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Sample records for dye sunset yellow

  1. Electrochemical Sunset Yellow Biosensor Based on Photocured Polyacrylamide Membrane for Food Dye Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Rozi, Normazida; Ahmad, Amalina; Yook Heng, Lee; Shyuan, Loh Kee; Hanifah, Sharina Abu

    2018-01-01

    An enzyme-based electrochemical biosensor was investigated for the analysis of Sunset Yellow synthetic food dye. A glassy carbon electrode was coated with a poly(acrylamide-co-ethyl methacrylate) membrane to immobilize laccase using a single-step photopolymerization procedure. Poly(acrylamide-co-ethyl methacrylate) membrane was demonstrated to have acceptable water absorption and suitable for biosensor application. Sunset Yellow biosensor exhibited a linear response range from 0.08 to 10.00 µM with a detection limit of 0.02 µM. This biosensor was successfully used to determine Sunset Yellow in soft drinks with recoveries of 99.0–101.6%. The method was validated using high-performance liquid chromatography, indicating the biosensor can be as a promising alternative method for Sunset Yellow detection. PMID:29301262

  2. Simultaneous Preconcentration and Determination of Brilliant Blue and Sunset Yellow in Foodstuffs by Solid-Phase Extraction Combined UV-Vis Spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Bişgin, Abdullah Taner

    2018-05-29

    Background: Brilliant Blue and Sunset Yellow, two highly water-soluble synthetic food dyes, are the most popular food dyes used and consumed. Although they are not highly toxic, some health problems can be observed when excessive amounts of food products containing these dyes are consumed. Objectives: The aim of the study was to develop a simultaneous UV-Vis combined solid-phase extraction method, based on the adsorption onto Amberlite XAD-8 resin, for determination of Brilliant Blue and Sunset Yellow dyes. Methods: Sample solution was poured into the reservoir of the column and permitted to gravitationally pass through the column at 2 mL/min flow rate. Adsorbed dyes were eluted to 5 mL of final volume with 1 mol/L HNO₃ in ethanol solution by applying a 2 mL/min flow rate. Dye concentrations of the solution were determined at 483 and 630 nm for Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue, respectively. Results: The detection limits of the method for Brilliant Blue and Sunset Yellow were determined as 0.13 and 0.66 ng/mL, respectively. Preconcentration factor was 80. Brilliant Blue contents of real food samples were found to be between 11 and 240 μg/g. Sunset Yellow concentrations of foodstuffs were determined to be between 19 and 331 μg/g. Conclusions: Economical, effective, and simple simultaneous determination of Brilliant Blue and Sunset Yellow was achieved by using a solid-phase extraction combined UV-Vis spectrometry method. Highlights: The method is applicable and suitable for routine analysis in quality control laboratories without the need for expert personnel and high operational costs because the instrumentation is simple and inexpensive.

  3. Lack of genotoxic effect of food dyes amaranth, sunset yellow and tartrazine and their metabolites in the gut micronucleus assay in mice.

    PubMed

    Poul, Martine; Jarry, Gérard; Elhkim, Mostafa Ould; Poul, Jean-Michel

    2009-02-01

    The food dyes amaranth, sunset yellow and tartrazine were administered twice, at 24h intervals, by oral gavage to mice and assessed in the in vivo gut micronucleus test for genotoxic effects (frequency of micronucleated cells) and toxicity (apoptotic and mitotic cells). The concentrations of each compound and their main metabolites (sulfanilic acid and naphthionic acid) were measured in faeces during a 24-h period after single oral administrations of the food dyes to mice. Parent dye compounds and their main aromatic amine metabolites were detected in significant amounts in the environment of colonic cells. Acute oral exposure to food dye additives amaranth, sunset yellow and tartrazine did not induce genotoxic effect in the micronucleus gut assay in mice at doses up to 2000 mg/kg b.w. Food dyes administration increased the mitotic cells at all dose levels when compared to controls. These results suggest that the transient DNA damages previously observed in the colon of mice treated by amaranth and tartrazine by the in vivo comet assay [Sasaki, Y.F., Kawaguchi, S., Kamaya, A., Ohshita, M., Kabasawa, K., Iwama, K., Taniguchi, K., Tsuda, S., 2002. The comet assay with 8 mouse organs: results with 39 currently used food additives. Mutat. Res. 519, 103-119] are unable to be fixed in stable genotoxic lesions and might be partly explained by local cytotoxicity of the dyes.

  4. Artificial neural network (ANN) method for modeling of sunset yellow dye adsorption using zinc oxide nanorods loaded on activated carbon: Kinetic and isotherm study.

    PubMed

    Maghsoudi, M; Ghaedi, M; Zinali, A; Ghaedi, A M; Habibi, M H

    2015-01-05

    In this research, ZnO nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon (ZnO-NPs-AC) was synthesized simply by a low cost and nontoxic procedure. The characterization and identification have been completed by different techniques such as SEM and XRD analysis. A three layer artificial neural network (ANN) model is applicable for accurate prediction of dye removal percentage from aqueous solution by ZnO-NRs-AC following conduction of 270 experimental data. The network was trained using the obtained experimental data at optimum pH with different ZnO-NRs-AC amount (0.005-0.015 g) and 5-40 mg/L of sunset yellow dye over contact time of 0.5-30 min. The ANN model was applied for prediction of the removal percentage of present systems with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA), a linear transfer function (purelin) at output layer and a tangent sigmoid transfer function (tansig) in the hidden layer with 6 neurons. The minimum mean squared error (MSE) of 0.0008 and coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.998 were found for prediction and modeling of SY removal. The influence of parameters including adsorbent amount, initial dye concentration, pH and contact time on sunset yellow (SY) removal percentage were investigated and optimal experimental conditions were ascertained. Optimal conditions were set as follows: pH, 2.0; 10 min contact time; an adsorbent dose of 0.015 g. Equilibrium data fitted truly with the Langmuir model with maximum adsorption capacity of 142.85 mg/g for 0.005 g adsorbent. The adsorption of sunset yellow followed the pseudo-second-order rate equation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Artificial neural network (ANN) method for modeling of sunset yellow dye adsorption using zinc oxide nanorods loaded on activated carbon: Kinetic and isotherm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, M.; Ghaedi, M.; Zinali, A.; Ghaedi, A. M.; Habibi, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    In this research, ZnO nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon (ZnO-NPs-AC) was synthesized simply by a low cost and nontoxic procedure. The characterization and identification have been completed by different techniques such as SEM and XRD analysis. A three layer artificial neural network (ANN) model is applicable for accurate prediction of dye removal percentage from aqueous solution by ZnO-NRs-AC following conduction of 270 experimental data. The network was trained using the obtained experimental data at optimum pH with different ZnO-NRs-AC amount (0.005-0.015 g) and 5-40 mg/L of sunset yellow dye over contact time of 0.5-30 min. The ANN model was applied for prediction of the removal percentage of present systems with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA), a linear transfer function (purelin) at output layer and a tangent sigmoid transfer function (tansig) in the hidden layer with 6 neurons. The minimum mean squared error (MSE) of 0.0008 and coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.998 were found for prediction and modeling of SY removal. The influence of parameters including adsorbent amount, initial dye concentration, pH and contact time on sunset yellow (SY) removal percentage were investigated and optimal experimental conditions were ascertained. Optimal conditions were set as follows: pH, 2.0; 10 min contact time; an adsorbent dose of 0.015 g. Equilibrium data fitted truly with the Langmuir model with maximum adsorption capacity of 142.85 mg/g for 0.005 g adsorbent. The adsorption of sunset yellow followed the pseudo-second-order rate equation.

  6. Highly sensitive determination of sunset yellow FCF (E110) in food products based on Chitosan/Nanoparticles/MWCNTs with modified gold electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovina, K.; Siddiquee, S.; Shaarani, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    Sunset Yellow belongs to the family of azo dyes, commonly used in food industry. High consumption of Sunset Yellow can cause health problem to human. Due to arising of the health issues, there are several analytical methods available for determination of Sunset Yellow. However, these methods are required skilled manpower, complicated procedures, time consuming and high cost. Herein, an electrochemical sensor was developed based on the combination of chitosan (CHIT), calcium oxide nanoparticles (CaONPs) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) sensing film for detection of Sunset Yellow in food products. Electrochemical behavior of the modified gold electrode in the presence of Sunset Yellow was studied by using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The morphological characteristics of CHIT/CaONPs/MWCNTs were observed under scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. Under optimal conditions, the DPV was detected with different concentrations of Sunset Yellow in the range of 0.9 to 10 ppm, with detection limit of 0.8 ppm. The developed method has successfully applied for monitoring the presence of Sunset Yellow with different food products including candy, royal jelly, ice cream and soft drink with satisfactory results.

  7. Genetic damage induced by a food coloring dye (sunset yellow) on meristematic cells of Brassica campestris L.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Kshama; Kumar, Girjesh

    2015-01-01

    We have performed the present piece of work to evaluate the effect of synthetic food coloring azo dye (sunset yellow) on actively dividing root tip cells of Brassica campestris L. Three doses of azo dye were administered for the treatment of actively dividing root tip cells, namely, 1%, 3%, and 5%, for 6-hour duration along with control. Mitotic analysis clearly revealed the azo dye induced endpoint deviation like reduction in the frequency of normal divisions in a dose dependent manner. Mitotic divisions in the control sets were found to be perfectly normal while dose based reduction in MI was registered in the treated sets. Azo dye has induced several chromosomal aberrations (genotoxic effect) at various stages of cell cycle such as stickiness of chromosomes, micronuclei formation, precocious migration of chromosome, unorientation, forward movement of chromosome, laggards, and chromatin bridge. Among all, stickiness of chromosomes was present in the highest frequency followed by partial genome elimination as micronuclei. The present study suggests that extensive use of synthetic dye should be forbidden due to genotoxic and cytotoxic impacts on living cells. Thus, there is an urgent need to assess potential hazardous effects of these dyes on other test systems like human and nonhuman biota for better scrutiny.

  8. Genetic Damage Induced by a Food Coloring Dye (Sunset Yellow) on Meristematic Cells of Brassica campestris L.

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Kshama; Kumar, Girjesh

    2015-01-01

    We have performed the present piece of work to evaluate the effect of synthetic food coloring azo dye (sunset yellow) on actively dividing root tip cells of Brassica campestris L. Three doses of azo dye were administered for the treatment of actively dividing root tip cells, namely, 1%, 3%, and 5%, for 6-hour duration along with control. Mitotic analysis clearly revealed the azo dye induced endpoint deviation like reduction in the frequency of normal divisions in a dose dependent manner. Mitotic divisions in the control sets were found to be perfectly normal while dose based reduction in MI was registered in the treated sets. Azo dye has induced several chromosomal aberrations (genotoxic effect) at various stages of cell cycle such as stickiness of chromosomes, micronuclei formation, precocious migration of chromosome, unorientation, forward movement of chromosome, laggards, and chromatin bridge. Among all, stickiness of chromosomes was present in the highest frequency followed by partial genome elimination as micronuclei. The present study suggests that extensive use of synthetic dye should be forbidden due to genotoxic and cytotoxic impacts on living cells. Thus, there is an urgent need to assess potential hazardous effects of these dyes on other test systems like human and nonhuman biota for better scrutiny. PMID:25954313

  9. Serological changes induced by blend of sunset yellow, metanil yellow and tartrazine in swiss albino rat, rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Beenam; Sharma, Shiv

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the toxic effect of blend of some food colors on Swiss albino rats. A blend (1:1:1) of sunset yellow, metanil yellow and tartrazine showed additive effects on serological parameters which indicate that addition of these dye together in food stuff may give rise to more toxic effects than are produced by each dye individually. Animals were divided into four groups (I, II, III, and IV). First group was treated as control and respective group of animals received 25, 50 and 75 mg/kg body weight blend of food colors by gavaging up to 30 days. The serological study showed a decrease in total protein and albumin and an increase in alkaline phosphatase, SGPT and total bilirubin. The results revealed that oral administration of these blend did not affect the body weight gain. The prolonged consumption of the blend may cause adverse effect on human health.

  10. Determination of sunset yellow in soft drinks based on fluorescence quenching of carbon dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yusheng; Zhao, Xin; Qiao, Man; Zhu, Jinghui; Liu, Shaopu; Yang, Jidong; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-10-01

    Fluorescent carbon dots was prepared by heating N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylene diaminetriacetic acid in air. The carbon dots were not only highly soluble in water but also uniform in size, and possessed strong blue fluorescence and excitation wavelength-dependent emission properties with the maximum excitation and emission wavelength at 366 nm and 423 nm, respectively. Food colorant sunset yellow whose excitation and emission wavelength at 303 nm and 430 nm could selectively quench the fluorescence of carbon dots, efficient fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the carbon dots and sunset yellow is achieved. This was exploited to design a method for the determination of sunset yellow in the concentration range from 0.3 to 8.0 μmol L- 1, with a limit of detection (3 σ/k) of 79.6 nmol L- 1. Furthermore the fluorimetric detection method was established and validated for sunset yellow in soft drinks samples with satisfactory results.

  11. Use of retailer fidelity card schemes in the assessment of food additive intake: Sunset Yellow a case study.

    PubMed

    Sardi, M; Haldemann, Y; Nordmann, H; Bottex, B; Safford, B; Smith, B; Tennant, D; Howlett, J; Jasti, P R

    2010-11-01

    The feasibility of using a retailer fidelity card scheme to estimate food additive intake was investigated using the Swiss retailer MIGROS's Cumulus Card and the example of the food colour Sunset Yellow (E 110). Information held within the card scheme was used to identify a sample of households purchasing foods containing Sunset Yellow over a 15 day period. A sample of 1204 households was selected for interview, of which 830 households were retained in the study following interview. Interviews were conducted to establish household structure, patterns of consumption by different individuals within the household, and the proportion of foods containing Sunset Yellow habitually purchased at the retailer and/or consumed outside the home. Information provided by the retailer on levels of Sunset Yellow in the foods was combined with the information obtained at interview to calculate the per-capita intake of Sunset Yellow by members of participating households. More than 99% of consumers (n = 1902) of foods containing Sunset Yellow were estimated to consume less than 1 mg Sunset Yellow kg(-1) body weight day(-1). The method proved to be a simple and resource-efficient approach to estimate food additive intake on the basis of actual consumer behaviour and thus reports results more closely related to the actual consumption of foods by individuals.

  12. Adsorption of sunset yellow FCF from aqueous solution by chitosan-modified diatomite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y Z; Li, J; Li, W J; Li, Y

    2015-01-01

    Sunset yellow (SY) FCF is a hazardous azo dye pollutant found in food processing effluent. This study investigates the use of diatomaceous earth with chitosan (DE@C) as a modified adsorbent for the removal of SY from wastewater. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results indicate the importance of functional groups during the adsorption of SY. The obtained N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm values accord well with IUPAC type II. Our calculations determined a surface area of 69.68 m2 g(-1) for DE@C and an average pore diameter of 4.85 nm. Using response surface methodology, optimized conditions of process variables for dye adsorption were achieved. For the adsorption of SY onto DE@C, this study establishes mathematical models for the optimization of pH, contact time and initial dye concentration. Contact time plays a greater role in the adsorption process than either pH or initial dye concentration. According to the adjusted correlation coefficient (adj-R2>0.97), the models used here are suitable for illustration of the adsorption process. Theoretical experimental conditions included a pH of 2.40, initial dye concentration of 113 mg L(-1) and 30.37 minutes of contact time. Experimental values for the adsorption rate (92.54%) were close to the values predicted by the models (95.29%).

  13. Comparison of ultrasonic with stirrer performance for removal of sunset yellow (SY) by activated carbon prepared from wood of orange tree: artificial neural network modeling.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, A M; Ghaedi, M; Karami, P

    2015-03-05

    The present work focused on the removal of sunset yellow (SY) dye from aqueous solution by ultrasound-assisted adsorption and stirrer by activated carbon prepared from wood of an orange tree. Also, the artificial neural network (ANN) model was used for predicting removal (%) of SY dye based on experimental data. In this study a green approach was described for the synthesis of activated carbon prepared from wood of an orange tree and usability of it for the removal of sunset yellow. This material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The impact of variables, including initial dye concentration (mg/L), pH, adsorbent dosage (g), sonication time (min) and temperature (°C) on SY removal were studied. Fitting the experimental equilibrium data of different isotherm models such as Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models display the suitability and applicability of the Langmuir model. Analysis of experimental adsorption data by different kinetic models including pseudo-first and second order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion models indicate the applicability of the second-order equation model. The adsorbent (0.5g) is applicable for successful removal of SY (>98%) in short time (10min) under ultrasound condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Photocatalytic degradation of synthetic food dye, sunset yellow FCF (FD&C yellow no. 6) by Ailanthus excelsa Roxb. possessing antioxidant and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Deepika, Subramanyam; Harishkumar, Rajendran; Dinesh, Murugesan; Abarna, Rajadurai; Anbalagan, Moorthy; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana; Selvaraj, Chinnadurai Immanuel

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of our work is to identify the bioactive compounds of bark and leaves extract from Ailanthus excelsa Roxb. and to explore its effectiveness against synthetic food dye. The presence of primary and secondary metabolites was confirmed by carrying out phytochemicals analysis. With the prior knowledge accessible on the indispensable secondary metabolites holding antioxidant and cytotoxicity activity, the quantitative screening of total phenolic and flavonoid content in methanolic and aqueous extract of bark and leaves from Ailanthus excelsa were done. Comparatively, a higher value of flavonoid (161±0.3μg/mg) and phenolic acid content (152.4±0.14μg/mg) was found in bark extract. By FTIR analysis, the characteristic peak was obtained at 1581.63 and 1598.99cm -1 confirmed the presence of functional groups associated to flavonoids and other phenolic groups respectively. In bark extract, 81% of DPPH inhibition was observed when compared to ascorbic acid (standard) 92% of free radical scavenging activity. Bark extract from Ailanthus excelsa exhibited 71% cytotoxicity against HeLa cell line (cervical cancer). In examining the toxicity level of crude extracts with red blood cells (RBC), the bark extract was showed a very less (2.8%) haemolytic activity. They also showed maximum zone of inhibition in antibacterial activity i.e. 13±0.5mm against Escherichia coli culture. At a concentration of 10mg/mL of crude extract from A. excelsa, 55% degradation of sunset yellow dye was observed. It concludes that, the compounds present in the A. excelsa, especially the bark extract showed better photocatalytic, haemolytic, antioxidant, cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity when compared to leaves extract. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as adsorbent for removal of sunset yellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, M.; Hekmati Jah, A.; Khodadoust, S.; Sahraei, R.; Daneshfar, A.; Mihandoost, A.; Purkait, M. K.

    2012-05-01

    Adsorption is a promising technique for decolorization of effluents of textile dyeing industries but its application is limited due to requirement of high amounts of adsorbent required. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded onto activated carbon (CdTN-AC) for the removal of sunset yellow (SY) dye from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch mode varying solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration, CdTN-AC dose, and temperature. In order to investigate the efficiency of SY adsorption on CdTN-AC, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models were studied. It was observed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than other kinetic models with good correlation coefficient. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy, entropy, activation energy, and sticking probability were also calculated. It was found that the sorption of SY onto CdTN-AC was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The proposed adsorbent is applicable for SY removal from waste of real effluents including pea-shooter, orange drink and jelly banana with efficiency more than 97%.

  16. Enhanced photocatalytic efficiency of NiS/TiO{sub 2} composite catalysts using sunset yellow, an azo dye under day light illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Rajamanickam, D.; Dhatshanamurthi, P.; Shanthi, M., E-mail: shanthimsm@gmail.com

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • NiS/TiO{sub 2} was successfully synthesized by sol–gel method. • This new method of preparation gives a homogeneous dispersion of NiS on TiO{sub 2}. • Degradation activity of NiS/TiO{sub 2} is found to be more efficient than other catalysts. • Addition of oxidants enhances the degradation efficiency significantly. • COD measurements reveal the complete mineralization of dye molecules. • The catalyst is found to be reusable. - Abstract: To improve the solar light induced photocatalytic application performances of TiO{sub 2}, in this study, the NiS modified TiO{sub 2} composite photocatalysts with various ratios of NiS to TiO{sub 2} weremore » prepared by sol–gel method. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution scanning electron microscope (HR-SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM), energy dispersive spectra (EDS), diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), photoluminescence spectra (PL), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (B–E–T) surface area measurement methods. The photocatalytic activity of NiS/TiO{sub 2} was investigated for the degradation of sunset yellow (SY) in aqueous solution using solar light. The NiS/TiO{sub 2} is found to be more efficient than prepared TiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}–P25 at pH 7 for the mineralization of SY. The effects of operational parameters such as the amount of photocatalyst, dye concentration and initial pH on photo mineralization of SY have been analyzed. The degradation was strongly enhanced in the presence of oxidants such as H{sub 3}K{sub 5}O{sub 18}S{sub 4} (Oxone), KIO{sub 4}, and KBrO{sub 3}. The mineralization of SY has been identified by COD measurements. The catalyst is found to be reusable.« less

  17. High Content Analysis technology for evaluating the joint toxicity of sunset yellow and sodium sulfite in vitro.

    PubMed

    Qu, Daofeng; Gu, Yanpei; Feng, Lifang; Han, Jianzhong

    2017-10-15

    Foods contain various additives that affect our daily lives. At present, food additive safety evaluation standards are based on the toxicity of single additives, but food additives are often used in combination and may have additive, synergistic or antagonistic actions. The current study investigated the toxicity of food additives and mechanisms of damage in HepG2 cells using High Content Analysis (HCA). We used the CCK-8 assay to determine cell viability, providing an experimental basis for determining the safety of food additives. All of the food additives tested were observed to decrease the growth of HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Sunset yellow and sodium sulfite had IC50 values of 1.06, and 0.30g/L at 24h, respectively. HCA showed that both sunset yellow and sodium sulfite had synergistic effects on cell number, membrane permeability, mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular calcium level, oxidative stress, and high dose group DNA damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of cadmium hydroxide nanowires and silver nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as new adsorbents for efficient removal of Sunset yellow: Kinetics and equilibrium study.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang

    2012-08-01

    Adsorption of Sunset yellow (SY) onto cadmium hydroxide nanowires loaded on activated carbon (Cd(OH)(2)-NW-AC) and silver nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (Ag-NP-AC) was investigated. The effects of pH, contact time, amount of adsorbents, initial dye concentration, agitation speed and temperature on Sunset yellow removal on both adsorbents were studied. Following the optimization of variables, the experimental data were fitted to different conventional isotherm models like Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) based on linear regression coefficient R(2) the Langmuir isotherm was found to be the best fitting isotherm model and the maximum monolayer adsorption capacities calculated based on this model for Cd(OH)(2)-NW-AC and Ag-NP-AC were found to be 76.9 and 37.03mg g(-1) at room temperatures, respectively. The experimental fitting of time dependency of adsorption of SY onto both adsorbent shows the applicability of second order kinetic model for interpretation of kinetic data. The pseudo-second order model best fits the adsorption kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy, entropy, activation energy, sticking probability, and Gibb's free energy changes were also calculated. It was found that the sorption of SY over (Cd(OH)(2)-NW-AC) and (Ag-NP-AC) was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. Efficiency of the adsorbent was also investigated using real effluents and more than 95% SY removal for both adsorbents was observed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sunset yellow FCF, a permitted food dye, alters functional responses of splenocytes at non-cytotoxic dose.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ashish; Kumar, Arvind; Tripathi, Anurag; Das, Mukul

    2013-03-13

    Sunset yellow FCF (SY), a permitted food color, is extensively used in various food preparations and quite often exceeds the permissible levels (100-200 mg/kg). Several toxicity studies on SY are reported, however immunomodulatory properties have not been explored yet. To investigate the immunotoxic properties of SY, splenocytes were isolated, cultured and subjected to mitogen stimulated proliferation assay (lipopolysaccharide, LPS or concanavalin A, Con A), mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) assay, immunophenotypic analysis of cell surface receptor expression and assay for cytokines release in the culture supernatants were performed in the presence of SY. Since SY did not exhibit any cytotoxicity up to 250 μg/ml, this dose was used for further studies. It was observed that SY (250 μg/ml) significantly (p<0.05) suppressed the mitogen induced proliferation of splenocytes and MLR response. Further, immunophenotypic analysis revealed that SY alters the relative expression of CD3e/CD4/CD8 in T cells and CD19 in B-cells. Consistent with the suppression of T-cell and B-cell responses and altered surface receptor expression, SY also lowered the expression of IL2, IL4, IL6, IL-17, IFN-γ and TNF-α cytokines. These results suggest that non-cytotoxic dose of SY may have immunomodulatory effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemical Analysis of the Dyes Used in Navy Green and Yellow Colored Smokes .

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-31

    RD-RI69 478 CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DYES USED IN NAVY OREEN AND 11 YELLOW COLORED SNOKES(U) NAVAL WEAPONS SUP POR T CENTER CRANE IN APPLIED SCIENCES...NWSC/CR/RDTR-271 00 CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DYES USED IN NAVY GREEN AND YELLOW COLORED SMOKES Anton Chin Naval Weapons Support Center Applied Sciences...62765 SF65-559 559-691 20392 TITLE (Iint/ude Sec uritE C/assitication) CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DYES USED IN NAVY GREEN AND YELLOW COLORED SMOKES 1.1

  1. An enhanced electrochemical platform based on graphene oxide and multi-walled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite for sensitive determination of Sunset Yellow and Tartrazine.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xinlan; Lu, Limin; Leng, Jing; Yu, Yongfang; Wang, Wenmin; Jiang, Min; Bai, Ling

    2016-01-01

    A novel electrochemical platform was designed for the simultaneous determination of Sunset Yellow (SY) and Tartrazine (TT), synthetic food dyes, by combining the signal amplification properties of graphene oxide (GO) and the excellent electronic and antifouling properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Stable dispersion of GO/MWCNTs composite was produced by sonication mixing. Compared with glassy carbon, MWCNTs and GO electrodes, GO/MWCNTs electrode exhibited strong enhancement effect and greatly increased the oxidation signal of SY and TT. Under optimized conditions, the enhanced anodic peak currents represented the excellent analytical performance of simultaneous detection of SY and TT in the range of 0.09-8.0 μM, with a low limit of detection of 0.025 μM for SY and 0.01 μM for TT (S/N = 3), respectively. To further validate its possible application, the proposed method was successfully used for the determination of SY and TT in orange juice with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Phases and structures of sunset yellow and disodium cromoglycate mixtures in water.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Smith, Gregory P; Yi, Youngwoo; Xu, Charles; Biffi, Silvia; Serra, Francesca; Bellini, Tommaso; Zhu, Chenhui; Clark, Noel A

    2016-01-01

    We study phases and structures of mixtures of two representative chromonic liquid crystal materials, sunset yellow FCF (SSY) and disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), in water. A variety of combinations of isotropic, nematic (N), and columnar (also called M) phases are observed depending on their concentrations, and a phase diagram is made. We find a tendency for DSCG-rich regions to show higher-order phases while SSY-rich regions show lower-order ones. We observe uniform mesophases only when one of the materials is sparse in the N phases. Their miscibility in M phases is so low that essentially complete phase separation occurs. X-ray scattering and spectroscopy studies confirm that SSY and DSCG molecules do not mix when they form chromonic aggregates and neither do their aggregates when they form M phases.

  3. A hybrid sorption - Spectrometric method for determination of synthetic anionic dyes in foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Tikhomirova, Tatyana I; Ramazanova, Gyulselem R; Apyari, Vladimir V

    2017-04-15

    A sorption-spectrometric method for determination of the anionic synthetic dyes based on their sorption on silica sorbent modified with hexadecyl groups (C16) followed by measuring the diffuse reflectance spectra on the surface of the sorbent has been proposed. Adsorption of sulfonated azo dyes Tartrazine (E102), Sunset Yellow FCF (E110), Ponceau 4R (E124) reaches maximum in acidic medium (1M HCl - pH 1). For the quinophthalone type dye Quinoline Yellow (E104), the adsorption is also maximal in an acidic medium (1M HCl - pH 2). The triphenylmethane dye Fast Green FCF (E143) is absorbed in the wider area of pH (1M HCl - pH 6). Increasing concentration of the dyes in a solution led to the increase in absorption band intensity in diffuse reflectance spectra of the adsorbent, which was used for their direct determination. The proposed method was applied to the determination of dyes in beverages and pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gold Nanorods as Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Substrates for Rapid and Sensitive Analysis of Allura Red and Sunset Yellow in Beverages.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yiming; Wang, Xiaohui; Lai, Keqiang; Huang, Yiqun; Rasco, Barbara A; Fan, Yuxia

    2018-03-21

    Synthetic colorants in food can be a potential threat to human health. In this study, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) coupled with gold nanorods as substrates is proposed to analyze allura red and sunset yellow in beverages. The gold nanorods with different aspect ratios were synthesized, and their long-term stability, SERS activity, and the effect of the different salts on the SERS signal were investigated. The results demonstrate that gold nanorods have a satisfactory stability (stored up to 28 days). SERS coupled with gold nanorods exhibit stronger sensitivity. MgSO 4 was chosen to improve the SERS signal of sunset yellow, and no salts could enhance the SERS signal of allura red. The lowest concentration was 0.10 mg/L for both colorant standard solutions. The successful prediction results using SERS were much closer to those obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography for the sample in beverages. SERS combined with gold nanorods shows potential for analyzing food colorants and other food additives as a rapid, convenient, and sensitive method.

