Further research is necessary to understand barriers with integrating palliative care and curative care in the NICU, and how NICU care affects bereavement and coping outcomes after infant death. PMID:27261370

  2. Survey of intensive care of severely head injured patients in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Jeevaratnam, D. R.; Menon, D. K.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To study practice in intensive care of patients with severe head injury in neurosurgical referral centres in United Kingdom. DESIGN--Structured telephone interview of senior nursing staff in intensive care unit of adult neurosurgical referral centre. SETTING--39 intensive care units in hospitals that accepted acute head injuries for specialist neurosurgical management, identified from Medical Directory and information from professional bodies. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Details of organisation and administration of intensive care and patterns of monitoring and treatment for patients admitted with severe head injury. RESULTS--Patients were managed in specialist neurosurgical intensive care units in 21 of the centres and in general intensive care units in 18. Their intensive care was coordinated by an anaesthetist in 25 units and by a neurosurgeon in 12. Annual case-load varied between units: 20 received > 100 patients, 12 received 50-100, and seven received 25-49. Monitoring and treatment varied considerably between centres. Invasive arterial pressure monitoring was used routinely in 36 units, but central venous pressure monitoring was routinely used in 24 and intracranial pressure was routinely monitored in only 19. Corticosteroids were used to treat intracranial hypertension in 19 units. Seventeen units routinely aimed for arterial carbon dioxide pressure of 3.3-4.0 kPa, and one unit still used severe hyperventilation to a pressure of < 3.3 kPa. CONCLUSION--The intensive care of patients with acute head injuries varied widely between the centres surveyed. Rationalisation of the intensive care of severe head injury with the production of widely accepted guidelines ought to improve the quality of care. PMID:8616307

  3. The diversity of work: differences, similarities and relationships concerning characteristics of the organisation, the work and psychological work reactions in intensive care and non-intensive care nursing.

    PubMed

    Tummers, Gladys E R; van Merode, Godefridus G; Landeweerd, Jan A

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in organisational characteristics, work characteristics and psychological work reactions, and to investigate relationships between these variables in intensive care units (ICUs) and non-ICUs. Questionnaires were distributed to intensive care (n = 184) and non-intensive care nurses (n = 927) working in 15 general hospitals in the Netherlands. MANOVA showed that ICU nurses reported significantly higher uncertainty, higher complexity, and higher decision authority than non-ICU nurses. Emotional exhaustion was significantly lower among ICU nurses. Regarding the pattern of relationships, the LISREL-analyses revealed that the indirect proposed pattern of relationships was invariant across the two samples, which means a validation of our research model.

  4. Etiology and outcomes for patients infected with HIV in intensive care units in a tertiary care hospital in China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiang; Zhang, Wen; Huang, Yingxiu; Tian, Yunfei; Su, Wenjing; Li, Yanmei; Zhang, Wei; Han, Ning; Yang, Di; Zhao, Hongxin

    2015-03-01

    Although the National Free Antiretroviral Treatment Program (NFATP) has resulted in a significant reduction in the incidence of AIDS-defining illnesses in China, severe complications in patients infected with HIV may require aggressive treatment and critical care support. The objective for this study was to investigate the etiology and outcomes of patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units in Ditan Hospital, China. The evaluation of the etiology and outcomes of patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units was conducted using the clinical data from 122 patients infected with HIV (129 occasions) admitted to the Beijing Ditan hospital from January 1, 2009, to October 1, 2013. Over the five-year study period, 129 occasions occurred for 122 patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units. Respiratory failure was the most common condition (53.4%) among the 129 occasions analyzed. This was followed by pneumothorax (12.4%), infectious shock (8.5%), neurological problems (8.5%), renal failure (7.8%), post-operative complications and trauma (5.4%), coronary heart disease (3.1%), adverse effects of HAART (3.1%), lymphoma (2.4%), and liver failure (0.8%). Mortality in intensive care units was 64.5% while in-hospital mortality was 65.9%. The strongest protective predictor for in-hospital mortality was earlier admission to an intensive care unit (OR = 0.050, CI = 0.020-0.126, P < 0.001). Respiratory failure was the most common condition in patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units, and the outcome for the patients was poor. Mortality was negatively associated with earlier admission to an intensive care unit, but was not associated with HAART. PMID:25154318

  5. Critical care management of major disasters: a practical guide to disaster preparation in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Shawn P; Niven, Alexander S; Reese, Jason M

    2012-02-01

    Recent events and regulatory mandates have underlined the importance of medical planning and preparedness for catastrophic events. The purpose of this review is to provide a brief summary of current commonly identified threats, an overview of mass critical care management, and a discussion of resource allocation to provide the intensive care unit (ICU) director with a practical guide to help prepare and coordinate the activities of the multidisciplinary critical care team in the event of a disaster. PMID:21220272

  6. Intensive care nurses' conceptions of a critical pathway in caring for aortic-surgery patients: a phenomenographic study.

    PubMed

    Bjurling-Sjöberg, Petronella; Engström, Gabriella; Lyckner, Sara; Rydlo, Cecilia

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify and describe intensive care nurses' different conceptions of a critical pathway in caring for patients that have undergone aortic-surgery. Individual semi-structured interviews with eight specialist registered nurses at a Swedish intensive care unit were conducted and phenomenographically analysed. Three descriptive categories, with a total of five sub-categories, constituted the outcome-space of how the pathway was conceived of in caring: as a guide open to individual patients needs (clinical judgement governs caring and patient autonomy governs caring), as an instrument to promote patient safety (a source of knowledge, a planning tool and a reference standard) and as a source of support for professional confidence. In accordance with current literature, the nurses in the present study identified a number of advantages in applying the pathway in caring even if they were also conscious that the use of a pathway can give rise to unreflective standardisation. The nurses' conceptions indicate that the pathway prescribed for managing patients who have undergone aortic surgery is supportive and facilitates patient safety without jeopardising respect for the patient's individual care needs. This insight may be used to influence a thoughtful dialogue about the practice of pathways in intensive care.

  7. Basic Competence of Intensive Care Unit Nurses: Cross-Sectional Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Lakanmaa, Riitta-Liisa; Suominen, Tarja; Ritmala-Castrén, Marita; Vahlberg, Tero; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Critical care patients benefit from the attention of nursing personnel with a high competence level. The aim of the study was to describe and evaluate the self-assessed basic competence of intensive care unit nurses and related factors. A cross-sectional survey design was used. A basic competence scale (Intensive and Critical Care Nursing Competence Scale version 1, Likert scale 1–5, 1 = poor and 5 = excellent) was employed among Finnish intensive care unit nurses (n = 431). Intensive care unit nurses' self-assessed basic competence was good (mean 4.19, SD 0.40). The attitude and value base of basic competence was excellent whereas experience base was the poorest compared to the knowledge base and skill base of intensive and critical care nursing. The strongest factor explaining nurses' basic competence was their experience of autonomy in nursing care (F value 60.85, β 0.11, SE 0.01, and P ≤ 0.0001). Clinical competence was self-rated as good. Nurses gave their highest competence self-ratings for ICU patient care according to the principles of nursing care. The ICU nurses also self-rated their professional competence as good. Collaboration was self-rated as the best competence. In basic and continuing education and professional self-development discussions it is meaningful to consider and find solutions for how to improve nurses' experienced autonomy in nursing. PMID:26557676

  8. Withdrawal of ventilatory support outside the intensive care unit: guidance for practice

    PubMed Central

    Laddie, Joanna; Craig, Finella; Brierley, Joe; Kelly, Paula; Bluebond-Langner, Myra

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the work of one tertiary paediatric palliative care service in facilitating planned withdrawal of ventilatory support outside the intensive care setting, with the purpose of developing local guidance for practice. Methods Retrospective 10-year (2003–2012) case note review of intensive care patients whose parents elected to withdraw ventilation in another setting. Demographic and clinical data revealed common themes and specific incidents relevant to local guideline development. Results 18 children (aged 2 weeks to 16 years) were considered. Three died prior to transfer. Transfer locations included home (5), hospice (8) and other (2). Primary pathologies included malignant, neurological, renal and respiratory diseases. Collaborative working was evidenced in the review including multidisciplinary team meetings with the palliative care team prior to discharge. Planning included development of symptom management plans and emergency care plans in the event of longer than anticipated survival. Transfer of children and management of extubations demonstrated the benefits of planning and recognition that unexpected events occur despite detailed planning. We identified the need for local written guidance supporting healthcare professionals planning and undertaking extubation outside the intensive care setting, addressing the following phases: (i) introduction of withdrawal, (ii) preparation pretransfer, (iii) extubation, (iv) care postextubation and (v) care postdeath. Conclusions Planned withdrawal of ventilatory support outside the intensive care setting is challenging and resource intensive. The development of local collaborations and guidance can enable parents of children dependent on intensive care to consider a preferred place of death for their child, which may be outside the intensive care unit. PMID:24951460

  9. The Intensive care unit specialist: Report from the Task Force of World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Amin, Pravin; Fox-Robichaud, Alison; Divatia, J V; Pelosi, Paolo; Altintas, Defne; Eryüksel, Emel; Mehta, Yatin; Suh, Gee Young; Blanch, Lluís; Weiler, Norbert; Zimmerman, Janice; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2016-10-01

    The role of the critical care specialist has been unequivocally established in the management of severely ill patients throughout the world. Data show that the presence of a critical care specialist in the intensive care unit (ICU) environment has reduced morbidity and mortality, improved patient safety, and reduced length of stay and costs. However, many ICUs across the world function as "open ICUs," in which patients may be admitted under a primary physician who has not been trained in critical care medicine. Although the concept of the ICU has gained widespread acceptance amongst medical professionals, hospital administrators and the general public; recognition and the need for doctors specializing in intensive care medicine has lagged behind. The curriculum to ensure appropriate training around the world is diverse but should ideally meet some minimum standards. The World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine has set up a task force to address issues concerning the training, functions, roles, and responsibilities of an ICU specialist.

  10. Children as donors: a national study to assess procurement of organs and tissues in pediatric intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Siebelink, Marion J; Albers, Marcel J I J; Roodbol, Petrie F; Van de Wiel, Harry B M

    2012-12-01

    A shortage of size-matched organs and tissues is the key factor limiting transplantation in children. Empirical data on procurement from pediatric donors is sparse. This study investigated donor identification, parental consent, and effectuation rates, as well as adherence to the national protocol. A national retrospective cohort study was conducted in all eight Dutch pediatric intensive care units. Records of deceased children were analyzed by an independent donation officer. Seventy-four (11%) of 683 deceased children were found to be suitable for organ donation and 132 (19%) for tissue donation. Sixty-two (84%) potential organ donors had been correctly identified; the parental consent and effectuation rate was 42%. Sixty-three (48%) potential tissue donors had been correctly identified; the parental consent and effectuation rate was 27%. Correct identification increased with age (logistic regression, organs: P = .024; tissues: P = .011). Although an overall identification rate of 84% of potential organ donors may seem acceptable, the variation observed suggests room for improvement, as does the overall low rate of identification of pediatric tissue donors. Efforts to address the shortage of organs and tissues for transplantation in children should focus on identifying potential donors and on the reasons why parents do not consent.

  11. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork.

  12. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork. PMID:27455363

  13. Preliminary report of the integration of a palliative care team into an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Sean; McHenry, Janet; Blank, Arthur E; Snow, Daniel; Eti Karakas, Serife; Santoro, Gabriella; Selwyn, Peter; Kvetan, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    Nearly half of Americans who die in hospitals spend time in the intensive care unit (ICU) in the last 3 days of life. Minority patients who die in the ICU are less likely to formalize advance directives and surviving family members report lower satisfaction with the provision of information and sensitivity to their cultural traditions at the end-of-life. This is a descriptive report of a convenience sample of 157 consecutive patients served by a palliative care team which was integrated into the operations of an ICU at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York, from August 2005 until August 2007. The team included an advance practice nurse (APN) and social worker. A separate case-control study was conducted comparing the length of hospital stay for persons who died in the ICU during the final 6 months of the project, prior to and post-palliative care consultation for 22 patients at the hospital campus where the project team was located versus 24 patients at the other campus. Pharmaco-economic data were evaluated for 22 persons who died with and 43 who died without a palliative care consultation at the intervention campus ICU to evaluate whether the project intervention was associated with an increase in the use of pain medications or alterations in the use of potentially non-beneficial life-prolonging treatments in persons dying in the ICU. Data was abstracted from the medical record with a standardized chart abstraction instrument by an unblinded research assistant. Interviews were conducted with a sample of family members and ICU nurses rating the quality of end-of-life care in the ICU with the Quality of Dying and Death in the ICU instrument (ICUQODD), and a family focus group was also conducted. Forty percent of patients were Caucasian, 35% were African American or Afro-Caribbean, 22% Hispanic and 3% were Asian or other. Exploration of the patients' and families' needs identified significant spiritual needs in 62.4% of cases. Education on the death

  14. Full-cost determination of different levels of care in the intensive care unit. An activity-based costing approach.

    PubMed

    Doyle, J J; Casciano, J P; Arikian, S R; Mauskopf, J; Paul, J E

    1996-10-01

    We applied an activity-based costing methodology to determine the full cost of intensive care service at a community hospital, a university hospital and a health maintenance organisation (HMO)-affiliated hospital. A total of 5 patient care units were analysed: the intensive care unit (ICU) and surgical ICU (SICU) at the university setting, the ICU at the community setting, and the SICU and cardiac care unit at the HMO setting. The selection of the different ICU types was based on the types of critical care units that were found in each setting (e.g. the HMO did not have an ICU). Institution-specific cost data and clinical management parameters were collected through surveys and site visits from the 3 respective organisation types. The analysis revealed a marked increase in patient-minute cost associated with mechanical ventilation. Higher costs associated with prolonged neuromuscular blockade have important economic implications with respect to selection of an appropriate neuromuscular blocking agent.

  15. Implementing ACCM critical care guidelines for septic shock management in a Cuban pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Cartaya, José M; Rovira, Luis E; Segredo, Yamilet; Alvarez, Idalys; Acevedo, Yoandra; Moya, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Sepsis is the most common direct cause of death worldwide and septic shock the syndrome's most serious complication. In 2002, the pediatric intensive care unit of the José Luis Miranda Pediatric University Hospital in Santa Clara (Villa Clara Province), Cuba, began implementing the recently published guidelines of the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) for management of pediatric and neonatal septic shock, observing a drop in case fatality from 34.6% to 19% between the years 2003 and 2007. ACCM updated these Guidelines in 2007. OBJECTIVE Describe experiences with the use of the 2007 ACCM updated Guidelines and discuss their possible impact in reducing case fatality. METHODS Between 2008 and 2010, a study was conducted of 280 children and adolescents, from newborns through 18 years, admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with a diagnosis of septic shock. The diagnostic and therapeutic criteria used were those recommended in the ACCM's 2007 updated Guidelines. The dependent variable was case fatality. Independent variables were age, sex, comorbidity or prior chronic disease, origin and course of sepsis, hemodynamic state, blood glucose level, hyperglycemia, organ dysfunction, volume of fluid therapy administered, use of mechanical ventilation and therapeutic response. RESULTS In the 3-year period, 28-day case fatality was 11.1% (31/280). A total of 45 patients had comorbidities, with 14 deaths and a case fatality rate of 31.1% vs. 7.2% (17/235) in previously healthy patients. Cold shock with a hemodynamic state of low cardiac output and high systemic vascular resistance predominated (68.9%), with low cardiac output and low systemic vascular resistance the least common type (12.5%), but the one with highest case fatality (34.4%). Hyperglycemia was present in 39.6% of patients, with 15.3% case fatality; case fatality was higher (25.6%) when hyperglycemia was in the 10-15.9 mmol/L range. Fluid therapy of 40-100 mL/kg was administered

  16. Migrant and minority family members in the intensive care unit. A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Quindemil, KettyElena; Anderson, Kathryn Hoehn; Mayer, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Statistics show that people with migrant and minority background as patients are significant in numbers in the intensive care unit. This also puts family members in the perspective of nursing because family members are an inherent part of the intensive care unit. Family-centered care is perhaps most applicable to vulnerable populations like migrant family in the intensive care unit to meet family member’s needs. But very little is known about the situation of migrant and minority family members in the intensive care unit. The aim of the study was to explore the state of the science regarding family-centered care in the intensive care unit of patients with migration background in general and with a possible focus on major migrant populations in Austria—Former Yugoslavian und Turkish origin. A literature review investigated research articles that contained information on migrant and minority family members in the intensive care unit. Key points in the relevant articles were identified and categorized into themes with an explanation of findings at the end. Seventeen articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. No article was found regarding groups of major migrant population groups in Austria. The included articles uncovered five predominant themes: importance of cultural norms, communication, family dynamics, universal caring, and nursing/provider deficit in culturally competent care. In order to provide adequate nursing care a more cohesive body of information on more specific geographic and cultural populations is recommended. Because of the complete lack of research regarding migrant families of Former Yugoslavian and Turkish origin into Austria, an exploration of this population is recommended. PMID:24860716

  17. Antimicrobial stewardship: application in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Owens, Robert C

    2009-09-01

    Critical-care units can be barometers for appropriate antimicrobial use. There, life and death hang on empirical antimicrobial therapy for treatment of infectious diseases. With increasing therapeutic empiricism, triple-drug, broad-spectrum regimens are often necessary, but cannot be continued without fear of the double-edged sword: a life-saving intervention or loss of life following Clostridium difficile infection, infection from a resistant organism, nephrotoxicity, cardiac toxicity, and so on. While broadened initial empirical therapy is considered a standard, it must be necessary, dosed according to pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic principles, and stopped when no longer needed. Antimicrobial stewardship interventions shepherd these considerations in antimicrobial therapy. With pharmacists and physicians trained in infectious disease and critical care, clear-cut interventions can be focused on beginning or growing a stewardship program, or proposing future studies.

  18. Antimicrobial stewardship: application in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Owens, Robert C

    2009-09-01

    Critical-care units can be barometers for appropriate antimicrobial use. There, life and death hang on empirical antimicrobial therapy for treatment of infectious diseases. With increasing therapeutic empiricism, triple-drug, broad-spectrum regimens are often necessary, but cannot be continued without fear of the double-edged sword: a life-saving intervention or loss of life following Clostridium difficile infection, infection from a resistant organism, nephrotoxicity, cardiac toxicity, and so on. While broadened initial empirical therapy is considered a standard, it must be necessary, dosed according to pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic principles, and stopped when no longer needed. Antimicrobial stewardship interventions shepherd these considerations in antimicrobial therapy. With pharmacists and physicians trained in infectious disease and critical care, clear-cut interventions can be focused on beginning or growing a stewardship program, or proposing future studies. PMID:19665090

  19. Nurse Activism in the newborn intensive care unit: actions in response to an ethical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Settle, Peggy Doyle

    2014-03-01

    Nurses working in a newborn intensive care unit report that treatment decision disagreements for infants in their care may lead to ethical dilemmas involving all health-care providers. Applying Rest's Four-Component Model of Moral Action as the theoretical framework, this study examined the responses of 224 newborn intensive care unit nurses to the Nurses Ethical Involvement Survey. The three most frequent actions selected were as follows: talking with other nurses, talking with doctors, and requesting a team meeting. The multiple regression analysis indicates that newborn intensive care unit nurses with greater concern for the ethical aspects of clinical practice (p = .001) and an increased perception of their ability to influence ethical decision making (p = .018) were more likely to display Nurse Activism. Future research is necessary to identify other factors leading to and inhibiting Nurse Activism as these findings explained just 8.5% of the variance.

