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Sample records for dwpf gc filter

  1. DWPF GC FILTER ASSEMBLY SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.; Imrich, K.

    2009-11-11

    On March 18, 2009 a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) GC Line Filter Assembly was received at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This filter assembly was removed from operation following the completion of Sludge Batch 4 processing in the DWPF. Work on this sample was requested in a Technical Assistance Request. This document reports the pictures, observations, samples collected, and analytical results for the assembly. The assembly arrived at SRNL separated into its three component filters: high efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-1, HEPA-2, and a high efficiency mist evaporator (HEME). Each stage of the assembly's media was sampled and examined visually and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Solids built up in the filter housing following the first stage HEME, were dissolved in dilute nitric acid and analyzed by ICP-AES and the undissolved white solids were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). The vast majority of the material in each of the three stages of the DWPF GC Line Filter Assembly appears to be contaminated with a Hg compound that is {approx}59 wt% Hg on a total solids basis. The Hg species was identified by XRD analysis to contain a mixture of Hg{sub 4}(OH)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Hg{sub 10}(OH){sub 4}(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}. Only in the core sample of the second stage HEPA, did this material appear to be completely covering portions of the filter media, possibly explaining the pressure drops observed by DWPF. The fact that the material migrates through the HEME filter and both HEPA filters, and that it was seen collecting on the outlet side of the HEME filter, would seem to indicate that these filters are not efficient at removing this material. Further SRAT off-gas system modeling should help determine the extent of Hg breakthrough past the Mercury Water Wash Tank (MWWT). The SRAT off-gas system has not been modeled since startup of the facility. Improvements to the efficiency of Hg stripping prior to the ammonia scrubber would seem to be

  2. DWPF risk analysis summary

    SciTech Connect

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1990-10-01

    This document contains selected risk analysis data from Chapter 9 (Safety Analysis) of the Defense Waste Processing Facility Safety Analysis Report DWPF SAR and draft Addendum 1 to the Waste Tank Farms SAR. Although these data may be revised prior to finalization of the draft SAR and the draft addendum, they are presently the best available information and were therefore used in preparing the risk analysis portion of the DWPF Environmental Analysis (DWPF EA). This information has been extracted from those draft documents an approved under separate cover so that it can be used as reference material for the DWPF EA when it is placed in the public reading rooms. 9 refs., 4 tabs.

  3. DWPF Development Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzscheiter, E.W.

    1994-05-09

    The DWPF Development Plan is based on an evaluation process flowsheet and related waste management systems. The scope is shown in Figure 1 entitled ``DWPF Process Development Systems.`` To identify the critical development efforts, each system has been analyzed to determine: The identification of unresolved technology issues. A technology issue (TI) is one that requires basic development to resolve a previously unknown process or equipment problem and is managed via the Technology Assurance Program co-chaired by DWPF and SRTC. Areas that require further work to sufficiently define the process basis or technical operating envelop for DWPF. This activity involves the application of sound engineering and development principles to define the scope of work required to complete the technical data. The identification of the level of effort and expertise required to provide process technical consultation during the start-up and demonstration of this first of a kind plant.

  4. SCIX IMPACT ON DWPF CPC

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.

    2011-07-14

    A program was conducted to systematically evaluate potential impacts of the proposed Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). The program involved a series of interrelated tasks. Past studies of the impact of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) and monosodium titanate (MST) on DWPF were reviewed. Paper studies and material balance calculations were used to establish reasonable bounding levels of CST and MST in sludge. Following the paper studies, Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) simulant was modified to have both bounding and intermediate levels of MST and ground CST. The SCIX flow sheet includes grinding of the CST which is larger than DWPF frit when not ground. Nominal ground CST was not yet available, therefore a similar CST ground previously in Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was used. It was believed that this CST was over ground and that it would bound the impact of nominal CST on sludge slurry properties. Lab-scale simulations of the DWPF CPC were conducted using SB10 simulants with no, intermediate, and bounding levels of CST and MST. Tests included both the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. Simulations were performed at high and low acid stoichiometry. A demonstration of the extended CPC flowsheet was made that included streams from the site interim salt processing operations. A simulation using irradiated CST and MST was also completed. An extensive set of rheological measurements was made to search for potential adverse consequences of CST and MST and slurry rheology in the CPC. The SCIX CPC impact program was conducted in parallel with a program to evaluate the impact of SCIX on the final DWPF glass waste form and on the DWPF melter throughput. The studies must be considered together when evaluating the full impact of SCIX on DWPF. Due to the fact that the alternant flowsheet for DWPF has not been selected, this study did not

  5. DWPF Safely Dispositioning Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-05

    The only operating radioactive waste glassification plant in the nation, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the liquid radioactive waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called “vitrification,” as the preferred option for treating liquid radioactive waste.

  6. DWPF MATERIALS EVALUATION SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, T.; Chandler, G.; Daugherty, W.; Imrich, K.; Jankins, C.

    1996-09-12

    To better ensure the reliability of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) remote canyon process equipment, a materials evaluation program was performed as part of the overall startup test program. Specific test programs included FA-04 ('Process Vessels Erosion/Corrosion Studies') and FA-05 (melter inspection). At the conclusion of field testing, Test Results Reports were issued to cover the various test phases. While these reports completed the startup test requirements, DWPF-Engineering agreed to compile a more detailed report which would include essentially all of the materials testing programs performed at DWPF. The scope of the materials evaouation programs included selected equipment from the Salt Process Cell (SPC), Chemical Process Cell (CPC), Melt Cell, Canister Decon Cell (CDC), and supporting facilities. The program consisted of performing pre-service baseline inspections (work completed in 1992) and follow-up inspections after completion of the DWPF cold chemical runs. Process equipment inspected included: process vessels, pumps, agitators, coils, jumpers, and melter top head components. Various NDE (non-destructive examination) techniques were used during the inspection program, including: ultrasonic testing (UT), visual (direct or video probe), radiography, penetrant testing (PT), and dimensional analyses. Finally, coupon racks were placed in selected tanks in 1992 for subsequent removal and corrosion evaluation after chemical runs.

  7. DWPF Safely Dispositioning Liquid Waste

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The only operating radioactive waste glassification plant in the nation, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the liquid radioactive waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called “vitrification,” as the preferred option for treating liquid radioactive waste.

  8. Unique ion filter: a data reduction tool for GC/MS data preprocessing prior to chemometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Adutwum, L A; Harynuk, J J

    2014-08-05

    Using raw GC/MS data as the X-block for chemometric modeling has the potential to provide better classification models for complex samples when compared to using the total ion current (TIC), extracted ion chromatograms/profiles (EIC/EIP), or integrated peak tables. However, the abundance of raw GC/MS data necessitates some form of data reduction/feature selection to remove the variables containing primarily noise from the data set. Several algorithms for feature selection exist; however, due to the extreme number of variables (10(6)-10(8) variables per chromatogram), the feature selection time can be prolonged and computationally expensive. Herein, we present a new prefilter for automated data reduction of GC/MS data prior to feature selection. This tool, termed unique ion filter (UIF), is a module that can be added after chromatographic alignment and prior to any subsequent feature selection algorithm. The UIF objectively reduces the number of irrelevant or redundant variables in raw GC/MS data, while preserving potentially relevant analytical information. In the m/z dimension, data are reduced from a full spectrum to a handful of unique ions for each chromatographic peak. In the time dimension, data are reduced to only a handful of scans around each peak apex. UIF was applied to a data set of GC/MS data for a variety of gasoline samples to be classified using partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) according to octane rating. It was also applied to a series of chromatograms from casework fire debris analysis to be classified on the basis of whether or not signatures of gasoline were detected. By reducing the overall population of candidate variables subjected to subsequent variable selection, the UIF reduced the total feature selection time for which a perfect classification of all validation data was achieved from 373 to 9 min (98% reduction in computing time). Additionally, the significant reduction in included variables resulted in a concomitant

  9. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Simulant Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M

    2005-04-05

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of an evaporation process to reduce the volume of the recycle stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The concentrated recycle would be returned to DWPF while the overhead condensate would be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Plant. Various blends of evaporator feed were tested using simulants developed from characterization of actual recycle streams from DWPF and input from DWPF-Engineering. The simulated feed was evaporated in laboratory scale apparatus to target a 30X volume reduction. Condensate and concentrate samples from each run were analyzed and the process characteristics (foaming, scaling, etc) were visually monitored during each run. The following conclusions were made from the testing: Concentration of the ''typical'' recycle stream in DWPF by 30X was feasible. The addition of DWTT recycle streams to the typical recycle stream raises the solids content of the evaporator feed considerably and lowers the amount of concentration that can be achieved. Foaming was noted during all evaporation tests and must be addressed prior to operation of the full-scale evaporator. Tests were conducted that identified Dow Corning 2210 as an antifoam candidate that warrants further evaluation. The condensate has the potential to exceed the ETP WAC for mercury, silicon, and TOC. Controlling the amount of equipment decontamination recycle in the evaporator blend would help meet the TOC limits. The evaporator condensate will be saturated with mercury and elemental mercury will collect in the evaporator condensate collection vessel. No scaling on heating surfaces was noted during the tests, but splatter onto the walls of the evaporation vessels led to a buildup of solids. These solids were difficult to remove with 2M nitric acid. Precipitation of solids was not noted during the testing. Some of the aluminum present in the recycle streams was converted from gibbsite to

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS QUENCHER SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, J.

    2011-11-14

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently received a deposit sample from the Melter Primary Off Gas System (POG) of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This sample was composed of material that had been collected while the quencher was in operation January 27, 2011 through March 31, 2011. DWPF requested, through a technical assistance request, characterization of the melter off-gas deposits by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. The purpose of the Melter Off-Gas System is to reduce the amount of radioactive particles and mercury in the gases vented to the atmosphere. Gases emitted from the melter pass through the primary film cooler, quencher, Off-Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT), Steam Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), a condenser, a high efficiency mist eliminator, and a high efficiency particulate air filter, before being vented to the Process Vessel Vent System. The film coolers cool the gases leaving the melter vapor space from {approx}750 C to {approx}375 C, by introducing air and steam to the flow. In the next step, the quencher cools the gas to about 60 C by bringing the condensate from the OGCT in contact with the effluent (Figure 1). Most of the steam in the effluent is then condensed and the melter vapor space pressure is reduced. The purpose of the OGCT is to collect and store the condensate formed during the melter operation. Condensate from the OGCT is circulated to the SAS and atomized with steam. This atomized condensate is mixed with the off-gas to wet and join the particulate which is then removed in the cyclone. The next stage incorporates a chilled water condenser which separates the vapors and elemental mercury from the off-gas steam. Primary off-gas deposit samples from the DWPF melter have previously been analyzed. In 2003, samples from just past the film cooler, from the inlet of the quencher and inside the quencher were analyzed at SRNL. It was determined that the samples were a

  11. DWPF SIMULANT CPC STUDIES FOR SB7B

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.

    2011-11-01

    same acid stoichiometric factor. The slow acid addition in MCU seemed to alter the reactions that consumed the small excess acid present such that hydrogen generation was promoted relative to sludge-only processing. The coupled test reached higher wt.% total solids, and this likely contributed to the SME cycle hydrogen limit being exceeded at 110% KMA. It is clear from the trends in the SME processing GC data, however, that the frit slurry formic acid contributed to driving the hydrogen generation rate above the SME cycle limit. Hydrogen generation rates after the second frit addition generally exceeded those after the first frit addition. SRAT formate loss increased with increasing acid stoichiometry (15% to 35%). A substantial nitrate gain which was observed to have occurred after acid addition (and nitrite destruction) was reversed to a net nitrate loss in runs with higher acid stoichiometry (nitrate in SRAT product less than sum of sludge nitrate and added nitric acid). Increased ammonium ion formation was also indicated in the runs with nitrate loss. Oxalate loss on the order 20% was indicated in three of the four acid stoichiometry runs and in the coupled flowsheet run. The minimum acid stoichiometry run had no indicated loss. The losses were of the same order as the official analytical uncertainty of the oxalate concentration measurement, but were not randomly distributed about zero loss, so some actual loss was likely occurring. Based on the entire set of SB7b test data, it is recommended that DWPF avoid concentrating additional sludge solids in single SRAT batches to limit the concentrations of noble metals to SB7a processing levels (on a grams noble metal per SRAT batch basis). It is also recommended that DWPF drop the formic acid addition that accompanies the process frit 418 additions, since SME cycle data showed considerable catalytic activity for hydrogen generation from this additional acid (about 5% increase in stoichiometry occurred from the frit

  12. Characterization of DWPF recycle condensate materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.; Adamson, D. J.; King, W. D.

    2015-04-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle Condensate Tank (RCT) sample was delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization with particular interest in the concentration of I-129, U-233, U-235, total U, and total Pu. Since a portion of Salt Batch 8 will contain DWPF recycle materials, the concentration of I-129 is important to understand for salt batch planning purposes. The chemical and physical characterizations are also needed as input to the interpretation of future work aimed at determining the propensity of the RCT material to foam, and methods to remediate any foaming potential. According to DWPF the Tank Farm 2H evaporator has experienced foaming while processing DWPF recycle materials. The characterization work on the RCT samples has been completed and is reported here.

  13. Agitation in DWPF Precipitate Pump Pit Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, J.C.

    1986-01-20

    An experimental program to test the reference agitator design for DWPF Precipitate Pump Pit Tanks has been completed. It was not known whether the reference agitator design would produce uniform mixing of precipitate slurry. There was also a concern that the reference agitator would produce excessive foaming of precipitate. An alternative agitator design that produces good mixing with little or no foam buildup was identified in the tests and is recommended for use in DWPF Precipitate Pump Pit Tanks. 7 refs.

  14. DWPF simulant CPC studies for SB8

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.; Zamecnik, J. R.

    2013-06-25

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) accepted a technical task request (TTR) from Waste Solidification Engineering to perform simulant tests to support the qualification of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) and to develop the flowsheet for SB8 in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). These efforts pertained to the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Separate studies were conducted for frit development and glass properties (including REDOX). The SRNL CPC effort had two primary phases divided by the decision to drop Tank 12 from the SB8 constituents. This report focuses on the second phase with SB8 compositions that do not contain the Tank 12 piece. A separate report will document the initial phase of SB8 testing that included Tank 12. The second phase of SB8 studies consisted of two sets of CPC studies. The first study involved CPC testing of an SB8 simulant for Tank 51 to support the CPC demonstration of the washed Tank 51 qualification sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells facility. SB8-Tank 51 was a high iron-low aluminum waste with fairly high mercury and moderate noble metal concentrations. Tank 51 was ultimately washed to about 1.5 M sodium which is the highest wash endpoint since SB3-Tank 51. This study included three simulations of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle with the sludge-only flowsheet at nominal DWPF processing conditions and three different acid stoichiometries. These runs produced a set of recommendations that were used to guide the successful SRNL qualification SRAT/SME demonstration with actual Tank 51 washed waste. The second study involved five SRAT/SME runs with SB8-Tank 40 simulant. Four of the runs were designed to define the acid requirements for sludge-only processing in DWPF with respect to nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. The fifth run was an intermediate acid stoichiometry demonstration of the coupled flowsheet for SB8. These runs produced a set of processing

  15. Supercritical water oxidation technology for DWPF

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.T.; Gentilucci, J.A.

    1992-02-07

    At the request of Mr. H.L. Brandt and others in the Savannah River Field Office High Level Waste Division office, DWPF, and SRL personnel have reviewed two potential applications for supercritical water oxidation technology in DWPF. The first application would replace the current hydrolysis process by destroying the organic fractions of the precipitated cesium / potassium tetraphenylborate slurry. The second application pertains to liquid benzene destruction. After a thorough evaluation the first application is not recommended. The second is ready to be tested if needed.

  16. Statistical Analysis of DWPF ARG-1 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.P.

    2001-03-02

    A statistical analysis of analytical results for ARG-1, an Analytical Reference Glass, blanks, and the associated calibration and bench standards has been completed. These statistics provide a means for DWPF to review the performance of their laboratory as well as identify areas of improvement.

  17. Phase Stability Determinations of DWPF Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, S.L.

    1999-10-22

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. To fulfill this requirement, glass samples were heat treated at various times and temperatures. These results will provide guidance to the repository program about conditions to be avoided during shipping, handling and storage of DWPF canistered waste forms.

  18. Characterization of DWPF recycle condensate tank materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle Condensate Tank (RCT) sample was delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization with particular interest in the concentration of I-129, U-233, U-235, total U, and total Pu. Since a portion of Salt Batch 8 will contain DWPF recycle materials, the concentration of I-129 is important to undertand for salt batch planning purposes. The chemical and physical characterizations are also needed as input to the interpretation of future work aimed at determining the propensity of the RCT material to foam, and methods to remediate any foaming potential. According to DWPF the Tank Farm 2H evaporator has experienced foaming while processing DWPF recycle materials. The characterization work on the RCT samples has been completed and is reported here. The composition of the Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) RCT material is largely a low base solution of 0.2M NaNO2 and 0.1M NaNO3 with a small amount of formate present. Insoluble solids comprise only 0.05 wt.% of the slurry. The solids appear to be largely sludge-like solids based on elemental composition and SEM-EDS analysis. The sample contains an elevated concentration of I-129 (38x) and substantial 59% fraction of Tc-99, as compared to the incoming SB8 Tank 40 feed material. The Hg concentration is 5x, when compared to Fe, of that expected based on sludge carryover. The total U and Pu concentrations are reduced significantly, 0.536 wt.% TS and 2.42E-03 wt.% TS, respectively, with the fissile components, U-233, U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241, an order of magnitude lower in concentration than those in the SB8 Tank 40 DWPF feed material. This report will be revised to include the foaming study requested in the TTR and outlined in the TTQAP when that work is concluded.

  19. DWPF Simulant CPC Studies For SB8

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, J. D.

    2013-09-25

    Prior to processing a Sludge Batch (SB) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), flowsheet studies using simulants are performed. Typically, the flowsheet studies are conducted based on projected composition(s). The results from the flowsheet testing are used to 1) guide decisions during sludge batch preparation, 2) serve as a preliminary evaluation of potential processing issues, and 3) provide a basis to support the Shielded Cells qualification runs performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). SB8 was initially projected to be a combination of the Tank 40 heel (Sludge Batch 7b), Tank 13, Tank 12, and the Tank 51 heel. In order to accelerate preparation of SB8, the decision was made to delay the oxalate-rich material from Tank 12 to a future sludge batch. SB8 simulant studies without Tank 12 were reported in a separate report.1 The data presented in this report will be useful when processing future sludge batches containing Tank 12. The wash endpoint target for SB8 was set at a significantly higher sodium concentration to allow acceptable glass compositions at the targeted waste loading. Four non-coupled tests were conducted using simulant representing Tank 40 at 110-146% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Hydrogen was generated during high acid stoichiometry (146% acid) SRAT testing up to 31% of the DWPF hydrogen limit. SME hydrogen generation reached 48% of of the DWPF limit for the high acid run. Two non-coupled tests were conducted using simulant representing Tank 51 at 110-146% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Hydrogen was generated during high acid stoichiometry SRAT testing up to 16% of the DWPF limit. SME hydrogen generation reached 49% of the DWPF limit for hydrogen in the SME for the high acid run. Simulant processing was successful using previously established antifoam addition strategy. Foaming during formic acid addition was not observed in any of the runs. Nitrite was destroyed in all runs and no N2O was detected

  20. Two step derivatization for the analyses of organic, amino acids and glycines on filter paper plasma by GC-MS/SIM.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Ran

    2007-03-01

    A rapid dried-filter paper plasma-spot analytical method was developed to quantify organic acids, amino acids, and glycines simultaneously in a two-step derivatization procedure with good sensitivity and specificity. The new method involves a two-step trimethylsilyl (TMS) - trifluoroacyl (TFA) derivatization procedure using GC-MS/ selective ion monitoring (GC-MS/SIM). The dried-filter paper plasma was fortified with an internal standard (tropate) as well as a standard mixture of distilled water and methanol. Methyl orange was added to the residue as an indicator. N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide) and N-methyl-bis-trifluoroacetamide were then added and heated to 60 degrees C for 10 and 15 min to produce the TMS and TFA derivatives, respectively. Using this method, the silylation of carboxylic functional groups was carried out, which was followed by the trifluoroacyl derivatization of the amino functional group. The derivatives were analyzed by GC-MS/SIM. A calibration cure showed a linear relationship for the target compounds between concentrations of 10-500 ng/mL. The limit of detection and quantification on a plasma spot were 10-90 ng/mL (S/N=9) and 80-500 ng/ mL, respectively. The correlation coefficient ranged from 0.938 and 0.999. When applied to the samples from positive patients, the method clearly differentiated normal subjects from the patients with various metabolic disorders such as PKU, MSUD, OTC and a Propionic Aciduria. The new developed method might be useful for making a rapid, sensitive and simultaneous diagnosis of inherited organic and amino acid disorders. In addition, this method is expected to be an alternative method for screening newborns for metabolic disorders in laboratories where expensive MS/MS is unavailable.

  1. DWPF SMECT PVV SAMPLE CHARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.; Crawford, C.

    2013-06-18

    On April 2, 2013, a solid sample of material collected from the Defense Waste Processing Facility’s Process Vessel Vent (PVV) jumper for the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) was received at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). DWPF has experienced pressure spikes within the SMECT and other process vessels which have resulted in processing delays while a vacuum was re-established. Work on this sample was requested in a Technical Assistance Request (TAR). This document reports the results of chemical and physical property measurements made on the sample, as well as insights into the possible impact to the material using DWPF’s proposed remediation methods. DWPF was interested in what the facility could expect when the material was exposed to either 8M nitric acid or 90% formic acid, the two materials they have the ability to flush through the PVV line in addition to process water once the line is capped off during a facility outage.

  2. DWPF waste glass Product Composition Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.G.; Postles, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to blend aqueous radwaste (PHA) with solid radwaste (Sludge) in a waste receipt vessel (the SRAT). The resulting SRAT material is transferred to the SME an there blended with ground glass (Frit) to produce a batch of melter feed slurry. The SME material is passed to a hold tank (the MFT) which is used to continuously feed the DWPF melter. The melter. The melter produces a molten glass wasteform which is poured into stainless steel canisters for cooling and, ultimately, shipment to and storage in a geologic repository. The Product Composition Control System (PCCS) is the system intended to ensure that the melt will be processible and that the glass wasteform will be acceptable. This document provides a description of this system.

  3. DWPF waste glass Product Composition Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.G.; Postles, R.L.

    1992-07-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to blend aqueous radwaste (PHA) with solid radwaste (Sludge) in a waste receipt vessel (the SRAT). The resulting SRAT material is transferred to the SME an there blended with ground glass (Frit) to produce a batch of melter feed slurry. The SME material is passed to a hold tank (the MFT) which is used to continuously feed the DWPF melter. The melter. The melter produces a molten glass wasteform which is poured into stainless steel canisters for cooling and, ultimately, shipment to and storage in a geologic repository. The Product Composition Control System (PCCS) is the system intended to ensure that the melt will be processible and that the glass wasteform will be acceptable. This document provides a description of this system.

  4. Liquidus Temperature Data for DWPF Glass

    SciTech Connect

    GF Piepel; JD Vienna; JV Crum; M Mika; P Hrma

    1999-05-21

    This report provides new liquidus temperature (TL) versus composition data that can be used to reduce uncertainty in TL calculation for DWPF glass. According to the test plan and test matrix design PNNL has measured TL for 53 glasses within and just outside of the current DWPF processing composition window. The TL database generated under this task will directly support developing and enhancing the current TL process-control model. Preliminary calculations have shown a high probability of increasing HLW loading in glass produced at the SRS and Hanford. This increase in waste loading will decrease the lifecycle tank cleanup costs by decreasing process time and the volume of waste glass produced.

  5. Thermal desorption GC-MS as a tool to provide PAH certified standard reference material on particulate matter quartz filters.

    PubMed

    Grandesso, Emanuela; Pérez Ballesta, Pascual; Kowalewski, Konrad

    2013-02-15

    Reference materials for particulate matter (PM) on filter media are not available for the quantification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient air. This is due to the difficulty of obtaining reference material that has a homogeneous distribution on a filter surface that is large enough for characterization and distribution. High volume sample filters from different locations and seasons were considered to validate the feasibility of the use of quartz filters as reference material for PAH concentrations. A rapid thermal desorption (TD) technique coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy was applied to characterise the material for the content of fifteen different PAHs. TD technique allowed for rapid and accurate analysis of small sections of filter (5mm diameter), leaving enough material for the production of twenty sub-filter cuts (42 mm diameter) that could be used for distribution and control. Stability and homogeneity tests required for material certification were performed as indicated by the ISO guide 34:2009 and ISO 35:2006. The contribution of the heterogeneous distribution of PAHs on the filter surface resulted generally lower than 10% and higher for more volatile PAHs. One year of storage at -18°C indicated no significant variation in PAH concentrations. Nevertheless, a methodology for shipping and storing of the filter material at ambient temperature in especially designed plastic envelopes, was also shown to allow for stabile concentrations within twenty days. The method accuracy was confirmed by the analysis of NIST SRM 1649a (urban dust) and PAH concentrations were validated against the reference values obtained from an inter-laboratory exercise. In the case of benzo[a]pyrene for masses quantified between 100 pg and 10 ng the TD method provided expanded uncertainties of circa 10%, while the inter-laboratory reference value uncertainties ranged between 15 and 20%. The evaluation of these results supports the use of the presented

  6. Rheological Modifier Testing with DWPF Process Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL, STONE

    2004-02-01

    Rheological modification agents were tested on simulated SRAT and SME products to determine if a suitable agent could be found for the DWPF process slurries. The agents tested were dispersants that lower the rheological properties of slurries by preventing agglomerization. Dolapix CE64, an ethylene glycol, and Disperse-Ayd W28, a polyacrylate, were the most effective dispersants tested. Further evaluation and testing should be performed on Dolapix CE64 and Disperse-Ayd W28 to determine if implementation is possible in DWPF. The initial phase of future work will include optimization of the rheology modifier by the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) and development of a maximum concentration limit for the rheology modifiers. IIT has been commissioned to evaluate the properties of these chemicals to determine if the chemical makeup can be optimized to enhance the properties of these modifiers. An initial concentration limit based upon the DWPF flammability limit and other constraints should be calculated to determine the potential downstream impacts.

  7. DWPF waste form compliance plan (Draft Revision)

    SciTech Connect

    Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L.

    1991-12-31

    The Department of Energy currently has over 100 million liters of high-level radioactive waste in storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In the late 1970`s, the Department of Energy recognized that there were significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the high-level waste in a stable solid form. Several alternative waste forms were evaluated in terms of product quality and reliability of fabrication. This evaluation led to a decision to build the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS to convert the easily dispersed liquid waste to borosilicate glass. In accordance with the NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) process, an Environmental Impact Statement was prepared for the facility, as well as an Environmental Assessment of the alternative waste forms, and issuance of a Record of Decision (in December, 1982) on the waste form. The Department of Energy, recognizing that start-up of the DWPF would considerably precede licensing of a repository, instituted a Waste Acceptance Process to ensure that these canistered waste forms would be acceptable for eventual disposal at a federal repository. This report is a revision of the DWPF compliance plan.

  8. Supercritical water oxidation technology for DWPF. [Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.T.; Gentilucci, J.A.

    1992-02-07

    At the request of Mr. H.L. Brandt and others in the Savannah River Field Office High Level Waste Division office, DWPF, and SRL personnel have reviewed two potential applications for supercritical water oxidation technology in DWPF. The first application would replace the current hydrolysis process by destroying the organic fractions of the precipitated cesium / potassium tetraphenylborate slurry. The second application pertains to liquid benzene destruction. After a thorough evaluation the first application is not recommended. The second is ready to be tested if needed.

  9. DWPF Sample Vial Insert Study-Statistical Analysis of DWPF Mock-Up Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.P.

    1997-09-18

    This report is prepared as part of Technical/QA Task Plan WSRC-RP-97-351 which was issued in response to Technical Task Request HLW/DWPF/TTR-970132 submitted by DWPF. Presented in this report is a statistical analysis of DWPF Mock-up test data for evaluation of two new analytical methods which use insert samples from the existing HydragardTM sampler. The first is a new hydrofluoric acid based method called the Cold Chemical Method (Cold Chem) and the second is a modified fusion method.Either new DWPF analytical method could result in a two to three fold improvement in sample analysis time.Both new methods use the existing HydragardTM sampler to collect a smaller insert sample from the process sampling system. The insert testing methodology applies to the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) and the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) samples.The insert sample is named after the initial trials which placed the container inside the sample (peanut) vials. Samples in small 3 ml containers (Inserts) are analyzed by either the cold chemical method or a modified fusion method. The current analytical method uses a HydragardTM sample station to obtain nearly full 15 ml peanut vials. The samples are prepared by a multi-step process for Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) analysis by drying, vitrification, grinding and finally dissolution by either mixed acid or fusion. In contrast, the insert sample is placed directly in the dissolution vessel, thus eliminating the drying, vitrification and grinding operations for the Cold chem method. Although the modified fusion still requires drying and calcine conversion, the process is rapid due to the decreased sample size and that no vitrification step is required.A slurry feed simulant material was acquired from the TNX pilot facility from the test run designated as PX-7.The Mock-up test data were gathered on the basis of a statistical design presented in SRT-SCS-97004 (Rev. 0). Simulant PX-7 samples were taken in the DWPF Analytical Cell Mock

  10. COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS MODEL FOR DWPF CANISTER FILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Kesterson, M.

    2011-03-31

    The purpose of this work was to develop a model that can be used to predict temperatures of the glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters during filling and cooldown. Past attempts to model these processes resulted in large (>200K) differences in predicted temperatures compared to experimentally measured temperatures. This work was therefore intended to also generate a model capable of reproducing the experimentally measured trends of the glass/canister temperature during filling and subsequent cooldown of DWPF canisters. To accomplish this, a simplified model was created using the finite element modeling software COMSOL Multiphysics which accepts user defined constants or expressions to describe material properties. The model results were compared to existing experimental data for validation. A COMSOL Multiphysics model was developed to predict temperatures of the glass within DWPF canisters during filling and cooldown. The model simulations and experimental data were in good agreement. The largest temperature deviations were {approx}40 C for the 87inch thermocouple location at 3000 minutes and during the initial cooldown at the 51 inch location occurring at approximately 600 minutes. Additionally, the model described in this report predicts the general trends in temperatures during filling and cooling observed experimentally. However, the model was developed using parameters designed to fit a single set of experimental data. Therefore, Q-loss is not currently a function of pour rate and pour temperature. Future work utilizing the existing model should include modifying the Q-loss term to be variable based on flow rate and pour temperature. Further enhancements could include eliminating the Q-loss term for a user defined convection where Navier-Stokes does not need to be solved in order to have convection heat transfer.

  11. Simple and rapid analytical method for detection of amino acids in blood using blood spot on filter paper, fast-GC/MS and isotope dilution technique.

    PubMed

    Kawana, Shuichi; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro; Hasegawa, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2010-11-15

    A simple and rapid method for quantitative analysis of amino acids, including valine (Val), leucine (Leu), isoleucine (Ile), methionine (Met) and phenylalanine (Phe), in whole blood has been developed using GC/MS. In this method, whole blood was collected using a filter paper technique, and a 1/8 in. blood spot punch was used for sample preparation. Amino acids were extracted from the sample, and the extracts were purified using cation-exchange resins. The isotope dilution method using ²H₈-Val, ²H₃-Leu, ²H₃-Met and ²H₅-Phe as internal standards was applied. Following propyl chloroformate derivatization, the derivatives were analyzed using fast-GC/MS. The extraction recoveries using these techniques ranged from 69.8% to 87.9%, and analysis time for each sample was approximately 26 min. Calibration curves at concentrations from 0.0 to 1666.7 μmol/l for Val, Leu, Ile and Phe and from 0.0 to 333.3 μmol/l for Met showed good linearity with regression coefficients=1. The method detection limits for Val, Leu, Ile, Met and Phe were 24.2, 16.7, 8.7, 1.5 and 12.9 μmol/l, respectively. This method was applied to blood spot samples obtained from patients with phenylketonuria (PKU), maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), hypermethionine and neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency (NICCD), and the analysis results showed that the concentrations of amino acids that characterize these diseases were increased. These results indicate that this method provides a simple and rapid procedure for precise determination of amino acids in whole blood.

  12. DWPF Air Lift Pump Life Cycle Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    IMRICH, KENNETH

    2004-03-15

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) air lift pump was successfully tested at Clemson for 72 days of operation. It provided sufficient flow to pump molten glass without excessive foaming. Slurry feeding also did not reveal any problems with cold cap stability. Metallurgically the Inconel 690 (690) portions of the pump were in excellent condition with no visual evidence of degradation even in high flow regions, i.e., air/melt interface and glass discharge regions. Spinel deposits, which completely covered the air passage on one side, were found at the inlet of each platinum/rhodium (Pt/Rh) nozzle. Although the deposits were extensive, they were porous and did not have an adverse effect on the operation of the pump. The technique used to secure the platinum/rhodium nozzles to the 690 housing appeared to be adequate with only minor oxidation of the 690 threads and glass in-leakage. Galvanic attack was observed where the nozzle formed a seal with the 690. Significant pitting of the 690 was observed around the entire seal. Intergranular cracking of the Pt/Rh alloy was extensive but the cause could not be determined. Testing would be required to evaluate the degradation. Data from the performance test and the metallurgical evaluation are being used to modify the design of the first DWPF production air lift pump. It will be fabricated entirely from 690 and use argon as the purge gas. It is intended to have a service life of 6 months. Recommendations for insertion, operation, and inspection of the pump are also included in this report. Performance data collected from the operation of the production pump will be used to further optimize the design. Laboratory exposure tests should also be performed to evaluate the galvanic effect between platinum/rhodium and 690.

  13. DWPF Macrobatch 2 Melt Rate Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.E.

    2001-01-03

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister production rate must be increased to meet canister production goals. Although a number of factors exist that could potentially increase melt rate, this study focused on two: (1) changes in frit composition and (2) changes to the feed preparation process to alter the redox of the melter feed. These two factors were investigated for Macrobatch 2 (sludge batch 1B) utilizing crucible studies and a specially designed ''melt rate'' furnace. Other potential factors that could increase melt rate include: mechanical mixing via stirring or the use of bubblers, changing the power skewing to redistribute the power input to the melter, and elimination of heat loss (e.g. air in leakage). The melt rate testing in FY00 demonstrated that melt rate can be improved by adding a different frit or producing a much more reducing glass by the addition of sugar as a reductant. The frit that melted the fastest in the melt rate testing was Frit 165. A paper stud y was performed using the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to determine the impact on predicted glass viscosity, liquidus, durability, and operating window if the frit was changed from Frit 200 to Frit 165. PCCS indicated that the window was very similar for both frits. In addition, the predicted viscosity of the frit 165 glass was 46 poise versus 84 poise for the Frit 200 glass. As a result, a change from Frit 200 to Frit 165 is expected to increase the melt rate in DWPF without decreasing waste loading.

  14. GADOLINIUM SOLUBILITY AND VOLATILITY DURING DWPF PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Reboul, S

    2008-01-30

    Understanding of gadolinium behavior, as it relates to potential neutron poisoning applications at the DWPF, has increased over the past several years as process specific data have been generated. Of primary importance are phenomena related to gadolinium solubility and volatility, which introduce the potential for gadolinium to be separated from fissile materials during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) and Melter operations. Existing data indicate that gadolinium solubilities under moderately low pH conditions can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on the quantities of other constituents that are present. With respect to sludge batching processes, the gadolinium solubility appears to be highly affected by iron. In cases where the mass ratio of Fe:Gd is 300 or more, the gadolinium solubility has been observed to be low, one milligram per liter or less. In contrast, when the ratio of Fe:Gd is 20 or less, the gadolinium solubility has been found to be relatively high, several thousands of milligrams per liter. For gadolinium to serve as an effective neutron poison in CPC operations, the solubility needs to be limited to approximately 100 mg/L. Unfortunately, the Fe:Gd ratio that corresponds to this solubility limit has not been identified. Existing data suggest gadolinium and plutonium are not volatile during melter operations. However, the data are subject to inherent uncertainties preventing definitive conclusions on this matter. In order to determine if gadolinium offers a practical means of poisoning waste in DWPF operations, generation of additional data is recommended. This includes: Gd solubility testing under conditions where the Fe:Gd ratio varies from 50 to 150; and Gd and Pu volatility studies tailored to quantifying high temperature partitioning. Additional tests focusing on crystal aging of Gd/Pu precipitates should be pursued if receipt of gadolinium-poisoned waste into the Tank Farm becomes routine.

  15. Statistical analysis of the DWPF prototypic sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Postles, R.L.; Reeve, C.P.; Jenkins, W.J.; Bickford, D.F.

    1991-12-31

    The DWPF process will be controlled using assay measurements on samples of feed slurry. These slurries are radioactive, and thus will be sampled remotely. A Hydraguard{trademark} pump-driven sampler system will be used as the remote sampling device. A prototype Hydraguard{trademark} sampler has been studied in a full-scale mock-up of a DWPF process vessel. Two issues were of dominant interest: (1) what accuracy and precision can be provided by such a pump-driven sampler in the face of the slurry rheology; and, if the Hydraguard{trademark} sample accurately represents the slurry in its local area, (2) is the slurry homogeneous enough throughout for it to represent the entire vessel? To determine Hydraguard{trademark} Accuracy, a Grab Sampler of simpler mechanism was used as reference. This (Low) Grab Sampler was located as near to the intake port of the Hydraguard{trademark} as could be arranged. To determine Homogeneity, a second (High) Grab Sampler was located above the first. The data necessary to these determinations comes from the measurement system, so its important variables also affect the results. Thus, the design of the test involved not just Sampling variables, but also some of the Measurement variables as well. However, the main concern was the Sampler and not the Measurement System, so the test design included only such measurement variables as could not be circumvented (Vials, Dissolution Method, and Aliquoting). The test was executed by, or under the direct oversight of, expert technologists. It thus did not explore the many important particulars of ``routine`` plant operations (such as Remote Sample Preparation or Laboratory Shift Operation).

  16. Statistical analysis of the DWPF prototypic sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Postles, R.L.; Reeve, C.P.; Jenkins, W.J.; Bickford, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    The DWPF process will be controlled using assay measurements on samples of feed slurry. These slurries are radioactive, and thus will be sampled remotely. A Hydraguard{trademark} pump-driven sampler system will be used as the remote sampling device. A prototype Hydraguard{trademark} sampler has been studied in a full-scale mock-up of a DWPF process vessel. Two issues were of dominant interest: (1) what accuracy and precision can be provided by such a pump-driven sampler in the face of the slurry rheology; and, if the Hydraguard{trademark} sample accurately represents the slurry in its local area, (2) is the slurry homogeneous enough throughout for it to represent the entire vessel To determine Hydraguard{trademark} Accuracy, a Grab Sampler of simpler mechanism was used as reference. This (Low) Grab Sampler was located as near to the intake port of the Hydraguard{trademark} as could be arranged. To determine Homogeneity, a second (High) Grab Sampler was located above the first. The data necessary to these determinations comes from the measurement system, so its important variables also affect the results. Thus, the design of the test involved not just Sampling variables, but also some of the Measurement variables as well. However, the main concern was the Sampler and not the Measurement System, so the test design included only such measurement variables as could not be circumvented (Vials, Dissolution Method, and Aliquoting). The test was executed by, or under the direct oversight of, expert technologists. It thus did not explore the many important particulars of routine'' plant operations (such as Remote Sample Preparation or Laboratory Shift Operation).

  17. DWPF DECON FRIT: SUMP AND SLURRY SOLIDS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Peeler, D.; Click, D.

    2010-10-20

    of the slurry solids was much broader than compared to the sump solids. More specifically, there were significantly more fines in the slurry solids as compared to the sump solids. (f) PSD results indicated that > 99% of both the sump and slurry solids were less than 350 microns. The PSD results also supported SEM/EDS analysis that there were significantly more fines in the slurry solids as compared to the sump solids. (2) Weight Percent Solids - Based on the measured supernate density and mass of insoluble solids (2.388 grams) filtered from the four liters of liquid slurry samples, the weight percent insoluble solids was estimated to be 0.060 wt%. This level of insoluble solids is higher than the ETP WAC limit of 100 mg/L, or 0.01 wt% which suggests a separation technology of some type would be required. (3) Chemical Analysis - (a) Elemental results from ICP-ES analysis indicated that the sump solids and slurry were very consistent with the nominal composition of Frit 418. There were other elements identified by ICP analysis which were either consistent with the presence of stainless steel (as identified by SEM/EDS analysis) or impurities that have been observed in 'as received' Frit 418 from the vendor. (b) IC anion analysis of the sump solids and slurry solids indicated all of the species were less than detection limits. (c) Radionuclide analysis of the sump solids also indicated that most of the analytes were either at or below the detection limits. (d) Organic analysis of the sump solids and slurry solids indicated all of the species were less than detection limits. It should be noted that the results of this study may not be representative of future decon frit solutions or sump/slurry solids samples. Therefore, future DWPF decisions regarding the possible disposal pathways for either the aqueous or solid portions of the Decon Frit system need to factor in the potential differences. More specifically, introduction of a different frit or changes to other DWPF

  18. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Shielded Cells Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, T. L.; Herman, D. T.; Stone, M.E

    2005-07-01

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of evaporation of actual Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) recycle material. Samples of the Off Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) were transferred from DWPF to the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) Shielded Cells and blended with De-Ionized (DI) water and a small amount of Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product. A total of 3000 mL of this feed was concentrated to approximately 90 mL during a semi-batch evaporation test of approximately 17 hours. One interruption occurred during the run when the feed tube developed a split and was replaced. Samples of the resulting condensate and concentrate were collected and analyzed. The resulting analysis of the condensate was compared to the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) limits for the F/H Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP). Results from the test were compared to previous testing using simulants and OLI modeling. Conclusions from this work included the following: (1) The evaporation of DWPF recycle to achieve a 30X concentration factor was successfully demonstrated. The feed blend of OGCT and SMECT material was concentrated from 3000 mL to approximately 90 mL during testing, a concentration of approximately 33X. (2) Foaming was observed during the run. Dow Corning 2210 antifoam was added seven times throughout the run at 100 parts per million (ppm) per addition. The addition of this antifoam was very effective in reducing the foam level, but the impact diminished over time and additional antifoam was required every 2 to 3 hours during the run. (3) No scale or solids formed on the evaporator vessel, but splatter was observed in the headspace of the evaporator vessel. No scaling formed on the stainless steel thermocouple. (4) The majority of the analytes met the F/H ETP WAC. However, the detection limits for selected species (Sr-90, Pu-238, Pu-240, Am-243, and Cm-244) exceeded the ETP WAC limits. (5) I

  19. Melt Rate Improvement for DWPF MB3: Frit Preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Lorier, T.H.

    2001-06-15

    The object of this research is to evaluate melt rate of Macrobatch 3 (MB3) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The aim is to find the proper frit composition and/or acid addition strategy so that the development of this insulating foam layer is averted.

  20. Chronic toxicity evaluation of simulated DWPF effluent to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    A 7-Day Full Series Chronic Toxicity test was conducted April 13--20, 1990, for the Savannah River Site to assess the chronic toxicity of Simulated defense waste processing facility (DWPF) effluent to Ceriodaphnia dubia. The simulated effluented consisted of Sodium Nitrate, Sodium Oxalate, Sodium Formate, and Corros. Inib.

  1. Final wash precipitate feed simulants for DWPF Cold Chemical Runs

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, J.C.

    1992-05-15

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is scheduled to start non-radioactive process operation in September, 1992. The Cold Chemical Runs will demonstrate acceptable process operation and provide data required to satisfy the Waste Compliance Plan. Five basic sludge simulants will be required for these tests. Two basic precipitate simulants will be needed to operate the Salt Processing Cell with and without mercury in the precipitate feed. Precipitate feed simulant specifications for DWPF Cold Chemical Runs are revised in this report. All previous specifications of precipitate feed simulants for DWPF Cold Chemical Runs (CCRs) are superceded by this document. The revision is needed to (1) eliminate use of hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) in the precipitate process operation, (2) simulate the projected composition of the precipitate feed to DWPF produced by final washing to reduce the nitrite concentration to [le] 0.01M without washing the simulated feed, (3) delete organic trim chemical additions to the precipitate feed and (4) specify an additive to prevent foaming of the precipitate. Two specifications are provided to operate the Salt Processing Cell with mercury (Tests 5 6) and without mercury (Tests 1--4) in the precipitate feed.

  2. Final wash precipitate feed simulants for DWPF Cold Chemical Runs

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, J.C.

    1992-05-15

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is scheduled to start non-radioactive process operation in September, 1992. The Cold Chemical Runs will demonstrate acceptable process operation and provide data required to satisfy the Waste Compliance Plan. Five basic sludge simulants will be required for these tests. Two basic precipitate simulants will be needed to operate the Salt Processing Cell with and without mercury in the precipitate feed. Precipitate feed simulant specifications for DWPF Cold Chemical Runs are revised in this report. All previous specifications of precipitate feed simulants for DWPF Cold Chemical Runs (CCRs) are superceded by this document. The revision is needed to (1) eliminate use of hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) in the precipitate process operation, (2) simulate the projected composition of the precipitate feed to DWPF produced by final washing to reduce the nitrite concentration to {le} 0.01M without washing the simulated feed, (3) delete organic trim chemical additions to the precipitate feed and (4) specify an additive to prevent foaming of the precipitate. Two specifications are provided to operate the Salt Processing Cell with mercury (Tests 5&6) and without mercury (Tests 1--4) in the precipitate feed.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF A PRECIPITATE REACTOR FEED TANK (PRFT) SAMPLE FROM THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF)

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Bannochie, C.

    2014-05-12

    , XRD and SEM) in support of the Salt IPT chemistry team. The overall conclusions from analyses performed in this study are that the PRFT slurry consists of 0.61 Wt.% insoluble MST solids suspended in a 0.77 M [Na+] caustic solution containing various anions such as nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, carbonate and oxalate. The corresponding measured sulfur level in the PRFT slurry, a critical element for determining how much of the PRFT slurry gets blended into the SRAT, is 0.437 Wt.% TS. The PRFT slurry does not contain insoluble oxalates nor significant quantities of high activity sludge solids. The lack of sludge solids has been alluded to by the Salt IPT chemistry team in citing that the mixing pump has been removed from Tank 49H, the feed tank to ARP-MCU, thus allowing the sludge solids to settle out. The PRFT aqueous slurry from DWPF was found to contain 5.96 Wt.% total dried solids. Of these total dried solids, relatively low levels of insoluble solids (0.61 Wt.%) were measured. The densities of both the filtrate and slurry were 1.05 g/mL. Particle size distribution of the PRFT solids in filtered caustic simulant and XRD analysis of washed/dried PRFT solids indicate that the PRFT slurry contains a bimodal distribution of particles in the range of 1 and 6 μm and that the particles contain sodium titanium oxide hydroxide Na2Ti2O4(OH)2 crystalline material as determined by XRD. These data are in excellent agreement with similar data obtained from laboratory sampling of vendor supplied MST. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) combined with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of washed/dried PRFT solids shows the particles to be like previous MST analyses consisting of irregular shaped micron-sized solids consisting primarily of Na and Ti. Thermogravimetric analysis of the washed and unwashed PRFT solids shows that the washed solids are very similar to MST solids. The TGA mass loss signal for the unwashed solids shows similar features to TGA performed on

  4. GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL WITH SLUDGE AND SUPERNATE SIMULANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Newell, J.; Best, D.; Zamecnik, J.

    2012-08-28

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating changes to its current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet to improve processing cycle times. This will enable the facility to support higher canister production while maximizing waste loading. Higher throughput is needed in the Chemical Process Cell (CPC) since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the DWPF gas chromatographs (GC) and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, reducing or eliminating the amount of formic acid used in the CPC is being developed. Earlier work at Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with an 80:20 molar blend of glycolic and formic acids has the potential to remove mercury in the SRAT without any significant catalytic hydrogen generation. This report summarizes the research completed to determine the feasibility of processing without formic acid. In earlier development of the glycolic-formic acid flowsheet, one run (GF8) was completed without formic acid. It is of particular interest that mercury was successfully removed in GF8, no formic acid at 125% stoichiometry. Glycolic acid did not show the ability to reduce mercury to elemental mercury in initial screening studies, which is why previous testing focused on using the formic/glycolic blend. The objective of the testing detailed in this document is to determine the viability of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in processing sludge over a wide compositional range as requested by DWPF. This work was performed under the guidance of Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The details regarding the simulant preparation and analysis have been documented previously.

  5. GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESSING CELL WITH MATRIX SIMULANTS AND SUPERNATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Newell, J.; Best, D.

    2012-05-07

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating changes to its current DWPF flowsheet to improve processing cycle times. This will enable the facility to support higher canister production while maximizing waste loading. Higher throughput is needed in the CPC since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the DWPF gas chromatographs (GC) and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, reducing or eliminating the amount of formic acid used in the CPC is being developed. Earlier work at Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with an 80:20 molar blend of glycolic and formic acids has the potential to remove mercury in the SRAT without any significant catalytic hydrogen generation. This report summarizes the research completed to determine the feasibility of processing without formic acid. In earlier development of the glycolic-formic acid flowsheet, one run (GF8) was completed without formic acid. It is of particular interest that mercury was successfully removed in GF8, no formic acid at 125% stoichiometry. Glycolic acid did not show the ability to reduce mercury to elemental mercury in initial screening studies, which is why previous testing focused on using the formic/glycolic blend. The objective of the testing detailed in this document is to determine the viability of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in processing sludge over a wide compositional range as requested by DWPF. This work was performed under the guidance of Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT and QAP). The details regarding the simulant preparation and analysis have been documented previously.

  6. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and

  7. Corrosion impact of reductant on DWPF and downstream facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J. I.; Imrich, K. J.; Jantzen, C. M.; Murphy, T. H.; Wilderman, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternate reductant in the preparation of high level waste for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). During processing, the glycolic acid is not completely consumed and small quantities of the glycolate anion are carried forward to other high level waste (HLW) facilities. The impact of the glycolate anion on the corrosion of the materials of construction throughout the waste processing system has not been previously evaluated. A literature review had revealed that corrosion data in glycolate-bearing solution applicable to SRS systems were not available. Therefore, testing was recommended to evaluate the materials of construction of vessels, piping and components within DWPF and downstream facilities. The testing, conducted in non-radioactive simulants, consisted of both accelerated tests (electrochemical and hot-wall) with coupons in laboratory vessels and prototypical tests with coupons immersed in scale-up and mock-up test systems. Eight waste or process streams were identified in which the glycolate anion might impact the performance of the materials of construction. These streams were 70% glycolic acid (DWPF feed vessels and piping), SRAT/SME supernate (Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels and piping), DWPF acidic recycle (DWPF condenser and recycle tanks and piping), basic concentrated recycle (HLW tanks, evaporators, and transfer lines), salt processing (ARP, MCU, and Saltstone tanks and piping), boric acid (MCU separators), and dilute waste (HLW evaporator condensate tanks and transfer line and ETF components). For each stream, high temperature limits and worst-case glycolate concentrations were identified for performing the recommended tests. Test solution chemistries were generally based on analytical results of actual waste samples taken from the various process facilities or of prototypical simulants produced in the laboratory. The materials of construction for most vessels

  8. The product consistency test for the DWPF wasteform

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.

    1990-01-01

    The preliminary specifications on the glass wasteform to be produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) require extensive characterization of the glass product both before actual production begins and then during production. To aid in this characterization, a leach test was needed that was easily reproducible, could be performed remotely on highly radioactive samples, and could yield results rapidly. Several standard leach tests were examined with a variety of test configurations. Using existing tests as a starting point, the DWPF Product Consistency Test (PCT) was developed in which crushed glass samples are exposed to 90{degrees}C deionized water for seven days. Based on extensive testing, including a seven-laboratory round robin and confirmatory testing with radioactive samples, the PCT is very reproducible, yields reliable results rapidly, and can be performed in shielded cell facilities with radioactive samples.

  9. The product consistency test for the DWPF wasteform

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.

    1990-12-31

    The preliminary specifications on the glass wasteform to be produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) require extensive characterization of the glass product both before actual production begins and then during production. To aid in this characterization, a leach test was needed that was easily reproducible, could be performed remotely on highly radioactive samples, and could yield results rapidly. Several standard leach tests were examined with a variety of test configurations. Using existing tests as a starting point, the DWPF Product Consistency Test (PCT) was developed in which crushed glass samples are exposed to 90{degrees}C deionized water for seven days. Based on extensive testing, including a seven-laboratory round robin and confirmatory testing with radioactive samples, the PCT is very reproducible, yields reliable results rapidly, and can be performed in shielded cell facilities with radioactive samples.

  10. Development of Alternative Rheological Measurements for DWPF Slurry Samples (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. c.

    2005-09-01

    Rheological measurements are used to evaluate the fluid dynamic behavior of Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, slurry samples. Measurements are currently made on non-radioactive simulant slurries using two state-of-the-art rheometers located at the Aiken County Technical Laboratory, ACTL. Measurements are made on plant samples using a rheometer in the Savannah River National Laboratory, SRNL, Shielded Cells facility. Low activity simulants or plant samples can be analyzed using a rheometer located in a radioactive hood in SRNL. Variations in the rheology of SB2 simulants impacted the interpretation of results obtained in a number of related studies. A separate rheological study was initiated with the following four goals: (1) Document the variations seen in the simulant slurries, both by a review of recent data, and by a search for similar samples for further study. (2) Attempt to explain the variations in rheological behavior, or, failing that, reduce the number of possible causes. In particular, to empirically check for rheometer-related variations. (3) Exploit the additional capabilities of the rheometers by developing new measurement methods to study the simulant rheological properties in new ways. (4) Formalize the rheological measurement process for DWPF-related samples into a series of protocols. This report focuses on the third and fourth goals. The emphasis of this report is on the development and formalization of rheological measurement methods used to characterize DWPF slurry samples. The organization is by rheological measurement method. Progress on the first two goals was documented in a concurrent technical report, Koopman (2005). That report focused on the types and possible causes of unusual rheological behavior in simulant slurry samples. It was organized by the sample being studied. The experimental portion of this study was performed in the period of March to April 2004. A general rheology protocol for routine DWPF slurry samples, Koopman

  11. DWPF STARTUP FRIT VISCOSITY MEASUREMENT ROUND ROBIN RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Edwards, Tommy B.; Russell, Renee L.; Workman, Phyllis J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Schumacher, Ray F.; Smith, Donald E.; Peeler, David K.; Vienna, John D.