  5. Simultaneous Determination of Potassium Sorbate, Sodium Benzoate, Quinoline Yellow and Sunset Yellow in Lemonades and Lemon Sauces by HPLC Using Experimental Design.

    PubMed

    Dinç Zor, Şule; Aşçı, Bürge; Aksu Dönmez, Özlem; Yıldırım Küçükkaraca, Dilek

    2016-07-01

    In this study, development and validation of a HPLC method was described for simultaneous determination of potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate, quinoline yellow and sunset yellow. A Box-Behnken design using three variables at three levels was employed to determine the optimum conditions of chromatographic separation: pH of mobile phase, 6.0-7.0; flow rate, 0.8-1.2 mL min(-1) and the ratio of mobile phase composed of a 0.025 M sodium acetate/acetic acid buffer, 80-90%. Resolution was chosen as a response. The optimized method was validated for linearity, the limits of detection and quantification, accuracy, precision and stability. All the validation parameters were within the acceptance range. The applicability of the developed method to the determination of these food additives in commercial lemonade and lemon sauce samples was successfully demonstrated. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. DNA binding studies of Sunset Yellow FCF using spectroscopy, viscometry and electrochemical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaadi, Sara; Hajian, Reza

    2017-10-01

    Color is one of the important factors in food industry. All food companies use synthetic pigments to improve the aesthetic of products. Studies on the interaction between deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and food dye molecules is important because DNA is responsible for some processes including replication and transcription of cells, mutations, genetic diseases, and some synthetic chemical nucleases. In this study, the molecular interaction between Sunset Yellow FCF (SY) as a common food coloring additive and calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) has been studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorometry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and viscometry techniques. The binding constant between ct-DNA and SY in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4) was calculated as 2.09 × 103 L mol-1. The non-electrostatic bonding constant (K0t) was almost consistent and the ratio of K0t/Kb increased by increasing the ionic strength in the range of 0.01-0.1 mol L-1 of KCl. This observation shows that, the molecular bonding of SY to ct-DNA is a combination of electrostatic and intercalation interactions. In the electrochemical studies, an oxidation peak at 0.71 V and a reduction peak at about 0.63 V was observed with the peak potential difference (ΔEp) of 0.08 V, showing a reversible process. The oxidation and reduction peaks were significantly decreased in the presence of ct-DNA and the reduction peak current shifted to negative values. In spectrofluorometric study, the fluorescence intensity of SY increased dramatically after successive addition of DNA due to the increasing of molecular surface area and decreasing of impact frequency between solvent and SY-DNA adduct. Moreover, viscometric study shows that the increasing of viscosity for SY solution in the presence of DNA is due to the intercalation mechanism with double strand DNA (ds-DNA).

  7. A Novel Preparation Method of Two Polymer Dyes with Low Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Dongjun; Zhang, Mingjie; Cui, Jin; Li, Weixue; Zhu, Guohua

    2017-01-01

    A new preparation method of polymer dyes was developed to improve both the grafting degree of the azo dyes onto O-carboxymethyl chitosan (OMCS) and the water solubility of prepared polymer dyes. Firstly, the coupling compound of two azo edible colorants, sunset yellow (SY) and allura red (AR), was grafted onto OMCS, and then coupled with their diazonium salt. The chemical structure of prepared polymer dyes was determined by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and 1H-NMR, and the results showed that the two azo dyes were successfully grafted onto OMCS. The grafting degree onto OMCS and the water solubility of polymer dyes were tested, and the results showed that they were both improved as expected. The UV-vis spectra analysis results showed that the prepared polymer dyes showed similar color performance with the original azo dyes. Eventually, the cytotoxicity of prepared polymer dyes was tested and compared with the original azo dyes by a cytotoxicity test on human liver cell lines LO2, and the results showed that their grafting onto OMCS significantly reduced the cytotoxicity. PMID:28772583

  8. Determination of Sudan I in drinks containing Sunset yellow by adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Marisol; Arancibia, Verónica; Aliaga, Margarita; Núñez, Claudia; Rojas-Romo, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    An efficient, fast and sensitive method for the determination of Sudan I (SI) in drinks containing Sunset yellow (Sy) is developed and validated using an adsorptive stripping voltammetric procedure. Sy is currently added to a large number of foods; however during their synthesis SI may be produced. The determination is based on adsorption of Sy and SI onto HMDE and later reduction of the azo group at -0.71 and -0.82V, respectively. Using the best set of the experimental conditions (pH 12.3; Eads: -0.40V) for the determination of SI in Sy, a linear response for SI in the concentration range 0.5-27.2μgL(-1) was found, with a detection limit of 1.5μgL(-1) in a tads of only 30s. The method was applied to the determination of SI in commercial drinks with satisfactory results. The presence of SI was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Derivative synchronous fluorimetry for determination of synthetic food dyes in food].

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhi-Hai; Wang, Ling-Yan; Liu, Yu; Cai, Qing; Wang, Hai-Li; Yan, Hong-Tao

    2014-05-01

    The first order derivative synchronous fluoremetry was proposed for simultaneous determination of sunset yellow and ponceau 4R The effect of different experimental conditions, such as different pH for character of fluorescence spectra and the choosing of the optimal wavelength difference were studied. It was showed that the zero-crossing points were at 313. 6 nm for ponceau 4R and at 302. 8 nm for sunset yellow in first order derivative synchronous fluorescence spectra. Therefore, 313. 6 and 302. 8 nm were selected for the determination of sunset yellow and ponceau 4R when delta lambda= 130 nm. This method could minimize interference without preseparation. The linear ranges of sunset yellow and ponceau 4R were from 0. 1 to 2. 0 mg L-1 and from 0. 1 to 4. 0 mg L-1 with correlation coefficient 0. 996 6 and 0. 999 2, the detection limits were 0. 041 and 0. 019 mg L-1 , RS-Ds were 4. 6% and 4. 8% (n=6), respectively. The recoveries varied from 91. 0% to 110%. The proposed method was successfully applied in simultaneous determination of sunset yellow and Ponceau 4R in food.

  10. A Zinc Oxide Nanoflower-Based Electrochemical Sensor for Trace Detection of Sunset Yellow

    PubMed Central

    Ya, Yu; Jiang, Cuiwen; Li, Tao; Liao, Jie; Fan, Yegeng; Wei, Yuning; Yan, Feiyan; Xie, Liping

    2017-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoflower (ZnONF) was synthesized by a simple process and was used to construct a highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the detection of sunset yellow (SY). Due to the large surface area and high accumulation efficiency of ZnONF, the ZnONF-modified carbon paste electrode (ZnONF/CPE) showed a strong enhancement effect on the electrochemical oxidation of SY. The electrochemical behaviors of SY were investigated using voltammetry with the ZnONF-based sensor. The optimized parameters included the amount of ZnONF, the accumulation time, and the pH value. Under optimal conditions, the oxidation peak current was linearly proportional to SY concentration in the range of 0.50–10 μg/L and 10–70 μg/L, while the detection limit was 0.10 μg/L (signal-to-noise ratio = 3). The proposed method was used to determine the amount of SY in soft drinks with recoveries of 97.5%–103%, and the results were in good agreement with the results obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography. PMID:28282900

  11. Decolorization of sulfonated azo dye Metanil Yellow by newly isolated bacterial strains: Bacillus sp. strain AK1 and Lysinibacillus sp. strain AK2.

    PubMed

    Anjaneya, O; Souche, S Yogesh; Santoshkumar, M; Karegoudar, T B

    2011-06-15

    Two different bacterial strains capable of decolorizing a highly water soluble azo dye Metanil Yellow were isolated from dye contaminated soil sample collected from Atul Dyeing Industry, Bellary, India. The individual bacterial strains Bacillus sp. AK1 and Lysinibacillus sp. AK2 decolorized Metanil Yellow (200 mg L(-1)) completely within 27 and 12h respectively. Various parameters like pH, temperature, NaCl and initial dye concentrations were optimized to develop an economically feasible decolorization process. The maximum concentration of Metanil Yellow (1000 mg L(-1)) was decolorized by strains AK2 and AK1 within 78 and 84 h respectively. These strains could decolorize Metanil Yellow over a broad pH range 5.5-9.0; the optimum pH was 7.2. The decolorization of Metanil Yellow was most efficient at 40°C and confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy, TLC, HPLC and GC/MS analysis. Further, both the strains showed the involvement of azoreductase in the decolorization process. Phytotoxicity studies of catabolic products of Metanil Yellow on the seeds of chick pea and pigeon pea revealed much reduction in the toxicity of metabolites as compared to the parent dye. These results indicating the effectiveness of strains AK1 and AK2 for the treatment of textile effluents containing azo dyes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. By-product identification and phytotoxicity of biodegraded Direct Yellow 4 dye.

    PubMed

    Nouren, Shazia; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Iqbal, Munawar; Bibi, Ismat; Kamal, Shagufta; Sadaf, Sana; Sultan, Misbah; Kausar, Abida; Safa, Yusra

    2017-02-01

    Citrus limon peroxidase mediated decolourization of Direct Yellow 4 (DY4) was investigated. The process variables (pH, temperature, incubation time, enzyme dose, H 2 O 2 amount, dye concentration, co-metal ions and surfactants) were optimized for maximum degradation of dye. Maximum dye decolourization of 89.47% was achieved at pH 5.0, temperature 50 °C, enzyme dose 24 U/mL, H 2 O 2 concentration 0.25 mM and DY4 concentration 18.75 mg/L and incubation time 10 min. The co-metal ions and surfactants did not affect the dye decolourization significantly. Response surface analysis revealed that predicted values were in agreement with experimentally determined responses. The degradation products were identified by UPLC/MS analysis and degradation pathway was proposed. Besides, phytotoxicity assay revealed a considerable detoxification in response of biodegradation of DY4 dye. C. limon showed promising efficiency for DY4 degradation and could possibly be used for the remediation of textile effluents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Simultaneous identification of synthetic and natural dyes in different food samples by UPLC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Badal Kumar; Mathiyalagan, Siva; Dalavai, Ramesh; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2017-11-01

    Fast foods and variety food items are populating among the food lovers. To improve the appearance of the food product in surviving gigantic competitive environment synthetic or natural food dyes are added to food items and beverages. Although regulatory bodies permit addition of natural colorants due to its safe and nontoxic nature in food, synthetic dyes are stringently controlled in all food products due to their toxicity by regulatory bodies. Artificial colors are need certification from the regulatory bodies for human consumption. To analyze food dyes in different food samples many analytical techniques are available like high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), thin layer chromatography (TLC), spectroscopic and gas chromatographic methods. However all these reported methods analyzed only synthetic dyes or natural dyes. Not a single method has analyzed both synthetic and natural dyes in a single run. In this study a robust ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method for simultaneous identification of 6 synthetic dyes (Tartrazine, Indigo carmine, Briliant blue, Fast green, malachite green, sunset yellow) and one natural dye (Na-Cu-Chlorophyllin) was developed using acquitic UPLC system equipped with Mass detector and acquity UPLC HSS T3 column (1.8 μm, 2.1 × 50 mm, 100Å). All the dyes were separated and their masses were determined through fragments’ masses analyses.

  14. HPLC-MS degradation study of E10 Sunset Yellow FCF in a commercial beverage.

    PubMed

    Gosetti, Fabio; Gianotti, Valentina; Polati, Stefano; Gennaro, Maria Carla

    2005-10-07

    Experimental evidence has shown that a beverage containing Sunset Yellow FCF (labelled as E110 in the European Union), when exposed to natural conditions of summer temperature and sunlight, losses its colour. To possibly identify the degradation pathway and collect information on the potential toxicity of the uncoloured species formed, different degradation conditions, under both oxidising and reducing environments, were simulated in laboratory. Experiments were carried out under the following conditions: (i) thermally induced degradation, (ii) visible photo induced degradation, (iii) UV-photo induced conditions in oxidising environment (addition of hydrogen peroxide, Fenton reaction) and (iv) UV-photo induced conditions in reducing environment (addition of sulphide and ascorbic acid, addition of ascorbic acid in the absence and in the presence of saccharose). Decolourisation process was observed in oxidant conditions when applying the Fenton reaction but the reaction was too quick to be progressively followed. On the other hand, it was also possible to study the degradation reaction observed in reducing conditions in the presence of ascorbic acid. The HPLC-MS results gave evidence for the cleavage of the double bond and the protonation of the azo groups. The loss of colour is therefore not due to a mineralization process but to the formation of a dimeric form of 5-amino-6-hydroxy-2-naphthalene sulfonate and, likely, of p-amino-benzensulfonate.

  15. Adsorption and Corrosion Inhibition Studies of Some Selected Dyes as Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel in Acidic Medium: Gravimetric, Electrochemical, Quantum Chemical Studies and Synergistic Effect with Iodide Ions.

    PubMed

    Peme, Thabo; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Bahadur, Indra; Adekunle, Abolanle S; Kabanda, Mwadham M; Ebenso, Eno E

    2015-09-02

    The corrosion inhibition properties of some organic dyes, namely Sunset Yellow (SS), Amaranth (AM), Allura Red (AR), Tartrazine (TZ) and Fast Green (FG), for mild steel corrosion in 0.5 M HCl solution, were investigated using gravimetric, potentiodynamic polarization techniques and quantum chemical calculations. The results showed that the studied dyes are good corrosion inhibitors with enhanced inhibition efficiencies. The inhibition efficiency of all the studied dyes increases with increase in concentration, and decreases with increase in temperature. The results showed that the inhibition efficiency of the dyes increases in the presence of KI due to synergistic interactions of the dye molecules with iodide (I(-)) ions. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that the studied dyes are mixed-type inhibitors both in the absence and presence of KI. The adsorption of the studied dyes on mild steel surface, with and without KI, obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and involves physical adsorption mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations revealed that the most likely sites in the dye molecules for interactions with mild steel are the S, O, and N heteroatoms.

  16. Synthesis and swelling characteristics of chitosan and CMC grafted sodium acrylate-co-acrylamide using modified nanoclay and examining its efficacy for removal of dyes.

    PubMed

    Nagarpita, M V; Roy, Pratik; Shruthi, S B; Sailaja, R R N

    2017-09-01

    Chitosan/carboxy methyl chitosan (CMC) grafted sodium acrylate-co-acrylamide/nanoclay superabsorbent nanocomposites have been synthesized in this study by following conventional and microwave assisted grafting methods. Microwave assisted grafting method showed higher grafting yield with enhanced reaction rate. Effect of nanoclay on water adsorption and swelling behaviour of both the composites in acidic, neutral and alkaline medium has been studied. Results showed enhanced swelling rate and water adsorption of both composites after adding 5% of silane treated nanoclay. Dye adsorption capacity of both the composites has been investigated for crystal violet, napthol green and sunset yellow dyes. It was observed that addition of 5% nanoclay enhanced the dye adsorption in both the composites. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models have been used to explain the dye adsorption capabilities. The chitosan and CMC nanocomposites follow both the models with R 2 value more than 0.97. Both the composites showed enhanced dye adsorption with 5% nanoclay. Effect of pH on dye adsorption has also been studied in both the composites. Chitosan nanocomposites showed better performance in dye removal as compared to CMC nanocomposites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mineralization of the sulfonated azo dye Mordant Yellow 3 by a 6-aminonaphthalene-2-sulfonate-degrading bacterial consortium.

    PubMed Central

    Haug, W; Schmidt, A; Nörtemann, B; Hempel, D C; Stolz, A; Knackmuss, H J

    1991-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions the sulfonated azo dye Mordant Yellow 3 was reduced by the biomass of a bacterial consortium grown aerobically with 6-aminonaphthalene-2-sulfonic acid. Stoichiometric amounts of the aromatic amines 6-aminonaphthalene-2-sulfonate and 5-aminosalicylate were generated and excreted into the medium. After re-aeration of the culture, these amines were mineralized by different members of the bacterial culture. Thus, total degradation of a sulfonated azo dye was achieved by using an alternating anaerobic-aerobic treatment. The ability of the mixed bacterial culture to reduce the azo dye was correlated with the presence of strain BN6, which possessed the ability to oxidize various naphthalenesulfonic acids. It is suggested that strain BN6 has a transport system for naphthalenesulfonic acids which also catalyzes uptake of sulfonated azo dyes. These dyes are then gratuitously reduced in the cytoplasm by unspecific reductases. PMID:1781678

  18. Application of an enzyme immunoassay for the quantitative determination of azo dye (Orange II) in food products.

    PubMed

    Xue, Huyin; Xing, Yue; Yin, Yongmei; Zhang, Taichang; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yu; Song, Pei; Tian, Xi; Xu, Yinghui; Wang, Peng; Meng, Meng; Xi, Rimo

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the preparation of polyclonal antibodies against a synthetic azo dye, Orange II, and the development of an indirect ELISA to detect Orange II in foods. The sulfonic group of Orange II was modified and linked with carrier protein to synthesise an artificial antigen. Based on the checkerboard titration, the method showed excellent sensitivity (IC₅₀ = 0.61 ng g⁻¹) to Orange II in the linear range of 0.05-10 ng g⁻¹. The antibody had little cross-reactivity with Chromotrope FB, Gardenia Yellow, Ponceau 4R, Sunset Yellow and Sudan dyes. The ELISA had limits of detection (LOD) of 0.22, 0.97 and 0.74 ng g⁻¹ in chilli powder, chilli oil and braised pork, respectively. The limits of quantification (LOQ) of the assay were 0.91 ng g⁻¹ in chilli powder, 1.48 ng g⁻¹ in chilli oil and 1.10 ng g⁻¹ in braised pork. For food products fortified with 1-10 ng g⁻¹ Orange II, the inter- and intra-assay variations were all less than 24.0% and 18.0%, respectively. Therefore, the proposed test could be used as a rapid screening method for Orange II detection in food samples.

  19. Sunset in Mars Gale Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-08

    NASA's Curiosity Mars rover recorded this view of the sun setting at the close of the mission's 956th Martian day, or sol (April 15, 2015), from the rover's location in Gale Crater. This was the first sunset observed in color by Curiosity. The image comes from the left-eye camera of the rover's Mast Camera (Mastcam). The color has been calibrated and white-balanced to remove camera artifacts. Mastcam sees color very similarly to what human eyes see, although it is actually a little less sensitive to blue than people are. Dust in the Martian atmosphere has fine particles that permit blue light to penetrate the atmosphere more efficiently than longer-wavelength colors. That causes the blue colors in the mixed light coming from the sun to stay closer to sun's part of the sky, compared to the wider scattering of yellow and red colors. The effect is most pronounced near sunset, when light from the sun passes through a longer path in the atmosphere than it does at mid-day. Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, built and operates the rover's Mastcam. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL designed and built the project's Curiosity rover. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19400

  20. Red rainbows at sunset/sunrise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    The rainbow model deveeloped at CEPAL is based on the Airy theory. The outputs show that a pure red rainbow could only observed from a hill or a mountain when the sun is below the horizon. When the sun is on the horizon, there should be a juxtaposition of a red band on the outside and of a yellow band on the inside (upper figures). However, observers report pure red bows at sea level (lower left figure). In these rare cases, it is possible to still see the sun after it has set. As sunlight passes through more and more dense atmosphere at sunset the light slows and bends closer and closer toward the normal. When the eye traces the light ray it appears to be higher in the sky (lower right figure).

  1. Negative ion ESI-MS analysis of natural yellow dye flavonoids--An isotopic labelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNab, Hamish; Ferreira, Ester S. B.; Hulme, Alison N.; Quye, Anita

    2009-07-01

    Flavonoids are amongst the most commonly used natural yellow colourants in paintings, as lakes, and in historical textiles as mordant dyes. In this paper, evidence from isotopically labelled substrates is used to propose negative ion electrospray collision induced decomposition mechanisms of flavones, flavonols and an isoflavone. These mechanisms include a retro-Diels-Alder fragmentation (observed for flavones and flavonols) and an M-122 fragmentation (characteristic of 3',4'-dihydroxyflavonols). In addition, the presence of a m/z 125 fragment ion is shown to be characteristic of 2'-hydroxyflavonols and an ion at m/z 149 is shown to be characteristic of 4'-hydroxyflavones. Applications of these methods are exemplified by the identification of a minor component of Dyer's camomile (Anthemis tinctoria L.) and the identification of the dye source in green threads sampled from an 18th Century Scottish tartan fragment.

  2. Photovoltaic performance of TiO2 electrode adsorbed with gardenia yellow purified by nonionic polymeric sorbent in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Oun; Kim, Eui Jin; Lee, Jae Hyeok; Kim, Tae Young; Park, Kyung Hee; Kim, Sang Yook; Suh, Hwa Jin; Lee, Hyo Jung; Lee, Jae Wook

    2015-02-05

    To improve the photovoltaic conversion efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), TiO2 electrode adsorbed with gardenia yellow purified by nonionic polymeric sorbent was successfully formulated on nanoporous TiO2 surface. Adsorption and desorption properties of crude gardenia yellow solution on a macroporous resin, XAD-1600, were investigated to purify gardenia yellow because of its strong adsorption and desorption abilities as well as high selectivity. To this end, adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data were measured and fitted using adsorption isotherms and kinetic models. Adsorption and desorption breakthrough curves in a column packed with XAD-1600 resin was obtained to optimize the separation process of gardenia yellow. The photovoltaic performance of the photo-electrode adsorbed with the crude and purified gardenia yellow in DSSCs was compared from current-voltage measurements. The results showed that the photovoltaic conversion efficiency was highly dependent on how to separate and purify gardenia yellow as a photosensitizer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnetic activated carbon-Fe3O4 nanocomposites--synthesis and applications in the removal of acid yellow dye 17 from water.

    PubMed

    Ranjithkumar, V; Hazeen, A Nizarul; Thamilselvan, M; Vairam, S

    2014-07-01

    In this work, synthesis of activated carbon-Fe3O4 composites using activated carbon and iron benzoate/oxalate precursors by simple pyrolytic method and its utility for the removal of acid yellow dye from water are presented. Iron carboxylates held up into the pores of carbon dissociate at their decomposition temperatures form dispersed Fe3O4 nanoparticles in carbon matrix. The composites were characterized by FTIR, PXRD, SEM, TEM, EDX and magnetization measurements. The size of the nano iron oxides are in the range of 21-33 nm formed from iron benzoate precursor and 6-11 nm from iron oxalate precursor. The oxides are magnetic and their saturation magnetization in the range of 0.08-0.16 emu/g and Coercivity (H(c)) 474-600, being lower and higher than that of bare bulk Fe3O4 are due to the nano size of oxides. Composites find application in the removal of acid yellow dye 17 from the synthetic aqueous solution at pH 5. The adsorption data are found to fit well for Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Kinetics data of adsorption of dyes indicate that the adsorption follows pseudo-second order kinetic model.

  4. Determination of synthetic food dyes in commercial soft drinks by TLC and ion-pair HPLC.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Francisca Ivani; Florindo Guedes, Maria Izabel; Pinto Vieira, Ícaro Gusmão; Pereira Mendes, Francisca Noélia; Salmito Rodrigues, Paula Alves; Costa Maia, Carla Soraya; Marques Ávila, Maria Marlene; de Matos Ribeiro, Luzara

    2014-08-15

    Synthetic food colourings were analyzed on commercial carbonated orange and grape soft drinks produced in Ceará State, Brazil. Tartrazine (E102), Amaranth (E123), Sunset Yellow (E110) and Brilliant Blue (E133) were extracted from soft drinks using C18 SPE and identified by thin layer chromatography (TLC), this method was used to confirm the composition of food colouring in soft drinks stated on label. The concentration of food colouring in soft drink was determined by ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. The results obtained with the samples confirm that the identification and quantification methods are recommended for quality control of the synthetic colours in soft drinks, as well as to determine whether the levels and lables complies with the recommendations of food dyes legislation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sunset over "Twin Peaks"

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-08-06

    This image was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) about one minute after sunset on Mars on Sol 21. The prominent hills dubbed "Twin Peaks" form a dark silhouette at the horizon, while the setting sun casts a pink glow over the darkening sky. The image was taken as part of a twilight study which indicates how the brightness of the sky fades with time after sunset. Scientists found that the sky stays bright for up to two hours after sunset, indicating that Martian dust extends very high into the atmosphere. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00783

  6. Toxicity of xanthene food dyes by inhibition of human drug-metabolizing enzymes in a noncompetitive manner.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Takaharu

    2009-01-01

    The synthetic food dyes studied were rose bengal (RB), phroxine (PL), amaranth, erythrosine B (ET), allura red, new coccine, acid red (AR), tartrazine, sunset yellow FCF, brilliant blue FCF, and indigo carmine. First, data confirmed that these dyes were not substrates for CYP2A6, UGT1A6, and UGT2B7. ET inhibited UGT1A6 (glucuronidation of p-nitrophenol) and UGT2B7 (glucuronidation of androsterone). We showed the inhibitory effect of xanthene dye on human UGT1A6 activity. Basic ET, PL, and RB in those food dyes strongly inhibited UGT1A6 activity, with IC(50) values = 0.05, 0.04, and 0.015 mM, respectively. Meanwhile, AR of an acidic xanthene food dye showed no inhibition. Next, we studied the inhibition of CYP3A4 of a major phase I drug-metabolizing enzyme and P-glycoprotein of a major transporter by synthetic food dyes. Human CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were also inhibited by basic xanthene food dyes. The IC(50) values of these dyes to inhibit CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were the same as the inhibition level of UGT1A6 by three halogenated xanthene food dyes (ET, PL, and RB) described above, except AR, like the results with UGT1A6 and UGT2B7. We also confirmed the noninhibition of CYP3A4 and P-gp by other synthetic food dyes. Part of this inhibition depended upon the reaction of (1)O(2) originating on xanthene dyes by light irradiation, because inhibition was prevented by (1)O(2) quenchers. We studied the influence of superoxide dismutase and catalase on this inhibition by dyes and we found prevention of inhibition by superoxide dismutase but not catalase. This result suggests that superoxide anions, originating on dyes by light irradiation, must attack drug-metabolizing enzymes. It is possible that red cosmetics containing phloxine, erythrosine, or rose bengal react with proteins on skin under lighting and may lead to rough skin.

  7. Sunset Sequence in Mars Gale Crater Animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-08

    NASA's Curiosity Mars rover recorded this sequence of views of the sun setting at the close of the mission's 956th Martian day, or sol (April 15, 2015), from the rover's location in Gale Crater. The four images shown in sequence here were taken over a span of 6 minutes, 51 seconds. This was the first sunset observed in color by Curiosity. The images come from the left-eye camera of the rover's Mast Camera (Mastcam). The color has been calibrated and white-balanced to remove camera artifacts. Mastcam sees color very similarly to what human eyes see, although it is actually a little less sensitive to blue than people are. Dust in the Martian atmosphere has fine particles that permit blue light to penetrate the atmosphere more efficiently than longer-wavelength colors. That causes the blue colors in the mixed light coming from the sun to stay closer to sun's part of the sky, compared to the wider scattering of yellow and red colors. The effect is most pronounced near sunset, when light from the sun passes through a longer path in the atmosphere than it does at mid-day. Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, built and operates the rover's Mastcam. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL designed and built the project's Curiosity rover. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19401

  8. Energy relay from an unconventional yellow dye to CdS/CdSe quantum dots for enhanced solar cell performance.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Remya; Das, Amrita; Deepa, Melepurath; Srivastava, Avanish Kumar

    2013-12-02

    A new design for a quasi-solid-state Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) enabled solar cell with unattached Lucifer yellow (LY) dye molecules as donors and CdS/CdSe quantum dots (QDs) tethered to titania (TiO2 ) as acceptors is presented. The Forster radius is experimentally determined to be 5.29 nm. Sequential energy transfer from the LY dye to the QDs and electron transfer from the QDs to TiO2 is followed by fluorescence quenching and electron lifetime studies. Cells with a donor-acceptor architecture (TiO2 /CdS/CdSe/ZnS-LY/S(2-)-multi-walled carbon nanotubes) show a maximum incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 53 % at 530 nm. This is the highest efficiency among Ru-dye free FRET-enabled quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs), and is much higher than the donor or acceptor-only cells. The FRET-enhanced solar cell performance over the majority of the visible spectrum paves the way to harnessing the untapped potential of the LY dye as an energy relay fluorophore for the entire gamut of dye sensitized, organic, or hybrid solar cells. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Isolation and Characterisation of a Molybdenum-reducing and Metanil Yellow Dye-decolourising Bacillus sp. strain Neni-10 in Soils from West Sumatera, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Mansur, Rusnam; Gusmanizar, Neni; Roslan, Muhamad Akhmal Hakim; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2017-01-01

    A molybdenum reducing bacterium with the novel ability to decolorise the azo dye Metanil Yellow is reported. Optimal conditions for molybdenum reduction were pH 6.3 and at 34°C. Glucose was the best electron donor. Another requirement includes a narrow phosphate concentration between 2.5 and 7.5 mM. A time profile of Mo-blue production shows a lag period of approximately 12 hours, a maximum amount of Mo-blue produced at a molybdate concentration of 20 mM, and a peak production at 52 h of incubation. The heavy metals mercury, silver, copper and chromium inhibited reduction by 91.9, 82.7, 45.5 and 17.4%, respectively. A complete decolourisation of the dye Metanil Yellow at 100 and 150 mg/L occurred at day three and day six of incubations, respectively. Higher concentrations show partial degradation, with an approximately 20% decolourisation observed at 400 mg/L. The bacterium is partially identified based on biochemical analysis as Bacillus sp. strain Neni-10. The absorption spectrum of the Mo-blue suggested the compound is a reduced phosphomolybdate. The isolation of this bacterium, which shows heavy metal reduction and dye-decolorising ability, is sought after, particularly for bioremediation. PMID:28228917

  10. Isolation and Characterisation of a Molybdenum-reducing and Metanil Yellow Dye-decolourising Bacillus sp. strain Neni-10 in Soils from West Sumatera, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Rusnam; Gusmanizar, Neni; Roslan, Muhamad Akhmal Hakim; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2017-01-01

    A molybdenum reducing bacterium with the novel ability to decolorise the azo dye Metanil Yellow is reported. Optimal conditions for molybdenum reduction were pH 6.3 and at 34°C. Glucose was the best electron donor. Another requirement includes a narrow phosphate concentration between 2.5 and 7.5 mM. A time profile of Mo-blue production shows a lag period of approximately 12 hours, a maximum amount of Mo-blue produced at a molybdate concentration of 20 mM, and a peak production at 52 h of incubation. The heavy metals mercury, silver, copper and chromium inhibited reduction by 91.9, 82.7, 45.5 and 17.4%, respectively. A complete decolourisation of the dye Metanil Yellow at 100 and 150 mg/L occurred at day three and day six of incubations, respectively. Higher concentrations show partial degradation, with an approximately 20% decolourisation observed at 400 mg/L. The bacterium is partially identified based on biochemical analysis as Bacillus sp. strain Neni-10. The absorption spectrum of the Mo-blue suggested the compound is a reduced phosphomolybdate. The isolation of this bacterium, which shows heavy metal reduction and dye-decolorising ability, is sought after, particularly for bioremediation.