  20. Intensive care nurses' perception of futility: job satisfaction and burnout dimensions.

    PubMed

    Özden, Dilek; Karagözoğlu, Şerife; Yildirim, Gülay

    2013-06-01

    Suffering repeated experiences of moral distress in intensive care units due to applications of futility reflects on nurses' patient care negatively, increases their burnout, and reduces their job satisfaction. This study was carried out to investigate the levels of job satisfaction and exhaustion suffered by intensive care nurses and the relationship between them through the futility dimension of the issue. The study included 138 intensive care nurses. The data were obtained with the futility questionnaire developed by the researchers, Maslach Burnout Inventory and Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. It was determined that nurses who agreed to the proposition that the application of futility demoralizes health-care professionals had low levels of job satisfaction but high levels of depersonalization. It was determined that nurses had moderate levels of job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, and personal achievements but high levels of sensitivity. Nurses' job satisfaction and sensitivities are positively affected when they consider that futility does not contradict the purposes of medicine.

  1. [Simulation technologies in anesthesiology, resuscitation and intensive care: state of the problem].

    PubMed

    Pasechnik, I N; Skobelev, E I; Volkova, N N; Sal'nikov, P S

    2014-01-01

    The foundation of simulation technologies application in educational process is presented in the article. It is described difficulties during anesthesiologists-resuscitators training and education of physicians of not intensive care specialty in intensive care methods. It was emphasized that new innovative educational stage is formed at present time. It is simulation stage between preclinical and clinical stages. Theoretical foundation and practical evidence of efficiency of simulation training are expressed in detail. PMID:25589311

  2. Outcome of respiratory intensive care for the elderly.

    PubMed

    McLean, R F; McIntosh, J D; Kung, G Y; Leung, D M; Byrick, R J

    1985-08-01

    We followed 1018 patients admitted consecutively to a multidisciplinary respiratory ICU (RICU), with special attention to patients aged 75 yr and over. The elderly had a higher RICU (11/49) and in-hospital (21/49) mortality than younger patients. The 28 survivors of hospitalization had a lower acute physiology score (APS) than nonsurvivors on admission (16.1 +/- 7.8 vs. 21.8 +/- 8.9, respectively), indicating less severe illness. The quality of long-term survival (12 to 24 months) was assessed using an open-ended questionnaire. Eighteen hospital survivors were alive at the time of follow-up and the quality of life was deemed satisfactory by 10 of 13 patients who were living independently. Only two of 28 survivors had been transferred to nursing home care, and two were in acute care hospitals. We conclude most elderly patients discharged from the RICU consider their lifestyle satisfactory and are not a large drain on community health care resources. Further studies of the screening process which determines RICU admission are necessary, because unimodal criteria such as age and APS after admission were not of prognostic value.

  3. [Hemodynamic monitoring in the critically patient. Recomendations of the Cardiological Intensive Care and CPR Working Group of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care and Coronary Units].

    PubMed

    Ochagavía, A; Baigorri, F; Mesquida, J; Ayuela, J M; Ferrándiz, A; García, X; Monge, M I; Mateu, L; Sabatier, C; Clau-Terré, F; Vicho, R; Zapata, L; Maynar, J; Gil, A

    2014-04-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring offers valuable information on cardiovascular performance in the critically ill, and has become a fundamental tool in the diagnostic approach and in the therapy guidance of those patients presenting with tissue hypoperfusion. From introduction of the pulmonary artery catheter to the latest less invasive technologies, hemodynamic monitoring has been surrounded by many questions regarding its usefulness and its ultimate impact on patient prognosis. The Cardiological Intensive Care and CPR Working Group (GTCIC-RCP) of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care and Coronary Units (SEMICYUC) has recently impulsed the development of an updating series in hemodynamic monitoring. Now, a final series of recommendations are presented in order to analyze essential issues in hemodynamics, with the purpose of becoming a useful tool for residents and critical care practitioners involved in the daily management of critically ill patients.

  4. Mortality profile across our Intensive Care Units: A 5-year database report from a Singapore restructured hospital.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Shahla

    2015-12-01

    Intensive care remains an area of high acuity and high mortality across the globe. With a rapidly aging population, the disease burden requiring intensive care is growing. The cost of critical care also is rising with new technology becoming available rapidly. We present the all-cause mortality results of 5 years database established in a restructured, large public hospital in Singapore, looking at all three types of Intensive Care Units present in our hospital. These include medical, surgical, and coronary care units.

  5. Outcomes for patients with lung cancer admitted to intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Alice Mânica; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Silva, Denise Rossato

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes for patients with lung cancer admitted to intensive care units and assess their clinical and demographic profiles. Methods Retrospective, analytical, observational study, wherein the outcomes for patients diagnosed with lung cancer admitted to the intensive care unit of university hospital from January 2010 until February 2011 were evaluated. Results Thirty-four patients' medical records were included. Twenty-six (76.5%) patients received some type of ventilatory support, of whom 21 (61.8%) used invasive mechanical ventilation and 11 (32.4%) used noninvasive ventilation at some point during their stay at the intensive care unit. Regarding mortality, 12 (35.3%) patients died during hospitalization at the intensive care unit, totaling 15 (44.1%) deaths during the entire hospitalization period; 19 (55.9%) patients were discharged from the hospital. The analysis of the variables showed that the patients who died had remained on invasive mechanical ventilation for a longer period 5.0 (0.25 to 15.0) days than the survivors (1.0 (0 to 1.0) days) (p=0.033) and underwent dialysis during their stay at the intensive care unit (p=0.014). Conclusions The mortality of patients with lung cancer admitted to the intensive care unit is associated with the time spent on invasive mechanical ventilation and the need for dialysis. PMID:23887754

  6. Children's Post-Traumatic Stress and the Role of Memory Following Admission to Intensive Care: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dow, Belinda; Kenardy, Justin; Long, Deborah; Le Brocque, Robyne

    2012-01-01

    Although our understanding of children's psychological outcomes following intensive care lags significantly behind advances in medicine, there is a growing awareness that intensive care admission impacts children beyond the boundaries of physical well-being. Intensive care presents a variety of disease-related, treatment-related, and…

  7. Physical Therapy Observation and Assessment in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Eilish; Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Observation and Assessment section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy assessments presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these assessments is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  8. The identification of family members' contribution to patients' care in the intensive care unit: a naturalistic inquiry.

    PubMed

    Williams, Caroline M A

    2005-01-01

    The admission of a patient to an intensive care unit (ICU) is recognized as being a stressful experience for their families. Many studies have focused on the needs of families within ICU, but few have highlighted the unique contribution that family members make towards patient care and recovery. Using a naturalistic approach, data were collected through observation, video recording, in-depth interviewing and reflective video analysis to explore the processes and factors underpinning families' contribution to patient care. The findings can be grouped into three themes: getting to know the patient through the family, family contribution to care and the nurses' role in supporting families of ICU patients. Families can have a very positive influence on the patient's care and recovery from ICU, but both the family members, and in turn the nursing staff, need to be supported appropriately if this valuable contribution to patient care is to be maximized and maintained.

  9. Police in an intensive care unit: what can happen?

    PubMed

    Lynøe, Niels; Leijonhufvud, Madeleine

    2013-12-01

    During spring 2009 a Swedish senior paediatric intensivist and associate professor was detained and later prosecuted for mercy-killing a child with severe brain damage. The intensivist was accused of having used high doses of thiopental after having withdrawn life-sustaining treatment when the child was imminently dying. After more than 2.5 years of investigation the physician was acquitted by the Stockholm City Court. The court additionally stated that the physician had provided good end-of-life care. Since the trial it has become evident that the accusation was based on a problematic medicolegal report. Nevertheless, the event has had severe negative consequences for the physician personally and professionally, and probably also, in general, for patients in the final stage of life. This case illustrates, together with other cases, that there is a lack of correspondence between ethical soft law/healthcare law and the Penal Code. To optimise medical practice we suggest that the criminal law be carefully examined and if possible changed. Furthermore, we suggest a peer-review system for assessing medicolegal reports in cases of suspected homicide.

  10. End of Life Issues in the Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Rashmi; Chaturvedi, R.; Rudra, A.; Jaideep, C.N.

    2012-01-01

    A structured discussion of End-of-Life (EOL) issues is a relatively new phenomenon in India. Personal beliefs, cultural and religious influences, peer, family and societal pressures affect EOL decisions. Indian law does not provide sanction to contentious issues such as do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders, living wills, and euthanasia. Finally, published data on EOL decisions in Indian ICUs is lacking. What is needed is a prospective determination of which patients will benefit from aggressive management and life-support. A consensus regarding the concept of Medical Futility is necessary to give impetus to further discussion on more advanced policies including ideas such as Managed Care to restrict unnecessary health care costs, euthanasia, the principle of withhold and/or withdraw, ethical and moral guidelines that would govern decisions regarding futile treatment, informed consent to EOL decisions and do-not-resuscitate orders. This review examines the above concepts as practiced worldwide and looks at some landmark judgments that have shaped current Indian policy, as well as raising talking points for possible legislative intervention in the field. PMID:24532934

  11. Police in an intensive care unit: what can happen?

    PubMed

    Lynøe, Niels; Leijonhufvud, Madeleine

    2013-12-01

    During spring 2009 a Swedish senior paediatric intensivist and associate professor was detained and later prosecuted for mercy-killing a child with severe brain damage. The intensivist was accused of having used high doses of thiopental after having withdrawn life-sustaining treatment when the child was imminently dying. After more than 2.5 years of investigation the physician was acquitted by the Stockholm City Court. The court additionally stated that the physician had provided good end-of-life care. Since the trial it has become evident that the accusation was based on a problematic medicolegal report. Nevertheless, the event has had severe negative consequences for the physician personally and professionally, and probably also, in general, for patients in the final stage of life. This case illustrates, together with other cases, that there is a lack of correspondence between ethical soft law/healthcare law and the Penal Code. To optimise medical practice we suggest that the criminal law be carefully examined and if possible changed. Furthermore, we suggest a peer-review system for assessing medicolegal reports in cases of suspected homicide. PMID:23900291

  12. Job satisfaction of intensive care nurses practising primary nursing. A comparison with those practising total patient care.

    PubMed

    Manley, K; Cruse, S; Keogh, S

    1996-01-01

    This study compares the job satisfaction experienced by intensive care nurses practising primary nursing with those who practised total patient care in an a earlier study using the same tool. Differences in the job aspects of; challenge, initiative, seeing work through, output/goals, knowledge and skills appear to be associated with the organisational approach. Some similarities exist between the two units-nurses gained most sense of achievement from: seeing patients improve, personal achievement, giving care and camaraderie. In both units nurses wanted greater opportunities for inter-professional involvement and decision-making. Primary nursing as an organisational approach may provide opportunities for increasing the amount of challenge, decision-making, opportunities for using initiative, seeing work through and subsequently job satisfaction in intensive care nursing. Further study of the job satisfaction of nurses practising primary nursing in ICU is recommended, but sizes and return rates need to be optimised.

  13. Conditions for parents' participation in the care of their child in neonatal intensive care – a field study

    PubMed Central

    Wigert, Helena; Hellström, Anna-Lena; Berg, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Background To promote participation by parents in the care of their child in neonatal intensive care units (NICU), health professionals need better understanding of what facilitates and what obstructs participation. The aim was to elucidate conditions for parents' participation in the care of their child in NICUs. Methods A field study with a hermeneutic lifeworld approach was used and data were collected at two NICUs through participative observations and interviews with representatives of management, staff and parents. Results The results point to a number of contradictions in the way parents were offered the opportunity to participate in neonatal intensive care. Management and staff both had good ambitions to develop ideal care that promoted parent participation. However, the care including the conditions for parental participation was driven by the terms of the staff, routines focusing on the medical-technical care and environment, and budgetary constraints. Conclusion The result shows that tangible strategies need to be developed in NICUs aimed at optimising conditions for parents to be present and involved in the care of their child. PMID:18215259

  14. [Respiratory and intensive care aspects of muscular dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, X; Lamothe, L; Heming, N; Orlikowski, D

    2015-12-01

    Among the various myopathies, Duchenne muscular dystrophy represents the myopathy with the most stereotypical respiratory evolution. This progressive respiratory failure is going to develop in a parallel way of motor deficit, conducting patients to mechanical ventilation at the end of their second decade. In the absence of curative therapeutics, respiratory cares like home ventilation and prevention of respiratory complications, in a systematic and organized way, allowed to decrease the morbidity and the mortality of these patients. It is not exceptional to meet patients with life expectancy of which overtakes about forty. Besides axial stabilization, cough assistance techniques and swallowing disorders management need to be associated to mechanical ventilation. Invasive techniques of ventilation as tracheostomy keep their place in this pathology even if alternative techniques allowing full day non-invasive ventilation were generalized these last years. PMID:26773587

  15. Sedation with dexmedetomidine in the intensive care setting

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Anthony T; Murphy, Claire V

    2011-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 agonist that produces sedation and analgesia without compromising the respiratory drive. Use of dexmedetomidine as a sedative in the critically ill is associated with fewer opioid requirements compared with propofol and a similar time at goal sedation compared with benzodiazepines. Dexmedetomidine may produce negative hemodynamic effects including lower mean heart rates and potentially more bradycardia than other sedatives used in the critically ill. Recent studies have demonstrated that dexmedetomidine is safe at higher dosages, but more studies are needed to determine whether the efficacy of dexmedetomidine is dose dependent. In addition, further research is required to define dexmedetomidine’s role in the care of delirious critically ill patients, as many, but not all, studies have indicated favorable outcomes. PMID:27147855

  16. [Breastfeeding in neonatal intensive care: description of a change].

    PubMed

    Dall'Oglio, Immacolata; Salvatori, Guglielmo; Stendardi, Maria Chiara; Bonci, Enea; D'Agostino, Giuseppina

    2004-01-01

    The results of a program to promote breast feeding in a neonatal intensive unit are presented. Data on all newborns admitted during the first three days of life in a neonatal intensive unit in the first semester of 1998 and 2000 were collected. Of the 100 newborns admitted in 1998 data were collected on 76 and on 50/61 admitted in 2000. Information on breast feeding practices at home were collected by phone interview to the mothers. The support program offered consisted in a room for breast milk collection with professional electric breast pump; a short information sheet on how to collect breast milk; cushions and armchairs to improve mothers comfort; an educational course for nurses on how to promote breastfeeding; and the availability of professional consultants before admission and after discharge. The newborns were comparable for the main characteristics. The number of mothers that collected the milk in the first three days did not change (from 72 to 80%). An increase was observed in the number of milk collections a day: 62% of the mothers collected the milk more than 4 times a day (compared to less than 35% in 1998) and the length of duration of milk collection increased from 21+/-24 days in 1998 to 42+/-44 in 2000 (p=0.01). Also the number of newborns breast feed increased from 21.2% in 1998 to 64% in 2000 (p=0.001). The change observed is encouraging, although not optimal. Further efforts need to be implemented with different strategies (information sheets, and the promotion of new milk collection techniques) to improve the results. PMID:15709466

  17. Glucose control in the intensive care unit: a roller coaster ride or a swinging pendulum?

    PubMed

    Comi, Richard J

    2009-06-01

    Many studies of tight control of blood glucose in critically ill patients are associated with poor outcomes. However, randomized studies of tight glucose control in patients admitted to coronary care or surgical intensive care units showed a reduction in mortality rates; supported by recommendations from professional organizations, many intensive care units implemented protocols for tight glucose control. More recent studies in medical intensive care units did not confirm the benefits of tight control, however, and the most recent study suggests that tight control increases mortality rates. Furthermore, tight control significantly increases episodes of hypoglycemia. The sum of the recent literature suggests that a degree of glucose control lies between the extremes of the adverse outcomes related to poor glucose control and those related to overly aggressive glucose control. PMID:19487715

  18. Lifestyle counseling for type 2 diabetes risk reduction in Dutch primary care: results of the APHRODITE study after 0.5 and 1.5 years.

    PubMed

    Vermunt, Paulina W A; Milder, Ivon E J; Wielaard, Frits; de Vries, Jeanne H M; van Oers, Hans A M; Westert, Gert P

    2011-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the overall effect of the Active Prevention in High-Risk Individuals of Diabetes Type 2 in and Around Eindhoven (APHRODITE) lifestyle intervention on type 2 diabetes risk reduction in Dutch primary care after 0.5 and 1.5 years and to evaluate the variability between general practices. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes (Finnish Diabetes Risk Score ≥13) were randomly assigned into an intervention group (n = 479) or a usual-care group (n = 446). Comparisons were made between study groups and between general practices regarding changes in clinical and lifestyle measures over 1.5 years. Participant, general practitioner, and nurse practitioner characteristics were compared between individuals who lost weight or maintained a stable weight and individuals who gained weight. RESULTS Both groups showed modest changes in glucose values, weight measures, physical activity, energy intake, and fiber intake. Differences between groups were significant only for total physical activity, saturated fat intake, and fiber intake. Differences between general practices were significant for BMI and 2-h glucose but not for energy intake and physical activity. In the intervention group, the nurse practitioners' mean years of work experience was significantly longer in individuals who were successful at losing weight or maintaining a stable weight compared with unsuccessful individuals. Furthermore, successful individuals more often had a partner. CONCLUSIONS Risk factors for type 2 diabetes could be significantly reduced by lifestyle counseling in Dutch primary care. The small differences in changes over time between the two study groups suggest that additional intervention effects are modest. In particular, the level of experience of the nurse practitioner and the availability of partner support seem to facilitate intervention success. PMID:21775759

  19. Experiences in end-of-life care in the Intensive Care Unit: A survey of resident physicians

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Zubair Umer; Muhammed, Fazil; Singh, Charu; Sudhakar, Abish

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The practice of intensive care includes withholding and withdrawal of care, when appropriate, and the goals of care change around this time to comfort and palliation. We decided to survey the attitudes, training, and skills of intensive care residents in relation to end-of-life (EoL) care. All residents at our institute who has worked for at least a month in an adult Intensive Care Unit were invited to participate. Materials and Methods: After Institutional Ethics Committee approval, a Likert-scale questionnaire, divided into five composite measures of EoL skills including training and attitude, was handed over to individual residents and completed data were anonymized. Frequency and descriptive analysis was performed for the demographic variables. Central tendency, variability, and reliability were examined for the five composite measures. Scale internal consistency was checked by Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Multivariate forward conditional regression analysis was conducted to examine the association of demographic data or EoL experience to composite measures. Results: Of the 170 eligible residents, we received 120 (70.5%) responses. Conclusions: Internal medicine residents have more experience in caring for dying patients and conducting EoL discussions. Even though majority of participants reported that they are comfortable with the concept of EoL care, this does not always reflect the actual practice in the hospital. There is a need for further training in skills around EoL care. As this is a self-assessment survey, the specific measures of attitudes and skills in EoL are poorly reflected, indicating a need for further research. PMID:27630457

  20. Experiences in end-of-life care in the Intensive Care Unit: A survey of resident physicians

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Zubair Umer; Muhammed, Fazil; Singh, Charu; Sudhakar, Abish

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The practice of intensive care includes withholding and withdrawal of care, when appropriate, and the goals of care change around this time to comfort and palliation. We decided to survey the attitudes, training, and skills of intensive care residents in relation to end-of-life (EoL) care. All residents at our institute who has worked for at least a month in an adult Intensive Care Unit were invited to participate. Materials and Methods: After Institutional Ethics Committee approval, a Likert-scale questionnaire, divided into five composite measures of EoL skills including training and attitude, was handed over to individual residents and completed data were anonymized. Frequency and descriptive analysis was performed for the demographic variables. Central tendency, variability, and reliability were examined for the five composite measures. Scale internal consistency was checked by Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Multivariate forward conditional regression analysis was conducted to examine the association of demographic data or EoL experience to composite measures. Results: Of the 170 eligible residents, we received 120 (70.5%) responses. Conclusions: Internal medicine residents have more experience in caring for dying patients and conducting EoL discussions. Even though majority of participants reported that they are comfortable with the concept of EoL care, this does not always reflect the actual practice in the hospital. There is a need for further training in skills around EoL care. As this is a self-assessment survey, the specific measures of attitudes and skills in EoL are poorly reflected, indicating a need for further research.