    2012-07-31

    A viscosity standard is needed to replace the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) glasses currently being used to calibrate viscosity measurement equipment. The current NIST glasses are either unavailable or less than ideal for calibrating equipment to measure the viscosity of high-level waste glasses. This report documents the results of a viscosity round robin study conducted on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) startup frit. DWPF startup frit was selected because its viscosity-temperature relationship is similar to most DWPF and Hanford high-level waste glass compositions. The glass underwent grinding and blending to homogenize the large (100 lb) batch. Portions of the batch were supplied to the laboratories (named A through H) for viscosity measurements following a specified temperature schedule with a temperature range of 1150 C to 950 C and with an option to measure viscosity at lower temperatures if their equipment was capable of measuring at the higher viscosities. Results were used to fit the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher and Arrhenius equations to viscosity as a function of temperature for the entire temperature range of 460 C through 1250 C as well as the limited temperature interval of approximately 950 C through 1250 C. The standard errors for confidence and prediction were determined for the fitted models.

  12. Literature search for offsite data to improve the DWPF melter off-gas model

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, W.E.

    2000-05-04

    This report documents the literature search performed and any relevant data that may help relax some of the constraints on the DWPF melter off-gas model. The objective of this task was to look for outside sources of technical data to help reduce some of the conservatism built in the DWPF melter off-gas model.

  13. NETEC COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER DEMONSTRATION FOR SRNL WITH SIMULATED SLUDGE BATCH 4 DWPF WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M; Allan Barnes, A; Alexander Choi, A; James Marra, J

    2008-07-28

    Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) Technology is being considered as a possible next generation melter for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Initial and baseline demonstrations that vitrified a Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) simulant at a waste loading of 50 weight percent (versus about 38 weight percent in the current DWPF Melter) were performed by the Nuclear Engineering and Technology Institute (NETEC) in South Korea via a subcontract from the Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC). This higher waste loading was achieved by using a CCIM which can run at higher glass processing temperatures (1250 C and higher) than the current DWPF Melter (1150 C). Higher waste loadings would result in less canisters being filled and faster waste throughput at the DWPF. The main demonstration objectives were to determine the maximum melt rate/waste throughput for the NETEC CCIM with a Sludge Batch 4 simulant as well as determine the viability of this technology for use in the DWPF.

  14. UNCERTAINTIES OF ANION AND TOC MEASUREMENTS AT THE DWPF LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.

    2011-04-07

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has identified a technical issue related to the amount of antifoam added to the Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Specifically, due to the long duration of the concentration and reflux cycles for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), additional antifoam has been required. The additional antifoam has been found to impact the melter flammability analysis as an additional source of carbon and hydrogen. To better understand and control the carbon and hydrogen contributors to the melter flammability analysis, SRR's Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested, via a Technical Task Request (TTR), that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conduct an error evaluation of the measurements of key Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) anions. SRNL issued a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) [2] in response to that request, and the work reported here was conducted under the auspices of that TTQAP. The TTR instructs SRNL to conduct an error evaluation of anion measurements generated by the DWPF Laboratory using Ion Chromatography (IC) performed on SME samples. The anions of interest include nitrate, oxalate, and formate. Recent measurements of SME samples for these anions as well as measurements of total organic carbon (TOC) were provided to SRNL by DWPF Laboratory Operations (Lab OPS) personnel for this evaluation. This work was closely coordinated with the efforts of others within SRNL that are investigating the Chemical Process Cell (CPC) contributions to the melter flammability. The objective of that investigation was to develop a more comprehensive melter flammability control strategy that when implemented in DWPF will rely on process measurements. Accounting for the uncertainty of the measurements is necessary for successful implementation. The error evaluations conducted as part of this task will facilitate the integration of appropriate uncertainties for the

  15. Maximum total organic carbon limit for DWPF melter feed

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.S.

    1995-03-13

    DWPF recently decided to control the potential flammability of melter off-gas by limiting the total carbon content in the melter feed and maintaining adequate conditions for combustion in the melter plenum. With this new strategy, all the LFL analyzers and associated interlocks and alarms were removed from both the primary and backup melter off-gas systems. Subsequently, D. Iverson of DWPF- T{ampersand}E requested that SRTC determine the maximum allowable total organic carbon (TOC) content in the melter feed which can be implemented as part of the Process Requirements for melter feed preparation (PR-S04). The maximum TOC limit thus determined in this study was about 24,000 ppm on an aqueous slurry basis. At the TOC levels below this, the peak concentration of combustible components in the quenched off-gas will not exceed 60 percent of the LFL during off-gas surges of magnitudes up to three times nominal, provided that the melter plenum temperature and the air purge rate to the BUFC are monitored and controlled above 650 degrees C and 220 lb/hr, respectively. Appropriate interlocks should discontinue the feeding when one or both of these conditions are not met. Both the magnitude and duration of an off-gas surge have a major impact on the maximum TOC limit, since they directly affect the melter plenum temperature and combustion. Although the data obtained during recent DWPF melter startup tests showed that the peak magnitude of a surge can be greater than three times nominal, the observed duration was considerably shorter, on the order of several seconds. The long surge duration assumed in this study has a greater impact on the plenum temperature than the peak magnitude, thus making the maximum TOC estimate conservative. Two models were used to make the necessary calculations to determine the TOC limit.

  16. Expanding Ring for the DWPF Melter Pour Spout

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K.J.

    2002-09-23

    The Materials Technology Section was requested to develop a novel concept, namely that of an expanding ring, to restore the upper knife edge in the DWPF melter pour spout. The expanding ring is a unit that, when deployed in the DPWF pour spout, will self-expand against the inner diameter of the 3-inch section of the pour spout providing a seal against glass leakage and a new knife edge that will mate with a Type 3A insert. This report provides a summary of the final design features of the expanding ring and an overview of its development.

  17. Organics Characterization Of DWPF Alternative Reductant Simulants, Glycolic Acid, And Antifoam 747

    SciTech Connect

    White, T. L.; Wiedenman, B. J.; Lambert, D. P.; Crump, S. L.; Fondeur, F. F.; Papathanassiu, A. E.; Kot, W. K.; Pegg, I. L.

    2013-10-01

    The present study examines the fate of glycolic acid and other organics added in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as part of the glycolic alternate flowsheet. Adoption of this flowsheet is expected to provide certain benefits in terms of a reduction in the processing time, a decrease in hydrogen generation, simplification of chemical storage and handling issues, and an improvement in the processing characteristics of the waste stream including an increase in the amount of nitrate allowed in the CPC process. Understanding the fate of organics in this flowsheet is imperative because tank farm waste processed in the CPC is eventually immobilized by vitrification; thus, the type and amount of organics present in the melter feed may affect optimal melt processing and the quality of the final glass product as well as alter flammability calculations on the DWPF melter off gas. To evaluate the fate of the organic compounds added as the part of the glycolic flowsheet, mainly glycolic acid and antifoam 747, samples of simulated waste that was processed using the DWPF CPC protocol for tank farm sludge feed were generated and analyzed for organic compounds using a variety of analytical techniques at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). These techniques included Ion Chromatography (IC), Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy. A set of samples were also sent to the Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for analysis by NMR Spectroscopy at the University of Maryland, College Park. Analytical methods developed and executed at SRNL collectively showed that glycolic acid was the most prevalent organic compound in the supernatants of Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) products examined. Furthermore, the studies suggested that commercially available glycolic acid contained minor amounts

  18. Burst Test Qualification Analysis of DWPF Canister-Plug Weld

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.K.; Gong, Chung

    1995-02-01

    The DWPF canister closure system uses resistance welding for sealing the canister nozzle and plug to ensure leak tightness. The welding group at SRTC is using the burst test to qualify this seal weld in lieu of the shear test in ASME B&PV Code, Section IX, paragraph QW-196. The burst test is considered simpler and more appropriate than the shear test for this application. Although the geometry, loading and boundary conditions are quite different in the two tests, structural analyses show similarity in the failure mode of the shear test in paragraph QW-196 and the burst test on the DWPF canister nozzle Non-linear structural analyses are performed using finite element techniques to study the failure mode of the two tests. Actual test geometry and realistic stress strain data for the 304L stainless steel and the weld material are used in the analyses. The finite element models are loaded until failure strains are reached. The failure modes in both tests are shear at the failure points. Based on these observations, it is concluded that the use of a burst test in lieu of the shear test for qualifying the canister-plug weld is acceptable. The burst test analysis for the canister-plug also yields the burst pressures which compare favorably with the actual pressure found during burst tests. Thus, the analysis also provides an estimate of the safety margins in the design of these vessels.

  19. ISOLOK VALVE ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR DWPF SME SAMPLING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

    2011-12-05

    Evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. Of the opportunities, a focus area related to optimizing the equipment and efficiency of the sample turnaround time for DWPF Analytical Laboratory was identified. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the possibility of using an Isolok{reg_sign} sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard{reg_sign} valve for taking process samples. Previous viability testing was conducted with favorable results using the Isolok sampler and reported in SRNL-STI-2010-00749 (1). This task has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time and decrease CPC cycle time. This report summarizes the results from acceptance testing which was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 (2) and which was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-RP-2011-00145 (3). The Isolok to be tested is the same model which was tested, qualified, and installed in the Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) sample system. RW-0333P QA requirements apply to this task. This task was to qualify the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) sampling process. The Hydragard, which is the current baseline sampling method, was used for comparison to the Isolok sampling data. The Isolok sampler is an air powered grab sampler used to 'pull' a sample volume from a process line. The operation of the sampler is shown in Figure 1. The image on the left shows the Isolok's spool extended into the process line and the image on the right shows the sampler retracted and then dispensing the liquid into the sampling container. To determine tank homogeneity, a Coliwasa sampler was used to grab samples at a high and low location within the mixing tank. Data from the two locations

  20. ELIMINATION OF THE CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF POUR STREAM SAMPLE AND THE GLASS FABRICATION AND TESTING OF THE DWPF SLUDGE BATCH QUALIFICATION SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.

    2012-05-11

    A recommendation to eliminate all characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and Product Consistency Test (PCT) of the sludge batch qualification sample was made by a Six-Sigma team chartered to eliminate non-value-added activities for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) sludge batch qualification program and is documented in the report SS-PIP-2006-00030. That recommendation was supported through a technical data review by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and is documented in the memorandums SRNL-PSE-2007-00079 and SRNL-PSE-2007-00080. At the time of writing those memorandums, the DWPF was processing sludge-only waste but, has since transitioned to a coupled operation (sludge and salt). The SRNL was recently tasked to perform a similar data review relevant to coupled operations and re-evaluate the previous recommendations. This report evaluates the validity of eliminating the characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and Product Consistency Test (PCT) of the sludge batch qualification samples based on sludge-only and coupled operations. The pour stream sample has confirmed the DWPF's ability to produce an acceptable waste form from Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) blending and product composition/durability predictions for the previous sixteen years but, ultimately the pour stream analysis has added minimal value to the DWPF's waste qualification strategy. Similarly, the information gained from the glass fabrication and PCT of the sludge batch qualification sample was determined to add minimal value to the waste qualification strategy since that sample is routinely not representative of the waste composition ultimately processed at the DWPF due to blending and salt processing considerations. Moreover, the qualification process has repeatedly confirmed minimal differences in glass behavior from actual radioactive waste to glasses fabricated from simulants or batch chemicals. In contrast, the

  1. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-11-24

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  2. YIELD STRESS REDUCTION OF DWPF MELTER FEED SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M; Michael02 Smith, M

    2006-12-28

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies High Level Waste for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. The HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate). The pretreatment process acidifies the sludge with nitric and formic acids, adds the glass formers as glass frit, then concentrates the resulting slurry to approximately 50 weight percent (wt%) total solids. This slurry is fed to the joule-heated melter where the remaining water is evaporated followed by calcination of the solids and conversion to glass. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is currently assisting DWPF efforts to increase throughput of the melter. As part of this effort, SRNL has investigated methods to increase the solids content of the melter feed to reduce the heat load required to complete the evaporation of water and allow more of the energy available to calcine and vitrify the waste. The process equipment in the facility is fixed and cannot process materials with high yield stresses, therefore increasing the solids content will require that the yield stress of the melter feed slurries be reduced. Changing the glass former added during pretreatment from an irregularly shaped glass frit to nearly spherical beads was evaluated. The evaluation required a systems approach which included evaluations of the effectiveness of beads in reducing the melter feed yield stress as well as evaluations of the processing impacts of changing the frit morphology. Processing impacts of beads include changing the settling rate of the glass former (which effects mixing and sampling of the melter feed slurry and the frit addition equipment) as well as impacts on the melt behavior due to decreased surface area of the beads versus frit

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF REMOTE HANFORD CONNECTOR GASKET REPLACEMENT TOOLING FOR DWPF

    SciTech Connect

    Krementz, D.; Coughlin, Jeffrey

    2009-05-05

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to develop tooling and equipment to remotely replace gaskets in mechanical Hanford connectors to reduce personnel radiation exposure as compared to the current hands-on method. It is also expected that radiation levels will continually increase with future waste streams. The equipment is operated in the Remote Equipment Decontamination Cell (REDC), which is equipped with compressed air, two master-slave manipulators (MSM's) and an electro-mechanical manipulator (EMM) arm for operation of the remote tools. The REDC does not provide access to electrical power, so the equipment must be manually or pneumatically operated. The MSM's have a load limit at full extension of ten pounds, which limited the weight of the installation tool. In order to remotely replace Hanford connector gaskets several operations must be performed remotely, these include: removal of the spent gasket and retaining ring (retaining ring is also called snap ring), loading the new snap ring and gasket into the installation tool and installation of the new gasket into the Hanford connector. SRNL developed and tested tools that successfully perform all of the necessary tasks. Removal of snap rings from horizontal and vertical connectors is performed by separate air actuated retaining ring removal tools and is manipulated in the cell by the MSM. In order install a new gasket, the snap ring loader is used to load a new snap ring into a groove in the gasket installation tool. A new gasket is placed on the installation tool and retained by custom springs. An MSM lifts the installation tool and presses the mounted gasket against the connector block. Once the installation tool is in position, the gasket and snap ring are installed onto the connector by pneumatic actuation. All of the tools are located on a custom work table with a pneumatic valve station that directs compressed air to the desired tool and

  4. Impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF CPC processing

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, J. D.

    2013-02-21

    As part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic-side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and new strip acid will be deployed. Processing will begin with a blend of the current solvent and the NGS. Compositional changes in the NGS solvent and blending with the current solvent require review of previously performed work to determine if additional experimental work is required to address any impacts to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC). The composition change involved the substitution of the N,N’-dicyclohexyl-N”-isotridecylguanidine LIX® 79 guanidine suppressor with N,N’,N”-tris (3,7-dimethyloctyl) guanidine (TiDG) guanidine suppressor. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by DWPF to evaluate any impacts to offgas generation, solvent buildup or carryover, chemical, thermal, and radiolytic stability of the blended and pure TiDG based NGS. Previous work has been performed by SRNL to evaluate impacts to CPC processing using the next generation solvent containing LIX® 79 suppressor with boric acid strip effluent. Based on previous experimental work and current literature, the following conclusions are made for processing in the CPC: No mechanism for a change in the catalytic hydrogen evolution in the CPC was identified for the NGS TiDG based solvent; The transition from the LIX® 79 based suppressor to the TiDG based suppressor is not expected to have any impact on solvent or Isopar® L accumulation; Transitioning from the current solvent to the TiDG based NGS is not expected to have an impact on solvent carryover or partitioning; No changes to the chemical stability of the solvent in the CPC process are expected; No changes to the thermal stability of the solvent in the CPC process are expected; A “worst case” scenario was examined in which all of the hydrogen atoms from the TiDG based NGS and blended solvent form hydrogen gas in the

  5. A STATISTICAL REVIEW OF DWPF LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS GENERATED DURING THE PROCESSING OF BATCHES 300 THROUGH 356

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T

    2006-08-31

    In this report, the Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provides summaries and comparisons of composition measurements for glass samples that were generated during the processing of batches 300 through 356 at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). These analyses, which include measurements of samples from the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) as well as samples of glass standards, were provided to SCS by the DWPF Laboratory (DWPF Lab) of Waste Laboratory Services. The comparisons made by SCS were extensive given that these data allowed for contrasts between preparation methods and between the two spectrometers that are currently in use at the DWPF Lab. In addition to general comparisons, specific questions that were posed in the Technical Task Request (TTR) behind this effort were addressed in this report.

  6. Checkout and start-up of the integrated DWPF (Defense Waste Processing Facility) melter system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.E.; Hutson, N.D.; Miller, D.H.; Morrison, J.; Shah, H.; Shuford, J.A.; Glascock, J.; Wurzinger, F.H.; Zamecnik, J.R.

    1989-11-11

    The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a one-ninth-scale demonstration of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation, melter, and off-gas systems. The IDMS will be the first engineering-scale melter system at SRL to process mercury and flowsheet levels of halides and sulfates. This report includes a summary of the IDMS program objectives, system and equipment descriptions, and detailed discussions of the system checkout and start-up. 10 refs., 44 figs., 20 tabs.

  7. Evaluation of Crystalline Silicotitanate and Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Support for Cesium and Mercury Removal from DWPF Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.N.

    1999-11-05

    The affinities for cesium and mercury ions contained in DWPF recycle simulants and Tank-22H waste have been evaluated using Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Support (SAMMS) ion-exchange materials, respectively. Results of the performance evaluations of CST on the uptake of cesium with simulants and actual DWPF recycle samples (Tank 22H) indicate that, in practice, this inorganic ion-exchange material can be used to remove radioactive cesium from the DWPF recycle. SAMMS material showed little or no affinity for mercury from highly alkaline DWPF waste. However, at near neutral conditions (DWPF simulant solution pH adjusted to 7), SAMMS was found to have a significant affinity for mercury. Conventional Duolite/256 ion exchange material showed an increase in affinity for mercury with increase in DWPF recycle simulant pH. Duolite/256 GT-73 also had a high batch distribution coefficient for mercury uptake from actual Tank 22H waste.

  8. REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES IN DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8)

    SciTech Connect

    Reboul, S.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.; Bannochie, C.

    2011-12-20

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that the waste producer 'shall report the curie inventory of radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115.' As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type all radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and contribute greater than 0.01 percent of the total curie inventory from the time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial list of radionuclides to be reported is based on the design-basis glass identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report. However, it is required that the list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that meet the 'greater than 0.01% of the curie inventory' criterion. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, and U-238; and Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete list of reportable radionuclides must also include these sets of U and Pu isotopes - and the U and Pu isotopic mass distributions must be identified. The DWPF receives HLW sludge slurry from Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 40. For Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), the waste in Tank 40 contained a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) material transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. This sludge blend is also referred to as Macrobatch 8. Laboratory analyses of a Tank 40 sludge sample were performed to quantify the concentrations of pertinent radionuclides in the SB7a waste. Subsequently, radiological decay and in

  9. ACCELERATED PROCESSING OF SB4 AND PREPARATION FOR SB5 PROCESSING AT DWPF

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, C

    2008-12-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) initiated processing of Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) in May 2007. SB4 was the first DWPF sludge batch to contain significant quantities of HM or high Al sludge. Initial testing with SB4 simulants showed potential negative impacts to DWPF processing; therefore, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed extensive testing in an attempt to optimize processing. SRNL's testing has resulted in the highest DWPF production rates since start-up. During SB4 processing, DWPF also began incorporating waste streams from the interim salt processing facilities to initiate coupled operations. While DWPF has been processing SB4, the Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) and the SRNL have been preparing Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). SB5 has undergone low-temperature aluminum dissolution to reduce the mass of sludge for vitrification and will contain a small fraction of Purex sludge. A high-level review of SB4 processing and the SB5 preparation studies will be provided.

  10. DWPF COAL CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

    2010-06-21

    A paper study was completed to assess the impact on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)'s Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) acid addition and melter off-gas flammability control strategy in processing Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) to SB13 with an added Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) stream and two Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) products (Strip Effluent and Actinide Removal Stream). In all of the cases that were modeled, an acid mix using formic acid and nitric acid could be achieved that would produce a predicted Reducing/Oxidizing (REDOX) Ratio of 0.20 Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe. There was sufficient formic acid in these combinations to reduce both the manganese and mercury present. Reduction of manganese and mercury are both necessary during Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing, however, other reducing agents such as coal and oxalate are not effective in this reduction. The next phase in this study will be experimental testing with SB10, FBSR, and both SWPF simulants to validate the assumptions in this paper study and determine whether there are any issues in processing these streams simultaneously. The paper study also evaluated a series of abnormal processing conditions to determine whether potential abnormal conditions in FBSR, SWPF or DWPF would produce melter feed that was too oxidizing or too reducing. In most of the cases that were modeled with one parameter at its extreme, an acid mix using formic acid and nitric acid could be achieved that would produce a predicted REDOX of 0.09-0.30 (target 0.20). However, when a run was completed with both high coal and oxalate, with minimum formic acid to reduce mercury and manganese, the final REDOX was predicted to be 0.49 with sludge and FBSR product and 0.47 with sludge, FBSR product and both SWPF products which exceeds the upper REDOX limit.

  11. COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS MODEL FOR DWPF CANISTER FILLING, REVISION 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kesterson, M.

    2011-09-08

    This revision is an extension of the COMSOL Multiphysics model previously developed and documented to simulate the temperatures of the glass during pouring a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. In that report the COMSOL Multiphysics model used a lumped heat loss term derived from experimental thermocouple data based on a nominal pour rate of 228 lbs./hr. As such, the model developed using the lumped heat loss term had limited application without additional experimental data. Therefore, the COMSOL Multiphysics model was modified to simulate glass pouring and subsequent heat input which, replaced the heat loss term in the initial model. This new model allowed for changes in flow geometry based on pour rate as well as the ability to increase and decrease flow and stop and restart flow to simulate varying process conditions. A revised COMSOL Multiphysics model was developed to predict temperatures of the glass within DWPF canisters during filling and cooldown. The model simulations and experimental data were in good agreement. The largest temperature deviations were {approx} 40 C for the 87 inch thermocouple location at 3000 minutes and during the initial cool down at the 51 inch location occurring at approximately 600 minutes. Additionally, the model described in this report predicts the general temperature trends during filling and cooling as observed experimentally. The revised model incorporates a heat flow region corresponding to the glass pouring down the centerline of the canister. The geometry of this region is dependent on the flow rate of the glass and can therefore be used to see temperature variations for various pour rates. The equations used for this model were developed by comparing simulation output to experimental data from a single pour rate. Use of the model will predict temperature profiles for other pour rates but the accuracy of the simulations is unknown due to only a single flow rate comparison.

  12. Yield Stress Reduction of DWPF Melter Feed Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.E.; Smith, M.E.

    2007-07-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies High Level Waste for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. The HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides and soluble sodium salts. The pretreatment process acidifies the sludge with nitric and formic acids, adds the glass formers as glass frit, then concentrates the resulting slurry to approximately 50 weight percent (wt%) total solids. This slurry is fed to the joule-heated melter where the remaining water is evaporated followed by calcination of the solids and conversion to glass. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is currently assisting DWPF efforts to increase throughput of the melter. As part of this effort, SRNL has investigated methods to increase the solids content of the melter feed to reduce the heat load required to complete the evaporation of water and allow more of the energy available to calcine and vitrify the waste. The process equipment in the facility is fixed and cannot process materials with high yield stresses, therefore increasing the solids content will require that the yield stress of the melter feed slurries be reduced. Changing the glass former added during pretreatment from an irregularly shaped glass frit to nearly spherical beads was evaluated. The evaluation required a systems approach which included evaluations of the effectiveness of beads in reducing the melter feed yield stress as well as evaluations of the processing impacts of changing the frit morphology. Processing impacts of beads include changing the settling rate of the glass former (which effects mixing and sampling of the melter feed slurry and the frit addition equipment) as well as impacts on the melt behavior due to decreased surface area of the beads versus frit. Beads were produced from the DWPF process frit by fire polishing. The frit was allowed to free fall through a flame

  13. EVALUATION OF REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DWPF HIGHER CAPACITY CANISTER

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.; Estochen, E.; Jordan, J.; Kesterson, M.; Mckeel, C.

    2014-08-05

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is considering the option to increase canister glass capacity by reducing the wall thickness of the current production canister. This design has been designated as the DWPF Higher Capacity Canister (HCC). A significant decrease in the number of canisters processed during the life of the facility would be achieved if the HCC were implemented leading to a reduced overall reduction in life cycle costs. Prior to implementation of the change, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to conduct an evaluation of the potential impacts. The specific areas of interest included loading and deformation of the canister during the filling process. Additionally, the effect of the reduced wall thickness on corrosion and material compatibility needed to be addressed. Finally the integrity of the canister during decontamination and other handling steps needed to be determined. The initial request regarding canister fabrication was later addressed in an alternate study. A preliminary review of canister requirements and previous testing was conducted prior to determining the testing approach. Thermal and stress models were developed to predict the forces on the canister during the pouring and cooling process. The thermal model shows the HCC increasing and decreasing in temperature at a slightly faster rate than the original. The HCC is shown to have a 3°F ΔT between the internal and outer surfaces versus a 5°F ΔT for the original design. The stress model indicates strain values ranging from 1.9% to 2.9% for the standard canister and 2.5% to 3.1% for the HCC. These values are dependent on the glass level relative to the thickness transition between the top head and the canister wall. This information, along with field readings, was used to set up environmental test conditions for corrosion studies. Small 304-L canisters were filled with glass and subjected to accelerated environmental testing for 3 months. No evidence of

  14. Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign report: Hanford Waste Vitrification Plan (HWVP) process demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, N.D.

    1992-08-10

    Vitrification facilities are being developed worldwide to convert high-level nuclear waste to a durable glass form for permanent disposal. Facilities in the United States include the Department of Energy`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) at the Hanford Site and the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, NY. At each of these sites, highly radioactive defense waste will be vitrified to a stable borosilicate glass. The DWPF and WVDP are near physical completion while the HWVP is in the design phase. The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a vitrification test facility at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It was designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas treatment systems. Because of the similarities of the DWPF and HWVP processes, the IDMS facility has also been used to characterize the processing behavior of a reference NCAW simulant. The demonstration was undertaken specifically to determine material balances, to characterize the evolution of offgas products (especially hydrogen), to determine the effects of noble metals, and to obtain general HWVP design data. The campaign was conducted from November, 1991 to February, 1992.

  15. The DWPF: Results of full scale qualification runs leading to radioactive operations

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, S.L.; Elder, H.H.; Occhipinti, J.H.; Snyder, D.E.

    1996-01-10

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC will immobilize high-level radioactive liquid waste, currently stored in underground carbon steel tanks, in borosilicate glass. The radioactive waste is transferred to the DWPF in two forms: precipitate slurry and sludge slurry. The radioactive waste is pretreated and then combined with a borosilicate glass frit in the DWPF. This homogeneous slurry is fed to a Joule-heated melter which operates at approximately 1150 degrees C. The glass is poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. The DWPF product (i.e. the canistered waste form) must comply with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) in order to be acceptable for disposal. The DWPF has completed Waste Qualification Runs which demonstrate the facility`s ability to comply with the waste acceptance specifications. During the Waste Qualification Runs seventy-one canisters of simulated waste glass were produced in preparation for Radioactive Operations. These canisters of simulated waste glass were produced during five production campaigns which also exercised the facility prior to beginning Radioactive Operations. The results of the Waste Qualification Runs are presented.

  16. Characterization of projected DWPF glasses heat treated to simulate canister centerline cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, S.L.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1992-05-01

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Eventually these canistered waste forms will be sent to a geologic repository for final disposal. In order to assure acceptability by the repository, the Department of Energy has defined requirements which DWPF canistered waste forms must meet. These requirements are the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS). The WAPS require DWPF to identify the crystalline phases expected to be present in the final glass product. Knowledge of the thermal history of the borosilicate glass during filling and cooldown of the canister is necessary to determine the amount and type of crystalline phases present in the final glass product. Glass samples of seven projected DWPF compositions were cooled following the same temperature profile as that of glass at the centerline of the full-scale DWPF canister. The glasses were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy to identify the crystalline phases present The volume percents of each crystalline phase present were determined by quantitative x-ray diffraction. The Product Consistency Test (PCI) was used to determine the durability of the heat-treated glasses.

  17. Durability of glasses from the Hg-doped Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1992-08-30

    The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) for the vitrification of high-level radioactive wastes is designed and constructed to be a 1/9th scale prototype of the full scale Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. The IDMS facility is the first engineering scale melter system capable of processing mercury, and flowsheet levels of halides and noble metals. In order to determine the effects of mercury on the feed preparation process, the off-gas chemistry, glass melting behavior, and glass durability, a three-run mercury (Hg) campaign was conducted. The glasses produced during the Hg campaign were composed of Batch 1 sludge, simulated precipitate hydrolysis aqueous product (PHA) from the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF), and Frit 202. The glasses were produced using the DWPF process/product models for glass durability, viscosity, and liquidus. The durability model indicated that the glasses would all be more durable than the glass qualified in the DWPF Environmental Assessment (EA). The glass quality was verified by performing the Product Consistency Test (PCT) which was designed for glass durability testing in the DWPF.

  18. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation -- DWPF Late Wash Facility, Salt Process Cell and Chemical Process Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, T.G.

    1994-10-17

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Nuclear Waste will be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for long term storage and disposal. This is a nuclear criticality safety evaluation for the Late Wash Facility (LWF), the Salt Processing Cell (SPC) and the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). of the DWPF. Waste salt solution is processed in the Tank Farm In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process and is then further washed in the DWPF Late Wash Facility (LWF) before it is fed to the DWPF Salt Processing Cell. In the Salt Processing Cell the precipitate slurry is processed in the Precipitate Reactor (PR) and the resultant Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) produce is combined with the sludge feed and frit in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell to produce a melter feed. The waste is finally immobilized in the Melt Cell. Material in the Tank Farm and the ITP and Extended Sludge processes have been shown to be safe against a nuclear criticality by others. The precipitate slurry feed from ITP and the first six batches of sludge feed are safe against a nuclear criticality and this evaluation demonstrates that the processes in the LWF, the SPC and the CPC do not alter the characteristics of the materials to compromise safety.

  19. SULFATE SOLUBILITY LIMIT VERIFICATION FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7B

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.

    2011-10-03

    the targeted values. The results for the SB7b glasses fabricated with Frit 418 showed an apparent trend of increasing sulfate retention with increasing Na{sub 2}O additions to the 5/25/11 sludge projection. This trend appears contradictory to other recent studies of sulfate retention in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) type glasses. Additional apparent contradictions to this trend were found in the data collected in the present study. Overall, the results for the SB7b sulfate study glasses with Frit 418 and the 5/25/11 projection with Na{sub 2}O additions showed that subtle changes in this complex glass composition impacted the degree of sulfate retention. These results do however provide confidence that a 0.6 wt % sulfate limit in glass is warranted for Frit 418 with the SB7b compositions evaluated in this study. The results for the SB7b glasses fabricated with Frit 702 are consistent with those of the previous SB7a study in that Frit 702 allowed for higher sulfate retention as compared to Frit 418 for the same sludge compositions. It is recommended that the DWPF implement a sulfate concentration limit of 0.6 wt % in glass for SB7b processing with Frit 418. If a higher than projected sulfate concentration is measured when SB7b processing begins (i.e., if a sulfate concentration higher than 0.6 wt % becomes necessary to achieve targeted waste loadings), DWPF should consider a transition to Frit 702. The sulfate limit could likely be raised to 0.8 wt % by transitioning to this frit. However, if DWPF considers transitioning from Frit 418 to Frit 702, additional glasses should be fabricated to confirm this higher limit due to the issues with incorrect B{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations for some of the glasses made with Frit 702 in this study. There are several factors other than sulfate retention that must also be carefully considered prior to changing frit compositions.

  20. Erosion Modeling Analysis For Modified DWPF SME Tank

    SciTech Connect

    LEE, SI

    2004-05-03

    In support of an erosion evaluation for the modified cooling coil guide and its supporting structure in the DWPF SME vessel, a computational model was developed to identify potential sites of high erosion using the same methodology established by previous work. The erosion mechanism identified in the previous work was applied to the evaluation of high erosion locations representative of the actual flow process in the modified coil guide of the SME vessel, abrasive erosion which occurs by high wall shear of viscous liquid. The results show that primary locations of the highest erosion due to the abrasive wall erosion are at the leading edge of the guide, external surface of the insert plate, the tank floor next to the insert plate of the coil guide support, and the upstream lead-in plate. The present modeling results show a good comparison between the original and the modified cases in terms of high erosion sites, as well as the degree of erosion and the calculated shear stress. Wall she ar of the tank floor is reduced by about 30 per cent because of the new coil support plate. Calculations for the impeller speed lower than 103 rpm in the SME showed similar erosion patterns but significantly reduced wall shear stresses and reduced overall erosion. Comparisons of the 103 rpm results with SME measurements indicated that no significant erosion of the tank floor in the SME is to be expected. Thus, it is recommended that the agitator speed of SME does not exceed 103 rpm.

  1. Validation of DWPF Melter Off-Gas Combustion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.S.

    2000-08-23

    The empirical melter off-gas combustion model currently used in the DWPF safety basis calculations is valid at melter vapor space temperatures above 570 degrees C, as measured in the thermowell. This lower temperature bound coincides with that of the off-gas data used as the basis of the model. In this study, the applicability of the empirical model in a wider temperature range was assessed using the off-gas data collected during two small-scale research melter runs. The first data set came from the Small Cylindrical Melter-2 run in 1985 with the sludge feed coupled with the precipitate hydrolysis product. The second data set came from the 774-A melter run in 1996 with the sludge-only feed prepared with the modified acid addition strategy during the feed pretreatment step. The results of the assessment showed that the data from these two melter runs agreed well with the existing model, and further provided the basis for extending the lower temperature bound of the model to the measured melter vapor space temperature of 445 degrees C.

  2. Preliminary Analysis of Species Partitioning in the DWPF Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.; Kesterson, M.; Johnson, F.; McCabe, D.

    2015-07-15

    The work described in this report is preliminary in nature since its goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating the off-gas entrainment rates from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter based on a simple mass balance using measured feed and glass pour stream compositions and timeaveraged melter operating data over the duration of one canister-filling cycle. The only case considered in this study involved the SB6 pour stream sample taken while Canister #3472 was being filled over a 20-hour period on 12/20/2010, approximately three months after the bubblers were installed. The analytical results for that pour stream sample provided the necessary glass composition data for the mass balance calculations. To estimate the “matching” feed composition, which is not necessarily the same as that of the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) batch being fed at the time of pour stream sampling, a mixing model was developed involving three preceding MFT batches as well as the one being fed at that time based on the assumption of perfect mixing in the glass pool but with an induction period to account for the process delays involved in the calcination/fusion step in the cold cap and the melter turnover.

  3. Analysis of high-level radioactive slurries as a method to reduce DWPF turnaround times

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, C.J.; Bibler, N.E.; Ferrara, D.M.; Hay, M.S.

    1996-06-01

    Analysis of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) samples as slurries rather than as dried or vitrified samples is an effective way to reduce sample turnaround times. Slurries can be dissolved with a mixture of concentrated acids to yield solutions for elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Slurry analyses can be performed in eight hours, whereas analyses of vitrified samples require up to 40 hours to complete. Analyses of melter feed samples consisting of the DWPF borosilicate frit and either simulated or actual DWPF radioactive sludge were typically within a range of 3--5% of the predicted value based on the relative amounts of sludge and frit added to the slurry. The results indicate that the slurry analysis approach yields analytical accuracy and precision competitive with those obtained from analyses of vitrified samples. Slurry analyses offer a viable alternative to analyses of solid samples as a simple way to reduce analytical turnaround times.

  4. Waste acceptance and the DWPF Startup Test Program: Impacts of process changes

    SciTech Connect

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1992-08-24

    The DWPF is currently carrying out a Startup Test Program which will lead to radioactive operations in the facility. The objective of a significant portion of this program is to demonstrate that the DWPF can reliably make glass which satisfies DOE`s product specifications. This objective will be achieved through a series of integrated process campaigns using feeds of various compositions (the Qualification Runs).2 During these campaigns, the DWPF Glass Product Control Programs (GPCP) will be used to ensure that glass is made which meets specifications. The GPCP uses a correlation between glass composition and leach test results to determine whether a particular batch of feed will make acceptable glass (i.e., glass which will meet the specifications).

  5. Waste acceptance and the DWPF Startup Test Program: Impacts of process changes

    SciTech Connect

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1992-08-24

    The DWPF is currently carrying out a Startup Test Program which will lead to radioactive operations in the facility. The objective of a significant portion of this program is to demonstrate that the DWPF can reliably make glass which satisfies DOE's product specifications. This objective will be achieved through a series of integrated process campaigns using feeds of various compositions (the Qualification Runs).2 During these campaigns, the DWPF Glass Product Control Programs (GPCP) will be used to ensure that glass is made which meets specifications. The GPCP uses a correlation between glass composition and leach test results to determine whether a particular batch of feed will make acceptable glass (i.e., glass which will meet the specifications).

  6. Discrete event simulation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K.L.

    1992-02-01

    A discrete event simulation of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory has been constructed in the GPSS language. It was used to estimate laboratory analysis times at process analytical hold points and to study the effect of sample number on those times. Typical results are presented for three different simultaneous representing increasing levels of complexity, and for different sampling schemes. Example equipment utilization time plots are also included. SRS DWPF laboratory management and chemists found the simulations very useful for resource and schedule planning.

  7. DWPF (Defense Waste Processing Facility) glass composition control based on glass properties

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J T; Brown, K G; Bickford, D F

    1988-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will immobilize Savannah River Plant (SRP) High Level Waste as a durable borosilicate glass for permanent disposal in a civilian repository. The DWPF will be controlled based on glass composition. The waste glass physical and chemical properties, such as viscosity, liquidus temperature, and durability are functions of glass chemistry. Preliminary models have been developed to evaluate the effects of feed composition variability on the glass properties. These properties are presently being related to the waste glass composition in order to develop process control paradigms that include batching algorithms, hold points, and transfer limits. 3 refs., 6 tabs.

  8. Material compatibility evaluation for DWPF nitric-glycolic acid-literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Skidmore, E.

    2013-06-01

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternative for formic and nitric acid in the DWPF flowsheet. Demonstration testing and modeling for this new flowsheet has shown that glycolic acid and glycolate has a potential to remain in certain streams generated during the production of the nuclear waste glass. A literature review was conducted to assess the impact of glycolic acid on the corrosion of the materials of construction for the DWPF facility as well as facilities downstream which may have residual glycolic acid and glycolates present. The literature data was limited to solutions containing principally glycolic acid.

  9. SUMMARY REPORT ON POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Johnson, F.

    2011-04-27

    This report summarizes a large amount of experimental work completed to identify the potential impacts of material from Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) on glass formulation at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The results show no significant issues with the predicted values of chemical durability and viscosity using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models when the SCIX components are added to projected DWPF glass compositions. No modifications to the viscosity and durability models appear to be necessary at this time in order to incorporate the SCIX streams at DWPF. It is recommended that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) continue to verify the durability and viscosity models as the projected compositions for DWPF processing evolve. It is also recommended that the data generated thus far be reviewed and a determination be made as to how best to extend the validation ranges of the durability and viscosity models. The liquidus temperatures for the experimental glasses are also reported and discussed in this report. The results show that the measured or estimated (based on measured data) liquidus temperature values for the glasses with SCIX components added are consistently higher than those predicted by the current model. Therefore, the PCCS liquidus temperature model will need to be modified in order to incorporate the SCIX streams at DWPF. It is recommended that SRNL carry out full measurements of the liquidus temperatures for those KT-series glasses where estimates have been made. These data should then be used to support an evaluation of whether a refitting of the liquidus temperature model coefficients will be sufficient to correctly predict the liquidus temperature of glasses containing the SCIX components (particularly higher TiO{sub 2} concentrations), or whether additional modifications to the model are required. While there are prediction issues with the current liquidus temperature model, they are not at this

  10. Assessment of combustion and related issues in the DWPF and ITP waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, T.

    1994-04-01

    This report presents a review of the safety analyses described in the DWPF Safety Analysis Report, the combustion analysis of the ITP Tanks 48 and 49, and presents conclusions drawn from interviews staff on issues related to accident analysis, in particular on issues related to combustion phenomena. The major objectives of this report are to clarify the issues related to the modes of combustion and expected loads on process vessels and structures and, in addition, to offer recommendations which would improve the defense-in-depth posture of the DWPF.

  11. SULFATE SOLUBILITY LIMIT VERIFICATION FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, A.

    2011-04-19

    During processing at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), high sulfate concentrations in the feed are a concern to DWPF as it can lead to the formation of a detrimental, sulfate-rich, molten salt phase on the surface of the glass melt pool. To avoid these issues, a sulfate concentration limit was implemented into the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). Related to SB7a frit development efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) assessed the viability of using the current 0.6 wt % SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} limit set for SB6 (in glass) and the possibility of increasing the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} solubility limit in PCCS to account for anticipated sulfur concentrations, targeted waste loadings, and inclusion of secondary streams (e.g., Actinide Removal Process (ARP)) with two recommended frits (Frit 418 and Frit 702) for SB7a processing. For a nominal SB7a blend with a 63 inch SB6 heel remaining in Tank 40 (projection SB7a-63), a 0.60 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass limit was determined for waste loadings of 34 wt% up to 40 wt% with Frit 418 based on crucible melts with batched chemicals. SRNL also examined the inclusion of ARP for the same blending scenario (SB7a-63-ARP) with Frit 418 and at least a 0.6 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} level, and waste loadings of 34 wt% to 40 wt% were also acceptable. When a visible yellow and/or white sulfate salt layer was visible on the surface of any cooled glass, it was assumed to have surpassed the solubility limit of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for that particular composition. All of the glasses fabricated at these concentrations did not exhibit a sulfate rich salt layer on the surface of the glass melt and retained the majority of the batched SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. At higher levels of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} 'spiked' into the projected sludge compositions over the aforementioned interval of waste loadings, with Frit 418, low viscosity sulfur layers were observed on the surface of glass melts which confirm exceeding the solubility limit. The

  12. Rheological Characterization of Unusual DWPF Slurry Samples (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.

    2005-09-01

    A study was undertaken to identify and clarify examples of unusual rheological behavior in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) simulant slurry samples. Identification was accomplished by reviewing sludge, Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product simulant rheological results from the prior year. Clarification of unusual rheological behavior was achieved by developing and implementing new measurement techniques. Development of these new methods is covered in a separate report, WSRC-TR-2004-00334. This report includes a review of recent literature on unusual rheological behavior, followed by a summary of the rheological measurement results obtained on a set of unusual simulant samples. Shifts in rheological behavior of slurries as the wt. % total solids changed have been observed in numerous systems. The main finding of the experimental work was that the various unusual DWPF simulant slurry samples exhibit some degree of time dependent behavior. When a given shear rate is applied to a sample, the apparent viscosity of the slurry changes with time rather than remaining constant. These unusual simulant samples are more rheologically complex than Newtonian liquids or more simple slurries, neither of which shows significant time dependence. The study concludes that the unusual rheological behavior that has been observed is being caused by time dependent rheological properties in the slurries being measured. Most of the changes are due to the effect of time under shear, but SB3 SME products were also changing properties while stored in sample bottles. The most likely source of this shear-related time dependence for sludge is in the simulant preparation. More than a single source of time dependence was inferred for the simulant SME product slurries based on the range of phenomena observed. Rheological property changes were observed on the time-scale of a single measurement (minutes) as well as on a time scale of hours

  13. DWPF CATALYTIC HYDROGEN GENERATION PROGRAM - REVIEW OF CURRENT STATUS

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.

    2009-07-10

    Significant progress has been made in the past two years in improving the understanding of acid consumption and catalytic hydrogen generation during the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processing of waste sludges in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). This report reviews issues listed in prior internal reviews, describes progress with respect to the recommendations made by the December 2006 external review panel, and presents a summary of the current understanding of catalytic hydrogen generation in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, are historically known catalysts for the conversion of formic acid into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Rh, Ru, and Pd are present in the DWPF SRAT feed as by-products of thermal neutron fission of {sup 235}U in the original waste. Rhodium appears to become most active for hydrogen as the nitrite ion concentration becomes low (within a factor of ten of the Rh concentration). Prior to hydrogen generation, Rh is definitely active for nitrite destruction to N{sub 2}O and potentially active for nitrite to NO formation. These reactions are all consistent with the presence of a nitro-Rh complex catalyst, although definite proof for the existence of this complex during Savannah River Site (SRS) waste processing does not exist. Ruthenium does not appear to become active for hydrogen generation until nitrite destruction is nearly complete (perhaps less nitrite than Ru in the system). Catalytic activity of Ru during nitrite destruction is significantly lower than that of either Rh or Pd. Ru appears to start activating as Rh is deactivating from its maximum catalytic activity for hydrogen generation. The slow activation of the Ru, as inferred from the slow rate of increase in hydrogen generation that occurs after initiation, may imply that some species (perhaps Ru itself) has some bound nitrite on it. Ru, rather than Rh, is primarily responsible for the

  14. Melt Rate Improvement for DWPF MB3: Foaming Theory and Mitigation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.K.

    2001-07-24

    The objective of this research is to enhance the basic understanding of the role of glass chemistry, including the chemical kinetics of pre-melting, solid state reactions, batch melting, and the reaction pathways in glass and/or acid addition strategy changes on the overall melting process for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Macrobatch 3 (MB3).

  15. Chronic toxicity evaluation of simulated DWPF effluent to Ceriodaphnia dubia. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    A 7-Day Full Series Chronic Toxicity test was conducted April 13--20, 1990, for the Savannah River Site to assess the chronic toxicity of Simulated defense waste processing facility (DWPF) effluent to Ceriodaphnia dubia. The simulated effluented consisted of Sodium Nitrate, Sodium Oxalate, Sodium Formate, and Corros. Inib.

  16. Literature review: Assessment of DWPF melter and melter off-gas system lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M. M.

    2015-07-30

    A glass melter for use in processing radioactive waste is a challenging environment for the materials of construction (MOC) resulting from a combination of high temperatures, chemical attack, and erosion/corrosion; therefore, highly engineered materials must be selected for this application. The focus of this report is to review the testing and evaluations used in the selection of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), glass contact MOC specifically the Monofrax® K-3 refractory and Inconel® 690 alloy. The degradation or corrosion mechanisms of these materials during pilot scale testing and in-service operation were analyzed over a range of oxidizing and reducing flowsheets; however, DWPF has primarily processed a reducing flowsheet (i.e., Fe2+/ΣFe of 0.09 to 0.33) since the start of radioactive operations. This report also discusses the materials selection for the DWPF off-gas system and the corrosion evaluation of these materials during pilot scale testing and non-radioactive operations of DWPF Melter #1. Inspection of the off-gas components has not been performed during radioactive operations with the exception of maintenance because of plugging.

  17. Literature review: Assessment of DWPF melter and melter off-gas system lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.

    2015-07-30

    A glass melter for use in processing radioactive waste is a challenging environment for the materials of construction (MOC) resulting from a combination of high temperatures, chemical attack, and erosion/corrosion; therefore, highly engineered materials must be selected for this application. The focus of this report is to review the testing and evaluations used in the selection of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), glass contact MOC specifically the Monofrax® K-3 refractory and Inconel® 690 alloy. The degradation or corrosion mechanisms of these materials during pilot scale testing and in-service operation were analyzed over a range of oxidizing and reducing flowsheets; however, DWPF has primarily processed a reducing flowsheet (i.e., Fe2+/ΣFe of 0.09 to 0.33) since the start of radioactive operations. This report also discusses the materials selection for the DWPF off-gas system and the corrosion evaluation of these materials during pilot scale testing and non-radioactive operations of DWPF Melter #1. Inspection of the off-gas components has not been performed during radioactive operations with the exception of maintenance because of plugging.

  18. Preliminary analysis of species partitioning in the DWPF melter. Sludge batch 7A

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A. S.; Smith III, F. G.; McCabe, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    The work described in this report is preliminary in nature since its goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating the off-gas carryover from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter based on a simple mass balance using measured feed and glass pour stream (PS) compositions and time-averaged melter operating data over the duration of one canister-filling cycle.

  19. Use of DWPF redox measurement technique on glasses from West Valley Nuclear Fuel Services Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1990-10-01

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). A similar vitrification facility exists at the West Valley Nuclear Fuel Services. In both of these facilities, control of the oxidation/reduction (redox) equilibrium in the glass melter is critical for processing of the nuclear waste. Redox can be determined by measuring the ratio of ferrous to ferric ions in the glass melt. A colorimetric procedure has been developed for the DWPF which has been shown to give rapid and reliable analytical results. This colorimetric technique has been shown to measure the Fe{sup 2+} component of glasses more accurately than other existing redox measurement methods. The DWPF redox technique was applied to a series of six glasses taken from the West Valley melter during a transient melter excursion. This excursion caused the glasses to become progressively more reducing with time. Application of the DWPF redox technique to these glasses correctly indicated the redox trends with a higher precision and with more accuracy than the West Valley wet chemical method and/or Alfred University's Mossbauer method. 1 fig., 18 refs.

  20. VERIFICATION OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY'S (DWPF) PROCESS DIGESTION METHOD FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Click, D.; Edwards, T.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

    2011-03-14

    For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO{sub 3} acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem Method, see DWPF Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestions of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples. The SB7a SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constituates the SB7a Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), to form the Sb7a Blend composition.

  1. Gc protein (vitamin D-binding protein): Gc genotyping and GcMAF precursor activity.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Okamura, Natsuko; Murakami, Aya; Kubo, Shinichi; Kirk, Kenneth L; Hori, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    The Gc protein (human group-specific component (Gc), a vitamin D-binding protein or Gc globulin), has important physiological functions that include involvement in vitamin D transport and storage, scavenging of extracellular G-actin, enhancement of the chemotactic activity of C5a for neutrophils in inflammation and macrophage activation (mediated by a GalNAc-modified Gc protein (GcMAF)). In this review, the structure and function of the Gc protein is focused on especially with regard to Gc genotyping and GcMAF precursor activity. A discussion of the research strategy "GcMAF as a target for drug discovery" is included, based on our own research.

  2. Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign report: The first two noble metals operations

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, N.D.; Zamecnik, J.R.; Smith, M.E.; Miller, D.H.; Ritter, J.A.

    1991-06-06

    The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas systems. The facility is the first pilot-scale melter system capable of processing mercury, and flowsheet levels of halides and noble metals. In order to characterize the processing of noble metals (Pd, Rh, Ru, and Ag) on a large scale, the IDMS will be operated batchstyle for at least nine feed preparation cycles. The first two of these operations are complete. The major observation to date occurred during the second run when significant amounts of hydrogen were evolved during the feed preparation cycle. The runs were conducted between June 7, 1990 and March 8, 1991. This time period included nearly six months of ``fix-up`` time when forced air purges were installed on the SRAT MFT and other feed preparation vessels to allow continued noble metals experimentation.

  3. The Behavior and Effects of the Noble Metals in the DWPF Melter System

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.E.; Bickford, D.F.

    1997-11-30

    Governments worldwide have committed to stabilization of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) by vitrification to a durable glass form for permanent disposal. All of these nuclear wastes contain the fission-product noble metals: ruthenium, rhodium, and palladium. SRS wastes also contain natural silver from iodine scrubbers. Closely associated with the noble metals are the fission products selenium and tellurium which are chemical analogs of sulfur and which combine with noble metals to influence their behavior and properties. Experience has shown that these melt insoluble metals and their compounds tend to settle to the floor of Joule-heated ceramic melters. In fact, almost all of the major research and production facilities have experienced some operational problem which can be associated with the presence of dense accumulations of these relatively conductive metals and/or their compounds. In most cases, these deposits have led to a loss of production capability, in some cases, to the point that melter operation could not continue. HLW nuclear waste vitrification facilities in the United States are the Department of Energy`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, the planned Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) at the Hanford Site and the operating West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, NY. The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a vitrification test facility at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It was designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas treatment systems. An extensive noble metals testing program was begun in 1990. The objectives of this task were to explore the effects of the noble metals on the DWPF melter feed preparation and waste vitrification processes. This report focuses on the vitrification portion of the test program.

  4. Literature Review: Assessment of DWPF Melter and Melter Off-gas System Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.

    2015-07-30

    Testing to date for the MOC for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) melters is being reviewed with the lessons learned from DWPF in mind and with consideration to the changes in the flowsheet/feed compositions that have occurred since the original testing was performed. This information will be presented in a separate technical report that identifies any potential gaps for WTP processing.

  5. Assessment of the impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF melter off-gas flammability

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, W. E.

    2013-02-13

    An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of replacing the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process with the Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) and blended solvent. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the current solvent in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would both be about 29% higher than their counterparts of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent in the absence of guanidine partitioning. When 6 ppm of guanidine (TiDG) was added to the effluent transfer to DWPF to simulate partitioning for the NGS-MCU and blended solvent cases and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer was controlled below 87 ppm, the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent were still about 12% and 4% lower, respectively, than those of the current solvent. It is, therefore, concluded that as long as the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm, using the current solvent assumption of 105 ppm Isopar{reg_sign} L or 150 ppm solvent in lieu of NGS-MCU or blended solvent in the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 6 ppm of TiDG in the effluent due to guanidine partitioning. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.

  6. Draft letter report: Evaluation of the adaptability of the DWPF feed preparation system to the HWVP

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.O.; Peterson, M.E.

    1996-03-01

    This report evaluates the performance of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation System using Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) process criteria and feed properties. Included is a proposed test plan to verify performance of the equipment identified in the evaluation. The HWVP is being designed to vitrify high-level liquid defense waste currently stored in double shell tanks on the Hanford site. The following sections describe the background and objectives and the approach used in this evaluation.

  7. Corrosion Testing of Monofrax K-3 Refractory in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Alternate Reductant Feeds

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.; Jantzen, C.; Burket, P.

    2016-04-06

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) uses a combination of reductants and oxidants while converting high level waste (HLW) to a borosilicate waste form. A reducing flowsheet is maintained to retain radionuclides in their reduced oxidation states which promotes their incorporation into borosilicate glass. For the last 20 years of processing, the DWPF has used formic acid as the main reductant and nitric acid as the main oxidant. During reaction in the Chemical Process Cell (CPC), formate and formic acid release measurably significant H2 gas which requires monitoring of certain vessel’s vapor spaces. A switch to a nitric acid-glycolic acid (NG) flowsheet from the nitric-formic (NF) flowsheet is desired as the NG flowsheet releases considerably less H2 gas upon decomposition. This would greatly simplify DWPF processing from a safety standpoint as close monitoring of the H2 gas concentration could become less critical. In terms of the waste glass melter vapor space flammability, the switch from the NF flowsheet to the NG flowsheet showed a reduction of H2 gas production from the vitrification process as well. Due to the positive impact of the switch to glycolic acid determined on the flammability issues, evaluation of the other impacts of glycolic acid on the facility must be examined.

  8. Corrosion tests of carbon steel exposed to a simulated DWPF recycle stream

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.E.