  11. Toxicity of Xanthene Food Dyes by Inhibition of Human Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes in a Noncompetitive Manner

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Takaharu

    2009-01-01

    The synthetic food dyes studied were rose bengal (RB), phroxine (PL), amaranth, erythrosine B (ET), allura red, new coccine, acid red (AR), tartrazine, sunset yellow FCF, brilliant blue FCF, and indigo carmine. First, data confirmed that these dyes were not substrates for CYP2A6, UGT1A6, and UGT2B7. ET inhibited UGT1A6 (glucuronidation of p-nitrophenol) and UGT2B7 (glucuronidation of androsterone). We showed the inhibitory effect of xanthene dye on human UGT1A6 activity. Basic ET, PL, and RB in those food dyes strongly inhibited UGT1A6 activity, with IC50 values = 0.05, 0.04, and 0.015 mM, respectively. Meanwhile, AR of an acidic xanthene food dye showed no inhibition. Next, we studied the inhibition of CYP3A4 of a major phase I drug-metabolizing enzyme and P-glycoprotein of a major transporter by synthetic food dyes. Human CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were also inhibited by basic xanthene food dyes. The IC50 values of these dyes to inhibit CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were the same as the inhibition level of UGT1A6 by three halogenated xanthene food dyes (ET, PL, and RB) described above, except AR, like the results with UGT1A6 and UGT2B7. We also confirmed the noninhibition of CYP3A4 and P-gp by other synthetic food dyes. Part of this inhibition depended upon the reaction of 1O2 originating on xanthene dyes by light irradiation, because inhibition was prevented by 1O2 quenchers. We studied the influence of superoxide dismutase and catalase on this inhibition by dyes and we found prevention of inhibition by superoxide dismutase but not catalase. This result suggests that superoxide anions, originating on dyes by light irradiation, must attack drug-metabolizing enzymes. It is possible that red cosmetics containing phloxine, erythrosine, or rose bengal react with proteins on skin under lighting and may lead to rough skin. PMID:20041016

  12. 78 FR 56811 - National Organic Program-Sunset Process

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 205 [Document Number AMS-NOP-13-0057; NOP-13-03] National Organic Program--Sunset Process AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Notification of sunset process. SUMMARY: This document describes the sunset review and...

  13. Sunset over Twin Peaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) about one minute after sunset on Mars on Sol 21. The prominent hills dubbed 'Twin Peaks' form a dark silhouette at the horizon, while the setting sun casts a pink glow over the darkening sky. The image was taken as part of a twilight study which indicates how the brightness of the sky fades with time after sunset. Scientists found that the sky stays bright for up to two hours after sunset, indicating that Martian dust extends very high into the atmosphere.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  14. Sunset over Ares Vallis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Every several days, Mars Pathfinder will image the sunrise and sunset on Mars. Future images will show a larger area -- we have a higher data rate than we expected when we planned this image, so we can get more information. Images taken at sunset, like this, and up to two hours later, will be used to investigate the distribution of dust within the Martian atmosphere. Already, we can see some dust layers in the images. By seeing how the twilight fades with time -- it lasts for over two hours -- we can determine that the dust extends high into the atmosphere.

  15. Mineralization of the textile dye acid yellow 42 by solar photoelectro-Fenton in a lab-pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Carolina; Romero, Julio; Villegas, Loreto; Cornejo-Ponce, Lorena; Salazar, Ricardo

    2016-12-05

    A complete mineralization of a textile dye widely used in the Chilean textile industry, acid yellow 42 (AY42), was studied. Degradation was carried out in an aqueous solution containing 100mgL(-1) of total organic carbon (TOC) of dye using the advanced solar photoelectro-Fenton (SPEF) process in a lab-scale pilot plant consisting of a filter press cell, which contains a boron doped diamond electrode and an air diffusion cathode (BDD/air-diffusion cell), coupled with a solar photoreactor for treat 8L of wastewater during 270min of electrolysis. The main results obtained during the degradation of the textile dye were that a complete transformation to CO2 depends directly on the applied current density, the concentration of Fe(2+) used as catalyst, and the solar radiation intensity. The elimination of AY42 and its organic intermediates was due to hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between electrogenerated H2O2 and added Fe(2+). The application of solar radiation in the process (SPEF) yield higher current efficiencies and lower energy consumptions than electro-Fenton (EF) and electro-oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (E OH2O2) by the additional production of hydroxyl radicals from the photolysis of Fe(III) hydrated species and the photodecomposition of Fe(III) complexes with organic intermediates. Moreover, some products and intermediates formed during mineralization of dye, such as inorganic ions, carboxylic acids and aromatic compounds were determined by photometric and chromatographic methods. An oxidation pathway is proposed for the complete conversion to CO2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This cross section of the Earth's atmosphere at sunset and earth limb (24.5S, 43.5E) displays an unusual layering believed to be caused by temperature inversions which effectively concentrate smoke, dust and aerosols into narrow layers. the top of the stratosphere can be seen as the top of the white layer thought to contain volcanic debris. The purple layer is the troposphere containing smoke from landclearing biomass burning.

  17. Sunset

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-11-01

    This cross section of the Earth's atmosphere at sunset and earth limb (24.5S, 43.5E) displays an unusual layering believed to be caused by temperature inversions which effectively concentrate smoke, dust and aerosols into narrow layers. the top of the stratosphere can be seen as the top of the white layer thought to contain volcanic debris. The purple layer is the troposphere containing smoke from landclearing biomass burning.

  18. Corncob as an effective, eco-friendly, and economic biosorbent for removing the azo dye Direct Yellow 27 from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Berber-Villamar, Nayda Karina; Netzahuatl-Muñoz, Alma Rosa; Morales-Barrera, Liliana; Chávez-Camarillo, Griselda Ma; Flores-Ortiz, César Mateo; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2018-01-01

    The corncob is an agricultural waste generated in huge quantities during corn processing. In this paper, we tested the capacity of corncob particles for water purification by removing the azo dye Direct Yellow 27 (DY27) via biosorption. The biosorption process was investigated in terms of the kinetics, equilibria, and thermodynamics. Batch biosorption studies showed that the biosorption performance has strong inverse correlations to the solution pH and the corncob particle size, and it increases quickly with increasing contact time and initial dye concentration. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model provides the best fit to the experimental data, whereas the Redlich-Peterson isotherm model is most suitable for describing the observed equilibrium biosorption. The biosorption process is exothermic, spontaneous, and physisorption in character. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) studies suggest that lignocellulose and proteins play key roles in the biosorption of DY27 from aqueous solutions by corncob. Furthermore, after biosorption onto the corncob, the dye can be effectively desorbed using 0.1 M NaOH solution. Therefore, the corncob can be used as a promising biosorbent to remediate DY27-contaminated water and wastewater.

  19. Corncob as an effective, eco-friendly, and economic biosorbent for removing the azo dye Direct Yellow 27 from aqueous solutions

    PubMed Central

    Berber-Villamar, Nayda Karina; Netzahuatl-Muñoz, Alma Rosa; Morales-Barrera, Liliana; Chávez-Camarillo, Griselda Ma.; Flores-Ortiz, César Mateo

    2018-01-01

    The corncob is an agricultural waste generated in huge quantities during corn processing. In this paper, we tested the capacity of corncob particles for water purification by removing the azo dye Direct Yellow 27 (DY27) via biosorption. The biosorption process was investigated in terms of the kinetics, equilibria, and thermodynamics. Batch biosorption studies showed that the biosorption performance has strong inverse correlations to the solution pH and the corncob particle size, and it increases quickly with increasing contact time and initial dye concentration. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model provides the best fit to the experimental data, whereas the Redlich-Peterson isotherm model is most suitable for describing the observed equilibrium biosorption. The biosorption process is exothermic, spontaneous, and physisorption in character. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) studies suggest that lignocellulose and proteins play key roles in the biosorption of DY27 from aqueous solutions by corncob. Furthermore, after biosorption onto the corncob, the dye can be effectively desorbed using 0.1 M NaOH solution. Therefore, the corncob can be used as a promising biosorbent to remediate DY27-contaminated water and wastewater. PMID:29698442

  20. Fe0 catalyzed photo-Fenton process to detoxify the biodegraded products of azo dye Mordant Yellow 10.

    PubMed

    Brindha, R; Muthuselvam, P; Senthilkumar, S; Rajaguru, P

    2018-06-01

    Inspired by the efficiency of the photo-Fenton process on oxidation of organic pollutants, we herein present the feasibility of visible light driven photo-Fenton process as a post treatment of biological method for the effective degradation and detoxification of monoazo dye Mordant Yellow 10 (MY10). Anaerobic degradation of MY10 by Pseudomonas aeroginosa formed aromatic amines which were further degraded in the subsequent Fe catalyzed photo-Fenton process carried out at pH 3.0, with iron shavings and H 2 O 2 under blue LED light illumination. LC-MS and stoichiometric analysis confirmed that reductive azo bond cleavage was the major reaction in anaerobic bacterial degradation of MY10 producing 4-amino benzene sulfonic acid (4-ABS) and 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA) which were further degraded into hydroxyl amines, nitroso and di/tri carboxylic acids by the photo-Fenton process. Toxicity studies with human small cell lung cancer A549 cells provide evidence that incorporation of Fe 0 catalyzed photo-Fenton step after anaerobic bacterial treatment improved the mineralization and detoxification of MY10 dye. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Plasmachemical degradation of azo dyes by humid air plasma: Yellow Supranol 4 GL, Scarlet Red Nylosan F3 GL and industrial waste.

    PubMed

    Abdelmalek, F; Gharbi, S; Benstaali, B; Addou, A; Brisset, J L

    2004-05-01

    A recent non-thermal plasma technique (i.e., a gliding arc discharge which generates reactive species at atmospheric pressure) is tested for pollution abatement of dyes dispersed in synthetic solutions and industrial effluents. Yellow Supranol 4 GL (YS) and Scarlet Red Nylosan F3 GL (SRN) are toxic synthetic dyes widely used in the Algerian textile industry and frequently present in liquid wastes of manufacture plants. Classical removal treatment processes are not efficient enough, so that the presence of dyes in liquid effluents may cause serious environmental problems, in connection with reusing waste waters for irrigation. The degradation processes achieved by the oxidising species formed in the plasma are followed by UV/VIS spectroscopy and by chemical oxygen demand measurements. They are almost complete (i.e., 92.5% for YS and 90% for dilute SRN) and rapidly follow pseudo-first-order laws, with overall estimated rate constants 3 x 10(-4) and 4 x 10(-4)s-1 for YS and SRN, respectively. The degradation rate constant for the industrial mixture (i.e., k = 1.45 x 10(-3)s-1) is a mean value for two consecutive steps (210(-3) and 6 x 10(-5)s-1) measured at the absorption peaks of the major constituent dyes, YS and SRN.

  2. Assessment on the decolourization of textile dye (Reactive Yellow) using Pseudomonas sp. immobilized on fly ash: Response surface methodology optimization and toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Roy, Uttariya; Sengupta, Shubhalakshmi; Banerjee, Priya; Das, Papita; Bhowal, Avijit; Datta, Siddhartha

    2018-06-18

    This study focuses on the investigation of removal of textile dye (Reactive Yellow) by a combined approach of sorption integrated with biodegradation using low cost adsorbent fly ash immobilized with Pseudomonas sp. To ensure immobilization of bacterial species on treated fly ash, fly ash with immobilized bacterial cells was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and fluorescence microscopy. Comparative batch studies were carried out using Pseudomonas sp, fly ash and immobilized Pseudomonas sp on flyash and were observed that immobilized Pseudomonas sp on flyash acted as better decolourizing agent. The optimized pH, temperature, and immobilized adsorbent dosage for highest percentage of dye removal were observed to be pH 6, 303 K, 1.2 g/L in all the cases. At optimum condition, the highest percentage of dye removal was found to be 88.51%, 92.62% and 98.72% for sorption (flyash), biodegradation (Pseudomonas sp) and integral approach (Pseudomonas sp on flyash) respectively. Optimization of operating parameters of textile dye decolourization was done by response surface methodology (RSM) using Design Expert 7 software. Phytotoxicity evaluation with Cicer arietinum revealed that seeds exposed to untreated dye effluents showed considerably lower growth, inhibited biochemical, and enzyme parameters with compared to those exposed to treated textile effluents. Thus this immobilized inexpensive technique could be used for removal of synthetic dyes present in textile wastewater. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis of magnetic activated carbon/α-Fe2O3 nanocomposite and its application in the removal of acid yellow 17 dye from water.

    PubMed

    Ranjithkumar, V; Sangeetha, S; Vairam, S

    2014-05-30

    The adsorption of acid yellow 17 dye on activated carbon/α-Fe2O3 nanocomposite prepared by simple pyrolytic method using iron(II) gluconate was investigated by batch technique. The composite was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The size of iron oxide nanoparticles formed from iron(II) gluconate precursor is in the range 5-17nm. The saturation magnetization (Ms), remanence (Mr) and coercivity (Hc) of the magnetic carbon nanocomposite is 5.6emu/g, 1.14emu/g and 448Oe, respectively. The adsorption data are found to fit well with Langmuir and, fairly well with Freundlich and Tempkin isotherms at higher concentration of dye (40-100mg/L). Kinetics data indicate that the adsorption of dye follows pseudo-second order kinetics model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Polyester Fabric's Fluorescent Dyeing in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and its Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoqing; Xu, Yanyan; Zheng, Laijiu; Yan, Jun; Zhao, Hongjuan; Zhang, Juan; Sun, Yanfeng

    2017-03-01

    As one of the most important coumarin-like dyes, disperse fluorescent Yellow 82 exhibits exceptionally large two-photon effects. Here, it was firstly introduced into the supercritical CO 2 dyeing polyester fabrics in this work. Results of the present work showed that the dyeing parameters such as the dyeing time, pressure and temperature had remarkable influences on the color strength of fabrics. The optimized dyeing condition in supercritical CO 2 dyeing has been proposed that the dyeing time was 60 min; the pressure was 25 MPa and the temperature was 120 °C. As a result, acceptable products were obtained with the wash and rub fastness rating at 5 or 4-5. The polyester fabrics dyed with fluorescent dyes can be satisfied for the requirement of manufacturing warning clothing. Importantly, the confocal microscopy imaging technology was successfully introduced into textile fields to observe the distribution and fluorescence intensity of disperse fluorescent Yellow 82 on polyester fabrics. As far as we know, this is the first report about supercritical CO 2 dyeing polyester fabrics based on disperse fluorescent dyes. It will be very helpful for the further design of new fluorescent functional dyes suitable for supercritical CO 2 dyeing technique.

  5. Alien Sunset (Artist Concept)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Our solitary sunsets here on Earth might not be all that common in the grand scheme of things. New observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have revealed that mature planetary systems -- dusty disks of asteroids, comets and possibly planets -- are more frequent around close-knit twin, or binary, stars than single stars like our sun. That means sunsets like the one portrayed in this artist's photo concept, and more famously in the movie 'Star Wars,' might be quite commonplace in the universe.

    Binary and multiple-star systems are about twice as abundant as single-star systems in our galaxy, and, in theory, other galaxies. In a typical binary system, two stars of roughly similar masses twirl around each other like pair-figure skaters. In some systems, the two stars are very far apart and barely interact with each other. In other cases, the stellar twins are intricately linked, whipping around each other quickly due to the force of gravity.

    Astronomers have discovered dozens of planets that orbit around a single member of a very wide stellar duo. Sunsets from these worlds would look like our own, and the second sun would just look like a bright star in the night sky.

    But do planets exist in the tighter systems, where two suns would dip below a planet's horizon one by one? Unveiling planets in these systems is tricky, so astronomers used Spitzer to look for disks of swirling planetary debris instead. These disks are made of asteroids, comets and possibly planets. The rocky material in them bangs together and kicks up dust that Spitzer's infrared eyes can see. Our own solar system is swaddled in a similar type of disk.

    Surprisingly, Spitzer found more debris disks around the tightest binaries it studied (about 20 stars) than in a comparable sample of single stars. About 60 percent of the tight binaries had disks, while the single stars only had about 20 percent. These snug binary systems are as close or closer than just three times the

  6. Ecology and management of yellow toadflax [Linaria vulgaris (L.) Mill.

    Treesearch

    Jim Jacobs; Sharlene Sing

    2006-01-01

    Yellow toadflax is a short-lived perennial herb native to the steppes of southeastern Europe and southwestern Asia (Eurasia). This species spreads by both seeds and vegetative buds on its roots and creeping rhizomes (see Figure 1). Yellow toadflax was intentionally introduced in North America but has escaped cultivation as an ornamental, a source of fabric dye, and as...

  7. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of synthetic dyes in food samples after cloud point extraction using multiple response optimizations.

    PubMed

    Heidarizadi, Elham; Tabaraki, Reza

    2016-01-01

    A sensitive cloud point extraction method for simultaneous determination of trace amounts of sunset yellow (SY), allura red (AR) and brilliant blue (BB) by spectrophotometry was developed. Experimental parameters such as Triton X-100 concentration, KCl concentration and initial pH on extraction efficiency of dyes were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) with a Doehlert design. Experimental data were evaluated by applying RSM integrating a desirability function approach. The optimum condition for extraction efficiency of SY, AR and BB simultaneously were: Triton X-100 concentration 0.0635 mol L(-1), KCl concentration 0.11 mol L(-1) and pH 4 with maximum overall desirability D of 0.95. Correspondingly, the maximum extraction efficiency of SY, AR and BB were 100%, 92.23% and 95.69%, respectively. At optimal conditions, extraction efficiencies were 99.8%, 92.48% and 95.96% for SY, AR and BB, respectively. These values were only 0.2%, 0.25% and 0.27% different from the predicted values, suggesting that the desirability function approach with RSM was a useful technique for simultaneously dye extraction. Linear calibration curves were obtained in the range of 0.02-4 for SY, 0.025-2.5 for AR and 0.02-4 μg mL(-1) for BB under optimum condition. Detection limit based on three times the standard deviation of the blank (3Sb) was 0.009, 0.01 and 0.007 μg mL(-1) (n=10) for SY, AR and BB, respectively. The method was successfully used for the simultaneous determination of the dyes in different food samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a Direct Spectrophotometric and Chemometric Method for Determining Food Dye Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Arroz, Erin; Jordan, Michael; Dumancas, Gerard G

    2017-07-01

    An ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometric and partial least squares (PLS) chemometric method was developed for the simultaneous determination of erythrosine B (red), Brilliant Blue, and tartrazine (yellow) dyes. A training set (n = 64) was generated using a full factorial design and its accuracy was tested in a test set (n = 13) using a Box-Behnken design. The test set garnered a root mean square error (RMSE) of 1.79 × 10 -7 for blue, 4.59 × 10 -7 for red, and 1.13 × 10 -6 for yellow dyes. The relatively small RMSE suggests only a small difference between predicted versus measured concentrations, demonstrating the accuracy of our model. The relative error of prediction (REP) for the test set were 11.73%, 19.52%, 19.38%, for blue, red, and yellow dyes, respectively. A comparable overlay between the actual candy samples and their replicated synthetic spectra were also obtained indicating the model as a potentially accurate method for determining concentrations of dyes in food samples.

  9. Prototype Scale Development of an Environmentally Benign Yellow Smoke Hand-Held Signal Formulation Based on Solvent Yellow 33

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-15

    VAAR) was purchased from McGean. Hydrated basic magnesium carbonate was obtained from Pine Bluff Arsenal (Pine Bluff, AR) and was confirmed to be Mg5( CO3 ...a potential environmental exposure of approximately 29 g of the toxic yellow dyes throughout the life cycle of a single M194 signal! To mitigate this...consists of Solvent Yellow 33 as the smoke sublimating agent, hydrated basic magnesium carbonate (Mg5( CO3 )4(OH)2·4H2O) instead of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3

  10. Water Quality Criteria for Colored Smokes: Solvent Yellow 33

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    Y . ’~ ~% d .’ 4’ . TABLE 4. DISTRIBUTION OF [1 4 C]-SOLVENT YELLOW 33 IN RATS 1 hr AFTER- EXPOSURE TO SOLVENT YELLOW 33 (SY) OR SOLVENT YELLOW 33...have shown that some individuals react strongly Lo this dye. The repeat insult patch test is used most often. The subjects receive five to ten exposures...70 Neutrophils Control 5 ± 2 0 ± 0 7 ± 3 3( lO cells/g) Exposed 1300 ± 130 d 470 ± i 0 0d 290 ± 50 d a. Adapted from Henderson et al. 1985b. b. Values

  11. Solar photocatalysis for treatment of Acid Yellow-17 (AY-17) dye contaminated water using Ag@TiO2 core-shell structured nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Ankita; Shetty K, Vidya

    2013-08-01

    Wastewater released from textile industries causes water pollution, and it needs to be treated before discharge to the environment by cost effective technologies. Solar photocatalysis is a promising technology for the treatment of dye wastewater. The Ag@TiO2 nanoparticles comprising of Ag core and TiO2 shell (Ag@TiO2) have unique photocatalytic property of inhibition of electron-hole recombination and visible light absorption, which makes it a promising photocatalyst for use in solar photocatalysis and with higher photocatalytic rate. Therefore, in the present work, the Ag@TiO2 nanoparticles synthesized by one pot method with postcalcination step has been used for the degradation of Acid Yellow-17 (AY-17) dye under solar light irradiation. The Ag@TiO2 nanoparticles were characterized using thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The catalyst has been found to be very effective in solar photocatalysis of AY-17, as compared to other catalysts. The effects of pH, catalyst loading, initial dye concentration, and oxidants on photocatalysis were also studied. The optimized parameters for degradation of AY-17 using Ag@TiO2 were found to be pH 3, dye/catalyst ratio of 1:10 (g/g), and 2 g/L of (NH4)2S2O8 as oxidant. Efficient decolorization and mineralization of AY-17 was achieved. The kinetics of color, total organic carbon, and chemical oxygen demand removal followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. Ag@TiO2 catalyst can be reused thrice without much decline in efficiency. The catalyst exhibited its potential as economic photocatalyst for treatment of dye wastewater.

  12. Kinetics of proton uptake and dye binding by photoactive yellow protein in wild type and in the E46Q and E46A mutants.

    PubMed

    Borucki, Berthold; Devanathan, Savitha; Otto, Harald; Cusanovich, Michael A; Tollin, Gordon; Heyn, Maarten P

    2002-08-06

    We studied the kinetics of proton uptake and release by photoactive yellow protein (PYP) from Ectothiorhodospira halophila in wild type and the E46Q and E46A mutants by transient absorption spectroscopy with the pH-indicator dyes bromocresol purple or cresol red in unbuffered solution. In parallel, we investigated the kinetics of chromophore protonation as monitored by the rise and decay of the blue-shifted state I(2) (lambda(max) = 355 nm). For wild type the proton uptake kinetics is synchronized with the fast phase of I(2) formation (tau = 500 micros at pH 6.2). The transient absorption signal from the dye also contains a slower component which is not due to dye deprotonation but is caused by dye binding to a hydrophobic patch that is transiently exposed in the structurally changed and partially unfolded I(2) intermediate. This conclusion is based on the wavelength, pH, and concentration dependence of the dye signal and on dye measurements in the presence of buffer. SVD analysis, moreover, indicates the presence of two components in the dye signal: protonation and dye binding. The dye binding has a rise time of about 4 ms and is coupled kinetically with a transition between two I(2) intermediates. In the mutant E46Q, which lacks the putative internal proton donor E46, the formation of I(2) is accelerated, but the proton uptake kinetics remains kinetically coupled to the fast phase of I(2) formation (tau = 100 micros at pH 6.3). For this mutant the protein conformational change, as monitored by the dye binding, occurs with about the same time constant as in wild type but with reduced amplitude. In the alkaline form of the mutant E46A the formation of the I(2)-like intermediate is even faster as is the proton uptake (tau = 20 micros at pH 8.3). No dye binding occurred in E46A, suggesting the absence of a conformational change. In all of the systems proton release is synchronized with the decay of I(2). Our results support mechanisms in which the chromophore of PYP

  13. 48 CFR 212.7102-3 - Sunset of the pilot authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sunset of the pilot... REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION OF COMMERCIAL ITEMS Pilot Program for Acquisition of Military-Purpose Nondevelopmental Items 212.7102-3 Sunset of the pilot authority...

  14. Comparing the Effectiveness of Online Sunrise/Sunset Calculators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phlips, Alan; Wilson, Teresa; Chizek Frouard, Malynda; Bartlett, Jennifer Lynn

    2018-01-01

    The USNO is responsible for providing information through its website on various types of natural phenomena, including times of sunrise and sunset for any given day and location. Alternative websites were explored to see what options are available in case the USNO can no longer support this on-line tool in the future. Websites with sunrise/sunset calculators were examined to see what algorithm they cited, if any. A large percentage of the websites took their calculations from three main sources (USNO, Meeus, and Schlyter). For ease of comparison, one website with an Application Programming Interface (API) for each algorithm was used to generate sunrise/sunset times for 2 dates per year for 24 years at latitudes from the equator to each pole along the prime meridian. Additionally, dates on which only one phenomenon was expected (first and last day of polar day and night) were tested to examine how each algorithm would perform for these extreme edge cases. At mid-latitudes, all of the algorithms agreed within 1 minute of each other but their predictions began to diverge as they approached the poles. Close to the poles, all three differed by more than a minute. While the algorithms diverged well before reaching the poles, Schlyter did so at much lower latitudes compared to the other two. In the edge cases, Schlyter and Meeus did not correctly document the missing sunrise/sunsets. Until a set of arctic or antarctic observations of sunrise and sunset times can be analyzed, we cannot ascertain which algorithm is the most accurate. However, the USNO algorithm handled cases of continuous day and night better than the others. There currently seems to be no better alternative to provide robust sunrise/set times than the USNO Complete Sun and Moon Data for One Day (http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/RS_OneDay.php).

  15. ScienceCast 96: Sunset Comet

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-03-14

    Comet Pan-STARRS has survived its encounter with the sun and is now emerging from twilight in the sunset skies of the northern hemisphere. A NASA spacecraft monitoring the comet has beamed back pictures of a wild and ragged tail.

  16. Sensitising potential of four textile dyes and some of their metabolites in a modified local lymph node assay.

    PubMed

    Stahlmann, Ralf; Wegner, Matthias; Riecke, Kai; Kruse, Matthias; Platzek, Thomas

    2006-02-15

    We studied the sensitising and allergenic potentials of the textile dyes disperse yellow 3, disperse orange 30, disperse red 82, disperse yellow 211 and two metabolites of disperse yellow 3, 4-aminoacetanilide and 2-amino-p-cresol, using modified protocols of the murine "local lymph node assay" (LLNA). Test substances were applied either to the dorsum of the mice ears (sensitisation protocol) or they were first applied to the skin of their backs and 2 weeks later to their ears (sensitisation-challenge protocol). In addition to the endpoints weight and cell number of the draining ear lymph nodes we analysed lymphocyte subpopulations by flow cytometry. In the sensitisation protocol, disperse yellow 3 and its metabolite 4-aminoacetanilide did not induce significant effects, whereas in the sensitisation-challenge protocol cell number and lymph node weight increased significantly indicating a sensitising potential in NMRI mice. Hence, two-phase treatment (skin of the back, ear) increased the sensitivity of this assay. The second metabolite of disperse yellow 3, 2-amino-p-cresol, showed distinct effects in both treatment protocols; this applied mainly to the parameters cell number and lymph node weight. The dye disperse red 82 caused ambiguous increases in lymph node weight and cell number in the sensitisation protocol which were not reproduced in the sensitisation-challenge protocol, ruling out a relevant sensitising potential for this dye in NMRI mice. Disperse yellow 211 and disperse orange 30 did not induce relevant changes under our experimental conditions. Phenotyping of lymphocytes did not influence the assessment of these dyes.