  1. Maternal mortality and morbidity: epidemiology of intensive care admissions in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, H; Dias, T; Jayawardena, A

    2013-12-01

    Maternal mortality reviews are used globally to assess the quality of health-care services. With the decline in the number of maternal deaths, it has become difficult to derive meaningful conclusions that could have an impact on quality of care using maternal mortality data. The emphasis has recently shifted to severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM), as an adjunct to maternal mortality reviews. Due to its heterogeneity, there are difficulties in recognising SAMM. The problem of identifying SAMM accurately is the main issue in investigating them. However, admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) provides an unambiguous, management-based inclusion criterion for a SAMM. ICU data are available across health-care settings prospectively and retrospectively, making them a tool that could be studied readily. However, admission to the ICU depends on many factors, such as accessibility and the availability of high-dependency units, which will reduce the need for ICU admission. Thresholds for admission vary widely and are generally higher in facilities that handle a heavier workload. In addition, not all women with SAMM receive intensive care. However, women at the severe end of the spectrum of severe morbidity will almost invariably receive intensive care. Notwithstanding these limitations, the epidemiology of intensive care admissions in pregnancy will provide valuable data about women with severe morbidity. The overall rate of obstetric ICU admission varies from 0.04% to 4.54%.

  2. Stressors in the relatives of patients admitted to an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Angélica Adam; Weigel, Bruna Dorfey; Dummer, Claus Dieter; Machado, Kelly Campara; Tisott, Taís Montagner

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify and stratify the main stressors for the relatives of patients admitted to the adult intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. Methods Cross-sectional descriptive study conducted with relatives of patients admitted to an intensive care unit from April to October 2014. The following materials were used: a questionnaire containing identification information and demographic data of the relatives, clinical data of the patients, and 25 stressors adapted from the Intensive Care Unit Environmental Stressor Scale. The degree of stress caused by each factor was determined on a scale of values from 1 to 4. The stressors were ranked based on the average score obtained. Results The main cause of admission to the intensive care unit was clinical in 36 (52.2%) cases. The main stressors were the patient being in a state of coma (3.15 ± 1.23), the patient being unable to speak (3.15 ± 1.20), and the reason for admission (3.00 ± 1.27). After removing the 27 (39.1%) coma patients from the analysis, the main stressors for the relatives were the reason for admission (2.75 ± 1.354), seeing the patient in the intensive care unit (2.51 ± 1.227), and the patient being unable to speak (2.50 ± 1.269). Conclusion Difficulties in communication and in the relationship with the patient admitted to the intensive care unit were identified as the main stressors by their relatives, with the state of coma being predominant. By contrast, the environment, work routines, and relationship between the relatives and intensive care unit team had the least impact as stressors. PMID:27737424

  3. Prolonged weaning: from the intensive care unit to home.

    PubMed

    Navalesi, P; Frigerio, P; Patzlaff, A; Häußermann, S; Henseke, P; Kubitschek, M

    2014-01-01

    Weaning is the process of withdrawing mechanical ventilation which starts with the first spontaneous breathing trial (SBT). Based on the degree of difficulty and duration, weaning is classified as simple, difficult and prolonged. Prolonged weaning, which includes patients who fail 3 SBTs or are still on mechanical ventilation 7 days after the first SBT, affects a relatively small fraction of mechanically ventilated ICU patients but these, however, requires disproportionate resources. There are several potential causes which can lead to prolonged weaning. It is nonetheless important to understand the problem from the point of view of each individual patient in order to adopt appropriate treatment and define precise prognosis. An otherwise stable patient who remains on mechanical ventilation will be considered for transfer to a specialized weaning unit (SWU). Though there is not a precise definition, SWU can be considered as highly specialized and protected environments for patients requiring mechanical ventilation despite resolution of the acute disorder. Proper staffing, well defined short-term and long-term goals, attention to psychological and social problems represent key determinants of SWU success. Some patients cannot be weaned, either partly or entirely, and may require long-term home mechanical ventilation. In these cases the logistics relating to caregivers and the equipment must be carefully considered and addressed.

  4. Tracheostomy in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: When and Where?

    PubMed Central

    Ertugrul, Ilker; Kesici, Selman; Bayrakci, Benan; Unal, Omer Faruk

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tracheostomy was first observed in Egyptian drawings in 3600 BC and performed frequently during the 1800’s diphtheria epidemic. Objectives: The aim of this study was to elucidate the indications, complications, mortality rate, and the effect of pediatric tracheostomy on length of PICU or hospital stay. Materials and Methods: Demographic characteristics, diagnosis at admission, duration of ventilation of 152 patients were analyzed retrospectively. Results: The most common tracheostomy indication was prolonged intubation. The mean duration of mechanical ventilation before tracheostomy was 23.8 days. Forty five percent of the tracheostomy procedures were performed at bedside. Neither the place nor the age had any effect on the development of complications (P = 0.701, P = 0.622). The procedure enabled 62% of the patients to be discharged from hospital. Conclusions: Tracheostomy facilitates discharge and weaning of mechanical ventilation. Although the timing of tracheostomy has to be determined for each individual patient, three weeks of ventilation seems to be a suitable period for tracheostomy. Tracheostomy can be performed at bedside safely but patient selection should be made carefully. PMID:26848369

  5. Impact of Performance Obstacles on Intensive Care Nurses‘ Workload, Perceived Quality and Safety of Care, and Quality of Working Life

    PubMed Central

    Gurses, Ayse P; Carayon, Pascale; Wall, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To study the impact of performance obstacles on intensive care nurses‘ workload, quality and safety of care, and quality of working life (QWL). Performance obstacles are factors that hinder nurses‘ capacity to perform their job and that are closely associated with their immediate work system. Data Sources/Study Setting Data were collected from 265 nurses in 17 intensive care units (ICUs) between February and August 2004 via a structured questionnaire, yielding a response rate of 80 percent. Study Design A cross-sectional study design was used. Data were analyzed by correlation analyses and structural equation modeling. Principal Findings Performance obstacles were found to affect perceived quality and safety of care and QWL of ICU nurses. Workload mediated the impact of performance obstacles with the exception of equipment-related issues on perceived quality and safety of care as well as QWL. Conclusions Performance obstacles in ICUs are a major determinant of nursing workload, perceived quality and safety of care, and QWL. In general, performance obstacles increase nursing workload, which in turn negatively affect perceived quality and safety of care and QWL. Redesigning the ICU work system to reduce performance obstacles may improve nurses‘ work. PMID:19207589

  6. Communicating Chaplains' Care: Narrative Documentation in a Neuroscience-Spine Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rebecca; Wirpsa, M Jeanne; Boyken, Lara; Sakumoto, Matthew; Handzo, George; Kho, Abel; Emanuel, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Chaplaincy care is different for every patient; a growing challenge is to ensure that electronic health records function to support personalized care. While ICU health care teams have advanced clinical practice guidelines to identify and integrate relevant aspects of the patient's story into whole person care, recommendations for documentation are rare. This qualitative study of over 400 free-text EHR notes offers unique insight into current use of free-text documentation in ICU by six chaplains integrated into the healthcare team. Our research provides insight into the phenomena chaplains record in the electronic record. Content analysis shows recurrent report of patient and family practices, beliefs, coping mechanisms, concerns, emotional resources and needs, family and faith support, medical decision making and medical communications. These findings are important for health care team discussions of factors deemed essential to whole person care in ICUs, and, by extension have the potential to support the development of EHR designs that aim to advance personalized care.

  7. Dignity in Practice: Day-to-Day Life in Intensive Care Units in Western Europe.

    PubMed

    Koksvik, Gitte H

    2015-01-01

    Dignity is a key concept in contemporary health care ethics, but the practical meaning of dignity in care remains unclear. In this article, I show that in practice, different and possibly conflicting notions of what dignity means are engaged simultaneously in the care of critical patients. The empirical data is based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in three separate intensive care units in three European countries, Spain, Norway, and France, in the spring of 2014. Four weeks were spent at each site. Using participant observations and semi-structured interviews with 24 intensive care unit staff, I illustrate how the ideal of patient dignity is carried out in practice in the daily life of these units.

  8. Peer Support as a Novel Strategy to Mitigate Post-Intensive Care Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Mark E; Jackson, James C; Hopkins, Ramona O; Thompson, Carol; Andrews, Adair; Netzer, Giora; Bates, Dina M; Bunnell, Aaron E; Christie, LeeAnn M; Greenberg, Steven B; Lamas, Daniela J; Sevin, Carla M; Weinhouse, Gerald; Iwashyna, Theodore J

    2016-01-01

    Post-intensive care syndrome, a condition defined by new or worsening impairment in cognition, mental health, and physical function after critical illness, has emerged in the past decade as a common and life-altering consequence of critical illness. New strategies are urgently needed to mitigate the risk of neuropsychological and functional impairment common after critical illness and to prepare and support survivors on their road toward recovery. The present state of critical care survivorship is described, and postdischarge care delivery in the United States and the potential impact of the present-day fragmented model of care delivery are detailed. A novel strategy that uses peer support groups could more effectively meet the needs of survivors of critical illness and mitigate post-intensive care syndrome. PMID:27153311

  9. Intensive Interaction as a Novel Approach in Social Care: Care Staff's Views on the Practice Change Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firth, Graham; Elford, Helen; Leeming, Catherine; Crabbe, Marion

    2008-01-01

    Background: Intensive Interaction is an approach to developing the pre-verbal communication and sociability of people with severe or profound and multiple learning disabilities and autism. Previous research has indicated many potential benefits; however, the approach is not consistently used in social care. Aim: To report on the significant and…

  10. Evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to medical Intensive Care Unit in body builders: Cases from tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Garg, Sunil Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Bodybuilding is the use of progressive resistance exercise to control and develop one's musculature. With the rise in number of persons adopting this activity, there is evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to intensive care in this population subset. Strict adherence to details of bodybuilding and avoidance of unsupervised medications are essential to prevent untoward effects.

  11. Evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to medical Intensive Care Unit in body builders: Cases from tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sunil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Bodybuilding is the use of progressive resistance exercise to control and develop one's musculature. With the rise in number of persons adopting this activity, there is evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to intensive care in this population subset. Strict adherence to details of bodybuilding and avoidance of unsupervised medications are essential to prevent untoward effects. PMID:25878431

  12. Voluntary peer review as innovative tool for quality improvement in the intensive care unit – a retrospective descriptive cohort study in German intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Kumpf, Oliver; Bloos, Frank; Bause, Hanswerner; Brinkmann, Alexander; Deja, Maria; Marx, Gernot; Kaltwasser, Arnold; Dubb, Rolf; Muhl, Elke; Greim, Clemens-A.; Weiler, Norbert; Chop, Ines; Jonitz, Günther; Schaefer, Henning; Felsenstein, Matthias; Liebeskind, Ursula; Leffmann, Carsten; Jungbluth, Annemarie; Waydhas, Christian; Pronovost, Peter; Spies, Claudia; Braun, Jan-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Quality improvement and safety in intensive care are rapidly evolving topics. However, there is no gold standard for assessing quality improvement in intensive care medicine yet. In 2007 a pilot project in German intensive care units (ICUs) started using voluntary peer reviews as an innovative tool for quality assessment and improvement. We describe the method of voluntary peer review and assessed its feasibility by evaluating anonymized peer review reports and analysed the thematic clusters highlighted in these reports. Methods: Retrospective data analysis from 22 anonymous reports of peer reviews. All ICUs – representing over 300 patient beds – had undergone voluntary peer review. Data were retrieved from reports of peers of the review teams and representatives of visited ICUs. Data were analysed with regard to number of topics addressed and results of assessment questionnaires. Reports of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT reports) of these ICUs are presented. Results: External assessment of structure, process and outcome indicators revealed high percentages of adherence to predefined quality goals. In the SWOT reports 11 main thematic clusters were identified representative for common ICUs. 58.1% of mentioned topics covered personnel issues, team and communication issues as well as organisation and treatment standards. The most mentioned weaknesses were observed in the issues documentation/reporting, hygiene and ethics. We identified several unique patterns regarding quality in the ICU of which long-term personnel problems und lack of good reporting methods were most interesting Conclusion: Voluntary peer review could be established as a feasible and valuable tool for quality improvement. Peer reports addressed common areas of interest in intensive care medicine in more detail compared to other methods like measurement of quality indicators. PMID:25587245

  13. Urinary tract infections due to Trichosporon spp. in severely ill patients in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Mattede, Maria das Graças Silva; Piras, Cláudio; Mattede, Kelly Dematte Silva; Ferrari, Aline Trugilho; Baldotto, Lorena Simões; Assbu, Michel Silvestre Zouain

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence of urinary tract infections due to Trichosporon spp. in an intensive care unit. Methods This descriptive observational study was conducted in an intensive care unit between 2007 and 2009. All consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit with a confirmed diagnosis were evaluated. Results Twenty patients presented with urinary tract infections due to Trichosporon spp. The prevalence was higher among men (65%) and among individuals > 70 years of age (55%). The mortality rate was 20%. The average intensive care unit stay was 19.8 days. The onset of infection was associated with prior use of antibiotics and was more frequent in the fall and winter. Conclusion Infection due to Trichosporon spp. was more common in men and among those > 70 years of age and was associated with the use of an indwelling urinary catheter for more than 20 days and with the use of broadspectrum antibiotics for more than 14 days. In addition, patients with urinary infection due to Trichosporon spp. were most often hospitalized in intensive care units in the fall and winter periods. PMID:26465246

  14. Delirium in intensive care unit patients under noninvasive ventilation: a multinational survey

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Lilian Maria Sobreira; Salluh, Jorge Ibrain Figueira; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Barreto, Bruna Brandão; Zantieff, Ricardo; Tobar, Eduardo; Esquinas, Antonio; Quarantini, Lucas de Castro; Gusmao-Flores, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    Objective To conduct a multinational survey of intensive care unit professionals to determine the practices on delirium assessment and management, in addition to their perceptions and attitudes toward the evaluation and impact of delirium in patients requiring noninvasive ventilation. Methods An electronic questionnaire was created to evaluate the profiles of the respondents and their related intensive care units, the systematic delirium assessment and management and the respondents' perceptions and attitudes regarding delirium in patients requiring noninvasive ventilation. The questionnaire was distributed to the cooperative network for research of the Associação de Medicina Intensiva Brasileira (AMIB-Net) mailing list and to researchers in different centers in Latin America and Europe. Results Four hundred thirty-six questionnaires were available for analysis; the majority of the questionnaires were from Brazil (61.9%), followed by Turkey (8.7%) and Italy (4.8%). Approximately 61% of the respondents reported no delirium assessment in the intensive care unit, and 31% evaluated delirium in patients under noninvasive ventilation. The Confusion Assessment Method for the intensive care unit was the most reported validated diagnostic tool (66.9%). Concerning the indication of noninvasive ventilation in patients already presenting with delirium, 16.3% of respondents never allow the use of noninvasive ventilation in this clinical context. Conclusion This survey provides data that strongly reemphasizes poor efforts toward delirium assessment and management in the intensive care unit setting, especially regarding patients requiring noninvasive ventilation. PMID:26761474

  15. [Intensive care within the context of military long-distance transport].

    PubMed

    Hossfeld, B; Rohowsky, B; Rödig, E; Lampl, L

    2004-05-01

    Due to the changed task spectrum of the German Federal Armed Forces with participation in international deployments for UN and NATO the concept of Aeromedical Evacuation (MedEvac) gained a new quality for the Air Force as well as for the Medical Corps. The transport of mostly severely injured or critically ill patients requires both, medical equipment which has to be permanently adapted to the national standard, and qualified intensive-care-personnel. At present, the aircrafts used for such deployments are four C-160 Transall, one CL-601 Challenger and two Airbus A310, which, if necessary, can be equipped with one or more intensive-care "patient transportation units" (PTU). Contrary to the two other aircrafts, the CL-601 Challenger is only equipped for the intensive-care transport of one individual patient. The PTU corresponds to the technical equipment of the intensive care unit of a level-1-trauma centre and ensures an intensive-care therapy on highest level also during longer transportation. The work with this equipment, the characteristics of the long-distance air transport and the special situation of the military deployment causes special demands on the qualifications of the assigned personnel. Primarily planned for the repatriation of injured or ill soldiers, in the mean time, this concept is also essential for the medevac of civilian victims after mass casualties worldwide.

  16. Boundaries obscured and boundaries reinforced: incorporation as a strategy of occupational enhancement for intensive care.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Simon

    2006-03-01

    Medical dominance is a recurring theme in sociological analyses of healthcare work. One example of a theoretical framework by which the medical profession is said to dominate other healthcare occupations is Turner's (1995: 138) enumeration of the modes of subordination, limitation and exclusion. As Elston (1991) has noted, however, such frameworks tend to be rather speculative and there is not a great deal of evidence on how these strategies are exercised, for example, at a micro-level. There is also a tendency to portray healthcare occupations as monolithic entities, without acknowledging differences within healthcare occupations, and the relationships between them, which can arise in different clinical locales. Through a micro-level analysis of the practice of intensive care, using ethnographic data collected on three intensive care units (ICUs) in England, this paper proposes a hitherto unidentified strategy -incorporation- for medical dominance at a micro-level. Paradoxically, an enhanced position for both intensive care medicine and intensive care nursing arises, relative to proximal healthcare groups. The argument of this paper is that within the ICU an occupational boundary (doctor-nurse) is obscured, while an organisational boundary which differentiates the ICU from the wider hospital is reinforced. Overall, the power relationship between medicine and nursing in intensive care is not 'zero-sum': the influence of both groups in the wider hospital is increased by this strategy of incorporation.

  17. Establishing an Anaesthesia and Intensive Care partnership and aiming for national impact in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ulisubisya, Mpoki; Jörnvall, Henrik; Irestedt, Lars; Baker, Tim

    2016-03-18

    Anaesthesia and Intensive Care is a neglected specialty in low-income countries. There is an acute shortage of health workers - several low-income countries have less than 1 anaesthesia provider per 100,000 population. Only 1.5% of hospitals in Africa have the intensive care resources needed for managing patients with sepsis. Health partnerships between institutions in high and low-income countries have been proposed as an effective way to strengthen health systems. The aim of this article is to describe the origin and conduct of a health partnership in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care between institutions in Tanzania and Sweden and how the partnership has expanded to have an impact at regional and national levels.The Muhimbili-Karolinska Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Collaboration was initiated in 2008 on the request of the Executive Director of Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar es Salaam. The partnership has conducted training courses, exchanges, research projects and introduced new equipment, routines and guidelines. The partnership has expanded to include all hospitals in Dar es Salaam. Through the newly formed Life Support Foundation, the partnership has had a national impact assisting the reanimation of the Society of Anaesthesiologists of Tanzania and has seen a marked increase of the number of young doctors choosing a residency in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care.