    1993-09-30

    Coupon immersion tests of ASTM A537 Class 1 carbon steel in simulated DWPF recycle solutions did not generate shock-sensitive deposits, consistent with two previous tests at SRTC. Results of three sets of tests indicate that the formation of detectable amounts of shock-sensitive deposits is not possible under test conditions. Solutions used included the increased nitrate concentration (0.05 M vs.the 0.01 M used previously) that reflects the introduction of ammonia scrubbing in the DWPF. The nitrite and hydroxide concentrations were 0.042 M and 0.5 M, respectively, which are the current Process Requirement concentrations for the DWPF Recycle Collection Tank. As a result of the increased nitrate level, the coupon showed superficial uniform corrosion at a rate {le} 0.4 mils per year (0.0004 in. per year) and pitting corrosion with a maximum depth of 0.7 mils (0.0007 in.). Electrochemical corrosion tests to revise the nitrite concentration limit to accommodate the higher nitrate concentration will be completed in October, 1993.

  9. Leaching TC-99 from DWPF glass in simulated geologic repository groundwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N.E.; Jurgensen, A.R.

    1986-09-30

    The purpose was to determine if DWPF glass in geologic groundwaters would immobilize Tc-99 as well as it does other elements. A previous study (using a borosilicate glass of a very different composition from DWPF glass) indicated that Tc-99 leached rapidly from the glass suggesting that glass may not be a good matrix for immobilizing Tc-99. It was suggested that the Tc-99 had migrated to vesicles in the glass while the glass was still molten. To determine if borosilicate glass was a good immobilizing matrix for Tc-99, this study was performed using DWPF glass. The leaching of Tc-99 was compared to other elements in the glass. It was shown that rapid leaching will not occur with SRP glass. The leach rate for Tc-99 was nearly identical to that for B, a matrix element in the glass. Another objective was to compare the release of Tc-99 under oxidizing and reducing conditions with other elements in the glass. In the tests described here, even though the glass was dissolving more under reducing conditions as a result of abnormally high pH values, less Tc-99 appeared in solution.

  10. Analysis Of DWPF Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8) Pour Stream Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, F. C.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2012-10-24

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed.

  11. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, David C.; Lambert, Daniel P.; Baich, Mark A.

    2005-08-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is in the process of investigating factors suspected of impacting catalytic hydrogen generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, Chemical Process Cell, CPC. Noble metal catalyzed hydrogen generation in simulation work constrains the allowable acid addition operating window in DWPF. This constraint potentially impacts washing strategies during sludge batch preparation. It can also influence decisions related to the addition of secondary waste streams to a sludge batch. Catalytic hydrogen generation data from 2002-2005 were reviewed. The data came from process simulations of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, and Slurry Mix Evaporator, SME. Most of the data was from the development work for the Sludge Batch 3 process flowsheet. This included simulant and radioactive waste testing. Preliminary Sludge Batch 4 data were also reviewed. A statistical analysis of SB3 simulant hydrogen generation data was performed. One factor considered in the statistical analysis was excess acid. Excess acid was determined experimentally as the acid added beyond that required to achieve satisfactory nitrite destruction.

  12. BEHAVIOR OF MERCURY DURING DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J.; Koopman, D.

    2012-04-09

    retention of mercury in the slurry. Both recovery of mercury in the offgas system and removal (segregation + recovery) from the slurry correlate with slurry consistency. Higher slurry consistency results in better retention of Hg in the slurry (less segregation) and better recovery in the offgas system, but the relationships of recovery and retention with consistency are sludge dependent. Some correlation with slurry yield stress and acid stoichiometry was also found. Better retention of mercury in the slurry results in better recovery in the offgas system because the mercury in the slurry is stripped more easily than the segregated mercury at the bottom of the vessel. Although better retention gives better recovery, the time to reach a particular slurry mercury content (wt%) is longer than if the retention is poorer because the segregation is faster. The segregation of mercury is generally a faster process than stripping. The stripping factor (mass of water evaporated per mass of mercury stripped) of mercury at the start of boiling were found to be less than 1000 compared to the assumed design basis value of 750 (the theoretical factor is 250). However, within two hours, this value increased to at least 2000 lb water per lb Hg. For runs with higher mercury recovery in the offgas system, the stripping factor remained around 2000, but runs with low recovery had stripping factors of 4000 to 40,000. DWPF data shows similar trends with the stripping factor value increasing during boiling. These high values correspond to high segregation and low retention of mercury in the sludge. The stripping factor for a pure Hg metal bead in water was found to be about 10,000 lb/lb. About 10-36% of the total Hg evaporated in a SRAT cycle was refluxed back to the SRAT during formic acid addition and boiling. Mercury is dissolved as a result of nitric acid formation from absorption of NO{sub x}. The actual solubility of dissolved mercury in the acidic condensate is about 100 times higher than

  13. ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7) POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, F.

    2012-01-20

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), also referred to as Macrobatch 7 (MB7), in June 2010. SB6 is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), H-Canyon Np transfers and SB6 that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51.1 SB6 was processed using Frit 418. Sludge is received into the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) and is processed through the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Tank (SME). The treated sludge slurry is then transferred to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) and fed to the melter. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP) and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. The DWPF requested various analyses of radioactive glass samples obtained from the melter pour stream during processing of SB6 as well as reduction/oxidation (REDOX) analysis of MFT samples to determine the impact of Argon bubbling. Sample analysis followed the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) and an Analytical Study Plan (ASP). Four Pour Stream (PS) glass samples and two MFT slurry samples were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from the DWPF. Table 1-1 lists the sample information for each pour stream glass sample. SB6 PS3 (S03472) was selected as the official pour stream sample for SB6 and full analysis was requested. This report details the visual observations of the as-received SB6 PS No.3 glass sample as well as results for the chemical composition, Product Consistency Test (PCT), radionuclide content, noble metals, and glass density. REDOX results will be provided for all four pour stream samples and vitrified samples of MFT-558 and MFT-568A. Where appropriate, data from other pour stream samples will be provided.

  14. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Modular CSSX Unit (CSSX), and Waste Transfer Line System of Salt Processing Program (U)

    SciTech Connect

    CHANG, ROBERT

    2006-02-02

    All of the waste streams from ARP, MCU, and SWPF processes will be sent to DWPF for vitrification. The impact these new waste streams will have on DWPF's ability to meet its canister production goal and its ability to support the Salt Processing Program (ARP, MCU, and SWPF) throughput needed to be evaluated. DWPF Engineering and Operations requested OBU Systems Engineering to evaluate DWPF operations and determine how the process could be optimized. The ultimate goal will be to evaluate all of the Liquid Radioactive Waste (LRW) System by developing process modules to cover all facilities/projects which are relevant to the LRW Program and to link the modules together to: (1) study the interfaces issues, (2) identify bottlenecks, and (3) determine the most cost effective way to eliminate them. The results from the evaluation can be used to assist DWPF in identifying improvement opportunities, to assist CBU in LRW strategic planning/tank space management, and to determine the project completion date for the Salt Processing Program.

  15. Analysis of Sludge Batch 3 (Macrobatch4) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample for Canister s02312

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C

    2005-09-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 3 (SB3), Macrobatch 4 (MB4) in March 2004 as part of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Batch 272. Sludge Batch 3 is a blend of the contents Tank 40 remaining from Sludge Batch 2 (SB2), the sludge that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51 and Canyon Np solution additions made directly to Tank 40. The sludge transferred from Tank 51 contained sludges from Tanks 7, 18 and 19 along with precipitated solutions of U, Pu/Gd and Am/Cm from the F and H Canyons. The blend of sludge from Tank 51, Tank 40, and the Canyon additions defines SB3 (or MB4). The sludge slurry is received into the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) and is processed through the SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Tank and fed to the melter. During the processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample. This glass sample is taken to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program and complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Two glass samples were obtained while pouring Canisters S02312 and S02315 which were sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility. Sample S02312 was designated for analysis, while sample S02315 was designated for archival storage. This report contains the visual observations of the as-received glass sample, results for the density, chemical composition, the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the calculated and measured radionuclide results needed for the Production Record for Canister S02312. The following conclusions were drawn from the examination of this DWPF pour stream glass sample: (1) The glass sample taken during the filling of DWPF Canister S02312 weighed 41.69 g and was generally dark and reflective. (2) Minor inclusions, on the order of 1 {micro}m in size, of noble metals were seen in the glass via contained scanning electron

  16. Determination of frequencies of contamination and fire related incidents for DWPF SAR

    SciTech Connect

    Hovis, G.L.; Harvel, C.D.; Abear, J.W.; Sims, C.H.

    1994-11-15

    At the request of the Risk Analysis group (RAG), and in support of the DWPF SAR, the Safety Information Management and Analysis group (SIMA) determined specific frequency and unavailability values dealing with contamination and fire related incidents. All results summarized herein are based upon actual facility operating data from the 200-Area Fault Tree Data Bank. The SAS statistical package was utilized to compute annual frequencies from appropriate event data. All calculations have been technically reviewed to ensure that they are accurate mathematical representations of actual operating history as recorded in the data bank.

  17. Examination Of Sulfur Measurements In DWPF Sludge Slurry And SRAT Product Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.; Wiedenman, B. J.

    2012-11-29

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to re-sample the received SB7b WAPS material for wt. % solids, perform an aqua regia digestion and analyze the digested material by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), as well as re-examine the supernate by ICP-AES. The new analyses were requested in order to provide confidence that the initial analytical subsample was representative of the Tank 40 sample received and to replicate the S results obtained on the initial subsample collected. The ICP-AES analyses for S were examined with both axial and radial detection of the sulfur ICP-AES spectroscopic emission lines to ascertain if there was any significant difference in the reported results. The outcome of this second subsample of the Tank 40 WAPS material is the first subject of this report. After examination of the data from the new subsample of the SB7b WAPS material, a team of DWPF and SRNL staff looked for ways to address the question of whether there was in fact insoluble S that was not being accounted for by ion chromatography (IC) analysis. The question of how much S is reaching the melter was thought best addressed by examining a DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Product sample, but the significant dilution of sludge material, containing the S species in question, that results from frit addition was believed to add additional uncertainty to the S analysis of SME Product material. At the time of these discussions it was believed that all S present in a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt sample would be converted to sulfate during the course of the SRAT cycle. A SRAT Product sample would not have the S dilution effect resulting from frit addition, and hence, it was decided that a DWPF SRAT Product sample would be obtained and submitted to SRNL for digestion and sample preparation followed by a round-robin analysis of the prepared samples by the DWPF Laboratory, F/H Laboratories, and SRNL for S and sulfate. The

  18. Results of Hg speciation testing on DWPF SMECT-4, SMECT-6, and RCT-2 samples

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2016-02-04

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team.i,ii The fifteenth shipment of samples was designated to include Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) samples from Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Batch 738 and a Recycle Condensate Tank (RCT) sample from SRAT Batch 736. The DWPF sample designations for the three samples analyzed are provided in Table 1. The Batch 738 ‘Baseline’ SMECT sample was taken prior to Precipitate Reactor Feed Tank (PRFT) addition and concentration and therefore, precedes the SMECT-5 sample reported previously. iii The Batch 738 ‘End of SRAT Cycle’ SMECT sample was taken at the conclusion of SRAT operations for this batch (PRFT addition/concentration, acid additions, initial concentration, MCU addition, and steam stripping). Batch 738 experienced a sludge slurry carryover event, which introduced sludge solids to the SMECT that were particularly evident in the SMECT-5 sample, but less evident in the ‘End of SRAT Cycle’ SMECT-6 sample. The Batch 736 ‘After SME’ RCT sample was taken after completion of SMECT transfers at the end of the SME cycle.

  19. Determination Of Reportable Radionuclides For DWPF Sludge Batch 7B (Macrobatch 9)

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C. L.; Diprete, D. P.

    2012-12-17

    The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. Twenty-seven radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b. Each of these radionuclides has a half-life greater than ten years and contributes more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis at some point from production through the 1100 year period between 2015 and 3115. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100- year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are the most extensive conducted to date. Some method development/refinement occurred during the conduct of these measurements, leading to lower detection limits and more accurate measurement of some isotopes than was previously possible.

  20. Results of Hg speciation testing on DWPF SMECT-8, OGCT-1, AND OGCT-2 samples

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.

    2016-02-22

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team. The sixteenth shipment of samples was designated to include a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) sample from Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Batch 738 processing and two Off-Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT) samples, one following Batch 736 and one following Batch 738. The DWPF sample designations for the three samples analyzed are provided. The Batch 738 ‘End of SME Cycle’ SMECT sample was taken at the conclusion of Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) operations for this batch and represents the fourth SMECT sample examined from Batch 738. Batch 738 experienced a sludge slurry carryover event, which introduced sludge solids to the SMECT that were particularly evident in the SMECT-5 sample, but less evident in the ‘End of SME Cycle’ SMECT-8 sample.

  1. DWPF Melter Off-Gas Flammability Assessment for Sludge Batch 9

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A. S.

    2016-07-11

    The slurry feed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter contains several organic carbon species that decompose in the cold cap and produce flammable gases that could accumulate in the off-gas system and create potential flammability hazard. To mitigate such a hazard, DWPF has implemented a strategy to impose the Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) limits on all key operating variables affecting off-gas flammability and operate the melter within those limits using both hardwired/software interlocks and administrative controls. The operating variables that are currently being controlled include; (1) total organic carbon (TOC), (2) air purges for combustion and dilution, (3) melter vapor space temperature, and (4) feed rate. The safety basis limits for these operating variables are determined using two computer models, 4-stage cold cap and Melter Off-Gas (MOG) dynamics models, under the baseline upset scenario - a surge in off-gas flow due to the inherent cold cap instabilities in the slurry-fed melter.

  2. Sludge Washing And Demonstration Of The DWPF Flowsheet In The SRNL Shielded Cells For Sludge Batch 8 Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J. M.; Crawford, C. L.

    2013-04-26

    The current Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks to Tank 51. Tank 51 sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes using a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). WSE requested the SRNL to perform characterization on a Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) sample and demonstrate the DWPF flowsheet in the SRNL shielded cells for SB8 as the final qualification process required prior to SB8 transfer from Tank 51 to Tank 40. A 3-L sample from Tank 51 (the SB8 qualification sample; Tank Farm sample HTF-51-12-80) was received by SRNL on September 20, 2012. The as-received sample was characterized prior to being washed. The washed material was further characterized and used as the material for the DWPF process simulation including a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, and glass fabrication and chemical durability measurements.

  3. Summary Report For The Analysis Of The Sludge Batch 7b (Macrobatch 9) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample For Canister S04023

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, F. C.

    2013-11-18

    In order to comply with the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Waste Form Compliance Plan for Sluldge Batch 7b, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel characterized the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) pour stream (PS) glass sample collected while filling canister S04023. This report summarizes the results of the compositional analysis for reportable oxides and radionuclides and the normalized Product Consistency Test (PCT) results. The PCT responses indicate that the DWPF produced glass that is significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass.

  4. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J.; Pickenheim, B.; Bannochie, C.; Billings, A.; Bibler, N.; Click, D.

    2010-10-01

    Prior to initiating a new sludge batch in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is required to simulate this processing, including Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation, waste glass fabrication, and chemical durability testing. This report documents this simulation for the next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 6 (SB6). SB6 consists of Tank 12 material that has been transferred to Tank 51 and subjected to Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD), Tank 4 sludge, and H-Canyon Pu solutions. Following LTAD and the Tank 4 addition, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided SRNL a 3 L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB6 qualification. Pu solution from H Canyon was also received. SB6 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of Pu from H Canyon), DWPF CPC simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass characterization and chemical durability evaluation. The following are significant observations from this demonstration. Sludge settling improved slightly as the sludge was washed. SRNL recommended (and the Tank Farm implemented) one less wash based on evaluations of Tank 40 heel projections and projections of the glass composition following transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40. Thorium was detected in significant quantities (>0.1 wt % of total solids) in the sludge. In past sludge batches, thorium has been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), seen in small quantities, and reported with the radionuclides. As a result of the high thorium, SRNL-AD has added thorium to their suite of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) elements. The acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing of 115%, or 1.3 mol acid per liter of SRAT receipt slurry, was adequate to accomplish some of the goals of SRAT processing: nitrite was destroyed to below 1,000 mg/kg and mercury was removed to

  5. Analysis Of The Sludge Batch 7b (Macrobatch 9) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, F. C.; Crawford, C. L.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2013-11-18

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9), in January 2012. SB7b is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and the SB7b material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7b was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Form Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Two pour stream glass samples were collected while processing SB7b. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where one was analyzed and the other was archived. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: The sum of oxides for the official SB7b pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%); The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7b is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7b pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7b Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample; As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the SB7b pour stream sample; The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7b pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.8 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass; The measured density of the SB7b pour stream glass was 2.70 g/cm{sup 3}; The Fe{sup 2+}/ΣFe ratio of the SB7b pour stream samples was 0.07.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS QUENCHER AND STEAM ATOMIZED SCRUBBER DEPOSIT SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Zeigler, K; Ned Bibler, N

    2007-06-06

    This report summarizes the results from the characterization of deposits from the inlets of the primary off-gas Quencher and Steam Atomized Scrubber (SAS) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), as requested by a technical assistance request. DWPF requested elemental analysis and compound identification to help determine the potential causes for the substance formation. This information will be fed into Savannah River National Laboratory modeling programs to determine if there is a way to decrease the formation of the deposits. The general approach to the characterization of these samples included x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results found in this report: (1) The deposits are not high level waste glass from the DWPF melt pool based on comparison of the compositions of deposits to the composition of a sample of glass taken from the pour stream of the melter during processing of Sludge Batch 3. (2) Chemical composition results suggest that the deposits are probably a combination of sludge and frit particles entrained in the off-gas. (3) Gamma emitters, such as Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-154, Am-241, and Am-243 were detected in both the Quencher and SAS samples with Cs-137 having the highest concentration of the gamma emitters. (4) No evidence existed for accumulation of fissile material (U-233, U-235, and Pu-239) relative to Fe in either deposit. (5) XRD results indicated both samples were primarily amorphorous and contained some crystals of the iron oxides, hematite and magnetite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe(Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4})), along with sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}). The other main crystalline compound in the SAS deposit was mercurous chloride. The main crystalline compound in the Quencher deposit was a uranium oxide compound. These are all sludge components. (6) SEM analysis of the Quencher deposit revealed crystalline uranium compounds within the sample

  7. DWPF coupled feed flowsheet material balance with batch one sludge and copper nitrate catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.S.

    1993-09-28

    The SRTC has formally transmitted a recommendation to DWPF to replace copper formate with copper nitrate as the catalyst form during precipitate hydrolysis [1]. The SRTC was subsequently requested to formally document the technical bases for the recommendation. A memorandum was issued on August 23, 1993 detailing the activities (and responsible individuals) necessary to address the impact of this change in catalyst form on process compatibility, safety, processibility environmental impact and product glass quality [2]. One of the activities identified was the preparation of a material balance in which copper nitrate is substituted for copper formate and the identification of key comparisons between this material balance and the current Batch 1 sludge -- Late Wash material balance [3].

  8. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF DWPF IMPACTS OF BORIC ACID USE IN CESIUM STRIP FOR SWPF AND MCU

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.

    2010-09-28

    A new solvent system is being evaluated for use in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and in the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The new system includes the option to replace the current dilute nitric acid strip solution with boric acid. To support this effort, the impact of using 0.01M, 0.1M, 0.25M and 0.5M boric acid in place of 0.001M nitric acid was evaluated for impacts on the DWPF facility. The evaluation only covered the impacts of boric acid in the strip effluent and does not address the other changes in solvents (i.e., the new extractant, called MaxCalix, or the new suppressor, guanidine). Boric acid additions may lead to increased hydrogen generation during the SRAT and SME cycles as well as change the rheological properties of the feed. The boron in the strip effluent will impact glass composition and could require each SME batch to be trimmed with boric acid to account for any changes in the boron from strip effluent additions. Addition of boron with the strip effluent will require changes in the frit composition and could lead to changes in melt behavior. The severity of the impacts from the boric acid additions is dependent on the amount of boric acid added by the strip effluent. The use of 0.1M or higher concentrations of boric acid in the strip effluent was found to significantly impact DWPF operations while the impact of 0.01M boric acid is expected to be relatively minor. Experimental testing is required to resolve the issues identified during the preliminary evaluation. The issues to be addressed by the testing are: (1) Impact on SRAT acid addition and hydrogen generation; (2) Impact on melter feed rheology; (3) Impact on glass composition control; (4) Impact on frit production; and (5) Impact on melter offgas. A new solvent system is being evaluated for use in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and in the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The new system includes the option to replace the

  9. DWPF nitric-glycolic flowsheet chemical process cell chemistry. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J. R.; Edwards, T. B.

    2016-02-01

    The conversions of nitrite to nitrate, the destruction of glycolate, and the conversion of glycolate to formate and oxalate were modeled for the Nitric-Glycolic flowsheet using data from Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulant runs conducted by SRNL from 2011 to 2015. The goal of this work was to develop empirical correlations for these variables versus measureable variables from the chemical process so that these quantities could be predicted a-priori from the sludge composition and measurable processing variables. The need for these predictions arises from the need to predict the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of the glass from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. This report summarizes the initial work on these correlations based on the aforementioned data. Further refinement of the models as additional data is collected is recommended.

  10. Determination of Reportable Radionuclides for DWPF Sludge Batch 3 (Macrobatch 4)

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C

    2005-05-01

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that ''The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115''. As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, IAEA Safeguards Reporting for HLW, requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from High Level Waste Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the previous contents of Tank 40 (Sludge Batch 2) and the sludge that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge from Tank 51 and Tank 40 defines Macrobatch 4 (also referred to as Sludge Batch 3). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities and determines the radionuclide activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the

  11. Interim glycol flowsheet reduction/oxidation (redox) model for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C. M.; Williams, M. S.; Zamecnik, J. R.; Missimer, D. M.

    2016-03-08

    Control of the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of glasses containing high concentrations of transition metals, such as High Level Waste (HLW) glasses, is critical in order to eliminate processing difficulties caused by overly reduced or overly oxidized melts. Operation of a HLW melter at Fe+2/ΣFe ratios of between 0.09 and 0.33, a range which is not overly oxidizing or overly reducing, helps retain radionuclides in the melt, i.e. long-lived radioactive 99Tc species in the less volatile reduced Tc4+ state, 104Ru in the melt as reduced Ru+4 state as insoluble RuO2, and hazardous volatile Cr6+ in the less soluble and less volatile Cr+3 state in the glass. The melter REDOX control balances the oxidants and reductants from the feed and from processing additives such as antifoam. Currently, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is running a formic acid-nitric acid (FN) flowsheet where formic acid is the main reductant and nitric acid is the main oxidant. During decomposition formate and formic acid releases H2 gas which requires close control of the melter vapor space flammability. A switch to a nitric acid-glycolic acid (GN) flowsheet is desired as the glycolic acid flowsheet releases considerably less H2 gas upon decomposition. This would greatly simplify DWPF processing. Development of an EE term for glycolic acid in the GN flowsheet is documented in this study.

  12. Analytical Results of DWPF Glass Sample Taken During Pouring of Canister S01913

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C

    2005-10-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) (Macrobatch 3) in December 2001 as part of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Batch 208. Macrobatch 3 consists of the contents of Tank 40 and Tank 8 in approximately equal proportions. A glass sample was obtained while pouring Canister S01913 and was sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells for characterization. This report contains observations of the glass sample, results for the density, the chemical composition, the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the radionuclide results needed for the Production Record for Canister S01913. The following conclusions are drawn from this work: (1) The glass sample taken during the filling of canister S01913 received at SRNL weighed 33.04 grams and was dark and reflective with no obvious inclusions indicating the glass was homogeneous. (2) The results of the composition for glass sample S01913 are in good agreement ({+-} 15%) with the DWPF SME results for Batch Number 254, the SME Batch that was being fed to the melter when the sample was collected. (3) The calculated WDF was 2.58. (4) Acid dissolution of the glass samples may not have completely dissolved the noble metals rhodium and ruthenium. (5) The PCT results for the glass (normalized boron release of 1.18 g/L) indicate that it is greater than seven standard deviations more durable than the EA glass; thus, the glass meets the waste acceptance criterion for durability. (6) The measured density of the glass was 2.56 {+-} 0.03 g/cm{sup 3}.

  13. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Viscosity Model: Revisions for Processing High TiO2 Containing Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C. M.; Edwards, T. B.

    2016-08-30

    Radioactive high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it is poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to guarantee, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository. The DWPF SPC system is known as the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). The DWPF will soon be receiving wastes from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) containing increased concentrations of TiO2, Na2O, and Cs2O . The SWPF is being built to pretreat the high-curie fraction of the salt waste to be removed from the HLW tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms at the SRS. In order to process TiO2 concentrations >2.0 wt% in the DWPF, new viscosity data were developed over the range of 1.90 to 6.09 wt% TiO2 and evaluated against the 2005 viscosity model. An alternate viscosity model is also derived for potential future use, should the DWPF ever need to process other titanate-containing ion exchange materials. The ultimate limit on the amount of TiO2 that can be accommodated from SWPF will be determined by the three PCCS models, the waste composition of a given sludge

  14. A bench scale study of a one-step dissolution process for treating contaminated fiberglass filters

    SciTech Connect

    Policke, T.A.; Ritter, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    High efficiency mist eliminators (HEME) and high efficiency particulate air filters (HEPA) made of High fiberglass will be used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to remove particulate matter from offgases generated during melter feed preparation and vitrification of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). These filters will be contaminated with high-level, radioactive species and also with various high-boiling organic compounds. For this reason, a process was developed at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) that will dissolve the spent filters so that the residues may be recycled to the HLW tanks for eventual vitrification. This process involves boiling the filters sequentially in NaOH, HN0{sub 3} and NaOH, while contained in a stainless steal wire mesh frame assembly. The objective of this communication is to present some of the original preliminary work done by Ritter on the simple one-step dissolution process. The results from six bench-scale experiments are reported for the dissolution of an organically-fouled sample of HEME obtained from the Integrated DWPF Melter (IDMS) offgas filtration system. The preliminary effects of filter packing density, air sparging versus rotating basket agitation, fouling, and adding Triton X-405 as a dispersing agent are reported.

  15. Phase II of a Six sigma Initiative to Study DWPF SME Analytical Turnaround Times: SRNL's Evaluation of Carbonate-Based Dissolution Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Thomas

    2005-09-01

    The Analytical Development Section (ADS) and the Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are participating in a Six Sigma initiative to improve the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory. The Six Sigma initiative has focused on reducing the analytical turnaround time of samples from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) by developing streamlined sampling and analytical methods [1]. The objective of Phase I was to evaluate the sub-sampling of a larger sample bottle and the performance of a cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) digestion method. Successful implementation of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} fusion method in the DWPF would have important time savings and convenience benefits because this single digestion would replace the dual digestion scheme now used. A single digestion scheme would result in more efficient operations in both the DWPF shielded cells and the inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) laboratory. By taking a small aliquot of SME slurry from a large sample bottle and dissolving the vitrified SME sample with carbonate fusion methods, an analytical turnaround time reduction from 27 hours to 9 hours could be realized in the DWPF. This analytical scheme has the potential for not only dramatically reducing turnaround times, but also streamlining operations to minimize wear and tear on critical shielded cell components that are prone to fail, including the Hydragard{trademark} sampling valves and manipulators. Favorable results from the Phase I tests [2] led to the recommendation for a Phase II effort as outlined in the DWPF Technical Task Request (TTR) [3]. There were three major tasks outlined in the TTR, and SRNL issued a Task Technical and QA Plan [4] with a corresponding set of three major task activities: (1) Compare weight percent (wt%) total solids measurements of large volume samples versus peanut vial samples. (2) Evaluate Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3

  16. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  17. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  18. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Amanda Billings, A; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-11-10

    Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) is predominantly a combination of H-modified (HM) sludge from Tank 11 that underwent aluminum dissolution in late 2007 to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and aluminum being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Purex sludge transferred from Tank 7. Following aluminum dissolution, the addition of Tank 7 sludge and excess Pu to Tank 51, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB5 qualification. SB5 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of a Pu/Be stream from H Canyon), DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass chemical durability evaluation. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernatant) and concentration (decanting of supernatant) of the Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF CPC simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. This includes a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid is added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and remove mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit is added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters for the CPC processing were based on work with a non radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and Product Consistency Test (PCT) evaluation of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This work is controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) , and analyses are guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R

  19. Evaluation of ISDP Batch 2 Qualification Compliance to 512-S, DWPF, Tank Farm, and Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, A.

    2010-05-05

    The purpose of this report is to document the acceptability of the second macrobatch (Salt Batch 2) of Tank 49H waste to H Tank Farm, DWPF, and Saltstone for operation of the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). Tank 49 feed meets the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) requirements specified by References 11, 12, and 13. Salt Batch 2 material is qualified and ready to be processed through ARP/MCU to the final disposal facilities.

  20. DWPF FLOWSHEET STUDIES WITH SIMULANT TO DETERMINE THE IMPACT OF NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT ON THE CPC PROCESS AND GLASS FORMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.; Hay, M.; Stone, M.

    2011-06-29

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS), a new strip acid, and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) will be deployed. The NGS is comprised of four components: 0.050 M MaxCalix (extractant), 0.50 M Cs-7SB (modifier), 0.003 M guanidine-LIX-79, with the balance ({approx}74 wt%) being Isopar{reg_sign} L. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST was required to determine the impact of these changes in 512-S and Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operations, as well as Chemical Process Cell (CPC), glass formulation activities, and melter operations. Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST is required to determine the impact of these changes. A Technical Task Request (TTR) was issued to support the assessments of the impact of the next generation solvent and mMST on the downstream DWPF flowsheet unit. The TTR identified five tasks to be investigated: (1) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for NGS; (2) Solvent Stability for DWPF CPC Conditions; (3) Glass Formulation Studies; (4) Boron Volatility and Melt Rate; and (5) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for mMST.

  1. DOWNSTREAM IMPACTS OF SLUDGE MASS REDUCTION VIA ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION ON DWPF PROCESSING OF SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE - 9382

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Hay, M; Daniel McCabe, D

    2009-01-14

    The SRS sludge that was to become a major fraction of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) contained a large fraction of H-Modified PUREX (HM) sludge, containing a large fraction of aluminum compounds that could adversely impact the processing and increase the vitrified waste volume. It is beneficial to reduce the non-radioactive fraction of the sludge to minimize the number of glass waste canisters that must be sent to a Federal Repository. Removal of aluminum compounds, such as boehmite and gibbsite, from sludge can be performed with the addition of NaOH solution and heating the sludge for several days. Preparation of SB5 involved adding sodium hydroxide directly to the waste tank and heating the contents to a moderate temperature through slurry pump operation to remove a fraction of this aluminum. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with demonstrating this process on actual tank waste sludge in our Shielded Cells Facility. This paper evaluates some of the impacts of aluminum dissolution on sludge washing and DWPF processing by comparing sludge processing with and without aluminum dissolution. It was necessary to demonstrate these steps to ensure that the aluminum removal process would not adversely impact the chemical and physical properties of the sludge which could result in slower processing or process upsets in the DWPF.

  2. DWPF Hydrogen Generation Study-Form of Noble Metal SRAT Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C

    2005-09-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, has requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory, SRNL, investigate the factors that contribute to hydrogen generation to determine if current conservatism in setting the DWPF processing window can be reduced. A phased program has been undertaken to increase understanding of the factors that influence hydrogen generation in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell, CPC. The hydrogen generation in the CPC is primarily due to noble metal catalyzed decomposition of formic acid with a minor contribution from radiolytic processes. Noble metals have historically been added as trim chemicals to process simulations. The present study investigated the potential conservatism that might be present from adding the catalytic species as trim chemicals to the final sludge simulant versus co-precipitating the noble metals into the insoluble sludge solids matrix. Two sludge simulants were obtained, one with co-precipitated noble metals and one without noble metals. Co-precipitated noble metals were expected to better match real waste behavior than using trimmed noble metals during CPC simulations. Portions of both sludge simulants were held at 97 C for about eight hours to qualitatively simulate the effects of long term storage on particle morphology and speciation. The two original and two heat-treated sludge simulants were then used as feeds to Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, process simulations. Testing was done at relatively high acid stoichiometries, {approx}175%, and without mercury in order to ensure significant hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation rates were monitored during processing to assess the impact of the form of noble metals. The following observations were made on the data: (1) Co-precipitated noble metal simulant processed similarly to trimmed noble metal simulant in most respects, such as nitrite to nitrate conversion, formate destruction, and pH, but differently with respect to hydrogen generation: (A

  3. DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7B (MACROBATCH 9)

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C. L.; Diprete, D. P.

    2014-05-01

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that “The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115”. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu- 242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to

  4. Determination Of Reportable Radionuclides For DWPF Sludge Batch 7B (Macrobatch 9)

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C. L.; DiPrete, D. P.

    2013-08-22

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that “The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115”. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to

  5. DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 5 (MACROBATCH 6)

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, D.

    2010-02-04

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that ''The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115''. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Tank 40 (Sludge Batch 4 (SB4)), Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51, and H-Canyon Np transfers completed after the start of processing. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 6 (MB6). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities and determines the radionuclide activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use

  6. DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7)

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.; Diprete, D.

    2011-06-01

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that 'The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115'. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) with H-Canyon Np transfers completed after the start of processing SB5, and Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 7 (MB7). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the

  7. DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 4 MACROBATCH 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

    2008-05-30

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS)1 1.2 require that 'The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115'. As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP)2 and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR)3. However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the previous contents of Tank 40 (Sludge Batch 3) and the sludge that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge from Tank 51 and Tank 40 defines Sludge Batch 4 (also referred to as Macrobatch 5 (MB5)). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities and determines the radionuclide activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of

  8. SRAT CHEMISTRY AND ACID CONSUMPTION DURING SIMULATED DWPF MELTER FEED PREPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D; David Best, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-12-03

    Due to higher than expected hydrogen generation during the Tank 51-Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) qualification run, DWPF engineering requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to expand the ongoing catalytic hydrogen generation program. The work presented in this Technical Report was identified as part of SRNL/Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) meetings to define potential causes of catalytic hydrogen generation as well as from an external technical review panel commissioned to evaluate SRNL hydrogen related data and programs. New scope included improving the understanding of SRAT/SME process chemistry, particularly as it related to acid consumption and hydrogen generation. The expanded hydrogen program scope was covered under the technical task request (TTR): HLW-DWPF-TTR-2007-0016. A task technical and quality assurance plan (TT&QAP) was issued to cover focus areas raised in meetings with LWO plus a portion of the recommendations made by the review panel. A supporting analytical study plan was issued. It was also noted in the review of catalytic hydrogen generation that control of the DWPF acid stoichiometry was an important element in controlling hydrogen generation. A separate TTR was issued to investigate ways of improving the determination of the acid requirement during processing: HLWDWPF-TTR-0015. A separate TT&QAP was prepared for this task request. This report discusses some progress on this task related to developing alternative acid equations and to performing experimental work to supplement the existing database. Simulant preparation and preliminary flowsheet studies were already documented. The prior work produced a sufficient quantity of simulant for the hydrogen program and melter feed rheology testing. It also defined a suitable acid addition stoichiometry. The results presented in this report come from samples and process data obtained during sixteen 22-L SRAT/SME simulations that were performed in the second half of 2007 to produce eight SME

  9. Water Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Aquaspace H2OME Guardian Water Filter, available through Western Water International, Inc., reduces lead in water supplies. The filter is mounted on the faucet and the filter cartridge is placed in the "dead space" between sink and wall. This filter is one of several new filtration devices using the Aquaspace compound filter media, which combines company developed and NASA technology. Aquaspace filters are used in industrial, commercial, residential, and recreational environments as well as by developing nations where water is highly contaminated.

  10. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.

    2004-12-31

    This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a discussion of proposed

  11. IMPACT OF IRRADIATION AND THERMAL AGING ON DWPF SIMULATED SLUDGE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Eibling, R; Michael Stone, M

    2006-10-16

    The research and development programs in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and other high-level waste vitrification processes require the use of both nonradioactive waste simulants and actual waste samples. While actual waste samples are the ideal materials to study, acquiring large quantities of actual waste is difficult and expensive. Tests utilizing actual high-level waste require the use of expensive shielded cells facilities to provide sufficient shielding for the researchers. Nonradioactive waste simulants have been used for laboratory testing, pilot-scale testing and full-scale integrated facility testing. These waste simulants were designed to reproduce the chemical and, if possible, the physical properties of the actual high-level waste. This technical report documents a study on the impact of irradiating a Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) simulant and of additional tests on aging a SB3 simulant by additional thermal processing. Prior simulant development studies examined methods of producing sludge and supernate simulants and processes that could be used to alter the physical properties of the simulant to more accurately mimic the properties of actual waste. Development of a precipitated sludge simulant for the River Protection Project (RPP) demonstrated that the application of heat for a period of time could significantly alter the rheology of the sludge simulant. The RPP precipitated simulant used distillation to concentrate the sludge solids and produced a reduction in sludge yield stress of up to 80% compared to the initial sludge properties. Observations at that time suggested that a substantial fraction of the iron hydroxide had converted to the oxide during the distillation. DWPF sludge simulant studies showed a much smaller reduction in yield stress ({approx}10%), demonstrated the impact of shear on particle size, and showed that smaller particle sizes yielded higher yield stress products. The current study documented in this report

  12. Inorganic analyses of volatilized and condensed species within prototypic Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canistered waste

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1992-06-30

    The high-level radioactive waste currently stored in carbon steel tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The canistered waste will be sent to a geologic repository for final disposal. The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require the identification of any inorganic phases that may be present in the canister that may lead to internal corrosion of the canister or that could potentially adversely affect normal canister handling. During vitrification, volatilization of mixed (Na, K, Cs)Cl, (Na, K, Cs){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, (Na, K, Cs)BF{sub 4}, (Na, K){sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} and (Na,K)CrO{sub 4} species from glass melt condensed in the melter off-gas and in the cyclone separator in the canister pour spout vacuum line. A full-scale DWPF prototypic canister filled during Campaign 10 of the SRS Scale Glass Melter was sectioned and examined. Mixed (NaK)CI, (NaK){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, (NaK) borates, and a (Na,K) fluoride phase (either NaF or Na{sub 2}BF{sub 4}) were identified on the interior canister walls, neck, and shoulder above the melt pour surface. Similar deposits were found on the glass melt surface and on glass fracture surfaces. Chromates were not found. Spinel crystals were found associated with the glass pour surface. Reference amounts of the halides and sulfates were found retained in the glass and the glass chemistry, including the distribution of the halides and sulfates, was homogeneous. In all cases where rust was observed, heavy metals (Zn, Ti, Sn) from the cutting blade/fluid were present indicating that the rust was a reaction product of the cutting fluid with glass and heat sensitized canister or with carbon-steel contamination on canister interior. Only minimal water vapor is present so that internal corrosion of the canister, will not occur.

  13. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)

  14. Metallic Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Filtration technology originated in a mid 1960's NASA study. The results were distributed to the filter industry, an HR Textron responded, using the study as a departure for the development of 421 Filter Media. The HR system is composed of ultrafine steel fibers metallurgically bonded and compressed so that the pore structure is locked in place. The filters are used to filter polyesters, plastics, to remove hydrocarbon streams, etc. Several major companies use the product in chemical applications, pollution control, etc.

  15. Filter validation.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Russell E

    2006-01-01

    Validation of a sterilizing filtration process is critical since it is impossible with currently available technology to measure the sterility of each filled container; therefore, sterility assurance of the filtered product must be achieved through validation of the filtration process. Validating a pharmaceutical sterile filtration process involves three things: determining the effect of the liquid on the filter, determining the effect of the filter on the liquid, and demonstrating that the filter removes all microorganisms from the liquid under actual processing conditions.

  16. FILTER TREATMENT

    DOEpatents

    Sutton, J.B.; Torrey, J.V.P.

    1958-08-26

    A process is described for reconditioning fused alumina filters which have become clogged by the accretion of bismuth phosphate in the filter pores, The method consists in contacting such filters with faming sulfuric acid, and maintaining such contact for a substantial period of time.

  17. Water Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A compact, lightweight electrolytic water filter generates silver ions in concentrations of 50 to 100 parts per billion in the water flow system. Silver ions serve as effective bactericide/deodorizers. Ray Ward requested and received from NASA a technical information package on the Shuttle filter, and used it as basis for his own initial development, a home use filter.

  18. ANALYSES AND COMPARISON OF BULK AND COIL SURFACE SAMPLES FROM THE DWPF SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.; Nash, C.; Stone, M.

    2012-02-17

    Sludge samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) heating coil frame and coil surface were characterized to identify differences that might help identify heat transfer fouling materials. The SME steam coils have seen increased fouling leading to lower boil-up rates. Samples of the sludge were taken from the coil frame somewhat distant from the coil (bulk tank material) and from the coil surface (coil surface sample). The results of the analysis indicate the composition of the two SME samples are very similar with the exception that the coil surface sample shows {approx}5-10X higher mercury concentration than the bulk tank sample. Elemental analyses and x-ray diffraction results did not indicate notable differences between the two samples. The ICP-MS and Cs-137 data indicate no significant differences in the radionuclide composition of the two SME samples. Semi-volatile organic analysis revealed numerous organic molecules, these likely result from antifoaming additives. The compositions of the two SME samples also match well with the analyzed composition of the SME batch with the exception of significantly higher silicon, lithium, and boron content in the batch sample indicating the coil samples are deficient in frit relative to the SME batch composition.

  19. Response of DWPF thermal flowmeters to composition change: Effect on 02 determination in Salt Process Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R.A.

    1992-02-03

    Thermal flowmeters (more accurately described as hot wire anamometers) have been installed in the Salt Process Cell (SPC) at the Savannah River Site to measure in-cell process flows. However, upon investigating the effect of composition on thermal flow meters, it was concluded that determining a priori correction factors is a very complicated process requiring fairly precise knowledge of the vapor composition and the meter characteristics. It is recommended that DWPF estimate air enleakage using a test procedure similar to one being developed in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF) which circumvents the correction problem by in situ calibration, and develop a profile which characterizes air inleakaqe as a function of [Delta]P to be used in conjunction with the inleakage test procedure. The recommended test procedure has some distinct advantages over the simple material balance approach. More detailed information on the characteristics of thermal flow meters the recommended air inleakage test procedure, and the inleakage profile are discussed in this report.

  20. Response of DWPF thermal flowmeters to composition change: Effect on 02 determination in Salt Process Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R.A.

    1992-02-03

    Thermal flowmeters (more accurately described as hot wire anamometers) have been installed in the Salt Process Cell (SPC) at the Savannah River Site to measure in-cell process flows. However, upon investigating the effect of composition on thermal flow meters, it was concluded that determining a priori correction factors is a very complicated process requiring fairly precise knowledge of the vapor composition and the meter characteristics. It is recommended that DWPF estimate air enleakage using a test procedure similar to one being developed in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF) which circumvents the correction problem by in situ calibration, and develop a profile which characterizes air inleakaqe as a function of {Delta}P to be used in conjunction with the inleakage test procedure. The recommended test procedure has some distinct advantages over the simple material balance approach. More detailed information on the characteristics of thermal flow meters the recommended air inleakage test procedure, and the inleakage profile are discussed in this report.

  1. Results Of Hg Speciation Testing On DWPF SMECT-1, SMECT-3, And SMECT-5 Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.

    2016-01-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team. The thirteenth shipment of samples was designated to include Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) from Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Batch 736 and 738 samples. Triplicate samples of each material were prepared for this shipment. Each replicate was analyzed for seven Hg species: total Hg, total soluble (dissolved) Hg, elemental Hg [Hg(0)], ionic (inorganic) Hg [Hg(I) and Hg(II)], methyl Hg [CH3Hg-X, where X is a counter anion], ethyl Hg [CH3CH2-Hg-X, where X is a counter anion], and dimethyl Hg [(CH3)2Hg]. The difference between the total Hg and total soluble Hg measurements gives the particulate Hg concentration, i.e. Hg adsorbed to the surface of particulate matter in the sample but without resolution of the specific adsorbed species. The average concentrations of Hg species in the aqueous samples derived from Eurofins reported data corrected for dilutions performed by SRNL are tabulated.

  2. Integration of SWPF into the DWPF Flowsheet: Gap Analysis and Test Matrix Development

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.

    2014-12-10

    Based on Revision 19 of the High Level Waste (HLW) System Plan, it is anticipated that the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) will be integrated into the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet in October 2018 (or with Sludge Batch 11 (SB11)). Given that, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has requested a technical basis be developed that validates the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for use during the processing of the SWPF-based coupled flowsheet or that leads to the refinements of or modifications to the models that are needed so that the models may be used during the processing of the SWPF-based coupled flowsheet. To support this objective, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has completed three key interim activities prior to validation of the current or development of refined PCCS models over the anticipated glass composition region for SWPF processing. These three key activities include: (1) defining the glass compositional region over which SWPF is anticipated to be processed, (2) comparing the current PCCS model validation ranges to the SWPF glass compositional region from which compositional gaps can be identified, and (3) developing a test matrix to cover the compositional gaps.

  3. Variational filtering.

    PubMed

    Friston, K J

    2008-07-01

    This note presents a simple Bayesian filtering scheme, using variational calculus, for inference on the hidden states of dynamic systems. Variational filtering is a stochastic scheme that propagates particles over a changing variational energy landscape, such that their sample density approximates the conditional density of hidden and states and inputs. The key innovation, on which variational filtering rests, is a formulation in generalised coordinates of motion. This renders the scheme much simpler and more versatile than existing approaches, such as those based on particle filtering. We demonstrate variational filtering using simulated and real data from hemodynamic systems studied in neuroimaging and provide comparative evaluations using particle filtering and the fixed-form homologue of variational filtering, namely dynamic expectation maximisation.

  4. DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS WITH TANK 40 AND H CANYON NEPTUNIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Stone, M

    2009-04-28

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) from Tank 40. SB5 contains the contents of Tank 51 from November 2008, qualified by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the heel in Tank 40 remaining from Sludge Batch 4. Current Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) plans are to (1) decant supernatant from Tank 40 to remove excess liquid caused by a leaking slurry pump and (2) receive a Np stream from H Canyon It should be noted that the Np stream contains significant nitrate requiring addition of nitrite to Tank 40 to maintain a high nitrite to nitrate ratio for corrosion control. SRNL has been requested to qualify the proposed changes; determine the impact on DWPF processability in terms of hydrogen generation, rheology, etc.; evaluate antifoam addition strategy; and evaluate mercury stripping. Therefore, SRNL received a 3 L sample of Tank 40 following the transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40 (Tank Farm Sample HTF-40-08-157 to be used in testing and to perform the required Waste Acceptance Product Specifications radionuclide analyses). Based on Tank Farm projections, SRNL decanted a portion* of the sample, added sodium nitrite, and added a Np solution from H Canyon representative of the Np to be dispositioned to Tank 40 (neutralized to 0.6 M excess hydroxide). The resulting material was used in a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) demonstration -- a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle. Preliminary data from the demonstration has been reported previously. This report includes discussion of these results and additional results, including comparisons to Tank Farm projections and the SB5 demonstration.

  5. DWPF COAL-CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL WORK (TANK 48 IMPACT STUDY)

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

    2010-10-15

    This report summarizes the results of both experimental and modeling studies performed using Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) simulants and FBSR product from Tank 48 simulant testing in order to develop higher levels of coal-carbon that can be managed by DWPF. Once the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process starts up for treatment of Tank 48 legacy waste, the FBSR product stream will contribute higher levels of coal-carbon in the sludge batch for processing at DWPF. Coal-carbon is added into the FBSR process as a reductant and some of it will be present in the FBSR product as unreacted coal. The FBSR product will be slurried in water, transferred to Tank Farm and will be combined with sludge and washed to produce the sludge batch that DWPF will process. The FBSR product is high in both water soluble sodium carbonate and unreacted coal-carbon. Most of the sodium carbonate is removed during washing but all of the coal-carbon will remain and become part of the DWPF sludge batch. A paper study was performed earlier to assess the impact of FBSR coal-carbon on the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) operation and melter off-gas flammability by combining it with SB10-SB13. The results of the paper study are documented in Ref. 7 and the key findings included that SB10 would be the most difficult batch to process with the FBSR coal present and up to 5,000 mg/kg of coal-carbon could be fed to the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. In the present study, a bench-scale demonstration of the DWPF CPC processing was performed using SB10 simulants spiked with varying amounts of coal, and the resulting seven CPC products were fed to the DWPF melter cold cap and off-gas dynamics models to determine the maximum coal that can be processed through the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. Based on the results of these experimental and modeling studies, the presence of coal-carbon in the sludge feed to DWPF is found to have

  6. Filtering apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Haldipur, Gaurang B.; Dilmore, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A vertical vessel having a lower inlet and an upper outlet enclosure separated by a main horizontal tube sheet. The inlet enclosure receives the flue gas from a boiler of a power system and the outlet enclosure supplies cleaned gas to the turbines. The inlet enclosure contains a plurality of particulate-removing clusters, each having a plurality of filter units. Each filter unit includes a filter clean-gas chamber defined by a plate and a perforated auxiliary tube sheet with filter tubes suspended from each tube sheet and a tube connected to each chamber for passing cleaned gas to the outlet enclosure. The clusters are suspended from the main tube sheet with their filter units extending vertically and the filter tubes passing through the tube sheet and opening in the outlet enclosure. The flue gas is circulated about the outside surfaces of the filter tubes and the particulate is absorbed in the pores of the filter tubes. Pulses to clean the filter tubes are passed through their inner holes through tubes free of bends which are aligned with the tubes that pass the clean gas.

  7. Filtering apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Haldipur, G.B.; Dilmore, W.J.

    1992-09-01

    A vertical vessel is described having a lower inlet and an upper outlet enclosure separated by a main horizontal tube sheet. The inlet enclosure receives the flue gas from a boiler of a power system and the outlet enclosure supplies cleaned gas to the turbines. The inlet enclosure contains a plurality of particulate-removing clusters, each having a plurality of filter units. Each filter unit includes a filter clean-gas chamber defined by a plate and a perforated auxiliary tube sheet with filter tubes suspended from each tube sheet and a tube connected to each chamber for passing cleaned gas to the outlet enclosure. The clusters are suspended from the main tube sheet with their filter units extending vertically and the filter tubes passing through the tube sheet and opening in the outlet enclosure. The flue gas is circulated about the outside surfaces of the filter tubes and the particulate is absorbed in the pores of the filter tubes. Pulses to clean the filter tubes are passed through their inner holes through tubes free of bends which are aligned with the tubes that pass the clean gas. 18 figs.

  8. CATALYTIC INTERACTIONS OF RHODIUM, RUTHENIUM, AND MERCURY DURING SIMULATED DWPF CPC PROCESSING WITH HYDROGEN GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D

    2008-10-09

    Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels were performed as part of the ongoing investigation into catalytic hydrogen generation. Rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury have been identified as the principal elemental factors affecting the peak hydrogen generation rate in the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) for a given acid addition. The primary goal of this study is to identify any significant interactions between the three factors. Noble metal concentrations were similar to recent sludge batches. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%. An experimental matrix was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), two duplicate midpoint runs, and two additional replicate runs to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing can identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge simulant was used for all tests. Acid addition was kept effectively constant except to compensate for variations in the starting mercury concentration. Six Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed to supplement the SME hydrogen generation database. Some of the preliminary findings from this study include: (1) Rh was linked to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the first two hours after acid addition in preliminary statistical modeling. (2) Ru was linked conclusively to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the last four hours of reflux in preliminary statistical modeling. (3) Increasing the ratio of Hg/Rh shifted the noble metal controlling the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate from

  9. MELTER OFF-GAS FLAMMABILITY ASSESSMENT FOR DWPF ALTERNATE REDUCTANT FLOWSHEET OPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.

    2011-07-08

    Glycolic acid and sugar are being considered as potential candidates to substitute for much of the formic acid currently being added to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter feed as a reductant. A series of small-scale melter tests were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) in January 2011 to collect necessary data for the assessment of the impact of these alternate reductants on the melter off-gas flammability. The DM10 melter with a 0.021 m{sup 2} melt surface area was run with three different feeds which were prepared at SRNL based on; (1) the baseline formic/nitric acid flowsheet, (2) glycolic/formic/nitric acid flowsheet, and (3) sugar/formic/nitric acid flowsheet - these feeds will be called the baseline, glycolic, and sugar flowsheet feeds, respectively, hereafter. The actual addition of sugar to the sugar flowsheet feed was made at VSL before it was fed to the melter. For each feed, the DM10 was run under both bubbled (with argon) and non-bubbled conditions at varying melter vapor space temperatures. The goal was to lower its vapor space temperature from nominal 500 C to less than 300 C at 50 C increments and maintain steady state at each temperature at least for one hour, preferentially for two hours, while collecting off-gas data including CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} concentrations. Just a few hours into the first test with the baseline feed, it was discovered that the DM10 vapor space temperature would not readily fall below 350 C simply by ramping up the feed rate as the test plan called for. To overcome this, ambient air was introduced directly into the vapor space through a dilution air damper in addition to the natural air inleakage occurring at the operating melter pressure of -1 inch H{sub 2}O. A detailed description of the DM10 run along with all the data taken is given in the report issued by VSL. The SRNL personnel have analyzed the DM10 data and identified 25 steady state periods lasting from 32 to 92 minutes for all

  10. Preparation and Heat-Treatment of DWPF Simulants With and Without Co-Precipitated Noble Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, David C.:Eibling, Russel E

    2005-08-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is in the process of investigating factors suspected of impacting catalytic hydrogen generation in the Chemical Process Cell of the Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF. Noble metal catalyzed hydrogen generation in simulation work constrains the allowable acid addition operating window in DWPF. This constraint potentially impacts washing strategies during sludge batch preparation. It can also influence decisions related to the addition of secondary waste streams to a sludge batch. Noble metals have historically been added as trim chemicals to process simulations. The present study investigated the potential conservatism that might be present from adding the catalytic species as trim chemicals to the final sludge simulant versus co-precipitating the noble metals into the insoluble sludge solids matrix. Parallel preparations of two sludge simulants targeting the composition of Sludge Batch 3 were performed in order to evaluate the impact of the form of noble metals. Identical steps were used except that one simulant had dissolved palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium present during the precipitation of the insoluble solids. Noble metals were trimmed into the other stimulant prior to process tests. Portions of both sludge simulants were held at 97 C for about eight hours to qualitatively simulate the effects of long term storage on particle morphology and speciation. The simulants were used as feeds for Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, process simulations. The following conclusions were drawn from the simulant preparation work: (1) The first preparation of a waste slurry simulant with co-precipitated noble metals was successful, based on the data obtained. It appears that 99+% of the noble metals were retained in the simulant. (2) Better control of carbonate, hydroxide, and post-wash trim chemical additions is needed before the new method of simulant preparation will be as reproducible as the old method. (3) The two new

  11. THE IMPACT OF THE MCU LIFE EXTENSION SOLVENT ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION EFFORTS

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D; Edwards, T

    2011-03-24

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NG-CSSX), a new strip acid, and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST is required to determine the impact of these changes in 512-S operations as well as Chemical Process Cell (CPC), Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass formulation activities, and melter operations at DWPF. To support programmatic objectives, the downstream impacts of the boric acid strip effluent (SE) to the glass formulation activities and melter operations are considered in this study. More specifically, the impacts of boric acid additions to the projected SB7b operating windows, potential impacts to frit production temperatures, and the potential impact of boron volatility are evaluated. Although various boric acid molarities have been reported and discussed, the baseline flowsheet used to support this assessment was 0.01M boric acid. The results of the paper study assessment indicate that Frit 418 and Frit 418-7D are robust to the implementation of the 0.01M boric acid SE into the SB7b flowsheet (sludge-only or ARP-added). More specifically, the projected operating windows for the nominal SB7b projections remain essentially constant (i.e., 25-43 or 25-44% waste loading (WL)) regardless of the flowsheet options (sludge-only, ARP added, and/or the presence of the new SE). These results indicate that even if SE is not transferred to the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), there would be no need to add boric acid (from a trim tank) to compositionally compensate for the absence of the boric acid SE in either a sludge-only or ARP-added SB7b flowsheet. With respect to boron volatility, the Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) assessments also

  12. Miscibility Evaluation Of The Next Generation Solvent With Polymers Currently Used At DWPF, MCU, And Saltstone

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-04-17

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, funded the development of an enhanced Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. This effort lead to the development of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) with Tris (3,7-dimethyl octyl) guanidine (TiDG). The first deployment target for the NGS solvent is within the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the new chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the affected facility. This report provides the calculated data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers known to be used or present in the MCU, Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Saltstone facilities that will be exposed to the NGS showed that TiDG could selectively affect the elastomers and some thermoplastics to varying extents, but the typical use of these polymers in a confined geometry will likely prevent the NGS from impacting component performance. The polymers identified as of primary concern include Grafoil® (flexible graphite), Tefzel®, Isolast®, ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) rubber, nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), and fluorocarbon rubber (FKM). Certain polymers like NBR and EPDM were found to interact mildly with NGS but their calculated swelling and the confined geometry will impede interaction with NGS. In addition, it was found that Vellumoid (cellulose fibers-reinforced glycerin and protein) may leach protein and Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) may leach plasticizer (such as Bis-Ethylhexyl-Phthalates) into the NGS solvent. Either case

  13. NOBLE METAL CHEMISTRY AND HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING SIMULATED DWPF MELTER FEED PREPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D

    2008-06-25

    Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell vessels were performed with the primary purpose of producing melter feeds for the beaded frit program plus obtaining samples of simulated slurries containing high concentrations of noble metals for off-site analytical studies for the hydrogen program. Eight pairs of 22-L simulations were performed of the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. These sixteen simulations did not contain mercury. Six pairs were trimmed with a single noble metal (Ag, Pd, Rh, or Ru). One pair had all four noble metals, and one pair had no noble metals. One supporting 4-L simulation was completed with Ru and Hg. Several other 4-L supporting tests with mercury have not yet been performed. This report covers the calculations performed on SRNL analytical and process data related to the noble metals and hydrogen generation. It was originally envisioned as a supporting document for the off-site analytical studies. Significant new findings were made, and many previous hypotheses and findings were given additional support as summarized below. The timing of hydrogen generation events was reproduced very well within each of the eight pairs of runs, e.g. the onset of hydrogen, peak in hydrogen, etc. occurred at nearly identical times. Peak generation rates and total SRAT masses of CO{sub 2} and oxides of nitrogen were reproduced well. Comparable measures for hydrogen were reproduced with more variability, but still reasonably well. The extent of the reproducibility of the results validates the conclusions that were drawn from the data.