  17. Light harvesting over a wide range of wavelength using natural dyes of gardenia and cochineal for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Tae-Young; Han, Shin; Ko, Hyun-Seok; Lee, Suk-Ho; Song, Yong-Min; Kim, Jung-Hun; Lee, Jae-Wook

    2014-07-15

    Two natural dyes extracted from gardenia yellow (Gardenia jasminoides) and cochineal (Dactylopius coccus) were used as sensitizers in the assembly of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to harvest light over a wide range of wavelengths. The adsorption characteristics, electrochemical properties and photovoltaic efficiencies of the natural DSSCs were investigated. The adsorption kinetics data of the dyes were obtained in a small adsorption chamber and fitted with a pseudo-second-order model. The photovoltaic performance of a photo-electrode adsorbed with single-dye (gardenia or cochineal) or the mixture or successive adsorption of the two dyes, was evaluated from current-voltage measurements. The energy conversion efficiency of the TiO2 electrode with the successive adsorption of cochineal and gardenia dyes was 0.48%, which was enhanced compared to single-dye adsorption. Overall, a double layer of the two natural dyes as sensitizers was successfully formulated on the nanoporous TiO2 surface based on the differences in their adsorption affinities of gardenia and cochineal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Application of LC-MS to the analysis of dyes in objects of historical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xian; Laursen, Richard

    2009-07-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with photodiode array and mass spectrometric detection permits dyes extracted from objects of historical interest or from natural plant or animal dyestuffs to be characterized on the basis of three orthogonal properties: HPLC retention time, UV-visible spectrum and molecular mass. In the present study, we have focused primarily on yellow dyes, the bulk of which are flavonoid glycosides that would be almost impossible to characterize without mass spectrometric detection. Also critical for this analysis is a method for mild extraction of the dyes from objects (e.g., textiles) without hydrolyzing the glycosidic linkages. This was accomplished using 5% formic acid in methanol, rather than the more traditional 6 M HCl. Mass spectroscopy, besides providing the molecular mass of the dye molecule, sometimes yields additional structural data based on fragmentation patterns. In addition, coeluting compounds can often be detected using extracted ion chromatography. The utility of mass spectrometry is illustrated by the analysis of historical specimens of silk that had been dyed yellow with flavonoid glycosides from Sophora japonica (pagoda tree) and curcumins from Curcuma longa (turmeric). In addition, we have used these techniques to identify the dye type, and sometimes the specific dyestuff, in a variety of objects, including a yellow varnish from a 19th century Tibetan altar and a 3000-year-old wool mortuary textiles, from Xinjiang, China. We are using HPLC with diode array and mass spectrometric detection to create a library of analyzed dyestuffs (>200 so far; mostly plants) to serve as references for identification of dyes in objects of historical interest.

  19. Biosorption of Azo dyes by spent Rhizopus arrhizus biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Neeta A.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, spent Rhizopus arrhizus biomass was used for the removal of six azo dyes from aqueous solutions. The dye removal capacity of the biomass was evaluated by conducting batch tests as a function of contact time, biomass dosage, pH and initial dye concentrations. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted well with the experimental data with correlation coefficients greater than 0.999, suggesting that chemisorptions might be the rate limiting step. The equilibrium sorption data showed good fit to the Langmuir isotherm model. Among the six dyes tested, the maximum monolayer adsorption capacity for fast red A and metanil yellow was found to be 108.8 and 128.5 mg/g, respectively. These encouraging results suggest that dead Rhizopus arrhizus biomass could be a potential biomaterial for the removal of azo dyes from aqueous dye solution.

  20. Molecular and excited state properties of isomeric scarlet disperse dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jihye; Szymczyk, Malgorzata; Mehraban, Nahid; Ding, Yi; Parrillo-Chapman, Lisa; El-Shafei, Ahmed; Freeman, Harold S.

    2018-06-01

    This work was part of an investigation aimed at characterizing the molecular and excited state properties of currently available disperse dyes developed to provide stability to extensive sunlight exposures when adsorbed on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fibers. Having completed the characterization of yellow, magenta, and cyan disperse dyes for PET-based fabrics used outdoors, our attention turned to the colors designed to enhance the color gamut of a standard 4-member (cyan/yellow/magenta/black) color set. The present study pertained specifically to the characterization of commercially available scarlet dyes. In this regard, HPLC analysis showed that a scarlet product used for PET coloration was mainly a 70/30 mixture of dyes, and the use of HRMS and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses indicated that these two dyes were azo compounds derived from isomeric pyridine-based couplers which differed in the location of the primary amino (sbnd NH2) and anilino (sbnd NHPh) groups attached to the pyridine ring. One dye structure has the sbnd NHPh group para to the azo group (Sc2), while the other has that group in the ortho position (Sc3). The presence of either ortho substituent provides photostabilization through intramolecular H-bonding with the azo moiety. Further, results from molecular modeling studies showed that the lower excited state oxidation potential of Sc3 relative to that of Sc2 allows Sc3 to function as an energy quencher for the excited state of Sc2 - through thermodynamically favorable electron transfer.

  1. PicoGreen dye as an active medium for plastic lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, C.; Vallabhan, C. P. G.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2015-08-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid lipid complex thin films are used as a host material for laser dyes. We tested PicoGreen dye, which is commonly used for the quantification of single and double stranded DNA, for its applicability as lasing medium. PicoGreen dye exhibits enhanced fluorescence on intercalation with DNA. This enormous fluorescence emission is amplified in a planar microcavity to achieve yellow lasing. Here the role of DNA is not only a host medium, but also as a fluorescence dequencher. With the obtained results we have ample reasons to propose PicoGreen dye as a lasing medium, which can lead to the development of DNA based bio-lasers.

  2. A new polymerizable fluorescent PET chemosensor of fluoride (F-) based on naphthalimide-thiourea dye.

    PubMed

    Alaei, Parvaneh; Rouhani, Shohre; Gharanjig, Kamaladin; Ghasemi, Jahanbakhsh

    2012-05-01

    A novel N-allyl-4-amino-substituted 1,8-naphthalimide dye, containing thiourea functional group with intense yellow-green fluorescence was successfully synthesized. Copolymerization was done with styrene. The photophysical characteristics of dye and its copolymer in solution and solid film were investigated in the presence of halide ions. The results reveal that the fluorescence emissions of the monomer dye and also its polymer were 'switched off' in the presence of fluoride ions. The dye showed spectral shifts and intensity changes in the presence of more fluoride ions which lead to detect certain fluoride concentrations of 10-150 mM at visible wavelengths. By adding the fluoride ions, green-yellow to purple color changes occurs and the green fluorescence emission quenches, all of which easily observed by naked eyes. These phenomena are essential for producing a dual responsive chemosensor for fluoride ions. The polymeric sensor, in the film state exhibited a fast response to the fluoride ions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Studies on the Inhalation Toxicity of Dyes Present in Colored Smoke Munitions. Phase I Studies: Generation and Characterization of Dye Aerosol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    DYE AEROSOL Rogene F. Henderson Y. S. Cheng J. S. Dutcher T. C. Marshall J. E. White 0)February 1 . 1984 Supported by SU. S. ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND...from Report) 1 . SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES IS. KEY WORDS (Coattine on re tore* side I’ necessary teid iatfiy by biock nuqber) Solvent Yellow Dye Aerosols...Solvent Green Exposure Atmosphere 2-(2’-quinolyl )-1,3-indandione 1 -4-di-p-toluidinoanthraquinone 20. AmTlACT (Cowftfuem a reserve ft D rofmwe ,uy md

  4. Quantitative cytochemistry of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins using the Naphthol Yellow S and dinitrofluorobenzene staining methods.

    PubMed

    Tas, J; James, J

    1981-09-01

    The 'total protein staining' of biological specimens with the electrostatically binding Naphthol Yellow S or the covalently binding dinitrofluorobenzene must be interpreted as methods which yield data on the specific amino acid pool of the proteins concerned. Both dyes bind to certain free amino-acid side-chains, giving different dye--protein ratios for various proteins. In the presence of DNA, dinitrofluorobenzene stains all proteins present in cell nuclei, whereas Naphthol Yellow S only stains the majority of the non-histone proteins. When protein staining methods are combined with the Feulgen--Pararosanile (SO2) procedure for DNA, decreased Feulgen--DNA contents were measured in dinitrofluorobenzene-stained isolated nuclei and lymphocytes.

  5. Doubling Your Sunsets or How Anyone Can Measure the Earth's Size with Wristwatch and Meterstick.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlins, Dennis

    1979-01-01

    Describes a simple method to measure the size of the Earth to an accuracy of order of magnitude 10 percent. The procedure involves finding the time interval between two sunsets, a sunset observed at sea level while lying down, and a sunset viewed at eye height after standing up. (GA)

  6. Sorption Behavior of Dye Compounds onto Natural Sediment of Qinghe River.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruixia; Liu, Xingmin; Tang, Hongxiao; Su, Yongbo

    2001-07-15

    The objective of this study is to assess the adsorption behavior of C.I. Basic Yellow X-5GL, C.I. Basic Red 13, C.I. Direct Blue 86, C.I. Vat Yellow 2, and C.I. Mordant Black 11 on natural sediment and to identify sediment characteristics that play a predominant role in the adsorption of the dyes. The potentiometric titration experiment is used to investigate acid-base properties of the sediment surface with a constant capacitance surface complexation model. The parameters controlling the sorption such as solution pH and ion strength, as well as the influence of organic carbon and Ca(2+) ion on the adsorption, are evaluated. It is shown that the titration data can be successfully described by the surface protonation and deprotonation model with the least-squares FITEQL program 2.0. The sorption isotherm data are fitted to the Freundlich equation in a nonlinear form (1/n=0.3-0.9) for all tested dyes. With increasing pH value, the sorption of C.I. Mordant Black 11 and C.I. Direct Blue 86 on the sediment decreases, while for C.I. Basic Yellow X-5GL and C.I. Basic Red 13, the extent of sorption slightly increases. In addition, ion strength also exhibits a considerably different effect on the sorption behavior of these dye compounds. The addition of Ca(2+) can greatly reduce the sorption of C.I. Basic Red 13 on the sediment surface, while it enhances the sorption of C.I. Direct Blue 6. The removal of organic carbon decreases the sorption of C.I. Mordant Black 11 and C.I. Direct Blue 86. In contrast, the sorption of C.I. Basic Red 13 and C.I. Basic Yellow X-5GL is obviously enhanced after the removal of organic carbon. The differences in adsorption behavior are mainly attributed to the physicochemical properties of these dye compounds. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  7. Influence of aromatic substitution patterns on azo dye degradability by Streptomyces spp. and Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed Central

    Pasti-Grigsby, M B; Paszczynski, A; Goszczynski, S; Crawford, D L; Crawford, R L

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-two azo dyes were used to study the influence of substituents on azo dye biodegradability and to explore the possibility of enhancing the biodegradabilities of azo dyes without affecting their properties as dyes by changing their chemical structures. Streptomyces spp. and Phanerochaete chrysosporium were used in the study. None of the actinomycetes (Streptomyces rochei A10, Streptomyces chromofuscus A11, Streptomyces diastaticus A12, S. diastaticus A13, and S. rochei A14) degraded the commercially available Acid Yellow 9. Decolorization of monosulfonated mono azo dye derivatives of azobenzene by the Streptomyces spp. was observed with five azo dyes having the common structural pattern of a hydroxy group in the para position relative to the azo linkage and at least one methoxy and/or one alkyl group in an ortho position relative to the hydroxy group. The fungus P. chrysosporium attacked Acid Yellow 9 to some extent and extensively decolorized several azo dyes. A different pattern was seen for three mono azo dye derivatives of naphthol. Streptomyces spp. decolorized Orange I but not Acid Orange 12 or Orange II. P. chrysosporium, though able to transform these three azo dyes, decolorized Acid Orange 12 and Orange II more effectively than Orange I. A correlation was observed between the rate of decolorization of dyes by Streptomyces spp. and the rate of oxidative decolorization of dyes by a commercial preparation of horseradish peroxidase type II, extracellular peroxidase preparations of S. chromofuscus A11, or Mn(II) peroxidase from P. chrysosporium. Ligninase of P. chrysosporium showed a dye specificity different from that of the other oxidative enzymes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1482183

  8. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.821 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across...

  9. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.821 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across...

  10. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.821 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across...

  11. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.821 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across...

  12. 42 CFR 403.756 - Sunset provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sunset provision. 403.756 Section 403.756 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions...

  13. 42 CFR 403.756 - Sunset provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sunset provision. 403.756 Section 403.756 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions...

  14. 42 CFR 403.756 - Sunset provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sunset provision. 403.756 Section 403.756 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions...

  15. 42 CFR 403.756 - Sunset provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sunset provision. 403.756 Section 403.756 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions...

  16. 42 CFR 403.756 - Sunset provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sunset provision. 403.756 Section 403.756 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions...

  17. 21 CFR 74.1710 - D&C Yellow No. 10.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false D&C Yellow No. 10. 74.1710 Section 74.1710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... with phthalic anhydride to give the unsulfonated dye, which is then sulfonated with oleum. (2) Color...

  18. 21 CFR 74.1710 - D&C Yellow No. 10.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false D&C Yellow No. 10. 74.1710 Section 74.1710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... with phthalic anhydride to give the unsulfonated dye, which is then sulfonated with oleum. (2) Color...

  19. 21 CFR 74.1710 - D&C Yellow No. 10.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false D&C Yellow No. 10. 74.1710 Section 74.1710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... with phthalic anhydride to give the unsulfonated dye, which is then sulfonated with oleum. (2) Color...

  20. 21 CFR 74.2705 - FD&C Yellow No. 5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false FD&C Yellow No. 5. 74.2705 Section 74.2705 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... ethyl ester, or a salt of this carboxylic acid. The resulting dye is purified and isolated as the sodium...

  1. 21 CFR 74.2705 - FD&C Yellow No. 5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false FD&C Yellow No. 5. 74.2705 Section 74.2705 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... ethyl ester, or a salt of this carboxylic acid. The resulting dye is purified and isolated as the sodium...

  2. 21 CFR 74.2705 - FD&C Yellow No. 5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false FD&C Yellow No. 5. 74.2705 Section 74.2705 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... ethyl ester, or a salt of this carboxylic acid. The resulting dye is purified and isolated as the sodium...

  3. 21 CFR 74.2705 - FD&C Yellow No. 5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false FD&C Yellow No. 5. 74.2705 Section 74.2705 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... ethyl ester, or a salt of this carboxylic acid. The resulting dye is purified and isolated as the sodium...

  4. Positively charged microporous ceramic membrane for the removal of Titan Yellow through electrostatic adsorption.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiuting; Li, Na; Zhu, Mengfu; Zhang, Lili; Deng, Yu; Deng, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    To develop a depth filter based on the electrostatic adsorption principle, positively charged microporous ceramic membrane was prepared from a diatomaceous earth ceramic membrane. The internal surface of the highly porous ceramic membrane was coated with uniformly distributed electropositive nano-Y2O3 coating. The dye removal performance was evaluated through pressurized filtration tests using Titan Yellow aqueous solution. It showed that positively charged microporous ceramic membrane exhibited a flow rate of 421L/(m(2)·hr) under the trans-membrane pressure of 0.03bar. Moreover it could effectively remove Titan Yellow with feed concentration of 10mg/L between pH3 to 8. The removal rate increased with the enhancement of the surface charge properties with a maximum rejection of 99.6%. This study provides a new and feasible method of removing organic dyes in wastewater. It is convinced that there will be a broad market for the application of charged ceramic membrane in the field of dye removal or recovery from industry wastewater. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Statistical Correlation between Ligninolytic Enzymes Secretion and Remazol Brilliant Yellow-3GL Dye Degradation Potential of Trametes versicolor IBL-04.

    PubMed

    Asgher, Muhammad; Shah, Syed Agha Hassan; Iqbal, Hafiz Muhammad Nasir

    2016-04-01

    Trametes versicolor IBL-04 was used for biodegradation of Remazol Brilliant Yellow 3-GL (RBY3-GL) reactive textile dye in Kirk's basal salts medium. During the initial screening study, the maximum decolorization (93.5%) of RBY3-GL was achieved in 7 days' shaking incubation period at pH 4 and 30 °C. Different physical and nutritional factors were statistically optimized to enhance the efficiency of T. versicolor IBL-04 for maximum decolorization. Under optimal conditions T. versicolor IBL-04 completely decolorized (100%) the RBY3-GL in 2 days of incubation with negligible adsorption on fungal mycelia. Laccase was the major enzyme (938.3 U/mL) secreted by T. versicolor IBL-04 along with comparatively lower activities of MnP. In this article and for the first time, a statistical correlation has been successfully investigated between the ligninolytic enzymes from an indigenously isolated white rot fungi, T. versicolor IBL-04, and the degradation of RBY3-GL.

  6. Reuse of Textile Dyeing Effluents Treated with Coupled Nanofiltration and Electrochemical Processes

    PubMed Central

    Buscio, Valentina; García-Jiménez, María; Vilaseca, Mercè; López-Grimau, Victor; Crespi, Martí; Gutiérrez-Bouzán, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The reactive dye Cibacron Yellow S-3R was selected to evaluate the feasibility of combining nanofiltration membranes with electrochemical processes to treat textile wastewater. Synthetic dyeing effluents were treated by means of two nanofiltration membranes, Hydracore10 and Hydracore50. Up to 98% of dye removal was achieved. The influence of salt concentration and pH on membrane treatment was studied. The best dye removal yield was achieved at pH 3 in the presence of 60 g/L of NaCl. After the membrane filtration, the concentrate containing high dye concentration was treated by means of an electrochemical process at three different current densities: 33, 83, and 166 mA/cm2. Results showed a lineal relationship between treatment time and applied current density. Both permeates and electrochemically-decoloured effluents were reused in new dyeing processes (100% of permeate and 70% of decoloured concentrates). Dyed fabrics were evaluated with respect to original dyeing. Colour differences were found to be into the acceptance range. PMID:28773614

  7. 47 CFR 27.1253 - Sunset Provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the 2150-2160/62 MHz band unless and until an AWS licensee requires use of the spectrum. AWS licensees... the date the first AWS license is issued in the band). Once the relocation rules sunset, an AWS licensee may require the incumbent to cease operations, provided that the AWS licensee intends to turn on a...

  8. 47 CFR 27.1253 - Sunset Provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the 2150-2160/62 MHz band unless and until an AWS licensee requires use of the spectrum. AWS licensees... the date the first AWS license is issued in the band). Once the relocation rules sunset, an AWS licensee may require the incumbent to cease operations, provided that the AWS licensee intends to turn on a...

  9. An analytic approach to sunset diagrams in chiral perturbation theory: Theory and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthanarayan, B.; Bijnens, Johan; Ghosh, Shayan; Hebbar, Aditya

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate the use of several code implementations of the Mellin-Barnes method available in the public domain to derive analytic expressions for the sunset diagrams that arise in the two-loop contribution to the pion mass and decay constant in three-flavoured chiral perturbation theory. We also provide results for all possible two mass configurations of the sunset integral, and derive a new one-dimensional integral representation for the one mass sunset integral with arbitrary external momentum. Thoroughly annotated Mathematica notebooks are provided as ancillary files in the Electronic Supplementary Material to this paper, which may serve as pedagogical supplements to the methods described in this paper.

  10. STS-67 sunset and earth limb view

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-03-17

    STS067-709-007 (2-18 March 1995) --- This shot, taken just after sunset, shows several distinct layers of gases in the atmosphere on the Earth’s limb. The distinct colors formed by the amount of scattered light that passes through these gases.

  11. Sub-1min separation in sequential injection chromatography for determination of synthetic water-soluble dyes in pharmaceutical formulation.

    PubMed

    Davletbaeva, Polina; Chocholouš, Petr; Bulatov, Andrey; Šatínský, Dalibor; Solich, Petr

    2017-09-05

    Sequential Injection Chromatography (SIC) evolved from fast and automated non-separation Sequential Injection Analysis (SIA) into chromatographic separation method for multi-element analysis. However, the speed of the measurement (sample throughput) is due to chromatography significantly reduced. In this paper, a sub-1min separation using medium polar cyano monolithic column (5mm×4.6mm) resulted in fast and green separation with sample throughput comparable with non-separation flow methods The separation of three synthetic water-soluble dyes (sunset yellow FCF, carmoisine and green S) was in a gradient elution mode (0.02% ammonium acetate, pH 6.7 - water) with flow rate of 3.0mLmin -1 corresponding with sample throughput of 30h -1 . Spectrophotometric detection wavelengths were set to 480, 516 and 630nm and 10Hz data collection rate. The performance of the separation was described and discussed (peak capacities 3.48-7.67, peak symmetries 1.72-1.84 and resolutions 1.42-1.88). The method was represented by validation parameters: LODs of 0.15-0.35mgL -1 , LOQs of 0.50-1.25mgL -1 , calibration ranges 0.50-150.00mgL -1 (r>0.998) and repeatability at 10.0mgL -1 of RSD≤0.98% (n=6). The method was used for determination of the dyes in "forest berries" colored pharmaceutical cough-cold formulation. The sample matrix - pharmaceuticals and excipients were not interfering with vis determination because of no retention in the separation column and colorless nature. The results proved the concept of fast and green chromatography approach using very short medium polar monolithic column in SIC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. 19 CFR Annex Viii-C to Part 351 - Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-C to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-C Annex VIII-C to Part 351—Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews Day 1 Event...

  13. 19 CFR Annex Viii-C to Part 351 - Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-C to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-C Annex VIII-C to Part 351—Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews Day 1 Event...

  14. 19 CFR Annex Viii-C to Part 351 - Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-C to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-C Annex VIII-C to Part 351—Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews Day 1 Event...

  15. 19 CFR Annex Viii-C to Part 351 - Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-C to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-C Annex VIII-C to Part 351—Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews Day 1 Event...

  16. 19 CFR Annex Viii-C to Part 351 - Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-C to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-C Annex VIII-C to Part 351—Schedule for Full Sunset Reviews Day 1 Event...

  17. Warm-White-Light-Emitting Diode Based on a Dye-Loaded Metal-Organic Framework for Fast White-Light Communication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiye; Wang, Zi; Lin, Bangjiang; Hu, XueFu; Wei, YunFeng; Zhang, Cankun; An, Bing; Wang, Cheng; Lin, Wenbin

    2017-10-11

    A dye@metal-organic framework (MOF) hybrid was used as a fluorophore in a white-light-emitting diode (WLED) for fast visible-light communication (VLC). The white light was generated from a combination of blue emission of the 9,10-dibenzoate anthracene (DBA) linkers and yellow emission of the encapsulated Rhodamine B molecules. The MOF structure not only prevents dye molecules from aggregation-induced quenching but also efficiently transfers energy to the dye for dual emission. This light-emitting material shows emission lifetimes of 1.8 and 5.3 ns for the blue and yellow components, respectively, which are significantly shorter than the 200 ns lifetime of Y 3 Al 5 O 12 :Ce 3+ in commercial WLEDs. The MOF-WLED device exhibited a modulating frequency of 3.6 MHz for VLC, six times that of commercial WLEDs.

  18. sunset

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-04

    ISS036-E-028913 (4 Aug. 2013) --- A sunset over the Aleutian Islands, with noctilucent clouds, is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 36 crew member on the International Space Station. The crew member took this panoramic view looking north from the Aleutian Islands when the space station was flying east at ?the top of the orbit,? the northernmost latitude reached by the orbital complex (51.6 degrees north). If the sun had been higher, the string of Aleutian Islands would have been visible in the foreground. Here the islands are on the dark side of the day-night line. From their vantage point at 222 kilometers altitude on this day, crew members were able to see as far north as the Arctic Ocean and the midnight sun. This image was taken just 20 minutes after local midnight in early August 2013. The midnight sun makes the red, diamond-shaped teardrop reflection (lower center)?perhaps a reflection within the camera lens, or from the window frame, or some item inside the ISS. Long blue-white stringers can be seen in the atmosphere above the midnight sun. These are known as noctilucent clouds (night-shining clouds). Some crew members say these wispy, rippling, iridescent clouds are the most beautiful phenomena they see from orbit. Noctilucents are thin so that they are best seen after sunset when the viewer is on the night side of the day-night line, but while these high clouds are still lit by the sun. Crews are trained in this somewhat complicated geometry?of clouds being lit from beneath, with the spacecraft in sunlight though the ground directly beneath is in darkness. Noctilucent clouds are also known as polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) as they appear in the summer hemisphere over polar latitudes. Some data suggest that they are becoming brighter, and appearing at lower latitudes, perhaps as an effect of global warming. A comparison of noctilucent cloud formation from 2012 and 2013 has been compiled using data from NASA?s Aeronomy of Ice in the

  19. Physical and chemical investigations on natural dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, S.; D'Anna, E.; de Giorgi, M. L.; Della Patria, A.; Baraldi, P.

    2010-09-01

    Natural dyes have been used extensively in the past for many purposes, such us to colour fibers and to produce inks, watercolours and paints, but their use declined rapidly after the discovery of synthetic colours. Nowadays we witness a renewed interest, as natural dyes are neither toxic nor polluting. In this work, physical and chemical properties of four selected dyes, namely red (Madder), yellow (Weld and Turmeric) and blue (Woad) colours, produced by means of traditional techniques at the Museo dei Colori Naturali (Lamoli, Italy), have been investigated. The chromatic properties have been studied through the reflectance spectroscopy, a non-invasive technique for the characterisation of chromaticity. Reflection spectra both from powders and egg-yolk tempera models have been acquired to provide the typical features of the dyes in the UV-vis spectral range. Moreover, to assess the feasibility of laser cleaning procedures, tempera layers were investigated after irradiation with an excimer laser. Micro Raman spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray analyses have complemented the survey, returning compositional and morphological information as well. Efforts have been made to give scientific feedback to the production processes and to support the research activity in the restoration of the artworks where these dyes were employed.

  20. Thiazole yellow G dyed PVA films for optoelectronics: microstructrural, thermal and photophysical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbar, Vidyashree; Bhajantri, R. F.; Naik, Jagadish; Rathod, Sunil G.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report the microstructural, optical and fluorescence properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/Thiazole Yellow G (TY) dye composite prepared by solvent casting. The formation of change-transfer complex as a result of the interaction between the dye molecules and polymer chain is confirmed in FTIR, FT-Raman, XRD and DSC studies. SEM studies present the morphology of the samples. The UV-visible absorption spectra possess characteristic peaks of the TY dye corresponding to n-π* transition along with a characteristic peak of PVA. The composites exhibit the decreasing energy gap and increasing refractive index with an increase in wt.% of the TY dye. The fluorescence-quenching phenomena are observed in emission wavelength range of 391-406 nm upon excitation in the vicinity of absorption maxima (335 nm) with the quantum yield of 0.72 for lowest concentration of dye. The prepared composites bear high brightness, and improved thermal stability, which make them a promising material for sensors and optoelectronic applications.

  1. Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument : Acoustical Monitoring 2010

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-05-01

    During the summer of 2010 (July - August), the Volpe Center collected baseline acoustical data at Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument (SUCR) at a site deployed for approximately 30 days. The baseline data collected during this period will help pa...

  2. Effects on DNA repair in human lymphocytes exposed to the food dye tartrazine yellow.

    PubMed

    Soares, Bruno Moreira; Araújo, Taíssa Maíra Thomaz; Ramos, Jorge Amando Batista; Pinto, Laine Celestino; Khayat, Bruna Meireles; De Oliveira Bahia, Marcelo; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Burbano, Rommel Mario Rodríguez; Khayat, André Salim

    2015-03-01

    Tartrazine is a food additive that belongs to a class of artificial dyes and contains an azo group. Studies about its genotoxic, cytotoxic and mutagenic effects are controversial and, in some cases, unsatisfactory. This work evaluated the potential in vitro cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and effects on DNA repair of human lymphocytes exposed to the dye. We assessed the cytotoxicity of tartrazine by 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide test and the response of DNA repair through comet assay (alkaline version). We used different concentrations of the dye, ranging from 0.25-64.0 mM. The results demonstrated that tartrazine has no cytotoxic effects. However, this dye had a significant genotoxic effect at all concentrations tested. Although most of the damage was amenable to repair, some damage remained higher than positive control after 24 h of repair. These data demonstrate that tartrazine may be harmful to health and its prolonged use could trigger carcinogenesis. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. [A novel yellow organic light-emitting device].