  18. Quality of life in the five years after intensive care: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Data on quality of life beyond 2 years after intensive care discharge are limited and we aimed to explore this area further. Our objective was to quantify quality of life and health utilities in the 5 years after intensive care discharge. Methods A prospective longitudinal cohort study in a University Hospital in the UK. Quality of life was assessed from the period before ICU admission until 5 years and quality adjusted life years calculated. Results 300 level 3 intensive care patients of median age 60.5 years and median length of stay 6.7 days, were recruited. Physical quality of life fell to 3 months (P = 0.003), rose back to pre-morbid levels at 12 months then fell again from 2.5 to 5 years after intensive care (P = 0.002). Mean physical scores were below the population norm at all time points but the mean mental scores after 6 months were similar to those population norms. The utility value measured using the EuroQOL-5D quality of life assessment tool (EQ-5D) at 5 years was 0.677. During the five years after intensive care unit, the cumulative quality adjusted life years were significantly lower than that expected for the general population (P < 0.001). Conclusions Intensive care unit admission is associated with a high mortality, a poor physical quality of life and a low quality adjusted life years gained compared to the general population for 5 years after discharge. In this group, critical illness associated with ICU admission should be treated as a life time diagnosis with associated excess mortality, morbidity and the requirement for ongoing health care support. PMID:20089197

  19. The influence of culture on home-based family caregiving at end-of-life: a case study of Dutch reformed family care givers in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Rhonda; Williams, Allison; Stajduhar, Kelli; Brazil, Kevin; Marshall, Denise

    2011-02-01

    Families are facing increased pressure to provide care to their terminally-ill or dying kin in the home. It is known that balancing care with other personal and social roles can adversely affect family caregivers' (FCGs) health, yet access to supportive services which can mitigate burden is often inadequate. Cultural factors are known to shape the experience of caregiving; however, most research to date tends to neglect the experiences of FCGs from different cultural groups. This understanding is necessary to ensure that supportive services are both meaningful and culturally-appropriate. Using qualitative methods, we undertook longitudinal research with a sample of Dutch Reformed FCGs (n = 5) to understand their experiences of caregiving and bereavement. The results of the study are suggestive of a cultural specificity with respect to caregiving that impacts both responsibilities and reactions to care. Three themes were salient to this group as a cultural entity: cultural attitudes towards care, religious beliefs and coping, and culturally-informed care-seeking behaviours. These three themes were seen to be a function of their religious and ethnic identities and were reinforced by ties to the communities in which they resided. Cultural identity provided a framework through which to understand and make sense of the experience, while group membership provided access to networks of informal support. This research contributes to the geographical literature on care/caregiving by providing insight into the social, cultural and religious context of informal family caregiving with a population who live in close geographic proximity. On a practical level, this case study indicates the importance of considering how these factors may operate in other settings in order to implement timely and appropriate interventions to better support FCGs who are caring for their terminally-ill loved-ones at home.

  20. Examining Health Care Costs: Opportunities to Provide Value in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Chang, Beverly; Lorenzo, Javier; Macario, Alex

    2015-12-01

    As health care costs threaten the economic stability of American society, increasing pressures to focus on value-based health care have led to the development of protocols for fast-track cardiac surgery and for delirium management. Critical care services can be led by anesthesiologists with the goal of improving ICU outcomes and at the same time decreasing the rising cost of ICU medicine.

  1. Empowering family members in end-of-life care decision making in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Browning, Annette M

    2009-01-01

    Critical care nurses are often faced with working with families during the end-of-life care of a loved one. Often there is indecisiveness in family members of critically ill patients when faced with making these difficult decisions. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe origins of indecisiveness in family members of critically ill patients who are faced with end-of-life care decisions. Strategies to empower family members during this crucial time are also discussed. PMID:19104247

  2. Intensive care unit-acquired urinary tract infections in a regional critical care system

    PubMed Central

    Laupland, Kevin B; Bagshaw, Sean M; Gregson, Daniel B; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Ross, Terry; Church, Deirdre L

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Few studies have evaluated urinary tract infections (UTIs) specifically acquired within intensive care units (ICUs), and the effect of such infections on patient outcome is unclear. The objectives of this study were to describe the occurrence, microbiology, and risk factors for acquiring UTIs in the ICU and to determine whether these infections independently increase mortality. Methods A surveillance cohort study was conducted among all adults admitted to multi-system and cardiovascular surgery ICUs in the Calgary Health Region (CHR, population about 1 million) between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2002. Results During the 3 years, 4465 patients were admitted 4915 times to a CHR ICU for 48 hours or more. A total of 356 ICU-acquired UTIs (defined as at least 105 colony-forming units/ml of one or two organisms 48 hours or more after ICU admission) occurred among 290 (6.5%) patients, yielding an overall incidence density of ICU-acquired UTIs of 9.6 per 1000 ICU days. Four bacteremic/fungemic ICU-acquired UTIs occurred (0.1 per 1000 ICU days). Development of an ICU-acquired UTI was more common in women (relative risk [RR] 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.43–1.75; P < 0.0001) and in medical (9%) compared with non-cardiac surgical (6%), and cardiac surgical patients (2%). The most common organisms isolated were Escherichia coli (23%), Candida albicans (20%), and Enterococcus species (15%). Antibiotic-resistant organisms were identified among 14% isolates. Although development of an ICU-acquired UTI was associated with significantly higher crude in-hospital mortality (86/290 [30%] vs. 862/4167 [21%]; RR = 1.43; 95% CI 1.19–1.73; P < 0.001); an ICU-acquired UTI was not an independent predictor for death. Conclusions Development of an ICU-acquired UTI is common in critically ill patients. Although a marker of increased morbidity associated with critical illness, it is not a significant attributable cause of mortality. PMID:15774051

  3. High-intensity telemedicine-enhanced acute care for older adults: an innovative healthcare delivery model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manish N; Gillespie, Suzanne M; Wood, Nancy; Wasserman, Erin B; Nelson, Dallas L; Dozier, Ann; McConnochie, Kenneth M

    2013-11-01

    Accessing timely acute medical care is a challenge for older adults. This article describes an innovative healthcare model that uses high-intensity telemedicine services to provide rapid acute care for older adults without requiring them to leave their senior living community (SLC) residences. This program, based in a primary care geriatrics practice that cares for SLC residents, is designed to offer acute care through telemedicine for complaints that are felt to need attention before the next available outpatient visit but not to require emergency department (ED) resources. This option gives residents access to care in their residence. Measures used to evaluate the program include successful completion of telemedicine visits, satisfaction of residents and caregivers with telemedicine care, and site of care that would have been recommended had telemedicine been unavailable. During the first 2 years of the program's operation, 281 of 301 requested telemedicine visits were completed successfully. Twelve residents were sent to an ED for care after the telemedicine visit. Ninety-four percent of residents reported being satisfied or very satisfied with telemedicine care. Had telemedicine not been available, residents would have been sent to an ED (48.1%) or urgent care center (27.0%) or been scheduled for an outpatient visit (24.4%). The project demonstrated that high-intensity telemedicine services for acute illnesses are feasible and acceptable and can provide definitive care without requiring ED or urgent care use. Continuation of the program will require evaluation demonstrating equal or better resident-level outcomes and the development of sustainable business models.

  4. Care of severe head injury patients in the Sarawak General Hospital: intensive care unit versus general ward.

    PubMed

    Sim, S K; Lim, S L; Lee, H K; Liew, D; Wong, A

    2011-06-01

    Intensive care for severe head injury patients is very important in the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury. However, in a resources constraint environment and limited availability of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds in the hospitals, not all severe head injury patients will receive ICU care. This prospective study is aimed to evaluate the outcome of severe head injured patients who received ICU and general ward care in Sarawak General Hospital (SGH) over a 6-month period. A total of thirty five severe head injury patients were admitted. Twenty three patients (65.7%) were ventilated in general ward whereas twelve patients (34.3%) were ventilated in ICU. Overall one month mortality in this study was 25.7%. Patients who received ICU care had a lower one month mortality than those who received general ward care (16.7% vs 30.4%), although it was not statistically different. Multivariate analysis revealed only GCS on admission (OR 0.731; 95% CI 0.460 to 0.877; P=0.042) as the independent predictive factor for one month mortality in this study.

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Intensive Care Management for Disabled Medicaid Beneficiaries with High Health Care Costs

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Janice F; Krupski, Antoinette; Joesch, Jutta M; West, Imara I; Atkins, David C; Court, Beverly; Mancuso, David; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate outcomes of a registered nurse–led care management intervention for disabled Medicaid beneficiaries with high health care costs. Data Sources/Study Setting Washington State Department of Social and Health Services Client Outcomes Database, 2008–2011. Study Design In a randomized controlled trial with intent-to-treat analysis, outcomes were compared for the intervention (n = 557) and control groups (n = 563). A quasi-experimental subanalysis compared outcomes for program participants (n = 251) and propensity score-matched controls (n = 251). Data Collection/Extraction Methods Administrative data were linked to describe costs and use of health services, criminal activity, homelessness, and death. Principal Findings In the intent-to-treat analysis, the intervention group had higher odds of outpatient mental health service use and higher prescription drug costs than controls in the postperiod. In the subanalysis, participants had fewer unplanned hospital admissions and lower associated costs; higher prescription drug costs; higher odds of long-term care service use; higher drug/alcohol treatment costs; and lower odds of homelessness. Conclusions We found no health care cost savings for disabled Medicaid beneficiaries randomized to intensive care management. Among participants, care management may have the potential to increase access to needed care, slow growth in the number and therefore cost of unplanned hospitalizations, and prevent homelessness. These findings apply to start-up care management programs targeted at high-cost, high-risk Medicaid populations. PMID:25427656

  6. [Scoring systems in intensive care medicine : principles, models, application and limits].

    PubMed

    Fleig, V; Brenck, F; Wolff, M; Weigand, M A

    2011-10-01

    Scoring systems are used in all diagnostic areas of medicine. Several parameters are evaluated and rated with points according to their value in order to simplify a complex clinical situation with a score. The application ranges from the classification of disease severity through determining the number of staff for the intensive care unit (ICU) to the evaluation of new therapies under study conditions. Since the introduction of scoring systems in the 1980's a variety of different score models has been developed. The scoring systems that are employed in intensive care and are discussed in this article can be categorized into prognostic scores, expenses scores and disease-specific scores. Since the introduction of compulsory recording of two scoring systems for accounting in the German diagnosis-related groups (DRG) system, these tools have gained more importance for all intensive care physicians. Problems remain in the valid calculation of scores and interpretation of the results.

  7. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Lucas Lima; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the outcomes enabled by the neuromuscular electric stimulation in critically ill patients in intensive care unit assisted. Methods A systematic review of the literature by means of clinical trials published between 2002 and 2012 in the databases LILACS, SciELO, MEDLINE and PEDro using the descriptors “intensive care unit”, “physical therapy”, “physiotherapy”, “electric stimulation” and “randomized controlled trials”. Results We included four trials. The sample size varied between 8 to 33 individuals of both genders, with ages ranging between 52 and 79 years, undergoing invasive mechanical ventilation. Of the articles analyzed, three showed significant benefits of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in critically ill patients, such as improvement in peripheral muscle strength, exercise capacity, functionality, or loss of thickness of the muscle layer. Conclusion The application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation promotes a beneficial response in critically patients in intensive care. PMID:25295458

  8. Quality indicators in intensive care medicine: why? Use or burden for the intensivist

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Jan-Peter; Mende, Hendrik; Bause, Hanswerner; Bloos, Frank; Geldner, Götz; Kastrup, Marc; Kuhlen, Ralf; Markewitz, Andreas; Martin, Jörg; Quintel, Michael; Steinmeier-Bauer, Klaus; Waydhas, Christian; Spies, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve quality (of therapy), one has to know, evaluate and make transparent, one’s own daily processes. This process of reflection can be supported by the presentation of key data or indicators, in which the real as-is state can be represented. Quality indicators are required in order to depict the as-is state. Quality indicators reflect adherence to specific quality measures. Continuing registration of an indicator is useless once it becomes irrelevant or adherence is 100%. In the field of intensive care medicine, studies of quality indicators have been performed in some countries. Quality indicators relevant for medical quality and outcome in critically ill patients have been identified by following standardized approaches. Different German societies of intensive care medicine have finally agreed on 10 core quality indicators that will be valid for two years and are currently recommended in German intensive care units (ICUs). PMID:21063472

  9. Evaluation of functional independence after discharge from the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Curzel, Juliane; Forgiarini Junior, Luiz Alberto; Rieder, Marcelo de Mello

    2013-01-01

    Objective 1) To evaluate the functional independence measures immediately after discharge from an intensive care unit and to compare these values with the FIMs 30 days after that period. 2) To evaluate the possible associated risk factors. Methods The present investigation was a prospective cohort study that included individuals who were discharged from the intensive care unit and underwent physiotherapy in the unit. Functional independence was evaluated using the functional independence measure immediately upon discharge from the intensive care unit and 30 days thereafter via a phone call. The patients were admitted to the Hospital Santa Clara intensive care unit during the period from May 2011 to August 2011. Results During the predetermined period of data collection, 44 patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The mean age of the patients was 55.4±10.5 years. Twenty-seven of the subjects were female, and 15 patients were admitted due to pulmonary disease. The patients exhibited an functional independence measure of 84.1±24.2. When this measure was compared to the measure at 30 days after discharge, there was improvement across the functional independence variables except for that concerned with sphincter control. There were no significant differences when comparing the gender, age, clinical diagnosis, length of stay in the intensive care unit, duration of mechanical ventilation, and the presence of sepsis during this period. Conclusion Functional independence, as evaluated by the functional independence measure scale, was improved at 30 days after discharge from the intensive care unit, but it was not possible to define the potentially related factors. PMID:23917973

  10. Implementing a Mobility Program to Minimize Post-Intensive Care Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ramona O; Mitchell, Lorie; Thomsen, George E; Schafer, Michele; Link, Maggie; Brown, Samuel M

    2016-01-01

    Immobility in the intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with neuromuscular weakness, post-intensive care syndrome, functional limitations, and high costs. Early mobility-based rehabilitation in the ICU is feasible and safe. Mobility-based rehabilitation varied widely across 5 ICUs in 1 health care system, suggesting a need for continuous training and evaluation to maintain a strong mobility-based rehabilitation program. Early mobility-based rehabilitation shortens ICU and hospital stays, reduces delirium, and increases muscle strength and the ability to ambulate. Long-term effects include increased ability for self-care, faster return to independent functioning, improved physical function, and reduced hospital readmission and death. Factors that influence early mobility-based rehabilitation include having an interdisciplinary team; strong unit leadership; access to physical, occupational, and respiratory therapists; a culture focused on patient safety and quality improvement; a champion of early mobility; and a focus on measuring performance and outcomes. PMID:27153308

  11. Development of a clinical data warehouse from an intensive care clinical information system.

    PubMed

    de Mul, Marleen; Alons, Peter; van der Velde, Peter; Konings, Ilse; Bakker, Jan; Hazelzet, Jan

    2012-01-01

    There are relatively few institutions that have developed clinical data warehouses, containing patient data from the point of care. Because of the various care practices, data types and definitions, and the perceived incompleteness of clinical information systems, the development of a clinical data warehouse is a challenge. In order to deal with managerial and clinical information needs, as well as educational and research aims that are important in the setting of a university hospital, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands, developed a data warehouse incrementally. In this paper we report on the in-house development of an integral part of the data warehouse specifically for the intensive care units (ICU-DWH). It was modeled using Atos Origin Metadata Frame method. The paper describes the methodology, the development process and the content of the ICU-DWH, and discusses the need for (clinical) data warehouses in intensive care.

  12. Nursing Activities Score: nursing work load in a burns Intensive Care Unit1

    PubMed Central

    Camuci, Marcia Bernadete; Martins, Júlia Trevisan; Cardeli, Alexandrina Aparecida Maciel; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the nursing work load in a Burns Intensive Care Unit according to the Nursing Activities Score. Method an exploratory, descriptive cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. The Nursing Activities Score was used for data collection between October 2011 and May 2012, totalling 1,221 measurements, obtained from 50 patients' hospital records. Data for qualitative variables was described in tables; for the quantitative variables, calculations using statistical measurements were used. Results the mean score for the Nursing Activities Score was 70.4% and the median was 70.3%, corresponding to the percentage of the time spent on direct care to the patient in 24 hours. Conclusion the Nursing Activities Score provided information which involves the process of caring for patients hospitalized in a Burns Intensive Care Unit, and indicated that there is a high work load for the nursing team of the sector studied. PMID:26107842

  13. Speaking about dying in the intensive care unit, and its implications for multidisciplinary end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Iedema, Rick; Sorensen, Ros; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Turnbull, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    This article addresses how professionals working in an intensive care unit in Australia speak about dying, with particular reference to the contradictions and complexities that characterize their work in this setting. The article reflects on the incommensurabilities in these clinicians' talk, and the consequences of this for how different professionals work together and care for extremely ill patients. Examples are drawn from talk recorded during ward rounds and focus groups. The article argues that intensive care units are settings where being reflexive about one's work and assumptions is especially difficult because it involves negotiating decisions and taking moral responsibility for decisions affecting very sick patients. These decisions and responsibilities put into sharp relief the 'wicked problems and tragic choices' of end-of-life existence and of intensive care in specific. This article shows some of the complex ways in which specific clinicians' discourse absorbs and manifests these tensions and responsibilities. The article concludes that these kinds of complexities are unlikely to be resolved with reference to formal knowledge or in-principle conviction, and that a new interactive basis needs to be found where clinicians can rehearse alternative ways of speaking with which to approach each other, the dying, and their families.

  14. Recommendations from the Association for European Paediatric Cardiology for training in paediatric cardiac intensive care.

    PubMed

    da Cruz, Eduardo; Lechner, Evelyn; Stiller, Brigitte; Munoz, Ricardo; Beghetti, Maurice; Fakler, Ulrich; Haas, Nikolaus

    2011-08-01

    The following document provides a summary of the guidelines and recommendations for paediatric cardiac intensive care training as a requirement for recognition as a European paediatric cardiologist. It is therefore primarily targeting paediatric cardiology trainees in Europe, including those doctors who might wish to become experts in cardiac intensive care. These recommendations represent a frame for consistency, will evolve, and may be adapted to specific institutional requirements. They will be complemented by a learning module to be provided by our Association in the near future.

  15. The impact of infection control on intensive care unit microbial isolates.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, F; Rodrigues, C; Mohib, M; Menon, S; Hakimiyan, A; Mehta, A

    1998-08-01

    In todays world, good infection control practices in high pressure intensive care units is of vital importance. Endogenous infections from the patients own microbial flora now cause the majority of nosocomial infections as the exogenous infections are curtailed to a large extent with aggressive surveillance and prevention of infection. We analysed absolute numbers of microbial isolates as an indirect reflection of infection rate in the intensive care unit (ICU) for 6 months in 1992, 1994 and 1996. We demonstrated that inspite of the total admission to the ICU increasing, the impact of infection control is certainly felt with strict inforcement of protocols.

  16. [Shortage of physicians in anaesthesiology and intensive care medicine - Causes, consequences and solutions].

    PubMed

    Papenfuß, Tim; Roch, Carmen

    2012-05-01

    74% of all hospitals had vacant positions in 2011, also departments of anaesthesiology and intensive care medicine. More than 50% of these departments work with locums. There are couple of reasons for the shortage of physicians. The consequences in anaesthesiology and intensive care medicine can result in qualitative and financial loss. To solve the shortage of physicians one has to solve the reasons. Main reasons are increasing feminization of medical profession and part-time-work, work-life-balance and a poor specialised education.