  14. Recommendations for rheological testing and modelling of DWPF melter feed slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M.A. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    The melter feed in the DWPF process is a non-Newtonian slurry. In the melter feed system and the sampling system, this slurry is pumped at a wide range of flow rates through pipes of various diameters. Both laminar and turbulent flows are encountered. Good rheology models of the melter feed slurries are necessary for useful hydraulic models of the melter feed and sampling systems. A concentric cylinder viscometer is presently used to characterize the stress/strain rate behavior of the melter feed slurries, and provide the data for developing rheology models of the fluids. The slurries exhibit yield stresses, and they are therefore modelled as Bingham plastics. The ranges of strain rates covered by the viscometer tests fall far short of the entire laminar flow range, and therefore hydraulic modelling applications of the present rheology models frequently require considerable extrapolation beyond the range of the data base. Since the rheology models are empirical, this cannot be done with confidence in the validity of the results. Axial pressure drop versus flow rate measurements in a straight pipe can easily fill in the rest of the laminar flow range with stress/strain rate data. The two types of viscometer tests would be complementary, with the concentric cylinder viscometer providing accurate data at low strain rates, near the yield point if one exists, and pipe flow tests providing data at high strain rates up to and including the transition to turbulence. With data that covers the laminar flow range, useful rheological models can be developed. In the Bingham plastic model, linear behavior of the shear stress as a function of the strain rate is assumed once the yield stress is exceeded. Both shear thinning and shear thickening behavior have been observed in viscometer tests. Bingham plastic models cannot handle this non-linear behavior, but a slightly more complicated yield/power law model can.

  15. Derivatization of carbohydrates for GC and GC-MS analyses.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Matute, A I; Hernández-Hernández, O; Rodríguez-Sánchez, S; Sanz, M L; Martínez-Castro, I

    2011-05-15

    GC and GC-MS are excellent techniques for the analysis of carbohydrates; nevertheless the preparation of adequate derivatives is necessary. The different functional groups that can be found and the diversity of samples require specific methods. This review aims to collect the most important methodologies currently used, either published as new procedures or as new applications, for the analysis of carbohydrates. A high diversity of compounds with diverse functionalities has been selected: neutral carbohydrates (saccharides and polyalcohols), sugar acids, amino and iminosugars, polysaccharides, glycosides, glycoconjugates, anhydrosugars, difructose anhydrides and products resulting of Maillard reaction (osuloses, Amadori compounds). Chiral analysis has also been considered, describing the use of diastereomers and derivatives to be eluted on chiral stationary phases.

  16. Ultraviolet filters.

    PubMed

    Shaath, Nadim A

    2010-04-01

    The chemistry, photostability and mechanism of action of ultraviolet filters are reviewed. The worldwide regulatory status of the 55 approved ultraviolet filters and their optical properties are documented. The photostabilty of butyl methoxydibenzoyl methane (avobenzone) is considered and methods to stabilize it in cosmetic formulations are presented.

  17. Initial results from the canistered waste forms produced during the first campaign of the DWPF Startup Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Startup Test Program, approximately 90 canisters will be filled with glass containing simulated radioactive waste during five separate campaigns. The first campaign is a facility acceptance test to demonstrate the operability of the facility and to collect initial data on the glass and the canistered waste forms. During the next four campaigns (the waste qualification campaigns) data will be obtained which will be used to demonstrate that the DWPF product meets DOE`s Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). Currently 12 of the 16 canisters have been filled with glass during the first campaign (FA-13). This paper describes the tests that have been carried out on these 12 glass-filled canisters and presents the data with reference to the acceptance criteria of the WAPS. These tests include measurement of canister dimensions prior to and after glass filling. dew point, composition, and pressure of the gas within the free volume of the canister, fill height, free volume, weight, leak rates of welds and temporary seals, and weld parameters.

  18. Characterization of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Environmental Assessment (EA) glass Standard Reference Material. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.; Beam, D.C.; Crawford, C.L.; Pickett, M.A.

    1993-06-01

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be immobilized by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Other waste form producers, such as West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP), will also immobilize high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass. The canistered waste will be stored temporarily at each facility for eventual permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The Department of Energy has defined a set of requirements for the canistered waste forms, the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The current Waste Acceptance Primary Specification (WAPS) 1.3, the product consistency specification, requires the waste form producers to demonstrate control of the consistency of the final waste form using a crushed glass durability test, the Product Consistency Test (PCI). In order to be acceptable, a waste glass must be more durable during PCT analysis than the waste glass identified in the DWPF Environmental Assessment (EA). In order to supply all the waste form producers with the same standard benchmark glass, 1000 pounds of the EA glass was fabricated. The chemical analyses and characterization of the benchmark EA glass are reported. This material is now available to act as a durability and/or redox Standard Reference Material (SRM) for all waste form producers.

  19. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J.; Billings, A.; Click, D.

    2011-07-08

    Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 7a*) be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) is composed of portions of Tanks 4, 7, and 12; the Sludge Batch 6 heel in Tank 51; and a plutonium stream from H Canyon. SRNL received the Tank 51 qualification sample (sample ID HTF-51-10-125) following sludge additions to Tank 51. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernate) and concentration (decanting of supernate) of the SB7a - Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a non

  20. Sludge Washing and Demonstration of the DWPF Nitric/Formic Flowsheet in the SRNL Shielded Cells for Sludge Batch 9 Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J.; Newell, D.; Martino, C.; Crawford, C.; Johnson, F.

    2016-11-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to qualify the next batch of sludge – Sludge Batch 9 (SB9). Current practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge to Tank 51 from other tanks. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current Defense Waste Process Facility (DWPF) feed tank. Prior to sludge transfer from Tank 51 to Tank 40, the Tank 51 sludge must be qualified. SRNL qualifies the sludge in multiple steps. First, a Tank 51 sample is received, then characterized, washed, and again characterized. SRNL then demonstrates the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet with the sludge. The final step of qualification involves chemical durability measurements of glass fabricated in the DWPF CPC demonstrations. In past sludge batches, SRNL had completed the DWPF demonstration with Tank 51 sludge. For SB9, SRNL has been requested to process a blend of Tank 51 and Tank 40 at a targeted ratio of 44% Tank 51 and 56% Tank 40 on an insoluble solids basis.

  1. DWPF Flowsheet Studies with Simulants to Determine Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit Solvent Partitioning and Verify Actinide Removal Process Incorporation Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, C

    2006-04-21

    The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) facility and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) are scheduled to begin processing salt waste in fiscal year 2007. A portion of the streams generated in the salt processing facilities will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to be incorporated in the glass matrix. Before the streams are introduced, a combination of impact analyses and research and development studies must be performed to quantify the impacts on DWPF processing. The Process Science & Engineering (PS&E) section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 to evaluate the impacts on DWPF processing. Simulant Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet studies have been performed using previous composition and projected volume estimates for the ARP sludge/monosodium titanate (MST) stream. Due to changes in the flammability control strategy for DWPF for salt processing, the incorporation strategy for ARP has changed and additional ARP flowsheet tests were necessary to validate the new processing strategy. The last round of ARP testing included the incorporation of the MCU stream and identified potential processing issues with the MCU solvent. The identified issues included the potential carry-over and accumulation of the MCU solvent components in the CPC condensers and in the recycle stream to the Tank Farm. Therefore, DWPF requested SRNL to perform additional MCU flowsheet studies to better quantify the organic distribution in the CPC vessels. The previous MCU testing used a Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) simulant since it was anticipated that both of these facilities would begin salt processing during SB4 processing. The same sludge simulant recipe was used in this round of ARP and MCU testing to minimize the number of changes between the two phases of testing so a better comparison could be made. ARP and MCU stream simulants were made for this phase of testing

  2. COMPUTER MODELING OF HIGH-LEVEL WASTE GLASS TEMPERATURES WITHIN DWPF CANISTERS DURING POURING AND COOL DOWN

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, J.

    2011-10-09

    This report describes the results of a computer simulation study to predict the temperature of the glass at any location inside a DWPF canister during pouring and subsequent cooling. These simulations are an integral part of a larger research focus aimed at developing methods to predict, evaluate, and ultimately suppress nepheline formation in HLW glasses. That larger research focus is centered on holistically understanding nepheline formation in HLW glass by exploring the fundamental thermal and chemical driving forces for nepheline crystallization with respect to realistic processing conditions. Through experimental work, the goal is to integrate nepheline crystallization potential in HLW glass with processing capability to ultimately optimize waste loading and throughput while maintaining an acceptable product with respect to durability. The results of this study indicated severe temperature gradients and prolonged temperature dwell times exist throughout different locations in the canister and that the time and temperatures that HLW glass is subjected to during processing is a function of pour rate. The simulations indicate that crystallization driving forces are not uniform throughout the glass volume in a DWPF (or DWPF-like) canister and illustrate the importance of considering overall kinetics (chemical and thermal driving forces) of nepheline formation when developing methods to predict and suppress its formation in HLW glasses. The intended path forward is to use the simulation data both as a driver for future experimental work and, as an investigative tool for evaluating the impact of experimental results. Simulation data will be used to develop laboratory experiments to more acutely evaluate nepheline formation in HLW glass by incorporating the simulated temperatures throughout the canister into the laboratory experiments. Concurrently, laboratory experiments will be performed to identify nepheline crystallization potential in HLW glass as a function of

  3. Fast GC-FID based metabolic fingerprinting of Japanese green tea leaf for its quality ranking prediction.

    PubMed

    Jumtee, Kanokwan; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2009-07-01

    There is a need of reliable, rapid, and cost-effective analysis technique to evaluate food and crop compositions, which are important to improve their qualities and quantities. Prior to fast GC-FID development, metabolic fingerprints, and predictive models obtained from a conventional GC-FID were evaluated by comparison to those derived from GC-TOF-MS. A similar chromatographic pattern with higher sensitivity of polyphenol compounds including epicatechin gallate (ECg) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) had been achieved by using conventional GC-FID. Fast gas chromatograph coupled with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) has been carried out with 10 m x 0.18 mm id x 0.20 microm df capillary column. The analysis time per sample was reduced to less than 14 min compared to those of a conventional GC-FID (38 min) and GC-TOF-MS (28 min). The fast GC-FID also offered reliable retention time reproducibility without significant loss of peak resolution. Projections to latent structures by means of partial least squares (PLS) with orthogonal signal correction filtering (OSC) was applied to the fast GC-FID data. The predictive model showed good model fit and predictability with RMSEP of 3.464, suggesting that fast GC-FID based metabolic fingerprinting could be an alternative method for the prediction of Japanese green tea quality.

  4. MOMA GC-MS coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Pinnick, V. T.; Grand, N.; Szopa, C.; Danell, R.; Lustrement, B.; Freissinet, C.; van Amerom, F. H.; Raulin, F.; Glavin, D. P.; Stalport, F.; Coll, P. J.; Arevalo, R. D.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Goesmann, F.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    The joint ESA-Roscosmos Exo-Mars-2018 rover mission seeks the signs of past or present life on Mars. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) aboard the ExoMars rover will be a key analytical tool in providing chemical (molecular) information from the solid samples, with particular focus on the characterization of organic content. Central to MOMA instrumentation is a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) which provides the unique ability to characterize a broad range of compounds allowing chemical analyses of volatile and non-volatile species. The Gas chromatograph and the oven have been built at LATMOS/LISA (France) and at MPS (Germany) respectively whereas the mass spectrometer has been built at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (USA). Both instruments have been tested separately first and have been coupled in order to test the efficiency of the future MOMA GC-MS instrument. The main objective of the second step has been to test the quantitative response of both instruments while they are coupled and to characterize the combined instrument detection limit for several compounds. A final experiment has been done in order to test the feasibility of the separation and detection of a mixture contained in a soil sample introduced in the MOMA oven.

  5. WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING POST ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION TANK 51 SLUDGE SLURRY

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M

    2008-04-28

    The remaining contents of Tank 51 from Sludge Batch 4 will be blended with Purex sludge from Tank 7 to constitute Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) has completed caustic addition to Tank 51 to perform low temperature Al dissolution on the H-Modified (HM) sludge material to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and Al being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) has also completed aluminum dissolution tests using a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry through funding by DOE EM-21. This report documents assessment of downstream impacts of the aluminum dissolved sludge, which were investigated so technical issues could be identified before the start of SB5 processing. This assessment included washing the aluminum dissolved sludge to a Tank Farm projected sodium concentration and weight percent insoluble solids content and DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing using the washed sludge. Based on the limited testing, the impact of aluminum dissolution on sludge settling is not clear. Settling was not predictable for the 3-L sample. Compared to the post aluminum dissolution sample, settling after the first wash was slower, but settling after the second wash was faster. For example, post aluminum dissolution sludge took six days to settle to 60% of the original sludge slurry height, while Wash 1 took nearly eight days, and Wash 2 only took two days. Aluminum dissolution did impact sludge rheology. A comparison between the as-received, post aluminum dissolution and washed samples indicate that the downstream materials were more viscous and the concentration of insoluble solids less than that of the starting material. This increase in viscosity may impact Tank 51 transfers to Tank 40. The impact of aluminum dissolution on DWPF CPC processing cannot be determined because acid addition for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle was under-calculated and thus

  6. Verification Of The Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Process Digestion Methods For The Sludge Batch 8 Qualification Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Click, D. R.; Edwards, T. B.; Wiedenman, B. J.; Brown, L. W.

    2013-03-18

    This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from inductively coupled plasma – atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium Peroxide/Sodium Hydroxide Fusion Dissolution (PF) and Cold Chem (CC) method digestions and Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption analysis of Hg digestions from the DWPF Hg digestion method of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples. The SB8 SRAT Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constitutes the SB8 Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), to form the SB8 Blend composition.

  7. Final Report - Engineering Study for DWPF Bubblers, VSL-10R1770-1, Rev. 0, dated 12/22/10

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Joseph, I.; Matlack, K. S.; Kot, W. K.; Diener, G. A.; Pegg, I. L.; Callow, R. A.

    2013-11-13

    The objective of this work was to perform an engineering assessment of the impact of implementation of bubblers to improve mixing of the glass pool, and thereby increase throughput, in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) on the melter and off-gas system. Most of the data used for this evaluation were from extensive melter tests performed on non-SRS feeds. This information was supplemented by more recent results on SRS HLW simulants that were tested on a melter system at VSL under contracts from ORP and SRR. Per the work scope, the evaluation focused on the following areas: Glass production rate; Corrosion of melter components; Power requirements; Pouring stability; Off-gas characteristics; Safety and flammability.

  8. Filter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kuban, Daniel P.; Singletary, B. Huston; Evans, John H.

    1984-01-01

    A plurality of holding tubes are respectively mounted in apertures in a partition plate fixed in a housing receiving gas contaminated with particulate material. A filter cartridge is removably held in each holding tube, and the cartridges and holding tubes are arranged so that gas passes through apertures therein and across the partition plate while particulate material is collected in the cartridges. Replacement filter cartridges are respectively held in holding canisters mounted on a support plate which can be secured to the aforesaid housing, and screws mounted on said canisters are arranged to push replacement cartridges into the cartridge holding tubes and thereby eject used cartridges therefrom.

  9. Filter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kuban, D.P.; Singletary, B.H.; Evans, J.H.

    A plurality of holding tubes are respectively mounted in apertures in a partition plate fixed in a housing receiving gas contaminated with particulate material. A filter cartridge is removably held in each holding tube, and the cartridges and holding tubes are arranged so that gas passes through apertures therein and across the the partition plate while particulate material is collected in the cartridges. Replacement filter cartridges are respectively held in holding canisters mounted on a support plate which can be secured to the aforesaid housing, and screws mounted on said canisters are arranged to push replacement cartridges into the cartridge holding tubes and thereby eject used cartridges therefrom.

  10. Sigma Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balgovind, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The GLA Fourth-Order model is needed to smooth the topography. This is to remove the Gibbs phenomenon. The Gibbs phenomenon occurs whenever we truncate a Fourier Series. The Sigma factors were introduced to reduce the Gibbs phenomenon. It is found that the smooth Fourier series is nothing but the original Fourier series with its coefficients multiplied by corresponding sigma factors. This operator can be applied many times to obtain high order sigma filtered field and is easily applicable using FFT. It is found that this filter is beneficial in deriving the topography.

  11. Water Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Seeking to find a more effective method of filtering potable water that was highly contaminated, Mike Pedersen, founder of Western Water International, learned that NASA had conducted extensive research in methods of purifying water on board manned spacecraft. The key is Aquaspace Compound, a proprietary WWI formula that scientifically blends various types of glandular activated charcoal with other active and inert ingredients. Aquaspace systems remove some substances; chlorine, by atomic adsorption, other types of organic chemicals by mechanical filtration and still others by catalytic reaction. Aquaspace filters are finding wide acceptance in industrial, commercial, residential and recreational applications in the U.S. and abroad.

  12. Notch filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, G. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A notch filter for the selective attenuation of a narrow band of frequencies out of a larger band was developed. A helical resonator is connected to an input circuit and an output circuit through discrete and equal capacitors, and a resistor is connected between the input and the output circuits.

  13. EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF) LABORATORY GERMANIUM OXIDE USE ON RECYCLE TRANSFERS TO THE H-TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.; Laurinat, J.

    2011-08-15

    When processing High Level Waste (HLW) glass, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. Therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream feed stream, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. This strategy is known as 'feed forward statistical process control.' The DWPF depends on chemical analysis of the feed streams from the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) where the frit plus adjusted sludge from the SRAT are mixed. The SME is the last vessel in which any chemical adjustments or frit additions can be made. Once the analyses of the SME product are deemed acceptable, the SME product is transferred to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) and onto the melter. The SRAT and SME analyses have been analyzed by the DWPF laboratory using a 'Cold Chemical' method but this dissolution did not adequately dissolve all the elemental components. A new dissolution method which fuses the SRAT or SME product with cesium nitrate (CsNO{sub 3}), germanium (IV) oxide (GeO{sub 2}) and cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) into a cesium germanate glass at 1050 C in platinum crucibles has been developed. Once the germanium glass is formed in that fusion, it is readily dissolved by concentrated nitric acid (about 1M) to solubilize all the elements in the SRAT and/or SME product for elemental analysis. When the chemical analyses are completed the acidic cesium-germanate solution is transferred from the DWPF analytic laboratory to the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) where the pH is increased to {approx}12 M to be released back to the tank farm and the 2H evaporator. Therefore, about 2.5 kg/yr of GeO{sub 2}/year will be diluted into 1.4 million gallons of recycle. This 2.5 kg/yr of GeO{sub 2} may increase to 4 kg/yr when improvements are implemented to attain

  14. Plasmonic filters.

    SciTech Connect

    Passmore, Brandon Scott; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Barrick, Todd A.

    2009-09-01

    Metal films perforated with subwavelength hole arrays have been show to demonstrate an effect known as Extraordinary Transmission (EOT). In EOT devices, optical transmission passbands arise that can have up to 90% transmission and a bandwidth that is only a few percent of the designed center wavelength. By placing a tunable dielectric in proximity to the EOT mesh, one can tune the center frequency of the passband. We have demonstrated over 1 micron of passive tuning in structures designed for an 11 micron center wavelength. If a suitable midwave (3-5 micron) tunable dielectric (perhaps BaTiO{sub 3}) were integrated with an EOT mesh designed for midwave operation, it is possible that a fast, voltage tunable, low temperature filter solution could be demonstrated with a several hundred nanometer passband. Such an element could, for example, replace certain components in a filter wheel solution.

  15. Water Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A compact, lightweight electrolytic water sterilizer available through Ambassador Marketing, generates silver ions in concentrations of 50 to 100 parts per billion in water flow system. The silver ions serve as an effective bactericide/deodorizer. Tap water passes through filtering element of silver that has been chemically plated onto activated carbon. The silver inhibits bacterial growth and the activated carbon removes objectionable tastes and odors caused by addition of chlorine and other chemicals in municipal water supply. The three models available are a kitchen unit, a "Tourister" unit for portable use while traveling and a refrigerator unit that attaches to the ice cube water line. A filter will treat 5,000 to 10,000 gallons of water.

  16. Integration of the Uncertainties of Anion and TOC Measurements into the Flammability Control Strategy for Sludge Batch 8 at the DWPF

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T. B.

    2013-03-14

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) in the development and implementation of a flammability control strategy for DWPF’s melter operation during the processing of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). SRNL’s support has been in response to technical task requests that have been made by SRR’s Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) organization. The flammability control strategy relies on measurements that are performed on Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples by the DWPF Laboratory. Measurements of nitrate, oxalate, formate, and total organic carbon (TOC) standards generated by the DWPF Laboratory are presented in this report, and an evaluation of the uncertainties of these measurements is provided. The impact of the uncertainties of these measurements on DWPF’s strategy for controlling melter flammability also is evaluated. The strategy includes monitoring each SME batch for its nitrate content and its TOC content relative to the nitrate content and relative to the antifoam additions made during the preparation of the SME batch. A linearized approach for monitoring the relationship between TOC and nitrate is developed, equations are provided that integrate the measurement uncertainties into the flammability control strategy, and sample calculations for these equations are shown to illustrate the impact of the uncertainties on the flammability control strategy.

  17. IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION: KT01, KT02, KT03, AND KT04-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2010-11-01

    Four series of glass compositions were selected, fabricated, and characterized as part of a study to determine the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. The KT01 and KT02-series of glasses were chosen to allow for the identification of the influence of the concentrations of major components of the glass on the retention of TiO{sub 2}. The KT03 series of glasses was chosen to allow for the identification of these influences when higher Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} and ZrO{sub 2} concentrations are included along with TiO2. The KT04 series of glasses was chosen to investigate the properties and performance of glasses based on the best available projections of actual compositions to be processed at the DWPF (i.e., future sludge batches including the SCIX streams).

  18. Eyeglass Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Biomedical Optical Company of America's suntiger lenses eliminate more than 99% of harmful light wavelengths. NASA derived lenses make scenes more vivid in color and also increase the wearer's visual acuity. Distant objects, even on hazy days, appear crisp and clear; mountains seem closer, glare is greatly reduced, clouds stand out. Daytime use protects the retina from bleaching in bright light, thus improving night vision. Filtering helps prevent a variety of eye disorders, in particular cataracts and age related macular degeneration.

  19. CRYSTAL FILTER TEST SET

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTAL FILTERS, *HIGH FREQUENCY, *RADIOFREQUENCY FILTERS, AMPLIFIERS, ELECTRIC POTENTIAL, FREQUENCY, IMPEDANCE MATCHING , INSTRUMENTATION, RADIOFREQUENCY, RADIOFREQUENCY AMPLIFIERS, TEST EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS

  20. Assessment of the Impact of a New Guanidine Suppressor In NGS on F/H Laboratory Analyses For DWPF and Saltstone MCU Transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2013-04-29

    Implementation of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) will now proceed with a new suppressor compound, 1,2,3-tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG), replacing the originally planned suppressor for NGS, 1,3-dicyclohexyl-2-(11-methyldodecyl) guanidine (DCiTG). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with evaluating the potential impact to F/H Laboratory analyses supporting the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) used to qualify transfers of MCU Strip Effluent (SE) into the facility and the Saltstone WAC used to qualify transfers of Tank 50 containing Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) from MCU into Saltstone. This assigned scope is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). Previous impact evaluations were conducted when the DCiTG suppressor was planned for NGS and concluded that there was no impact to either the determination of MCU SE pH nor the analysis of Isopar® L carryover in the MCU SE and DSS streams. SRNL reported on this series of cross-check studies between the SRNL and F/H Laboratories. The change in suppressor from DCiTG to TiDG in the NGS should not impact the measurement of Isopar® L or pH in SE or DSS necessary to satisfy DWPF and Saltstone WAC (Tank 50) criteria, respectively. A statistical study of the low bias observed in Isopar® L measurements in both SRNL and F/H Laboratories may be necessary now that the final NGS composition is fixed in order to quantify the low bias so that a proper correction can be applied to measurements critical to the DWPF and Saltstone WACs. Depending upon the final DWPF WAC requirement put in place for SE pH, it could become necessary to implement an alternative ICP-AES measurement of boron. The current blended solvent system testing in SRNL should address any impacts to Isopar® L carryover into either the DSS or the SE. It is recommended that SRNL monitor the current blended solvent

  1. Filtered or Unfiltered?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Ann; Haycock, Ken

    2001-01-01

    Discusses results of a survey questionnaire of public and school libraries that investigated the use of Internet filtering software. Considers filter alternatives; reasons for filtering or not filtering; brand names; satisfaction with site blocking; satisfaction with the decision to install filter software; and guidelines for considering filters.…

  2. Ceramic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    Filters were formed from ceramic fibers, organic fibers, and a ceramic bond phase using a papermaking technique. The distribution of particulate ceramic bond phase was determined using a model silicon carbide system. As the ceramic fiber increased in length and diameter the distance between particles decreased. The calculated number of particles per area showed good agreement with the observed value. After firing, the papers were characterized using a biaxial load test. The strength of papers was proportional to the amount of bond phase included in the paper. All samples exhibited strain-tolerant behavior.

  3. Rocket noise filtering system using digital filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauritzen, David

    1990-01-01

    A set of digital filters is designed to filter rocket noise to various bandwidths. The filters are designed to have constant group delay and are implemented in software on a general purpose computer. The Parks-McClellan algorithm is used. Preliminary tests are performed to verify the design and implementation. An analog filter which was previously employed is also simulated.

  4. Response to requests by FMF and DWPF concerning disposal of FMF saltstone drums in Z-Area vaults

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.; Cook, J.R.

    1989-07-25

    Disposal of FMF saltstone in 55 gallon drums in the Z-Area Industrial Waste Landfill requires modification of the landfill permit. Approximately 5000 drums of FMF saltstone are currently stored on SC DHEC-permitted concrete storage pads adjacent to the burial ground. At a meeting with DWPF, FMF, and EPS on July 18, 1989, IWT agreed to supply the following information: (1) Consequence of disposal of CCA (Cu, Cr, As) treated wood pallets in the Z-Area vaults. (Four drums of FMF saltstone are currently banded to each pallet.) (2) Consequence of placing partially filled FMF drums in the Z-Area vaults. (3) Formulation for clean grout back-fill. Grout will be emplaced around and over the drums, thereby isolating them from environment (rainwater) prior to vault capping. (4) Maximum loading of FMF saltstone drums in the Z-Area vaults. (5) Consequence of void volume in drums, in clean grout, or both on groundwater modeling results. This document is a response to the above requests.

  5. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D(3)-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years.

  6. IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION: KT08, KT09, AND KT10-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2011-04-26

    This report is the fourth in a series of studies of the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is also considered in the study. The KT08-series of glasses was designed to evaluate any impacts of the inclusion of uranium and thorium in glasses containing the SCIX components. The KT09-series of glasses was designed to study the effect of increasing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and K{sub 2}O concentrations on the propensity for crystallization of titanium containing phases in high TiO{sub 2} concentration glasses. Earlier work on the KT05-series glasses recommended that the impact of these two components be studied further. Increased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations have been shown to improve the properties and performance of high waste loading glasses, and K{sub 2}O has been reported to improve the retention of TiO{sub 2} in silicate glasses. The KT10-series of compositions was designed to evaluate any impacts of the SCIX components at concentrations 50% higher than currently projected.a The glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and characterized to identify crystallization, to verify chemical compositions, to measure viscosity, and to measure durability. Liquidus temperature measurements for the KT10-series glasses are underway and will be reported separately. All but one of the KT08-series glasses were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction (XRD). One of the slowly cooled glasses contained a small amount of trevorite, which had no practical impact on the durability of the glass and is typically found in DWPF-type glasses. The measured Product Consistency Test (PCT) responses for the KT08-series glasses are well predicted by the DWPF models. The viscosities of the KT08-series glasses were generally

  7. Schematic for efficient computation of GC, GC3, and AT3 bias spectra of genome.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Ahsan Z; Venu Gopal, T; Bhattacharya, C

    2012-01-01

    Selection of synonymous codons for an amino acid is biased in protein translation process. This biased selection causes repetition of synonymous codons in structural parts of genome that stands for high N/3 peaks in DNA spectrum. Period-3 spectral property is utilized here to produce a 3-phase network model based on polyphase filterbank concepts for derivation of codon bias spectra (CBS). Modification of parameters in this model can produce GC, GC3, and AT3 bias spectra. Complete schematic in LabVIEW platform is presented here for efficient and parallel computation of GC, GC3, and AT3 bias spectra of genomes alongwith results of CBS patterns. We have performed the correlation coefficient analysis of GC, GC3, and AT3 bias spectra with codon bias patterns of CBS for biological and statistical significance of this model.

  8. ROTARY FILTER FINES TESTING FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D.

    2011-08-03

    SRNL was requested to quantify the amount of 'fines passage' through the 0.5 micron membranes currently used for the rotary microfilter (RMF). Testing was also completed to determine if there is any additional benefit to utilizing a 0.1 micron filter to reduce the amount of fines that could pass through the filter. Quantifying of the amount of fines that passed through the two sets of membranes that were tested was accomplished by analyzing the filtrate by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) for titanium. Even with preparations to isolate the titanium, all samples returned results of less than the instrument's detection limit of 0.184 mg/L. Test results show that the 0.5 micron filters produced a significantly higher flux while showing a negligible difference in filtrate clarity measured by turbidity. The first targeted deployment of the RMF is with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). SCIX uses crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to sorb cesium to decontaminate a clarified salt solution. The passage of fine particles through the filter membranes in sufficient quantities has the potential to impact the downstream facilities. To determine the amount of fines passage, a contract was established with SpinTek Filtration to operate a 3-disk pilot scale unit with prototypic filter disk and various feeds and two different filter disk membranes. SpinTek evaluated a set of the baseline 0.5 micron filter disks as well as a set of 0.1 micron filter disks to determine the amount of fine particles that would pass the membrane and to determine the flux each set produced. The membrane on both disk sets is manufactured by the Pall Corporation (PMM 050). Each set of disks was run with three feed combinations: prototypically ground CST, CST plus monosodium titanate (MST), and CST, MST, plus Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) simulant. Throughout the testing, samples of the filtrate were collected, measured for turbidity, and sent back

  9. NOVEL MICROWAVE FILTER DESIGN TECHNIQUES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE FILTERS, MICROWAVE FREQUENCY, PHASE SHIFT CIRCUITS, BANDPASS FILTERS, TUNED CIRCUITS, NETWORKS, IMPEDANCE MATCHING , LOW PASS FILTERS, MULTIPLEXING, MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, WAVEGUIDE FILTERS, WAVEGUIDE COUPLERS.

  10. DWPF SB6 INITIAL CPC FLOWSHEET TESTING SB6-1 TO SB6-4L TESTS OF SB6-A AND SB6-B SIMULANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Best, D.

    2009-09-09

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing to Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) processing in late fiscal year 2010. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB6 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processes. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2008-0043, Rev.0 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB6 composition at the time of the study. This composition assumed a blend of 101,085 kg of Tank 4 insoluble solids and 179,000 kg of Tank 12 insoluble solids. The current plans are to subject Tank 12 sludge to aluminum dissolution. Liquid Waste Operations assumed that 75% of the aluminum would be dissolved during this process. After dissolution and blending of Tank 4 sludge slurry, plans included washing the contents of Tank 51 to {approx}1M Na. After the completion of washing, the plan assumes that 40 inches on Tank 40 slurry would remain for blending with the qualified SB6 material. There are several parameters that are noteworthy concerning SB6 sludge: (1) This is the second batch DWPF will be processing that contains sludge that has had a significant fraction of aluminum removed through aluminum dissolution; (2) The sludge is high in mercury, but the projected concentration is lower than SB5; (3) The sludge is high in noble metals, but the projected concentrations are lower than SB5; and(4) The sludge is high in U and Pu - components that are not added in sludge simulants. Six DWPF process simulations were completed in 4-L laboratory-scale equipment using

  11. A Statistical Review of DWPF Laboratory Data Including Measurements of the ARG-1 Standard for Batches 94 - 263.

    SciTech Connect

    THOMAS, EDWARDS

    2004-11-30

    Measurements of calibration and bench standards as well as samples of ARG-1 that were performed by the DWPF Lab during the processing of batches 94 through 263 were provided to SCS for review. Three datasets, one associated with each of three preparation methods (Cold Chem, Mixed Acid, and Fusion) were included in the review. The review conducted covered several areas of investigation. Biases in these measurements relative to the reference values for the standards including ARG-1 were estimated and found to be of no practical concern. Percent relative standard deviations for these data also were determined. Sources of variation in the measurements (i.e., batch-to-batch and within process batch) were estimated and compared. An investigation into evidence of instrument drift during a group of measurements representing a prototypical block was conducted for each preparation method using pairs of calibration and bench standards. No evidence of instrument drift at levels of practical concern was seen in these data. Also, the replicates of calibration standards at the beginning of each analytical block were found to be unnecessary. The uncertainties of the measurements, which incorporated biases and precision errors, were computed for the calibration standards, bench standards, and ARG-1. The limits for these uncertainties were compared to the current, LIMS operating limits for the errors in the measurements of these standards. These comparisons may provide opportunities for revising the LIMS limits. Comparisons between MFT and SME results were made for both the Mixed Acid and the Fusion prep methods. There was no evidence of differences (in either bias or precision) between the results for these two tanks for either of the two prep methods.

  12. THE USE OF DI WATER TO MITIGATE DUSTING FOR ADDITION OF DWPF FRIT TO THE SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E.

    2010-07-21

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DPWF) presently is in the process to determine means to reduce water utilization in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process, thus reducing effluent and processing times. The frit slurry addition system mixes the dry frit with water, yielding approximately a 50 weight percent slurry containing frit and the other fraction water. This slurry is discharged into the SME and excess water is removed via boiling. To reduce this water load to the SME, DWPF has proposed using a pneumatic system in conveying the frit to the SME, in essence a dry delivery system. The problem associated with utilizing a dry delivery system with the existing frit is the generation of dust when discharged into the SME. The use of water has been shown to be effective in the mining industry as well in the DOE complex to mitigate dusting. The method employed by SRNL to determine the quantity of water to mitigate dusting in dry powders was effective, between a lab and bench scale tests. In those tests, it was shown that as high as five weight percent (wt%) of water addition was required to mitigate dust from batches of glass forming minerals used by the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford, Washington. The same method used to determine the quantity of water to mitigate dusting was used in this task to determine the quantity of water to mitigate this dusting using as-received frit. The ability for water to mitigate dusting is due to its adhesive properties as shown in Figure 1-1. Wetting the frit particles allows for the smaller frit particles (including dust) to adhere to the larger frit particles or to agglomerate into large particles. Fluids other than water can also be used, but their adhesive properties are different than water and the quantity required to mitigate dusting is different, as was observed in reference 1. Excessive water, a few weight percentages greater than that required to mitigate dusting can cause the resulting material not to flow. The primary

  13. Study of spontaneous combustion coals by GC and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Shu, X; Xu, J; Xu, J; Ge, L; Chen, D

    1996-06-01

    Organic geochemical characteristics of 3 Chinese spontaneous combustion coals have been carried out by means of GC and GC-MS analysis. It has been observed that more compounds with low to medium carbon number, such as terpenoids and others can be found in spontaneous combustion coals than in normal samples.

  14. Greenhouse Gas Analysis by GC/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, E. M.; Easton, Z. M.; Macek, P.

    2015-12-01

    Current methods to analyze greenhouse gases rely on designated complex, multiple-column, multiple-detector gas chromatographs. A novel method was developed in partnership with Shimadzu for simultaneous quantification of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in environmental gas samples. Gas bulbs were used to make custom standard mixtures by injecting small volumes of pure analyte into the nitrogen-filled bulb. Resulting calibration curves were validated using a certified gas standard. The use of GC/MS systems to perform this analysis has the potential to move the analysis of greenhouse gasses from expensive, custom GC systems to standard single-quadrupole GC/MS systems that are available in most laboratories, which wide variety of applications beyond greenhouse gas analysis. Additionally, use of mass spectrometry can provide confirmation of identity of target analytes, and will assist in the identification of unknown peaks should they be present in the chromatogram.

  15. Filter quality of pleated filter cartridges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Wan; Huang, Sheng-Hsiu; Chiang, Che-Ming; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2008-04-01

    The performance of dust cartridge filters commonly used in dust masks and in room ventilation depends both on the collection efficiency of the filter material and the pressure drop across the filter. Currently, the optimization of filter design is based only on minimizing the pressure drop at a set velocity chosen by the manufacturer. The collection efficiency, an equally important factor, is rarely considered in the optimization process. In this work, a filter quality factor, which combines the collection efficiency and the pressure drop, is used as the optimization criterion for filter evaluation. Most respirator manufacturers pleat the filter to various extents to increase the filtration area in the limit space within the dust cartridge. Six sizes of filter holders were fabricated to hold just one pleat of filter, simulating six different pleat counts, ranging from 0.5 to 3.33 pleats cm(-1). The possible electrostatic charges on the filter were removed by dipping in isopropyl alcohol, and the air velocity is fixed at 100 cm s(-1). Liquid dicotylphthalate particles generated by a constant output atomizer were used as challenge aerosols to minimize particle loading effects. A scanning mobility particle sizer was used to measure the challenge aerosol number concentrations and size distributions upstream and downstream of the pleated filter. The pressure drop across the filter was monitored by using a calibrated pressure transducer. The results showed that the performance of pleated filters depend not only on the size of the particle but also on the pleat count of the pleated filter. Based on filter quality factor, the optimal pleat count (OPC) is always higher than that based on pressure drop by about 0.3-0.5 pleats cm(-1). For example, the OPC is 2.15 pleats cm(-1) from the standpoint of pressure drop, but for the highest filter quality factor, the pleated filter needed to have a pleat count of 2.65 pleats cm(-1) at particle diameter of 122 nm. From the aspect of

  16. Product/Process (P/P) Models For The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF): Model Ranges And Validation Ranges For Future Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.; Edwards, T.

    2015-09-25

    Radioactive high level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it is poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to guarantee, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository.

  17. HEPA filter dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

    1994-02-22

    A process is described for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal. 4 figures.

  18. Hepa filter dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Brewer, Ken N.; Murphy, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

  19. Recirculating electric air filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage eleode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

  20. HEPA filter dissolution process

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

  1. Recirculating electric air filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage electrode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

  2. [Analysis of essential oil components by GC/FTIR and GC/MS].

    PubMed

    Cai, Ji-bao; Lin, Ping; Sang, Wen-qiang; Li, Jun; Su, Qing-de

    2005-10-01

    The volatile components of clary sage (Salvia sclarea L.) oil were identified by gas chromatography-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (GC/FTIR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The application of GC/FTIR in analysis of essential oil was mainly discussed. The accuracy of qualitative analysis for essential oil was improved by such technique asthe reconstruction of different spectra regions Gram-Schmidt Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy, and the application of subtracting of Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy, and the mass spectrometry.

  3. ARRANGEMENT FOR REPLACING FILTERS

    DOEpatents

    Blomgren, R.A.; Bohlin, N.J.C.

    1957-08-27

    An improved filtered air exhaust system which may be continually operated during the replacement of the filters without the escape of unfiltered air is described. This is accomplished by hermetically sealing the box like filter containers in a rectangular tunnel with neoprene covered sponge rubber sealing rings coated with a silicone impregnated pneumatic grease. The tunnel through which the filters are pushed is normal to the exhaust air duct. A number of unused filters are in line behind the filters in use, and are moved by a hydraulic ram so that a fresh filter is positioned in the air duct. The used filter is pushed into a waiting receptacle and is suitably disposed. This device permits a rapid and safe replacement of a radiation contaminated filter without interruption to the normal flow of exhaust air.

  4. Method of securing filter elements

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Erik P.; Haslam, Jeffery L.; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2016-10-04

    A filter securing system including a filter unit body housing; at least one tubular filter element positioned in the filter unit body housing, the tubular filter element having a closed top and an open bottom; a dimple in either the filter unit body housing or the top of the tubular filter element; and a socket in either the filter unit body housing or the top of the tubular filter element that receives the dimple in either the filter unit body housing or the top of the tubular filter element to secure the tubular filter element to the filter unit body housing.

  5. Rigid porous filter

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas L.; Dennis, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter including a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulates from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulates. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area-to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  6. Filter type gas sampler with filter consolidation

    DOEpatents

    Miley, Harry S.; Thompson, Robert C.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Perkins, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for automatically consolidating a filter or, more specifically, an apparatus for drawing a volume of gas through a plurality of sections of a filter, whereafter the sections are subsequently combined for the purpose of simultaneously interrogating the sections to detect the presence of a contaminant.

  7. Filter type gas sampler with filter consolidation

    DOEpatents

    Miley, H.S.; Thompson, R.C.; Hubbard, C.W.; Perkins, R.W.

    1997-03-25

    Disclosed is an apparatus for automatically consolidating a filter or, more specifically, an apparatus for drawing a volume of gas through a plurality of sections of a filter, where after the sections are subsequently combined for the purpose of simultaneously interrogating the sections to detect the presence of a contaminant. 5 figs.

  8. Vanishing GC-rich isochores in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed Central

    Duret, Laurent; Semon, Marie; Piganeau, Gwenaël; Mouchiroud, Dominique; Galtier, Nicolas

    2002-01-01

    To understand the origin and evolution of isochores-the peculiar spatial distribution of GC content within mammalian genomes-we analyzed the synonymous substitution pattern in coding sequences from closely related species in different mammalian orders. In primate and cetartiodactyls, GC-rich genes are undergoing a large excess of GC --> AT substitutions over AT --> GC substitutions: GC-rich isochores are slowly disappearing from the genome of these two mammalian orders. In rodents, our analyses suggest both a decrease in GC content of GC-rich isochores and an increase in GC-poor isochores, but more data will be necessary to assess the significance of this pattern. These observations question the conclusions of previous works that assumed that base composition was at equilibrium. Analysis of allele frequency in human polymorphism data, however, confirmed that in the GC-rich parts of the genome, GC alleles have a higher probability of fixation than AT alleles. This fixation bias appears not strong enough to overcome the large excess of GC --> AT mutations. Thus, whatever the evolutionary force (neutral or selective) at the origin of GC-rich isochores, this force is no longer effective in mammals. We propose a model based on the biased gene conversion hypothesis that accounts for the origin of GC-rich isochores in the ancestral amniote genome and for their decline in present-day mammals. PMID:12524353

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANTIFOAM TRACKING SYSTEM AS AN OPTION TO SUPPORT THE MELTER OFF-GAS FLAMMABILITY CONTROL STRATEGY AT THE DWPF

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.; Lambert, D.

    2014-08-27

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) in the development and implementation of an additional strategy for confidently satisfying the flammability controls for DWPF’s melter operation. An initial strategy for implementing the operational constraints associated with flammability control in DWPF was based upon an analytically determined carbon concentration from antifoam. Due to the conservative error structure associated with the analytical approach, its implementation has significantly reduced the operating window for processing and has led to recurrent Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) and Melter Feed Tank (MFT) remediation. To address the adverse operating impact of the current implementation strategy, SRR issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to SRNL requesting the development and documentation of an alternate strategy for evaluating the carbon contribution from antifoam. The proposed strategy presented in this report was developed under the guidance of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) and involves calculating the carbon concentration from antifoam based upon the actual mass of antifoam added to the process assuming 100% retention. The mass of antifoam in the Additive Mix Feed Tank (AMFT), in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), and in the SME is tracked by mass balance as part of this strategy. As these quantities are monitored, the random and bias uncertainties affecting their values are also maintained and accounted for. This report documents: 1) the development of an alternate implementation strategy and associated equations describing the carbon concentration from antifoam in each SME batch derived from the actual amount of antifoam introduced into the AMFT, SRAT, and SME during the processing of the batch. 2) the equations and error structure for incorporating the proposed strategy into melter off-gas flammability assessments

  10. Generalized Hampel Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Ronald K.; Neuvo, Yrjö; Astola, Jaakko; Gabbouj, Moncef

    2016-12-01

    The standard median filter based on a symmetric moving window has only one tuning parameter: the window width. Despite this limitation, this filter has proven extremely useful and has motivated a number of extensions: weighted median filters, recursive median filters, and various cascade structures. The Hampel filter is a member of the class of decsion filters that replaces the central value in the data window with the median if it lies far enough from the median to be deemed an outlier. This filter depends on both the window width and an additional tuning parameter t, reducing to the median filter when t=0, so it may be regarded as another median filter extension. This paper adopts this view, defining and exploring the class of generalized Hampel filters obtained by applying the median filter extensions listed above: weighted Hampel filters, recursive Hampel filters, and their cascades. An important concept introduced here is that of an implosion sequence, a signal for which generalized Hampel filter performance is independent of the threshold parameter t. These sequences are important because the added flexibility of the generalized Hampel filters offers no practical advantage for implosion sequences. Partial characterization results are presented for these sequences, as are useful relationships between root sequences for generalized Hampel filters and their median-based counterparts. To illustrate the performance of this filter class, two examples are considered: one is simulation-based, providing a basis for quantitative evaluation of signal recovery performance as a function of t, while the other is a sequence of monthly Italian industrial production index values that exhibits glaring outliers.

  11. Counting digital filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zohar, S.

    1977-01-01

    Overall design of filter combines radix converter with ADC in single functional unit that directly converts analog input to its negative binary representation. Four basic elements of filter are fixed register, shift register, counter, and accumulator.

  12. Bag filters for TPP

    SciTech Connect

    L.V. Chekalov; Yu.I. Gromov; V.V. Chekalov

    2007-05-15

    Cleaning of TPP flue gases with bag filters capable of pulsed regeneration is examined. A new filtering element with a three-dimensional filtering material formed from a needle-broached cloth in which the filtration area, as compared with a conventional smooth bag, is increased by more than two times, is proposed. The design of a new FRMI type of modular filter is also proposed. A standard series of FRMI filters with a filtration area ranging from 800 to 16,000 m{sup 2} is designed for an output more than 1 million m{sub 3}/h of with respect to cleaned gas. The new bag filter permits dry collection of sulfur oxides from waste gases at TPP operating on high-sulfur coals. The design of the filter makes it possible to replace filter elements without taking the entire unit out of service.

  13. MST Filterability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M. R.; Burket, P. R.; Duignan, M. R.

    2015-03-12

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). The low filter flux through the ARP has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Recent filter flux has averaged approximately 5 gallons per minute (gpm). Salt Batch 6 has had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. In addition, at the time the testing started, SRR was assessing the impact of replacing the 0.1 micron filter with a 0.5 micron filter. This report describes testing of MST filterability to investigate the impact of filter pore size and MST particle size on filter flux and testing of filter enhancers to attempt to increase filter flux. The authors constructed a laboratory-scale crossflow filter apparatus with two crossflow filters operating in parallel. One filter was a 0.1 micron Mott sintered SS filter and the other was a 0.5 micron Mott sintered SS filter. The authors also constructed a dead-end filtration apparatus to conduct screening tests with potential filter aids and body feeds, referred to as filter enhancers. The original baseline for ARP was 5.6 M sodium salt solution with a free hydroxide concentration of approximately 1.7 M.3 ARP has been operating with a sodium concentration of approximately 6.4 M and a free hydroxide concentration of approximately 2.5 M. SRNL conducted tests varying the concentration of sodium and free hydroxide to determine whether those changes had a significant effect on filter flux. The feed slurries for the MST filterability tests were composed of simple salts (NaOH, NaNO2, and NaNO3) and MST (0.2 – 4.8 g/L). The feed slurry for the filter enhancer tests contained simulated salt batch 6 supernate, MST, and filter enhancers.

  14. Survey of digital filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagle, H. T., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A three part survey is made of the state-of-the-art in digital filtering. Part one presents background material including sampled data transformations and the discrete Fourier transform. Part two, digital filter theory, gives an in-depth coverage of filter categories, transfer function synthesis, quantization and other nonlinear errors, filter structures and computer aided design. Part three presents hardware mechanization techniques. Implementations by general purpose, mini-, and special-purpose computers are presented.

  15. Nonlinear Attitude Filtering Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Crassidis, John L.; Cheng, Yang

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of modern nonlinear filtering methods for attitude estimation. Early applications relied mostly on the extended Kalman filter for attitude estimation. Since these applications, several new approaches have been developed that have proven to be superior to the extended Kalman filter. Several of these approaches maintain the basic structure of the extended Kalman filter, but employ various modifications in order to provide better convergence or improve other performance characteristics. Examples of such approaches include: filter QUEST, extended QUEST, the super-iterated extended Kalman filter, the interlaced extended Kalman filter, and the second-order Kalman filter. Filters that propagate and update a discrete set of sigma points rather than using linearized equations for the mean and covariance are also reviewed. A two-step approach is discussed with a first-step state that linearizes the measurement model and an iterative second step to recover the desired attitude states. These approaches are all based on the Gaussian assumption that the probability density function is adequately specified by its mean and covariance. Other approaches that do not require this assumption are reviewed, including particle filters and a Bayesian filter based on a non-Gaussian, finite-parameter probability density function on SO(3). Finally, the predictive filter, nonlinear observers and adaptive approaches are shown. The strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches are discussed.

  16. Filtering by nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Campos Cantón, E; González Salas, J S; Urías, J

    2008-12-01

    Synchronization of nonlinear systems forced by external signals is formalized as the response of a nonlinear filter. Sufficient conditions for a nonlinear system to behave as a filter are given. Some examples of generalized chaos synchronization are shown to actually be special cases of nonlinear filtering.

  17. The Ribosome Filter Redux

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Vincent P.; Edelman, Gerald M.

    2010-01-01

    The ribosome filter hypothesis postulates that ribosomes are not simply translation machines but also function as regulatory elements that differentially affect or filter the translation of particular mRNAs. On the basis of new information, we take the opportunity here to review the ribosome filter hypothesis, suggest specific mechanisms of action, and discuss recent examples from the literature that support it. PMID:17890902

  18. HEPA filter encapsulation

    DOEpatents

    Gates-Anderson, Dianne D.; Kidd, Scott D.; Bowers, John S.; Attebery, Ronald W.

    2003-01-01

    A low viscosity resin is delivered into a spent HEPA filter or other waste. The resin is introduced into the filter or other waste using a vacuum to assist in the mass transfer of the resin through the filter media or other waste.

  19. Filter service system

    DOEpatents

    Sellers, Cheryl L.; Nordyke, Daniel S.; Crandell, Richard A.; Tomlins, Gregory; Fei, Dong; Panov, Alexander; Lane, William H.; Habeger, Craig F.

    2008-12-09

    According to an exemplary embodiment of the present disclosure, a system for removing matter from a filtering device includes a gas pressurization assembly. An element of the assembly is removably attachable to a first orifice of the filtering device. The system also includes a vacuum source fluidly connected to a second orifice of the filtering device.