    PubMed

    Ma, Chen; Wang, Hua; Hao, Yu-Ying; Gao, Zhi-Xiang; Zhou, He-Feng; Xu, Bing-She

    2008-07-01

    The fabrication of a novel organic yellow-light-emitting device using Rhodamine B as dopant with double quantum-well (DQW) structure was introduced in the present article. The structure and thickness of this device is ITO/CuPc (6 nm) /NPB (20 nm) /Alq3 (3 nm)/Alq3 : Rhodamine B (3 nm) /Alq3 (3 nm) /Al q3 : Rhodamine B(3 nm) /Alq3 (30 nm) /Liq (5 nm)/Al (30 nm). With the detailed investigation of electroluminescence of the novel organic yellow-light-emitting device, the authors found that the doping concentration of Rhodamine B (RhB) had a very big influence on luminance and efficiency of the organic yellow-light-emitting device. When doping concentration of Rhodamine B (RhB) was 1.5 wt%, the organic yellow-light-emitting device was obtained with the maximum current efficiency of 1.526 cd x A(-1) and the maximum luminance of 1 309 cd x m(-2). It can be seen from the EL spectra of the devices that there existed energy transferring from Alq3 to RhB in the organic light-emitting layers. When the doping concentration of RhB increased, lambda(max) of EL spectra redshifted obviously. The phenomenon was attributed to the Stokes effect of quantum wells and self-polarization of RhB dye molecules.

  4. 19 CFR Annex Viii-A to Part 351 - Schedule for 90-Day Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Schedule for 90-Day Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-A to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-A Annex VIII-A to Part 351—Schedule for 90-Day Sunset...

  5. 19 CFR Annex Viii-A to Part 351 - Schedule for 90-Day Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Schedule for 90-Day Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-A to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-A Annex VIII-A to Part 351—Schedule for 90-Day Sunset...

  6. 19 CFR Annex Viii-A to Part 351 - Schedule for 90-Day Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Schedule for 90-Day Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-A to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-A Annex VIII-A to Part 351—Schedule for 90-Day Sunset...

  7. 19 CFR Annex Viii-A to Part 351 - Schedule for 90-Day Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Schedule for 90-Day Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-A to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-A Annex VIII-A to Part 351—Schedule for 90-Day Sunset...

  8. 19 CFR Annex Viii-A to Part 351 - Schedule for 90-Day Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Schedule for 90-Day Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-A to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-A Annex VIII-A to Part 351—Schedule for 90-Day Sunset...

  9. 76 FR 78888 - Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review: Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... Sunset Review: Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium From Russia AGENCY: Import Administration... and nitrided vanadium from the Russian Federation (Russia), pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff... vanadium from Russia, pursuant to section 751(c) of the Act. See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset...

  10. A novel porous anionic metal–organic framework with pillared double-layer structure for selective adsorption of dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Shu-Nan; Han, Yi; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-15

    A novel porous anionic metal–organic framework, (Me{sub 2}NH{sub 2}){sub 2}[Zn{sub 2}L{sub 1.5}bpy]·2DMF (BUT-201; H{sub 4}L=4,8-disulfonaphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylic acid; bpy=4,4-bipyridine; DMF=N,N-dimethylformamide), with pillared double-layer structure has been synthesized through the reaction of a sulfonated carboxylic acid ligand and Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O with 4,4-bipyridine as a co-ligand. It is found that BUT-201 can rapidly adsorb cationic dyes with a smaller size such as Methylene Blue (MB) and Acriflavine Hydrochloride (AH) by substitution of guest (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}NH{sub 2}{sup +}, but has no adsorption towards the cationic dyes with a lager size such as Methylene Violet (MV), the anionic dyes like C. I. Acidmore » Yellow 1 (AY1) and neutral dyes like C. I. Solvent Yellow 7 (SY7), respectively. The results show that the adsorption behavior of BUT-201 relates not only to the charge but also to the size/shape of dyes. Furthermore, the adsorbed dyes can be gradually released in the methanol solution of LiNO{sub 3}. - Graphical abstract: A porous anionic metal–organic framework (BUT-201) can selectively adsorb the cationic dyes by cationic guest molecule substitution, and the adsorbed dyes can be gradually released in the methanol solution of LiNO{sub 3}. - Highlights: • An anionic metal-organic framework (BUT-201) has been synthesized and characterized. • BUT-201 has a three-dimensional (3D) pillared double-layer structure. • BUT-201 can selectively and rapidly adsorb cationic dyes. • The adsorbed dyes can be gradually released in the methanol solution of LiNO{sub 3}.« less

  11. Demonstrating Electrophoretic Separation in a Straight Paper Channel Delimited by a Hydrophobic Wax Barrier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Chunxiu; Lin, Wanqi; Cai, Longfei

    2016-01-01

    A demonstration is described of electrophoretic separation of carmine and sunset yellow with a paper-based device. The channel in the paper device was fabricated by hand with a wax pen. Electrophoretic separation of carmine and sunset yellow was achieved within a few minutes by applying potential on the channel using a simple and inexpensive power…

  12. High laser efficiency and photostability of pyrromethene dyes mediated by nonpolar solvent.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Monika; Kamble, Priyadarshini; Rath, M C; Naik, D B; Ray, Alok K

    2015-08-10

    Many pyrromethene (PM) dyes have been shown to outperform established rhodamine dyes in terms of laser efficiency in the green-yellow spectral region, but their rapid photochemical degradation in commonly used ethanol or methanol solvents continues to limit its use in high average power liquid dye lasers. A comparative study on narrowband laser efficiency and photostability of commercially available PM567 and PM597 dyes, using nonpolar n-heptane and 1,4-dioxane and polar ethanol solvents, was carried out by a constructed pulsed dye laser, pumped by the second harmonic (532 nm) radiation of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Interestingly, both nonpolar solvents showed a significantly higher laser photostability (∼100 times) as well as peak efficiency (∼5%) of these PM dyes in comparison to ethanol. The different photostability of the PM dyes was rationalized by determining their triplet-state spectra and capability to generate reactive singlet oxygen (O21) by energy transfer to dissolved oxygen in these solvents using pulse radiolysis. Heptane is identified as a promising solvent for these PM dyes for use in high average power dye lasers, pumped by copper vapor lasers or diode-pumped solid-state green lasers.

  13. 76 FR 12939 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy: Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy: Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review of the Antidumping Duty Order AGENCY... resin'') from Italy. The Department has conducted an expedited sunset review of this order. As a result... lead to continuation or recurrence of dumping at the margins identified in the Final Results of Review...

  14. 75 FR 51981 - Polychloroprene Rubber from Japan: Final Results of Sunset Review and Revocation of Finding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-588-046] Polychloroprene Rubber from Japan: Final Results of Sunset Review and Revocation of Finding AGENCY: Import Administration... parties did not file a notice of intent to participate in this sunset review. As a result, in accordance...

  15. Synthesis and characterization of Acacia gum-Fe0Np-silica nanocomposite: an efficient Fenton-like catalyst for the degradation of Remazol Brilliant Violet dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vandana; Singh, Jadveer; Srivastava, Preeti

    2018-04-01

    Acacia gum-Fe0Np-silica nanocomposite (GFS1) has been crafted through sol-gel technique using a two-step process that involved the reduction of iron salt to zerovalent iron nanoparticles (Fe0Nps) followed by their impregnation within Acacia gum-silica matrix. GFS1 was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. GFS1 is decorated with Fe0Nps of 5 nm average size. The VSM study revealed that GFS1 has ferromagnetic nature. GFS1 was used as a heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst for the degradation of azo dyes using Remazol Brilliant Violet (RBV) dye as a model dye. In first 5 min of operation, > 86% dye degradation was achieved and 94% dye (from 100 mg L-1 dye solution) was successfully degraded in 50 min. The dye degradation followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The GFS1 performed efficiently well over the wide range of dye concentrations (25-200 mg L-1). The catalyst was reused for eight repeated cycles where 12.5% dye degradation was possible even in the eighth cycle. The catalyst behaved fairly well for the degradation of Metanil Yellow (MY) and Orange G (OG) dyes also. Under the optimum conditions of RBV dye degradation, Metanil Yellow (MY) and Orange G (OG) dyes were degraded to the extent of 97 and 26.3%, respectively.

  16. Solar/UV-induced photocatalytic degradation of three commercial textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Neppolian, B; Choi, H C; Sakthivel, S; Arabindoo, Banumathi; Murugesan, V

    2002-01-28

    The photocatalytic degradation of three commercial textile dyes with different structure has been investigated using TiO(2) (Degussa P25) photocatalyst in aqueous solution under solar irradiation. Experiments were conducted to optimise various parameters viz. amount of catalyst, concentration of dye, pH and solar light intensity. Degradation of all the dyes were examined by using chemical oxygen demand (COD) method. The degradation efficiency of the three dyes is as follows: Reactive Yellow 17(RY17) > Reactive Red 2(RR2) > Reactive Blue 4 (RB4), respectively. The experimental results indicate that TiO(2) (Degussa P25) is the best catalyst in comparison with other commercial photocatalysts such as, TiO(2) (Merck), ZnO, ZrO(2), WO(3) and CdS. Though the UV irradiation can efficiently degrade the dyes, naturally abundant solar irradiation is also very effective in the mineralisation of dyes. The comparison between thin-film coating and aqueous slurry method reveals that slurry method is more efficient than coating but the problems of leaching and the requirement of separation can be avoided by using coating technique. These observations indicate that all the three dyes could be degraded completely at different time intervals. Hence, it may be a viable technique for the safe disposal of textile wastewater into the water streams.

  17. Cow urine, Indian yellow, and art forgeries: An update.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gregory Dale

    2017-07-01

    In a recent technical note in this Journal, de Faria et al., 2017 [1] reported the Raman spectrum of authentic Indian yellow artists' pigment, correcting a decades old reference spectrum that has led to the misidentification of this pigment in artworks that actually contained tartrazine yellow. The present communication provides additional information and corrects important experimental details mentioned by de Faria et al. that should lead to further identifications of the authentic pigment in artworks. Despite their claim that the analysis of this naturally fluorescent colorant is only possible with Fourier transform (FT) instruments, the ready characterization of two authentic samples of historic Indian yellow pigment is demonstrated here using commonly available visible and near-infrared excitation sources on a dispersive Raman microspectrometer. To highlight the importance of the proper identification of dyes and colorants, the authentication and art historical implications of previous literature reports that have misidentified Indian yellow on historic documents are more thoroughly discussed here from a forensic science point of view. The numerous modern pigments that are sold as imitation Indian yellow are addressed and analyzed, allowing the ready noninvasive detection of anachronistic colorants in attempted forgeries. Finally, this unusual pigment is positively identified for the first time using non-invasive dispersive Raman microspectroscopy on a historic object of uncertain date, a highly decorative manuscript from the Indian subcontinent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Adsorption performance of mixed dyes on alkalization loofah fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongli; Liu, Jinyan; Li, Xingxing

    2018-02-01

    When the polyporous structures of loofah fiber is adequately exposed after alkali treatment,lignin, hemicellulose and pectin are removed. Specific surface area is increased to maximum, which means the efficiency of absorptivity is highest. In this paper, by using alkalization loofah (AL) as adsorbent, the effect of loofah fiber on waste water treatment is studied under the efficiency of loofah fiber which contain acridine yellow, methylene blue, mixed solution of the two dyes. The optimum treatment conditions of loofah fiber were studied from five aspects which include dosage, temperature, mixing time, pH and concentration. The results showed that the optimal conditions are 30°C, pH 8.0, 20mg dosage of loofah fiber in 40ml solution and mixing time 25min. The optimal treatment conditions of mixed dyes were studied from the aspects of mixing time, the dosage of AL and the molar ratio of the two components in the mixed dyes.

  19. Equatorial F region neutral winds and shears near sunset measured with chemical release techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiene, A.; Larsen, M. F.; Kudeki, E.

    2015-10-01

    The period near sunset is a dynamic and critical time for the daily development of the equatorial nighttime ionosphere and the instabilities that occur there. It is during these hours that the preconditions necessary for the later development of Equatorial Spread F (ESF) plasma instabilities occur. The neutral dynamics of the sunset ionosphere are also of critical importance to the generation of currents and electric fields; however, the behavior of the neutrals is experimentally understood primarily through very limited single-altitude measurements or measurements that provide weighted altitude means of the winds as a function of time. To date, there have been very few vertically resolved neutral wind measurements in the F region at sunset. We present two sets of sounding rocket chemical release measurements, one from a launch in the Marshall Islands on Kwajalein atoll and one from Alcantara, Brazil. Analysis of the release motions has yielded vertically resolved neutral wind profiles that show both the mean horizontal winds and the vertical shears in the winds. In both experiments, we observe significant vertical gradients in the zonal wind that are unexpected by classical assumptions about the behavior of the neutral wind at these altitudes at sunset near the geomagnetic equator.

  20. Negative post sunset height rise of F layer: Causes and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Lalit Mohan; Patra, Amit

    Post sunset height rise (PSHR) of the F layer is a manifestation of the pre reversal enhancement (PRE) of zonal electric field in the equatorial and low latitude ionosphere. Ionosonde observations, made during the equinox period from Sriharikota (13.7 degree North, 80.1 degree East, 6.7 degree North magnetic latitude), a low latitude station in India, have been utilized to study the PSHR of the F layer. Normally, the height of the F layer increases during the early post sunset period (positive PSHR) whose magnitude has a direct bearing on the equatorial spread F (ESF). However, observations revealed that on a few nights (about 3% nights) the height of the F layer descended in the early post sunset period itself, indicating the absence of PRE of zonal field. Such events have been termed as negative PSHR events. Such events never preceded ESF. Detailed investigations revealed that the negative PSHR events were accompanied by an enhancement of low latitude sporadic E (Es) activity with increase in the Es blanketing (fbEs) and top (ftEs) frequencies, during the post sunset period. Numerical simulations have been carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the westward Pedersen and Hall conductivity gradients that exists in the low latitude E region during the evening hours, in causing the PRE of zonal field and the PSHR of the F layer. Model simulation reveals that the dominant cause of PRE of zonal field is the divergence of Hall current in the low latitude E region. When the zonal conductivity gradient of the low latitude E region was assumed to be either zero or slightly eastward, owing to the intensification of Es, model computation resulted in the negative PSHR of the F layer. Thus, the observational and computational results highlight the important role of the low latitude Es in the PRE of the zonal electric field.

  1. Water quality criteria for colored smokes: Solvent Yellow 33, Final report. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, K.A.; Hovatter, P.S.

    1987-11-01

    The available data on the environmental fate, aquatic toxicity, and mammalian toxicity of Solvent Yellow 33, a quinoline dye used in colored smoke grenades, were reviewed. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guidelines were used in an attempt to generate water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life and its use and of human health. 87 refs., 2 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. Effect of Light Intensity and Temperature on the Current Voltage Characteristics of Al/ SY/ p- Si Organic-Inorganic Heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imer, Arife Gencer; Ocak, Yusuf Selim

    2016-10-01

    An organic-inorganic contact was fabricated by forming a thin film of sunset yellow dye ( SY) on a p- Si wafer. The device showed a good rectification property, and the sunset yellow thin film modified the barrier height (Φb) of Al/ p- Si contact by influencing the space charge region. The heterojunction had a strong response to the different illumination intensities and showed that it can be suitable for photodiode applications. The I- V measurements of the device were also applied in the temperature range of 100-500 K. It was seen that characteristic parameters of the device were strongly dependent upon temperature. While the value of Φb increased, the ideality factor ( n) decreased with the increase in temperature. This variation was attributed to spatial inhomogeneity at the interface. The Norde function was used to determine the temperature-dependent series resistance and Φb values, and there was a good agreement with that of ln I- V data. The values of the Richardson constant ( A*) and mean Φb were determined as 29.47 Acm-2 K-2 by means of a modified activation energy plot, matching with a theoretical one, and 1.032 eV, respectively. Therefore, it was stated that the current voltage characteristic with the temperature can be explained by thermionic emission theory with Gaussian distribution of the Φb at the interface.

  3. 76 FR 78613 - Furfuryl Alcohol From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Expedited Third Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... People's Republic of China: Final Results of Expedited Third Sunset Review of the Antidumping Duty Order... September 1, 2011, the Department of Commerce (``Department'') initiated the third five-year (``sunset'') review of the antidumping duty order on furfuryl alcohol from the People's Republic of China (``PRC...

  4. Hypersensitivity reactions to food colours with special reference to the natural colour annatto extract (butter colour).

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, H; Larsen, J C; Tarding, F

    1978-01-01

    It is well known that synthetic food colours especially some azo dyes can provoke hypersensitivity reactions such as urticaria, angioneurotic oedema, and astma (Michaëlsson and Juhlin, 1973, Granholt and Thune, 1975). Natural food colours are scarcely investigated with respect to potential allergic properties. Annatto extract, a commonly used food colour in edible fats e.g. butter, has been tested in patients. Among 61 consecutive patients suffereing from chornic urticaria and/or angioneurotic oedema 56 patients were orally provoked by annatto extract during elimination diet. Challenge was performed with a dose equivalent to the amount used in 25 grammes of butter. Twentysix per cent of the patients reacted to this colour 4 hours (SD: 2,6) after intake. Similar challenges with synthetic dyes showed the following results: Tartrazine 11%, Sunset Yellow FCF 17%, Food Red 17 16%, Amaranth 9%, Ponceau 4 R 15%, Erythrosine 12% and Brillant Blue FCF 14%. The present study indicates that natural food colours may induce hypersensitivity reactions as frequent as synthetic dyes.

  5. Mechanisms and chemistry of dye adsorption on manganese oxides-modified diatomite.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Al-Degs, Yehya S; Khraisheh, Majeda A M; Ahmad, Mohammad N; Allen, Stephen J

    2009-08-01

    The investigations into structural changes which occur during adsorbent modification and the adsorption mechanisms are essential for an effective design of adsorption systems. Manganese oxides were impregnated onto diatomite to form the type known as delta-birnessite. Initial investigations established the effectiveness of manganese oxides-modified diatomite (MOMD) to remove basic and reactive dyes from aqueous solution. The adsorption capacity of MOMD for methylene blue (MB), hydrolysed reactive black (RB) and hydrolysed reactive yellow (RY) was 320, 419, and 204mg/g, respectively. Various analytical techniques were used to characterise the structure and the mechanisms of the dye adsorption process onto MOMD such as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic absorption spectrometry (A.A.). A small shift to higher values of the d-spacing of dye/MOMD was observed indicating that a small amount of the dye molecules were intercalated in the MOMD structure and other molecules were adsorbed on the external surface of MOMD. Two mechanisms of dye adsorption onto MOMD were proposed; intercalation of the dye in the octahedral layers and adsorption of the dye on the MOMD external surface. Moreover, the results demonstrated that the MOMD structure was changed upon insertion of MB and RY with an obvious decrease in the intensity of the second main peak of the MOMD X-ray pattern.

  6. Identification and partial characterization of C-glycosylflavone markers in Asian plant dyes using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mouri, Chika; Laursen, Richard

    2011-10-14

    Flavonoids in the grasses (Poaceae family), Arthraxon hispidus (Thunb.) Makino and Miscanthus tinctorius (Steudel) Hackel have long histories of use for producing yellow dyes in Japan and China, but up to now there have been no analytical procedures for characterizing the dye components in textiles dyed with these materials. LC-MS analysis of plant material and of silk dyed with extracts of these plants shows the presence, primarily, of flavonoid C-glycosides, three of which have been tentatively identified as luteolin 8-C-rhamnoside, apigenin 8-C-rhamnoside and luteolin 8-C-(4-ketorhamnoside). Two of these compounds, luteolin 8-C-rhamnoside (M=432), apigenin 8-C-rhamnoside (M=416), along with the previously known tricin (M=330) and several other flavonoids that appear in varying amounts, serve as unique markers for identifying A. hispidus and M. tinctorius as the source of yellow dyes in textiles. Using this information, we have been able to identify grass-derived dyes in Japanese textiles dated to the Nara and Heian periods. However, due to the high variability in the amounts of various flavonoid components, our goal of distinguishing between the two plant sources remains elusive. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies of yellow organic dyestuffs and lake pigments in oil paint.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Hannah E; Fabian, David M; Svoboda, Shelley A; Wustholz, Kristin L

    2013-08-21

    Identifying natural, organic dyes and pigments is important for the conservation, preservation, and historical interpretation of works of art. Although previous SERS studies have demonstrated high sensitivity and selectivity for red lake pigments using various pretreatment conditions, corresponding investigations of yellow lake pigments and paints are relatively sparse. Here, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy is used to identify a variety of yellow organic dyestuffs and lake pigments in oil paint. High-quality SERS spectra of yellow dyestuffs (i.e., turmeric, old fustic, Buckthorn berries) and corresponding paints could be obtained with or without sample pretreatment using microliter quantities of HCl and methanol at room temperature. However, the SERS spectra of yellow lake pigments (i.e., Stil de Grain, Reseda lake) and their corresponding oil paints were only observed upon sample pretreatment. Ultimately, we demonstrate a reliable sample treatment protocol for SERS-based identification of turmeric, old fustic, Buckthorn berries, Stil de Grain, and Reseda lake as well as for microscopic samples of the corresponding oil paints.

  8. The effect of Urban Park Sunset Program on land value in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. R.; Yoon, H.

    2016-12-01

    Intense urbanization has increased land scarcity in cities in the world, and consequently, securing lands for public parks and open spaces has become more challenging. Korea is not an exception. With Urban Park Sunset Plan, a plan for cancelling the designation as urban parks, nearly 583㎢ of publicly appropriated private land for the purpose will be released and returned to private owners. If municipalities want to keep the easement on the land, first, they should prepare physical design for parks or open spaces by 2015, and second, they should complete construction of those by 2020. In this study, we investigate the effect of Urban Park Sunset Program on land value. Our two-fold analysis includes: First, trend analysis where we extract variations of land values in Korea for 20 years (1996 2015). Second, we use panel data modeling to estimate the impact size of milestone plan implementation on land value; in 2000, Urban Park Sunset Plan was announced publicly, in 2015, the reserved land without physical design plan were released and finally, in 2020 the rest of the reserved land that has not yet been developed as parks or open spaces will be released. Along this process, we assess the ripple effect induced from the policy. As a result, we expect to find out potential economic impact of Urban Park Sunset Plan on land value, which could be applied for the preparation of countermeasures and the political decision making happening in the near future. This work was supported by the Korea Environmental Industry and Technology Institute (KEITI) under Grant (No. 2014-001-310007).

  9. Effect of electrolyte nature on kinetics of remazol yellow G removal by electrocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, M.; Bagheri-Roochi, M.; Asghari, A.

    2011-10-01

    The present study describes an electrocoagulation process for the removal of remazol yellow G from dye solutions using Iron as the anode and Steel as the cathode. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models were used to analyze the kinetic data obtained at different concentrations in different conditions. The adsorption kinetics was well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  10. 78 FR 38944 - Lemon Juice From Mexico: Final Results of Full Sunset Review of the Suspended Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-201-835] Lemon Juice From Mexico... the notice of initiation of the sunset review of the suspended antidumping duty investigation on lemon... Department initiated a sunset review of the suspended antidumping duty investigation on lemon juice from...

  11. Performance evaluation of two Aspergillus spp. for the decolourization of reactive dyes by bioaccumulation and biosorption.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Megha; Gola, Deepak; Panja, Rupobrata; Malik, Anushree; Ahammad, Shaikh Ziauddin

    2018-01-01

    A biological method was adopted to decolourize textile dyes, which is an economic and eco-friendly technology for textile wastewater remediation. Two fungal strains, i.e. Aspergillus lentulus and Aspergillus fumigatus, were used to study the removal of low to high concentrations (25 to 2000 mg L -1 ) of reactive remazol red, reactive blue and reactive yellow dyes by biosorption and bioaccumulation. The biosorption was successful only at the lower concentrations. A. lentulus was capable of removing 67-85% of reactive dyes during bioaccumulation mode of treatment at 500 mg L -1 dye concentration with an increased biomass uptake capacity. To cope up with the high dye concentration of 2000 mg L -1 , a novel combined approach was successful in case of A. lentulus, where almost 76% removal of reactive remazol red dye was observed during bioaccumulation followed by biosorption. The scanning electron microscopy also showed the accumulation of dye on the surface of fungal mycelium. The results signify the application of such robust fungal strains for the removal of high concentration of dyes in the textile wastewaters.

  12. Global Specification of the Post-Sunset Equatorial Ionization Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coker, C.; Dandenault, P. B.; Dymond, K.; Budzien, S. A.; Nicholas, A. C.; Chua, D. H.; McDonald, S. E.; Metzler, C. A.; Walker, P. W.; Scherliess, L.; Schunk, R. W.; Gardner, L. C.; Zhu, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI) on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) is used to specify the post-sunset Equatorial Ionization Anomaly. Ultraviolet emission profiles of 135.6 nm and 91.1 nm emissions from O++ e recombination are measured in successive altitude scans along the orbit of the satellite. The overlapping sample geometry provides for a high resolution reconstruction of the ionosphere in altitude and latitude for each pass of the satellite. Emission profiles are ingested by the Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) space weather model, which was developed by Utah State University and is run operationally at the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA). The resulting specification of the equatorial ionosphere reveals significant variability in the postsunset anomaly, which is reflective of the driving space weather processes, namely, electric fields and neutral winds. Significant longitudinal and day-to-day variability in the magnitude (or even existence) of the post-sunset anomaly reveal the influence of atmospheric tides and waves as well as geomagnetic disturbances on the pre-reversal enhancement of the electric field. Significant asymmetry between anomaly crests reveals the influence of atmospheric tides and waves on meridional neutral winds. A neutral wind parallel to the magnetic field line pushes plasma up (or down) the field lines, which raises (or lowers) the altitude of the crests and modifies the horizontal location and magnitude of the crests. The variability in the post-sunset anomaly is one of the largest sources of error in ionospheric specification models. The SSULI instrument provides critical data towards the reduction of this specification error and the determination of key driver parameters used in ionospheric forecasting. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the USAF Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Base Program, and the Office of Naval

  13. 76 FR 46595 - National Organic Program (NOP); Sunset Review (2011)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ...-07-14FR] RIN 0581-AC77 National Organic Program (NOP); Sunset Review (2011) AGENCY: Agricultural... the Secretary of Agriculture (Secretary) by the National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) on November 5... exemption (use) of 12 substances in organic production and handling. Consistent with the recommendations...

  14. 76 FR 45513 - Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway: Preliminary Results of Full Third Sunset Review of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... Salmon From Norway: Preliminary Results of Full Third Sunset Review of Antidumping Duty Order AGENCY...) order on fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of..., the Department initiated the third sunset review of the AD order on fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon...

  15. Mineralization of hetero bi-functional reactive dye in aqueous solution by Fenton and photo-Fenton reactions.

    PubMed

    Torrades, Francesc; García-Hortal, José Antonio; García-Montaño, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the advanced oxidation of the hetero bi-functional reactive dye Sumifix Supra Yellow 3RF (CI Reactive Yellow 145) using dark Fenton and photo-Fenton conditions in a lab-scale experiment. A 2(3) factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of the three key factors: temperature, Fe(II) and H2O2 concentrations, for a dye concentration of 250 mg L(-1) with chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 172 mg L(-1) O2 at pH=3. The response function was the COD reduction. This methodology lets us find the effects and interactions of the studied variables and their roles in the efficiency of the treatment process. In the optimization, the correlation coefficients for the model (R2) were 0.948 and 0.965 for Fenton and photo-Fenton treatments, respectively. Under optimized reaction conditions: pH=3, temperature=298 K, [H2O2]=11.765 mM and [Fe(II)]=1.075 mM; 60 min of treatment resulted in a 79% and 92.2% decrease in COD, for the dye taken as the model organic compound, after Fenton and photo-Fenton treatments, respectively.

  16. Utilization of Corn Cob and TiO2 Photocatalyst Thin Films for Dyes Removal.

    PubMed

    Gan, Hui-Yee; Leow, Li-Eau; Ong, Siew-Teng

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness of using TiO2 and corn cob films to remove Malachite Green oxalate (MG) and Acid Yellow 17 (AY 17) from binary dye solution was studied. The immobilization method in this study can avoid the filtration step which is not suited for practical applications. Batch studies were performed under different experimental conditions and the parameters studied involved initial pH of dye solution, initial dye concentration and contact time and reusability. The equilibrium data of MG and AY 17 conform to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm model, respectively. The percentage removal of MG remained high after four sorption cycles, however for AY 17, a greater reduction was observed. The removal of both dyes were optimized and modeled via Plackett- Burman design (PB) and Response Surface Methodology (RSM). IR spectrum and surface conditions analyses were carried out using fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM), respectively.

  17. 78 FR 10134 - Welded Large Diameter Line Pipe From Japan: Final Results of the Expedited Second Sunset Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Pipe From Japan: Final Results of the Expedited Second Sunset Review of the Antidumping Duty Order... antidumping duty order on welded large diameter line pipe (line pipe) from Japan pursuant to section 751(c) of... Department initiated the sunset review of the antidumping duty order on line pipe from Japan pursuant to...

  18. 76 FR 70411 - Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway: Final Results of Full Third Sunset Review of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... Salmon From Norway: Final Results of Full Third Sunset Review of Countervailing Duty Order AGENCY: Import... fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as... on fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway pursuant to section 751(c) of the Act. See Sunset...