  17. "How's the baby doing?" Struggling with narratives of progress in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Layne, L L

    1996-12-01

    In this at once biographical and autobiographical piece (cf. Shapiro 1988), I describe the processes of "knowledge-making" of one neonatal intensive care parent. In particular, I investigate the ways that narratives of linear progress informed my efforts to understand my son's condition and future prospects, that is, to engage in lay prognostication. In examining and comparing the three metaphors most commonly used to describe my son's changing condition-roller coaster, graduation, and course-I explore how the discrepancy between narratives of linear progress and the complex and volatile condition of many premature and/or critically ill babies is discursively managed in a neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:8979242

  18. Use of analgesic agents for invasive medical procedures in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Bauchner, H; May, A; Coates, E

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the use of analgesic agents for invasive medical procedures in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. The directors of 38 pediatric units and 31 neonatal units reported that analgesics were infrequently used for intravenous cannulation (10%), suprapubic bladder aspiration (8%), urethral catheterization (2%), or venipuncture (2%). Analgesics were used significantly more regularly in pediatric than in neonatal intensive care units for arterial line placement, bone marrow aspiration, central line placement, chest tube insertion, paracentesis, and lumbar puncture. PMID:1403404

  19. [Quality of care in intensive care units. Retrospective study on long-term patients].

    PubMed

    García, M P; López, P; Eseverri, C; Zazpe, C; Asiain, M C

    1998-01-01

    Nursing care must be evaluated in order to determine its effectiveness and identify deficiencies, which makes it possible to introduce corrective measures to optimize quality. The quality of care given to patients in our unit was evaluated with a retrospective analysis of 915 records in the Nursing Care Plan corresponding to 59 patients with a mean ICU stay of 15.5 days. Six areas of care and indicators of deficient practice were identified: orotracheal intubation: accidental disconnection, displacement, obstruction, and pressure sores on lips; arterial catheterization: accidental disconnection and obstruction; central venous catheterization: accidental disconnection and contamination; urinary catheterization: accidental disconnection and urinary bacteriology; nasogastric intubation: accidental disconnection, obstruction, and nasal pressure sores; conservation of skin integrity: presence of pressure sores, and prevention of falls from the bed or chair. The reference standards were taken from the published literature. The results show that airway care was adequate, although the frequency of pressure sores on the lip produced by orotracheal tubes was high. The indicators for following up the care of vascular and urinary catheters showed results similar to established standards. There was a high rate of nasogastric tube obstruction due to the administration of medication. Finally, the frequency of pressure sores was well below established standards and there were no accidental falls. It is concluded that the detection of areas in which care is deficient requires an analysis of relevant nursing activities so that corrective measures can be taken. This study is a useful baseline for future quality control.

  20. [Parental roles and needs in neonatal intensive care: a review of Portuguese guidelines].

    PubMed

    Amorim, Mariana; Alves, Elisabete; Barros, Henrique; Silva, Susana

    2016-08-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze the parental roles and needs included in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit guidelines. Thematic content analysis was conducted of 33 guidelines (28 consensuses and 5 documents directed to parents) freely available on the Portuguese Pediatrics Society website in August 2014. These documents deal mainly with information needs, child care activities performed by the parents and the respective responsibilities in decision making with respect to the health of children. Furthermore, parental and family characteristics were mentioned as risk factors for prematurity and perinatal diseases. The psychosocial consequences of parenthood experienced in Neonatal Intensive Care Units, as well as the adequacy of their environmental characteristics to parental needs, were less frequently touched upon. Issues related to the safety and comfort, confidence of parents in healthcare and social support were rarely touched upon. The results reflect sociocultural norms associated with intensive parenting, which is exclusively child centered, highly emotional and performed under the guidance of health professionals. The important aspect is to issue and disseminate guidelines that foster the integration of family-centered care in the dynamics of Neonatal Intensive Care Units. PMID:27557031

  1. [German Refined-Diagnosis Related Groups, version 2007. The depiction of intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Mang, H; Bauer, M

    2007-02-01

    Since the G-DRG system was introduced in Germany in 2004, attempts have been made to model medical services performed in the intensive care units on a performance-oriented system by capitation. Based on this background the InEK, the institution which is responsible for design and development of the G-DRG system, has implemented several new issues into the version for 2007 which will be presented in this article. On the one hand the changes concerning the coding rules of diagnosis and procedures will be described and on the other hand important topics, such as "multimodal intensive care" or "complex treatment of patients with severe infections by multi-resistant pathogens", will be focused on. Furthermore, some new developments concerning the global functions ("complex procedures", "complex intensive treatment") as well as the changes in the coding rule for the demographic factor "mechanical ventilation" will be discussed. Finally, the regulations for additional remuneration are updated. In general, the attempts of the InEK to improve the G-DRG mapping for intensive care medicine are welcome and constructive. The regulations provided seem to be beneficial, but at the same time complicating the instructions. Hence, standardisation of intensive care medicine via diagnosis-related-groups still remains inadequate and therefore unsatisfactory in 2007.

  2. Head of the bed elevation angle recorder for intensive care unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krefft, Maciej; Zamaro-Michalska, Aleksandra; Zabołotny, Wojciech M.; Zaworski, Wojciech; Grzanka, Antoni; Łazowski, Tomasz; Tavola, Mario; Siewiera, Jacek; Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Małgorzata

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a recording system optimized for long term measurement of bed headrest elevation angle in the Intensive Care Unit. The continuous monitoring of this parameter allows to find the correlation between the patient's position in bed and the risk of the Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP), a very serious problem in therapy of critically ill patients. Recorder might be be an important tool to evaluate the "care bundles" - sets of preventive procedures recommended for treatment of patients in the ICU.

  3. Developmentally supportive care in the neonatal intensive care unit: an occupational therapist's role.

    PubMed

    Nightlinger, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    The role of a pediatric occupational therapist (OT) in the NICU is to provide comprehensive services, including evaluation, treatment, education, decision making, family support, and discharge planning. It may also include early intervention services or outpatient pediatric rehabilitation services. This article will address the need for developmentally supportive care in the NICU, and specifically addresses the role of an OT in this setting. It will explain how crucial collaboration between team members can be in providing quality, comprehensive care for these neonates. In addition, it will address the important role of the parent in this setting for developmentally supportive care while in the NICU and follow-up intervention upon discharge.

  4. Telemedicine in the intensive care unit: its role in emergencies and disaster management.

    PubMed

    Rolston, Daniel M; Meltzer, Joseph S

    2015-04-01

    Disasters and emergencies lead to an overburdened health care system after the event, so additional telemedicine support can improve patient outcomes. If telemedicine is going to become an integral part of disaster response, there needs to be improved preparation for the use of telemedicine technologies. Telemedicine can improve patient triage, monitoring, access to specialists, health care provider burnout, and disaster recovery. However, the evidence for telemedicine and tele-intensive care in the disaster setting is limited, and it should be further studied to identify situations in which it is the most clinically effective and cost-effective.

  5. Bonding with books: the parent-infant connection in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lynne J

    2013-01-01

    Parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) experience one of the most stressful events of their lives. At times, they are unable to participate fully, if at all, in the care of their infant. Parents in the NICU have a need to participate in the care of their infant to attain the parental role. Parental reading to infants in the NICU is an intervention that can connect the parent and infant and offers a way for parents to participate in caregiving. This intervention may have many benefits and may positively affect the parent-infant relationship. PMID:23477977

  6. Bonding with books: the parent-infant connection in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lynne J

    2013-01-01

    Parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) experience one of the most stressful events of their lives. At times, they are unable to participate fully, if at all, in the care of their infant. Parents in the NICU have a need to participate in the care of their infant to attain the parental role. Parental reading to infants in the NICU is an intervention that can connect the parent and infant and offers a way for parents to participate in caregiving. This intervention may have many benefits and may positively affect the parent-infant relationship.

  7. Parents as their infant's primary caregivers in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg; Engvall, Gunn

    2009-04-01

    The aim was to explore parents' and professionals' opinions about parental performance of care in a neonatal intensive care unit. Forty-three parents and 85 nurses completed questionnaires composed of a list of 95 caregiving activities; 14 nurses and 4 neonatologists participated in four focus group interviews. Considerable differences appeared in parents' and nurses' responses about parents' participation in their infants' care. All listed activities were marked as optional by at least a few parents. Agreement was reached about parents as their infants' primary caregivers, based on individual assessment of parents' willingness and ability, with nurses acting as educators and supporters instead of caregivers.

  8. How to start and sustain a successful pediatric cardiac intensive care program: A combined clinical and administrative strategy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Anthony C.

    2002-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To delineate key clinical and administrative factors in starting a pediatric cardiac intensive care program and to introduce a scorecard concept to measure excellence in such a new program. Methods: Review of current clinical research data in pediatric cardiac intensive care and administrative business concepts for their application to the pediatric cardiac intensive care program. RESULTS: Although clinical concepts in cardiac intensive care are useful as basic philosophical strategies at the bedside, administrative principles are essential in operational strategies vital to the success of such a program. Using both clinical and business administrative concepts, a balanced strategy can be formulated. CONCLUSIONS: Starting a pediatric cardiac intensive care program is a difficult endeavor. A combined clinical and administrative approach is needed in starting and sustaining excellence in a pediatric cardiac intensive care program. Monitoring excellence in such a program warrants application of a scorecard system. PMID:12780977

  9. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy: The New Must Have Tool in the Intensive Care Unit?

    PubMed

    Green, Michael Stuart; Sehgal, Sankalp; Tariq, Rayhan

    2016-09-01

    Standard hemodynamic monitoring such as blood pressure and pulse oximetry may only provide a crude estimation of organ perfusion in the critical care setting. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is based on the same principle as a pulse oximeter and allows continuous noninvasive monitoring of hemoglobin oxygenation and deoxygenation and thus tissue saturation "StO2" This review aims to provide an overview of NIRS technology principles and discuss its current clinical use in the critical care setting. The study selection was performed using the PubMed database to find studies that investigated the use of NIRS in both the critical care setting and in the intensive care unit. Currently, NIRS in the critical care setting is predominantly being used for infants and neonates. A number of studies in the past decade have shown promising results for the use of NIRS in surgical/trauma intensive care units during shock management as a prognostic tool and in guiding resuscitation. It is evident that over the past 2 decades, NIRS has gone from being a laboratory fascination to an actively employed clinical tool. Even though the benefit of routine use of this technology to achieve better outcomes is still questionable, the fact that NIRS is a low-cost, noninvasive monitoring modality improves the attractiveness of the technology. However, more research may be warranted before recommending its routine use in the critical care setting. PMID:27206637

  10. Survey of Canadian critical care nurses' experiences of conflict in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Marie; Throndson, Karen; Girardin, Julie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance our understanding of Canadian critical care nurses' experiences of and responses to situations of conflict in the ICU. Through a 35-item web-based survey, members of the Canadian Association of Critical Care Nurses were asked questions regarding the types, causes and frequency of conflict experienced, the nursing interventions found most helpful in situations of conflict, and the resources found most helpful in responding to situations of conflict. A total of 241 nurses responded to the survey. The mean age of the nurses was 43 years, and the majority were female (89.2%), direct care providers (66.4%), with greater than 11 years of experience in critical care (58.3%), and working in medical/surgical ICUs (66.4%) in tertiary care hospitals (67.2%). Approximately 51% of the nurses reported being involved in at least one situation of conflict related to the management of a patient in the last week worked. The most common types of conflict encountered were disagreements between the team and family (46.5%) or within the team (35.3%). The nurses acknowledged the importance of clear, consistent and honest communication with patients and families when conflict arises and rank-ordered the resources found most helpful to patients, families, and nurses in conflict situations. Implications for practice and education are discussed and recommendations for future research are outlined.

  11. Design of the environment of care for safety of patients and personnel: does form follow function or vice versa in the intensive care unit?

    PubMed

    Bartley, Judene; Streifel, Andrew J

    2010-08-01

    We review the context of the environment of care in the intensive care unit setting in relation to patient safety and quality, specifically addressing healthcare-associated infection issues and solutions involving interdisciplinary teams. Issues addressed include current and future architectural design and layout trends, construction trends affecting intensive care units, and prevention of construction-associated healthcare-associated infections related to airborne and waterborne risks and design solutions. Specific elements include single-occupancy, acuity-scalable intensive care unit rooms; environmental aspects of hand hygiene, such as water risks, sink design/location, human waste management, surface selection (floor covering, countertops, furniture, and equipment) and cleaning, antimicrobial-treated or similar materials, ultraviolet germicidal irradiation, specialized rooms (airborne infection isolation and protective environments), and water system design and strategies for safe use of potable water and mitigation of water intrusion. Effective design and operational use of the intensive care unit environment of care must engage critical care personnel from initial planning and design through occupancy of the new/renovated intensive care unit as part of the infection control risk assessment team. The interdisciplinary infection control risk assessment team can address key environment of care design features to enhance the safety of intensive care unit patients, personnel, and visitors. This perspective will ensure the environment of care supports human factors and behavioral aspects of the interaction between the environment of care and its occupants. PMID:20647797

  12. [Intensive care and radio, two universes that feed of each other].

    PubMed

    Houguet, Morgan

    2014-04-01

    The discovery of the healthcare environment can be a stupefying and sometimes difficult process. It is a setting where life rubs shoulders with death every day and where laughter and tears are equally commonplace. Morgan Houguet, a young nurse, shares the humanity of his practice in intensive care.

  13. Evaluation of vitamin D level in patients from neurosurgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ho Jun; Jeong, Je Hoon; Jin, Eun-Sun; Shin, Il Young; Hwang, Hyung Sik; Moon, Seung-Myung

    2013-06-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in maintaining normal bone metabolism. Recent studies have suggested that vitamin D influences many other physiological processes, including muscle function, cardiovascular homeostasis, nerve function, and immune response. Furthermore, accumulated evidence suggests that vitamin D also mediates the immune system response to infection. Critical neurosurgical patients have higher infection and mortality rates. To correlate vitamin D deficiency to the immunological status of neurosurgical intensive care unit patients, we detected serum vitamin D level in 15 patients with clinically suspected infection and 10 patients with confirmed infection. Serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, the primary circulating form of vitamin D, was significantly decreased in patients with suspected or confirmed infection after a 2-week neurosurgical intensive care unit hospitalization, while serum level of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, the active form of vitamin D, was significantly decreased in patients after a 4-week neurosurgical intensive care unit hospitalization. These findings suggest that vitamin D deficiency is linked to the immunological status of neurosurgical intensive care unit patients and vitamin D supplementation can improve patient's immunological status.

  14. Survey of Oxygen Delivery Practices in UK Paediatric Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Administration of supplemental oxygen is common in paediatric intensive care. We explored the current practice of oxygen administration using a case vignette in paediatric intensive care units (PICU) in the united kingdom. Methods. We conducted an online survey of Paediatric Intensive Care Society members in the UK. The survey outlined a clinical scenario followed by questions on oxygenation targets for 5 common diagnoses seen in critically ill children. Results. Fifty-three paediatric intensive care unit members from 10 institutions completed the survey. In a child with moderate ventilatory requirements, 21 respondents (42%) did not follow arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) targets. In acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis, there was a trend to aim for lower PaO2 as the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) increased. Conversely, in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension, respondents aimed for normal PaO2 even as the FiO2 increased. Conclusions. In this sample of clinicians PaO2 targets were not commonly used. Clinicians target lower PaO2 as FiO2 increases in acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis whilst targeting normal range irrespective of FiO2 in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27516901

  15. A Fatal Bloodstream Infection by Staphylococcus pettenkoferi in an Intensive Care Unit Patient

    PubMed Central

    Mammina, Caterina; Bonura, Celestino; Verde, Maria Stella; Fasciana, Teresa; Palma, Daniela Maria

    2011-01-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci are increasingly recognized as leading pathogens in bacteremia, with incidence peaking in intensive care units. Interpretation of blood cultures that are positive for CoNS is often doubtful. We describe a fatal case of bacteremia by a newly recognized species of CoNS, Staphylococcus pettenkoferi, in an ICU patient. PMID:24826324

  16. Brief Report: Incidence of and Risk Factors for Autistic Disorder in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Survivors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Ohtani, Yasuyo; Ornitz, Edward; Kuriya, Norikazu; Murakami, Yoshihiko; Fukuda, Seiichi; Hashimoto, Takeo; Yamashita, Fumio

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the incidence of autistic disorder (AD) among 5,271 children in a neonatal intensive care unit in Japan found that 18 children were later diagnosed with AD, an incidence more than twice as high as previously reported. Children with AD had a significantly higher history of the meconium aspiration syndrome than the controls. (Author/DB)

  17. [Dermal and inhalation poisoning. Rare guests in our intensive care units?].

    PubMed

    Sagoschen, I

    2013-09-01

    Patients with dermal and inhalation poisoning are uncommon in intensive care treatment. We describe the diagnostics and specific toxicological treatment of patients with hydrofluoric acid burns. For inhalation poisoning, we focus on smoke inhalation, especially the management of cyanide and carbon monoxide poisoning. Special attention is given to the use of hyperbaric oxygenation for the treatment of carbon monoxide poisoning.

  18. Analysis of the social network development of a virtual community for Australian intensive care professionals.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Kaye Denise; Hansen, Margaret; Jackson, Debra; Elliott, Doug

    2014-11-01

    Social media platforms can create virtual communities, enabling healthcare professionals to network with a broad range of colleagues and facilitate knowledge exchange. In 2003, an Australian state health department established an intensive care mailing list to address the professional isolation experienced by senior intensive care nurses. This article describes the social network created within this virtual community by examining how the membership profile evolved from 2003 to 2009. A retrospective descriptive design was used. The data source was a deidentified member database. Since 2003, 1340 healthcare professionals subscribed to the virtual community with 78% of these (n = 1042) still members at the end of 2009. The membership profile has evolved from a single-state nurse-specific network to an Australia-wide multidisciplinary and multiorganizational intensive care network. The uptake and retention of membership by intensive care clinicians indicated that they appeared to value involvement in this virtual community. For healthcare organizations, a virtual community may be a communications option for minimizing professional and organizational barriers and promoting knowledge flow. Further research is, however, required to demonstrate a link between these broader social networks, enabling the exchange of knowledge and improved patient outcomes.

  19. Renal replacement therapy in adult and pediatric intensive care : Recommendations by an expert panel from the French Intensive Care Society (SRLF) with the French Society of Anesthesia Intensive Care (SFAR) French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies (GFRUP) the French Dialysis Society (SFD).