  20. DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ARP PRODUCT SIMULANT AND SB4 TANK 40 SLUDGE SLURRY

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D; John Pareizs, J; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Stone, M; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Kim Crapse, K; David Hobbs, D

    2008-05-14

    The radioactive startup of two new SRS processing facilities, the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side-Solvent-Extraction Unit (MCU) will add two new waste streams to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The ARP will remove actinides from the 5.6 M salt solution resulting in a sludge-like product that is roughly half monosodium titanate (MST) insoluble solids and half sludge insoluble solids. The ARP product will be added to the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) at boiling and dewatered prior to pulling a SRAT receipt sample. The cesium rich MCU stream will be added to the SRAT at boiling after both formic and nitric acid have been added and the SRAT contents concentrated to the appropriate endpoint. A concern was raised by an external hydrogen review panel that the actinide loaded MST could act as a catalyst for hydrogen generation (Mar 15, 2007 report, Recommendation 9). Hydrogen generation, and it's potential to form a flammable mixture in the off-gas, under SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processing conditions has been a concern since the discovery that noble metals catalyze the decomposition of formic acid. Radiolysis of water also generates hydrogen, but the radiolysis rate is orders of magnitude lower than the noble metal catalyzed generation. As a result of the concern raised by the external hydrogen review panel, hydrogen generation was a prime consideration in this experiment. Testing was designed to determine whether the presence of the irradiated ARP simulant containing MST caused uncontrolled or unexpected hydrogen production during experiments simulating the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) due to activation of titanium. A Shielded Cells experiment, SC-5, was completed using SB4 sludge from Tank 405 combined with an ARP product produced from simulants by SRNL researchers. The blend of sludge and MST was designed to be prototypic of planned DWPF SRAT and SME cycles. As glass quality was not an objective in

  1. Regenerative particulate filter development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Descamp, V. A.; Boex, M. W.; Hussey, M. W.; Larson, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Development, design, and fabrication of a prototype filter regeneration unit for regenerating clean fluid particle filter elements by using a backflush/jet impingement technique are reported. Development tests were also conducted on a vortex particle separator designed for use in zero gravity environment. A maintainable filter was designed, fabricated and tested that allows filter element replacement without any leakage or spillage of system fluid. Also described are spacecraft fluid system design and filter maintenance techniques with respect to inflight maintenance for the space shuttle and space station.

  2. A unified Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubberud, Allen R.

    2017-01-01

    When considering problems of linear sequential estimation, two versions of the Kalman filter, the continuous-time version and the discrete-time version, are often used. (A hybrid filter also exists.) In many applications in which the Kalman filter is used, the system to which the filter is applied is a linear continuous-time system, but the Kalman filter is implemented on a digital computer, a discrete-time device. The two general approaches for developing a discrete-time filter for implementation on a digital computer are: (1) approximate the continuous-time system by a discrete-time system (called discretization of the continuous-time system) and develop a filter for the discrete-time approximation; and (2) develop a continuous-time filter for the system and then discretize the continuous-time filter. Generally, the two discrete-time filters will be different, that is, it can be said that discretization and filter generation are not, in general, commutative operations. As a result, any relationship between the discrete-time and continuous-time versions of the filter for the same continuous-time system is often obfuscated. This is particularly true when an attempt is made to generate the continuous-time version of the Kalman filter through a simple limiting process (the sample period going to zero) applied to the discrete-time version. The correct result is, generally, not obtained. In a 1961 research report, Kalman showed that the continuous-time Kalman filter can be obtained from the discrete-time Kalman filter by taking limits as the sample period goes to zero if the white noise process for the continuous-time version is appropriately defined. Using this basic concept, a discrete-time Kalman filter can be developed for a continuous-time system as follows: (1) discretize the continuous-time system using Kalman's technique; and (2) develop a discrete-time Kalman filter for that discrete-time system. Kalman's results show that the discrete-time filter generated in

  3. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  4. Choosing between GC FTIR and GC MS spectra for an efficient intelligent identification of illicit amphetamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosav, S.; Dinica, R.; Praisler, M.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we are presenting a comparative analysis between several expert systems built for the identification of illicit amphetamines based on their GC-FTIR and GC-MS spectra. The systems were built using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), and are dedicated to the recognition of amphetamines. Structure-activity relationships are incorporated into the knowledge base, allowing the systems to identify the amphetamines according to their toxicological activity (stimulant or hallucinogenic). The results show that GC-FTIR data are much more relevant for the efficiency of the expert systems, probably due to the fact that these spectra constitute a "fingerprint" of the molecular structures. We are also presenting a spectroscopic analysis in order to evaluate the relevance of each type of input variable (absorption and abundance) on which the recognition of an unknown sample is based.

  5. Compact planar microwave blocking filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A compact planar microwave blocking filter includes a dielectric substrate and a plurality of filter unit elements disposed on the substrate. The filter unit elements are interconnected in a symmetrical series cascade with filter unit elements being organized in the series based on physical size. In the filter, a first filter unit element of the plurality of filter unit elements includes a low impedance open-ended line configured to reduce the shunt capacitance of the filter.

  6. Analysis of Explosives by GC-UV.

    PubMed

    Andrasko, Jan; Lagesson-Andrasko, Ludmila; Dahlén, Johan; Jonsson, Bengt-Harald

    2017-01-10

    A mixture of explosives was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) linked to ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometry that enabled detection in the range of 178-330 nm. The gas-phase UV spectra of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), ethylene glycol dinitrate (EGDN), glycerine trinitrate (NG, nitroglycerine), triacetone triperoxide (TATP), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were successfully recorded. The most interesting aspect of the current application is that it enabled simultaneous detection of both the target analyte and its decomposition products. At suitable elevated temperatures of the transfer line between the GC instrument and the UV detector, a partial decomposition was accomplished. Detection was made in real time and resulted in overlaid spectra of the mother compound and its decomposition product. Hence, the presented approach added another level to the qualitative identification of the explosives in comparison with traditional methods that relies only on the detection of the target analyte. As expected, the decomposition product of EGDN, NG, and PETN was NO, while TATP degraded to acetone. DNT and TNT did not exhibit any decomposition at the temperatures used.

  7. Generic Kalman Filter Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisano, Michael E., II; Crues, Edwin Z.

    2005-01-01

    The Generic Kalman Filter (GKF) software provides a standard basis for the development of application-specific Kalman-filter programs. Historically, Kalman filters have been implemented by customized programs that must be written, coded, and debugged anew for each unique application, then tested and tuned with simulated or actual measurement data. Total development times for typical Kalman-filter application programs have ranged from months to weeks. The GKF software can simplify the development process and reduce the development time by eliminating the need to re-create the fundamental implementation of the Kalman filter for each new application. The GKF software is written in the ANSI C programming language. It contains a generic Kalman-filter-development directory that, in turn, contains a code for a generic Kalman filter function; more specifically, it contains a generically designed and generically coded implementation of linear, linearized, and extended Kalman filtering algorithms, including algorithms for state- and covariance-update and -propagation functions. The mathematical theory that underlies the algorithms is well known and has been reported extensively in the open technical literature. Also contained in the directory are a header file that defines generic Kalman-filter data structures and prototype functions and template versions of application-specific subfunction and calling navigation/estimation routine code and headers. Once the user has provided a calling routine and the required application-specific subfunctions, the application-specific Kalman-filter software can be compiled and executed immediately. During execution, the generic Kalman-filter function is called from a higher-level navigation or estimation routine that preprocesses measurement data and post-processes output data. The generic Kalman-filter function uses the aforementioned data structures and five implementation- specific subfunctions, which have been developed by the user on

  8. GC/HRSIR as a Complementary Technique to GC/ECNIMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion mass spectrometry (GC/ECNIMS) is a highly selective and sensitive technique for the analysis of appropriate analytes in complex matrices. Its major drawback is often the lack of fragmentation indicative of structure that can be use...

  9. Optically tunable optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Robert T. B.; Wah, Christopher; Iizuka, Keigo; Shimotahira, Hiroshi

    1995-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an optically tunable optical filter that uses photorefractive barium titanate. With our filter we implement a spectrum analyzer at 632.8 nm with a resolution of 1.2 nm. We simulate a wavelength-division multiplexing system by separating two semiconductor laser diodes, at 1560 nm and 1578 nm, with the same filter. The filter has a bandwidth of 6.9 nm. We also use the same filter to take 2.5-nm-wide slices out of a 20-nm-wide superluminescent diode centered at 840 nm. As a result, we experimentally demonstrate a phenomenal tuning range from 632.8 to 1578 nm with a single filtering device.

  10. Contactor/filter improvements

    DOEpatents

    Stelman, D.

    1988-06-30

    A contactor/filter arrangement for removing particulate contaminants from a gaseous stream is described. The filter includes a housing having a substantially vertically oriented granular material retention member with upstream and downstream faces, a substantially vertically oriented microporous gas filter element, wherein the retention member and the filter element are spaced apart to provide a zone for the passage of granular material therethrough. A gaseous stream containing particulate contaminants passes through the gas inlet means as well as through the upstream face of the granular material retention member, passing through the retention member, the body of granular material, the microporous gas filter element, exiting out of the gas outlet means. A cover screen isolates the filter element from contact with the moving granular bed. In one embodiment, the granular material is comprised of porous alumina impregnated with CuO, with the cover screen cleaned by the action of the moving granular material as well as by backflow pressure pulses. 6 figs.

  11. Concentric Split Flow Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A concentric split flow filter may be configured to remove odor and/or bacteria from pumped air used to collect urine and fecal waste products. For instance, filter may be designed to effectively fill the volume that was previously considered wasted surrounding the transport tube of a waste management system. The concentric split flow filter may be configured to split the air flow, with substantially half of the air flow to be treated traveling through a first bed of filter media and substantially the other half of the air flow to be treated traveling through the second bed of filter media. This split flow design reduces the air velocity by 50%. In this way, the pressure drop of filter may be reduced by as much as a factor of 4 as compare to the conventional design.

  12. Hybrid Filter Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laicer, Castro; Rasimick, Brian; Green, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Cabin environmental control is an important issue for a successful Moon mission. Due to the unique environment of the Moon, lunar dust control is one of the main problems that significantly diminishes the air quality inside spacecraft cabins. Therefore, this innovation was motivated by NASA s need to minimize the negative health impact that air-suspended lunar dust particles have on astronauts in spacecraft cabins. It is based on fabrication of a hybrid filter comprising nanofiber nonwoven layers coated on porous polymer membranes with uniform cylindrical pores. This design results in a high-efficiency gas particulate filter with low pressure drop and the ability to be easily regenerated to restore filtration performance. A hybrid filter was developed consisting of a porous membrane with uniform, micron-sized, cylindrical pore channels coated with a thin nanofiber layer. Compared to conventional filter media such as a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, this filter is designed to provide high particle efficiency, low pressure drop, and the ability to be regenerated. These membranes have well-defined micron-sized pores and can be used independently as air filters with discreet particle size cut-off, or coated with nanofiber layers for filtration of ultrafine nanoscale particles. The filter consists of a thin design intended to facilitate filter regeneration by localized air pulsing. The two main features of this invention are the concept of combining a micro-engineered straight-pore membrane with nanofibers. The micro-engineered straight pore membrane can be prepared with extremely high precision. Because the resulting membrane pores are straight and not tortuous like those found in conventional filters, the pressure drop across the filter is significantly reduced. The nanofiber layer is applied as a very thin coating to enhance filtration efficiency for fine nanoscale particles. Additionally, the thin nanofiber coating is designed to promote capture of

  13. Total Variation Electrocardiogram Filtering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    hand, the TV smoothing is still a low pass filter, which effectively filters out high-frequency noise. Results We compared the performance of the TV...resulting signal to make the ECG samples positive and to amplify the high-frequency components. Finally, in the last stage, it uses a low -pass filter to...collected during the study on glycemic control in young adults performed at the USDA Beltsville Human Nutrition Center. The study has been approved by

  14. Filter vapor trap

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold

    1976-04-13

    A sintered filter trap is adapted for insertion in a gas stream of sodium vapor to condense and deposit sodium thereon. The filter is heated and operated above the melting temperature of sodium, resulting in a more efficient means to remove sodium particulates from the effluent inert gas emanating from the surface of a liquid sodium pool. Preferably the filter leaves are precoated with a natrophobic coating such as tetracosane.

  15. Smart Filter Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    polarity relative to phase-state polarity . It was found that zero-state leakage (about 3% in intensity as mentioned) limited useful TPAF performance to...resources. Our first efforts used polar formatted filters having 32 sectors, of which only 16 were independent since the filter was trained as a... polar plane. One common choice for the angle of this line, for example, corresponds to thresholding on the real part of the transform. Fourier filters

  16. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line.

  17. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-06-06

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line. 2 figs.

  18. Nanofiber Filters Eliminate Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    With support from Phase I and II SBIR funding from Johnson Space Center, Argonide Corporation of Sanford, Florida tested and developed its proprietary nanofiber water filter media. Capable of removing more than 99.99 percent of dangerous particles like bacteria, viruses, and parasites, the media was incorporated into the company's commercial NanoCeram water filter, an inductee into the Space Foundation's Space Technology Hall of Fame. In addition to its drinking water filters, Argonide now produces large-scale nanofiber filters used as part of the reverse osmosis process for industrial water purification.

  19. Differential inhibition onto developing and mature granule cells generates high-frequency filters with variable gain

    PubMed Central

    Pardi, María Belén; Ogando, Mora Belén; Schinder, Alejandro F; Marin-Burgin, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis provides the dentate gyrus with heterogeneous populations of granule cells (GC) originated at different times. The contribution of these cells to information encoding is under current investigation. Here, we show that incoming spike trains activate different populations of GC determined by the stimulation frequency and GC age. Immature GC respond to a wider range of stimulus frequencies, whereas mature GC are less responsive at high frequencies. This difference is dictated by feedforward inhibition, which restricts mature GC activation. Yet, the stronger inhibition of mature GC results in a higher temporal fidelity compared to that of immature GC. Thus, hippocampal inputs activate two populations of neurons with variable frequency filters: immature cells, with wide‐range responses, that are reliable transmitters of the incoming frequency, and mature neurons, with narrow frequency response, that are precise at informing the beginning of the stimulus, but with a sparse activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08764.001 PMID:26163657

  20. Predicting Partitioning and Diffusion Properties of Nonpolar Chemicals in Biotic Media and Passive Sampler Phases by GC × GC.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Deedar; Arey, J Samuel

    2017-02-14

    The chemical parameters needed to explain and predict bioavailability, biodynamics, and baseline toxicity are not readily available for most nonpolar chemicals detected in the environment. Here, we demonstrate that comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) retention times can be used to predict 26 relevant properties for nonpolar chemicals, specifically: partition coefficients for diverse biotic media and passive sampler phases; aquatic baseline toxicity; and relevant diffusion coefficients. The considered biotic and passive sampler phases include membrane and storage lipids, serum and muscle proteins, carbohydrates, algae, mussels, polydimethylsiloxane, polyethylene, polyoxymethylene, polyacrylate, polyurethane, and semipermeable membrane devices. GC × GC-based chemical property predictions are validated with a compilation of 1038 experimental property data collected from the literature. As an example application, we overlay a map of baseline toxicity to fathead minnows onto the separated analyte signal of a polychlorinated alkanes (chlorinated paraffins) technical mixture that contains 7820 congeners. In a second application, GC × GC-estimated properties are used to parametrize multiphase partitioning models for mammalian tissues and organs. In a third example, we estimate chemical depuration kinetics for mussels. Finally, we illustrate an approach to screen the GC × GC chromatogram for nonpolar chemicals of potentially high concern, defined based on their GC × GC-estimated biopartitioning properties, diffusion properties, and baseline toxicity.

  1. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized β-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years. PMID:18633461

  2. Filter holder and gasket assembly for candle or tube filters

    DOEpatents

    Lippert, T.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Bruck, G.J.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1999-03-02

    A filter holder and gasket assembly are disclosed for holding a candle filter element within a hot gas cleanup system pressure vessel. The filter holder and gasket assembly includes a filter housing, an annular spacer ring securely attached within the filter housing, a gasket sock, a top gasket, a middle gasket and a cast nut. 9 figs.

  3. Filter holder and gasket assembly for candle or tube filters

    DOEpatents

    Lippert, Thomas Edwin; Alvin, Mary Anne; Bruck, Gerald Joseph; Smeltzer, Eugene E.

    1999-03-02

    A filter holder and gasket assembly for holding a candle filter element within a hot gas cleanup system pressure vessel. The filter holder and gasket assembly includes a filter housing, an annular spacer ring securely attached within the filter housing, a gasket sock, a top gasket, a middle gasket and a cast nut.

  4. ANALYSIS OF SLUDGE BATCH 4 (MACROBATCH 5) FOR CANISTER S02902 AND SLUDGE BATCH 5 (MACROBATCH 6) FOR CANISTER S03317 DWPF POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-10-04

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 4 (SB4), Macrobatch 5 (MB5) on May 29, 2007. Sludge Batch 4 was a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) and SB4 material qualified in Tank 51. On November 28, 2008, DWPF began processing Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) from Tank 40 which is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from SB4, SB5 material qualified in Tank 51 and H-Canyon Pu and Np transfers. SB4 was processed using Frit 510 and SB5 used Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. During the processing of SB4 and SB5, glass samples were obtained during the pouring of canisters S02902 and S03317, respectively. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed (durability, chemical and radionuclide composition). The following observations and conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The sum of the oxides for the chemical composition of both the SB4 and SB5 pour stream glasses is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) acceptance limits (95 {le} sum of oxides {le} 105). (2) The calculated Sludge Dilution Factor (SDF) for SB4 is 2.52. The measured radionuclide content is in good agreement with the calculated values from the dried sludge results from the SB4 Waste Acceptance Production Specification (WAPS) sample (References 1 and 19). (3) The calculated SDF for SB5 is 2.60. The measured radionuclide content is in good agreement with the calculated values from the dried sludge results from the SB5 WAPS sample (References 2 and 20). (4) Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis shows there are noble metal inclusions, primarily ruthenium, present in both pour stream samples. (5) The Product

  5. Extended range harmonic filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankowski, H.; Geia, A. J.; Allen, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Two types of filters, leaky-wall and open-guide, are combined into single component. Combination gives 10 db or greater additional attenuation to fourth and higher harmonics, at expense of increasing loss of fundamental frequency by perhaps 0.05 to 0.08 db. Filter is applicable to all high power microwave transmitters, but is especially desirable for satellite transmitters.

  6. Tunable acoustical optical filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    Solid state filter with active crystal element increases sensitivity and resolution of passive and active spectrometers. Filter is capable of ranging through infrared and visible spectra, can be built as portable device for field use, and is suitable for ecological surveying, for pollution detection, and for pollutant classification.

  7. Filtering reprecipitated slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Late Washing Demonstration at Savannah River Technology Center, Interim Waste Technology has filtered reprecipitated and non reprecipitated slurry with the Experimental Laboratory Filter (ELF) at TNX. Reprecipitated slurry generates higher permeate fluxes than non reprecipitated slurry. Washing reprecipitated slurry may require a defoamer because reprecipitation encourages foaming.

  8. Filtering reprecipitated slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, M.F.

    1992-12-31

    As part of the Late Washing Demonstration at Savannah River Technology Center, Interim Waste Technology has filtered reprecipitated and non reprecipitated slurry with the Experimental Laboratory Filter (ELF) at TNX. Reprecipitated slurry generates higher permeate fluxes than non reprecipitated slurry. Washing reprecipitated slurry may require a defoamer because reprecipitation encourages foaming.

  9. Durability of ceramic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Tressler, R.E.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1994-10-01

    The objectives of this program are to identify the potential long-term thermal/chemical effects that advanced coal-based power generating systems have on the stability of porous ceramic filter materials, as well as to assess the influence of these effects on filter operating performance and life.

  10. Implicit Kalman filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skliar, M.; Ramirez, W. F.

    1997-01-01

    For an implicitly defined discrete system, a new algorithm for Kalman filtering is developed and an efficient numerical implementation scheme is proposed. Unlike the traditional explicit approach, the implicit filter can be readily applied to ill-conditioned systems and allows for generalization to descriptor systems. The implementation of the implicit filter depends on the solution of the congruence matrix equation (A1)(Px)(AT1) = Py. We develop a general iterative method for the solution of this equation, and prove necessary and sufficient conditions for convergence. It is shown that when the system matrices of an implicit system are sparse, the implicit Kalman filter requires significantly less computer time and storage to implement as compared to the traditional explicit Kalman filter. Simulation results are presented to illustrate and substantiate the theoretical developments.

  11. Sintered composite filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1986-05-02

    A particulate filter medium formed of a sintered composite of 0.5 micron diameter quartz fibers and 2 micron diameter stainless steel fibers is described. Preferred composition is about 40 vol.% quartz and about 60 vol.% stainless steel fibers. The media is sintered at about 1100/sup 0/C to bond the stainless steel fibers into a cage network which holds the quartz fibers. High filter efficiency and low flow resistance are provided by the smaller quartz fibers. High strength is provided by the stainless steel fibers. The resulting media has a high efficiency and low pressure drop similar to the standard HEPA media, with tensile strength at least four times greater, and a maximum operating temperature of about 550/sup 0/C. The invention also includes methods to form the composite media and a HEPA filter utilizing the composite media. The filter media can be used to filter particles in both liquids and gases.

  12. Sub-micron filter

    DOEpatents

    Tepper, Frederick; Kaledin, Leonid

    2009-10-13

    Aluminum hydroxide fibers approximately 2 nanometers in diameter and with surface areas ranging from 200 to 650 m.sup.2/g have been found to be highly electropositive. When dispersed in water they are able to attach to and retain electronegative particles. When combined into a composite filter with other fibers or particles they can filter bacteria and nano size particulates such as viruses and colloidal particles at high flux through the filter. Such filters can be used for purification and sterilization of water, biological, medical and pharmaceutical fluids, and as a collector/concentrator for detection and assay of microbes and viruses. The alumina fibers are also capable of filtering sub-micron inorganic and metallic particles to produce ultra pure water. The fibers are suitable as a substrate for growth of cells. Macromolecules such as proteins may be separated from each other based on their electronegative charges.

  13. Comparison of Three Solid Phase Materials for the Extraction of Carboxylic Acids from River Water Followed by 2D GC × GC-TOFMS Determination

    PubMed Central

    Bosire, G. O.; Ngila, J. C.; Parshotam, H.

    2016-01-01

    The extraction and determination of aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids as well as their influence on the aromaticity and molecularity relationship of natural organic matter (NOM) in water are reported in this study. Three solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbents were used and their extraction efficiencies evaluated after chromatographic determinations (using gas chromatography with a time of flight mass spectrometer (GC × GC-TOFMS) and liquid chromatography with organic carbon detector (LC-OCD)). More than 42 carboxylic acids were identified in raw water from the Vaal River, which feeds the Lethabo Power Generation Station, South Africa, with cooling water. The aromatic carboxylic acid efficiency (28%) was achieved by using Strata™ X SPE while the highest aliphatic carboxylic acid efficiency (92.08%) was achieved by silica SPE. The hydrophobic nature of NOM in water depends on the nature of organic compounds in water, whether aromatic or aliphatic. The LC-OCD was used to assess the hydrophobicity levels of NOM as a function of these carboxylic acids in cooling water. The LC-OCD results showed that the aromatic nature of NOM in SPE filtered water followed the order Silica>Strata X>C-18. From the results, the hydrophobicity degree of the samples depended on the type and number of carboxylic acids that were removed by the SPE cartridges. PMID:27274730

  14. Comparison of Three Solid Phase Materials for the Extraction of Carboxylic Acids from River Water Followed by 2D GC × GC-TOFMS Determination.

    PubMed

    Bosire, G O; Ngila, J C; Parshotam, H

    2016-01-01

    The extraction and determination of aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids as well as their influence on the aromaticity and molecularity relationship of natural organic matter (NOM) in water are reported in this study. Three solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbents were used and their extraction efficiencies evaluated after chromatographic determinations (using gas chromatography with a time of flight mass spectrometer (GC × GC-TOFMS) and liquid chromatography with organic carbon detector (LC-OCD)). More than 42 carboxylic acids were identified in raw water from the Vaal River, which feeds the Lethabo Power Generation Station, South Africa, with cooling water. The aromatic carboxylic acid efficiency (28%) was achieved by using Strata™ X SPE while the highest aliphatic carboxylic acid efficiency (92.08%) was achieved by silica SPE. The hydrophobic nature of NOM in water depends on the nature of organic compounds in water, whether aromatic or aliphatic. The LC-OCD was used to assess the hydrophobicity levels of NOM as a function of these carboxylic acids in cooling water. The LC-OCD results showed that the aromatic nature of NOM in SPE filtered water followed the order Silica>Strata X>C-18. From the results, the hydrophobicity degree of the samples depended on the type and number of carboxylic acids that were removed by the SPE cartridges.

  15. Gas-particle partitioning of odorants in a pig house measured by thermal desorption GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kristin Barkve; Glasius, Marianne; Feilberg, Anders

    2014-05-01

    Odorous compounds identified in pig houses span a wide range of vapour pressures and may thus be present as volatile and semi-volatile compounds, but little is known about the partitioning between phases. In this study, the concentrations of 17 known odorants were measured in a pig house both in the gas phase and in particles. Particles were collected on PTFE coated glass fibre (GF) filters while gas phase compounds were collected using Tenax TA and Carbograph 5TD sorption tubes after the filtration. All samples were analysed using a thermal desorption gas chromatograph and mass spectrometer (TD-GC-MS). The effect of desorbing the filters at different temperatures (290, 200 and 100 °C) was investigated, and we found that a desorption temperature of 290 °C was optimal. Backup filters were placed behind the front particle sampling filter to account for adsorption of gas-phase compounds to the front filters (positive artefact). Adsorption of propanoic acid, butanoic acid and 4-methylphenol to GF filters and PTFE-coated GF filters was specifically investigated in the laboratory by measuring the air concentration with proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry. Both field and laboratory results show considerable adsorption of most compounds to filters, and the use of backup filters is necessary to account for this. Of the odorants investigated in this study, carboxylic acids (C4-C6) were the most abundant in the particles, which is ascribed to acid dissociation in the particles. The logarithm of the subcooled liquid vapour pressures, log p, plotted against the logarithm of estimated equilibrium gas-particle coefficients, log Kp, showed that the compounds were divided into two groups, polar and non-polar compounds, that showed linear trends with mr-values of -0.94 and -0.83 respectively. The study shows that it is possible to measure gas-particle partitioning by filters and TD-GC-MS. Only very low concentrations and low fractions of odorants were found in the

  16. GC-MS and GC-IRD studies on the six-ring regioisomeric dimethoxybenzylpiperazines (DMBPs).

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hay, Karim M; Deruiter, Jack; Clark, C Randall

    2013-07-01

    Gas chromatography with infrared detection (GC-IRD) provides direct confirmatory data for the differentiation between the six regioisomeric aromatic ring substituted dimethoxybenzylpiperazines (DMBPs). These regioisomeric substances are resolved by GC and the vapour-phase infrared spectra clearly differentiate among the six dimethoxybenzyl substitution patterns. The mass spectra for these regioisomeric substances are almost identical. With only the 2,3-dimethoxy isomer showing one unique major fragment ion at m/z 136. Thus mass spectrometry does not provide for the confirmation of identity of any one of these compounds to the exclusion of the other isomers. Perfluoroacylation of the secondary amine nitrogen for each of the six regioisomers gave mass spectra showing some differences in the relative abundance of fragment ions without the appearance of any unique fragments for specific confirmation of structure. Gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection (GC-TOF) provided an additional means of confirmation of the elemental composition of the major fragment ions in the mass spectra of these compounds.

  17. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    DOEpatents

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  18. Solc filter engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, W. J.; Title, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    A Solc (1965) filter configuration is presented which is both tunable and spectrally variable, since it possesses an adjustable bandwidth, and which although less efficient than a Lyot filter is attractive because of its spectral versatility. The lossless design, using only an entrance and exit polarizer, improves throughput generally and especially in the IR, where polarizers are less convenient than dichroic sheet polarizers. Attention is given to the transmission profiles of Solc filters with different numbers of elements and split elements, as well as their mechanical design features.

  19. Multilevel filtering elliptic preconditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, C. C. Jay; Chan, Tony F.; Tong, Charles

    1989-01-01

    A class of preconditioners is presented for elliptic problems built on ideas borrowed from the digital filtering theory and implemented on a multilevel grid structure. They are designed to be both rapidly convergent and highly parallelizable. The digital filtering viewpoint allows the use of filter design techniques for constructing elliptic preconditioners and also provides an alternative framework for understanding several other recently proposed multilevel preconditioners. Numerical results are presented to assess the convergence behavior of the new methods and to compare them with other preconditioners of multilevel type, including the usual multigrid method as preconditioner, the hierarchical basis method and a recent method proposed by Bramble-Pasciak-Xu.

  20. Yangjing Capsule Extract Promotes Proliferation of GC-1 Spg Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Jin, Baofang; Zhang, Xindong; Cui, Yugui; Sun, Dalin; Gao, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of Yangjing Capsule (YC) extract on proliferation of GC-1 spermatogonia (spg) cells and the mechanism. Methods. GC-1 spg cells were treated with 0.01, 0.1, and 1 mg/mL YC extract. MTT assay was performed to detect the cell viability. Flow cytometry was used to measure the cell cycle and apoptosis of GC-1 spg cells. Real-time PCR and western blot were applied to determine the mRNA and protein expression of Oct-4 and Plzf. Gfrα1 knockdown and LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor) were applied to explore the underlying mechanism. Results. After 48 h treatment of YC, the viability of GC-1 spg cells increased significantly and the ratio of apoptotic cells reduced significantly. The increased mRNA and protein expression of Oct-4 and Plzf suggested YC promoted self-renewal of GC-1 spg cells. Both Gfrα1 siRNAs and LY294002 treatments held back YC extract's stimulation effects on mRNA and protein expression of Oct-4 and Plzf and consequently inhibited the proliferation of GC-1 spg cells induced by YC extract. Conclusion. YC extract could stimulate the proliferation of GC-1 spg cells. Partly via Gfrα1, YC extract is able to trigger the activation of PI3K pathway and finally lead to self-renewal of GC-1 spg cells. PMID:24817900

  1. Improved PCR Amplification of Broad Spectrum GC DNA Templates.

    PubMed

    Guido, Nicholas; Starostina, Elena; Leake, Devin; Saaem, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Many applications in molecular biology can benefit from improved PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. Conventional PCR amplification of DNA sequences with regions of GC less than 30%, or higher than 70%, is complex due to secondary structures that block the DNA polymerase as well as mispriming and mis-annealing of the DNA. This complexity will often generate incomplete or nonspecific products that hamper downstream applications. In this study, we address multiplexed PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. In order to mitigate amplification complications due to high or low GC regions, we tested a combination of different PCR cycling conditions and chemical additives. To assess the fate of specific oligonucleotide (oligo) species with varying GC content in a multiplexed PCR, we developed a novel method of sequence analysis. Here we show that subcycling during the amplification process significantly improved amplification of short template pools (~200 bp), particularly when the template contained a low percent of GC. Furthermore, the combination of subcycling and 7-deaza-dGTP achieved efficient amplification of short templates ranging from 10-90% GC composition. Moreover, we found that 7-deaza-dGTP improved the amplification of longer products (~1000 bp). These methods provide an updated approach for PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a broad range of GC content.

  2. Investigation of Imposter Perfumes Using GC-MS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowery, Kelly A.; Blanchard, Daniel E.; Smith, Stephanie; Betts, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment to initiate students into several features of gas chromatograph-mass spectrometers (GC-MS) through the study of branded and counterfeit perfumes is described. The experiment enables the students to appreciate the power of GC-MS in distinguishing between original and imitation perfumes, and in analyzing data with its application…

  3. NOVEL MICROWAVE FILTER DESIGN TECHNIQUES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTRIC FILTERS, MICROWAVE FREQUENCY), (*MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, ELECTRIC FILTERS), CIRCUITS, CAPACITORS, COILS, RESONATORS, STRIP TRANSMISSION LINES, WAVEGUIDES, TUNING DEVICES, PARAMETRIC AMPLIFIERS, FREQUENCY CONVERTERS .

  4. A GC-MS metabolic profiling study of plasma samples from mice on low- and high-fat diets.

    PubMed

    Spagou, Konstantina; Theodoridis, Georgios; Wilson, Ian; Raikos, Nikolaos; Greaves, Peter; Edwards, Richard; Nolan, Barbara; Klapa, Maria I

    2011-05-15

    Metabolic profiling of biofluids, based on the quantitative analysis of the concentration profile of their free low molecular mass metabolites, has been playing increasing role employed as a means to gain understanding of the progression of metabolic disorders, including obesity. Chromatographic methods coupled with mass spectrometry have been established as a strategy for metabolic profiling. Among these, GC-MS, targeting mainly the primary metabolism intermediates, offers high sensitivity, good peak resolution and extensive databases. However, the derivatization step required for many involatile metabolites necessitates specific data validation, normalization and analysis protocols to ensure accurate and reproducible performance. In this study, the GC-MS metabolic profiles of plasma samples from mice maintained on 12- or 15-month long low (10 kcal%) or high (60 kcal%) fat diets were obtained. The profiles of the trimethylsilyl(TMS)-methoxime(MeOx) derivatives of the free polar metabolites were acquired through GC-(ion trap)MS, using [U-(13)C]-glucose as the internal standard. After the application of a recently developed data correction and normalization/filtering protocol for GC-MS metabolomic datasets, the profiles of 48 out of the 77 detected metabolites were used in multivariate statistical analysis. Data mining suggested a decrease in the activity of the energy metabolism with age. In addition, the metabolic profiles indicated the presence of subpopulations with different physiology within the high- and low-fat diet mice, which correlated well with the difference in body weight among the animals and current knowledge about hyperglycemic conditions.

  5. Active-R filter

    DOEpatents

    Soderstrand, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational amplifier-type active filter in which the only capacitor in the circuit is the compensating capacitance of the operational amplifiers, the various feedback and coupling elements being essentially solely resistive.

  6. Improved optical filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    Filter includes partial polarizer between birefrigent elements. Plastic film on partial polarizer compensates for any polarization rotation by partial polarizer. Two quarter-wave plates change incident, linearly polarized light into elliptically polarized light.

  7. HEPA air filter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pet dander and other irritating allergens from the air. Along with other methods to reduce allergens, such ... controlling the amount of allergens circulating in the air. HEPA filters can be found in most air ...

  8. Compact photonic spin filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yougang; Liu, Zhenxing; Liu, Yachao; Zhou, Junxiao; Shu, Weixing; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2016-10-01

    In this letter, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a compact photonic spin filter formed by integrating a Pancharatnam-Berry phase lens (focal length of ±f ) into a conventional plano-concave lens (focal length of -f). By choosing the input port of the filter, photons with a desired spin state, such as the right-handed component or the left-handed one, propagate alone its original propagation direction, while the unwanted spin component is quickly diverged after passing through the filter. One application of the filter, sorting the spin-dependent components of vector vortex beams on higher-order Poincaré sphere, is also demonstrated. Our scheme provides a simple method to manipulate light, and thereby enables potential applications for photonic devices.

  9. Parallel Subconvolution Filtering Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Andrew A.

    2003-01-01

    These architectures are based on methods of vector processing and the discrete-Fourier-transform/inverse-discrete- Fourier-transform (DFT-IDFT) overlap-and-save method, combined with time-block separation of digital filters into frequency-domain subfilters implemented by use of sub-convolutions. The parallel-processing method implemented in these architectures enables the use of relatively small DFT-IDFT pairs, while filter tap lengths are theoretically unlimited. The size of a DFT-IDFT pair is determined by the desired reduction in processing rate, rather than on the order of the filter that one seeks to implement. The emphasis in this report is on those aspects of the underlying theory and design rules that promote computational efficiency, parallel processing at reduced data rates, and simplification of the designs of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits needed to implement high-order filters and correlators.

  10. Remotely serviced filter and housing

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Maurice J.; Zaladonis, Larry A.

    1988-09-27

    A filter system for a hot cell comprises a housing adapted for input of air or other gas to be filtered, flow of the air through a filter element, and exit of filtered air. The housing is tapered at the top to make it easy to insert a filter cartridge using an overhead crane. The filter cartridge holds the filter element while the air or other gas is passed through the filter element. Captive bolts in trunnion nuts are readily operated by electromechanical manipulators operating power wrenches to secure and release the filter cartridge. The filter cartridge is adapted to make it easy to change a filter element by using a master-slave manipulator at a shielded window station.

  11. Interleukin-6 gene -174G>C and -636G>C promoter polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, J F; Cortinhas, A J; Albuquerque, C M; Baptista, C S; Ribeiro, R; Viegas, Carlos; Matos, Augusto; Machado, João; Pires, Maria A; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique; Martins-Bessa, A; Leitão, J C; Bastos, E

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most commonly diagnosed internal malignancies affecting men. Due to the important roles of IL-6 in different physiological and pathophysiological processes, IL-6 polymorphisms may modulate PCa risk. IL-6 -174 G>C (rs 1800795, also designated -236 G>C) and -636 G>C (rs 1800796, also designated -572 G>C) promoter polymorphisms have been implicated in PCa susceptibility, albeit still controversial. A literature search using PubMed and Highwire databases was conducted, resulting in eight case-control studies concerning the IL-6 -174 G>C polymorphism (11,613 PCa cases and 13,992 controls) and four case-control publications regarding the IL-6 -636 G>C polymorphism (1,941 PCa cases and 3,357 controls). In order to derive a more precise estimation, a meta-analysis based upon these selected case-control studies was performed. There was no significant association between IL-6 -174 G>C polymorphism and PCa increased risk. Nevertheless, the presence of allele C and the CC genotype were statistically significantly associated with decreased PCa risk in the overall analysis for IL-6 -636 G>C polymorphism. Additional studies in larger samples and analyses of functional repercussions of these SNPs in prostate tumor cells are necessary to validate these findings.

  12. NICMOS Filter Wheel Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    This is an engineering test {described in SMOV4 Activity Description NICMOS-04} to verify the aliveness, functionality, operability, and electro-mechanical calibration of the NICMOS filter wheel motors and assembly after NCS restart in SMOV4. This test has been designed to obviate concerns over possible deformation or breakage of the fitter wheel "soda-straw" shafts due to excess rotational drag torque and/or bending moments which may be imparted due to changes in the dewar metrology from warm-up/cool-down. This test should be executed after the NCS {and filter wheel housing} has reached and approximately equilibrated to its nominal operating temperature.Addition of visits G0 - G9 {9/9/09}: Ten visits copied from proposal 11868 {visits 20, 30, ..., 90, A0, B0}. Each visit moves two filter positions, takes lamp ON/OFF exposures and then moves back to the blank position. Visits G0, G1 and G2 will leave the filter wheels disabled. The remaining visits will leave the filter wheels enabled. There are sufficient in between times to allow for data download and analysis. In the case of problem is encountered, the filter wheels will be disabled through a real time command. The in between times are all set to 22-50 hours. It is preferable to have as short as possible in between time.

  13. Contactor/filter improvements

    DOEpatents

    Stelman, David

    1989-01-01

    A contactor/filter arrangement for removing particulate contaminants from a gaseous stream includes a housing having a substantially vertically oriented granular material retention member with upstream and downstream faces, a substantially vertically oriented microporous gas filter element, wherein the retention member and the filter element are spaced apart to provide a zone for the passage of granular material therethrough. The housing further includes a gas inlet means, a gas outlet means, and means for moving a body of granular material through the zone. A gaseous stream containing particulate contaminants passes through the gas inlet means as well as through the upstream face of the granular material retention member, passing through the retention member, the body of granular material, the microporous gas filter element, exiting out of the gas outlet means. Disposed on the upstream face of the filter element is a cover screen which isolates the filter element from contact with the moving granular bed and collects a portion of the particulates so as to form a dust cake having openings small enough to exclude the granular material, yet large enough to receive the dust particles. In one embodiment, the granular material is comprised of prous alumina impregnated with CuO, with the cover screen cleaned by the action of the moving granular material as well as by backflow pressure pulses.

  14. Investigation of spectrophotometrically determined substances in Yucca extract by GC/MS, TLC and on-column injection GC.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Yoko; Hirata, Keiko; Suzuki, Kumi; Iida, Kenji; Kamata, Kunihiro

    2004-06-01

    Spectrophotometrically determined substances in Yucca extract, listed as "Yucca foam extract" in the "List of Existing Food Additives in Japan", were investigated by GC/MS, TLC and GC. A TLC method using an anisaldehyde color developing reagent similar to that employed in spectrophotometry was established for selective detection of sapogenins in Yucca extract. Several steroidal sapogenins were found by GC/MS in the fractions corresponding to spots on the TLC plate, and these were assumed to have contributed to the color development in spectrophotometry. Sarsasapogenin and smilagenin were the dominant sapogenins. An on-column injection GC method to determine these sapogenins in Yucca extract was also developed. The sum of these two sapogenins in Yucca extract was 0.9%. The total amount of sapogenin estimated by GC was approximately 2%, which was similar to that measured by spectrophotometry.

  15. Outdoor and indoor benzene evaluation by GC-FID and GC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Sousa, José A; Domingues, Valentina F; Rosas, Mónica S; Ribeiro, Susana O; Alvim-Ferraz, Conceiçao M; Delerue-Matos, Cristina F

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of benzene in different environments such as indoor (with and without tobacco smoke), a city area, countryside, gas stations and near exhaust pipes from cars running on different types of fuels was performed. The samples were analyzed using gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection (FID) and tandem mass spectrometric detection (MS/MS) (to confirm the identification of benzene in the air samples). Operating conditions for the GC-MS analysis were optimized as well as the sampling and sample preparation. The results obtained in this work indicate that i) the type of fuel directly influences the benzene concentration in the air. Gasoline with additives provided the highest amount of benzene followed by unleaded gasoline and diesel; ii) the benzene concentration in the gas station was always higher than the advisable limit established by law (5 μg m⁻³) and during the unloading of gasoline the achieved concentration was 8371 μg m⁻³; iii) the data from the countryside (Taliscas) and the urban city (Matosinhos) were below 5 μg m⁻³ except 5 days after a fire on a petroleum refinery plant located near the city; iv) it was proven that in coffee shops where smoking is allowed the benzene concentration is higher (6 μg m⁻³) than in coffee shops where this is forbidden (4 μg m⁻³). This method may also be helpful for environmental analytical chemists who use GC-MS/MS for the confirmation or/and quantification of benzene.

  16. GC3 biology in corn, rice, sorghum and other grasses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The third, or wobble, position in a codon provides a high degree of possible degeneracy and is an elegant fault-tolerance mechanism. Nucleotide biases between organisms at the wobble position have been documented and correlated with the abundances of the complementary tRNAs. We and others have noticed a bias for cytosine and guanine at the third position in a subset of transcripts within a single organism. The bias is present in some plant species and warm-blooded vertebrates but not in all plants, or in invertebrates or cold-blooded vertebrates. Results Here we demonstrate that in certain organisms the amount of GC at the wobble position (GC3) can be used to distinguish two classes of genes. We highlight the following features of genes with high GC3 content: they (1) provide more targets for methylation, (2) exhibit more variable expression, (3) more frequently possess upstream TATA boxes, (4) are predominant in certain classes of genes (e.g., stress responsive genes) and (5) have a GC3 content that increases from 5'to 3'. These observations led us to formulate a hypothesis to explain GC3 bimodality in grasses. Conclusions Our findings suggest that high levels of GC3 typify a class of genes whose expression is regulated through DNA methylation or are a legacy of accelerated evolution through gene conversion. We discuss the three most probable explanations for GC3 bimodality: biased gene conversion, transcriptional and translational advantage and gene methylation. PMID:20470436

  17. Combined diplexer and harmonic filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    By using two directional filters having circular waveguide filter cavities, diplexing and harmonic filtering functions can be combined into a more compact integrated waveguide assembly. Device is filter which passes power within its pass band limits, but also has a directional characteristic so power transmitted into two-port output waveguide will travel in only one direction.

  18. Filter and method of fabricating

    DOEpatents

    Janney, Mark A.

    2006-02-14

    A method of making a filter includes the steps of: providing a substrate having a porous surface; applying to the porous surface a coating of dry powder comprising particles to form a filter preform; and heating the filter preform to bind the substrate and the particles together to form a filter.

  19. DDP-116 general digital filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.; Graham, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    The methods are described for calibrating, selecting filter weights, filtering, and computing filter response functions. These methods are computed on a statistical analyzer (STAN) system with a Honeywell DDP-116 central processor. The following filter types are computed: all pass, low pass, high pass, band pass, band rejection, and derivative.

  20. An IIR median hybrid filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Peter H.; Sartori, Michael A.; Bryden, Timothy M.

    1992-01-01

    A new class of nonlinear filters, the so-called class of multidirectional infinite impulse response median hybrid filters, is presented and analyzed. The input signal is processed twice using a linear shift-invariant infinite impulse response filtering module: once with normal causality and a second time with inverted causality. The final output of the MIMH filter is the median of the two-directional outputs and the original input signal. Thus, the MIMH filter is a concatenation of linear filtering and nonlinear filtering (a median filtering module). Because of this unique scheme, the MIMH filter possesses many desirable properties which are both proven and analyzed (including impulse removal, step preservation, and noise suppression). A comparison to other existing median type filters is also provided.

  1. Remotely serviced filter and housing

    DOEpatents

    Ross, M.J.; Zaladonis, L.A.

    1987-07-22

    A filter system for a hot cell comprises a housing adapted for input of air or other gas to be filtered, flow of the air through a filter element, and exit of filtered air. The housing is tapered at the top to make it easy to insert a filter cartridge holds the filter element while the air or other gas is passed through the filter element. Captive bolts in trunnion nuts are readily operated by electromechanical manipulators operating power wrenches to secure and release the filter cartridge. The filter cartridge is adapted to make it easy to change a filter element by using a master-slave manipulator at a shielded window station. 6 figs.

  2. Anti-clogging filter system

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Erik P.

    2015-05-19

    An anti-clogging filter system for filtering a fluid containing large particles and small particles includes an enclosure with at least one individual elongated tubular filter element in the enclosure. The individual elongated tubular filter element has an internal passage, a closed end, an open end, and a filtering material in or on the individual elongated tubular filter element. The fluid travels through the open end of the elongated tubular element and through the internal passage and through the filtering material. An anti-clogging element is positioned on or adjacent the individual elongated tubular filter element and provides a fluid curtain that preferentially directs the larger particulates to one area of the filter material allowing the remainder of the filter material to remain more efficient.

  3. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Brown, Ian G.

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  4. Evaluation of GC-APCI/MS and GC-FID as a complementary platform.

    PubMed

    Pacchiarotta, Tiziana; Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; Carrasco-Pancorbo, Alegria; Deelder, André M; Mayboroda, Oleg A

    2010-12-01

    With a development of the metabolomics field, complementary cross-platform approaches started to attract attention, as none of the contemporary analytical methods had the capacity to cover the entire space of the human metabolome. In the current manuscript, we have evaluated an online coupling of gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) and flame ionization detector (FID) as ways of cross-detector analysis. The possible value of this combination was recognized from the very first days of GC-MS history but was never explored in detail. We have compared the basic analytical parameters of both detectors, such as limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification, with intra- and interday reproducibility. We show that for the majority of the tested compounds, MS detector demonstrates lower LOD. At the same time, FID appeared to be more robust, showing lower relative standard deviations (RSDs) for intra- and interday reproducibility. We conclude that the gain of this dual detector acquisition appears to be most evident for complex biological samples, where wide dynamic range and predictable response of FID are useful for an initial quantitative overview of sample composition and estimation of molar proportions of different metabolites. MS provides reliable, structural information and superior, at least in the case of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, sensitivity. Taken together, both detectors represent a flexible tool for explorative studies and if supported by a powerful data-processing algorithm, would appear to be useful in any metabolic profiling study.

  5. Evaluation of GC-APCI/MS and GC-FID As a Complementary Platform

    PubMed Central

    Pacchiarotta, Tiziana; Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; Carrasco-Pancorbo, Alegria; Deelder, André M.; Mayboroda, Oleg A.

    2010-01-01

    With a development of the metabolomics field, complementary cross-platform approaches started to attract attention, as none of the contemporary analytical methods had the capacity to cover the entire space of the human metabolome. In the current manuscript, we have evaluated an online coupling of gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) and flame ionization detector (FID) as ways of cross-detector analysis. The possible value of this combination was recognized from the very first days of GC-MS history but was never explored in detail. We have compared the basic analytical parameters of both detectors, such as limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification, with intra- and interday reproducibility. We show that for the majority of the tested compounds, MS detector demonstrates lower LOD. At the same time, FID appeared to be more robust, showing lower relative standard deviations (RSDs) for intra- and interday reproducibility. We conclude that the gain of this dual detector acquisition appears to be most evident for complex biological samples, where wide dynamic range and predictable response of FID are useful for an initial quantitative overview of sample composition and estimation of molar proportions of different metabolites. MS provides reliable, structural information and superior, at least in the case of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, sensitivity. Taken together, both detectors represent a flexible tool for explorative studies and if supported by a powerful data-processing algorithm, would appear to be useful in any metabolic profiling study. PMID:21119931

  6. Hyphenated GC-FTIR and GC-MS techniques applied in the analysis of bioactive compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosav, Steluta; Paduraru, Nicoleta; Praisler, Mirela

    2014-08-01

    The drugs of abuse, which affect human nature and cause numerous crimes, have become a serious problem throughout the world. There are hundreds of amphetamine analogues on the black market. They consist of various alterations of the basic amphetamine molecular structure, which are yet not yet included in the lists of forbidden compounds although they retain or slightly modify the hallucinogenic effects of their parent compound. It is their important variety that makes their identification quite a challenge. A number of analytical procedures for the identification of amphetamines and their analogues have recently been reported. We are presenting the profile of the main hallucinogenic amphetamines obtained with the hyphenated techniques that are recommended for the identification of illicit amphetamines, i. e. gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (GC-FTIR). The infrared spectra of the analyzed hallucinogenic amphetamines present some absorption bands (1490 cm-1, 1440 cm-1, 1245 cm-1, 1050 cm-1 and 940 cm-1) that are very stable as position and shape, while their intensity depends of the side-chain substitution. The specific ionic fragment of the studied hallucinogenic compounds is the 3,4-methylenedioxybenzyl cation (m/e = 135) which has a small relative abundance (lesser than 20%). The complementarity of the above mentioned techniques for the identification of hallucinogenic compounds is discussed.

  7. Method development by GC-ECD and HS-SPME-GC-MS for beer volatile analysis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gisele C; da Silva, Abner A S; da Silva, Larissa S N; Godoy, Ronoel Luiz de O; Nogueira, Luciana C; Quitério, Simone L; Raices, Renata S L

    2015-01-15

    Two methods for the extraction, identification and quantification of the highest occurrence and lowest perception threshold off-flavours in fifteen different samples of Brazilian Pilsner beers were developed. For this purpose, headspace solid phase microextraction in combination with a gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometric detection (HS-SPME-GC-MS) as well as headspace extraction in combination with a gas chromatography coupled to electron capture detection (HS-GC-ECD) were evaluated. The first and the second methods were used for esters and vicinal diketones analysis, respectively. All data were comprehended below the taster's threshold detection limit: ethyl acetate 39.48 ng mL(-1) (RSD mean value 4.2%), isoamyl acetate 3.88 ng mL(-1) (RSD mean value 3.4%), ethyl hexanoate 0.61 ng mL(-1) (RSD mean value 3.1%) and 2,3-butanedione 0.10 ng mL(-1) (RSD mean value 2.9%). The validated method demonstrated to be useful for the analysis of highest incidence beer off-flavours.

  8. Filter cake characterization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.

    1995-11-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center is developing an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept for high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards, as well as to provide gas turbine protection. The ILEC system is a ceramic barrier hot gas filter (HGF) that removes particulate while simultaneously contributing to the control of sulfur, alkali, and potentially other contaminants in high-temperature, high-pressure fuel gases, or combustion gases. The gas-phase contaminant removal is performed by sorbent particles injected into the HGF. The overall objective of this program is to demonstrate, at a bench scale, the technical feasibility of the ILEC concept for multi-contaminant control, and to provide test data applicable to the design of subsequent field tests. The program has conducted ceramic barrier filter testing under simulated PFBC conditions to resolve issues relating to filter cake permeability, pulse cleaning, and filter cake additive performance. ILEC testing has also been performed to assess the potential for in-filter sulfur and alkali removal.

  9. Filter component assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S.; Smeltzer, E.W.

    1995-11-01

    The objectives of this program are to provide a more ruggedized filter system that utilizes porous ceramic filters which have improved resistance to damage resulting from crack propagation, thermal fatigue and/or thermal excursions during plant or process transient conditions, and/or mechanical ash bridging events within the candle filter array. As part of the current Phase 1, Task 1, effort of this program, Westinghouse is evaluating the filtration characteristics, mechanical integrity, and corrosion resistance of the following advanced or second generation candle filters for use in advanced coal-fired process applications: 3M CVI-SiC composite--chemical vapor infiltration of silicon carbide into an aluminosilicate Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber preform; DuPont PRD-66--filament wound candle filter structure containing corundum, cordierite, cristobalite, and mullite; DuPont SiC-SiC--chemical infiltration of silicon carbide into a silicon carbide Nicalon{trademark} fiber mat or felt preform; and IF and P Fibrosic{trademark}--vacuum infiltrated oxide-based chopped fibrous matrix. Results to date are presented.

  10. DOE HEPA filter test program

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This standard establishes essential elements of a Department of Energy (DOE) program for testing HEPA filters to be installed in DOE nuclear facilities or used in DOE-contracted activities. A key element is the testing of HEPA filters for performance at a DOE Filter Test Facility (FTF) prior to installation. Other key elements are (1) providing for a DOE HEPA filter procurement program, and (2) verifying that HEPA filters to be installed in nuclear facilities appear on a Qualified Products List (QPL).

  11. Disinfecting Filters For Recirculated Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilichi, Carmine A.

    1992-01-01

    Simple treatment disinfects air filters by killing bacteria, algae, fungi, mycobacteria, viruses, spores, and any other micro-organisms filters might harbor. Concept applied to reusable stainless-steel wire mesh filters and disposable air filters. Treatment used on filters in air-circulation systems in spacecraft, airplanes, other vehicles, and buildings to help prevent spread of colds, sore throats, and more-serious illnesses.

  12. Kalman filter modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The formulation of appropriate state-space models for Kalman filtering applications is studied. The so-called model is completely specified by four matrix parameters and the initial conditions of the recursive equations. Once these are determined, the die is cast, and the way in which the measurements are weighted is determined foreverafter. Thus, finding a model that fits the physical situation at hand is all important. Also, it is often the most difficult aspect of designing a Kalman filter. Formulation of discrete state models from the spectral density and ARMA random process descriptions is discussed. Finally, it is pointed out that many common processes encountered in applied work (such as band-limited white noise) simply do not lend themselves very well to Kalman filter modeling.

  13. Stack filter classifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Reid B; Hush, Don

    2009-01-01

    Just as linear models generalize the sample mean and weighted average, weighted order statistic models generalize the sample median and weighted median. This analogy can be continued informally to generalized additive modeels in the case of the mean, and Stack Filters in the case of the median. Both of these model classes have been extensively studied for signal and image processing but it is surprising to find that for pattern classification, their treatment has been significantly one sided. Generalized additive models are now a major tool in pattern classification and many different learning algorithms have been developed to fit model parameters to finite data. However Stack Filters remain largely confined to signal and image processing and learning algorithms for classification are yet to be seen. This paper is a step towards Stack Filter Classifiers and it shows that the approach is interesting from both a theoretical and a practical perspective.

  14. GC-IMS: a technology for many applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Lawrence V.; Romeskie, Julian M.