  19. 76 FR 70409 - Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway: Final Results of Full Third Sunset Review of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... Salmon From Norway: Final Results of Full Third Sunset Review of Antidumping Duty Order AGENCY: Import... and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as... Department initiated the third sunset review of the AD order on fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway...

  20. Detection of azo dyes in curry powder using a 1064-nm dispersive hyperspectral Raman imaging system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Curry powder is extensively used in Southeast Asian dishes. It has been subject to adulteration by azo dyes. This study used a newly developed 1064 nm dispersive hyperspectral Raman imaging system for detection of metanil yellow and Sudan-I contamination in curry powder. Curry powder was mixed with ...

  1. A combined Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)/UV-vis approach for the investigation of dye content in commercial felt tip pens inks.

    PubMed

    Saviello, Daniela; Trabace, Maddalena; Alyami, Abeer; Mirabile, Antonio; Giorgi, Rodorico; Baglioni, Piero; Iacopino, Daniela

    2018-05-01

    The development of protocols for the protection of the large patrimony of works of art created by felt tip pen media since the 1950's requires detailed knowledge of the main dyes constituting commercial ink mixtures. In this work Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) and UV-vis spectroscopy were used for the first time for the systematic identification of dye composition in commercial felt tip pens. A large selection of pens comprising six colors of five different brands was analyzed. Intense SERS spectra were obtained for all colors, allowing identification of main dye constituents. Poinceau 4R and Eosin dyes were found to be the main constituents of red and pink colors; Rhodamine and Tartrazine were found in orange and yellow colors; Erioglaucine was found in green and blue colors. UV-vis analysis of the same inks was used to support SERS findings but also to unequivocally assign some uncertain dye identifications, especially for yellow and orange colors. The spectral data of all felt tip pens collected through this work were assembled in a database format. The data obtained through this systematic investigation constitute the basis for the assembly of larger reference databases that ultimately will support the development of conservation protocols for the long term preservation of modern art collections. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic toxicity of azo and anthracenedione dyes to embryo-larval fathead minnow.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Joanne L; Bartlett, Adrienne J; Balakrishnan, Vimal K

    2016-03-01

    The toxicity of selected azo and anthracenedione dyes was studied using chronic exposures of embryo-larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Newly fertilized fathead minnow embryos were exposed through the egg stage, past hatching, through the larval stage (until 14 days post-hatch), with dye solutions renewed daily. The anthracenedione dyes Acid Blue 80 (AB80) and Acid Blue 129 (AB129) caused no effects in larval fish at the highest measured concentrations tested of 7700 and 6700 μg/L, respectively. Both azo dyes Disperse Yellow 7 (DY7) and Sudan Red G (SRG) decreased survival of larval fish, with LC50s (based on measured concentrations of dyes in fish exposure water) of 25.4 μg/L for DY7 and 16.7 μg/L for SRG. Exposure to both azo dyes caused a delayed response, with larval fish succumbing 4-10 days after hatch. If the exposures were ended at the embryo stage or just after hatch, the potency of these two dyes would be greatly underestimated. Concentrations of dyes that we measured entering the Canadian environment were much lower than those that affected larval fish survival in the current tests. In a total of 162 samples of different municipal wastewater effluents from across Canada assessed for these dyes, all were below detection limits. The similarities of the structures and larval fish responses for the two azo and two anthracenedione dyes in this study support the use of read-across data for risk assessment of these classes of compounds. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sunrise/sunset thermal shock disturbance analysis and simulation for the TOPEX satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, C. J.; Welch, R. V.; Zimbelman, D. F.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown here that during normal on-orbit operations the TOPEX low-earth orbiting satellite is subjected to an impulsive disturbance torque caused by rapid heating of its solar array when entering and exiting the earth's shadow. Error budgets and simulation results are used to demonstrate that this sunrise/sunset torque disturbance is the dominant Normal Mission Mode (NMM) attitude error source. The detailed thermomechanical modeling, analysis, and simulation of this torque is described, and the predicted on-orbit performance of the NMM attitude control system in the face of the sunrise/sunset disturbance is presented. The disturbance results in temporary attitude perturbations that exceed NMM pointing requirements. However, they are below the maximum allowable pointing error which would cause the radar altimeter to break lock.

  4. 14 CFR 105.19 - Parachute operations between sunset and sunrise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 105.19... between sunset and sunrise, unless the person or object descending from the aircraft displays a light that... be displayed from the time that the person or object is under a properly functioning open parachute...

  5. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Eui-Jong; Tabatabai, S Assiyeh Alizadeh; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-10-15

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR18), and acid yellow 36 (AY36) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane-dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye-dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. New physicochemical interpretations for the adsorption of food dyes on chitosan films using statistical physics treatment.

    PubMed

    Dotto, G L; Pinto, L A A; Hachicha, M A; Knani, S

    2015-03-15

    In this work, statistical physics treatment was employed to study the adsorption of food dyes onto chitosan films, in order to obtain new physicochemical interpretations at molecular level. Experimental equilibrium curves were obtained for the adsorption of four dyes (FD&C red 2, FD&C yellow 5, FD&C blue 2, Acid Red 51) at different temperatures (298, 313 and 328 K). A statistical physics formula was used to interpret these curves, and the parameters such as, number of adsorbed dye molecules per site (n), anchorage number (n'), receptor sites density (NM), adsorbed quantity at saturation (N asat), steric hindrance (τ), concentration at half saturation (c1/2) and molar adsorption energy (ΔE(a)) were estimated. The relation of the above mentioned parameters with the chemical structure of the dyes and temperature was evaluated and interpreted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis of magnetic biocomposite for efficient adsorption of azo dye from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Sivashankar, R; Sathya, A B; Krishnakumar, Uma; Sivasubramanian, V

    2015-11-01

    A novel magnetic biocomposite was synthesized using metal chlorides and aquatic macrophytes by co-precipitation method. The resulting product, magnetic biocomposite was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM). The adsorption performance of the magnetic biocomposite was tested with removal of Metanil Yellow dye from aqueous solution. The effect of influencing parameters such as initial dye concentration, solution pH and agitation were investigated. The equilibrium isotherm was well described by the Langmuir model with the with maximum adsorption capacity of 90.91mg/g. Adsorption kinetics experiments were carried out and the data were well fitted by a pseudo-second-order equation. The results revealed that the magnetic biocomposite could efficiently adsorb the azo dyes from aqueous solution, and the spent adsorbents could be recovered completely by magnetic separation process. Therefore, the prepared magnetic biocomposite could thus be used as promising adsorbent for the removal of azo dyes from polluted water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Yellow Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing Vaccine Information Testing for Vaccine Adverse Events Yellow fever Vaccine Continuing Education Course Yellow Fever Home Prevention Vaccine Vaccine Recommendations Reactions to Yellow Fever Vacine Yellow Fever Vaccine, Pregnancy, & ... Transmission Symptoms, Diagnosis, & Treatment Maps Africa ...

  9. 78 FR 60850 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil: Final Results of the Expedited Second Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... Steel Wire Rod From Brazil: Final Results of the Expedited Second Sunset Review of the Countervailing... of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (wire rod) from...: Background On June 3, 2013, the Department initiated the second sunset review of the CVD order \\1\\ on wire...

  10. Ethnobotany of dye plants in Dong communities of China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yujing; Ahmed, Selena; Liu, Bo; Guo, Zhiyong; Huang, Weijuan; Wu, Xianjin; Li, Shenghua; Zhou, Jiangju; Lei, Qiyi; Long, Chunlin

    2014-02-19

    Dyes derived from plants have an extensive history of use for coloring food and clothing in Dong communities and other indigenous areas in the uplands of China. In addition to use as coloring agents, Dong communities have historically utilized dye plants for their value for enhancing the nutritive, medicinal and preservative properties of foods. However, the persistence of plant-derived dyes and associated cultural practices and traditional knowledge is threatened with rapid socio-economic change in China. Research is needed to document the ethnobotany of dye plants in indigenous communities towards their conservation and potential commercialization as a sustainable means of supporting local development initiatives. Semi-structured surveys on plants used for coloring agents and associated traditional knowledge were conducted in fifteen Dong villages of Tongdao County in Hunan Province of South Central China during 2011-2012. Transect walks were carried out with key informants identified from semi-structured surveys to collect samples and voucher specimens for each documented plant species for taxonomic identification. Dong households at the study sites utilize the flowers, bark, stems, tubers and roots of 13 plant species from 9 families as dyes to color their customary clothing and food. Out of the documented plants, a total of 7 are used for coloring food, 3 for coloring clothing and 3 for both food and clothing. Documented plants consist of 3 species that yield black pigments, 3 for brownish red/russet pigments, 3 for red pigments, 2 for dark blue pigments and 2 for yellow pigments. In addition to dyes, the plants have multiple uses including medicinal, ornamental, sacrificial, edible, and for timber. The use of dyes derived from plants persists at the study sites for their important role in expressing Dong cultural identity through customary clothing and food. Further research is needed to evaluate the safety of dye plants, their efficacy in enhancing food

  11. Direct identification of early synthetic dyes: FT-Raman study of the illustrated broadside prints of José Gaudalupe Posada (1852-1913)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, F.; Mauck, K.; Chefitz, M.; Freeman, R.

    2010-09-01

    Fourier Transform (FT)-Raman spectroscopy was used for the non-invasive, direct identification of colorants used to dye historical printed papers, overcoming obstacles such as low concentration of the dye, faded colors and fluorescence interference of the aged paper substrate. Based on a newly created FT-Raman reference database of 20 widely used dyes in the 19th century paper industry, the detectability of these dyes on aged biomaterials was determined by studying dyed paper samples from contemporary dye manuals, and identifying diagnostic peaks detectable on those substrates. Lastly, the method was applied to analyze the colorants used to dye the papers of a group of prints illustrated by the influential Mexico City artist José Guadalupe Posada, active 1876-1913. Unambiguous identification of the synthetic organic colorants Malachite Green (a triarylmethane dye), Orange II and Metanil Yellow (two acid monoazo dyes), Cotton Scarlet (an acid diazo dye), Phloxine (a xanthene dye) and Victoria Blue (a triarylmethane dye) in several of Posada’s prints challenged previous art-historical assumptions that these artworks were colored with natural dyes. The acquired knowledge has important conservation implications given that aniline dyes are sensitive to light and to aqueous treatments otherwise commonly carried out on works of art on paper.

  12. 77 FR 44429 - National Organic Program (NOP); Sunset Review (2012); Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ...-01FR] RIN 0581-AC96 National Organic Program (NOP); Sunset Review (2012); Correction AGENCY... used as ingredients in processed products labeled as ``organic'' if organic forms are not commercially... requirements, Seals and insignia, Soil conservation. Accordingly, 7 CFR part 205 is corrected by making the...

  13. The Center for Family Life and the Sunset Park Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffer, Ethel

    The Center of Family Life (CFL) is a private nonprofit agency. Since its creation in 1978 CFL has offered a wide range of services to children and families in Sunset Park, a low-income multi-echnic Brooklyn, New York neighborhood. All families with children under age 18 and pregnant women living in the neighborhood are eligible for services free…

  14. The use of sunrise and sunset terminators to calibrate ionospheric movement measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, J. D.; Brownlie, G. D.; From, W. R.

    1981-12-01

    A suggestion is made concerning the use of the wave disturbances induced by the sunrise and sunset terminators for the calibration of HF radio reflection techniques measuring the velocity of ionospheric movements. Observations of the E-W and the N-S angles of arrival and the rate of change of phase range of radar echoes during sunrise are presented which demonstrate an overall negative correlation of E-W angle of arrival with the rate of change of phase range, and indicate a fluctuation velocity of 415 + or - 30 m/sec. Further observations of F-region reflections at sunrise and sunset at Brisbane, Australia indicate disturbances with a mean velocity of 400 m/sec, in agreement with the terminator velocity at this latitude. The agreement between measured and known terminator velocities thus demonstrates the reliability of the radar reflection method.

  15. Kinetic and calorimetric study of the adsorption of dyes on mesoporous activated carbon prepared from coconut coir dust.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Jeremias de Souza; da Costa Júnior, Nivan Bezerra; Almeida, Luis Eduardo; Vieira, Eunice Fragoso da Silva; Cestari, Antonio Reinaldo; Gimenez, Iara de Fátima; Villarreal Carreño, Neftali Lênin; Barreto, Ledjane Silva

    2006-06-15

    Mesoporous activated carbon has been prepared from coconut coir dust as support for adsorption of some model dye molecules from aqueous solutions. The methylene blue (MB) and remazol yellow (RY) molecules were chosen for study of the adsorption capacity of cationic and anionic dyes onto prepared activated carbon. The adsorption kinetics was studied with the Lagergren first- and pseudo-second-order kinetic models as well as the intraparticle diffusion model. The results for both dyes suggested a multimechanism sorption process. The adsorption mechanisms in the systems dyes/AC follow pseudo-second-order kinetics with a significant contribution of intraparticle diffusion. The samples simultaneously present acidic and basic sites able to act as anchoring sites for basic and acidic dyes, respectively. Calorimetric studies reveal that dyes/AC interaction forces are correlated with the pH of the solution, which can be related to the charge distribution on the AC surface. These AC samples also exhibited very short equilibrium times for the adsorption of both dyes, which is an economically favorable requisite for the activated carbon described in this work, in addition to the local abundance of the raw material.

  16. Curcuma longa extract as a histological dye for collagen fibres and red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Avwioro, O G; Onwuka, S K; Moody, J O; Agbedahunsi, J M; Oduola, T; Ekpo, O E; Oladele, A A

    2007-01-01

    Crude ethanolic extract and column chromatographic fractions of the Allepey cultivar of Curcuma longa Roxb, commonly called turmeric (tumeric) in commerce, were used as a stain for tissue sections. Staining was carried out under basic, acidic and neutral media conditions. Inorganic and organic dissolution solvents were used. The stain was used as a counterstain after alum and iron haematoxylins. C. longa stained collagen fibres, cytoplasm, red blood cells and muscle cells yellow. It also stained in a fashion similar to eosin, except for its intense yellow colour. Preliminary phytochemical evaluation of the active column fraction revealed that it contained flavonoids, free anthraquinone and deoxy sugar. A cheap, natural dye can thus be obtained from C. longa. PMID:17451535

  17. Hibiscus plant named `Sahara Sunset` U.S. Plant Patent 21,765

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    'Sahara Sunset' is a new and distinct cultivar of Hibiscus, botanically known as Hibiscus acetosella. The new Hibiscus was originated in Poplarville, Miss. and is a product of a mutation induction program. The parent of the present new cultivar is an unknown Hibiscus acetosella Wels. Ex Hiern seedli...

  18. Time-resolved spectroscopy of dye-labeled photoactive yellow protein suggests a pathway of light-induced structural changes in the N-terminal cap.

    PubMed

    Hoersch, Daniel; Otto, Harald; Cusanovich, Michael A; Heyn, Maarten P

    2009-07-14

    The photoreceptor PYP responds to light activation with global conformational changes. These changes are mainly located in the N-terminal cap of the protein, which is approximately 20 A away from the chromophore binding pocket and separated from it by the central beta-sheet. The question of the propagation of the structural change across the central beta-sheet is of general interest for the superfamily of PAS domain proteins, for which PYP is the structural prototype. Here we measured the kinetics of the structural changes in the N-terminal cap by transient absorption spectroscopy on the ns to second timescale. For this purpose the cysteine mutants A5C and N13C were prepared and labeled with thiol reactive 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein (IAF). A5 is located close to the N-terminus, while N13 is part of helix alpha1 near the functionally important salt bridge E12-K110 between the N-terminal cap and the central anti-parallel beta-sheet. The absorption spectrum of the dye is sensitive to its environment, and serves as a sensor for conformational changes near the labeling site. In both labeled mutants light activation results in a transient red-shift of the fluorescein absorption spectrum. To correlate the conformational changes with the photocycle intermediates of the protein, we compared the kinetics of the transient absorption signal of the dye with that of the p-hydroxycinnamoyl chromophore. While the structural change near A5 is synchronized with the rise of the I(2) intermediate, which is formed in approximately 200 mus, the change near N13 is delayed and rises with the next intermediate I(2)', which forms in approximately 2 ms. This indicates that different parts of the N-terminal cap respond to light activation with different kinetics. For the signaling pathway of photoactive yellow protein we propose a model in which the structural signal propagates from the chromophore binding pocket across the central beta-sheet via the N-terminal region to helix alpha1

  19. Evaluation of out-in skin transparency using a colorimeter and food dye in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, H; Tadaki, H; Takami, S; Muramatsu, R; Hagiwara, S; Mizuno, T; Arakawa, H

    2009-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a disease of skin barrier dysfunction and outside stimuli can cross the skin barrier. To examine a new method for evaluating the outside to inside skin transparency with a colorimeter and yellow dyes. In study 1, a total of 28 volunteer subjects (24 normal and four with atopic dermatitis) participated. After provocation with yellow dye, the skin colour of all the subjects was measured using a colorimeter. The skin transparency index was calculated by the changes of the skin colour to yellow. Other variables of skin function, including transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum hydration, were also measured. In study 2, the skin transparency index was evaluated for a cohort of 38 patients with atopic dermatitis, 27 subjects with dry skin and 29 healthy controls. In study 1, the measurement of skin colour (b*) using tartrazine showed good results. There was a significant relationship between the skin transparency index with tartrazine and the atopic dermatitis score (P = 0.014). No other measurements of skin function, including the TEWL, were correlated. In study 2, the skin transparency index score obtained with tartrazine in the patients with atopic dermatitis was significantly higher than that of the controls and those with dry skin (P < 0.001 and P = 0.022, respectively). However, the TEWL in patients with atopic dermatitis was not significantly higher than that of patients with dry skin and the TEWL in subjects with dry skin was not higher than that of the controls. This method, which used a colorimeter and food dye, is noninvasive, safe and reliable for the evaluation of out-in skin transparency and can demonstrate the characteristic dysfunction in the skin barrier in patients with atopic dermatitis.

  20. Separation and recovery of food coloring dyes using aqueous biphasic extraction chromatographic resins.

    PubMed

    Huddleston, J G; Willauer, H D; Boaz, K R; Rogers, R D

    1998-06-26

    Aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) and aqueous biphasic extraction chromatographic (ABEC) resins are currently under investigation for their utility in the removal of color from textile plant wastes. The structures of several widely used food colorings, suggest that these dyes would also be retained on the resins. In work currently in progress, we have begun to investigate the retention and resolution of several common food colorings including indigo carmine, amaranth, carminic acid. erythrosin B, tartrazine and quinoline yellow. The relationship between the uptake of these dyes on ABEC resins in terms of the binding strengths and capacities of the resins and their partitioning behavior in ABS is illustrated. Some possible theoretical and practical approaches to the prediction of the partitioning and retention behavior is discussed.

  1. Patch testing to a textile dye mix by the international contact dermatitis research group.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, Marléne; Ale, Iris; Andersen, Klaus E; Diepgen, Thomas; Goh, Chee-Leok; Goossens R, An; Jerajani, Hemangi; Maibach, Howard I; Sasseville, Denis; Bruze, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Disperse dyes are well-known contact sensitizers not included in the majority of commercially available baseline series. To investigate the outcome of patch testing to a textile dye mix (TDM) consisting of 8 disperse dyes. Two thousand four hundred ninety-three consecutive dermatitis patients in 9 dermatology clinics were patch tested with a TDM 6.6%, consisting of Disperse (D) Blue 35, D Yellow 3, D Orange 1 and 3, D Red 1 and 17, all 1.0% each, and D Blue 106 and D Blue 124, each 0.3%. 90 reacted positively to the TDM. About 92.2% of the patients allergic to the TDM were also tested with the 8 separate dyes. Contact allergy to TDM was found in 3.6% (1.3-18.2) Simultaneous reactivity to p-phenylenediamine was found in 61.1% of the TDM-positive patients. Contact allergy to TDM and not to other p-amino-substituted sensitizers was diagnosed in 1.2%. The most frequent dye allergen in the TDM-positive patients was D Orange 3. Over 30% of the TDM allergic patients had been missed if only the international baseline series was tested. Contact allergy to TDM could explain or contribute to dermatitis in over 20% of the patients. Textile dye mix should be considered for inclusion into the international baseline series.

  2. Removal of Acid Yellow 17 Dye by Fenton Oxidation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Jehangeer; Sayed, Murtaza; Ali, Fayaz; Khan, Hasan Mahmood

    2018-05-01

    In the present research work the degradation of acid yellow 17 (AY 17) by H2O2/Fe2+ was investigated. The effect of various conditions such as pH value, temperature, conc. of H2O2, Fe2+, conc. of AY 17 were studied. Additionally the scavenging effects of various anions such as Cl-, SO42-, CO32- and HCO3-, on percent degradation of AY 17 were examined. It was found that these anions decrease percent degradation as well as rate of degradation reaction. The optimum conditions were determined as [AY 17]=[Fe2+]=0.06 mM [H2O2]=0.9 mM, and pH 3.0 for 60 min of reaction time. It was found that at optimum conditions 89% degradation of AY17 was achieved. The degradation kinetics of AY17 followed pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. Thermodynamic studies under natural conditions showed positive value of ΔH (enthalpy) which indicates the degradation process is endothermic.

  3. Ethnobotany of dye plants in Dong communities of China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dyes derived from plants have an extensive history of use for coloring food and clothing in Dong communities and other indigenous areas in the uplands of China. In addition to use as coloring agents, Dong communities have historically utilized dye plants for their value for enhancing the nutritive, medicinal and preservative properties of foods. However, the persistence of plant-derived dyes and associated cultural practices and traditional knowledge is threatened with rapid socio-economic change in China. Research is needed to document the ethnobotany of dye plants in indigenous communities towards their conservation and potential commercialization as a sustainable means of supporting local development initiatives. Methods Semi-structured surveys on plants used for coloring agents and associated traditional knowledge were conducted in fifteen Dong villages of Tongdao County in Hunan Province of South Central China during 2011–2012. Transect walks were carried out with key informants identified from semi-structured surveys to collect samples and voucher specimens for each documented plant species for taxonomic identification. Results Dong households at the study sites utilize the flowers, bark, stems, tubers and roots of 13 plant species from 9 families as dyes to color their customary clothing and food. Out of the documented plants, a total of 7 are used for coloring food, 3 for coloring clothing and 3 for both food and clothing. Documented plants consist of 3 species that yield black pigments, 3 for brownish red/russet pigments, 3 for red pigments, 2 for dark blue pigments and 2 for yellow pigments. In addition to dyes, the plants have multiple uses including medicinal, ornamental, sacrificial, edible, and for timber. Conclusions The use of dyes derived from plants persists at the study sites for their important role in expressing Dong cultural identity through customary clothing and food. Further research is needed to evaluate the safety of dye

  4. [Yellow fever].

    PubMed

    Sabbatani, Sergio; Fiorino, Sirio

    2007-06-01

    After the discovery of the New World, yellow fever proved to be an important risk factor of morbidity and mortality for Caribbean populations. In the following centuries epidemic risk, expanded by sea trade and travel, progressively reached the settlements in North America and Brazil as well as the Atlantic seaboard of tropical and equatorial Africa. In the eighteenth century and the first half of the nineteenth century epidemics of yellow fever were reported in some coastal towns in the Iberian peninsula, French coast, Great Britain and Italy, where, in 1804 at Leghorn, only one epidemic was documented. Prevention and control programs against yellow fever, developed at the beginning of the twentieth century in Cuba and in Panama, were a major breakthrough in understanding definitively its aetiology and pathogenesis. Subsequently, further advances in knowledge of yellow fever epidemiology were obtained when French scientists, working in West and Central Africa, showed that monkeys were major hosts of the yellow fever virus (the wild yellow fever virus), besides man. In addition, advances in research, contributing to the development of vaccines against the yellow fever virus in the first half of the nineteenth century, are reported in this paper.

  5. Azobenzene dye-coupled quadruply hydrogen-bonding modules as colorimetric indicators for supramolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yagang; Zimmerman, Steven C

    2012-01-01

    The facile coupling of azobenzene dyes to the quadruply hydrogen-bonding modules 2,7-diamido-1,8-naphthyridine (DAN) and 7-deazaguanine urea (DeUG) is described. The coupling of azobenzene dye 2 to mono-amido DAN units 4, 7, and 9 was effected by classic 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine (DMAP)-catalyzed peptide synthesis with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethyl carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) as activating agent, affording the respective amide products 5, 8, and 10 in 60-71% yield. The amide linkage was formed through either the aliphatic or aromatic ester group of 2, allowing both the flexibility and absorption maximum to be tuned. Azobenzene dye 1 was coupled to the DeUG unit 11 by Steglich esterification to afford the product amide 12 in 35% yield. Alternatively, azobenzene dye 16 underwent a room-temperature copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition with DeUG alkyne 17 to give triazole 18 in 71% yield. Azobenzene coupled DAN modules 5, 8, and 10 are bright orange-red in color, and azobenzene coupled DeUG modules 12 and 18 are orange-yellow in color. Azobenzene coupled DAN and DeUG modules were successfully used as colorimetric indicators for specific DAN-DeUG and DAN-UPy (2-ureido-4(1H)-pyrimidone) quadruply hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  6. Azobenzene dye-coupled quadruply hydrogen-bonding modules as colorimetric indicators for supramolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yagang

    2012-01-01

    Summary The facile coupling of azobenzene dyes to the quadruply hydrogen-bonding modules 2,7-diamido-1,8-naphthyridine (DAN) and 7-deazaguanine urea (DeUG) is described. The coupling of azobenzene dye 2 to mono-amido DAN units 4, 7, and 9 was effected by classic 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine (DMAP)-catalyzed peptide synthesis with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N’-ethyl carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) as activating agent, affording the respective amide products 5, 8, and 10 in 60–71% yield. The amide linkage was formed through either the aliphatic or aromatic ester group of 2, allowing both the flexibility and absorption maximum to be tuned. Azobenzene dye 1 was coupled to the DeUG unit 11 by Steglich esterification to afford the product amide 12 in 35% yield. Alternatively, azobenzene dye 16 underwent a room-temperature copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition with DeUG alkyne 17 to give triazole 18 in 71% yield. Azobenzene coupled DAN modules 5, 8, and 10 are bright orange–red in color, and azobenzene coupled DeUG modules 12 and 18 are orange–yellow in color. Azobenzene coupled DAN and DeUG modules were successfully used as colorimetric indicators for specific DAN–DeUG and DAN–UPy (2-ureido-4(1H)-pyrimidone) quadruply hydrogen-bonding interactions. PMID:22509220

  7. 19 CFR 351.218 - Sunset reviews under section 751(c) of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... International Trade Commission and conduct an expedited sunset review and issue final results of review in.... 351.218 Section 351.218 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...; (2) Notify the International Trade Commission in writing as such normally not later than 20 days...

  8. 19 CFR 351.218 - Sunset reviews under section 751(c) of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... International Trade Commission and conduct an expedited sunset review and issue final results of review in.... 351.218 Section 351.218 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...; (2) Notify the International Trade Commission in writing as such normally not later than 20 days...

  9. 19 CFR 351.218 - Sunset reviews under section 751(c) of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... International Trade Commission and conduct an expedited sunset review and issue final results of review in.... 351.218 Section 351.218 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...; (2) Notify the International Trade Commission in writing as such normally not later than 20 days...

  10. UV-Vis microspectrophotometry as a method of differentiation between cotton fibre evidence coloured with reactive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Was-Gubala, Jolanta; Starczak, Roza

    2015-05-01

    The main purposes of this study was to assess the usefulness of microspectrophotometry (MSP), both in the ultraviolet (UV) and visible (Vis) range for discriminating single cotton fibres dyed with reactive dyes coming from the same manufacturer, as well as the possibility of evaluation of the concentration of dye in an examine fibre. This study utilised woven cotton fabrics dyed with different concentrations of one-compound reactive dyes with the commercial name Cibacron® (at present Novacron®) as the focus of the MSP analysis. The spectra were recorded in the UV-Vis range between 200 and 800 nm, in transmission mode. The results from this study illustrated that all of the analysed cotton samples dyed with reactive dyes were distinguishable between each other with the use of MSP, mostly in the visible, and also in ultraviolet range. The limit for applied MSP techniques was 0.18% of the concentration of a dye in the textile sample. The results indicate that based on the absorbance measurements for fibres constituting e.g. forensic traces it was not possible to estimate the concentration of the dye in the fibre because Beer's law did not obey. The intra-sample, and inter- sample variation, as well as dichroism effect in a case of a cotton fibres dyed with reactive dye were observed. On the basis of the results obtained for each analysed cotton sample, it was concluded that there was no correlation between colour uniformity in cotton fabric (changes in lightness, red/green and yellow/blue colour) and concentration of the reactive dye.

  11. Equilibrium, kinetics and process design of acid yellow 132 adsorption onto red pine sawdust.

    PubMed

    Can, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Linear and non-linear regression procedures have been applied to the Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich, and Redlich-Peterson isotherms for adsorption of acid yellow 132 (AY132) dye onto red pine (Pinus resinosa) sawdust. The effects of parameters such as particle size, stirring rate, contact time, dye concentration, adsorption dose, pH, and temperature were investigated, and interaction was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscope. The non-linear method of the Langmuir isotherm equation was found to be the best fitting model to the equilibrium data. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was found as 79.5 mg/g. The calculated thermodynamic results suggested that AY132 adsorption onto red pine sawdust was an exothermic, physisorption, and spontaneous process. Kinetics was analyzed by four different kinetic equations using non-linear regression analysis. The pseudo-second-order equation provides the best fit with experimental data.