    PubMed

    Vinsonneau, Christophe; Allain-Launay, Emma; Blayau, Clarisse; Darmon, Michael; Ducheyron, Damien; Gaillot, Theophile; Honore, Patrick M; Javouhey, Etienne; Krummel, Thierry; Lahoche, Annie; Letacon, Serge; Legrand, Matthieu; Monchi, Mehran; Ridel, Christophe; Robert, René; Schortgen, Frederique; Souweine, Bertrand; Vaillant, Patrick; Velly, Lionel; Osman, David; Van Vong, Ly

    2015-12-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in critically ill patients is currently very frequent and requires renal replacement therapy (RRT) in many patients. During the last 15 years, several studies have considered important issues regarding the use of RRT in ARF, like the time to initiate the therapy, the dialysis dose, the types of catheter, the choice of technique, and anticoagulation. However, despite an abundant literature, conflicting results do not provide evidence on RRT implementation. We present herein recommendations for the use of RRT in adult and pediatric intensive care developed with the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system by an expert group of French Intensive Care Society (SRLF), with the participation of the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR), the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care and Emergencies (GFRUP), and the French Dialysis Society (SFD). The recommendations cover 4 fields: criteria for RRT initiation, technical aspects (access routes, membranes, anticoagulation, reverse osmosis water), practical aspects (choice of the method, peritoneal dialysis, dialysis dose, adjustments), and safety (procedures and training, dialysis catheter management, extracorporeal circuit set-up). These recommendations have been designed on a practical point of view to provide guidance for intensivists in their daily practice. PMID:26714808

  20. Housestaff Experience, Workload, and Test Ordering in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Charles H., III; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study of the workload of nine medical interns and seven residents in a neonatal intensive care nursery investigated the number of X-rays, arterial blood gas analyses (ABGs), and electrolyte determinations ordered for 321 infants over 5 months. Results show that as the workload increased, interns ordered ABGs more often than residents, especially…

  1. Evaluation of medical devices in thoracic radiograms in intensive care unit - time to pay attention!

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ana Sofia Linhares; Afonso, Maria da Graça Alves; Dinis, Mónica Ribeiro dos Santos Alves; dos Santos, Maria Cristina Granja Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify and evaluate the correct positioning of the most commonly used medical devices as visualized in thoracic radiograms of patients in the intensive care unit of our center. Methods A literature search was conducted for the criteria used to evaluate the correct positioning of medical devices on thoracic radiograms. All the thoracic radiograms performed in the intensive care unit of our center over an 18-month period were analyzed. All admissions in which at least one thoracic radiogram was performed in the intensive care unit and in which at least one medical device was identifiable in the thoracic radiogram were included. One radiogram per admission was selected for analysis. The radiograms were evaluated by an independent observer. Results Out of the 2,312 thoracic radiograms analyzed, 568 were included in this study. Several medical devices were identified, including monitoring leads, endotracheal and tracheostomy tubes, central venous catheters, pacemakers and prosthetic cardiac valves. Of the central venous catheters that were identified, 33.6% of the subclavian and 23.8% of the jugular were malpositioned. Of the endotracheal tubes, 19.9% were malpositioned, while all the tracheostomy tubes were correctly positioned. Conclusion Malpositioning of central venous catheters and endotracheal tubes is frequently identified in radiograms of patients in an intensive care unit. This is relevant because malpositioned devices may be related to adverse events. In future studies, an association between malpositioning and adverse events should be investigated. PMID:27737432

  2. Examining the Needs of Bereaved Parents in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meert, Kathleen L.; Briller, Sherylyn H.; Myers Schim, Stephanie; Thurston, Celia; Kabel, Allison

    2009-01-01

    The pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is a high-tech setting aimed at restoring health to critically ill children. When childhood death occurs in the PICU, it constitutes a special context for parent bereavement. The purpose of this interdisciplinary qualitative research was to gain a deeper understanding of parents' needs around the time of…

  3. Renal replacement therapy in adult and pediatric intensive care : Recommendations by an expert panel from the French Intensive Care Society (SRLF) with the French Society of Anesthesia Intensive Care (SFAR) French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies (GFRUP) the French Dialysis Society (SFD).

    PubMed

    Vinsonneau, Christophe; Allain-Launay, Emma; Blayau, Clarisse; Darmon, Michael; Ducheyron, Damien; Gaillot, Theophile; Honore, Patrick M; Javouhey, Etienne; Krummel, Thierry; Lahoche, Annie; Letacon, Serge; Legrand, Matthieu; Monchi, Mehran; Ridel, Christophe; Robert, René; Schortgen, Frederique; Souweine, Bertrand; Vaillant, Patrick; Velly, Lionel; Osman, David; Van Vong, Ly

    2015-12-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in critically ill patients is currently very frequent and requires renal replacement therapy (RRT) in many patients. During the last 15 years, several studies have considered important issues regarding the use of RRT in ARF, like the time to initiate the therapy, the dialysis dose, the types of catheter, the choice of technique, and anticoagulation. However, despite an abundant literature, conflicting results do not provide evidence on RRT implementation. We present herein recommendations for the use of RRT in adult and pediatric intensive care developed with the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system by an expert group of French Intensive Care Society (SRLF), with the participation of the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR), the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care and Emergencies (GFRUP), and the French Dialysis Society (SFD). The recommendations cover 4 fields: criteria for RRT initiation, technical aspects (access routes, membranes, anticoagulation, reverse osmosis water), practical aspects (choice of the method, peritoneal dialysis, dialysis dose, adjustments), and safety (procedures and training, dialysis catheter management, extracorporeal circuit set-up). These recommendations have been designed on a practical point of view to provide guidance for intensivists in their daily practice.

  4. Management of neutropenic patients in the intensive care unit (NEWBORNS EXCLUDED) recommendations from an expert panel from the French Intensive Care Society (SRLF) with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies (GFRUP), the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR), the French Society of Hematology (SFH), the French Society for Hospital Hygiene (SF2H), and the French Infectious Diseases Society (SPILF).

    PubMed

    Schnell, David; Azoulay, Elie; Benoit, Dominique; Clouzeau, Benjamin; Demaret, Pierre; Ducassou, Stéphane; Frange, Pierre; Lafaurie, Matthieu; Legrand, Matthieu; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Mokart, Djamel; Naudin, Jérôme; Pene, Frédéric; Rabbat, Antoine; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Ribaud, Patricia; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Vincent, François; Zahar, Jean-Ralph; Darmon, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Neutropenia is defined by either an absolute or functional defect (acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome) of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and is associated with high risk of specific complications that may require intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Specificities in the management of critically ill neutropenic patients prompted the establishment of guidelines dedicated to intensivists. These recommendations were drawn up by a panel of experts brought together by the French Intensive Care Society in collaboration with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies, the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, the French Society of Hematology, the French Society for Hospital Hygiene, and the French Infectious Diseases Society. Literature review and formulation of recommendations were performed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Each recommendation was then evaluated and rated by each expert using a methodology derived from the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. Six fields are covered by the provided recommendations: (1) ICU admission and prognosis, (2) protective isolation and prophylaxis, (3) management of acute respiratory failure, (4) organ failure and organ support, (5) antibiotic management and source control, and (6) hematological management. Most of the provided recommendations are obtained from low levels of evidence, however, suggesting a need for additional studies. Seven recommendations were, however, associated with high level of evidences and are related to protective isolation, diagnostic workup of acute respiratory failure, medical management, and timing surgery in patients with typhlitis.

  5. Primary immunodeficiency investigation in patients during and after hospitalization in a pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Suavinho, Érica; de Nápolis, Ana Carolina R.; Segundo, Gesmar Rodrigues S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze whether the patients with severe infections, admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, underwent the active screening for primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Methods: Retrospective study that assessed the data records of patients with any severe infections admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, covering a period from January 2011 to January 2012, in order to confirm if they performed an initial investigation for PID with blood count and immunoglobulin dosage. Results: In the studied period, 53 children were hospitalized with severe infections in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, and only in seven (13.2%) the initial investigation of PID was performed. Among these patients, 3/7 (42.8%) showed quantitative alterations in immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels, 1/7 (14.3%) had the diagnosis of cyclic neutropenia, and 1/7 (14.3%) presented thrombocytopenia and a final diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. Therefore, the PID diagnosis was confirmed in 5/7 (71.4%) of the patients. Conclusions: The investigation of PID in patients with severe infections has not been routinely performed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Our findings suggest the necessity of performing PID investigation in this group of patients. PMID:24676187

  6. Management of neutropenic patients in the intensive care unit (NEWBORNS EXCLUDED) recommendations from an expert panel from the French Intensive Care Society (SRLF) with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies (GFRUP), the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR), the French Society of Hematology (SFH), the French Society for Hospital Hygiene (SF2H), and the French Infectious Diseases Society (SPILF).

    PubMed

    Schnell, David; Azoulay, Elie; Benoit, Dominique; Clouzeau, Benjamin; Demaret, Pierre; Ducassou, Stéphane; Frange, Pierre; Lafaurie, Matthieu; Legrand, Matthieu; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Mokart, Djamel; Naudin, Jérôme; Pene, Frédéric; Rabbat, Antoine; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Ribaud, Patricia; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Vincent, François; Zahar, Jean-Ralph; Darmon, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Neutropenia is defined by either an absolute or functional defect (acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome) of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and is associated with high risk of specific complications that may require intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Specificities in the management of critically ill neutropenic patients prompted the establishment of guidelines dedicated to intensivists. These recommendations were drawn up by a panel of experts brought together by the French Intensive Care Society in collaboration with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies, the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, the French Society of Hematology, the French Society for Hospital Hygiene, and the French Infectious Diseases Society. Literature review and formulation of recommendations were performed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Each recommendation was then evaluated and rated by each expert using a methodology derived from the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. Six fields are covered by the provided recommendations: (1) ICU admission and prognosis, (2) protective isolation and prophylaxis, (3) management of acute respiratory failure, (4) organ failure and organ support, (5) antibiotic management and source control, and (6) hematological management. Most of the provided recommendations are obtained from low levels of evidence, however, suggesting a need for additional studies. Seven recommendations were, however, associated with high level of evidences and are related to protective isolation, diagnostic workup of acute respiratory failure, medical management, and timing surgery in patients with typhlitis. PMID:27638133

  7. Postdischarge Service Use by Families of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tien, Chia-Ling; Peterson, Carla A.; Shelley, Mack C., II

    2002-01-01

    A study examined patterns and predictors of service use by 85 families of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) graduates, specifically premature infants. Enabling variables (NICU contacts and follow-up services) and parents' perceptions of children's problems were major predictors of service use. No demographic characteristics predicted service…

  8. Maternal Stress and Efficacy for Latina Mothers with Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denney, Maria K.; Okamoto, Yukari; Singer, George H. S.; Brenner, Mary E.; Barkley, Steven C.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the levels of maternal stress and efficacy for Spanish- and English-speaking Latina mothers whose infants were in neonatal intensive care. Thirty-two Latina mothers participated in the study. Significant group differences were found between Spanish-and English-speaking Latina mothers. More stress was experienced by Spanish-…

  9. Parents' Experiences during Their Infant's Transition from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to Home: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Sharon W.; Spillet, Marydee A.; Cronin, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Limited literature exists which examines how parents of infants hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) transition from their infant's NICU hospital stay to home. This study examines the question, "What are the experiences of parents during their infant's transition from the NICU to home?" Grounded theory methods served as the…

  10. BEGINNINGS: An Interim Individualized Family Service Plan for Use in the Intensive Care Nursery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Joy V.; Langlois, Aimee; Ross, Erin Sandseth; Smith-Sharp, Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    This article describes BEGINNINGS, an interim Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) for use in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It discusses the rationale that supports the process, the format, and recommendations for its implementation. The program's early intervention services help to identify supports and to facilitate transition to…

  11. Using Infant Massage Following a Mother's Unfavorable Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Experiences: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lappin, Grace

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore the synchronous behaviors enacted by mother and infant with blindness. In the study, a mother's less than optimal experience with the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) had a profound effect not only on her and her infant son, who was born 3 months prematurely and was visually impaired, but also on…

  12. Neonatal Intensive-Care Unit Graduates Show Persistent Difficulties in an Intradimensional Shift Card Sort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittler, Phyllis M.; Brooks, Patricia J.; Rossi, Vanessa; Karmel, Bernard Z.; Gardner, Judith M.; Flory, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal intensive-care unit (NICU) graduates, a group at risk for attention problems and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, performed an intradimensional shift card sort at 34, 42, 51, and 60 months to assess executive function and to examine effects of individual risk factors. In the "silly" game, children sorted cards…

  13. Factors Affecting Code Status in a University Hospital Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Scoy, Lauren Jodi; Sherman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The authors collected data on diagnosis, hospital course, and end-of-life preparedness in patients who died in the intensive care unit (ICU) with "full code" status (defined as receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation), compared with those who didn't. Differences were analyzed using binary and stepwise logistic regression. They found…

  14. Residential Behavior Therapy Treatment as an Intensive Care Approach to the Development of Community Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eun, Bong-soo; And Others

    The Pendleton Project residential service is a short term intensive care alternative to the long term, costly, and ineffective non-community based institutional model for treating children and families suffering from behavior problems. The residential services are designed to develop community competency from the vantage point of its unique…

  15. Cost-benefit analysis: patient care at neurological intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kopacević, Lenka; Strapac, Marija; Mihelcić, Vesna Bozan

    2013-09-01

    Modern quality definition relies on patient centeredness and on patient needs for particular services, continuous control of the service provided, complete service quality management, and setting quality indicators as the health service endpoints. The health service provided to the patient has certain costs. Thus, one can ask the following: "To what extent does the increasing cost of patient care with changes in elimination improve the quality of health care and what costs are justifiable?" As stroke is the third leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Europe and worldwide, attention has been increasingly focused on stroke prevention and providing quality care for stroke patients. One of the most common medical/nursing problems in these patients is change in elimination, which additionally affects their mental health.

  16. Changing personnel behavior to promote quality care practices in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Dominic; Farmery, Keith; Johnson, Martin; Harper, Christine; Clarke, Fiona L; Holton, Phillip; Wilson, Susan; Rayson, Paul; Bence, Hugh

    2005-01-01

    The delivery of safe high quality patient care is a major issue in clinical settings. However, the implementation of evidence-based practice and educational interventions are not always effective at improving performance. A staff-led behavioral management process was implemented in a large single-site acute (secondary and tertiary) hospital in the North of England for 26 weeks. A quasi-experimental, repeated-measures, within-groups design was used. Measurement focused on quality care behaviors (ie, documentation, charting, hand washing). The results demonstrate the efficacy of a staff-led behavioral management approach for improving quality-care practices. Significant behavioral change (F [6, 19] = 5.37, p < 0.01) was observed. Correspondingly, statistically significant (t-test [t] = 3.49, df = 25, p < 0.01) reductions in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were obtained. Discussion focuses on implementation issues. PMID:18360574

  17. New Study Shows Flu Vaccine Reduced Children's Risk of Intensive Care Unit Flu Admission by Three-Fourths

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Image Library (PHIL) New Study Shows Flu Vaccine Reduced Children’s Risk of Intensive Care Unit Flu ... Media Relations (404) 639-3286 Getting a flu vaccine reduces a child's risk of flu-related intensive ...

  18. Does a single specialty intensive care unit make better business sense than a multi-specialty intensive care unit? A costing study in a trauma center in India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Parmeshwar; Jithesh, Vishwanathan; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Context: Though intensive care units (ICUs) only account for 10% of hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. Aim: To evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multi-specialty and neurosurgery ICU in an apex trauma care facility in India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203 bedded level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India from May, 2012 to June 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Statistical Analysis: Fisher's two-tailed t-test. Results: Total cost/bed/day for the multi-specialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU was Rs. 14,306.7/-, manpower constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Conclusions: Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist healthcare decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multi-specialty ICUs are more expensive, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that need to be designed. PMID:25829909

  19. [Health education in transplant patients and their families in an intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Pueyo-Garrigues, M; San Martín Loyola, Á; Caparrós Leal, M C; Jiménez Muñoz, C

    2016-01-01

    Health Education (HE) is extremely important in transplant patients and their families in order to promote suitable self-care in this new stage of life. Intensive Care Units offer various opportunities by nurses in order to improve their Health Education. This process could start in this unit where the interaction between nurse and family is constant. The HE of transplant patient includes three dimensions: Knowledge: information about self-care in order to have a healthy way of life, and getting some information on how to reduce anxiety in patients and their families; Skills: as regards the abilities to properly apply the Health Education, where the families are really important; and finally Attitudes: ambivalent attitudes that are experienced by transplant patients. The objective is to describe the level of development of HE for critical transplant patients and their families from Intensive Care Units. A non-systematic literature review was performed in Pubmed and CINHAL data bases. In conclusion, it is emphasised that the skill of the HE nurse in an Intensive Care Units is important to promote lifestyles appropriate to the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor needs of transplant patients. Its implementation entails positive effects on clinical outcomes of the patient, decreased morbidity and mortality, costs, and health resources. PMID:26810953

  20. [Health education in transplant patients and their families in an intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Pueyo-Garrigues, M; San Martín Loyola, Á; Caparrós Leal, M C; Jiménez Muñoz, C

    2016-01-01

    Health Education (HE) is extremely important in transplant patients and their families in order to promote suitable self-care in this new stage of life. Intensive Care Units offer various opportunities by nurses in order to improve their Health Education. This process could start in this unit where the interaction between nurse and family is constant. The HE of transplant patient includes three dimensions: Knowledge: information about self-care in order to have a healthy way of life, and getting some information on how to reduce anxiety in patients and their families; Skills: as regards the abilities to properly apply the Health Education, where the families are really important; and finally Attitudes: ambivalent attitudes that are experienced by transplant patients. The objective is to describe the level of development of HE for critical transplant patients and their families from Intensive Care Units. A non-systematic literature review was performed in Pubmed and CINHAL data bases. In conclusion, it is emphasised that the skill of the HE nurse in an Intensive Care Units is important to promote lifestyles appropriate to the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor needs of transplant patients. Its implementation entails positive effects on clinical outcomes of the patient, decreased morbidity and mortality, costs, and health resources.

  1. [Equivalent continuous noise level in neonatal intensive care unit associated to burnout syndrome].

    PubMed

    Garrido Galindo, A P; Camargo Caicedo, Y; Vélez-Pereira, A M

    2015-01-01

    Noise levels in neonatal intensive care units allow the appearance of symptoms associated with burnout such as stress, irritability, fatigue and emotional instability on health care personnel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the equivalent continuous noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit and compare the results with noise levels associated with the occurrence of burnout syndrome on the care team. Continuous sampling was conducted for 20 days using a type I sound level meter on the unit. The maximum, the ninetieth percentile and the equivalent continuous noise level (Leq) values were recorded. Noise level is reported in the range of 51.4-77.6 decibels A (dBA) with an average of 64 dBA, 100.6 dBA maximum, and average background noise from 57.9 dBA. Noise levels exceed the standards suggested for neonatal intensive care units, are close to maximum values referred for noise exposure in the occupational standards and to noise levels associated with the onset of burnout; thus allowing to infer the probability of occurrence of high levels of noise present in the unit on the development of burnout in caregivers.

  2. [Equivalent continuous noise level in neonatal intensive care unit associated to burnout syndrome].

    PubMed

    Garrido Galindo, A P; Camargo Caicedo, Y; Vélez-Pereira, A M

    2015-01-01

    Noise levels in neonatal intensive care units allow the appearance of symptoms associated with burnout such as stress, irritability, fatigue and emotional instability on health care personnel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the equivalent continuous noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit and compare the results with noise levels associated with the occurrence of burnout syndrome on the care team. Continuous sampling was conducted for 20 days using a type I sound level meter on the unit. The maximum, the ninetieth percentile and the equivalent continuous noise level (Leq) values were recorded. Noise level is reported in the range of 51.4-77.6 decibels A (dBA) with an average of 64 dBA, 100.6 dBA maximum, and average background noise from 57.9 dBA. Noise levels exceed the standards suggested for neonatal intensive care units, are close to maximum values referred for noise exposure in the occupational standards and to noise levels associated with the onset of burnout; thus allowing to infer the probability of occurrence of high levels of noise present in the unit on the development of burnout in caregivers. PMID:26187519

  3. [Innovations in continuing/permanent education methods for the intensive care nurses].