    1998-12-01

    Fast GC (gas chromatography) - IMS (ion mobility spectrometry) as a core technology is sufficiently flexible with respect to a broad range of chemical detection capabilities. The application of this dual technology can provide unique solutions in many operational environments. GC-IMS is the next evolutionary step in the advancement of IMS technology. Using the advantages of IMS (i.e., small, high sensitivity, rugged, operates at atmospheric pressure, etc.) And the chemical selection capability of GC, this detector configuration can be customized to detect and identify explosives, ICAO markers, and narcotics. This paper will present a technical discussion on GC-IMS and describe several commercial off the shelf (COTS) systems with potential application in many operating environments. Instruments include the Orion for explosives detection, Ariel for narcotics detection, Sirius for both explosives and narcotics detection, and NorthStar for handheld narcotics detection.

  15. NICMOS Filter Wheel Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Sangeeta

    2003-07-01

    This is an engineering test to verify the aliveness, functionality, operability, and electro-mechanical calibration of the NICMOS filter wheel motors and assembly after NCS restart in August 2003. This test has been designed to obviate concerns over possible deformation or breakage of the fitter wheel "soda-straw" shafts due to excess rotational drag torque and/or bending moments which may be imparted due to changes in the dewar metrology from warm-up/cool-down. This test should be executed after the NCS {and filter wheel housing} has reached and approximately equilibrated to its nominal Cycle 11 operating temperature.

  16. Electronically tuned optical filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, J. A.; Pasierb, E. F.; Oh, C. S.; Mccaffrey, M. T.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed account is given of efforts to develop a three layer, polychromic filter that can be tuned electronically. The operation of the filter is based on the cooperative alignment of pleochroic dye molecules by nematic liquid crystals activated by electric fields. This orientation produces changes in the optical density of the material and thus changes in the color of light transmitted through the medium. In addition, attempts to improve materials and devices which employ field induced changes of a cholesteric to a nematic liquid crystal are presented.

  17. Bicarbonate Modulates Photoreceptor Guanylate Cyclase (ROS-GC) Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Duda, Teresa; Wen, Xiao-Hong; Isayama, Tomoki; Sharma, Rameshwar K; Makino, Clint L

    2015-04-24

    By generating the second messenger cGMP in retinal rods and cones, ROS-GC plays a central role in visual transduction. Guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) link cGMP synthesis to the light-induced fall in [Ca(2+)]i to help set absolute sensitivity and assure prompt recovery of the response to light. The present report discloses a surprising feature of this system: ROS-GC is a sensor of bicarbonate. Recombinant ROS-GCs synthesized cGMP from GTP at faster rates in the presence of bicarbonate with an ED50 of 27 mM for ROS-GC1 and 39 mM for ROS-GC2. The effect required neither Ca(2+) nor use of the GCAPs domains; however, stimulation of ROS-GC1 was more powerful in the presence of GCAP1 or GCAP2 at low [Ca(2+)]. When applied to retinal photoreceptors, bicarbonate enhanced the circulating current, decreased sensitivity to flashes, and accelerated flash response kinetics. Bicarbonate was effective when applied either to the outer or inner segment of red-sensitive cones. In contrast, bicarbonate exerted an effect when applied to the inner segment of rods but had little efficacy when applied to the outer segment. The findings define a new regulatory mechanism of the ROS-GC system that affects visual transduction and is likely to affect the course of retinal diseases caused by cGMP toxicity.

  18. Bicarbonate Modulates Photoreceptor Guanylate Cyclase (ROS-GC) Catalytic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Duda, Teresa; Wen, Xiao-Hong; Isayama, Tomoki; Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Makino, Clint L.

    2015-01-01

    By generating the second messenger cGMP in retinal rods and cones, ROS-GC plays a central role in visual transduction. Guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) link cGMP synthesis to the light-induced fall in [Ca2+]i to help set absolute sensitivity and assure prompt recovery of the response to light. The present report discloses a surprising feature of this system: ROS-GC is a sensor of bicarbonate. Recombinant ROS-GCs synthesized cGMP from GTP at faster rates in the presence of bicarbonate with an ED50 of 27 mm for ROS-GC1 and 39 mm for ROS-GC2. The effect required neither Ca2+ nor use of the GCAPs domains; however, stimulation of ROS-GC1 was more powerful in the presence of GCAP1 or GCAP2 at low [Ca2+]. When applied to retinal photoreceptors, bicarbonate enhanced the circulating current, decreased sensitivity to flashes, and accelerated flash response kinetics. Bicarbonate was effective when applied either to the outer or inner segment of red-sensitive cones. In contrast, bicarbonate exerted an effect when applied to the inner segment of rods but had little efficacy when applied to the outer segment. The findings define a new regulatory mechanism of the ROS-GC system that affects visual transduction and is likely to affect the course of retinal diseases caused by cGMP toxicity. PMID:25767116

  19. Preferential recombination between GC clusters in yeast mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Dieckmann, C L; Gandy, B

    1987-01-01

    Yeast mitochondrial DNA molecules have long, AT-rich intergenic spacers punctuated by short GC clusters. GC-rich elements have previously been characterized by others as preferred sites for intramolecular recombination leading to the formation of subgenomic petite molecules. In the present study we show that GC clusters are favored sites for intermolecular recombination between a petite and the wild-type grande genome. The petite studied retains 6.5 kb of mitochondrial DNA reiterated tandemly to form molecules consisting of repeated units. Genetic selection for integration of tandem 6.5 kb repeats of the petite into the grande genome yielded a novel recombination event. One of two crossovers in a double exchange event occurred as expected in the 6.5 kb of matching sequence between the genomes, whereas the second exchange involved a 44 bp GC cluster in the petite and another 44 bp GC cluster in the grande genome 700 bp proximal to the region of homology. Creation of a mitochondrial DNA molecule with a repetitive region led to secondary recombination events that generated a family of molecules with zero to several petite units. The finding that 44 bp GC clusters are preferred as sites for intermolecular exchange adds to the data on petite excision implicating these elements as recombinational hotspots in the yeast mitochondrial genome. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3327690

  20. A Monolithically-Integrated μGC Chemical Sensor System

    PubMed Central

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Bauer, Joseph M.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Sanchez, Lawrence J.; Anderson, John M.; Whiting, Joshua J.; Porter, Daniel A.; Copic, Davor; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.

    2011-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is used for organic and inorganic gas detection with a range of applications including screening for chemical warfare agents (CWA), breath analysis for diagnostics or law enforcement purposes, and air pollutants/indoor air quality monitoring of homes and commercial buildings. A field-portable, light weight, low power, rapid response, micro-gas chromatography (μGC) system is essential for such applications. We describe the design, fabrication and packaging of μGC on monolithically-integrated Si dies, comprised of a preconcentrator (PC), μGC column, detector and coatings for each of these components. An important feature of our system is that the same mechanical micro resonator design is used for the PC and detector. We demonstrate system performance by detecting four different CWA simulants within 2 min. We present theoretical analyses for cost/power comparisons of monolithic versus hybrid μGC systems. We discuss thermal isolation in monolithic systems to improve overall performance. Our monolithically-integrated μGC, relative to its hybrid cousin, will afford equal or slightly lower cost, a footprint that is 1/2 to 1/3 the size and an improved resolution of 4 to 25%. PMID:22163970

  1. Differentiation of methylenedioxybenzylpiperazines (MDBPs) and methoxymethylbenzylpiperazines (MMBPs) By GC-IRD and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hay, Karim M; Awad, Tamer; Deruiter, Jack; Clark, C Randall

    2011-07-15

    The substituted benzylpiperazines, 3,4-methylenedioxybenzylpiperazine (3,4-MDBP), its regioisomer 2,3-methylenedioxybenzylpiperazine (2,3-MDBP) and four isobaric ring substituted methoxymethylbenzylpiperazines (MMBP) have almost identical mass spectra. Perfluoroacylation of the secondary amine nitrogen of these isomeric piperazines gave mass spectra with differences in relative abundance of some fragment ions. However, the spectra did not yield any unique fragments for specific identification of one isomer to the exclusion of the other compounds. Gas chromatography coupled with infrared detection (GC-IRD) provides direct confirmatory data for the structural differentiation between the six isomers. The mass spectra in combination with the vapor phase infrared spectra provide for specific confirmation of each of the isomeric piperazines. The underivatized and perfluoroacyl derivative forms of the ring substituted benzylpiperazines were resolved on the polar stationary phase Rtx-200.

  2. Differentiation of methylenedioxybenzylpiperazines (MDBP) by GC-IRD and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hay, Karim M; Awad, Tamer; DeRuiter, Jack; Clark, C Randall

    2010-02-25

    The substituted benzylpiperazine, 3,4-methylenedioxybenzylpiperazine (3,4-MDBP) and its regioisomer 2,3-methylenedioxybenzylpiperazine (2,3-MDBP) have almost identical mass spectra. Perfluoroacylation of the secondary amine nitrogen of these regioisomeric piperazines gave mass spectra with differences in relative abundance of some fragment ions. However the spectra did not yield any unique fragments for specific identification of one regioisomer to the exclusion of the other compound. Gas chromatographic separation coupled with infrared detection (GC-IRD) provides direct confirmatory data for structural differentiation between the two regioisomers. The mass spectrum in combination with the vapor-phase infrared spectrum provides for specific confirmation of each of the regioisomeric piperazines. The underivatized and perfluoroacyl derivative forms of the ring substituted benzylpiperazines were resolved on a 30-m capillary column containing an Rxi-50 stationary phase.

  3. Using GC × GC-FID profiles to estimate the age of weathered gasoline samples.

    PubMed

    Zorzetti, Brianne M; Harynuk, James J

    2011-11-01

    Predicting the amount of time that a petroleum mixture has been exposed to weathering effects has applications in areas of environmental and other forensic investigations, such as aiding in determining the cause and intent of a fire. Historically, research on the evaporation rates of hydrocarbon mixtures has focused on forensic oil spill identification and predicting if a fresh sample could be weathered to give an observed composition in an aged sample. Relatively little attention has focused on approaching the problem from the other direction: estimating exposure time based on the observed composition of a weathered sample at a given time and assuming a prior composition. Here, we build upon our previous research into the weathering of model mixtures by extending our work to gasoline. Samples of gasoline with varying octane ratings and from several vendors were weathered under controlled conditions and their composition monitored over time by two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC). A variety of chemometric models were explored, including partial least squares (PLS), nonlinear PLS (PolyPLS) and locally weighted regression (LWR). A hierarchical application of multivariate techniques was able to predict the time for which a sample had been exposed to evaporative weathering. Partial least squares discriminant analysis could predict whether a sample was relatively fresh (<12 h exposure time) or highly weathered (>20 h exposure time). Subsequent regression models for these classes were evaluated for accuracy using the root mean square error of prediction. LWR was the most successful, whereby fresh and highly weathered samples were predicted to within 30 min and 5 h of exposure, respectively.

  4. Application of GC-FID and GC-MS for assessing PAHs in suspended dust.

    PubMed

    Weglarz, A; Skrok, R

    2000-07-01

    The social concern about polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is due to the awareness that several of them are carcinogens and are present in polluted air. Several epidemiological investigations have tried to assess the influence of air pollution on the incidence in the population (1). Some authors have suggest that 1-10% of the incidence of lung cancer is caused by air pollution (2, 3). Several sources, e.g. traffic, oil heating, wood stoves, industry may contribute PAHs to the air pollution. Therefore continuous air pollution control applying selective and precise analytical procedures is needed. The submitted work presents results of examination of sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [naphthalene, acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, dibenzo(a, h)anthracene, benzo(ghi)perylene] settled on particles of 10 microns fractions of ashes, emitted from industrial and communication sources. Samples of suspended dust were collected at twelve measuring points, from May to June 1998, in 24-hour cycles, in accordance with US EPA methodology. PAHs were extracted from suspended dust in a Soxhlet apparatus and then exposed to extraction in a liquid-solid system (solid extraction-SPE) to eliminate redundant pollution, which may interfere with compounds by determined analysis. Samples were then analyzed using by capillary gas chromatographs "Varian" model 3400 with FID and MS detectors. Results of analysis make it possible to determine the influence of industry and traffic on atmospheric pollution, to compare results of two analytical methods (GC-FID and GC-MS).

  5. The analysis of linear and monomethylalkanes in exhaled breath samples by GC×GC-FID and GC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Hengerics Szabó, Alexandra; Podolec, Peter; Ferenczy, Viktória; Kubinec, Róbert; Blaško, Jaroslav; Soják, Ladislav; Górová, Renáta; Addová, Gabriela; Ostrovský, Ivan; Višňovský, Jozef; Bierhanzl, Václav; Čabala, Radomír; Amann, Anton

    2015-01-26

    A new arrangement of the INCAT (inside needle capillary adsorption trap) device with Carbopack X and Carboxen 1000 as sorbent materials was applied for sampling, preconcentration and injection of C6C19n-alkanes and their monomethyl analogs in exhaled breath samples. For the analysis both GC-MS/MS and GC×GC-FID techniques were used. Identification of the analytes was based on standards, measured retention indices and selective SRM transitions of the individual isomers. The GC-MS/MS detection limits were in the range from 2.1 pg for n-tetradecane to 86 pg for 5-methyloctadecane. The GC×GC-FID detection limits ranged from 19 pg for n-dodecane to 110 pg for 3-methyloctane.

  6. Detection of virgin coconut oil adulteration with animal fats using quantitative cholesterol by GC × GC-TOF/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Baocheng; Li, Peiwu; Ma, Fei; Wang, Xiuping; Matthäus, Bertrand; Chen, Ran; Yang, Qingqing; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Qi

    2015-07-01

    A new method based on the cholesterol level was developed to detect the presence of animal fats in virgin coconut oil (VCO). In this study, the sterols in VCO and animal fats was separated using conventional one-dimensional gas chromatography (1D GC) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC). Compared with 1D GC, the GC×GC system could obtain a complete baseline separation of the sterol trimethylsilyl ethers derived from cholesterol and cholestanol, so that the cholesterol content in pure VCO and false VCO adulterated with animal fats could be accurately determined. Cholesterol, a main sterol found in animal fats, represented less than 5mg/kg of VCO. The study demonstrated that the determination of the cholesterol level in VCO could be used for reliable detection of the presence of lard, chicken fat, mutton tallow, beef tallow, or their mixture in VCO at a level as little as 0.25%.

  7. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  8. Rotating drum filter

    DOEpatents

    Anson, Donald

    1990-01-01

    A perforated drum (10) rotates in a coaxial cylindrical housing (18) having three circumferential ports (19,22,23), and an axial outlet (24) at one end. The axis (11) is horizontal. A fibrous filter medium (20) is fed through a port (19) on or near the top of the housing (81) by a distributing mechanism (36) which lays a uniform mat (26) of the desired thickness onto the rotating drum (10). This mat (26) is carried by the drum (10) to a second port (23) through which dirty fluid (13) enters. The fluid (13) passes through the filter (26) and the cleaned stream (16) exits through the open end (15) of the drum (10) and the axial port (24) in the housing (18). The dirty filter material (20) is carried on to a third port (22) near the bottom of the housing (18) and drops into a receiver (31) from which it is continuously removed, cleaned (30), and returned (32) to the charging port (36) at the top. To support the filter mat, the perforated cylinder may carry a series of tines (40), shaped blades (41), or pockets, so that the mat (26) will not fall from the drum (10) prematurely. To minimize risk of mat failure, the fluid inlet port (23) may be located above the horizontal centerline (11).

  9. Digital hum filtering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knapp, R.W.; Anderson, N.L.

    1994-01-01

    Data may be overprinted by a steady-state cyclical noise (hum). Steady-state indicates that the noise is invariant with time; its attributes, frequency, amplitude, and phase, do not change with time. Hum recorded on seismic data usually is powerline noise and associated higher harmonics; leakage from full-waveform rectified cathodic protection devices that contain the odd higher harmonics of powerline frequencies; or vibrational noise from mechanical devices. The fundamental frequency of powerline hum may be removed during data acquisition with the use of notch filters. Unfortunately, notch filters do not discriminate signal and noise, attenuating both. They also distort adjacent frequencies by phase shifting. Finally, they attenuate only the fundamental mode of the powerline noise; higher harmonics and frequencies other than that of powerlines are not removed. Digital notch filters, applied during processing, have many of the same problems as analog filters applied in the field. The method described here removes hum of a particular frequency. Hum attributes are measured by discrete Fourier analysis, and the hum is canceled from the data by subtraction. Errors are slight and the result of the presence of (random) noise in the window or asynchrony of the hum and data sampling. Error is minimized by increasing window size or by resampling to a finer interval. Errors affect the degree of hum attenuation, not the signal. The residual is steady-state hum of the same frequency. ?? 1994.

  10. The microstrip wideband filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodenkov, S. A.; Belyaev, B. A.; Balva, Ya F.; Aplesnin, S. S.; Bandurina, O. N.

    2016-11-01

    The filter of high frequency-selective properties is developed. The central six-mode resonator of the design which can be used in the aerospace equipment is electromagnetically connected with six single-mode resonators. The good agreement of the calculated data in comparison with the data received on the experimental model of a design is shown.

  11. Ozone decomposing filter

    SciTech Connect

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.; Whinnery, L.L. Jr.

    1999-11-02

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  12. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  13. Digital transversal filter architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberger, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    A fast and efficient architecture is described for the realization of a pipelined, fully parallel digital transversal filter in VLSI. The order of summation is changed such that no explicit multiplication is seen, gated accumulators are used, and the coefficients are circulated. Estimates for the number of transistors needed for a CMOS implementation are given.

  14. Filter Component Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced particulate filtration systems are currently being developed at Westinghouse for use in both coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems. To date, Westinghouse has demonstrated 5855 hours of successful operation of first generation monolithic filter elements in PFBC applications when ash bridging or process thermal transient excursions are avoided. Alternate advanced monolithic and second generation fiber reinforced, filament wound and vacuum infiltrated filters are also being developed which are considered to have enhanced high temperature creep resistance, improved fracture toughness, or enhanced thermal shock characteristics, respectively. Mechanical and component fabrication improvements, as well as degradation mechanisms for each filter element have been identified by Westinghouse during exposure to simulated PFBC operating conditions and alkali-containing steam/air environments. Additional effort is currently being focused on determining the stability of the advanced monolithic high temperature creep resistant clay bonded silicon carbide (SiC) materials, alumina/mullite, and chemically vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC materials during operation in the Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filtration (W-APF) system at Foster Wheeler`s pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion (PCFBC) test facility in Karhula, Finland. Select advanced filter materials are being defined for additional long-term exposure in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) gas streams. The results of these efforts are summarized in this paper. 6 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Ozone decomposing filter

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy L.

    1999-01-01

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  16. Filter Sensing Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Sappok, Alex; Herman, Andrew; Parks, Jim; Prikhodko, Vitaly

    2016-07-21

    Leaders from Filter Sensing Technologies, CTS Corporation, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory discuss how a small business developed an award-winning diesel emissions control sensor with support from the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and researchers at ORNL’s National Transportation Research Center.

  17. Filter Sensing Technologies

    ScienceCinema

    Sappok, Alex; Herman, Andrew; Parks, Jim; Prikhodko, Vitaly

    2016-10-19

    Leaders from Filter Sensing Technologies, CTS Corporation, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory discuss how a small business developed an award-winning diesel emissions control sensor with support from the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and researchers at ORNL’s National Transportation Research Center.

  18. Foam For Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Like nature's honeycomb, foam is a structure of many-sided cells, apparently solid but actually only three percent material and 97 percent air. Foam is made by a heat-producing chemical reaction which expands a plastic material in a manner somewhat akin to the heat-induced rising of a loaf of bread. The resulting structure of interconnected cells is flexible yet strong and extremely versatile in applicati6n. Foam can, for example, be a sound absorber in one form, while in another it allows sound to pass through it. It can be a very soft powder puff material and at the same time a highly abrasive scrubber. A sampling of foam uses includes stereo speaker grilles, applying postage meter ink, filtering lawnmower carburetor air; deadening noise in trucks and tractors, applying cosmetics, releasing fabric softener and antistatic agents in home clothes dryers, painting, filtering factory heating and ventilating systems, shining shoes, polishing cars, sponge-mopping floors, acting as pre-operative surgical scrubbers-the list is virtually limitless. The process by which foam is made produces "windows," thin plastic membranes connecting the cell walls. Windowed foam is used in many applications but for certain others-filtering, for example-it is desirable to have a completely open network. Scott Paper Company's Foam Division, Chester, Pennsylvania, improved a patented method of "removing the windows," to create an open structure that affords special utility in filtering applications. NASA technology contributed to Scott's improvement.

  19. Immunotherapy of HIV-infected patients with Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Ushijima, Naofumi; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of HIV-infected patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from HIV-infected cells. Therefore, macrophages of HIV-infected patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Since Nagalase is the intrinsic component of the envelope protein gp120, serum Nagalase activity is the sum of enzyme activities carried by both HIV virions and envelope proteins. These Nagalase carriers were already complexed with anti-HIV immunoglobulin G (IgG) but retained Nagalase activity that is required for infectivity. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF), which produces no side effects in humans. Macrophages activated by administration of 100 ng GcMAF develop a large amount of Fc-receptors as well as an enormous variation of receptors that recognize IgG-bound and unbound HIV virions. Since latently HIV-infected cells are unstable and constantly release HIV virions, the activated macrophages rapidly intercept the released HIV virions to prevent reinfection resulting in exhaustion of infected cells. After less than 18 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF for nonanemic patients, they exhibited low serum Nagalase activities equivalent to healthy controls, indicating eradication of HIV-infection, which was also confirmed by no infectious center formation by provirus inducing agent-treated patient PBMCs. No recurrence occurred and their healthy CD + cell counts were maintained for 7 years.

  20. INTERIOR VIEW OF FILTER WHEEL MACHINE USED TO FILTER OUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF FILTER WHEEL MACHINE USED TO FILTER OUT AND SEPARATE BICARBONATE FROM AMMONIONATED BRINE. DISCHARGE FROM STRIPPER COLUMNS (SOLVAY COLUMNS). - Solvay Process Company, SA Wetside Building, Between Willis & Milton Avenue, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  1. Filter assembly for metallic and intermetallic tube filters

    DOEpatents

    Alvin, Mary Anne; Lippert, Thomas E.; Bruck, Gerald J.; Smeltzer, Eugene E.

    2001-01-01

    A filter assembly (60) for holding a filter element (28) within a hot gas cleanup system pressure vessel is provided, containing: a filter housing (62), said filter housing having a certain axial length and having a peripheral sidewall, said sidewall defining an interior chamber (66); a one piece, all metal, fail-safe/regenerator device (68) within the interior chamber (66) of the filter housing (62) and/or extending beyond the axial length of the filter housing, said device containing an outward extending radial flange (71) within the filter housing for seating an essential seal (70), the device also having heat transfer media (72) disposed inside and screens (80) for particulate removal; one compliant gasket (70) positioned next to and above the outward extending radial flange of the fail-safe/regenerator device; and a porous metallic corrosion resistant superalloy type filter element body welded at the bottom of the metal fail-safe/regenerator device.

  2. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: COLLOID POLISHING FILTER METHOD - FILTER FLOW TECHNOLOGY, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Filter Flow Technology, Inc. (FFT) Colloid Polishing Filter Method (CPFM) was tested as a transportable, trailer mounted, system that uses sorption and chemical complexing phenomena to remove heavy metals and nontritium radionuclides from water. Contaminated waters can be pro...

  3. Optically bistable interference filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weiting

    1990-07-01

    In general the temperature dependence of refractive index of coating materials is usually small. The most notable exception being the lead telluride. Thinfilm filters made of PbTe possess anomalously high nortlinearily in refractive index. We have investigated the phenomenon theoretically and experimexitally. 2 . BISTABLE CHARACTERISTICS OF INTERFERENCE FILTERS It can be proved that the transmittance and reflectance of a twin-cavity NLIF which consists of two F-B filters coupled by a single low-index are given by 2 a(1r1 )(1-r0) T --i. -. (1) -d (1r01) (1r12) (1-i-Fsin 4)(1+sin p) where a r01 F . Te phase change of the cavity 0 IS 2r0dnAI0D (2) 2k5dT 1k where the absorbtance A 00 the initial detunning of fresonance and the first term on the right side of the equation(1)-(2) the output characteristics of the NLIF can be calculated. 3 . EXPERIMENTAL CASE The interference filters suggested to be used in my research will be made by vacuum deposition with a thermal source. The filters will be made according to the prescripti The dominant mechanism responsible for d(nhl) must be the change in the refractive index. A low limit on the OB switch-on time is found to be O. 35us and switch-off time is 5. 5us. 4. REFERENCES 1. W. T. Feng " Temperature effects on properties of zinc selenide and lead telluride" to be published in Infrared Physics. 2. H. S. Carslaw Conduction

  4. Aroma active components in aqueous kiwi fruit essence and kiwi fruit puree by GC-MS and multidimensional GC/GC-O.

    PubMed

    Jordán, María J; Margaría, Carlos A; Shaw, Philip E; Goodner, Kevin L

    2002-09-11

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and multidimensional gas chromatography olfactometry (GC/GC-O) were utilized to study the aroma profile and the aroma active components of commercial kiwi essence and the initial fresh fruit puree. Totals of 29 and 33 components were identified and quantified in the essence and the puree, respectively. Ten components were quantified for the first time as constituents of the kiwi fruit including 3-penten-2-ol, 3-hydroxy-2-butanone, 3-methyl-2-butenal, 2-hexanol, nonanal, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-2-butanone, 3-methyl 3-buten-2-one, and octane. Analysis of these samples by multidimensional gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) allowed for the identification of >80% of the aroma active components present at level traces in this fruit. A total of 35 components appear to contribute to the aroma of kiwi fresh puree and its aqueous essence. Components described for the first time as constituents of the aroma profile in this fruit were 2-ethylfuran, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-cyclohexen-1-one, (E,E)-2,6-nonadienal, diethyl succinate, and hexyl hexanoate.

  5. OPTIMIZATION OF ADVANCED FILTER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Newby; M.A. Alvin; G.J. Bruck; T.E. Lippert; E.E. Smeltzer; M.E. Stampahar

    2002-06-30

    Two advanced, hot gas, barrier filter system concepts have been proposed by the Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation to improve the reliability and availability of barrier filter systems in applications such as PFBC and IGCC power generation. The two hot gas, barrier filter system concepts, the inverted candle filter system and the sheet filter system, were the focus of bench-scale testing, data evaluations, and commercial cost evaluations to assess their feasibility as viable barrier filter systems. The program results show that the inverted candle filter system has high potential to be a highly reliable, commercially successful, hot gas, barrier filter system. Some types of thin-walled, standard candle filter elements can be used directly as inverted candle filter elements, and the development of a new type of filter element is not a requirement of this technology. Six types of inverted candle filter elements were procured and assessed in the program in cold flow and high-temperature test campaigns. The thin-walled McDermott 610 CFCC inverted candle filter elements, and the thin-walled Pall iron aluminide inverted candle filter elements are the best candidates for demonstration of the technology. Although the capital cost of the inverted candle filter system is estimated to range from about 0 to 15% greater than the capital cost of the standard candle filter system, the operating cost and life-cycle cost of the inverted candle filter system is expected to be superior to that of the standard candle filter system. Improved hot gas, barrier filter system availability will result in improved overall power plant economics. The inverted candle filter system is recommended for continued development through larger-scale testing in a coal-fueled test facility, and inverted candle containment equipment has been fabricated and shipped to a gasifier development site for potential future testing. Two types of sheet filter elements were procured and assessed in the program

  6. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Durability-Composition Models and the Applicability of the Associated Reduction of Constraints (ROC) Criteria for High TiO2 Containing Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C. M.; Edwards, T. B.; Trivelpiece, C. L.

    2016-08-30

    Radioactive high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the DWPF since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it has been poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than relying on statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to determine, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository. The DWPF SPC system is known as the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). One of the process models within PCCS is known as the Thermodynamic Hydration Energy Reaction MOdel (THERMO™). The DWPF will soon be receiving increased concentrations of TiO2-, Na2O-, and Cs2O-enriched wastes from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The SWPF has been built to pretreat the high-curie fraction of the salt waste to be removed from the HLW tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms at the SRS. In order to validate the existing TiO2 term in THERMO™ beyond 2.0 wt% in the DWPF, new durability data were developed over the target range of 2.00 to 6.00 wt% TiO2 and evaluated against the 1995 durability model. The durability was measured by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. This study documents the adequacy of the existing THERMO™ terms. It is recommended that the modified THERMO™ durability models and

  7. cDNA-based gene mapping and GC3 profiling in the soft-shelled turtle suggest a chromosomal size-dependent GC bias shared by sauropsids.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Ishijima, Junko; Nishida-Umehara, Chizuko; Agata, Kiyokazu; Kuratani, Shigeru; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian and avian genomes comprise several classes of chromosomal segments that vary dramatically in GC-content. Especially in chicken, microchromosomes exhibit a higher GC-content and a higher gene density than macrochromosomes. To understand the evolutionary history of the intra-genome GC heterogeneity in amniotes, it is necessary to examine the equivalence of this GC heterogeneity at the nucleotide level between these animals including reptiles, from which birds diverged. We isolated cDNAs for 39 protein-coding genes from the Chinese soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis, and performed chromosome mapping of 31 genes. The GC-content of exonic third positions (GC3) of P. sinensis genes showed a heterogeneous distribution, and exhibited a significant positive correlation with that of chicken and human orthologs, indicating that the last common ancestor of extant amniotes had already established a GC-compartmentalized genomic structure. Furthermore, chromosome mapping in P. sinensis revealed that microchromosomes tend to contain more GC-rich genes than GC-poor genes, as in chicken. These results illustrate two modes of genome evolution in amniotes: mammals elaborated the genomic configuration in which GC-rich and GC-poor regions coexist in individual chromosomes, whereas sauropsids (reptiles and birds) refined the chromosomal size-dependent GC compartmentalization in which GC-rich genomic fractions tend to be confined to microchromosomes.

  8. Assessment of ceramic membrane filters

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.; Im, K.H.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this project include the development of analytical models for evaluating the fluid mechanics of membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters, and to determine the effects of thermal and thermo-chemical aging on the material properties of emerging ceramic hot gas filters. A honeycomb cordierite monolith with a thin ceramic coating and a rigid candle filter were evaluated.

  9. Quick-change filter cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, John C.; McFarland, Andrew R.; Ortiz, Carlos A.

    1995-01-01

    A quick-change filter cartridge. In sampling systems for measurement of airborne materials, a filter element is introduced into the sampled airstream such that the aerosol constituents are removed and deposited on the filter. Fragile sampling media often require support in order to prevent rupture during sampling, and careful mounting and sealing to prevent misalignment, tearing, or creasing which would allow the sampled air to bypass the filter. Additionally, handling of filter elements may introduce cross-contamination or exposure of operators to toxic materials. Moreover, it is desirable to enable the preloading of filter media into quick-change cartridges in clean laboratory environments, thereby simplifying and expediting the filter-changing process in the field. The quick-change filter cartridge of the present invention permits the application of a variety of filter media in many types of instruments and may also be used in automated systems. The cartridge includes a base through which a vacuum can be applied to draw air through the filter medium which is located on a porous filter support and held there by means of a cap which forms an airtight seal with the base. The base is also adapted for receiving absorbing media so that both particulates and gas-phase samples may be trapped for investigation, the latter downstream of the aerosol filter.

  10. Drive Diagnostic Filter Wheel Control

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlich, D.

    2007-07-17

    DrD Filter Wheel Control is National Instrument's Labview software that drives a Drive Diagnostic filter wheel. The software can drive the filter wheel between each end limit, detect the positive and negative limit and each home position and post the stepper motot values to an Excel spreadsheet. The software can also be used to cycle the assembly between the end limits.

  11. Drilling fluid filter

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Garner, Kory

    2007-01-23

    A drilling fluid filter for placement within a bore wall of a tubular drill string component comprises a perforated receptacle with an open end and a closed end. A hanger for engagement with the bore wall is mounted at the open end of the perforated receptacle. A mandrel is adjacent and attached to the open end of the perforated receptacle. A linkage connects the mandrel to the hanger. The linkage may be selected from the group consisting of struts, articulated struts and cams. The mandrel operates on the hanger through the linkage to engage and disengage the drilling fluid filter from the tubular drill string component. The mandrel may have a stationary portion comprising a first attachment to the open end of the perforated receptacle and a telescoping adjustable portion comprising a second attachment to the linkage. The mandrel may also comprise a top-hole interface for top-hole equipment.

  12. Dichroic ultraviolet light filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocher, Christoph; Weder, Christoph; Smith, Paul

    2003-10-01

    With the intention to produce dichroic filters for use in photoluminescent systems that rely on polarized UV light, we synthesized a number of linear, dichroic dyes, which absorb mainly in the near-UV range of the electromagnetic spectrum. These dyes were designed for compatibility with common thermoplastic polymers such as linear low-density poly(ethylene), poly(ethylene terephthalate), and polyamide-12. Films of these host polymers that consisted of 0.2% by weight of various dichroic UV dyes were produced by common melt-processing schemes. Uniaxial drawing of these films yielded highly dichroic UV filters with dichroic ratios in absorption that in some cases exceeded 100. The fact that these free-standing films display little or no coloration and are environmentally stable makes them useful for various applications that involve generation of polarized UV light.

  13. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  14. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  15. Tunable Microwave Transversal Filters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER AFOSR-TR. 84-0977 S4. TI TLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYP ?FE&T&PEO OEE U!NABLE MICROWAVE TRANSVERSAL FILTERS...this goal through magnetostatic waves MSW propagating at microwave frequency in magnetically biased, liquid phase epitaxial films of yttrium iron...garnet (YIG) grown on gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG). This technology has a number of advantages; low loss (greater than 30db/usec at xband), tunable by

  16. Regenerable particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Stuecker, John N.; Cesarano, III, Joseph; Miller, James E.

    2009-05-05

    A method of making a three-dimensional lattice structure, such as a filter used to remove particulates from a gas stream, where the physical lattice structure is designed utilizing software simulation from pre-defined mass transfer and flow characteristics and the designed lattice structure is fabricated using a free-form fabrication manufacturing technique, where the periodic lattice structure is comprised of individual geometric elements.

  17. Digital Filter Design Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    McClellan, and the Minimum p - Error IIR Filter Design Method of Deczky. Acceso Fo S CRA&!I DIC TAd [8 13v i . , . a.- II **’. . ’uaJI r -TABLE OF ,CONTENT...NFILT-- FILTE LENGTH C dUYPE-- TYPE OF FILIP C I MULTIPLE PASSbAND/STOPHASZ P11151 C =DIYFEZlNTIATCP C 3 HILBEET DANSFCRZ PELTE2 C NiANDS-- NUEBEi Of

  18. Improvement in birefringent filters. IV - The alternate partial polarizer filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    The design and performance of a birefringent filter with alternate partial polarizers are analyzed. The properties of several filter configurations with imperfect intermediate polarizers are examined. It is shown that such filters have significant advantages in transmission and profile shape over both the standard Lyot and the contrast element Lyot filters. These theoretical advantages are demonstrated by the measured properties of an actual filter using the alternate partial polarizer (APP) design. This filter is a four-module eight-crystal APP device which has been built using Polaroid HN-38 for the perfect polarizers and two laminated sheets of HN-55 for the partial polarizers. The measured characteristics of the filter are found to be in good agreement with theory.

  19. Carbon nanotube filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  20. Binomial Gaussian mixture filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitoharju, Matti; Ali-Löytty, Simo; Piché, Robert

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present a novel method for approximating a normal distribution with a weighted sum of normal distributions. The approximation is used for splitting normally distributed components in a Gaussian mixture filter, such that components have smaller covariances and cause smaller linearization errors when nonlinear measurements are used for the state update. Our splitting method uses weights from the binomial distribution as component weights. The method preserves the mean and covariance of the original normal distribution, and in addition, the resulting probability density and cumulative distribution functions converge to the original normal distribution when the number of components is increased. Furthermore, an algorithm is presented to do the splitting such as to keep the linearization error below a given threshold with a minimum number of components. The accuracy of the estimate provided by the proposed method is evaluated in four simulated single-update cases and one time series tracking case. In these tests, it is found that the proposed method is more accurate than other Gaussian mixture filters found in the literature when the same number of components is used and that the proposed method is faster and more accurate than particle filters.

  1. Digital matched filter ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magill, D. T.; Edwards, G.

    The architecture of a digital matched filter (DMF) and the selected technology used is described. The characteristics of the DMF ASIC are summarized in tabular form. Three architectures are considered for the implementation of a DMF ASIC. First, there is the conventional trapped delay line architecture which requires a large adder tree. The second architecture is the systolic array DMF which consists of a number of identical stages cascaded together. The third architecture is the bank-of-correlators DMF, in which the reference code is recirculated around through the delay line. Since the objective is to maximize the length of the DMF, the tapped delay line architecture is selected. The tapped delay form is designed to support BPSK, QPSK, and OQPSK chip modulation. Matched filter lengths of up to 256 chips can be supported by cascading 4 ASICs. The DMF is designed as a gate array using an advanced double metal, 1.5 micron CMOS process. The regularity of FIR filter architecture allows the core of the device to be laid out very compactly, resulting in efficient usage of the gate array.

  2. Carbon nanotube filters.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Srivastava, O N; Talapatra, S; Vajtai, R; Ajayan, P M

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus ( approximately 25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  3. Differentiation of methylbenzylpiperazines (MBPs) and benzoylpiperazine (BNZP) using GC-MS and GC-IRD.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hay, Karim M; DeRuiter, Jack; Clark, C Randall

    2012-06-01

    Three-ring substituted methylbenzylpiperazines (MBPs) and their isobaric benzoylpiperazine (BNZP) have equal mass and many common mass spectral fragment ions. The mass spectrum of BNZP yields a unique benzoyl-group containing fragment at m/z 122 and an additional major fragment at m/z 69 that allows its discrimination from the three MBP regioisomers. Perfluoroacylation of the secondary amine nitrogen of these isomeric piperazines gave mass spectra with differences in relative abundance of some fragment ions but acylation does not alter the fragmentation pathway and did not provide additional MS fragments of discrimination among these isomers. Gas chromatography coupled with infrared detection (GC-IRD) provides direct confirmatory data for the structural differentiation between the four isomers. The mass spectra in combination with the vapour phase IR spectra provide for specific confirmation of each of the isomeric piperazines. The underivatized and perfluoroacyl derivatives of these four piperazines were resolved on a stationary phase of 100% trifluoropropyl methyl polysiloxane (Rtx-200). Gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry provides an additional means of differentiating between the isobaric MBP and BNZP which have equivalent nominal masses but are different in their elemental composition and exact masses.

  4. GC-MS and GC-NPD Determination of Formaldehyde Dimethylhydrazone in Water Using SPME.

    PubMed

    Kenessov, Bulat; Sailaukhanuly, Yerbolat; Koziel, Jacek A; Carlsen, Lars; Nauryzbayev, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    Formaldehyde dimethylhydrazone (FADMH) is one of the important transformation products of residual rocket fuel 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (1,1-DMH). Thus, recent studies show that FADMH toxicity is comparable to that of undecomposed 1,1-DMH. In this study, a new method for quantification of FADMH in water based on solid phase microextraction (SPME) in combination with gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometric (MS) and nitrogen-phosphorus detection (NPD) is presented. Effects of SPME fiber coating type, extraction and desorption temperatures, extraction time, and pH on analyte recovery were studied. The optimized method used 65 micron polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene fiber coating for 1 min headspace extractions at 30 °C. Preferred pH and desorption temperature from the SPME fiber are >8.5 and 200 °C, respectively. Detection limits were estimated to be 1.5 and 0.5 μg L(-1) for MS and NPD, respectively. The method was applied to laboratory-scale experiments to quantify FADMH. Results indicate applicability for in situ sampling and analysis and possible first-time detection of free FADMH in water.

  5. Biochemical characterization of peptides from herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gC: loss of CNBr fragments from the carboxy terminus of truncated, secreted gC molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, G E; Coligan, J E; Holland, T C; Levine, M; Glorioso, J C; Nairn, R

    1984-01-01

    A biochemical characterization of peptides from herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein gC was carried out. We utilized simple micromethods, based on immunological isolation of biosynthetically radiolabeled gC, to obtain gC in pure form for biochemical study. CNBr fragments of gC were prepared, isolated, and characterized. These CNBr fragments were resolved into six peaks by chromatography on Sephacryl S-200 in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. Only three of the CNBr fragments contained carbohydrate side chains, as judged from the incorporation of [14C]glucosamine. Radiochemical microsequence analyses were carried out on the gC molecule and on each of the CNBr fragments of gC. A comparison of this amino acid sequence data with the amino acid sequence predicted from the DNA sequence of the gC gene showed that the first 25 residues of the predicted sequence are not present in the gC molecule isolated from infected cells and allowed alignment of the CNBr fragments in the gC molecule. Glycoprotein gC was also examined from three gC mutants, synLD70, gC-8, and gC-49. These mutants lack an immunoreactive envelope form of gC but produce a secreted, truncated gC gene product. Glycoprotein gC from cells infected with any of these gC- mutants was shown to have lost more than one CNBr fragment present in the wild-type gC molecule. The missing fragments included the one containing the putative transmembrane anchor sequence. Glycoprotein gC from the gC-8 mutant was also shown, by tryptic peptide map analysis, to have lost more than five major arginine-labeled tryptic peptides arginine-labeled tryptic peptides present in the wild-type gC molecule and to have gained a lysine-labeled tryptic peptide not present in wild-type gC. Images PMID:6092712

  6. GC-Based Techniques for Breath Analysis: Current Status, Challenges, and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingjun; Tang, Zhentao; Duan, Yixiang; Liu, Yong

    2016-07-03

    Breath analysis is a noninvasive diagnostic method that profiles a person's physical state by volatile organic compounds in the breath. It has huge potential in the field of disease diagnosis. In order to offer opportunities for practical applications, various GC-based techniques have been investigated for on-line breath analysis since GC is the most preferred technique for mixed gas separation. This article reviews the development of breath analysis and GC-based techniques in basic breath research, involving sampling methods, preconcentration methods, conventional GC-based techniques, and newly developed GC techniques for breath analysis. The combination of GC and newly developed detection techniques takes advantages of the virtues of each. In addition, portable GC or micro GC are poised to become field GC-based techniques in breath analysis. Challenges faced in GC-based techniques for breath analysis are discussed candidly. Effective cooperation of experts from different fields is urgent to promote the development of breath analysis.

  7. COBE experience with filter QUEST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filla, O.; Keat, J.; Chu, D.

    1991-01-01

    A gyro based filter variation on the standard QUEST attitude determination algorithm is applied to the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE). Filter QUEST is found to be three times as fast as the batch estimator and slightly more accurate than regular QUEST. Perhaps more important than its speed or accuracy is the fact that Filter QUEST can provide real time attitude solutions when regular QUEST cannot, due to lack of observability. Filter QUEST is also easy to use and adjust for the proper memory length. Suitable applications for Filter QUEST include coarse and real time attitude determination.

  8. Filtering information from human experts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendel, Max B.; Sheridan, Thomas B.

    1989-01-01

    The authors propose a model, or filter, for debiasing opinions from multiple experts and combining them into a single consistent estimate of some variable of interest. A distinguishing feature of the approach consists of making the calibration of experts an integral part of filtering. This enables the filter to learn from previous experience with the experts. The theoretical development takes a Bayesian perspective, using de Finetti's (1964) notion of exchangeability. Experimental results with a preliminary computer implementation of the filter show that its estimates are better than those from comparable filters that do not involve calibration.

  9. GC-MS and GC-IRD studies on dimethoxyphenethylamines (DMPEA): regioisomers related to 2,5-DMPEA.

    PubMed

    Maher, Hadir M; Awad, Tamer; DeRuiter, Jack; Clark, C Randall

    2012-01-01

    A series of regioisomeric dimethoxyphenethylamines have a mass spectra essentially equivalent to the drug substance 2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine (2,5-DMPEA). These substances have a molecular weight of 181, and major fragment ions in their electron ionization mass spectra at m/z 151/152. The trifluoroacetyl, pentafluoropropionyl, and heptafluorobutryl derivatives of these primary amines were prepared and evaluated by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection (GC-MS). The mass spectra for these derivatives do not show unique fragment ions to allow the specific identification of a particular isomer. Thus, GC-MS does not provide for the confirmation of identity of any one of the six isomers to the exclusion of the other five compounds. However, GC-MS does divide the compounds into two groups depending on the mass of the base peak. GC with infrared detection provides direct confirmatory data for the identification of 2,5-DMPEA from the other regioisomers involved in the study. Perfluoroacylated derivatives of the six regioisomeric dimethoxyphenethylamines were successfully resolved via capillary GC on a non-polar stationary phase consisting of 50% phenyl and 50% methyl polysiloxane (Rxi-50).

  10. In-service filter testing

    SciTech Connect

    Terada, K.; Woodard, R.W.; Jensen, R.T.

    1985-04-29

    This report contains the observations, test results, and conclusions of three separate in-service tests beginning in November 1979 and concluding in September 1983. The in-service tests described in this report produced encouraging results on filters constructed with fiberglass medium containing 5% Nomex and separators of aluminum foil coated with a thin film of vinyl-epoxy polymer. Filters containing medium with Kevlar fiber additives demonstrated they merited further evaluation. Other types of filters tested include separatorless filters (Flanders SuperFlow) and one filter with fiberglass separators. Asbestos-containing filters were used for comparison until their supply was exhausted. All filters tested were judged to have performed satisfactorily under the test conditions.

  11. Analytical Biases Associated with GC-Content in Molecular Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Romiguier, Jonathan; Roux, Camille

    2017-01-01

    Molecular evolution is being revolutionized by high-throughput sequencing allowing an increased amount of genome-wide data available for multiple species. While base composition summarized by GC-content is one of the first metrics measured in genomes, its genomic distribution is a frequently neglected feature in downstream analyses based on DNA sequence comparisons. Here, we show how base composition heterogeneity among loci and taxa can bias common molecular evolution analyses such as phylogenetic tree reconstruction, detection of natural selection and estimation of codon usage. We then discuss the biological, technical and methodological causes of these GC-associated biases and suggest approaches to overcome them. PMID:28261263

  12. Comparison of Aroma-Active Volatiles in Oolong Tea Infusions Using GC-Olfactometry, GC-FPD, and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Zhu, JianCai; Chen, Feng; Wang, LingYing; Niu, YunWei; Yu, Dan; Shu, Chang; Chen, HeXing; Wang, HongLin; Xiao, ZuoBing

    2015-09-02

    The aroma profile of oolong tea infusions (Dongdingwulong, DDWL; Tieguanyin, TGY; Dahongpao, DHP) were investigated in this study. Gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) with the method of aroma intensity (AI) was employed to investigate the aroma-active compounds in tea infusions. The results presented forty-three, forty-five, and forty-eight aroma-active compounds in the TGY, DHP, and DDWL infusions, including six, seven, and five sulfur compounds, respectively. In addition, the concentration of volatile compounds in the tea infusions was further quantitated by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography (SPME)-GC-MS and SPME-GC-flame photometric detection (FPD). Totally, seventy-six and thirteen volatile and sulfur compounds were detected in three types of tea infusions, respectively. Quantitative results showed that forty-seven aroma compounds were at concentrations higher than their corresponding odor thresholds. On the basis of the odor activity values (OAVs), 2-methylpropanal (OAV: 230-455), 3-methylbutanal (1-353), 2-methylbutanal (34-68), nerolidol (108-184), (E)-2-heptenal (148-294), hexanal (134-230), octanal (28-131), β-damascenone (29-59), indole (96-138), 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (34-67), (R)-(-)-linalool (63-87), and dimethyl sulfide (7-1320) presented relatively higher OAVs than those of other compounds, indicating the importance of these compounds in the overall aroma of tea infusions.

  13. GC/GC-MS analysis, isolation and identification of bioactive essential oil components from the Bhutanese medicinal plant, Pleurospermum amabile.

    PubMed

    Wangchuk, Phurpa; Keller, Paul A; Pyne, Stephen G; Taweechotipatr, Malai; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee

    2013-09-01

    We have hydrodistilled the essential oil (EO) from the aerial parts of the Bhutanese medicinal plant, Pleurospermum amabile using a Clevenger apparatus and evaluated this EO by GC/GC-MS and NMR analysis followed by testing for bioactivity. The GC-MS analysis identified 52 compounds with (E)-isomyristicin as a major component (32.2%). Repeated purification yielded four compounds; (E)-isomyristicin (1), (E)-isoapiol (2), methyl eugenol (3) and (E)-isoelemicin (4). Compound 2 and the mother EO showed the best antiplasmodial activity against the Plasmodium falciparum strains, TM4/8.2 (chloroquine and antifolate sensitive) and K1CB1 (multidrug resistant). They exhibited mild antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis. None of the test samples showed cytotoxicity.

  14. Differentiation of the regioisomeric 2-, 3-, and 4-trifluoromethylphenylpiperazines (TFMPP) by GC-IRD and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Maher, Hadir M; Awad, Tamer; Clark, C Randall

    2009-07-01

    Gas chromatography with infrared detection (GC-IRD) provides direct confirmatory data for the identification of the psychoactive designer drug 3-trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine (3-TFMPP) from the regioisomeric 2- and 4-trifluoromethylphenylpiperazines. These three regioisomeric substances are well resolved by GC and the vapor phase infrared spectra clearly differentiate among the three trifluoromethylphenyl substitution patterns. However, the mass spectra for the three regioisomeric 2-, 3-, and 4-trifluoromethylphenylpiperazines are identical and do not provide structural confirmation for one of the three isomers to the exclusion of the other two compounds. Perfluoroacylation of the secondary amine nitrogen for each of the three regioisomers was conducted in an effort to individualize their mass spectra. The resulting derivatives were resolved by GC and their mass spectra showed some differences in relative abundance of fragment ions without the appearance of any unique fragments for specific confirmation of structure.

  15. GC-MS and GC-IRD analysis of 2-, 3- and 4-methylmethamphetamine and 2-, 3- and 4-methylamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sean; Blakey, Karen; Rands-Trevor, Karen

    2012-07-10

    4-Methylmethamphetamine has been detected in samples submitted for analysis in several states throughout Australia. Six ring substituted methyl isomers of methamphetamine and amphetamine were synthesised and analysed. As the regioisomeric 2-, 3- and 4-methylmethamphetamine and 2-, 3- and 4-methylamphetamine have virtually identical mass spectra, the use of MS is an ineffective technique to discriminate between these closely related compounds. We set out to determine whether the regioisomers could be differentiated by a combination of GC-MS, acetyl derivatisation and GC-IRD. We demonstrate that the three isomers of methylmethamphetamine and methylamphetamine can be separated by GC, and a combination of acetyl derivatisation and vapour phase IR can identify the specific ring substituted compound.

  16. Comparison of GC-MS and GC-IRD methods for the differentiation of methamphetamine and regioisomeric substances.

    PubMed

    Awad, Tamer; Belal, Tarek; DeRuiter, Jack; Kramer, Kevin; Clark, C Randall

    2009-03-10

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-infrared detection (GC-IRD) methods were developed and compared for the differentiation of regioisomeric phenethylamines related to methamphetamine. There are a total of five regioisomeric phenethylamines (methamphetamine and four regioisomers) that produce essentially equivalent mass spectra. This unique set of five phenethylamines having the same molecular weight and elemental composition yield major mass spectral fragments at equivalent mass. The trifluoroacetyl derivatives of the primary and secondary amines yield characteristic individual fragment ions allowing structural differentiation among these regioisomers. The vapor phase infrared spectra generated via capillary gas chromatography differentiated among these compounds without the need for derivatization. The regioisomeric phenethylamines are well resolved by GC with the elution order generally determined by the degree of molecular linearity.

  17. GC and GC-MS analysis of the essential oil of Nepeta cilicica Boiss. ex Benth. from Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Formisano, Carmen; Rigano, Daniela; Arnold, Nelly Apostolides; Piozzi, Franco; Senatore, Felice

    2013-01-01

    The hydrodistillation of the aerial parts of Nepeta cilicica Boiss. ex Benth., collected in Lebanon in the Horsh Ehden reserve, yielded 0.13% (w/w) of essential oil. Gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectroscopy analysis enabled the identification of 75 compounds representing 96.8% of the total oil. The most abundant compounds were spathulenol (15.1%), hexadecanoic acid (14%), δ-cadinene (5.5%) and α-copaene (4.5%). On the whole, the oil was constituted mainly by sesquiterpenes (45.9%), among which sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (27.6%) slightly prevailed over oxygenated sesquiterpenes (18.3%).

  18. Air Sampling Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    General Metal Works' Accu-Vol is a high-volume air sampling system used by many government agencies to monitor air quality for pollution control purposes. Procedure prevents possible test-invalidating contamination from materials other than particulate pollutants, caused by manual handling or penetration of windblown matter during transit, a cassette was developed in which the filter is sealed within a metal frame and protected in transit by a snap-on aluminum cover, thus handled only under clean conditions in the laboratory.

  19. Advances in Collaborative Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, Yehuda; Bell, Robert

    The collaborative filtering (CF) approach to recommenders has recently enjoyed much interest and progress. The fact that it played a central role within the recently completed Netflix competition has contributed to its popularity. This chapter surveys the recent progress in the field. Matrix factorization techniques, which became a first choice for implementing CF, are described together with recent innovations. We also describe several extensions that bring competitive accuracy into neighborhood methods, which used to dominate the field. The chapter demonstrates how to utilize temporal models and implicit feedback to extend models accuracy. In passing, we include detailed descriptions of some the central methods developed for tackling the challenge of the Netflix Prize competition.

  20. Robust Kriged Kalman Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Baingana, Brian; Dall'Anese, Emiliano; Mateos, Gonzalo; Giannakis, Georgios B.

    2015-11-11

    Although the kriged Kalman filter (KKF) has well-documented merits for prediction of spatial-temporal processes, its performance degrades in the presence of outliers due to anomalous events, or measurement equipment failures. This paper proposes a robust KKF model that explicitly accounts for presence of measurement outliers. Exploiting outlier sparsity, a novel l1-regularized estimator that jointly predicts the spatial-temporal process at unmonitored locations, while identifying measurement outliers is put forth. Numerical tests are conducted on a synthetic Internet protocol (IP) network, and real transformer load data. Test results corroborate the effectiveness of the novel estimator in joint spatial prediction and outlier identification.

  1. Charcoal filter testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.

    1997-08-01

    In this very brief, informal presentation, a representative of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission outlines some problems with charcoal filter testing procedures and actions being taken to correct the problems. Two primary concerns are addressed: (1) the process to find the test method is confusing, and (2) the requirements of the reference test procedures result in condensation on the charcoal and causes the test to fail. To address these problems, emergency technical specifications were processed for three nuclear plants. A generic or an administrative letter is proposed as a more permanent solution. 1 fig.