  12. Importance of Temperature Calibration for Sunset Laboratory Carbon Analyzer: NIOSH and IMPROVE Temperature Protocols

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Sunset Laboratory Dual-Optical Carbonaceous Analyzer that simultaneously measures transmission and reflectance signals is widely used in thermal-optical analysis of particulate matter samples. Most often it is used to measure total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and eleme...

  13. A Construction to Determine the Azimuths and Times of Sunrise and Sunset

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furton, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a paper-and-pencil construction to determine and graphically depict with reasonable accuracy the times and azimuths of sunrise and sunset on any day of the year at any location on Earth. The construction requires, as input, a date (or the sun's declination) and the latitude and longitude of the location in question, and one…

  14. Tyre char preparation from waste tyre rubber for dye removal from effluents.

    PubMed

    Mui, Edward L K; Cheung, W H; McKay, Gordon

    2010-03-15

    A number of chars from waste tyre rubber were prepared by carbonisation at 673-1173 K. The effects of holding time, heating rate and particle size on the textural characteristics and elemental composition of the resultant chars were investigated. It was demonstrated that temperatures over 773 K did not have a significant improvement on the total surface area but resulted in lower char yields following increased aromatisation. Modelling of dye adsorption isotherms showed that the Redlich-Peterson expression yields the best-fit between experimental and predicted data. Furthermore, for a larger sized dye like Acid Yellow 117 (MW=848 g/mol), the amount adsorbed by the tyre char is not directly proportional to the total surface area when compared with a commercial carbon, revealing that factors other than total surface area are involved in the adsorption potential of the tyre chars. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Induce of laccase from Trametes gallica and its degradation on neutral dyes and organophosphorus pesticides].

    PubMed

    Jing, De-Jun; Huang, Jian-Bo; Yang, Zhou-Ping; Hu, Rong; Cheng, Zi-Zhang; Huang, Qian-Ming

    2011-12-01

    The characteristics of the induction of laccase in Trametes gallica under different initial cultural pH, incubation time by different inducers were discussed, as well as the effects of temperature, pH and time on laccase degradation of six dyes and four organophosphors. The results showed that RB-bright blue, ABTS and o-toluidine affected the production of laccase at different levels, and ABTS was the best inductive agent in our test conditions, whose optimal initial pH and incubation time were 4.0 and 13 days, respectively. The appropriate reaction temperature of the laccase produced was 38 degrees C, and it got a good stability, for it could retain 78.6% of the enzyme activity after 20 min holding at 40 degrees C. Mediated by ABTS, the optimal temperature for laccase to degrade the six types of neutral dyes could be divided into two cases, that was 30 degrees C (neutral black, neutral bordeaux, neutral pink, methyl orange) and 60 degrees C (neutral dark yellow, cresol red), the optimal pH were 6.0 (neutral black), 2.0 (neutral bordeaux, neutral pink) and 4.0 (methyl orange, neutral dark yellow, cresol red), respectively, while the optimal times separately were 6 h (methyl orange, neutral dark yellow, cresol red), 12 h (neutral pink) and 24 h (neutral bordeaux). And using the same inductive agent, the best temperature for laccase to degrade dimethoate, chlorpyrifos, trichlorfon and parathion-pyridazine was 25 degrees C, the suitable time was 9 h, and the optimal pH was 10.0 for dimethoate, chlorpyrifos and parathion-pyridazine, and 8.0 for trichlorfon.

  16. In-Vitro Analysis of the Effect of Constructional Parameters and Dye Class on the UV Protection Property of Cotton Knitted Fabrics.

    PubMed

    Kan, Chi-Wai; Au, Chui-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Cotton knitted fabrics were manufactured with different yarn types (conventional ring spun yarn and torque-free ring spun yarn) with different fibre types (combed cotton and combed Supima cotton) and yarn fineness (Ne30 and Ne40). These fabrics were then dyed with three types of dye (reactive, direct and sulphur dye) with three dye concentrations (0.1%, 1.0% and 5.0% on-weight of fabric (owf)) in three colours (red, yellow and blue). This study examined the impact of constructional parameters and dyeing on ultraviolet (UV) protection properties of cotton knitted fabric. In-vitro test with spectrophotometer was used for evaluating the UV protection property of dyed cotton knitted fabrics. Among the six parameters investigated, fineness of yarn and dye concentration were the most significant factors affecting UPF while the color effect is the least significant. Experimental results revealed that the UPF value of dyed fabrics made from combed cotton is generally higher than the combed Supima cotton since combed cotton is composed of shorter fibres which facilitate the blocking or absorption of UV radiation. Second, fabrics made with twist yarn (i.e. ring spun yarn) have higher UPF value than the corresponding ESTex one (i.e. torque-free yarn) in general since fabrics made with ring spun yarn tend to shrink during wet processing and so it is more compact. Third, the UPF value of fabrics made with 30Ne yarn was higher than the 40Ne one since it is thicker and has lower fabric porosity. Fourth, fabrics dyed with lower concentration of dye gave the lowest UPF. Fifth, the sulphur dyed samples performed worse than the reactive and direct dyed samples in terms of UV protection property. Sixth, there is no significant difference in UPF for red, yellow and blue coloured fabrics. Seventh, this study also demonstrated that lightness of fabric is negatively related to UV protection property.

  17. In-Vitro Analysis of the Effect of Constructional Parameters and Dye Class on the UV Protection Property of Cotton Knitted Fabrics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cotton knitted fabrics were manufactured with different yarn types (conventional ring spun yarn and torque-free ring spun yarn) with different fibre types (combed cotton and combed Supima cotton) and yarn fineness (Ne30 and Ne40). These fabrics were then dyed with three types of dye (reactive, direct and sulphur dye) with three dye concentrations (0.1%, 1.0% and 5.0% on-weight of fabric (owf)) in three colours (red, yellow and blue). This study examined the impact of constructional parameters and dyeing on ultraviolet (UV) protection properties of cotton knitted fabric. In-vitro test with spectrophotometer was used for evaluating the UV protection property of dyed cotton knitted fabrics. Among the six parameters investigated, fineness of yarn and dye concentration were the most significant factors affecting UPF while the color effect is the least significant. Experimental results revealed that the UPF value of dyed fabrics made from combed cotton is generally higher than the combed Supima cotton since combed cotton is composed of shorter fibres which facilitate the blocking or absorption of UV radiation. Second, fabrics made with twist yarn (i.e. ring spun yarn) have higher UPF value than the corresponding ESTex one (i.e. torque-free yarn) in general since fabrics made with ring spun yarn tend to shrink during wet processing and so it is more compact. Third, the UPF value of fabrics made with 30Ne yarn was higher than the 40Ne one since it is thicker and has lower fabric porosity. Fourth, fabrics dyed with lower concentration of dye gave the lowest UPF. Fifth, the sulphur dyed samples performed worse than the reactive and direct dyed samples in terms of UV protection property. Sixth, there is no significant difference in UPF for red, yellow and blue coloured fabrics. Seventh, this study also demonstrated that lightness of fabric is negatively related to UV protection property. PMID:26222792

  18. Yellow fever.

    PubMed

    Monath, Thomas P; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2015-03-01

    Yellow fever, a mosquito-borne flavivirus disease occurs in tropical areas of South America and Africa. It is a disease of major historical importance, but remains a threat to travelers to and residents of endemic areas despite the availability of an effective vaccine for nearly 70 years. An important aspect is the receptivity of many non-endemic areas to introduction and spread of yellow fever. This paper reviews the clinical aspects, pathogenesis, and epidemiology of yellow fever, with an emphasis on recent changes in the distribution and incidence of the disease. Recent knowledge about yellow fever 17D vaccine mechanism of action and safety are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 78 FR 77590 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Albemarle Sound to Sunset Beach, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 [Docket No. USCG-2013-1020] Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Albemarle Sound to Sunset Beach, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AICW), Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of deviation from drawbridge regulation. SUMMARY: The...

  20. 78 FR 47191 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Albemarle Sound to Sunset Beach, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 [Docket No. USCG-2013-0687] Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Albemarle Sound to Sunset Beach, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AICW), Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of deviation from drawbridge regulation. SUMMARY: The...

  1. Precursor wave structure, prereversal vertical drift, and their relative roles in the development of post sunset equatorial spread-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, Mangalathayil; Sobral, José; alam Kherani, Esfhan; Batista, Inez S.; Souza, Jonas

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of large-scale wave structure in the equatorial bottomside F region that are present during daytime as precursor to post sunset development of the spread F/plasma bubble irregularities are investigated in this paper. Digisonde data from three equatorial sites in Brazil (Fortaleza, Sao Luis and Cachimbo) for a period of few months at low to medium/high solar activity phases are analyzed. Small amplitude oscillations in the F layer true heights, representing wave structure in polarization electric field, are identified as upward propagating gravity waves having zonal scale of a few hundred kilometers. Their amplitudes undergo amplification towards sunset, and depending on the amplitude of the prereversal vertical drift (PRE) they may lead to post sunset generation of ESF/plasma bubble irregularities. On days of their larger amplitudes they appear to occur in phase coherence on all days, and correspondingly the PRE vertical drift velocities are larger than on days of the smaller amplitudes of the wave structure that appear at random phase on the different days. The sustenance of these precursor waves structures is supported by the relatively large ratio (approaching unity) of the F region-to- total field line integrated Pedersen conductivities as calculated using the SUPIM simulation of the low latitude ionosphere. This study examines the role of the wave structure relative to that of the prereversal vertical drift in the post sunset spread F irregularity development.

  2. 19 CFR Annex Viii-B to Part 351 - Schedule for Expedited Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Schedule for Expedited Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-B to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-B Annex VIII-B to Part 351—Schedule for Expedited...

  3. 19 CFR Annex Viii-B to Part 351 - Schedule for Expedited Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Schedule for Expedited Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-B to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-B Annex VIII-B to Part 351—Schedule for Expedited...

  4. 19 CFR Annex Viii-B to Part 351 - Schedule for Expedited Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Schedule for Expedited Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-B to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-B Annex VIII-B to Part 351—Schedule for Expedited...

  5. 19 CFR Annex Viii-B to Part 351 - Schedule for Expedited Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Schedule for Expedited Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-B to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-B Annex VIII-B to Part 351—Schedule for Expedited...

  6. 19 CFR Annex Viii-B to Part 351 - Schedule for Expedited Sunset Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Schedule for Expedited Sunset Reviews VIII Annex VIII-B to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VIII-B Annex VIII-B to Part 351—Schedule for Expedited...

  7. Microcolumn studies of dye adsorption onto manganese oxides modified diatomite.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghouti, M A; Khraisheh, M A M; Ahmad, M N; Allen, S J

    2007-07-19

    The method described here cannot fully replace the analysis of large columns by small test columns (microcolumns). The procedure, however, is suitable for speeding up the determination of adsorption parameters of dye onto the adsorbent and for speeding up the initial screening of a large adsorbent collection that can be tedious if a several adsorbents and adsorption conditions must be tested. The performance of methylene blue (MB), a basic dye, Cibacron reactive black (RB) and Cibacron reactive yellow (RY) was predicted in this way and the influence of initial dye concentration and other adsorption conditions on the adsorption behaviour were demonstrated. On the basis of the experimental results, it can be concluded that the adsorption of RY onto manganese oxides modified diatomite (MOMD) exhibited a characteristic "S" shape and can be simulated effectively by the Thomas model. It is shown that the adsorption capacity increased as the initial dye concentration increased. The increase in the dye uptake capacity with the increase of the adsorbent mass in the column was due to the increase in the surface area of adsorbent, which provided more binding sites for the adsorption. It is shown that the use of high flow rates reduced the time that RY in the solution is in contact with the MOMD, thus allowing less time for adsorption to occur, leading to an early breakthrough of RY. A rapid decrease in the column adsorption capacity with an increase in particle size with an average 56% reduction in capacity resulting from an increase in the particle size from 106-250 microm to 250-500 microm. The experimental data correlated well with calculated data using the Thomas equation and the bed depth-service time (BDST) equation. Therefore, it might be concluded that the Thomas equation and the BDST equations can produce accurate predication for variation of dye concentration, mass of the adsorbent, flow rate and particle size. In general, the values of adsorption isotherm capacity

  8. UV-Vis microspectrophotometry as a method of differentiation between cotton fibre evidence coloured with reactive dyes.

    PubMed

    Was-Gubala, Jolanta; Starczak, Roza

    2015-05-05

    The main purposes of this study was to assess the usefulness of microspectrophotometry (MSP), both in the ultraviolet (UV) and visible (Vis) range for discriminating single cotton fibres dyed with reactive dyes coming from the same manufacturer, as well as the possibility of evaluation of the concentration of dye in an examine fibre. This study utilised woven cotton fabrics dyed with different concentrations of one-compound reactive dyes with the commercial name Cibacron® (at present Novacron®) as the focus of the MSP analysis. The spectra were recorded in the UV-Vis range between 200 and 800nm, in transmission mode. The results from this study illustrated that all of the analysed cotton samples dyed with reactive dyes were distinguishable between each other with the use of MSP, mostly in the visible, and also in ultraviolet range. The limit for applied MSP techniques was 0.18% of the concentration of a dye in the textile sample. The results indicate that based on the absorbance measurements for fibres constituting e.g. forensic traces it was not possible to estimate the concentration of the dye in the fibre because Beer's law did not obey. The intra-sample, and inter- sample variation, as well as dichroism effect in a case of a cotton fibres dyed with reactive dye were observed. On the basis of the results obtained for each analysed cotton sample, it was concluded that there was no correlation between colour uniformity in cotton fabric (changes in lightness, red/green and yellow/blue colour) and concentration of the reactive dye. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrochemical decolorization of dye wastewater by surface-activated boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond electrode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chienhung; Nurhayati, Ervin; Juang, Yaju; Huang, Chihpin

    2016-07-01

    Complex organics contained in dye wastewater are difficult to degrade and often require electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs) to treat it. Surface activation of the electrode used in such treatment is an important factor determining the success of the process. The performance of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BD-NCD) film electrode for decolorization of Acid Yellow (AY-36) azo dye with respect to the surface activation by electrochemical polarization was studied. Anodic polarization found to be more suitable as electrode pretreatment compared to cathodic one. After anodic polarization, the originally H-terminated surface of BD-NCD was changed into O-terminated, making it more hydrophilic. Due to the oxidation of surface functional groups and some portion of sp(2) carbon in the BD-NCD film during anodic polarization, the electrode was successfully being activated showing lower background current, wider potential window and considerably less surface activity compared to the non-polarized one. Consequently, electrooxidation (EO) capability of the anodically-polarized BD-NCD to degrade AY-36 dye was significantly enhanced, capable of nearly total decolorization and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal even after several times of re-using. The BD-NCD film electrode favored acidic condition for the dye degradation; and the presence of chloride ion in the solution was found to be more advantageous than sulfate active species. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Biodecolorization of Reactive Yellow-2 by Serratia sp. RN34 Isolated from Textile Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Najme, Rabia; Hussain, Sabir; Maqbool, Zahid; Imran, Muhammad; Mahmood, Faisal; Manzoor, Hamid; Yasmeen, Tahira; Shehzad, Tanvir

    2015-12-01

    Remediation of colored textile wastewaters is a matter of interest. In this study, 49 bacteria were isolated from the textile wastewater and tested for their ability to decolorize reactive yellow-2 (RY2) dye. The most efficient isolate, RN34, was identified through amplification, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of its 16S rDNA and was designated as Serratia sp. RN34. This bacterium was also found capable of decolorizing other related reactive azo-dyes, including reactive black-5, reactive red-120, and reactive orange-16 but at varying rates. The optimum pH for decolorization of RY2 by the strain RN34 was 7.5 using yeast extract as cosubstrate under static incubation at 30 °C. The strain RN34 also showed potential to decolorize RY2 in the presence of considerable amounts of hexavalent chromium and sodium chloride. A phytotoxicity study demonstrated relatively reduced toxicity of RY2 decolorized products on Vigna radiata plant as compared to the uninoculated RY2 solution.

  11. Decolorization and degradation of reactive yellow HF aqueous solutions by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Bedolla-Guzman, A; Feria-Reyes, R; Gutierrez-Granados, S; Peralta-Hernández, Juan M

    2017-05-01

    Textile manufacturing is the one responsible for water bodies' contamination through the discharge of colored wastes. This work presents the study of reactive yellow HF (RYHF) dye degradation under two different electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOP), namely anodic oxidation (AO) and electro-Fenton (EF)/boron-doped diamond (BDD) process. For the AO, 100 and 300 mg/L solutions using Pt and BDD as anodes in a 100 mL stirred tank cell were used, with a supporting electrolyte of 0.05 mol/L of Na 2 SO 4 at pH 3 under 30 and 50 mA/cm 2 current density. The EF/BDD process was carried out in a flow reactor at 4 and 7 L/min to degrade 100, 200, and 300 mg/L RYHF solutions under 50 and 80 mA/cm 2 . UV-Vis determinations were used for decolorization evaluation, while high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method provided information on dye degradation rate.

  12. Discovery of black dye crystal structure polymorphs: Implications for dye conformational variation in dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Cole, Jacqueline M.; Low, Kian Sing; Gong, Yun

    2015-11-24

    Here, we present the discovery of a new crystal structure polymorph (1) and pseudopolymorph (2) of the Black Dye, one of the world’s leading dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells, DSSCs (10.4% device performance efficiency). This reveals that Black Dye molecules can adopt multiple low-energy conformers. This is significant since it challenges existing models of the Black Dye···TiO 2 adsorption process that renders a DSSC working electrode; these have assumed a single molecular conformation that refers to the previously reported Black Dye crystal structure (3). The marked structural differences observed between 1, 2, and 3 make the need for modeling multiplemore » conformations more acute. Additionally, the ordered form of the Black Dye (1) provides a more appropriate depiction of its anionic structure, especially regarding its anchoring group and NCS bonding descriptions. The tendency toward NCS ligand isomerism, evidenced via the disordered form 2, has consequences for electron injection and electron recombination in Black Dye embedded DSSC devices. Dyes 2 and 3 differ primarily by the absence or presence of a solvent of crystallization, respectively; solvent environment effects on the dye are thereby elucidated. This discovery of multiple Black Dye conformers from diffraction, with atomic-level definition, complements recently reported nanoscopic evidence for multiple dye conformations existing at a dye···TiO 2 interface, for a chemically similar DSSC dye; those results emanated from imaging and spectroscopy, but were unresolved at the submolecular level. Taken together, these findings lead to the general notion that multiple dye conformations should be explicitly considered when modeling dye···TiO 2 interfaces in DSSCs, at least for ruthenium-based dye complexes.« less

  13. Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus lamk) wood waste as a textile natural dye by micowave-assisted extraction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadariyah, Lailatul; Gala, Selfina; Widoretno, Dhaniar Rulandri; Kunhermanti, Delita; Bhuana, Donny S.; Sumarno, Mahfud, Mahfud

    2017-05-01

    The development of technology causes most of textile industries in Indonesia prefer to use synthetic dyes in the fabric dyeing process. In fact, synthetic dyes is able to have negative effect since it is is toxic to the health of workers and environment. To resolve this issues, one way to do is to use natural dyes. One of untapped potential in Indonesia is wood waste of jackfruit from furniture industry. Jackfruit wood itself containing dyestuffs which gives yellow color pigment so that it can be used as an alternative source of natural dyes. The purpose of this research is to study the effect of extraction time, mass to solvent volume ratio, and microwave power to yield of dyes. The extract of dye analyzed by UV-Visible Spectrophotometer and GC-MS, along the coloring and endurance tests of natural dyes on fabric and compare it with synthetic dyes. In this research, material is going to be extracted is the wood of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus lamk) with material size between 35 mesh - 60 mesh. The extraction process is done by using ethanol 96%. Extraction using MAE is carried out at the ratio of materials to solvent of 0,02-0,1 g/mL, the microwave power of 100-800 Watt, and the extraction time of 10-90 minutes. The conclusion is at microwave power of 400 Watt, material to solvent ratio of the 0,02 g/mL, the yield is 3,39% while at microwave power of 600 Watt, material to solvent ratio of the 0,02 g/mL, the yield is 3,67% with extraction time of 30 minutes. The highest recovery from ethanol 96% solvent is 60,41%. The result of UV-Vis Spectrophotometry and GC-MS test show that there is a chromophore compound in the extract of natural dye. The test results show the natural dyes of jackfruit wood can be used to coloring on the textile because it can gives staining result permanently.

  14. Identification of Drosophila melanogaster yellow-f and yellow-f2 proteins as dopachrome-conversion enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qian; Fang, Jianmin; Ding, Haizhen; Johnson, Jody K; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2002-01-01

    This study describes the identification of Drosophila yellow-f and yellow-f2 as dopachrome-conversion enzymes responsible for catalysing the conversion of dopachrome into 5,6-dihydroxyindole in the melanization pathway. Drosophila yellow -y gene and yellow -b, -c, -f and -f2 genes were expressed in an insect cell/baculovirus expression system and their corresponding recombinant proteins were screened for dopachrome-conversion enzyme activity. Among the yellow and yellow -related genes, the yellow -f and yellow -f2 genes were identified as the genes coding for Drosophila dopachrome-conversion enzyme based on the high activity of their recombinant proteins in catalysing the production of 5,6-dihydroxyindole from dopachrome. Both yellow-f and yellow-f2 are capable of mediating a decarboxylative structural rearrangement of dopachrome, as well as an isomerization/tautomerization of dopamine chrome and dopa methyl ester chrome. Northern hybridization revealed the transcription of yellow -f in larvae and pupae, but a high abundance of mRNA was observed in later larval and early pupal stages. In contrast, yellow-f2 transcripts were present at all stages, but high abundance of its mRNA was observed in later-stage pupae and adults. These data indicate that yellow-f and yellow-f2 complement each other during Drosophila development and that the yellow-f is involved in larval and pupal melanization, and yellow-f2 plays a major role in melanization reactions in Drosophila during later pupal and adult development. Results from this study provide the groundwork towards a better understanding of the physiological roles of the Drosophila yellow gene family. PMID:12164780

  15. Color Degradation of Textiles with Natural Dyes and of Blue Scale Standards Exposed to White LED Lamps:Evaluation of White LED Lamps for Effectiveness as Museum Lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Mie; Moriyama, Takayoshi; Toda, Masahiro; Kohmoto, Kohtaro; Saito, Masako

    White light-emitting diodes (LED) are well suited for museum lighting because they emit neither UV nor IR radiation, which damage artifacts. The color degradation of natural dyes and blue scale standards (JIS L 0841) by white LED lamps are examined, and the performance of white LED lamps for museum lighting is evaluated. Blue scale standard grades 1-6 and silk fabrics dyed with 22 types of natural dyes classified as mid to highly responsive in a CIE technical report (CIE157:2004) were exposed to five types of white LED lamps using different luminescence methods and color temperatures. Color changes were measured at each 15000 lx·hr (500 lx at fabric surface × 300 hr) interval ten times. The accumulated exposure totaled 150000 lx·hr. The data on conventional white LED lamps and previously reported white fluorescent (W) and museum fluorescent (NU) lamps was evaluated. All the white LED lamps showed lower fading rates compared with a W lamp on a blue scale grade 1. The fading rate of natural dyes in total was the same between an NU lamp (3000 K) and a white LED lamp (2869 K). However, yellow natural dyes showed higher fading rates with the white LED lamp. This tendency is due to the high power characteristic of the LED lamp around 400-500 nm, which possibly contributes to the photo-fading action on the dyes. The most faded yellow dyes were Ukon (Curcuma longa L.) and Kihada (Phellodendron amurense Rupr.), and these are frequently used in historic artifacts such as kimono, wood-block prints, and scrolls. From a conservation point of view, we need to continue research on white LED lamps for use in museum lighting.

  16. Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products

    DOEpatents

    Chang, S.G.

    1994-07-26

    The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O[sub 3], PO, PO[sub 2], etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like. 20 figs.

  17. Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Ger

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O.sub.3, PO, PO.sub.2, etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like.

  18. The Plumbing System of a Highly Explosive Basaltic Volcano: Sunset Crater, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. M.; Roggensack, K.; Clarke, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    We seek to better understand highly explosive basaltic eruptions with specific focus on magmatic volatile solubility in alkali basalts and the magma plumbing system. Sunset Crater, an alkali basalt (~3.7 wt.% alkalis) scoria cone volcano, erupted explosively in 1085 AD. We analyzed 125 primary melt inclusions (MIs) from Sunset Crater tephra deposited by 2 subplinian phases and 1 Strombolian explosion to compare magma volatiles and storage conditions. We picked rapidly quenched free olivine crystals and selected large volume MIs (50-180 μm) located toward crystal cores. MIs are faceted and exhibit little major element composition variability with minor post entrapment crystallization (2-10%). MIs are relatively dry but CO2-rich. Water content varies from 0.4 wt.% to 1.5 wt.% while carbon dioxide abundance ranges between 1,150 ppm and 3,250 ppm. Most MIs contain >1 wt.% H2O and >2,150 ppm CO2. All observed MIs contain a vapor bubble, so we are evaluating MI vapor bubbles with Raman spectroscopy and re-homogenization experiments to determine the full volatile budget. Because knowledge of volatile solubility is critical to accurately interpret results from MI analyses, we measured H2O-CO2 solubility in the Sunset Crater bulk composition. Fluid-saturated experiments at 4 and 6 kbar indicate shallower entrapment pressures for these MIs than values calculated for this composition using existing models. Assuming fluid saturation, MIs record depths from 6 km to 14 km, including groupings suggesting two pauses for longer-term storage at ~6 km and ~10.5 km. We do not observe any significant differences in MIs from phases exhibiting different eruptive styles, suggesting that while a high CO2 content may drive rapid magma ascent and be partly responsible for highly explosive eruptions, shallower processes may govern the final eruptive character. To track shallow processes during magma ascent from depth of MI-entrapment up to the surface, we are examining MI re-entrants.

  19. Rapid Dye Regeneration Mechanism of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jiwon; Park, Young Choon; Han, Sang Soo; Goddard, William A; Lee, Yoon Sup; Kim, Hyungjun

    2014-12-18

    During the light-harvesting process of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), the hole localized on the dye after the charge separation yields an oxidized dye, D(+). The fast regeneration of D(+) using the redox pair (typically the I(-)/I3(-) couple) is critical for the efficient DSSCs. However, the kinetic processes of dye regeneration remain uncertain, still promoting vigorous debates. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to determine that the inner-sphere electron-transfer pathway provides a rapid dye regeneration route of ∼4 ps, where penetration of I(-) next to D(+) enables an immediate electron transfer, forming a kinetic barrier. This explains the recently reported ultrafast dye regeneration rate of a few picoseconds determined experimentally. We expect that our MD based comprehensive understanding of the dye regeneration mechanism will provide a helpful guideline in designing TiO2-dye-electrolyte interfacial systems for better performing DSSCs.

  20. Computation of times of sunrise, sunset, and twilight in or near mountainous terrain

    Treesearch

    Bill C. Ryan

    1977-01-01

    An electronic calculator with trigonometric functions can be used to compute times of sunrise, sunset, or twilight, or time of desired illumination at any location in mountainous terrain. The method is more convenient and versatile, and less cumbersome than using tables. Latitude, longitude, elevation, day of the year (1 to 366), and slope to the horizon at the...

  1. Adsorption of direct dyes from aqueous solutions by carbon nanotubes: determination of equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics parameters.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chao-Yin; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Wu, Jane-Yii

    2008-11-15

    This study examined the feasibility of removing direct dyes C.I. Direct Yellow 86 (DY86) and C.I. Direct Red 224 (DR224) from aqueous solutions using carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The effects of dye concentration, CNT dosage, ionic strength and temperature on adsorption of direct dyes by CNTs were also evaluated. Pseudo second-order, intraparticle diffusion and Bangham models were adopted to evaluate experimental data and thereby elucidate the kinetic adsorption process. Additionally, this study used the Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin and Radushkevich (D-R) and Temkin isotherms to describe equilibrium adsorption. The adsorption percentage of direct dyes increased as CNTs dosage, NaCl addition and temperature increased. Conversely, the adsorption percentage of direct dyes decreased as dye concentration increased. The pseudo second-order model best represented adsorption kinetics. Based on the regressions of intraparticle diffusion and Bangham models, experimental data suggest that the adsorption of direct dyes onto CNTs involved intraparticle diffusion, but that was not the only rate-controlling step. The equilibrium adsorption of DR86 is best fitted in the Freundlich isotherm and that of DR224 was best fitted in the D-R isotherm. The capacity of CNTs to adsorb DY86 and DR224 was 56.2 and 61.3 mg/g, respectively. For DY86, enthalpy (DeltaH(0)) and entropy (DeltaS(0)) were 13.69 kJ/mol and 139.51 J/mol K, respectively, and those for DR224 were 24.29 kJ/mol and 172.06 J/mol K, respectively. The values of DeltaH(0), DeltaG(0) and E all indicate that the adsorption of direct dyes onto CNTs was a physisorption process.