    PubMed

    Vázquez Guillamet, B; Guillamet Lloveras, A; Martínez Estalella, G; Pérez Ramírez, F

    2014-01-01

    Intensive care nursing is carried out in a dynamic environment characterized by the continuous incorporation of new technologies, approaches to care and a request for safety, participation and transparency by the public. Continuing/permanent intensive care nursing training in the acquisition of new competencies is key in this setting. In order to achieve this goal, simulation and problem based learning should be incorporated as essential methodologies to teach these skills. At the same time research should be done on which attitudes, competences, and knowledge are necessary to increase their intellectual knowledge. The core characteristics of ICU and its nursing should allow a deep change in their approach to continuing/permanent nursing education.

  4. How is intensive care reimbursed? A review of eight European countries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Reimbursement schemes in intensive care are more complex than in other areas of healthcare, due to special procedures and high care needs. Knowledge regarding the principles of functioning in other countries can lead to increased understanding and awareness of potential for improvement. This can be achieved through mutual exchange of solutions found in other countries. In this review, experts from eight European countries explain their respective intensive care unit reimbursement schemes. Important conclusions include the apparent differences in the countries’ reimbursement schemes-despite all of them originating from a DRG system-, the high degree of complexity found, and the difficulties faced in several countries when collecting the data for this collaborative work. This review has been designed to assist the intensivist clinician and researcher in understanding neighbouring countries’ approaches and in putting research into the context of a European perspective. In addition, steering committees and decision makers might find this a valuable source to compare different reimbursement schemes. PMID:24216146

  5. How is intensive care reimbursed? A review of eight European countries.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Donnelly, Maria; van Zanten, Arthur Rh; Andersen, Jakob Steen; Guidet, Bertrand; Trujillano Cabello, Jose Javier; Gardiner, Shane; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Winter, Bob; Joannidis, Michael; Schmutz, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Reimbursement schemes in intensive care are more complex than in other areas of healthcare, due to special procedures and high care needs. Knowledge regarding the principles of functioning in other countries can lead to increased understanding and awareness of potential for improvement. This can be achieved through mutual exchange of solutions found in other countries. In this review, experts from eight European countries explain their respective intensive care unit reimbursement schemes. Important conclusions include the apparent differences in the countries' reimbursement schemes-despite all of them originating from a DRG system-, the high degree of complexity found, and the difficulties faced in several countries when collecting the data for this collaborative work. This review has been designed to assist the intensivist clinician and researcher in understanding neighbouring countries' approaches and in putting research into the context of a European perspective. In addition, steering committees and decision makers might find this a valuable source to compare different reimbursement schemes. PMID:24216146

  6. Ethical issues experienced by intensive care unit nurses in everyday practice.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Maria I D; Moreira, Isabel M P B

    2013-02-01

    This research aims to identify the ethical issues perceived by intensive care nurses in their everyday practice. It also aims to understand why these situations were considered an ethical issue and what interventions/strategies have been or are expected to be developed so as to minimize them. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview with 15 nurses working at polyvalent intensive care units in 4 Portuguese hospitals, who were selected by the homogenization of multiple samples. The qualitative content analysis identified end-of-life decisions, privacy, interaction, team work, and health-care access as emerging ethical issues. Personal, team, and institutional aspects emerge as reasons behind the experience of these issues. Personal and team resources are used in and for solving these issues. Moral development and training are the most significant strategies. PMID:22918059

  7. Ethical issues experienced by intensive care unit nurses in everyday practice.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Maria I D; Moreira, Isabel M P B

    2013-02-01

    This research aims to identify the ethical issues perceived by intensive care nurses in their everyday practice. It also aims to understand why these situations were considered an ethical issue and what interventions/strategies have been or are expected to be developed so as to minimize them. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview with 15 nurses working at polyvalent intensive care units in 4 Portuguese hospitals, who were selected by the homogenization of multiple samples. The qualitative content analysis identified end-of-life decisions, privacy, interaction, team work, and health-care access as emerging ethical issues. Personal, team, and institutional aspects emerge as reasons behind the experience of these issues. Personal and team resources are used in and for solving these issues. Moral development and training are the most significant strategies.

  8. [Innovations in continuing/permanent education methods for the intensive care nurses].

    PubMed

    Vázquez Guillamet, B; Guillamet Lloveras, A; Martínez Estalella, G; Pérez Ramírez, F

    2014-01-01

    Intensive care nursing is carried out in a dynamic environment characterized by the continuous incorporation of new technologies, approaches to care and a request for safety, participation and transparency by the public. Continuing/permanent intensive care nursing training in the acquisition of new competencies is key in this setting. In order to achieve this goal, simulation and problem based learning should be incorporated as essential methodologies to teach these skills. At the same time research should be done on which attitudes, competences, and knowledge are necessary to increase their intellectual knowledge. The core characteristics of ICU and its nursing should allow a deep change in their approach to continuing/permanent nursing education. PMID:24332845

  9. I Brazilian guidelines for respiratory physiotherapy in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Cíntia; Zanetti, Nathalia Mendonça; Comaru, Talitha; Ribeiro, Simone Nascimento Dos Santos; Andrade, Lívia Barboza de; Santos, Suzi Laine Longo Dos

    2012-06-01

    Developing guidelines for the role of the physiotherapist in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units is essential because these professionals are responsible for the rehabilitation of critically ill patients. Rehabilitation includes the evaluation and prevention of functional kinetic alterations, application of treatment interventions (respiratory and/or motor physiotherapy), control and application of medical gases, care of mechanical ventilation, weaning and extubation, tracheal gas insufflation, inflation/deflation of the endotracheal cuff protocol, and surfactant application, aiming to allow patients to have a full recovery and return to their functional activities. In this article, we present guidelines that are intended to guide the physiotherapist in some of the prevention/treatment interventions in respiratory therapy (airway clearance, lung expansion, position in bed, airway suction, drug inhalation, and cough assist), which help in the rehabilitation process of newborns and children in intensive care units during mechanical ventilation and up to 12 hours following extubation.

  10. [Nuclear magnetic resonance based metabolic phenotyping for patient evaluations in operating rooms and intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Blaise, B J; Gouel-Chéron, A; Floccard, B; Monneret, G; Plaisant, F; Chassard, D; Javouhey, E; Claris, O; Allaouchiche, B

    2014-03-01

    Metabolic phenotyping consists in the identification of subtle and coordinated metabolic variations associated with various pathophysiological stimuli. Different analytical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance, allow the simultaneous quantification of a large number of metabolites. Statistical analyses of these spectra thus lead to the discrimination between samples and the identification of a metabolic phenotype corresponding to the effect under study. This approach allows the extraction of candidate biomarkers and the recovery of perturbed metabolic networks, driving to the generation of biochemical hypotheses (pathophysiological mechanisms, diagnostic tests, therapeutic targets…). Metabolic phenotyping could be useful in anaesthesiology and intensive care medicine for the evaluation, monitoring or diagnosis of life-threatening situations, to optimise patient managements. This review introduces the physical and statistical fundamentals of NMR-based metabolic phenotyping, describes the work already achieved by this approach in anaesthesiology and intensive care medicine. Finally, potential areas of interest are discussed for the perioperative and intensive management of patients, from newborns to adults.

  11. Chicken pox outbreak in the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital: Lessons learnt the hard way

    PubMed Central

    Sarit, Sharma; Shruti, Sharma; Deepinder, Chhina; Chhina, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes 2 clinically and epidemiologically distinct forms of diseases. Chickenpox (varicella) is the disease that results from primary infection with the VZV. Herpes zoster (HZ) results from the reactivation of VZV latently infecting the dorsal root ganglia. We are reporting an outbreak of varicella infection among the health care workers (HCWs) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital. We found transmission of varicella among eight HCWs of pulmonary ICU. They had a history of contact with a patient having HZ infection. Investigation of the outbreak was conducted as per guidelines. Better dissemination of information on disease transmission, isolation of infected patients inside the hospital, and adequate protection (including vaccination) for susceptible employees are important to prevent such outbreaks. PMID:26816447

  12. Caring for a chronically ill infant: a paradigm case of maternal rehearsal in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hayes, N; Stainton, M C; McNeil, D

    1993-12-01

    This study examines a mother's perspective of caring for a chronically ill infant coming home from the neonatal intensive care unit. Understanding the meaning of the situation for the parent can foster excellence in clinical practice that is based on understanding derived from descriptions of their experience. This paper presents a paradigm case extracted from a larger phenomenological study that is examining the high-risk perinatal experience. Hermeneutic methods used for analysis led to the discovery of five meanings in the experience for the parent: (a) uncertainty; (b) experiencing the baby as powerful; (c) striving to gain acceptance from the baby; (d) blurred territory in taking up the practices of care; and (e) being alone and vulnerable. PMID:8133433

  13. Chicken pox outbreak in the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital: Lessons learnt the hard way.

    PubMed

    Sarit, Sharma; Shruti, Sharma; Deepinder, Chhina; Chhina, R S

    2015-12-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes 2 clinically and epidemiologically distinct forms of diseases. Chickenpox (varicella) is the disease that results from primary infection with the VZV. Herpes zoster (HZ) results from the reactivation of VZV latently infecting the dorsal root ganglia. We are reporting an outbreak of varicella infection among the health care workers (HCWs) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital. We found transmission of varicella among eight HCWs of pulmonary ICU. They had a history of contact with a patient having HZ infection. Investigation of the outbreak was conducted as per guidelines. Better dissemination of information on disease transmission, isolation of infected patients inside the hospital, and adequate protection (including vaccination) for susceptible employees are important to prevent such outbreaks. PMID:26816447

  14. Nurse/parent role perceptions in care of neonatal intensive care unit infants: implications for the advanced practice nurse.

    PubMed

    Paredes, S D; Frank, D I

    2000-09-01

    This study compared parent and nurse perceptions of the nurse's roles regarding responsibilities toward infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It also examined the attitudes of nurses and parents regarding the extent to which parents should participate in the care of their infants in the NICU, as well as the role of the advanced practice nurse (APN). The convenience sample of 25 parents of infants in the NICU and 35 nurses who cared for the infants was surveyed regarding perceptions of nurses and parents about nurse responsibilities and parent roles in the NICU. Results suggest parents and nurses have different perceptions about role expectations and that nurses perceive themselves to lack comfort and knowledge in providing support to parents. The findings support a role of the APN as fostering a nursing NICU philosophy to facilitate role transition for parents of infants in the NICU.

  15. [The well-being of the newborn infant in neonatal intensive care].

    PubMed

    Ancora, G

    2010-06-01

    Patients referred to Neonatal Intensive Care Units are particularly vulnerable because they are in a critical or sensitive period of development. When physicians were first able to really save preemies 40 years ago, not much thought was given to their brain development. The babies we care for are so early that the brain cells are still migrating to where they will finally rest in developed brain. We are shaped, to an extent, by our environment. In early life, the environment takes on a particularly important role. So treatments may over-stimulate areas of the brain with unknown consequences. For this reason minimally invasive treatments together with attention to the environment will favour a care developmentally appropriate for pre-term babies. Use of nasalCPAP, early rescue surfactant, synchronized mechanical ventilation, together with temperature, light and noise control could help to obtain these results. Pain control, music therapy, massage, kangaroo care and a family centred care are essential to optimize results obtained from the intensive care. PMID:21090074

  16. Is a Single Entry Training Scheme for Intensive Care Medicine Both Inevitable and Desirable?

    PubMed

    McLean, Anthony S

    2015-09-01

    The development of Intensive Care Medicine as a recognizable branch of medicine has been underway for more than half a century, with delivery by a number of different service models. This delivery may be entirely by related medical specialties, such as anesthesiology or pulmonology; alternatively, it may be as a standalone-recognized specialty and frequently by a hybrid of these two extremes. A country may have a completely different delivery model from neighboring countries, and different models may exist within a single country. Debate about the most appropriate method of providing critical care services frequently centers around the training. However, an alternative perspective is that training regimes only follow on from another objective, namely to have Intensive Care Medicine represented in important forums by dedicated critical care physicians. A historical perspective of the development of critical care in two countries over a 40-year period is discussed, whereby a transition from a multiple specialty provision of critical care medicine to that of a single binational pathway occurred. The perceived advantages and disadvantages are outlined, offering insights into how possible future challenges in a highly complex medical specialty can be anticipated and strategies formulated. PMID:25978335

  17. Intensive care discharges: improving the quality of clinical handover through changes to discharge documentation.

    PubMed

    Hall, William; Keane, Philip; Wang, Sarra; Debell, Frances; Allana, Alisha; Karia, Priyesh

    2015-01-01

    Patients who have stepped down from intensive care tread a precarious clinical course, and the handover of care between clinical teams at this point should be treated as a high risk event. Poor handover can leave patients vulnerable to suboptimal care and preventable harm. Properly structured written discharge summaries have been shown to improve information transfer and quality of care. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has published guidelines entitled "Acute illness in adults in hospital: recognising and responding to deterioration," which states that patients transferred from intensive care should have a formal structured handover supported by a written plan, and it provides minimum criteria for what information should be included. A retrospective audit was carried out (n=28) to identify if discharge summaries were compliant with these standards. Discharge summaries consistently lacked essential criteria, including psychosocial needs (29%), nutritional needs (50%), therapy needs (29%), ceilings of care (39%), and communication needs (18%). Less than a third of verbal handovers between the nursing and medical teams were documented. After consultation, a new summary template was developed and embedded into practice. The new design prompted trainees to ensure they completed adequate information in all domains of care. Additional sections were added to improve recording of when, and to whom, clinical handover took place, which led to improved clinical governance. The overall quality of discharge summaries was improved, with increased compliance in 11 out of 13 domains. Feedback from staff about the new discharge summaries was positive. This project is easily transferable, and has the potential to improve patient safety and quality of care. PMID:26734430

  18. Characterisation of sleep in intensive care using 24-hour polysomnography: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Many intensive care patients experience sleep disruption potentially related to noise, light and treatment interventions. The purpose of this study was to characterise, in terms of quantity and quality, the sleep of intensive care patients, taking into account the impact of environmental factors. Methods This observational study was conducted in the adult ICU of a tertiary referral hospital in Australia, enrolling 57 patients. Polysomnography (PSG) was performed over a 24-hour period to assess the quantity (total sleep time: hh:mm) and quality (percentage per stage, duration of sleep episode) of patients' sleep while in ICU. Rechtschaffen and Kales criteria were used to categorise sleep. Interrater checks were performed. Sound pressure and illuminance levels and care events were simultaneously recorded. Patients reported on their sleep quality in ICU using the Richards Campbell Sleep Questionnaire and the Sleep in Intensive Care Questionnaire. Data were summarised using frequencies and proportions or measures of central tendency and dispersion as appropriate and Cohen's Kappa statistic was used for interrater reliability of the sleep data analysis. Results Patients' median total sleep time was 05:00 (IQR: 02:52 to 07:14). The majority of sleep was stage 1 and 2 (medians: 19 and 73%) with scant slow wave and REM sleep. The median duration of sleep without waking was 00:03. Sound levels were high (mean Leq 53.95 dB(A) during the day and 50.20 dB(A) at night) and illuminance levels were appropriate at night (median <2 lux) but low during the day (median: 74.20 lux). There was a median 1.7 care events/h. Patients' mean self-reported sleep quality was poor. Interrater reliability of sleep staging was highest for slow wave sleep and lowest for stage 1 sleep. Conclusions The quantity and quality of sleep in intensive care patients are poor and may be related to noise, critical illness itself and treatment events that disturb sleep. The study highlights the

  19. Caring for patients receiving therapeutic hypothermia post cardiac arrest in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Glen; MacDonald, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Survivors of ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest have poor and often devastating neurological outcomes despite advances in resuscitation techniques and services (Bernard et al., 2002; Collins & Samworth, 2008). In an effort to increase survival rates, improve neurological outcomes and reduce mortality for surviving patients, clinical trials have shown that a mild state of therapeutic hypothermia (32 degrees C to 34 degrees C) has been linked to improved patient outcomes post cardiac arrest (Koran, 2008; Lee & Asare, 2010). Many hospitals in Canada currently use therapeutic hypothermia (TH), but the nursing care requires advanced nursing knowledge and skills. In an effort to prepare registered nurses to care for patients receiving TH, a specially designed education program was implemented at the Rouge Valley Health System Hospital (RVHS) in Ontario. Busy nurses need flexibility in the delivery of programs in the clinical setting, and this program was designed to meet that need with a combination of self-paced modules, lectures, discussions and a return demonstration. In this article, the authors discuss the nursing care of post cardiac arrest patients receiving TH, and the design and implementation of the education program.

  20. Factors influencing intensive care nurses' knowledge and attitudes regarding ventilator-associated pneumonia and oral care practice in intubated patients in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Ante; Badovinac, Ana; Spalj, Stjepan; Par, Matej; Slaj, Martina; Plančak, Darije

    2014-10-01

    Adequate oral care in intubated patients may reduce occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia. The purpose of this study was to explore knowledge, attitudes, and oral care practice in Croatian intensive care units and influencing factors. Nurses' knowledge is insufficient; however, most of them reported positive attitude toward the importance of oral care. Performed oral hygiene measures are mostly inappropriate. There is a need to improve the knowledge of ventilator-associated pneumonia and oral care.

  1. Evaluation of an integrated intensive care unit monitoring display by critical care fellow physicians.

    PubMed

    Görges, Matthias; Westenskow, Dwayne R; Markewitz, Boaz A

    2012-12-01

    In the past two far-view displays, which showed vital signs, trends, alarms, infusion pump status, and therapy support indicators, were developed and assessed by critical care nurses (Görges et al. in Dimens Crit Care Nurs. 30(4):206-17, 2011). The aim of the current study is to assess the generalizability of these findings to physicians. The first aim is to test whether an integrated far-view display, designed to be readable from 3 to 5 m, enables critical care physicians to more rapidly and accurately (1) recognize a change in patient condition; (2) identify alarms; and (3) identify near-empty infusion pumps, than a traditional patient monitor and infusion pump. A second aim is to test if the new displays reduce the mental workload required for this decision making. Fifteen critical care fellow physicians (median age of 34 years, with 2-8 years of ICU experience) were asked to use the three displays to compare the data from two patients and decide which patient required their attention first. Each physician made 60 decisions: 20 with each of the two far-view displays and 20 decisions with a standard patient monitor next to an infusion pump. A 41 and 26 % improvement in decision accuracy was observed with the bar and clock far-view displays, respectively. Specifically, the identification of near empty infusion pumps, a task normally performed by nurses, and patients with a single alarm were better with the new displays. Using the bar display physicians made their decision 12 % faster than when using the control display, a median improvement of 2.1 s. No significant differences were observed in measured workload. Displays that present patient data in a redesigned format enables critical care clinicians to more rapidly identify changes in patient conditions and to more accurately decide which patient needs their attention. In a clinical setting, this could improve patient safety. In future work, an evaluation of the display using live patient data from an ICU

  2. Successful introduction of a daily checklist to enhance compliance with accepted standards of care in the medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Nama, A; Sviri, S; Abutbul, A; Stav, I; van Heerden, P V

    2016-07-01

    We introduced a simple checklist to act as an aid to memory for our junior medical staff to ensure that every patient in the intensive care unit (ICU) received every appropriate element of a bundle of care every day. The checklist was developed in consultation with our junior doctors and was designed to be completed every morning for every patient by the junior doctor reviewing the patient. The completed checklist was then checked again by the attending intensivist on the main daily ward round to ensure all the appropriate elements of the checklist had been applied to the patient. It was also noted each day which of the elements of the checklist had been forgotten and was therefore prompted to be completed by use of the checklist. Of the 75 patients surveyed there were 99 occasions, in 48 patients, when the checklist detected a forgotten element of the bundle of care (i.e. in 64% of patients). There was a decrease in the incidence of missed elements of the bundle of care the longer the patient stayed in the ICU. Types of missed elements varied with the duration of the ICU stay. We found that the introduction of a simple checklist, developed in collaboration with the junior medical staff who would be using the checklist every day in the ICU, resulted in the detection and correction of missed elements of a bundle of care we had previously introduced in the ICU.