  2. On Filtered Binary Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    BINARY PROCESSES 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) R.F. Pawula and S.O. Rice 13s. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED.!14 DATE OF REPORT MY,, o.. Day) 15. PAGE COUNT...APR EDITION OF I JAN 73 IS OBSOLETE. UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE eO R.TR. 85-0055 On Filtered Binary Processes R . F. Pawula ...is authorized to reproduce and distribute reprints for governmental purposes notwithstanding any copyright notation ",."/ hereon. R. F. Pawula is with

  3. Multilevel ensemble Kalman filtering

    DOE PAGES

    Hoel, Hakon; Law, Kody J. H.; Tempone, Raul

    2016-06-14

    This study embeds a multilevel Monte Carlo sampling strategy into the Monte Carlo step of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) in the setting of finite dimensional signal evolution and noisy discrete-time observations. The signal dynamics is assumed to be governed by a stochastic differential equation (SDE), and a hierarchy of time grids is introduced for multilevel numerical integration of that SDE. Finally, the resulting multilevel EnKF is proved to asymptotically outperform EnKF in terms of computational cost versus approximation accuracy. The theoretical results are illustrated numerically.

  4. Syntactic Polysulfide Degradation Observed by SPME GC/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, A L; Alviso, C; Harvey, C; Saab, A

    2005-03-09

    We have utilized SPME GC/MS to monitor the degradation of syntactic polysulfide in the presence of Viton A at elevated temperature. This approach allowed the identification of products from two distinct degradation mechanisms. Small-scale laboratory experiments of this type are directly applicable to gas sampling for enhanced surveillance.

  5. TPH measurements: The advantage of using GC/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, R.; MacMurphey, J.

    1997-12-31

    This study provides analytical data supporting the use of GC/MS to quantify TPH in environmental samples. Analysis of these data shows that there is no statistical difference between TPH values quantified using GC/MS and those derived from conventional TPH methods using GC/FID. Further, the GC/MS analysis used in this study is readily adaptable to most environmental laboratories currently performing the volatile and semi-volatile EPA analyses (i.e., 8260 and 8270, respectively; EPA SW 846). The strategic implications of this result are: (1) additional information (e.g., PAHs) often required when conducting a risk based assessment can be derived from pre-existing site assessment data, thereby decreasing the cost and time required to obtain the additional samples and analytical information; and (2) unique TPH distributions can be critically evaluated using mass spectral analysis in order to ascertain the nature and potential source of the compounds present in the TPH mixture. The later point can be crucial when specific sources and their distributions are unknown. The benefits of having MS data available on a routine basis seem to increase as a function of the size and the public profile of the project.

  6. HIGH SPEED GC/MS FOR AIR ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A high speed GC/MS system consisting of a gas chromatograph equipped with a narrow bandwidth injection accessory and using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer detector has been adapted for analysis of ambient whole air samples which have been collected in passivated canisters. ...

  7. Performance of the future MOMA GC-ITMS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, Noel; Buch, Arnaud; Veronica, Pinnick; Szopa, Cyril; Danell, Ryan; Van Amerom, Friso H. W.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Freissinet, Caroline; Arevalo, Ricardo; Stalport, Fabien; Getty, Stephanie; Coll, Patrice; Steinninger, Harald; Brinckerhoff, William; Mahaffy, Paul; Goesmann, Fred; Raulin, F.; Goetz, Walter; MOMA Team

    2016-10-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment aboard the future ExoMars mission will be the continuation of the SAM expirement aboard the Curiosity rover, with the search for the organic composition of the Mars surface. With ExoMars the sample will be extracted as deep as 2 meters below the martian surface to minimize effects of radiation and oxidation on organic materials. To analyze the wide range of organic composition (volatile and non-volatiles compounds) of the Martian soil MOMA is composed with an UV laser desorption / ionization (LDI) and a pyrolysis gas chromatography ion trap mass spectrometry (pyr-GC-ITMS). In order to analyze refractory organic compounds and chirality samples which undergo GC-ITMS analysis may be submitted to a derivatization process, consisting of the reaction of the sample components with specific reactants (MTBSTFA [1], DMF-DMA [2] or TMAH [3]).To optimize and test the performance of the GC-ITMS instrument we have performed several coupling tests campaigns between the GC, providing by the French team (LISA, LATMOS, CentraleSupelec), and the MS, providing by the US team (NASA, GSFC). Last campaign has been done with the ETU models which is similar to the flight model and which include the oven and the taping station providing by the German team (MPS).The results obtained demonstrate the current status of the end-to-end performance of the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry mode of operation.

  8. GC/MS determination of amines following exhaustive trifluoroacetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, J.S.; Green, J.B.; McWilliams, T.B.; Yu, S.K.T.

    1993-08-01

    An analytical method for trifluoroacetylation of aromatic amines and GC/MS of the resulting derivatives has been developed. The key feature of the method is its capability to differentiate d tertiary amines; since, using the conditions described in the report, most primary, secondary, an primary amines add two and secondary amines add one trifluoroacetyl group. In general, tertiary amines do not react. Since conventional trifluoroacetylation procedures introduce only a single trifluoroacetyl group into both primary and secondary aminess the procedure reported here improves GC/MS identification of the relatively large number of isomers of nitrogen compounds found in petroleum or similarly complex mixtures. For example, using exhaustive trifluoroacetylation, it is possible to differentiate isomeric forms of C{sub 9}H{sub 11}N (e.g., cyclohexenopyridines, aminoindans, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline and tetrahydroisoquinolines). Examples of the application of the method to petroleum and coal liquid products are provided. Because of the limited thermal stability of the derivatives of primary amines, the method is applicable only to distillates boiling below 370{degrees}C (700{degrees}F). To expedite utilization of the method by others, GC retention indices and relative GC/MS total ion current response factors for 102 trifluoroacetyl derivatives are included in the body of the report and their 70 ev mass spectra are reported in Appendix A.

  9. A new RACE method for extremely GC-rich genes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianzong; Jarvis, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) is widely utilized to determine the 5′- and 3′-terminal nucleotide sequences of genes. Many different RACE methods have been developed to meet various requirements, but none address the difficult problems that arise when trying to isolate the ends of extremely GC-rich genes. In this study, we found that we were unable to isolate the correct 5′ or 3′ ends of an insect gene, which appeared to include extremely GC-rich sequences, using current RACE methods. Thus, we developed a new RACE method that can be used for this purpose. This new method entails first strand cDNA synthesis at 70°C with Thermo-X™ reverse transcriptase in the presence of homoectoine, followed by a polymerase chain reaction with 98°C denaturation steps and Phusion™ DNA polymerase in the presence of 1M betaine and 5% DMSO. The use of these conditions yielded 5′- and 3′-RACE products that were about 80% GC over 213 and 162 bp, respectively, and included shorter, internal regions of 82–89% GC. PMID:16875657

  10. Catalytic pyrolysis-GC/MS of lignin from several sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignin from four different sources extracted by various methods were pyrolyzed at 650 degree C using analytical pyrolysis methods, py-GC/MS. Pyrolysis was carried out in the absence and presence of two heterogeneous catalysts , an acidic zeolite (HZSM-5) catalyst and a mixed metal oxide catalyst (Co...

  11. On the Interpretation of the CHC Factor Gc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Kees-Jan; Kievit, Rogier A.; Dolan, Conor; van der Maas, Han

    2011-01-01

    On the one hand, the factors Gf and Gc in the Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) model of intelligence are hypothesized to represent individual differences in unique psychological or biological capacities. On the other hand, they are interpreted as representing the theoretical variables fluid and crystallized intelligence in investment theory. With…

  12. Using GC-MS to Determine Relative Reactivity Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, R. Daniel, Jr.

    1995-08-01

    An undergraduate organic chemistry microscale experiment involving the monochlorination of methylcyclohexane using sulfuryl chloride and benzoyl peroxide is described. Simple GC-MS analysis of the product mixture allows students to calculate relative reactivity ratios for free-radical chlorination of primary, secondary, and tertiary carbons in methylcyclohexane.

  13. Localizing the impact of satellite radiance observations using a global group ensemble filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lili; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Whitaker, Jeffrey S.

    2016-06-01

    Assimilation of satellite radiances has been proven to have positive impacts on the forecast skill, especially for regions with sparse conventional observations. Localization is an essential component to effectively assimilate satellite radiances in ensemble Kalman filters with affordable ensemble sizes. However, localizing the impact of radiance observations is not straightforward, since their location and separation from grid point model variables are not well defined. A global group filter (GGF) is applied here to provide a theoretical estimate of vertical localization functions for radiance observations being assimilated for global numerical weather prediction. As an extension of the hierarchical ensemble filter, the GGF uses groups of climatological ensembles to provide an estimated localization function that reduces the erroneous increments due to ensemble correlation sampling error. Results from an idealized simulation with known background error covariances show that the GGF localization function is superior to the optimal Gaspari and Cohn (GC) localization function. When the GGF is applied to the AMSU-A radiances, it can provide different localization functions for different channels, which indicates the complexity and large computational cost of tuning the localization scales for radiance observations. The GC, GGF, and fitted GGF (FGGF) localization functions are compared using experiments with the NCEP GFS and the NOAA operational EnKF. Verifications relative to the conventional observations, AMSU-A radiances, and the ECMWF analyses show that the GGF and FGGF have smaller errors than GC except in the tropics, and the advantages of the GGF and FGGF persist through 120 h forecast lead time.

  14. Anisotropic Total Variation Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Grasmair, Markus; Lenzen, Frank

    2010-12-15

    Total variation regularization and anisotropic filtering have been established as standard methods for image denoising because of their ability to detect and keep prominent edges in the data. Both methods, however, introduce artifacts: In the case of anisotropic filtering, the preservation of edges comes at the cost of the creation of additional structures out of noise; total variation regularization, on the other hand, suffers from the stair-casing effect, which leads to gradual contrast changes in homogeneous objects, especially near curved edges and corners. In order to circumvent these drawbacks, we propose to combine the two regularization techniques. To that end we replace the isotropic TV semi-norm by an anisotropic term that mirrors the directional structure of either the noisy original data or the smoothed image. We provide a detailed existence theory for our regularization method by using the concept of relaxation. The numerical examples concluding the paper show that the proposed introduction of an anisotropy to TV regularization indeed leads to improved denoising: the stair-casing effect is reduced while at the same time the creation of artifacts is suppressed.

  15. Partial polarizer filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A birefringent filter module comprises, in seriatum. (1) an entrance polarizer, (2) a first birefringent crystal responsive to optical energy exiting the entrance polarizer, (3) a partial polarizer responsive to optical energy exiting the first polarizer, (4) a second birefringent crystal responsive to optical energy exiting the partial polarizer, and (5) an exit polarizer. The first and second birefringent crystals have fast axes disposed + or -45 deg from the high transmitivity direction of the partial polarizer. Preferably, the second crystal has a length 1/2 that of the first crystal and the high transmitivity direction of the partial polarizer is nine times as great as the low transmitivity direction. To provide tuning, the polarizations of the energy entering the first crystal and leaving the second crystal are varied by either rotating the entrance and exit polarizers, or by sandwiching the entrance and exit polarizers between pairs of half wave plates that are rotated relative to the polarizers. A plurality of the filter modules may be cascaded.

  16. Nanoparticle optical notch filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasinadhuni, Pradeep Kumar

    Developing novel light blocking products involves the design of a nanoparticle optical notch filter, working on the principle of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). These light blocking products can be used in many applications. One such application is to naturally reduce migraine headaches and light sensitivity. Melanopsin ganglion cells present in the retina of the human eye, connect to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN-the body's clock) in the brain, where they participate in the entrainment of the circadian rhythms. As the Melanopsin ganglion cells are involved in triggering the migraine headaches in photophobic patients, it is necessary to block the part of visible spectrum that activates these cells. It is observed from the action potential spectrum of the ganglion cells that they absorb light ranging from 450-500nm (blue-green part) of the visible spectrum with a λmax (peak sensitivity) of around 480nm (blue line). Currently prescribed for migraine patients is the FL-41 coating, which blocks a broad range of wavelengths, including wavelengths associated with melanopsin absorption. The nanoparticle optical notch filter is designed to block light only at 480nm, hence offering an effective prescription for the treatment of migraine headaches.

  17. Is chondroitin sulfate responsible for the biological effects attributed to the GC protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF)?

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Marco; Reinwald, Heinz; Pacini, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesize that a plasma glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate, may be responsible for the biological and clinical effects attributed to the Gc protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF), a protein that is extracted from human blood. Thus, Gc protein binds chondroitin sulfate on the cell surface and such an interaction may occur also in blood, colostrum and milk. This interpretation would solve the inconsistencies encountered in explaining the effects of GcMAF in vitro and in vivo. According to our model, the Gc protein or the GcMAF bind to chondroitin sulfate both on the cell surface and in bodily fluids, and the resulting multimolecular complexes, under the form of oligomers trigger a transmembrane signal or, alternatively, are internalized and convey the signal directly to the nucleus thus eliciting the diverse biological effects observed for both GcMAF and chondroitin sulfate.

  18. Spatial filters for high average power lasers

    DOEpatents

    Erlandson, Alvin C

    2012-11-27

    A spatial filter includes a first filter element and a second filter element overlapping with the first filter element. The first filter element includes a first pair of cylindrical lenses separated by a first distance. Each of the first pair of cylindrical lenses has a first focal length. The first filter element also includes a first slit filter positioned between the first pair of cylindrical lenses. The second filter element includes a second pair of cylindrical lenses separated by a second distance. Each of the second pair of cylindrical lenses has a second focal length. The second filter element also includes a second slit filter positioned between the second pair of cylindrical lenses.

  19. Note: Cryogenic coaxial microwave filters

    SciTech Connect

    Tancredi, G.; Meeson, P. J.; Schmidlin, S.

    2014-02-15

    The careful filtering of microwave electromagnetic radiation is critical for controlling the electromagnetic environment for experiments in solid-state quantum information processing and quantum metrology at millikelvin temperatures. We describe the design and fabrication of a coaxial filter assembly and demonstrate that its performance is in excellent agreement with theoretical modelling. We further perform an indicative test of the operation of the filters by making current-voltage measurements of small, underdamped Josephson junctions at 15 mK.

  20. Multi-filter spectrophotometry simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, Kim A. S.; Gibson, Brad K.; Hickson, Paul

    1993-01-01

    To complement both the multi-filter observations of quasar environments described in these proceedings, as well as the proposed UBC 2.7 m Liquid Mirror Telescope (LMT) redshift survey, we have initiated a program of simulated multi-filter spectrophotometry. The goal of this work, still very much in progress, is a better quantitative assessment of the multiband technique as a viable mechanism for obtaining useful redshift and morphological class information from large scale multi-filter surveys.

  1. Coated x-ray filters

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, Peter A.

    1992-11-24

    A radiation filter for filtering radiation beams of wavelengths within a preselected range of wavelengths comprises a radiation transmissive substrate and an attenuating layer deposited on the substrate. The attenuating layer may be deposited by a sputtering process or a vacuum process. Beryllium may be used as the radiation transmissive substrate. In addition, a second radiation filter comprises an attenuating layer interposed between a pair of radiation transmissive layers.

  2. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, T. M.; Yin, B.; Alvarez, L. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters on infrared and blue transitions of some alkali atoms is calculated. A composite system is designed to further increase the background noise rejection. The measured results of the solar background rejection and image quality through the filter are presented. The results show that the filter may provide high transmission and high background noise rejection with excellent image quality.

  3. Phenotype differentiation of three E. coli strains by GC-FID and GC-MS based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Shi, Chunyun; Gao, Peng; Yuan, Kailong; Yang, Dawei; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2008-08-15

    Two mutants of E. coli with deletion of sdhAB and ackA-pta genes respectively and their wild-type strains were subjected to gas chromatography-flame-ionization detection (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolomics analysis. Intracellular metabolites of the three strains were profiled by GC-FID firstly. Methodological evaluation of the employed platform indicated that the limit of detection ranges were from 0.2 to 12.5 ng for some representative metabolites and the corresponding recoveries were varied from 68.7 to 122.7%. Secondly, multivariable data analysis was applied to the acquired data sets. As expected, the three phenotypes could be easily differentiated, and the perturbed metabolite pools in the genetically modified strains were screened. Lastly, the metabolites playing key roles in the differentiation were further identified by GC-MS. It was confirmed that succinic acid and aspartic acid were similarly affected in the modified strains. But proline content was altered contrarily. Additionally, deletion of sdhAB gene also affected the growth property of relevant mutant greatly. The potential mechanism was postulated accordingly.

  4. Odor-active compounds in cooked rice cultivars from Camargue (France) analyzed by GC-O and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Maraval, Isabelle; Mestres, Christian; Pernin, Karine; Ribeyre, Fabienne; Boulanger, Renaud; Guichard, Elisabeth; Gunata, Ziya

    2008-07-09

    Volatile compounds of cooked rice from scented (Aychade, Fidji) and nonscented (Ruille) cultivars grown in the Camargue area in France were compared to that of a marketed Asian scented one (Thai) by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). GC-O analyses of the organic extracts resulted in the perception of 40 odorous compounds. Only two compounds, oct-1-en-3-one and 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, were almost always perceived. Hierarchical cluster analysis showed that most of the difference between rice odors was linked to quantitative differences with only 11 compounds being specific to some of the rice. Sixty compounds were identified and quantified by GC-MS, including a few new odor-active components. Principal component analysis enabled us to differentiate scented cultivars from a nonscented one, and scented rice cultivars from Camargue from a Thai sample. Calculated odor-active values evidenced that the Thai sample odor differed from that of scented Camargue cultivars because of the degradation of lipids and of cinnamic acid compounds.

  5. Optimization of integrated polarization filters.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J

    2014-10-01

    This study reports on the design of small footprint, integrated polarization filters based on engineered photonic lattices. Using a rods-in-air lattice as a basis for a TE filter and a holes-in-slab lattice for the analogous TM filter, we are able to maximize the degree of polarization of the output beams up to 98% with a transmission efficiency greater than 75%. The proposed designs allow not only for logical polarization filtering, but can also be tailored to output an arbitrary transverse beam profile. The lattice configurations are found using a recently proposed parallel tabu search algorithm for combinatorial optimization problems in integrated photonics.

  6. Spatial filtering with photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maigyte, Lina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-03-15

    Photonic crystals are well known for their celebrated photonic band-gaps—the forbidden frequency ranges, for which the light waves cannot propagate through the structure. The frequency (or chromatic) band-gaps of photonic crystals can be utilized for frequency filtering. In analogy to the chromatic band-gaps and the frequency filtering, the angular band-gaps and the angular (spatial) filtering are also possible in photonic crystals. In this article, we review the recent advances of the spatial filtering using the photonic crystals in different propagation regimes and for different geometries. We review the most evident configuration of filtering in Bragg regime (with the back-reflection—i.e., in the configuration with band-gaps) as well as in Laue regime (with forward deflection—i.e., in the configuration without band-gaps). We explore the spatial filtering in crystals with different symmetries, including axisymmetric crystals; we discuss the role of chirping, i.e., the dependence of the longitudinal period along the structure. We also review the experimental techniques to fabricate the photonic crystals and numerical techniques to explore the spatial filtering. Finally, we discuss several implementations of such filters for intracavity spatial filtering.

  7. Filter selection using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Devesh

    1996-03-01

    Convolution operators act as matched filters for certain types of variations found in images and have been extensively used in the analysis of images. However, filtering through a bank of N filters generates N filtered images, consequently increasing the amount of data considerably. Moreover, not all these filters have the same discriminatory capabilities for the individual images, thus making the task of any classifier difficult. In this paper, we use genetic algorithms to select a subset of relevant filters. Genetic algorithms represent a class of adaptive search techniques where the processes are similar to natural selection of biological evolution. The steady state model (GENITOR) has been used in this paper. The reduction of filters improves the performance of the classifier (which in this paper is the multi-layer perceptron neural network) and furthermore reduces the computational requirement. In this study we use the Laws filters which were proposed for the analysis of texture images. Our aim is to recognize the different textures on the images using the reduced filter set.

  8. SRBF: Speckle reducing bilateral filtering.

    PubMed

    Balocco, Simone; Gatta, Carlo; Pujol, Oriol; Mauri, Josepa; Radeva, Petia

    2010-08-01

    Speckle noise negatively affects medical ultrasound image shape interpretation and boundary detection. Speckle removal filters are widely used to selectively remove speckle noise without destroying important image features to enhance object boundaries. In this article, a fully automatic bilateral filter tailored to ultrasound images is proposed. The edge preservation property is obtained by embedding noise statistics in the filter framework. Consequently, the filter is able to tackle the multiplicative behavior modulating the smoothing strength with respect to local statistics. The in silico experiments clearly showed that the speckle reducing bilateral filter (SRBF) has superior performances to most of the state of the art filtering methods. The filter is tested on 50 in vivo US images and its influence on a segmentation task is quantified. The results using SRBF filtered data sets show a superior performance to using oriented anisotropic diffusion filtered images. This improvement is due to the adaptive support of SRBF and the embedded noise statistics, yielding a more homogeneous smoothing. SRBF results in a fully automatic, fast and flexible algorithm potentially suitable in wide ranges of speckle noise sizes, for different medical applications (IVUS, B-mode, 3-D matrix array US).

  9. A new type of GC-MS with advanced capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialkov, Alexander B.; Steiner, Urs; Jones, Larry; Amirav, Aviv

    2006-03-01

    We have combined the benefits of supersonic molecular beam interface and its related fly-through electron ionization (EI) ion source with the advanced features of the Varian 1200L gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (MS-MS), resulting in a new and powerful GC-MS platform with record setting performance. Electron ionization of vibrationally cold molecules in the supersonic molecular beams (SMB) (cold EI) provided mass spectra with enhanced molecular ion, yet with good library search results and superior identification probabilities. We found that high GC column flow rates lower the elution temperature for any given compounds. This allows much larger molecules to elute at the maximum temperature of standard columns. We analyzed a mixture of heavy linear chain hydrocarbons all the way to C84H170 with a molecular weight of 1179.3 amu, using a 4 m 0.25 mm i.d. column and 32 ml/min He flow rate. Furthermore, we obtained a dominant molecular ion to all these compounds. The lower elution temperatures also greatly enhance the ability to analyze very thermally labile compounds such as carbamate pesticides. The experimental 1200 system is capable of triple quadrupole based MS-MS. We found that MS-MS on the molecular ion is much more effective than on fragment ions, and thus, the enhancement of the molecular ion directly improves the MS-MS sensitivity. Fast GC-MS analysis was also explored, based on very high column flow rate for fast splitless injections without affecting the sensitivity, and on the high system selectivity due to the combination of enhanced molecular ion and MS-MS. We demonstrate a few seconds long GC-MS-MS analysis of diazinon, spiked at 10 ng/g in a mixed fruit and vegetable extract. The feature of enhanced molecular ion provides significant enhancement in the detection sensitivity via SIM and RSIM on the molecular ion. While octafluoronaphthalene (OFN) detection limit of below 1 fg in SIM mode is shown, the

  10. AER image filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Rodríguez, F.; Linares-Barranco, A.; Paz, R.; Miró-Amarante, L.; Jiménez, G.; Civit, A.

    2007-05-01

    Address Event Representation (AER) is an emergent neuromorphic interchip communication protocol that allows real-time virtual massive connectivity among huge number of neurons located on different chips.[1] By exploiting high speed digital communication circuits (with nano-seconds timing), synaptic neural connections can be time multiplexed, while neural activity signals (with mili-seconds timings) are sampled at low frequencies. Neurons generate "events" according to their activity levels. That is, more active neurons generate more events per unit time and access the interchip communication channel more frequently than neurons with low activity. In Neuromorphic system development, AER brings some advantages to develop real-time image processing system: (1) AER represents the information like time continuous stream not like a frame; (2) AER sends the most important information first (although this depends on the sender); (3) AER allows to process information as soon as it is received. When AER is used in artificial vision field, each pixel is considered like a neuron, so pixel's intensity is represented like a sequence of events; modifying the number and the frequency of these events, it is possible to make some image filtering. In this paper we present four image filters using AER: (a) Noise addition and suppression, (b) brightness modification, (c) single moving object tracking and (d) geometrical transformations (rotation, translation, reduction and magnification). For testing and debugging, we use USB-AER board developed by Robotic and Technology of Computers Applied to Rehabilitation (RTCAR) research group. This board is based on an FPGA, devoted to manage the AER functionality. This board also includes a micro-controlled for USB communication, 2 Mbytes RAM and 2 AER ports (one for input and one for output).

  11. Application of DFT Filter Banks and Cosine Modulated Filter Banks in Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yuan-Pei; Vaidyanathan, P. P.

    1994-01-01

    None given. This is a proposal for a paper to be presented at APCCAS '94 in Taipei, Taiwan. (From outline): This work is organized as follows: Sec. II is devoted to the construction of the new 2m channel under-decimated DFT filter bank. Implementation and complexity of this DFT filter bank are discussed therein. IN a similar manner, the new 2m channel cosine modulated filter bank is discussed in Sec. III. Design examples are given in Sec. IV.

  12. Evidence that Processing of the Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Gn/Gc Polyprotein Is Critical for Viral Infectivity and Requires an Internal Gc Signal Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Plegge, Teresa; Hofmann-Winkler, Heike; Spiegel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is an emerging, highly pathogenic bunyavirus against which neither antivirals nor vaccines are available. The SFTSV glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, facilitate viral entry into host cells. Gn and Gc are generated from a precursor protein, Gn/Gc, but it is currently unknown how the precursor is converted into the single proteins and whether this process is required for viral infectivity. Employing a rhabdoviral pseudotyping system, we demonstrate that a predicted signal sequence at the N-terminus of Gc is required for Gn/Gc processing and viral infectivity while potential proprotein convertase cleavage sites in Gc are dispensable. Moreover, we show that expression of Gn or Gc alone is not sufficient for host cell entry while particles bearing both proteins are infectious, and we provide evidence that Gn facilitates Golgi transport and virion incorporation of Gc. Collectively, these results suggest that signal peptidase liberates mature Gc from the Gn/Gc precursor and that this process is essential for viral infectivity and thus constitutes a potential target for antiviral intervention. PMID:27855227

  13. The double well mass filter

    DOE PAGES

    Gueroult, Renaud; Rax, Jean -Marcel; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2014-02-03

    Various mass filter concepts based on rotating plasmas have been suggested with the specific purpose of nuclear waste remediation. We report on a new rotating mass filter combining radial separation with axial extraction. Lastly, the radial separation of the masses is the result of a “double-well” in effective radial potential in rotating plasma with a sheared rotation profile.

  14. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    A solid colloidal optical wavelength filter includes a suspension of spheal particles dispersed in a coagulable medium such as a setting plastic. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium; agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  15. BMP FILTERS: UPFLOW VS. DOWNFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Filtration methods have been found to be effective in reducing pollutant levels in stormwater. The main drawback of these methods is that the filters get clogged frequently and require periodical maintenance. In stormwater treatment, because of the cost of pumping, the filters ar...

  16. Filter desulfation system and method

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, Michael D.; Robel, Wade J.; Verkiel, Maarten; Driscoll, James J.

    2010-08-10

    A method of removing sulfur from a filter system of an engine includes continuously passing an exhaust flow through a desulfation leg of the filter system during desulfation. The method also includes sensing at least one characteristic of the exhaust flow and modifying a flow rate of the exhaust flow during desulfation in response to the sensing.

  17. Vectorization of linear discrete filtering algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiess, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Linear filters, including the conventional Kalman filter and versions of square root filters devised by Potter and Carlson, are studied for potential application on streaming computers. The square root filters are known to maintain a positive definite covariance matrix in cases in which the Kalman filter diverges due to ill-conditioning of the matrix. Vectorization of the filters is discussed, and comparisons are made of the number of operations and storage locations required by each filter. The Carlson filter is shown to be the most efficient of the filters on the Control Data STAR-100 computer.

  18. GC-MS investigation of tropane alkaloids in Datura stramonium.

    PubMed

    Philipov, Stefan; Berkov, Strahil

    2002-01-01

    Alkaloids, GS-MS, Datura stramonium The alkaloid spectrum in roots, leaves and seeds of Datura stramonium L. was investigated by GC-MS. Twenty-nine tropane alkaloids are detected. Twelve of them are new constituents for the species and the two tropane esters 3-(3'-acetoxytropoyloxy)tropane (21) and 3-(2'-hydroxytropoyloxy)tropane (26) are described for the first time.

  19. Method for factor analysis of GC/MS data

    DOEpatents

    Van Benthem, Mark H; Kotula, Paul G; Keenan, Michael R

    2012-09-11

    The method of the present invention provides a fast, robust, and automated multivariate statistical analysis of gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) data sets. The method can involve systematic elimination of undesired, saturated peak masses to yield data that follow a linear, additive model. The cleaned data can then be subjected to a combination of PCA and orthogonal factor rotation followed by refinement with MCR-ALS to yield highly interpretable results.

  20. Removing EDB with GAC filters

    SciTech Connect

    Narbaitz, R.M.; Baratta, A.; Parsons, F.Z. )

    1994-08-01

    Nearly 1,000 point-of-entry granular activated carbon (GAC) filters are efficiently removing ethylene dibromide (EDB) from contaminated groundwater throughout Florida. This article discusses the design, performance, and operational problems of the filters and assesses the possibility of extending the interval between GAC replacement from the current six months. Few breakthroughs have occurred in these filters, and most were caused by desorption during periods of sharp decreases in well-water EDB concentrations. Because GAC loading data from the literature described the program data very well, they were used in conjunction with the equilibrium column model to predict the performance of the program's filters for different GAC replacement periods. Based on the most conservative estimates, maintenance for 50% of the filters could be extended to every nine months.

  1. An improved pinhole spatial filter

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, K.; Celliers, P.; Murray, J.; Wallace, R.; Stone, G.; Van Wonterghem, B.; MacGowan, B.; Da Silva, L.; Hunt, J.; Manes, K.

    1996-08-21

    Lasers generate phase aberrated light that can damage laser glass, frequency conversion crystals, lenses, and mirror coatings and can also reduce extractable energy and power. Spatial pinhole filters can partly eliminate such ``hot spots.`` Problems are that the pinhole closes during the laser pulse and has to be made too large initially. Debris from the pinhole can coat or damage spatial filter lenses. This paper presents a novel design for a more robust pinhole filter. Phase distorted (hot spot) light refracts at grazing incidence by plasma on the wall of a funnel shaped filter resulting in less absorption and debris. Refracted light absorbs at low intensities on the vacuum wall. We present 2D hydrodynamic computer simulations and compare the two types of filters with experiment.

  2. Sintered composite medium and filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1987-01-01

    A particulate filter medium is formed of a sintered composite of 0.5 micron diameter quartz fibers and 2 micron diameter stainless steel fibers. A preferred composition is about 40 vol. % quartz and about 60 vol. % stainless steel fibers. The media is sintered at about 1100.degree. C. to bond the stainless steel fibers into a cage network which holds the quartz fibers. High filter efficiency and low flow resistance are provided by the smaller quartz fibers. High strength is provided by the stainless steel fibers. The resulting media has a high efficiency and low pressure drop similar to the standard HEPA media, with tensile strength at least four times greater, and a maximum operating temperature of about 550.degree. C. The invention also includes methods to form the composite media and a HEPA filter utilizing the composite media. The filter media can be used to filter particles in both liquids and gases.

  3. Recycling used automotive oil filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peaslee, Kent D.

    1994-02-01

    Over 400 million used automotive oil filters are discarded in the United States each year, most of which are disposed of in landfills wasting valuable resources and risking contamination of ground- and surface-water supplies. This article summarizes U.S. bureau of Mines research evaluating scrap prepared from used automotive oil filters. Experimental results show that crushed and drained oil filters have a bulk density that is higher than many typical scrap grades, a chemical analysis low in residual elements (except tin due to use of tin plate in filters), and an overall yield, oil-filter scrap to cast steel, of 76% to 85%, depending on the method used to prepare the scrap.

  4. GC Content Heterogeneity Transition of Conserved Noncoding Sequences Occurred at the Emergence of Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Hettiarachchi, Nilmini; Saitou, Naruya

    2016-01-01

    Conserved non-coding sequences (CNSs) of Eukaryotes are known to be significantly enriched in regulatory sequences. CNSs of diverse lineages follow different patterns in abundance, sequence composition, and location. Here, we report a thorough analysis of CNSs in diverse groups of Eukaryotes with respect to GC content heterogeneity. We examined 24 fungi, 19 invertebrates, and 12 non-mammalian vertebrates so as to find lineage specific features of CNSs. We found that fungi and invertebrate CNSs are predominantly GC rich as in plants we previously observed, whereas vertebrate CNSs are GC poor. This result suggests that the CNS GC content transition occurred from the ancestral GC rich state of Eukaryotes to GC poor in the vertebrate lineage due to the enrollment of GC poor transcription factor binding sites that are lineage specific. CNS GC content is closely linked with the nucleosome occupancy that determines the location and structural architecture of DNAs. PMID:28040773

  5. Potential deleterious role of anti-Neu5Gc antibodies in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Salama, Apolline; Evanno, Gwénaëlle; Harb, Jean; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Human beings do not synthesize the glycolyl form of the sialic acid (Neu5Gc) and only express the acetylated form of the sugar, whereas a diet-based intake of Neu5Gc provokes a natural immunization and production of anti-Neu5Gc antibodies in human serum. However, Neu5Gc is expressed on mammal glycoproteins and glycolipids in most organs and cells. We review here the relevance of Neu5Gc and anti-Neu5Gc antibodies in the context of xenotransplantation and the use of animal-derived molecules and products, as well as the possible consequences of a long-term exposure to anti-Neu5Gc antibodies in recipients of xenografts. In addition, the importance of an accurate estimation of the anti-Neu5Gc response following xenotransplantation and the future contribution of knockout animals mimicking the human situation are also assessed.

  6. Detection of the Spermicide Nonoxynol-9 Via GC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musah, Rabi A.; Vuong, Angela L.; Henck, Colin; Shepard, Jason R. E.

    2012-05-01

    The spermicide nonoxynol-9 is actually a complex mixture of dozens of closely related amphiphilic compounds, and the chemical properties of this assortment significantly hamper its characterization by GC-MS. The inability to perform routine GC-MS testing on nonoxynol-9 has limited its evidentiary value in forensic casework, which relies heavily on this technique for analysis. A disturbing trend in sexual assault is the use of condoms by assailants, to avoid leaving behind DNA evidence that can connect a perpetrator to a victim. This observation necessitates the development of alternative methods for the analysis of trace evidence that can show causal links between a victim and a suspect. Detection of lubricants associated with sexual assault is one such way to establish this connection. The development of GC-MS methods that permit facile detection of both nonoxynol-9 alone and nonoxynol-9 extracted from other complex matrices that have potential as trace evidence in sexual assault is reported. A detection limit of 2.14 μg of nonoxynol-9 is demonstrated, and a detailed mass spectral profile that elaborates on what is known of its structure is provided.

  7. Computational color constancy using chromagenic filters in color filter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Raju; Hardeberg, Jon Yngve

    2012-03-01

    We have proposed, in this paper, a new color constancy technique, an extension to the chromagenic color constancy. Chromagenic based illuminant estimation methods take two shots of a scene, one without and one with a specially chosen color filter in front of the camera lens. Here, we introduce chromagenic filters into the color filter array itself by placing them on top of R, G or B filters and replacing one of the two green filters in the Bayer's pattern with them. This allows obtaining two images of the same scene via demosaicking: a normal RGB image, and a chromagenic image, equivalent of RGB image with a chromagenic filter. The illuminant can then be estimated using chromagenic based illumination estimation algorithms. The method, we named as CFA based chromagenic color constancy (or 4C in short), therefore, does not require two shots and no registration issues involved unlike as in the other chromagenic based color constancy algorithms, making it more practical and useful computational color constancy method in many applications. Experiments show that the proposed color filter array based chromagenic color constancy method produces comparable results with the chromagenic color constancy without interpolation.

  8. Group-specific component (GC) polymorphism in Cádiz (southern Spain).

    PubMed

    Vizcaya, M A; Romero, J L; Gamero, J J; Arufe, M I

    1992-01-01

    The genetic polymorphism of group-specific component (GC) was analysed in a sample of 443 healthy unrelated subjects of both sexes resident in the province of Cádiz (Southern Spain). Isoelectric focusing was carried out in polyacrylamide gels followed by staining with coomassie blue R 250. The estimated gene frequencies were as follows: GC*1S = 0.6185; GC*1F = 0.1162; GC*2 = 0.2652.

  9. Objects tracking with adaptive correlation filters and Kalman filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ontiveros-Gallardo, Sergio E.; Kober, Vitaly

    2015-09-01

    Object tracking is commonly used for applications such as video surveillance, motion based recognition, and vehicle navigation. In this work, a tracking system using adaptive correlation filters and robust Kalman prediction of target locations is proposed. Tracking is performed by means of multiple object detections in reduced frame areas. A bank of filters is designed from multiple views of a target using synthetic discriminant functions. An adaptive approach is used to improve discrimination capability of the synthesized filters adapting them to multiple types of backgrounds. With the help of computer simulation, the performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated in terms of detection efficiency and accuracy of object tracking.

  10. [Study on rapid analysis method of pesticide contamination in processed foods by GC-MS and GC-FPD].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Maki; Otsuka, Kenji; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Tomizawa, Sanae; Kamijo, Kyoko; Iwakoshi, Keiko; Sato, Chizuko; Nagayama, Toshihiro; Takano, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    A simple and rapid method using GC-MS and GC-FPD for the determination of pesticide contamination in processed food has been developed. Pesticides were extracted from a sample with ethyl acetate in the presence of anhydrous sodium sulfate, then cleaned up with a combination of mini-columns, such as macroporous diatomaceous earth, C18, GCB (graphite carbon black) and PSA. Recovery tests of 57 pesticides (known to be toxic or harmful) from ten kinds of processed foods (butter, cheese, corned beef, dried shrimp, frozen Chinese dumplings, grilled eels, instant noodles, kimchi, retort-packed curry and wine) were performed, and the recovery rates were mostly between 70% and 120%. This method can be used to judge whether or not processed foods are contaminated with pesticides at potentially harmful levels.

  11. Characterisation of fatty acids in drying oils used in paintings on canvas by GC and GC-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Cartoni, G; Russo, M V; Spinelli, F; Talarico, F

    2001-01-01

    Of the various binding media used in paintings, this work examines drying oils. During the initial phase of polymerisation and the progressive ageing process, the fraction of unsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids undergoes various changes (reticulation, oxidation, etc.), that give rise to characteristic compounds. Within a broader research project, aimed at the characterisation of binding media, a preliminary study was made of the ageing process of linseed oil. In this regard, linseed oil was spread on a glass or canvas support and then dried in the open air. The ageing of the spread linseed oil was monitored by taking samples of the material at regular intervals. After the fatty acids had changed into methylesters, the samples were analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results obtained have been reported as a ratio between the areas of the chromatographic peaks of the different fatty acids found.

  12. Analysis of essential oils from Scutellaria orientalis ssp. alpina and S. utriculata by GC and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Formisano, Carmen; Rigano, Daniela; Senatore, Felice; Piozzi, Franco; Arnold, Nelly Apostolides

    2011-09-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils obtained from aerial parts of Scutellaria orientalis L. ssp. alpina (Boiss.) O. Schwarz and S. utriculata Labill. growing wild in Lebanon, were analyzed by GC and GC-MS. In S. orientalis ssp. alpina, strongly characterized by sesquiterpenes (41.2%) and particularly sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (31.7%), hexahydrofarnesylacetone (11.7%) was recognized as the main constituent, together with hexadecanoic acid (7.6%), caryophyllene (7.4%), caryophyllene oxide (6.8%), 4-vinylguaiacol (5.4%) and germacrene D (5.4%). S. utriculata oil was instead constituted above all by monoterpenes (42.2%), particularly oxygen containing monoterpenes (39.9%), and in this oil the main compounds were linalool (20.1%), 4-vinyl guaiacol (15.5%), alpha-terpineol (8.9%), (E)-nerolidol (8.9%) and geraniol (8.2%).

  13. Comparative Analysis of Volatile Composition in Chinese Truffles via GC × GC/HR-TOF/MS and Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Chen, Haitao; Sun, Baoguo; Mao, Xueying; Zhang, Yuyu; Zhou, Ying

    2016-01-01

    To compare the volatile compounds of Chinese black truffle and white truffle from Yunnan province, this study presents the application of a direct solvent extraction/solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (DSE-SAFE) coupled with a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HR-TOF/MS) and an electronic nose. Both of the analytical methods could distinguish the aroma profile of the two samples. In terms of the overall profile of truffle samples in this research, more kinds of acids were detected via the method of DSE-SAFE. Besides, compounds identified in black truffle (BT), but not in white truffle (WT), or vice versa, and those detected in both samples at different levels were considered to play an important role in differentiating the two samples. According to the analysis of electronic nose, the two samples could be separated, as well. PMID:27058524

  14. Amplitude and phase fourier correlation of ``twin'' GC-spectra of fatty acids from sheep dairy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teusdea, Alin C.; Gabor, Gianina; Hilma, Elena

    2012-08-01

    Authors present the discrimination performances of amplitude and phase-only Fourier correlation over the "twin" typed GC-spectra of sheep milk and ripened cheese. Therefore, in order to assess the most robust Fourier correlation method for the "twin" GC-spectra discrimination, the correlation matrix is built up over 17 analyzed GC-spectra in both amplitude and phase domains.

  15. Electrothermally tunable MEMS filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, A. V. S. S.; K. P., Venkatesh; Bhat, Navakanta; Pratap, Rudra

    2014-03-01

    MEMS resonators have potential application in the area of frequency selective devices (e.g., gyroscopes, mass sensors, etc.). In this paper, design of electro thermally tunable resonators is presented. SOIMUMPs process is used to fabricate resonators with springs (beams) and a central mass. When voltage is applied, due to joule heating, temperature of the conducting beams goes up. This results in increase of electrical resistance due to mobility degradation. Due to increase in the temperature, springs start softening and therefore the fundamental frequency decreases. So for a given structure, one can modify the original fundamental frequency by changing the applied voltage. Coupled thermal effects result in non-uniform heating. It is observed from measurements and simulations that some parts of the beam become very hot and therefore soften more. Consequently, at higher voltages, the structure (equivalent to a single resonator) behaves like coupled resonators and exhibits peak splitting. In this mode, the given resonator can be used as a band rejection filter. This process is reversible and repeatable. For the designed structure, it is experimentally shown that by varying the voltage from 1 to 16V, the resonant frequency could be changed by 28%.

  16. Rapid sample pre-treatment prior to GC-MS and GC-MS/MS urinary toxicological screening.

    PubMed

    Versace, François; Sporkert, Frank; Mangin, Patrice; Staub, Christian

    2012-11-15

    Drug screening is an important issue in clinical and forensic toxicology. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) remains the gold standard technique for the screening of unknown compounds in urine samples. However, this technique requires substantial sample preparation, which is time consuming. Moreover, some common drugs such as cannabis cannot be easily detected in urine using general procedures. In this work, a sample preparation protocol for treating 200 μL of urine in less than 30 min is described. The enzymatic hydrolysis of glucuro-conjugates was performed in 5 min thanks to the use of microwaves. The use of a deconvolution software allowed reducing the GC-MS run to 10 min, without impairing the quality of the compound identifications. Comparing the results from 139 authentic urine samples to those obtained using the current routine analysis indicated this method performed well. Moreover, additional 5-min GC-MS/MS programs are described, enabling a very sensitive target screening of 54 drugs, including THC-COOH or buprenorphine, without further sample preparation. These methods appeared as an interesting alternative to immuno-assays based screening. The analytical strategy presented in this article proved to be a promising approach for systematic toxicological analysis (STA) of drugs in urine.

  17. A generic screening methodology for horse doping control by LC-TOF-MS, GC-HRMS and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Kioussi, Maroula K; Lyris, Emmanouil M; Angelis, Yiannis S; Tsivou, Maria; Koupparis, Michael A; Georgakopoulos, Costas G

    2013-12-15

    In the present study a general screening protocol was developed to detect prohibited substances and metabolites for doping control purposes in equine sports. It was based on the establishment of a unified sample preparation and on the combined implementation of liquid and gas chromatographic MS analysis. The sample pretreatment began with two parallel procedures: enzymatic hydrolysis of sulfate and glucuronide conjugates, and methanolysis of the 17β-sulfate steroid conjugates. The extracts were treated for LC-TOF-MS, GC-HRMS and GC-MS assays. The majority of the prohibited substances were identified through a high mass accuracy technique, such as LC-TOF-MS, without prior derivatization. The sample preparation procedure included the formation of methylated and trimethylsilylated derivatives common in toxicological GC-MS libraries. The screening method was enhanced by post-run library searching using automated mass spectral deconvolution and identification system (AMDIS) combined with deconvolution reporting software (DRS). The current methodology is able to detect the presence of more than 350 target analytes in horse urine and may easily incorporate a lot of new substances without changes in chromatography. The full scan acquisition allows retrospective identification of prohibited substances in stored urine samples after reprocessing of the acquired data. Validation was performed for sixty representative compounds and included limit of detection, matrix interference - specificity, extraction recovery, precision, mass accuracy, matrix effect and carry over contamination. The suitability of the method was demonstrated with previously declared positive horse urine samples.

  18. At least two Fc Neu5Gc residues of monoclonal antibodies are required for binding to anti-Neu5Gc antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chuanfei; Gao, Kai; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Lan; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Chunyu; Li, Meng; Wormald, Mark R.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Wang, Junzhi

    2016-01-01

    Two non-human glycan epitopes, galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-gal) and Neu5Gc-α-2-6-galactose (Neu5Gc) have been shown to be antigenic when attached to Fab oligosaccharides of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) , while α-gal attached to Fc glycans was not. However, the antigenicity of Neu5Gc on the Fc glycans remains unclear in the context that most mAbs carry only Fc glycans. After studying two clinical mAbs carrying significant amounts of Fc Neu5Gc, we show that their binding activity with anti-Neu5Gc antibody resided in a small subset of mAbs carrying two or more Fc Neu5Gc, while mAbs harboring only one Neu5Gc showed no reactivity. Since most Neu5Gc epitopes were distributed singly on the Fc of mAbs, our results suggest that the potential antigenicity of Fc Neu5Gc is low. Our study could be referenced in the process design and optimization of mAb production in murine myeloma cells and in the quality control of mAbs for industries and regulatory authorities. PMID:26823113

  19. At least two Fc Neu5Gc residues of monoclonal antibodies are required for binding to anti-Neu5Gc antibody.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanfei; Gao, Kai; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Lan; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Chunyu; Li, Meng; Wormald, Mark R; Rudd, Pauline M; Wang, Junzhi

    2016-01-29

    Two non-human glycan epitopes, galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-gal) and Neu5Gc-α-2-6-galactose (Neu5Gc) have been shown to be antigenic when attached to Fab oligosaccharides of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) , while α-gal attached to Fc glycans was not. However, the antigenicity of Neu5Gc on the Fc glycans remains unclear in the context that most mAbs carry only Fc glycans. After studying two clinical mAbs carrying significant amounts of Fc Neu5Gc, we show that their binding activity with anti-Neu5Gc antibody resided in a small subset of mAbs carrying two or more Fc Neu5Gc, while mAbs harboring only one Neu5Gc showed no reactivity. Since most Neu5Gc epitopes were distributed singly on the Fc of mAbs, our results suggest that the potential antigenicity of Fc Neu5Gc is low. Our study could be referenced in the process design and optimization of mAb production in murine myeloma cells and in the quality control of mAbs for industries and regulatory authorities.

  20. Fragmentation pathways and mechanisms of aromatic compounds in atmospheric pressure studied by GC-DMS and DMS-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendler, Shai; Lambertus, Gordon R.; Dunietz, Barry D.; Coy, Stephen L.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.; Miller, Raanan A.; Sacks, Richard D.

    2007-06-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is a highly sensitive sensing technology capable of selecting and detecting ions based on the difference between ion mobility at high and low electric field. The combination of a micro-fabricated DMS with gas chromatography (GC) has allowed extensive investigation of the ion chemistry and collisionally induced dissociation (CID) of diaryl molecules on a millisecond timescale at temperatures up to 130 °C. DMS-pre-filtered time-of-flight mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) has been used to verify the chemical composition of the ion species resolved by GC-DMS. This work focuses on the fragmentation of diaryl compounds, including diphenyl methane (DPM) and bibenzyl (BB), using information from the DMS and DMS-MS spectra of a series of aromatic compounds. Density functional theory calculations have been used to investigate the geometry and the energy along the reaction coordinate for the loss of benzene from DPM·H+ and BB·H+ for comparison with GC-DMS and DMS-MS experimental results and with previously reported chemical ionization MS. DPM-H+ is observed to undergo field-induced fragmentation in the DMS to produce C7H7+(Bz+) and unobserved neutral benzene with a low energy barrier. In contrast, BB·H+ fragments to C8H9+ and benzene with a higher energy barrier. Calculated barriers and experimental results are in qualitative agreement. Depletion of the ionized fragments in favor of ion-neutral clusters was also observed at higher concentrations. It is suggested that CID in DMS can further enhance DMS analytical performance.

  1. Use of field-applied quality control samples to monitor performance of a Goulden large-sample extractor/GC-MS method for pesticides in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foreman, W.T.; Gates, Paul M.; Foster, G.D.; Rinella, F.A.; McKenzie, S.W.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1985, the Goulden large-sample extractor (GLSE) has been used to isolate a broad array of trace-organic contaminants from large volumes of water. In this study, field-applied quality control measures, including matrix and surrogate spikes and blanks, were used to monitor method performance from GLSE extraction through GC-MS analysis. The method was applied to the determination of multiple classes of pesticides isolated from 4- to 112-L filtered surface-water samples. Average recoveries of six surrogate compounds ranged from 84 ?? 18% for [2H10]diazinon to 15 ?? 13% for 4,4'-[2H8]DDT, the low recoveries for which were largely a result of unmonitored breakdown of this surrogate by the GC injection system. Field-matrix-spike samples were prepared by fortifying 10-L, 35-L, and 110-L filtered surface-water samples with 68 pesticides to amended concentrations of 11- to 50-ng/L each. Recoveries ranged from not detected to greater than 100%. Variability in pesticide recoveries from triplicate 10-L water samples collected at one site averaged 5.7% relative standard deviation and did not exceed 19%.Since 1985, the Goulden large-sample extractor (GLSE) has been used to isolate a broad array of trace-organic contaminants from large volumes of water. In this study, field-applied quality control measures, including matrix and surrogate spikes and blanks, were used to monitor method performance from GLSE extraction through GC-MS analysis. The method was applied to the determination of multiple classes of pesticides isolated from 4- to 112-L filtered surface-water samples. Average recoveries of six surrogate compounds ranged from 84 ?? 18% for [2H10]diazinon to 15 ?? 13% for 4,4???-[2H8]DDT, the low recoveries for which were largely a result of unmonitored breakdown of this surrogate by the GC injection system. Field-matrix-spike samples were prepared by fortifying 10-L, 35-L, and 110-L filtered surface-water samples with 68 pesticides to amended concentrations of 11- to 50

  2. Adaptive filtering with correlated state noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argentiero, P.

    1972-01-01

    An adaptive filter which uses a minimum variance criteria to estimate state noise covariance is presented. It is not necessary to assume white state noise in order to implement the filter. Simulation results are given which demonstrate that the filter tracks a satellite in the presence of modeling errors better than a conventional minimum variance filter with state noise. It is also shown that the propagated convariance matrix of the filter is an accurate indicator of the filter's performance.

  3. ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    E.S. Connolly; G.D. Forsythe

    2000-09-30

    DuPont Lanxide Composites, Inc. undertook a sixty-month program, under DOE Contract DEAC21-94MC31214, in order to develop hot gas candle filters from a patented material technology know as PRD-66. The goal of this program was to extend the development of this material as a filter element and fully assess the capability of this technology to meet the needs of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems at commercial scale. The principal objective of Task 3 was to build on the initial PRD-66 filter development, optimize its structure, and evaluate basic material properties relevant to the hot gas filter application. Initially, this consisted of an evaluation of an advanced filament-wound core structure that had been designed to produce an effective bulk filter underneath the barrier filter formed by the outer membrane. The basic material properties to be evaluated (as established by the DOE/METC materials working group) would include mechanical, thermal, and fracture toughness parameters for both new and used material, for the purpose of building a material database consistent with what is being done for the alternative candle filter systems. Task 3 was later expanded to include analysis of PRD-66 candle filters, which had been exposed to actual PFBC conditions, development of an improved membrane, and installation of equipment necessary for the processing of a modified composition. Task 4 would address essential technical issues involving the scale-up of PRD-66 candle filter manufacturing from prototype production to commercial scale manufacturing. The focus would be on capacity (as it affects the ability to deliver commercial order quantities), process specification (as it affects yields, quality, and costs), and manufacturing systems (e.g. QA/QC, materials handling, parts flow, and cost data acquisition). Any filters fabricated during this task would be used for product qualification tests

  4. Attitude Representations for Kalman Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The four-component quaternion has the lowest dimensionality possible for a globally nonsingular attitude representation, it represents the attitude matrix as a homogeneous quadratic function, and its dynamic propagation equation is bilinear in the quaternion and the angular velocity. The quaternion is required to obey a unit norm constraint, though, so Kalman filters often employ a quaternion for the global attitude estimate and a three-component representation for small errors about the estimate. We consider these mixed attitude representations for both a first-order Extended Kalman filter and a second-order filter, as well for quaternion-norm-preserving attitude propagation.

  5. Advanced simulation of digital filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, G. S.

    1980-09-01

    An Advanced Simulation of Digital Filters has been implemented on the IBM 360/67 computer utilizing Tektronix hardware and software. The program package is appropriate for use by persons beginning their study of digital signal processing or for filter analysis. The ASDF programs provide the user with an interactive method by which filter pole and zero locations can be manipulated. Graphical output on both the Tektronix graphics screen and the Versatec plotter are provided to observe the effects of pole-zero movement.

  6. Systolic VLSI for Kalman filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H.-G.; Chang, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    A novel two-dimensional parallel computing method for real-time Kalman filtering is presented. The mathematical formulation of a Kalman filter algorithm is rearranged to be the type of Faddeev algorithm for generalizing signal processing. The data flow mapping from the Faddeev algorithm to a two-dimensional concurrent computing structure is developed. The architecture of the resulting processor cells is regular, simple, expandable, and therefore naturally suitable for VLSI chip implementation. The computing methodology and the two-dimensional systolic arrays are useful for Kalman filter applications as well as other matrix/vector based algebraic computations.

  7. Properties of ceramic candle filters

    SciTech Connect

    Pontius, D.H.

    1995-06-01

    The mechanical integrity of ceramic filter elements is a key issue for hot gas cleanup systems. To meet the demands of the advanced power systems, the filter components must sustain the thermal stresses of normal operations (pulse cleaning), of start-up and shut-down conditions, and of unanticipated process upsets such as excessive ash accumulation without catastrophic failure. They must also survive the various mechanical loads associated with handling and assembly, normal operation, and process upsets. For near-term filter systems, these elements must survive at operating temperatures of 1650{degrees}F for three years.

  8. Concrete ensemble Kalman filters with rigorous catastrophic filter divergence

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, David; Majda, Andrew J.; Tong, Xin T.

    2015-01-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter and ensemble square root filters are data assimilation methods used to combine high-dimensional, nonlinear dynamical models with observed data. Ensemble methods are indispensable tools in science and engineering and have enjoyed great success in geophysical sciences, because they allow for computationally cheap low-ensemble-state approximation for extremely high-dimensional turbulent forecast models. From a theoretical perspective, the dynamical properties of these methods are poorly understood. One of the central mysteries is the numerical phenomenon known as catastrophic filter divergence, whereby ensemble-state estimates explode to machine infinity, despite the true state remaining in a bounded region. In this article we provide a breakthrough insight into the phenomenon, by introducing a simple and natural forecast model that transparently exhibits catastrophic filter divergence under all ensemble methods and a large set of initializations. For this model, catastrophic filter divergence is not an artifact of numerical instability, but rather a true dynamical property of the filter. The divergence is not only validated numerically but also proven rigorously. The model cleanly illustrates mechanisms that give rise to catastrophic divergence and confirms intuitive accounts of the phenomena given in past literature. PMID:26261335

  9. Concrete ensemble Kalman filters with rigorous catastrophic filter divergence.

    PubMed

    Kelly, David; Majda, Andrew J; Tong, Xin T

    2015-08-25

    The ensemble Kalman filter and ensemble square root filters are data assimilation methods used to combine high-dimensional, nonlinear dynamical models with observed data. Ensemble methods are indispensable tools in science and engineering and have enjoyed great success in geophysical sciences, because they allow for computationally cheap low-ensemble-state approximation for extremely high-dimensional turbulent forecast models. From a theoretical perspective, the dynamical properties of these methods are poorly understood. One of the central mysteries is the numerical phenomenon known as catastrophic filter divergence, whereby ensemble-state estimates explode to machine infinity, despite the true state remaining in a bounded region. In this article we provide a breakthrough insight into the phenomenon, by introducing a simple and natural forecast model that transparently exhibits catastrophic filter divergence under all ensemble methods and a large set of initializations. For this model, catastrophic filter divergence is not an artifact of numerical instability, but rather a true dynamical property of the filter. The divergence is not only validated numerically but also proven rigorously. The model cleanly illustrates mechanisms that give rise to catastrophic divergence and confirms intuitive accounts of the phenomena given in past literature.

  10. Digital filtering: background and tutorial for psychophysiologists.

    PubMed

    Cook, E W; Miller, G A

    1992-05-01

    Digital filtering offers more to psychophysiologists than is commonly appreciated. An introduction is offered here to foster the explicit design and use of digital filters. Because of considerable confusion in the literature about terminology important to both analog and digital filtering, basic concepts are reviewed and clarified. Because some time series concepts are fundamental to digital filtering, these are also presented. Examples of filters commonly used in psychophysiology are given, and procedures are presented for the design and use of one type of digital filter. Properties of some types of digital filters are described, and the relative advantages of simple analog and digital filters are discussed.

  11. Special antitumor immune effects of laser immunotherapy with SWNT-GC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feifan; Song, Sheng; Chen, Wei R.

    2014-02-01

    In our previous work, we constructed a multifunction nano system SWNT-GC, which can synergize photothermal and immunological effects. To further improve the application of this system, we study the cytotoxicity of SWNT-GC and investigate the effects on malignant tumor therapy. Here, we selected the optimal concentration of GC and SWNTs for the stable SWNT-GC construction. No cytotoxicity was observed under the dose used in the experiments. Using mouse melanoma tumor model, Laser+SWNT-GC treatment resulted in a significant mice survival rate, there were no long-term survivors under other treatment. It is providing a promising treatment modality for the malignancy.

  12. Inferior vena cava filters in cancer patients: to filter or not to filter

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Razeq, Hikmat; Mansour, Asem; Ismael, Yousef; Abdulelah, Hazem

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Cancer and its treatment are recognized risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE); active cancer accounts for almost 20% of all newly diagnosed VTE. Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are utilized to provide mechanical thromboprophylaxis to prevent pulmonary embolism (PE) or to avoid bleeding from systemic anticoagulation in high-risk situations. In this report, and utilizing a case study, we will address the appropriate utilization of such filters in cancer patients. Methods: The case of a 43-year-old female patient with rectal cancer, who developed deep vein thrombosis following a complicated medical course, will be presented. The patient was anticoagulated with a low molecular weight heparin, but a few months later and following an episode of bleeding, an IVC filter was planned. Using the PubMed database, articles published in English language addressing issues related to IVC filters in cancer patients were accessed and will be presented. Results: Many recent studies questioned the need to insert IVC filters in advanced-stage cancer patients, particularly those whose anticipated survival is short and prevention of PE may be of little clinical benefit and could be a poor utilization of resources. Conclusion: Systemic anticoagulation can be safely offered for the majority of cancer patients. When the risk of bleeding or pulmonary embolism is high, IVC filters can be utilized. However, placement of such filters should take into consideration the stage of disease and life expectancy of such patients. PMID:21479140

  13. Fremont Tree-Well Filter

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Fremont Tree-Well Filter Spine project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  14. Spin Filtering in Storage Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, N. N.; Pavlov, F. F.

    The spin filtering in storage rings is based on a multiple passage of a stored beam through a polarized internal gas target. Apart from the polarization by the spin-dependent transmission, a unique geometrical feature of interaction with the target in such a filtering process, pointed out by H.O. Meyer,1 is a scattering of stored particles within the beam. A rotation of the spin in the scattering process affects the polarization buildup. We derive here a quantum-mechanical evolution equation for the spin-density matrix of a stored beam which incorporates the scattering within the beam. We show how the interplay of the transmission and scattering within the beam changes from polarized electrons to polarized protons in the atomic target. After discussions of the FILTEX results on the filtering of stored protons,2 we comment on the strategy of spin filtering of antiprotons for the PAX experiment at GSI FAIR.3.

  15. Bio-enhanced activated carbon filter with immobilized microorganisms for removing organic pollutants in the Songhua River.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Nan; Li, Wei-Guang; Zhang, Duo-Ying; Wang, Guang-Zhi

    2010-01-01

    Five dominant microorganisms including four kinds of Pseudomonas and one kind of Bacillus were isolated from the Songhua River. The organic pollutants removal potential and community composition of these five dominant microorganisms immobilized on activated carbon filter, which is called the bio-enhanced activated carbon filter (BEAC), were investigated to compare with the naturally formed biological activated carbon (BAC) filter. Songhua River was used as the raw water. The pilot scale test results showed the biomass in the BEAC filter increased initially and then stabilized after 45 d of operation with an average value of 192 nmolPO(4)/g carbon. The corresponding biological activity reached 1,368 ng ATP/g carbon. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) results showed that the BEAC filter degraded the toxic organic substances more effectively than the BAC filter, especially for halogenated hydrocarbons and PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed the eco-system of five dominant microorganisms did not change in the BEAC filter even on 180 d of operation. Two of the five dominant microorganisms, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas balearica, had high biological activity and were more adaptable to the surface of the carbon media than the other three dominant microorganisms. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) photograph showed a large quantity of microorganisms developed on the BEAC filter. The toxicity test using Deltatox Bioassay Technology Analyzer indicated that the dominant microorganisms were safe to be applied in drinking water treatment process.

  16. The glycosylation and characterization of the candidate Gc macrophage activating factor.

    PubMed

    Ravnsborg, Tina; Olsen, Dorthe T; Thysen, Anna Hammerich; Christiansen, Maja; Houen, Gunnar; Højrup, Peter

    2010-04-01

    The vitamin D binding protein, Gc globulin, has in recent years received some attention for its role as precursor for the extremely potent macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). An O-linked trisaccharide has been allocated to the threonine residue at position 420 in two of the three most common isoforms of Gc globulin (Gc1s and Gc1f). A substitution for a lysine residue at position 420 in Gc2 prevents this isoform from being glycosylated at that position. It has been suggested that Gc globulin subjected sequentially to sialidase and galactosidase treatment generates GcMAF in the form of Gc globulin with only a single GalNAc attached to T420. In this study we confirm the location of a linear trisaccharide on T420. Furthermore, we provide the first structural evidence of the generation of the proposed GcMAF by use of glycosidase treatment and mass spectrometry. Additionally the generated GcMAF candidate was tested for its effect on cytokine release from macrophages in human whole blood.

  17. Gene Evolutionary Trajectories and GC Patterns Driven by Recombination in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Sundararajan, Anitha; Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Kwicklis, Madeline; Engstrom, Kayla; Garcia, Nathan; Oviedo, Oliver J.; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Gonzales, Michael D.; He, Yan; Wang, Minghui; Sun, Qi; Pillardy, Jaroslaw; Kianian, Shahryar F.; Pawlowski, Wojciech P.; Chen, Changbin; Mudge, Joann

    2016-01-01

    Recombination occurring during meiosis is critical for creating genetic variation and plays an essential role in plant evolution. In addition to creating novel gene combinations, recombination can affect genome structure through altering GC patterns. In maize (Zea mays) and other grasses, another intriguing GC pattern exists. Maize genes show a bimodal GC content distribution that has been attributed to nucleotide bias in the third, or wobble, position of the codon. Recombination may be an underlying driving force given that recombination sites are often associated with high GC content. Here we explore the relationship between recombination and genomic GC patterns by comparing GC gene content at each of the three codon positions (GC1, GC2, and GC3, collectively termed GCx) to instances of a variable GC-rich motif that underlies double strand break (DSB) hotspots and to meiocyte-specific gene expression. Surprisingly, GCx bimodality in maize cannot be fully explained by the codon wobble hypothesis. High GCx genes show a strong overlap with the DSB hotspot motif, possibly providing a mechanism for the high evolutionary rates seen in these genes. On the other hand, genes that are turned on in meiosis (early prophase I) are biased against both high GCx genes and genes with the DSB hotspot motif, possibly allowing important meiotic genes to avoid DSBs. Our data suggests a strong link between the GC-rich motif underlying DSB hotspots and high GCx genes. PMID:27713757

  18. Photostability evaluation of five UV-filters, trans-resveratrol and beta-carotene in sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Juliana Vescovi; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Gaspar, Lorena Rigo

    2015-10-12

    Trans-resveratrol (RES) is used in cosmetic formulations and beta-carotene (BTC) is a classical sunscreen antioxidant, but their photostability in sunscreens, a property directly correlated to performance and safety has not been addressed in the literature. This paper reports the assessment of RES and/or BTC influence on the photostability of five UV-filters (octyl methoxycinnamate - OMC, avobenzone -AVO, octocrylene - OCT, bemotrizinole - BMZ, octyltriazone - OTZ) in three different combinations after UVA exposure followed by the identification of degradation products and the assessment of photoreactivity. The evaluation of sunscreen photostability was performed by HPLC and spectrophotometric analysis, and degradation products were identified by GC-MS analysis. Components RES, BTC, OMC and AVO were significantly degraded after UV exposure (reduction of around 16% in recovery). According to HPLC analysis, all formulations presented similar photostability profiles. Eleven degradation products were identified in GC-MS analysis, among them products of RES, BTC, OMC and AVO photodegradation. All evaluated formulations were considered photoreactive, as well as the isolated compounds RES and AVO. Considering HPLC, spectrophotometric and GC-MS results, it is suggested that formulations containing BMZ were considered the most photostable. The combination RES+BTC in a sunscreen improved the photostability of AVO. The benefits of using a combination of antioxidants in sunscreens was demonstrated by showing that using RES+BTC+studied UV-filters led to more photostable formulations, which in turn implies in better safety and efficacy.

  19. GC content evolution in coding regions of angiosperm genomes: a unifying hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Glémin, Sylvain; Clément, Yves; David, Jacques; Ressayre, Adrienne

    2014-07-01

    In angiosperms (as in other species), GC content varies along and between genes, within a genome, and between genomes of different species, but the reason for this distribution is still an open question. Grass genomes are particularly intriguing because they exhibit a strong bimodal distribution of genic GC content and a sharp 5'-3' decreasing GC content gradient along most genes. Here, we propose a unifying model to explain the main patterns of GC content variation at the gene and genome scale. We argue that GC content patterns could be mainly determined by the interactions between gene structure, recombination patterns, and GC-biased gene conversion. Recent studies on fine-scale recombination maps in angiosperms support this hypothesis and previous results also fit this model. We propose that our model could be used as a null hypothesis to search for additional forces that affect GC content in angiosperms.

  20. Aquatic Plants Aid Sewage Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, B. C.

    1985-01-01

    Method of wastewater treatment combines micro-organisms and aquatic plant roots in filter bed. Treatment occurs as liquid flows up through system. Micro-organisms, attached themselves to rocky base material of filter, act in several steps to decompose organic matter in wastewater. Vascular aquatic plants (typically, reeds, rushes, cattails, or water hyacinths) absorb nitrogen, phosphorus, other nutrients, and heavy metals from water through finely divided roots.

  1. Control of separation and quantitative analysis by GC-FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmoud, A.; Huvenne, Jean P.; Legrand, P.

    1992-03-01

    Software for 3-D representations of the 'Absorbance-Wavenumber-Retention time' is used to control the quality of the GC separation. Spectral information given by the FTIR detection allows the user to be sure that a chromatographic peak is 'pure.' The analysis of peppermint essential oil is presented as an example. This assurance is absolutely required for quantitative applications. In these conditions, we have worked out a quantitative analysis of caffeine. Correlation coefficients between integrated absorbance measurements and concentration of caffeine are discussed at two steps of the data treatment.

  2. Blind Identification of Graph Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segarra, Santiago; Mateos, Gonzalo; Marques, Antonio G.; Ribeiro, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    Network processes are often represented as signals defined on the vertices of a graph. To untangle the latent structure of such signals, one can view them as outputs of linear graph filters modeling underlying network dynamics. This paper deals with the problem of joint identification of a graph filter and its input signal, thus broadening the scope of classical blind deconvolution of temporal and spatial signals to the less-structured graph domain. Given a graph signal $\\mathbf{y}$ modeled as the output of a graph filter, the goal is to recover the vector of filter coefficients $\\mathbf{h}$, and the input signal $\\mathbf{x}$ which is assumed to be sparse. While $\\mathbf{y}$ is a bilinear function of $\\mathbf{x}$ and $\\mathbf{h}$, the filtered graph signal is also a linear combination of the entries of the lifted rank-one, row-sparse matrix $\\mathbf{x} \\mathbf{h}^T$. The blind graph-filter identification problem can thus be tackled via rank and sparsity minimization subject to linear constraints, an inverse problem amenable to convex relaxations offering provable recovery guarantees under simplifying assumptions. Numerical tests using both synthetic and real-world networks illustrate the merits of the proposed algorithms, as well as the benefits of leveraging multiple signals to aid the blind identification task.

  3. The Archimedes Plasma Mass Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. L.; Ohkawa, T.; Agnew, S. F.; Cluggish, B. P.; Freeman, R. L.; Gilleland, J.; Putvinski, S.; Sevier, L.; Umstadter, K. R.

    2001-10-01

    Archimedes Technology Group is developing a plasma technology, called the Archimedes Plasma Mass Filter, which can separate a waste mixture ion by ion into mass groups and as such represents a major advance in waste separations technology. The filter is a plasma device employing a magnetic and electric field configuration that acts as a low-mass-pass filter for ions. Ions with mass above a tunable “cutoff mass” are expelled from the plasma. The Archimedes Plasma Mass Filter satisfies all of the requirements of an economic mass separator system: good single-pass separation, acceptable energy cost per ion, and high material throughput. This technology could significantly reduce the volume of radioactive waste at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, which is storing sixty percent of the nation’s defense nuclear waste. The potential waste reduction is dramatic because 82 wtpresently scheduled to be vitrified (immobilized and stored in glass) at Hanford are below mass number 60 while 99.9the radioactivity comes from atoms above mass number 89. We will present the plasma physics basis for the filter effect, the fundamental parameter constraints, and modeling results of filter operation.

  4. Cross-species analysis of genic GC3 content and DNA methylation patterns.

    PubMed

    Tatarinova, Tatiana; Elhaik, Eran; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    The GC content in the third codon position (GC(3)) exhibits a unimodal distribution in many plant and animal genomes. Interestingly, grasses and homeotherm vertebrates exhibit a unique bimodal distribution. High GC(3) was previously found to be associated with variable expression, higher frequency of upstream TATA boxes, and an increase of GC(3) from 5' to 3'. Moreover, GC(3)-rich genes are predominant in certain gene classes and are enriched in CpG dinucleotides that are potential targets for methylation. Based on the GC(3) bimodal distribution we hypothesize that GC(3) has a regulatory role involving methylation and gene expression. To test that hypothesis, we selected diverse taxa (rice, thale cress, bee, and human) that varied in the modality of their GC(3) distribution and tested the association between GC(3), DNA methylation, and gene expression. We examine the relationship between cytosine methylation levels and GC(3), gene expression, genome signature, gene length, and other gene compositional features. We find a strong negative correlation (Pearson's correlation coefficient r = -0.67, P value < 0.0001) between GC(3) and genic CpG methylation. The comparison between 5'-3' gradients of CG(3)-skew and genic methylation for the taxa in the study suggests interplay between gene-body methylation and transcription-coupled cytosine deamination effect. Compositional features are correlated with methylation levels of genes in rice, thale cress, human, bee, and fruit fly (which acts as an unmethylated control). These patterns allow us to generate evolutionary hypotheses about the relationships between GC(3) and methylation and how these affect expression patterns. Specifically, we propose that the opposite effects of methylation and compositional gradients along coding regions of GC(3)-poor and GC(3)-rich genes are the products of several competing processes.

  5. Cross-Species Analysis of Genic GC3 Content and DNA Methylation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Tatarinova, Tatiana; Elhaik, Eran; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    The GC content in the third codon position (GC3) exhibits a unimodal distribution in many plant and animal genomes. Interestingly, grasses and homeotherm vertebrates exhibit a unique bimodal distribution. High GC3 was previously found to be associated with variable expression, higher frequency of upstream TATA boxes, and an increase of GC3 from 5′ to 3′. Moreover, GC3-rich genes are predominant in certain gene classes and are enriched in CpG dinucleotides that are potential targets for methylation. Based on the GC3 bimodal distribution we hypothesize that GC3 has a regulatory role involving methylation and gene expression. To test that hypothesis, we selected diverse taxa (rice, thale cress, bee, and human) that varied in the modality of their GC3 distribution and tested the association between GC3, DNA methylation, and gene expression. We examine the relationship between cytosine methylation levels and GC3, gene expression, genome signature, gene length, and other gene compositional features. We find a strong negative correlation (Pearson’s correlation coefficient r = −0.67, P value < 0.0001) between GC3 and genic CpG methylation. The comparison between 5′-3′ gradients of CG3-skew and genic methylation for the taxa in the study suggests interplay between gene-body methylation and transcription-coupled cytosine deamination effect. Compositional features are correlated with methylation levels of genes in rice, thale cress, human, bee, and fruit fly (which acts as an unmethylated control). These patterns allow us to generate evolutionary hypotheses about the relationships between GC3 and methylation and how these affect expression patterns. Specifically, we propose that the opposite effects of methylation and compositional gradients along coding regions of GC3-poor and GC3-rich genes are the products of several competing processes. PMID:23833164

  6. Ecological and evolutionary significance of genomic GC content diversity in monocots

    PubMed Central

    Šmarda, Petr; Bureš, Petr; Horová, Lucie; Leitch, Ilia J.; Mucina, Ladislav; Pacini, Ettore; Tichý, Lubomír; Grulich, Vít; Rotreklová, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Genomic DNA base composition (GC content) is predicted to significantly affect genome functioning and species ecology. Although several hypotheses have been put forward to address the biological impact of GC content variation in microbial and vertebrate organisms, the biological significance of GC content diversity in plants remains unclear because of a lack of sufficiently robust genomic data. Using flow cytometry, we report genomic GC contents for 239 species representing 70 of 78 monocot families and compare them with genomic characters, a suite of life history traits and climatic niche data using phylogeny-based statistics. GC content of monocots varied between 33.6% and 48.9%, with several groups exceeding the GC content known for any other vascular plant group, highlighting their unusual genome architecture and organization. GC content showed a quadratic relationship with genome size, with the decreases in GC content in larger genomes possibly being a consequence of the higher biochemical costs of GC base synthesis. Dramatic decreases in GC content were observed in species with holocentric chromosomes, whereas increased GC content was documented in species able to grow in seasonally cold and/or dry climates, possibly indicating an advantage of GC-rich DNA during cell freezing and desiccation. We also show that genomic adaptations associated with changing GC content might have played a significant role in the evolution of the Earth’s contemporary biota, such as the rise of grass-dominated biomes during the mid-Tertiary. One of the major selective advantages of GC-rich DNA is hypothesized to be facilitating more complex gene regulation. PMID:25225383

  7. Resolution and quantification of complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in heavy fuel oil sample by means of GC × GC-TOFMS combined to multivariate curve resolution.

    PubMed

    Parastar, Hadi; Radović, Jagoš R; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Diez, Sergi; Bayona, Josep Maria; Tauler, Roma

    2011-12-15

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS) combined to multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) is proposed for the resolution and quantification of very complex mixtures of compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in heavy fuel oil (HFO). Different GC × GC-TOFMS data slices acquired during the analysis of HFO samples and PAH standards were simultaneously analyzed using the MCR-ALS method to resolve the pure component elution profiles in the two chromatographic dimensions as well as their pure mass spectra. Outstandingly, retention time shifts within and between GC × GC runs were not affecting the results obtained using the proposed strategy and proper resolution of strongly coeluted compounds, baseline and background contributions was achieved. Calibration curves built up with standard samples of PAHs allowed the quantification of ten of them in HFO aromatic fractions. Relative errors in their estimated concentrations were in all cases below 6%. The obtained results were compared to those obtained by commercial software provided with GC × GC-TOFMS instruments and to Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC). Inspection of these results showed improvement in terms of data fitting, elution process description, concentration relative errors and relative standard deviations.

  8. New approach to study of spilled crude oils using high resolution GC-MS (SIM) and metastable reaction monitoring GC-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Munoz, D; Doumenq, P; Guiliano, M; Jacquot, F; Scherrer, P; Mille, G

    1997-12-12

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and geochemical biomarkers are good environmental markers to study the origin and evolution of an oil spill. To have access to the greatest number of molecular ratios, no fractionation of oil into aliphatic and aromatic compounds is made. Three analytical MS approaches are tested to analyze markers in this total hydrocarbon fraction: classical quadrupole GC-MS, high resolution GC-MS (HR GC-MS) and metastable reaction monitoring GC-MS-MS (MRM GC-MS-MS). This analytical approach is used to follow the evolution of PAHs in petroleum polluted mangrove soils over 8 years by using molecular ratios between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and tri- and tetracyclic terpanes.

  9. Sub-wavelength efficient polarization filter (SWEP filter)

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Marcus L.; Simpson, John T.

    2003-12-09

    A polarization sensitive filter includes a first sub-wavelength resonant grating structure (SWS) for receiving incident light, and a second SWS. The SWS are disposed relative to one another such that incident light which is transmitted by the first SWS passes through the second SWS. The filter has a polarization sensitive resonance, the polarization sensitive resonance substantially reflecting a first polarization component of incident light while substantially transmitting a second polarization component of the incident light, the polarization components being orthogonal to one another. A method for forming polarization filters includes the steps of forming first and second SWS, the first and second SWS disposed relative to one another such that a portion of incident light applied to the first SWS passes through the second SWS. A method for separating polarizations of light, includes the steps of providing a filter formed from a first and second SWS, shining incident light having orthogonal polarization components on the first SWS, and substantially reflecting one of the orthogonal polarization components while substantially transmitting the other orthogonal polarization component. A high Q narrowband filter includes a first and second SWS, the first and second SWS are spaced apart a distance being at least one half an optical wavelength.

  10. Synthesis of multielement microwave directional filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, A. P.; Usenkov, I. V.

    1991-07-01

    Multielement directional filters consisting of a series connection of single-loop filters are analyzed. A procedure for synthesizing such filters according to given parameters of the damping frequency response curve is described, and the phase-frequency response of the synthesized filters is examined.

  11. Water washable stainless steel HEPA filter

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Terrance D.

    2001-01-01

    The invention is a high efficiency particulate (HEPA) filter apparatus and system, and method for assaying particulates. The HEPA filter provides for capture of 99.99% or greater of particulates from a gas stream, with collection of particulates on the surface of the filter media. The invention provides a filter system that can be cleaned and regenerated in situ.

  12. Io's Sodium Cloud (Clear Filter)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of Jupiter's moon Io and its surrounding sky is shown in false color. It was taken at 5 hours 30 minutes Universal Time on Nov. 9, 1996 by the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft, using a clear filter whose wavelength range was approximately 400 to 1100 nanometers. This picture differs in two main ways from the green-yellow filter image of the same scene which was released yesterday.

    First, the sky around Io is brighter, partly because the wider wavelength range of the clear filter lets in more scattered light from Io's illuminated crescent and from Prometheus' sunlit plume. Nonetheless, the overall sky brightness in this frame is comparable to that seen through the green-yellow filter, indicating that even here much of the diffuse sky emission is coming from the wavelength range of the green-yellow filter (i.e., from Io's Sodium Cloud).

    The second major difference is that a quite large roundish spot has appeared in Io's southern hemisphere. This spot -- which has been colored red -- corresponds to thermal emission from the volcano Pele. The green-yellow filter image bears a much smaller trace of this emission because the clear filter is far more sensitive to those relatively long wavelengths where thermal emission is strongest.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  13. Compensatory signals associated with the activation of human GC 5' splice sites.

    PubMed

    Kralovicova, Jana; Hwang, Gyulin; Asplund, A Charlotta; Churbanov, Alexander; Smith, C I Edvard; Vorechovsky, Igor

    2011-09-01

    GC 5' splice sites (5'ss) are present in ∼1% of human introns, but factors promoting their efficient selection are poorly understood. Here, we describe a case of X-linked agammaglobulinemia resulting from a GC 5'ss activated by a mutation in BTK intron 3. This GC 5'ss was intrinsically weak, yet it was selected in >90% primary transcripts in the presence of a strong and intact natural GT counterpart. We show that efficient selection of this GC 5'ss required a high density of GAA/CAA-containing splicing enhancers in the exonized segment and was promoted by SR proteins 9G8, Tra2β and SC35. The GC 5'ss was efficiently inhibited by splice-switching oligonucleotides targeting either the GC 5'ss itself or the enhancer. Comprehensive analysis of natural GC-AG introns and previously reported pathogenic GC 5'ss showed that their efficient activation was facilitated by higher densities of splicing enhancers and lower densities of silencers than their GT 5'ss equivalents. Removal of the GC-AG introns was promoted to a minor extent by the splice-site strength of adjacent exons and inhibited by flanking Alu repeats, with the first downstream Alus located on average at a longer distance from the GC 5'ss than other transposable elements. These results provide new insights into the splicing code that governs selection of noncanonical splice sites.

  14. Numerical simulation of large fabric filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedláček, Jan; Kovařík, Petr

    2012-04-01

    Fabric filters are used in the wide range of industrial technologies for cleaning of incoming or exhaust gases. To achieve maximal efficiency of the discrete phase separation and long lifetime of the filter hoses, it is necessary to ensure uniform load on filter surface and to avoid impacts of heavy particles with high velocities to the filter hoses. The paper deals with numerical simulation of two phase flow field in a large fabric filter. The filter is composed of six chambers with approx. 1600 filter hoses in total. The model was simplified to one half of the filter, the filter hoses walls were substituted by porous zones. The model settings were based on experimental data, especially on the filter pressure drop. Unsteady simulations with different turbulence models were done. Flow field together with particles trajectories were analyzed. The results were compared with experimental observations.

  15. Shielded multi-stage EMI noise filter

    SciTech Connect

    Kisner, Roger Allen; Fugate, David Lee

    2016-11-08

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) noise filter embodiments and methods for filtering are provided herein. EMI noise filters include multiple signal exclusion enclosures. The multiple signal exclusion enclosures contain filter circuit stages. The signal exclusion enclosures can attenuate noise generated external to the enclosures and/or isolate noise currents generated by the corresponding filter circuits within the enclosures. In certain embodiments, an output of one filter circuit stage is connected to an input of the next filter circuit stage. The multiple signal exclusion enclosures can be chambers formed using conductive partitions to divide an outer signal exclusion enclosure. EMI noise filters can also include mechanisms to maintain the components of the filter circuit stages at a consistent temperature. For example, a metal base plate can distribute heat among filter components, and an insulating material can be positioned inside signal exclusion enclosures.

  16. Uncertainty quantification of acoustic emission filtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zárate, Boris A.; Caicedo, Juan M.; Ziehl, Paul

    2012-04-01

    This paper compares six different filtering protocols used in Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring of fatigue crack growth. The filtering protocols are combination of three different filtering techniques which are based on Swansong-like filters and load filters. The filters are compared deterministically and probabilistically. The deterministic comparison is based on the coefficient of determination of the resulting AE data, while the probabilistic comparison is based on the quantification of the uncertainty of the different filtering protocols. The uncertainty of the filtering protocols is quantified by calculating the entropy of the probability distribution of some AE and fracture mechanics parameters for the given filtering protocol. The methodology is useful in cases where several filtering protocols are available and there is no reason to choose one over the others. Acoustic Emission data from a compact tension specimen tested under cyclic load is used for the comparison.

  17. Frequency sampling filters, design and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliphas, A.

    A linear programming method of reduced complexity is developed for the design of FIR frequency sampling digital filters. The frequency sampling method can be used directly in the frequency domain when implementing filtering by fast convolution using discrete Fourier transforms. For narrowband filters or filter banks, methods are shown which significantly reduce the required multiplication operations per data point in filter implementations. A general result is presented on the problem of finding the zeros of the transfer function of an FIR filter. This problem arises when it is necessary to convert a linear phase digital filter design into a minimum phase design. It also arises if it is desired to implement a high order filter by the cascading of a number of low order filters. A method is developed for the computation of the zeros of filters which have been designed by the frequency sampling technique. For such designs the locations of all zeros on the unit circle are known.

  18. Spatial filters for high power lasers

    DOEpatents

    Erlandson, Alvin Charles; Bayramian, Andrew James

    2014-12-02

    A spatial filter includes a first filter element and a second filter element overlapping with the first filter element. The first filter element includes a first pair of cylindrical lenses separated by a first distance. Each of the first pair of cylindrical lenses has a first focal length. The first filter element also includes a first longitudinal slit filter positioned between the first pair of cylindrical lenses. The second filter element includes a second pair of cylindrical lenses separated by a second distance. Each of the second pair of cylindrical lenses has a second focal length. The second filter element also includes a second longitudinal slit filter positioned between the second pair of cylindrical lenses.

  19. [Clinical examination of the gingival effects of three glass ionomer restorative materials (GC Fuji IX GP, GC Fuji IX GP EXTRA és GC EQUIA)].

    PubMed

    Horváth, Attila; Papp, Zsuzsanna; Dobó-Nagy, Csaba; Gera, István

    2014-12-01

    The restoration of cervical abrasions, erosions or cervical carious lesions is still challenging because of their unpredictable adhesion and possible negative effects on the marginal plaque accumulation. The impact of three different glass ionomer cements (GIC) on the marginal gingiva and root sensitivity was studied. Furthermore, it was investigated in details, whether or not a recently developed light curing varnish (GC Coat - EQUIA) had any additional effect on the gingival tissue. A total number of 30 non-smokers with healthy gingiva having at least one cervical supra/paragingival abrasion/erosion/abfraction defects were enrolled in the present study. The cervical defects were randomly restored by using one of the three GIC and the gingival parameters were recorded and evaluated at baseline, 6 weeks and 6 months. According to our results root sensitivity were substantially decreased in all the three groups. Plaque scores were also reduced in all groups with the greatest improvement at the sites where the new varnish were applied. Although this improvement was not reflected by the gingival parameters, such as bleeding on probing and crevicular fluid flow, since both were slightly increased in the varnish group. However, neither the intra-group, nor the intergroup differences reached statistical significance. Consequently, the three investigated GIC did not significantly affect the gingival health, therefore they might serve as alternative for the treatment of such cervical lesions. Nevertheless, the new light cure varnish-coated GIC did not seem to be either clinically or statistical significantly more favorable.

  20. Integration of GC/EI-MS and GC/NCI-MS for simultaneous quantitative determination of opiates, amphetamines, MDMA, ketamine, and metabolites in human hair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya-Hsueh; Lin, Keh-Liang; Chen, Su-Chin; Chang, Yan-Zin

    2008-07-15

    In this paper, the possibility of using a multiple ionization mode approach of GC/MS was developed for the simultaneous hair testing of common drugs of abuse in Asia, including amphetamines (amphetamine, AP; methamphetamine, MA; methylenedioxy amphetamine, MDA; methylenedioxy methamphetamine, MDMA; methylenedioxy ethylamphetamine, MDEA), ketamine (ketamine, K; norketamine, NK), and opiates (morphine, MOR; codeine, COD; 6-acetylmorphine, 6-AM). This strategy integrated the characteristics of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using electron impact ionization (EI) and negative chemical ionization (NCI). Hair samples (25 mg) were washed, cut, and incubated overnight at 25 degrees C in methanol-trifluoroacetic acid (methanol-TFA). The samples were extracted by solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure, derivatized using heptafluorobutyric acid anhydride (HFBA) at 70 degrees C for 30 min, and the derivatives analyzed by GC-MS with EI and NCI. The limit of detection (LOD) with GC/EI-MS analysis obtained were 0.03 ng/mg for AP, MA, MDA, MDMA, and MDEA; 0.05 ng/mg for K, NK, MOR, and COD; and 0.08 ng/mg for 6-AM. The LOD of GC/NCI-MS analysis was much lower than GC/EI-MS analysis. The LOD obtained were 30 pg/mg for AP and MDA in GC/EI-MS and 2 pg/mg in GC/NCI-MS. Therefore, the sensitivity of AP and MDA in GC/NCI-MS was improved from 15-fold compared with EI. The sensitivity of AP, MA, MDA, MDMA, MDEA, MOR, and COD was improved from 15- to 60-fold compared with EI. In addition, the sensitivity of 6-AM increased 8-fold through selection of m/z 197 for the quantitative ion. Moreover, K and NK could dramatically improve their sensitivity at 200- and 2000-fold. The integration of GC/EI-MS and GC/NCI-MS can obtain the high sensitivity and complementary results of drugs of abuse in hair. Six hair samples from known drug abusers were examined by this new strategy. These results show that integrating the characteristics of GC/EI-MS and GC/NCI-MS were not only enhancement of

  1. α1 Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase (sGC) Splice Forms as Potential Regulators of Human sGC Activity*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sharina, Iraida G.; Jelen, Filip; Bogatenkova, Elena P.; Thomas, Anthony; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2008-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), a key protein in the NO/cGMP signaling pathway, is an obligatory heterodimeric protein composed of one α- and one β-subunit. The α1/β1 sGC heterodimer is the predominant form expressed in various tissues and is regarded as the major isoform mediating NO-dependent effects such as vasodilation. We have identified three new α1 sGC protein variants generated by alternative splicing. The 363 residue N1-α1 sGC splice variant contains the regulatory domain, but lacks the catalytic domain. The shorter N2-α1 sGC maintains 126 N-terminal residues and gains an additional 17 unique residues. The C-α1 sGC variant lacks 240 N-terminal amino acids, but maintains a part of the regulatory domain and the entire catalytic domain. Q-PCR of N1-α1, N2-α1 sGC mRNA levels together with RT-PCR analysis for C-α1 sGC demonstrated that the expression of the α1 sGC splice forms vary in different human tissues indicative of tissue-specific regulation. Functional analysis of the N1-α1 sGC demonstrated that this protein has a dominant-negative effect on the activity of sGC when coexpressed with the α1/β1 heterodimer. The C-α1 sGC variant heterodimerizes with the β1 subunit and produces a fully functional NO- and BAY41-2272-sensitive enzyme. We also found that despite identical susceptibility to inhibition by ODQ, intracellular levels of the 54-kDa C-α1 band did not change in response to ODQ treatments, while the level of 83 kDa α1 band was significantly affected by ODQ. These studies suggest that modulation of the level and diversity of splice forms may represent novel mechanisms modulating the function of sGC in different human tissues. PMID:18381288

  2. The use of filter media to determine filter cleanliness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Staden, S. J.; Haarhoff, J.

    It is general believed that a sand filter starts its life with new, perfectly clean media, which becomes gradually clogged with each filtration cycle, eventually getting to a point where either head loss or filtrate quality starts to deteriorate. At this point the backwash cycle is initiated and, through the combined action of air and water, returns the media to its original perfectly clean state. Reality, however, dictates otherwise. Many treatment plants visited a decade or more after commissioning are found to have unacceptably dirty filter sand and backwash systems incapable of returning the filter media to a desired state of cleanliness. In some cases, these problems are common ones encountered in filtration plants but many reasons for media deterioration remain elusive, falling outside of these common problems. The South African conditions of highly eutrophic surface waters at high temperatures, however, exacerbate the problems with dirty filter media. Such conditions often lead to the formation of biofilm in the filter media, which is shown to inhibit the effective backwashing of sand and carbon filters. A systematic investigation into filter media cleanliness was therefore started in 2002, ending in 2005, at the University of Johannesburg (the then Rand Afrikaans University). This involved media from eight South African Water Treatment Plants, varying between sand and sand-anthracite combinations and raw water types from eutrophic through turbid to low-turbidity waters. Five states of cleanliness and four fractions of specific deposit were identified relating to in situ washing, column washing, cylinder inversion and acid-immersion techniques. These were measured and the results compared to acceptable limits for specific deposit, as determined in previous studies, though expressed in kg/m 3. These values were used to determine the state of the filters. In order to gain greater insight into the composition of the specific deposits stripped from the media, a

  3. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  4. Digital frequency tracking filter design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Hen-Geul

    In this paper, three design approaches of the digital frequency tracking filter are presented. The common structure of these approaches are: (1) to have a bank of filters to process the received signals (signals are separated into a few sections as the excitation frequency sweeps from low to high) from the test specimen, (2) to use the Welsh method to compute the spectral density via the FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) algorithm. The bandpass filter bank is employed in the 1st approach to remove the noise which is contained in all sections of received signals. The decimation and interpolation schemes are used in the 2nd approach to reduce the unnecessary computations which exist in the over sampled sections of received signals. The modulation and demodulation schemes (for high-frequency sections only) combined with decimation and interpolation schemes (for over sampled section only) are employed in the 3rd approach. The modulation and demodulation schemes are used to shift the spectrum from high-frequency to low-frequency for simplying the filtering process via LPFs (Low Pass Filters).

  5. Modal Filters for Infrared Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ksendzov, Alexander; MacDonald, Daniel R.; Soibel, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Modal filters in the approximately equal to 10-micrometer spectral range have been implemented as planar dielectric waveguides in infrared interferometric applications such as searching for Earth-like planets. When looking for a small, dim object ("Earth") in close proximity to a large, bright object ("Sun"), the interferometric technique uses beams from two telescopes combined with a 180 phase shift in order to cancel the light from a brighter object. The interferometer baseline can be adjusted so that, at the same time, the light from the dimmer object arrives at the combiner in phase. This light can be detected and its infrared (IR) optical spectra can be studied. The cancellation of light from the "Sun" to approximately equal to 10(exp 6) is required; this is not possible without special devices-modal filters- that equalize the wavefronts arriving from the two telescopes. Currently, modal filters in the approximately equal to 10-micrometer spectral range are implemented as single- mode fibers. Using semiconductor technology, single-mode waveguides for use as modal filters were fabricated. Two designs were implemented: one using an InGaAs waveguide layer matched to an InP substrate, and one using InAlAs matched to an InP substrate. Photon Design software was used to design the waveguides, with the main feature all designs being single-mode operation in the 10.5- to 17-micrometer spectral range. Preliminary results show that the filter's rejection ratio is 26 dB.

  6. A biological oil adsorption filter.

    PubMed

    Pasila, Antti

    2004-12-01

    A new oil adsorption method called adsorption filtration (AF) has been developed. It is a technology where by oil residues can be cleaned from water by running it through a simple filter made from freeze treated, dried, milled and then fragmented plant material. By choosing suitable plants and fragmentation sizes it is possible to produce filters, which pass water but adsorb oil. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities of manufacturing oil adsorbing filter materials from reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) or hemp fibre (Cannabis sativa L.). The oil (80 ml) was mixed with de-ionised water (200 ml) and this mixture was filtered through 10 or 20 g adsorption filters. Fine spring harvested hemp fibre (diameter less than 1 mm) and reed canary grass fragments adsorb 2-4 g of oil per gram of adsorption material compared to 1-3 g of water. Adsorption filtration is thus a novel way of gathering spilled oil in shallow coastal waters before the oil reaches the shore.

  7. Microbial validation of vent filters.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J H; Frieben, W R

    1984-08-01

    The Upjohn Company uses filtration to remove microorganisms and particulates from air and other gases which may come in contact with sterile products. To validate the microbial retentivity of these filters, they were challenged with an aerosol of Bacillus subtilis var niger spores. An aerosol challenge was used because it more closely simulated the use for which these filters were designed. The test apparatus was constructed of autoclavable components using a jet-type nebulizer and heated air mixing tube. Characterization of the aerosol particle size distribution with a particle size analyzer demonstrated that 80% of the particles had a diameter of x 3.0 times;m and that the particles had a mean mass diameter of 1.9 times;m with a geometric standard deviation of 1.8 times;m. Studies conducted with aerosols of Bacillus subtilis var niger spores demonstrated that the test apparatus could recover ca. 50% of the spores that were aerosolized. Hydrophobic filters from various manufactures were challenged with an aerosol of at least 10(8) spores of Bacillus subtilis. All filters tested could retain at least 10(9) spores when physical integrity of the filter was verfield.

  8. Filter systems for IGCC applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, S.; Gieger, R.; Sobel, N.; Johnson, D.

    1995-11-01

    The objectives of this program were to identify metallic filter medium to be utilized in the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle process (IGCC). In IGCC processes utilizing high efficiency desulfurizing technology, the traditional corrosion attack, sulfidation, is minimized so that metallic filters are viable alternatives over ceramic filters. Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station is being developed to demonstrate Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology. The Pall Gas Solid Separation (GSS) System is a self cleaning filtration system designed to remove virtually all particulate matter from gas streams. The heart of the system is the filter medium used to collect the particles on the filter surface. The medium`s filtration efficiency, uniformity, permeability, voids volume, and surface characteristics are all important to establishing a permeable permanent cake. In-house laboratory blowback tests, using representative full scale system particulate, were used to confirm the medium selection for this project. Test elements constructed from six alloys were supplied for exposure tests: PSS 310SC (modified 310S alloy); PSS 310SC heat treated; PSS 310SC-high Cr; PSS 310SC-high Cr heat treated; PSS Hastelloy X; and PSS Hastelloy X heat treated.

  9. Novel Nonlinear Hybrid Filters for Image Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shaomin

    1995-01-01

    Image noise removal and enhancement are important subjects in image processing. Nonlinear techniques for image enhancement and noise reduction challenge the linear techniques by improving image quality while removing noise. The purpose of this thesis is devoted to systematically unifying theory and techniques for mixed noise removal and image enhancement, and to developing new techniques for removing large amounts of mixed Gaussian and impulsive noise while preserving image details. In this thesis, we introduce three new hybrid filters which combine linear and nonlinear filters to produce new hybrid filters capable of removing large amounts of mixed noise. To efficiently use the ambiguous information in an image, both fuzzy set concepts and fuzzy logic operating rules are utilized in the filter design techniques. The three new filters include the single level trained fuzzy filter (SLTF), the multi-level adaptive fuzzy filter (MLAF), and the decision directed window adaptive hybrid filter (DDWAH). The SLTF filter is designed to remove large amounts of mixed noise by combining an impulse filter with a fuzzy filter. The efficiency of the SLTF filter in removing large amounts of mixed noise while preserving image edges is demonstrated. The MLAF filter is an adaptive SLTF filter which uses the local variance of image gray scales to adapt the weights used in the linear portion of the filter to local image statistics. The MLAF filter provides improved visual performance compared to the SLTF filter. The adaptive DDWAH filter uses local statistics to adapt the window size of the filter to local statistics. This approach prevents distortion of small objects in the image, and removes noise more effectively than non-adaptive filters. The experimental results clearly show the improved noise removal performance and good edge preservation properties. Theoretical analysis verifies the measured results.

  10. Active dc filter for HVDC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W. ); Asplund, G.

    1994-01-01

    This article is a case history of the installation of active dc filters for high-performance, low-cost harmonics filtering at the Lindome converter station in the Konti-Skan 2 HVDC transmission link between Denmark and Sweden. The topics of the article include harmonics, interference, and filters, Lindome active dc filter, active dc filter design, digital signal processor, control scheme, protection and fault monitoring, and future applications.

  11. Classification of Coffee Beans by GC-C-IRMS, GC-MS, and 1H-NMR

    PubMed Central

    Arana, Victoria Andrea; Esseiva, Pierre; Pazos, Diego

    2016-01-01

    In a previous work using 1H-NMR we reported encouraging steps towards the construction of a robust expert system for the discrimination of coffees from Colombia versus nearby countries (Brazil and Peru), to assist the recent protected geographical indication granted to Colombian coffee in 2007. This system relies on fingerprints acquired on a 400 MHz magnet and is thus well suited for small scale random screening of samples obtained at resellers or coffee shops. However, this approach cannot easily be implemented at harbour's installations, due to the elevated operational costs of cryogenic magnets. This limitation implies shipping the samples to the NMR laboratory, making the overall approach slower and thereby more expensive and less attractive for large scale screening at harbours. In this work, we report on our attempt to obtain comparable classification results using alternative techniques that have been reported promising as an alternative to NMR: GC-MS and GC-C-IRMS. Although statistically significant information could be obtained by all three methods, the results show that the quality of the classifiers depends mainly on the number of variables included in the analysis; hence NMR provides an advantage since more molecules are detected to obtain a model with better predictions. PMID:27516919

  12. Attempted suicide by ingestion of chlorpyrifos: identification in serum and gastric content by GC-FID/GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María A; Ballesteros, Salomé; Sánchez de la Torre, Carolina; Sanchiz, Antonio; Almarza, Elena; García-Aguilera, Alejandro

    2004-10-01

    A mild case of self-poisoning with a chlorpyrifos formulation following oral ingestion is reported. A 15-year-old female went to the emergency room after the ingestion of a product from a bottle marked with a label "Poison". On admission, she was obtunded, with normal vital signs and a strong smell of solvent. Therapeutic measures included the application of decontamination procedures, oxygen, and gastric protectors. She had a good outcome with mild CNS depression and bradycardia. Two hours after ingestion, biological samples were collected in the emergency room and sent for analysis to our laboratory with instructions to investigate the presence of solvents. The serum and gastric content contained 5.3 and 9.4 microg/mL of unmetabolized chlorpyrifos, 4.6 and 6.9 microg/mL of toluene, and 2.5 and 7.9 microg/mL of butyl acetate, respectively. Small traces of other solvents and tetradifon were also detected. Toxicological analyses were negative for ethanol, other volatile solvents, and common drugs of abuse. The simultaneous determination of chlorpyrifos, toluene, and butyl acetate was performed using the combination of gas chromatography (GC)-flame ionization detection for screening analysis and GC-mass spectrometry for confirmation of the obtained results. The method provides an excellent and rapid tool for use in cases of pesticide poisonings, allowing the simultaneous detection of the pesticide and distillates in the performance of systematic toxicological analysis in forensic and clinical laboratories.

  13. Determination of aromatic compounds in eluates of pyrolysis solid residues using HS-GC-MS and DLLME-GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Maria S; Gonçalves, M; Lapa, N; Barbosa, R; Mendes, B; Pinto, F; Gulyurtlu, Ibrahim

    2009-11-15

    A method for the determination of 15 aromatic hydrocarbons in eluates from solid residues produced during the co-pyrolysis of plastics and pine biomass was developed. In a first step, several sampling techniques (headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), static headspace sampling (HS), and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) were compared in order to evaluate their sensitivity towards these analytes. HS-SPME and HS sampling had the better performance, but DLLME was itself as a technique able to extract volatiles with a significant enrichment factor. HS sampling coupled with GC-MS was chosen for method validation for the analytes tested. Calibration curves were constructed for each analyte with correlation coefficients higher than 0.999. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.66-37.85 ng/L. The precision of the HS method was evaluated and good repeatability was achieved with relative standard deviations of 4.8-13.2%. The recoveries of the analytes were evaluated by analysing fortified real eluate samples and were in the range of 60.6-113.9%. The validated method was applied in real eluate samples. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) were the compounds in higher concentrations. The DLLME technique coupled with GC-MS was used to investigate the presence of less volatile contaminants in eluate samples. This analysis revealed the presence of significant amounts of alkyl phenols and other aromatic compounds with appreciable water solubility.

  14. Differentiation of methoxybenzoylpiperazines (OMeBzPs) and methylenedioxybenzylpiperazines (MDBPs) By GC-IRD and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hay, Karim M; DeRuiter, Jack; Clark, C Randall

    2012-06-01

    The designer drug 3,4-methylenedioxybenzylpiperazine (3,4-MDBP), its positional isomer 2,3-methylenedioxybenzylpiperazine (2,3-MDBP) and three regioisomeric ring-substituted methoxybenzoylpiperazines (OMeBzPs) have identical elemental composition and no marked differences in their mass spectra with only the three methoxybenzoylpiperazine regioisomers showing one unique major fragment ion at m/z 152. Perfluoroacylation of the secondary amine nitrogen of these isomeric piperazines gave mass spectra with differences in the relative abundance of some fragment ions but did not alter the fragmentation pathway to provide unique ions for discrimination among these isomers. Exact mass determination using gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) did not provide any discrimination among these compounds since the main fragment ions are of identical elemental composition. Gas chromatography coupled to infrared detection (GC-IRD) provides direct confirmatory data for the identification of the carbonyl containing compounds and the differentiation of the psychoactive designer drug 3,4-MDBP from its direct (2,3-MDBP) and indirect (OMeBzPs) regioisomers. The mass spectra in combination with the vapour phase infrared spectra provide for specific confirmation of each of the isomeric piperazines. The underivatized and perfluoroacyl derivative forms of the five piperazines involved in this study were resolved on a stationary phase of 100% trifluoropropyl methyl polysiloxane (Rtx-200).

  15. Filters for HST Wide Field Camera 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, S.; Brown, T.; Boucarut, R.; Figer, D.; Hartig, G.; Kimble, R.; MacKenty, J.; Robberto, M.; Telfer, R.; Kim-Quijano, J.; Quijada, M.; Allen, G.; Arsenovic, P.; Hilbert, B.; Lupie, O.; Townsend, J.

    2006-06-01

    Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3) has been built for installation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during the next servicing mission. The WFC3 instrument consists of both a UVIS and an IR channel, each with its own complement of filters. On the UVIS side, a selectable optical filter assembly (SOFA) contains a set of 12 wheels that house 48 elements (42 full-frame filters, 5 quadrant filters, and 1 UV grism). The IR channel has one filter wheel which houses 17 elements (15 filters and 2 grisms). While the majority of UVIS filters exhibited excellent performance during ground testing, a subset of filters showed filter ghosting; improved replacements for these filters have been procured and installed. No filter ghosting was found in any of the IR filters; however, the new IR detector for WFC3 will have significantly more response blueward of 800 nm than the original detector, requiring that two filters originally constructed on a fused silica substrate be remade to block any visible light transmission. This paper summarizes the characterization of the final complement of the WFC3 UVIS and IR filters, highlighting improvements in the replacement filters and the projected benefit to science observations.

  16. Gaussian particle flow implementation of PHD filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lingling; Wang, Junjie; Li, Yunpeng; Coates, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Particle filter and Gaussian mixture implementations of random finite set filters have been proposed to tackle the issue of jointly estimating the number of targets and their states. The Gaussian mixture PHD (GM-PHD) filter has a closed-form expression for the PHD for linear and Gaussian target models, and extensions using the extended Kalman filter or unscented Kalman Filter have been developed to allow the GM-PHD filter to accommodate mildly nonlinear dynamics. Errors resulting from linearization or model mismatch are unavoidable. A particle filter implementation of the PHD filter (PF-PHD) is more suitable for nonlinear and non-Gaussian target models. The particle filter implementations are much more computationally expensive and performance can suffer when the proposal distribution is not a good match to the posterior. In this paper, we propose a novel implementation of the PHD filter named the Gaussian particle flow PHD filter (GPF-PHD). It employs a bank of particle flow filters to approximate the PHD; these play the same role as the Gaussian components in the GM-PHD filter but are better suited to non-linear dynamics and measurement equations. Using the particle flow filter allows the GPF-PHD filter to migrate particles to the dense regions of the posterior, which leads to higher efficiency than the PF-PHD. We explore the performance of the new algorithm through numerical simulations.

  17. Radiant zone heated particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-12-27

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  18. PRD-66 Gas Filter Development

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, G.D.; Connolly, E.S.

    1997-07-01

    The PRD-66 manufacturing process offers a unique approach to the production of hot gas candle filters for application in Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustors (PFBC) and Integrated Gas Combined Cycle (IGCC) power systems. Fabricated from readily available and inexpensive raw materials, the PRD-66 process uses an admixture of textile and ceramic concepts to produce an all-oxide filter element containing no refractor ceramic fiber (RCF) residues in the finished products. The use demonstration of textile grade glass yarn as a consumable reactant gives the advantages of fabrication versatility and shape control and a unique micro-layered phase structure in the fired product, resulting in unsurpassed thermal shock resistance and operating temperature capability of greater than 1200{degrees}C in a low-cost package. This high throughput, adaptable process allows tailoring of filter element dimensions and operating properties to specific system needs with short lead times and low cost penalties.

  19. Polarization filtering of SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of polarization filtering for the bistatic case is developed for optimum discrimination between two types of targets. The resulting method is half analytical and half numerical. Because it is based on the Stokes matrix representation, the targets of interest can be extended targets. The scattered field from such targets is partially polarized. This method is then applied to the monostatic case with numerical examples relying on the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) full-polarimetric L-band radar data. A matched filter to maximize the power ratio between urban and natural targets is developed. The results show that the same filter is optimal for both ocean and forest targets as natural targets.

  20. Anaerobic filter for biogas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavadej, S.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory study evaluated the performance of an anaerobic filter in producing biogas from pig waste with 30,000 mg/l of COD. The filter packing was bamboo rings of 1 and 1/2 in. diameter, 1 in. long; the bamboo-bed filter operated satisfactorily in a wide COD loading range of 3.74-15.65 kg/cu m/d which corresponds to the hydraulic retention of 8.47 to 1.68 days. At the optimum loading of 7.299 kg COD/cu m/d, the largest gas rate of 0.212 cu m/kg of COD was produced. The required volume of the digester for 1.2 cu m/d of gas production would be only 1.5 cu m; in practical applications, consideration should be given to the gas collecting system and clogging problems.