  3. Successful introduction of a daily checklist to enhance compliance with accepted standards of care in the medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Nama, A; Sviri, S; Abutbul, A; Stav, I; van Heerden, P V

    2016-07-01

    We introduced a simple checklist to act as an aid to memory for our junior medical staff to ensure that every patient in the intensive care unit (ICU) received every appropriate element of a bundle of care every day. The checklist was developed in consultation with our junior doctors and was designed to be completed every morning for every patient by the junior doctor reviewing the patient. The completed checklist was then checked again by the attending intensivist on the main daily ward round to ensure all the appropriate elements of the checklist had been applied to the patient. It was also noted each day which of the elements of the checklist had been forgotten and was therefore prompted to be completed by use of the checklist. Of the 75 patients surveyed there were 99 occasions, in 48 patients, when the checklist detected a forgotten element of the bundle of care (i.e. in 64% of patients). There was a decrease in the incidence of missed elements of the bundle of care the longer the patient stayed in the ICU. Types of missed elements varied with the duration of the ICU stay. We found that the introduction of a simple checklist, developed in collaboration with the junior medical staff who would be using the checklist every day in the ICU, resulted in the detection and correction of missed elements of a bundle of care we had previously introduced in the ICU. PMID:27456181

  4. An office or a bedroom? Challenges for family-centered care in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Liben, Stephen; Carnevale, Franco A; Cohen, S Robin

    2012-09-01

    Although the modern pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) has followed general pediatrics and adopted the family-centered care model, little is known about how families prospectively experience PICU care. The authors' goal was to better understand the experiences of families whose child was hospitalized in a PICU. They conducted a 12-month prospective ethnographic study in a PICU in a tertiary care hospital in a large North American urban center. Data were obtained via participant-observation and formal and informal interviews with 18 families and staff key informants. Findings revealed a disconnect between the espoused model of family-centered care and quotidian professional practices. This divergence emerged in the authors' analysis as a heuristic that contrasts a professional "office" to a sick child's "bedroom." PICU practices and protocols transformed the child into a patient and parents into visitors; issues such as noise, visitation, turf, and privacy could favor staff comfort and convenience over that of the child and family. The authors' discussion highlights suggestions to overcome this divergence in order to truly make the PICU family centered.

  5. Intensive care nurses' encounters with multicultural families in Norway: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Høye, Sevald; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nurses' perceptions of their encounters with multicultural families in intensive care units in Norwegian hospitals. Immigrants from non-Western countries make up 6.1% of the population in Norway. When a person suffers an acute and critical illness the person's family may experience crises. Nurses' previous experiences of caring for culturally diverse patients and families is challenging due to linguistic differences, and contextual factors. Family members should be near their critically ill spouse to reduce the impact from a frightening environment. The study had a descriptive exploratory qualitative design with a retrospective focus. Three multistage focus groups consisting of 16 nurses were set up in intensive care units. The data were analysed by interpretive content analysis. The theme 'Cultural diversity and workplace stressors' emerged. This theme was characterised by four categories: 'impact on work patterns'; 'communication challenges'; 'responses to crises' and 'professional status and gender issues'. In conclusion, nurses' perception of their encounters with multicultural families in intensive care units seem to be ambiguous with challenges in interaction, and the nurses' stressors emanating from linguistic, cultural and ethnic differentness. To diminish cultural diversity the nurses strive for increased knowledge of different cultures and religions.

  6. Intensive care nurses' encounters with multicultural families in Norway: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Høye, Sevald; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nurses' perceptions of their encounters with multicultural families in intensive care units in Norwegian hospitals. Immigrants from non-Western countries make up 6.1% of the population in Norway. When a person suffers an acute and critical illness the person's family may experience crises. Nurses' previous experiences of caring for culturally diverse patients and families is challenging due to linguistic differences, and contextual factors. Family members should be near their critically ill spouse to reduce the impact from a frightening environment. The study had a descriptive exploratory qualitative design with a retrospective focus. Three multistage focus groups consisting of 16 nurses were set up in intensive care units. The data were analysed by interpretive content analysis. The theme 'Cultural diversity and workplace stressors' emerged. This theme was characterised by four categories: 'impact on work patterns'; 'communication challenges'; 'responses to crises' and 'professional status and gender issues'. In conclusion, nurses' perception of their encounters with multicultural families in intensive care units seem to be ambiguous with challenges in interaction, and the nurses' stressors emanating from linguistic, cultural and ethnic differentness. To diminish cultural diversity the nurses strive for increased knowledge of different cultures and religions. PMID:18468898

  7. Are Intensive Care Factors Associated with Depressive Symptoms Six Months after Acute Lung Injury?

    PubMed Central

    Dowdy, David W.; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Dinglas, Victor D.; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Sevransky, Jonathan; Shanholtz, Carl; Needham, Dale M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate intensive care-related factors as predictors of depressive symptoms 6 months after acute lung injury (ALI) Design Prospective cohort study Setting Thirteen intensive care units (ICUs) in 4 hospitals in Baltimore, MD Patients Consecutive ALI survivors (n = 160; 71% from medical ICUs) screened for depressive symptoms at six months post-ALI Interventions None Measurements and Main Results We prospectively measured 12 features of critical illness and ICU care and used multivariable regression to evaluate associations with depressive symptoms as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) depression score. The prevalence of a positive screening for depression (score ≥8) at 6 months post-ALI was 26%. Depressive symptoms were significantly associated with surgical (versus medical or trauma) ICU admission (relative risk [RR] 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1 – 4.2), maximum daily Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score of >10 (RR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1 – 3.5), and mean daily ICU benzodiazepine dose of ≥75mg of midazolam-equivalent (RR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1 – 3.5). Conclusions Depressive symptoms at 6 months post-ALI are common and potentially associated with ICU-related factors. Mechanisms by which critical illness and intensive care management associate with depressive symptoms merit further investigation. PMID:19357507

  8. [Can new technologies reduce the rate of medications errors in adult intensive care?].

    PubMed

    Benoit, E; Beney, J

    2011-09-01

    In the intensive care environment, technology is omnipresent to ensure the monitoring and the administration of critical drugs to unstable patients. Since the early 2000's computerized physician order entry (CPOE), bar code assisted medication administration (BCMA), "smart" infusion pumps (SIP), electronic medication administration record (eMAR) and automated dispensing systems (ADS) have been recommended to reduce medication errors. About ten years later, their implementation rises but remains modest. The objective of this study is to determine the impact of these technologies on the rate of medication errors (ME) in adult intensive care. CPOE allows a strong and significant reduction of ME, especially the least critical ones. Only when adding a clinical decision support system (CDSS), CPOE could allow a reduction of serious errors. Used alone, it could even increase them. The available studies do not have the sufficient power to demonstrate the benefits of SIP or BCMA on ME. However, these devices, reveal practices, such as overriding of alerts. Power or methodology problems and conflicting results do not allow to determine the ability of ADS to reduce the incidence of ME in the intensive care. The studies, investigating these technologies, are not very recent, of limited number and present lacks in their methodology, which does not allow to determine whether they can reduce the incidence of MEs in the adult intensive care. Currently, the benefits appear to be limited which may be explained by the complexity of their integration into the care process. Special attention should be given to the communication between caregivers, the human-computer interface and the caregivers' training.

  9. A comparative cost analysis of polytrauma and neurosurgery Intensive Care Units at an apex trauma care facility in India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Parmeshwar; Jithesh, V.; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Although Intensive Care Units (ICUs) only account for 10% of the hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of the hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multispecialty and neurosurgery ICUs at an apex trauma care facility in India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203-bedded Level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India, from May 1, 2012 to June 30, 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in the study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Fisher's two tailed t-test. Results: Total cost/bed/day for the multispecialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU, it was Rs. 14,306.7/-, workforce constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Conclusions: Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist health-care decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multispecialty ICUs are more cost-effective, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that needs to be designed. PMID:27555693

  10. General intensive care for patients with traumatic brain injury: An update

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tumul; Kowalski, Stephen; Arabi, Yaseen; Dash, Hari Hara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a growing epidemic throughout the world and may present as major global burden in 2020. Some intensive care units throughout the world still have no access to specialized monitoring methods, equipments and other technologies related to intensive care management of these patients; therefore, this review is meant for providing generalized supportive measurement to this subgroup of patients so that evidence based management could minimize or prevent the secondary brain injury. Methods: Therefore, we have included the PubMed search for the relevant clinical trials and reviews (from 1 January 2007 to 31 March 2013), which specifically discussed about the topic. Results: General supportive measures are equally important to prevent and minimize the effects of secondary brain injury and therefore, have a substantial impact on the outcome in patients with TBI. The important considerations for general supportive intensive care unit care remain the prompt reorganization and treatment of hypoxemia, hypotension and hypercarbia. Evidences are found to be either against or weak regarding the use of routine hyperventilation therapy, tight control blood sugar regime, use of colloids and late as well as parenteral nutrition therapy in patients with severe TBI. Conclusion: There is also a need to develop some evidence based protocols for the health-care sectors, in which there is still lack of specific management related to monitoring methods, equipments and other technical resources. Optimization of physiological parameters, understanding of basic neurocritical care knowledge as well as incorporation of newer guidelines would certainly improve the outcome of the TBI patients. PMID:24843343

  11. Multi-View Interaction Modelling of human collaboration processes: a business process study of head and neck cancer care in a Dutch academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Stuit, Marco; Wortmann, Hans; Szirbik, Nick; Roodenburg, Jan

    2011-12-01

    In the healthcare domain, human collaboration processes (HCPs), which consist of interactions between healthcare workers from different (para)medical disciplines and departments, are of growing importance as healthcare delivery becomes increasingly integrated. Existing workflow-based process modelling tools for healthcare process management, which are the most commonly applied, are not suited for healthcare HCPs mainly due to their focus on the definition of task sequences instead of the graphical description of human interactions. This paper uses a case study of a healthcare HCP at a Dutch academic hospital to evaluate a novel interaction-centric process modelling method. The HCP under study is the care pathway performed by the head and neck oncology team. The evaluation results show that the method brings innovative, effective, and useful features. First, it collects and formalizes the tacit domain knowledge of the interviewed healthcare workers in individual interaction diagrams. Second, the method automatically integrates these local diagrams into a single global interaction diagram that reflects the consolidated domain knowledge. Third, the case study illustrates how the method utilizes a graphical modelling language for effective tree-based description of interactions, their composition and routing relations, and their roles. A process analysis of the global interaction diagram is shown to identify HCP improvement opportunities. The proposed interaction-centric method has wider applicability since interactions are the core of most multidisciplinary patient-care processes. A discussion argues that, although (multidisciplinary) collaboration is in many cases not optimal in the healthcare domain, it is increasingly considered a necessity to improve integration, continuity, and quality of care. The proposed method is helpful to describe, analyze, and improve the functioning of healthcare collaboration. PMID:21867775

  12. Multi-View Interaction Modelling of human collaboration processes: a business process study of head and neck cancer care in a Dutch academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Stuit, Marco; Wortmann, Hans; Szirbik, Nick; Roodenburg, Jan

    2011-12-01

    In the healthcare domain, human collaboration processes (HCPs), which consist of interactions between healthcare workers from different (para)medical disciplines and departments, are of growing importance as healthcare delivery becomes increasingly integrated. Existing workflow-based process modelling tools for healthcare process management, which are the most commonly applied, are not suited for healthcare HCPs mainly due to their focus on the definition of task sequences instead of the graphical description of human interactions. This paper uses a case study of a healthcare HCP at a Dutch academic hospital to evaluate a novel interaction-centric process modelling method. The HCP under study is the care pathway performed by the head and neck oncology team. The evaluation results show that the method brings innovative, effective, and useful features. First, it collects and formalizes the tacit domain knowledge of the interviewed healthcare workers in individual interaction diagrams. Second, the method automatically integrates these local diagrams into a single global interaction diagram that reflects the consolidated domain knowledge. Third, the case study illustrates how the method utilizes a graphical modelling language for effective tree-based description of interactions, their composition and routing relations, and their roles. A process analysis of the global interaction diagram is shown to identify HCP improvement opportunities. The proposed interaction-centric method has wider applicability since interactions are the core of most multidisciplinary patient-care processes. A discussion argues that, although (multidisciplinary) collaboration is in many cases not optimal in the healthcare domain, it is increasingly considered a necessity to improve integration, continuity, and quality of care. The proposed method is helpful to describe, analyze, and improve the functioning of healthcare collaboration.

  13. [Learning from failure - implications for respiratory and intensive care medicine: a conceptual review].

    PubMed

    Kabitz, H-J

    2013-08-01

    The clinical, social and economical impact of failure in medicine [i. e., adverse health care events (AHCE)] is overwhelming. Respiratory and intensive care medicine are strongly relevant to AHCE, particularly in cases associated with respiratory failure, mechanical ventilation and pharmacotherapy. In spite of the obvious necessity to learn from AHCE, its realisation in health-care organisations is still rare. This conceptual review therefore aims to (i) clarify the most relevant terminology, (ii) identify obstacles related to this health-care topic, and (iii) present possible strategies for solving the problems, thereby enabling respiratory and intensive care medicine to systematically and effectively learn from failure. A review of the literature (effective as of June 2013) derived from the electronic databases Medline via PubMed, EMBASE, ERIC and Google Scholar identified the following relevant obstacles (ii): a so-called blame culture associated with concealing failure, missing system analyses (vs. individual breakdown), and (economically) misdirected incentives. Possible strategies to overcome these obstacles (iii) include acknowledging the importance of leadership, a safe environment, open reporting, an effective feedback culture, and detection (e. g., trigger-tools), analysis and discussion (e. g., double loop learning) of failure. The underlying reasons for the occurrence of AHCE are based on structural, organisational and human shortcomings, and affect all categories of caregivers. Approaches to solving the problem should therefore focus primarily on the entire system, rather than on the individual alone. PMID:23846430

  14. Intensive Care Nurses’ Belief Systems Regarding the Health Economics: A Focused Ethnography

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Abbas; Vafaee-Najar, Ali; Bakhshi, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health care beliefs can have an effect on the efficiency and effectiveness of nursing practices. Nevertheless, how belief systems impact on the economic performance of intensive care unit (ICU) nurses is not known. This study aimed to explore the ICU nurses’ beliefs and their effect on nurse’s: practices and behavior patterns regarding the health economics. Methods: In this study, a focused ethnography method was used. Twenty-four informants from ICU nurses and other professional individuals were purposively selected and interviewed. As well, 400 hours of ethnographic observations were used for data collection. Data analysis was performed using the methods described by Miles and Huberman (1994). Findings: Eight beliefs were found that gave meaning to ICU nurse’s practices regarding the health economics. 1. The registration of medications and supplies disrupt the nursing care; 2. Monitoring and auditing improve consumption; 3. There is a fear of possible shortage in the future; 4. Supply and replacement of equipment is difficult; 5. Higher prices lead to more accurate consumption; 6. The quality of care precedes the costs; 7. Clinical Guidelines are abundant but useful; and 8. Patient economy has priority over hospital economy. Maintaining the quality of patient care with least attention to hospital costs was the main focus of the beliefs formed up in the ICU regarding the health economics. Conclusions: ICU nurses’ belief systems have significantly shaped in relation to providing a high-quality care. Although high quality of care can lead to a rise in the effectiveness of nursing care, cost control perspective should also be considered in planning for improve the quality of care. Therefore, it is necessary to involve the ICU nurses in decision-making about unit cost management. They must become familiar with the principles of heath care economics and productivity by applying an effective cost management program. It may be optimal to implement the

  15. N P Singh: History of the first intensive care unit in Delhi – reminiscences

    PubMed Central

    Devanandan, SP

    2010-01-01

    As most of us are aware, ventilator support came to stay after the polio epidemic in Denmark in the ‘50s. Many of us are also aware that Peter Safar, an Anaesthesiologist, is credited with pioneering cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), who also wrote a book titled “The ABC of Resuscitation” in 1957 for training the public in CPR. It was later adopted by the American Heart Association. He also started the first intensive care unit (ICU) in 1958 in the USA. Ten years later, from 1968, the specialty grew from strength to strength in our country and, in 1992, the Society of Critical Care Medicine was formed. PMID:21224980

  16. Acute kidney injury on admission to the intensive care unit: where to go from here?

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Marlies

    2008-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common problem, especially in critically ill patients. In Critical Care, Kolhe and colleagues report that 6.3% of 276,731 patients in 170 intensive care units (ICUs) in the UK had evidence of severe AKI within the first 24 hours of admission to ICU. ICU and hospital mortality as well as length of stay in hospital were significantly increased. In light of this serious burden on individuals and the health system in general, the following commentary discusses the current state of knowledge of AKI in ICU and calls for more attention to preventive strategies.

  17. [Glossary of bioethic terms and expressions frequently used in pediatric intensive care practice].

    PubMed

    Hernández Rastrollo, R; Hernández González, A; Hermana Tezanos, M T; Cambra Lasaosa, F J; Rodríguez Núñez, A

    2008-04-01

    Ethical issues are of increasing interest in current medicine, and pediatrics is no exception. In critical care, the relevance of these considerations becomes even greater. Commonly used expressions in bioethics, frequently lead to terminological confusion and misunderstandings, as reported by several publications, revealing a lack of clear concepts in many cases. As an attempt to clarify or facilitate the comprehension of the most relevant terms in this field, the Spanish Society of Pediatric Intensive Care has prepared a Glossary of the most commonly used terms and expressions.

  18. Early mobilization of mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Taito, Shunsuke; Shime, Nobuaki; Ota, Kohei; Yasuda, Hideto

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies have suggested that the early mobilization of mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care unit is safe and effective. However, in these studies, few patients reached high levels of active mobilization, and the standard of care among the studies has been inconsistent. The incidence of adverse events during early mobilization is low. Its importance should be considered in the context of the ABCDE bundle. Protocols of early mobilization with strict inclusion and exclusion criteria are needed to further investigate its contributions. PMID:27478617

  19. Bench-to-bedside review: Leadership and conflict management in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Strack van Schijndel, Rob JM; Burchardi, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    In the management of critical care units, leadership and conflict management are vital areas for the successful performance of the unit. In this article a practical approach to define competencies for leadership and principles and practices of conflict management are offered. This article is, by lack of relevant intensive care unit (ICU) literature, not evidence based, but it is the result of personal experience and a study of literature on leadership as well on conflicts and negotiations in non-medical areas. From this, information was selected that was recognisable to the authors and, thus, also seems to be useful knowledge for medical doctors in the ICU environment. PMID:18086322

  20. [Supplemental parenteral nutrition for intensive care patients: a logical combination with enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Thibault, Ronan; Berger, Mette M; Pichard, Claude

    2009-12-01

    Undernutrition is a widespread problem in the intensive care and is associated with a worse clinical outcome. Enteral nutrition is the recommended nutritional support in ICU patients. However, enteral nutrition is frequently insufficient to cover protein-energy needs. The initiation of supplemental parenteral nutrition, when enteral nutrition is insufficient, could optimize the nutritional therapy. Such a combination could allow reducing morbidity, length of stay and recovery, as well as improving quality of life and health care costs. Prospective studies are currently underway to test this hypothesis.