  2. Equilibrium and kinetic adsorption study of Basic Yellow 28 and Basic Red 46 by a boron industry waste.

    PubMed

    Olgun, Asim; Atar, Necip

    2009-01-15

    In this study, the adsorption characteristics of Basic Yellow 28 (BY 28) and Basic Red 46 (BR 46) onto boron waste (BW), a waste produced from boron processing plant were investigated. The equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium data were analyzed by using various adsorption isotherm models and the results have shown that adsorption behavior of two dyes could be described reasonably well by a generalized isotherm. Kinetic studies indicated that the kinetics of the adsorption of BY 28 and BR 46 onto BW follows a pseudo-second-order model. The result showed that the BW exhibited high-adsorption capacity for basic dyes and the capacity slightly decreased with increasing temperature. The maximum adsorption capacities of BY 28 and BR 46 are reported at 75.00 and 74.73mgg(-1), respectively. The dye adsorption depended on the initial pH of the solution with maximum uptake occurring at about pH 9 and electrokinetic behavior of BW. Activation energy of 15.23kJ/mol for BY 28 and 18.15kJ/mol for BR 46 were determined confirming the nature of the physisorption onto BW. These results indicate that BW could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of the textile dyes from effluents.

  3. Cold Pad-Batch dyeing method for cotton fabric dyeing with reactive dyes using ultrasonic energy.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Zeeshan; Memon, Muhammad Hanif; Khatri, Awais; Tanwari, Anwaruddin

    2011-11-01

    Reactive dyes are vastly used in dyeing and printing of cotton fibre. These dyes have a distinctive reactive nature due to active groups which form covalent bonds with -OH groups of cotton through substitution and/or addition mechanism. Among many methods used for dyeing cotton with reactive dyes, the Cold Pad Batch (CPB) method is relatively more environment friendly due to high dye fixation and non requirement of thermal energy. The dyed fabric production rate is low due to requirement of at least twelve hours batching time for dye fixation. The proposed CPB method for dyeing cotton involves ultrasonic energy resulting into a one third decrease in batching time. The dyeing of cotton fibre was carried out with CI reactive red 195 and CI reactive black 5 by conventional and ultrasonic (US) method. The study showed that the use of ultrasonic energy not only shortens the batching time but the alkalis concentrations can considerably be reduced. In this case, the colour strength (K/S) and dye fixation (%F) also enhances without any adverse effect on colour fastness of the dyed fabric. The appearance of dyed fibre surface using scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed relative straightening of fibre convolutions and significant swelling of the fibre upon ultrasonic application. The total colour difference values ΔE (CMC) for the proposed method, were found within close proximity to the conventionally dyed sample. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. 75 FR 60084 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose from Mexico: Preliminary Results of the First Five-year (“Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration A-201-834 Purified... Order AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. SUMMARY: On June 2, 2010, the Department of Commerce (the Department) initiated sunset reviews of the...

  5. 76 FR 18573 - Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Sunset Area Community...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... shopping and commercial space; and green infrastructure. Sunset Terrace's redevelopment provides the... DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT [Docket No. FR-5513-N-01] Notice of Availability of a.... [[Page 18574

  6. Characteristics of a Broadband Dye Laser Using Pyrromethene and Rhodamine Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Wheeler, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    A broadband dye laser pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser with a full-width half-maximum (FWHM) from 592 to 610 nm was created for the use in a dual-pump broadband CARS system called WIDECARS. The desired broadband dye laser was generated with a mixture of Pyrromethene dyes as an oscillator gain medium and a spectral selective optic in the oscillator cavity. A mixture of Rhodamine dyes were used in the amplifier dye cell. To create this laser a study was performed to characterize the spectral behavior of broadband dye lasers created with Rhodamine dyes 590, 610, and 640, Pyrromethene dyes 597 and 650 as well as mixture of these dyes.

  7. 76 FR 3614 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan: Final Results of Sunset Review and Revocation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-588-707] Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan: Final Results of Sunset Review and Revocation of Antidumping Duty Order AGENCY.... As a result, in accordance with 19 CFR 351.218(d)(1)(iii)(A), the Department determined that no...

  8. Binding patterns and structure-affinity relationships of food azo dyes with lysozyme: a multitechnique approach.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei; Ding, Fei; Peng, Yu-Kui; Jiang, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Li

    2013-12-18

    Food dyes serve to beguile consumers: they are often used to imitate the presence of healthful, colorful food produce such as fruits and vegetables. But considering the hurtful impact of these chemicals on the human body, it is time to thoroughly uncover the toxicity of these food dyes at the molecular level. In the present contribution, we have examined the molecular reactions of protein lysozyme with model food azo compound Color Index (C.I.) Acid Red 2 and its analogues C.I. Acid Orange 52, Solvent Yellow 2, and the core structure of azobenzene using a combination of biophysical methods at physiological conditions. Fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), time-resolved fluorescence, UV-vis absorption as well as computer-aided molecular modeling were used to analyze food dye affinity, binding mode, energy transfer, and the effects of food dye complexation on lysozyme stability and conformation. Fluorescence emission spectra indicate complex formation at 10(-5) M dye concentration, and this corroborates time-resolved fluorescence results showing the diminution in the tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence mainly via a static type (KSV = 1.505 × 10(4) M(-1)) and Förster energy transfer. Structural analysis displayed the participation of several amino acid residues in food dye protein adducts, with hydrogen bonds, π-π and cation-π interactions, but the conformation of lysozyme was unchanged in the process, as derived from fluorescence emission, far-UV CD, and synchronous fluorescence spectra. The overall affinity of food dye is 10(4) M(-1) and there exists only one kind of binding domain in protein for food dye. These data are consistent with hydrophobic probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) displacement, and molecular modeling manifesting the food dye binding patch was near to Trp-62 and Trp-63 residues of lysozyme. On the basis of the computational analyses, we determine that the type of substituent on the azobenzene structure has a powerful influence on the

  9. An alkaline bacterial laccase for polymerization of natural precursors for hair dye synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Kumar, Aditya; Sondhi, Sonica; Sharma, Prince; Gupta, Naveen

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, an extracellular alkali stable laccase (Lac DS) from Bacillus subtilis DS which has pH optima at 8.5 using p -phenylenediamine (PPD) as substrate has been reported. Lac DS retained 70% activity for 4 h at pH 8.5 and 90% activity for 24 h at 55 °C. The enzyme yield was enhanced by optimization of fermentation conditions. A 746-fold increase in yield was observed under optimized conditions using 150 µM MgSO 4 , 1.2% yeast extract, 0.35% tryptone, and 150 µM vanillic acid. Lac DS was used to polymerize natural dye precursor catechol, pyrogallol, syringaldehyde, syringic acid, ferulic acid and gallic acid to develop a range of natural hair colors such as black, golden yellow, and reddish brown. The results indicate that alkaline Lac DS is a suitable candidate to develop a user-friendly and commercially applicable hair dyeing process in the area of cosmetic industry.

  10. Characteristics of a broadband dye laser using Pyrromethene and Rhodamine dyes.

    PubMed

    Tedder, Sarah A; Wheeler, Jeffrey L; Danehy, Paul M

    2011-02-20

    A broadband dye laser pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser with a full width at half-maximum from 592 to 610 nm was created for the use in a dual-pump broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) system called width increased dual-pump enhanced CARS (WIDECARS). The desired broadband dye laser was generated with a mixture of Pyrromethene dyes as an oscillator gain medium and a spectral selective optic in the oscillator cavity. A mixture of Rhodamine dyes was used in the amplifier dye cell. To create this laser, a study was performed to characterize the spectral behavior of broadband dye lasers created with Rhodamine dyes 590, 610, and 640 and Pyrromethene dyes 597 and 650, as well as mixtures of these dyes.

  11. Response surface optimization of electro-oxidation process for the treatment of C.I. Reactive Yellow 186 dye: reaction pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajkumar, K.; Muthukumar, M.

    2017-05-01

    In this study, central composite design at five levels (- β, -1, 0, +1, + β) combined with response surface methodology has been applied to optimize C.I. Reactive Yellow 186 using electro-oxidation process with graphite electrodes in a batch reactor. The variables considered were the pH ( X 1), NaCl concentration (M) ( X 2), and electrolysis time (min) ( X 3) on C.I. Reactive Yellow 186 were studied. A second-order empirical relationship between the response and independent variables was derived. Analysis of variance showed a high coefficient of determination value ( R 2 = 0.9556 and 0.9416 for color and COD, respectively). The optimized condition of the electro-oxidation of Reactive Yellow 186 is as follows: pH 3.9; NaCl concentration 0.11 M; and electrolysis time 18 min. Under this condition, the maximal decolorization efficiency of 99 % and COD removal 73 % was achieved. Detailed physico-chemical analysis of electrode and residues of the electro-oxidation process has also been carried out UV-Visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The intermediate compounds formed during the oxidation were identified using a gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. According to these results, response surface methodology could be useful for reducing the time to treat effluent wastewater.

  12. Experimental and theoretical study using DFT method for the competitive adsorption of two cationic dyes from wastewaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regti, Abdelmajid; Ayouchia, Hicham Ben El; Laamari, My Rachid; Stiriba, Salah Eddine; Anane, Hafid; Haddad, Mohammadine El

    2016-12-01

    The adsorption of cationic dyes, Basic Yellow (BY28) and Methylene Blue (MB) on a new activated carbon from medlar species were studied in both single and binary system. Some experimental parameters, namely, pH, amount of adsorbent and contact time are studied. Quantum chemical results indicate that the adsorption efficiency was directly related to the dye electrophilicity power. Some theorical parameters were calculated and proved that MB is more electrophilic than BY28, than greatest interaction with surface sites. Kinetic study showed that the adsorption follows the pseudo-second-order model and Freundlich was the best model to describe the phenomenon in the single and binary system. According to the local reactivity results using Parr functions, the sulphur and nitrogen atoms will be the main adsorption sites.

  13. Determination of green, blue and yellow artificial food colorants and their abuse in herb-coloured green Easter beers on tap.

    PubMed

    Stachová, Ivana; Lhotská, Ivona; Solich, Petr; Šatínský, Dalibor

    2016-07-01

    Beer is one of the most popular alcoholic beverages worldwide. For consumer acceptance, significant factors are its taste, flavour and colour. This study determines selected synthetic green, blue and yellow food colorants in popular Easter herb-coloured green beers on tap produced in breweries on Holy Thursday. The abuse of beer colouring with Tartrazine (E 102), Quinoline yellow (E 104), Sunset yellow (E 110), Patent blue (E 131), Indigo carmine (E 132), Brilliant blue FCF (E 133), Green S (E 142) and Fast green FCF (E 143) was assessed in 11 green beer samples purchased in local restaurants. HPLC was used for the separation and detection of artificial colorants with diode-array detection and a Chromolith Performance CN 100 × 4.6 mm column with guard pre-column Chromolith CN 5 × 4.6 mm. Separation was performed in gradient elution with mobile phase containing methanol-aqueous 2% ammonium acetate at pH 7.0. The study showed that eight beers (70%) marketed in the Czech Republic contained artificial colorants (Tartrazine and Brilliant blue FCF). The concentration of colorants found in analysed green herb-coloured beers ranged from 1.58 to 3.49 mg l(-)(1) for Tartrazine, 0.45-2.18 mg l(-)(1) for Brilliant blue, while Indigo carmine was detected only once at concentration 2.36 mg l(-)(1). Only three beers showed no addition of the synthetic colorants. However, the levels of artificial colorants found in beers marketed in the Czech region were very low and did not show a serious risk for consumers' health.

  14. Characteristics of dye Rhoeo spathacea in dye sensitizer solar cell (DSSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumardiasih, Sri; Obina, Wilfrida M.; Cari; Supriyanto, Agus; Septiawan, Trio Y.; Khairuddin

    2017-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is a device that converts solar energy into electrical energy. The magnitude of the efficiency of DSSC is mainly based on the amount of dye absorbed by the surface of TiO2. In this work, used natural dye extracted from leaves Rhoeo spathacea. The dye partially used to immerse of TiO2 as working electrodes, and the rest are directly mixed TiO2 paste to obtain dye titanium dioxide.The paste TiO2 and dye titanium dioxide coated onto the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass plate by spin coating method. The absorbance spectra of the dye, dye titanium dioxide and TiO2 were obtained by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The conductivity of the dye, dye titanium dioxide, and TiO2 was measured by two point probe El-Kahfi 100. The DSSC based on dye titanium dioxide that stirring for 5 hours the highest efficiency of 0,0520 % whereas those based on TiO2 immersed for 36 hours showed achieved 0,0501 % obtained from I-V characterization.

  15. Optimization of process variables for decolorization of Disperse Yellow 211 by Bacillus subtilis using Box-Behnken design.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Praveen; Singh, Lakhvinder; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2009-05-30

    Decolorization of textile azo dye Disperse Yellow 211 (DY 211) was carried out from simulated aqueous solution by bacterial strain Bacillus subtilis. Response surface methodology (RSM), involving Box-Behnken design matrix in three most important operating variables; temperature, pH and initial dye concentration was successfully employed for the study and optimization of decolorization process. The total 17 experiments were conducted in the study towards the construction of a quadratic model. According to analysis of variance (ANOVA) results, the proposed model can be used to navigate the design space. Under optimized conditions the bacterial strain was able to decolorize DY 211 up to 80%. Model indicated that initial dye concentration of 100 mgl(-1), pH 7 and a temperature of 32.5 degrees C were found optimum for maximum % decolorization. Very high regression coefficient between the variables and the response (R(2)=0.9930) indicated excellent evaluation of experimental data by polynomial regression model. The combination of the three variables predicted through RSM was confirmed through confirmatory experiments, hence the bacterial strain holds a great potential for the treatment of colored textile effluents.

  16. New insight of hybrid membrane to degrade Congo red and Reactive yellow under sunlight.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, A; Jackcina Stobel Christy, E; Pius, Anitha

    2018-02-01

    A study was carried out to investigate the degradation of organic contaminants (Congo red and Reactive yellow - 105) using cellulose acetate - polystyrene (CA-PS) membrane with and without ZnO impregnation. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), atomic force microscope (AFM) and thermogravimeric analysis (TG-DTA) analysis were carried out to characterize bare and ZnO impregnated CA-PS membranes. Membrane efficiency was also tested for pure water flux and antifouling performance. The modified membrane showed almost 85% water flux recovery. Blending of ZnO nanoparticles to CA-PS matrix could decrease membrane fouling and increase permeation quality of the membrane with above 90% of photocatalytic degradation efficiency for dyes. The rate of degradation of dyes was observed using UV-Vis spectrometer. Reusability of CA-PS-ZnO membrane was studied and no significant change was noted in the degradation efficiency until fourth cycle. Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model well describes the photo degradation capacity and the degradation of dyes CR and RY - 105 exhibited pseudo-first order kinetics. The regression coefficient (R) of CR and RY - 105 found to be 0.99. The novelty of the prepared CA-PS-ZnO membrane is that it has better efficiency and high thermal stability than our previously reported material. Therefore, ZnO impregnated CA-PS membrane had proved to be an innovative alternative for the degradation of CR and RY - 105 dyes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dye laser amplifier including a low turbulence, stagnation-free dye flow configuration

    DOEpatents

    Davin, J.

    1992-12-01

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of for example 30 gallons/minute, a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell and a screen device for insuring that the dye stream passes into the dye cell in a substantially turbulent free, stagnation-free manner. 9 figs.

  18. Utilization of activated carbon produced from fruit juice industry solid waste for the adsorption of Yellow 18 from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Angin, Dilek

    2014-09-01

    The use of activated carbon obtained from sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) stones for the removal of a basic textile dye, which is Yellow 18, from aqueous solutions at different contact times, pH values and solution temperatures was investigated. The surface area and micropore volume of chemically modified activated carbon were 1704 m(2) g(-1) and 0.984 cm(3) g(-1), respectively. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms were well described by the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm equation and the calculated adsorption capacity was 75.76 mg g(-1) at 318 K. The adsorption kinetic of Yellow 18 obeys the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters were calculated to estimate the nature of adsorption. The activation energy of the system was calculated as 0.71-2.36 kJ/mol. According to these results, prepared activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent to compare with the commercial activated carbon for the removal of Yellow 18 from wastewater. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dye adsorption onto activated carbons from tyre rubber waste using surface coverage analysis.

    PubMed

    Mui, Edward L K; Cheung, W H; Valix, Marjorie; McKay, Gordon

    2010-07-15

    Two types of activated carbons from tyre char (with or without sulphuric acid treatment) were produced via carbon dioxide activation with BET surface areas in the range 59-1118 m(2)/g. Other characterisation tests include micropore and mesopore surface areas and volumes, pH, and elemental compositions, particularly heteroatoms such as nitrogen and sulphur. They were correlated to the adsorption capacity which were in the range of 0.45-0.71 mmol/g (untreated) and 0.62-0.84 mmol/g (acid-treated) for Acid Blue 25. In the case of larger-sized molecules like Acid Yellow 117, capacities were in the range of 0.23-0.42 mmol/g (untreated) and 0.29-0.40 mmol/g (acid-treated). Some tyre carbons exhibit a more superior performance than a microporous, commercial activated carbon (Calgon F400). By modelling the dye adsorption equilibrium data, the Redlich-Peterson isotherm is adopted as it has the lowest SSE. Based on the surface coverage analysis, a novel molecular orientation modelling of adsorbed dyes has been proposed and correlated with surface area and surface charge. For the acid dyes used in this study, molecules were likely to be adsorbed by the mesopore areas. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality assessment of the saffron samples using second-order spectrophotometric data assisted by three-way chemometric methods via quantitative analysis of synthetic colorants in adulterated saffron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoum, Saeed; Gholami, Ali; Hemmesi, Marjan; Abbasi, Saleheh

    2015-09-01

    Saffron is a valuable culinary spice that can be used not only for dyes and cooking, but also for many medical purposes. Due to its high price and restriction of its production, various fraud manners in its production have been growing. Addition of synthetic colorants to saffron is the most common way for adulteration. In this work, chemometric methods are proposed to resolve the three-dimensional absorbance spectra-pH data for simultaneous determination of the two colorants Tartrazin and Sunset yellow, in adulterated saffron. The rank deficiency in the concentration mode impaired the system. Therefore, to extirpate the ambiguity, which results from rank deficiency, three-way variation array V was generated by subtracting the first pH spectrum from each spectrum at each pH. This allows the extraction of extent reaction profile and mixture reaction spectral profiles, as well as the relative concentrations of the analytes.

  1. Yellow fever: epidemiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Elizabeth D

    2007-03-15

    Yellow fever continues to occur in regions of Africa and South America, despite the availability of effective vaccines. Recently, some cases of severe neurologic disease and multiorgan system disease have been described in individuals who received yellow fever vaccine. These events have focused attention on the need to define criteria for judicious use of yellow fever vaccine and to describe the spectrum of adverse events that may be associated with yellow fever vaccine. Describing host factors that would increase risk of these events and identifying potential treatment modalities for yellow fever and yellow fever vaccine-associated adverse events are subjects of intense investigation.

  2. STS-55 Earth observation shows a sunset over South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Earth observation taken aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, shows a spectacular sunset view over South America and the cleanest atmosphere since before the volcanic eruptions of 1991, according to NASA scientists studying the STS-55 photography. A dark cloud layer is evident at an altitude of 7 to 9 kilometers. Five kilometers higher, a pink layer of sulfuric acid droplets and ammonium sulfate particles begins at the tropopause and extends upward into the stratosphere to 19 kilometers. Above that, blue scattering by the atmosphere diminishes until, at an altitude of 60 kilometers, the blackness of space is predominant.

  3. Self-Assembly of Cis-Configured Squaraine Dyes at the TiO2-Dye Interface: Far-Red Active Dyes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Punitharasu, Vellimalai; Mele Kavungathodi, Munavvar Fairoos; Nithyanandhan, Jayaraj

    2018-05-16

    To synergize both steric and electronic factors in designing the dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells, a series of cis-configured unsymmetrical squaraine dyes P11-P15 with suitably functionalized alkyl groups and squaric acid units containing the electron-withdrawing groups were synthesized, respectively. These dyes capture the importance of (i) the effect and position of branched alkyl groups, (ii) mono- and di-anchoring groups containing dyes, and (iii) further appending the alkyl groups through the cyanoester vinyl unit on the central squaric acid units of D-A-D-based cis-configured squaraine dyes. All the above factors govern the controlled self-assembly of the dyes on the TiO 2 surface which helps to broaden the absorption profile of the dyes with an increased energy-harvesting process. With respect to the position of the branched alkyl groups, dye P11 with the sp 3 -C and N-alkyl groups away from the TiO 2 surface showed a better device efficiency of 5.98% ( J sc of 14.46 mA cm -2 , V oc of 0.576 V, and ff of 71.8%) than its positional isomer P12 with 3.45% ( J sc of 8.78 mA cm -2 , V oc of 0.554 V, and ff of 70.9%). However, with respect to the dyes containing mono- and di-anchoring groups, P13 with two anchoring units exhibited a superior device performance of 7.58% ( J sc of 17.12 mA cm -2 , V oc of 0.618 V, and ff of 71.7%) in the presence of optically transparent co-adsorbent CDCA (3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholanic acid) than dyes P11 and P12.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of mixed dye: Natural and synthetic organic dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richhariya, Geetam; Kumar, Anil

    2018-05-01

    Mixed dye from hibiscus sabdariffa and eosin Y was employed in the fabrication of dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC). Nanostructured mesoporous film was prepared from the titanium dioxide (TiO2). The energy conversion efficiency of hibiscus, eosin Y and mixed dye was obtained as 0.41%, 1.53% and 2.02% respectively. Mixed DSSC has shown improvement in the performance of the cell as compared to hibiscus and eosin Y dye due to addition of synthetic organic dye. This illustrates the effect of synthetic organic dyes in performance enhancement of natural dyes. It has been credited to the improved absorption of light mainly in higher energy state (λ = 440-560 nm) when two dyes were employed simultaneously as was obvious from the absorption spectra of dyes adsorbed onto TiO2 electrode. The cell with TiO2 electrode sensitized by mixed dye gives short circuit current density (Jsc) = 4.01 mA/cm2, open circuit voltage (Voc) = 0.67 V, fill factor (FF) = 0.60 and energy conversion efficiency (η) of 2.02%.

  5. Thermophysical behavior of the uppermost lunar surface from Diviner high time-resolution, post-sunset observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, P.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Paige, D. A.; Hayne, P. O.; Williams, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Lunar "Cold Spots" are areas around small fresh craters that are colder than their surroundings in nighttime regolith temperature (e.g., Bandfield et al., 2014, Williams et al., 2016), implying that the thermophysical properties of the surface here, exterior to the visible ejecta, have somehow been altered by the impact process. Intriguingly, this cold anomaly does not appear in Diviner observations during eclipses, when the sun has been blocked for only a short period of time (Hayne et al., 2011). Here, we extend the investigation of the immediate reaction of Cold Spots and other areas of interest to the cessation of solar heating by specifically targeting and analyzing observations in the post-sunset, or twilight, period (i.e., 16:00-17:00 local time). Analysis of this time period focuses specifically on variability in the thermophysical structure of the upper 1 cm of lunar surface, whereas previous analyses of nighttime temperatures typically speak to the upper 10s of cm. Initial results suggest that twilight temperatures mimic the behavior of eclipse temperatures, in that the Cold Spot does not become colder until 30-45 min. after sunset. In fact, it is warmer than surroundings in the first 30 min. This suggests that the thermal inertia of the upper 1 cm is higher than surroundings, while the thermal inertia of the upper 10s of cm may be lower. A current impediment to such a study is that, the finer the Diviner data is resolved temporally, the fewer areas exist that have data at all time resolutions. As part of a goal of the LRO extended mission to better constrain the thermophysical properties of the upper regolith, we plan to take advantage of the 5 twilight crossings between 10/2016 - 10/2018 to make targeted observations of a variety of types of geological features up to 5 times, spaced 4 lunar min. apart, during the post-sunset hour. A trial campaign 4-5/2015 observed 22 targets a total of 94 times. At one of the 2 targeted large Cold Spots, 4 co

  6. 78 FR 69369 - Laminated Woven Sacks From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... fabric; laminated by any method either to an exterior ply of plastic film such as biaxially-oriented... (Decision Memorandum). Analysis of Comments Received All issues raised in this sunset review are addressed...

  7. Laccase induction by synthetic dyes in Pycnoporus sanguineus and their possible use for sugar cane bagasse delignification.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Christian; Farnet Da Silva, Anne-Marie; Ziarelli, Fabio; Perraud-Gaime, Isabelle; Gutiérrez-Rivera, Beatriz; García-Pérez, José Antonio; Alarcón, Enrique

    2017-02-01

    The use of synthetic dyes for laccase induction in vivo has been scarcely explored. We characterized the effect of adding different synthetic dyes to liquid cultures of Pycnoporus sanguineus on laccase production. We found that carminic acid (CA) can induce 722 % and alizarin yellow 317 % more laccase than control does, and they promoted better fungal biomass development in liquid cultures. Aniline blue and crystal violet did not show such positive effect. CA and alizarin yellow were degraded up to 95 % during P. sanguineus culturing (12 days). With this basis, CA was selected as the best inducer and used to evaluate the induction of laccase on solid-state fermentation (SSF), using sugarcane bagasse (SCB) as substrate, in an attempt to reach selective delignification. We found that laccase induction occurred in SSF, and a slight inhibition of cellulase production was observed when CA was added to the substrate; also, a transformation of SCB under SSF was followed by the 13 C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Results showed that P. sanguineus can selectively delignify SCB, decreasing aromatic C compounds by 32.67 % in 16 days; O-alkyl C region (polysaccharides) was degraded less than 2 %; delignification values were not correlated with laccase activities. Cellulose-crystallinity index was increased by 27.24 % in absence of CA and 15.94 % when 0.01 mM of CA was added to SCB; this dye also inhibits the production of fungal biomass in SSF (measured as alkyl C gain). We conclude that CA is a good inducer of laccase in liquid media, and that P. sanguineus is a fungus with high potential for biomass delignification.

  8. Dye laser amplifier including a dye cell contained within a support vessel

    DOEpatents

    Davin, James

    1992-01-01

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of greater than 30 gallons/minute at a static pressure greater than 150 pounds/square inch and a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell.

  9. Recycling food waste to clean water: the use of a biodigester's residual liquid inoculum (RLI) to decolourise textile azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Maganha de Almeida, A C; Backhaus, J; Corso, C R

    2018-01-01

    A residual liquid inoculum (RLI) was used to decolourise solutions of Acid Yellow 25 (AY25) and Direct Violet 51 (DV51) azo dyes. The RLI was obtained through anaerobic digestion of food waste from a university restaurant. The concentration of bacteria in the RLI was 8.45 × 10 7 CFU mL -1 . Dye solutions (50 μg mL -1 ) were inoculated with the RLI (20% v/v) and incubated at room temperature. The decolourisation studies took place at microaerophilic and in-batch conditions and at pH = 2.50. Initially, the dyes were taken up from solution by biosorption; maximum colour removal was achieved after 3 hours of incubation, with 88.66% for AY25 and 77.65% of DV51. At prolonged incubation times (3-96 hours) decolourisation was mainly attributed to biodegradation of the azo solutions, with breakage of the azo bond, as detected by UV-VIS spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis. Analysis of UV-VIS absorption rates of dyes showed, however, that AY25 was more readily biodegradable whereas DV51 was more recalcitrant to the action of the RLI.

  10. Determination of fast ozone oxidation rate for textile dyes by using a continuous quench-flow system.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Arlindo C; Nunes, José C; Simões, Rogério M S

    2010-06-15

    To study the fast kinetic decolourisation of textile dyes by ozone a continuous quench-flow system was used. This system has not been used before for these purposes. Reaction times in the range of 7-3000 ms were explored. The reaction was quenched with potassium iodide, which proved to be very effective, and the indigo method was used to follow the ozone concentration. Dyes from the most representative chemical classes currently used in the textile industry, i.e. azo and anthraquinone, were selected. Using the initial slope method, the effect of dye and ozone concentrations was researched and the kinetic equations thus established. Using tert-butyl alcohol, as radical scavenger, and pH close to 2.5, the second-order rate constant of the reactant dyes at 280 K varies in the range of 1.20x10(4)-7.09x10(5)M(-1)s(-1); the Acid Orange 7 exhibiting thus its lowest value, the Acid Blue 45 its highest value and the Acid Green 25 and 27 and Direct Yellow 4 intermediate values (approximately 1.6x10(5)M(-1)s(-1)). Without radical scavenger and the pH close to 4, the reaction rate increases one order of magnitude, but, on the reverse, the efficiency of ozone to decolourisation decreases. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Decolorization and biodegradation of textile dye Navy blue HER by Trichosporon beigelii NCIM-3326.

    PubMed

    Saratale, R G; Saratale, G D; Chang, J S; Govindwar, S P

    2009-07-30

    Navy blue HER was decolorized and degraded within 24h by Trichosporon beigelii NCIM-3326 under static condition. In the present study, we investigated various physicochemical parameters such as agitation, temperature, pH, cell concentration, initial dye concentration and different carbon and nitrogen sources to achieve maximum dye degradation by T. beigelii. Sequentially, decolorization and decrease in the total organic carbon (TOC) of Navy blue HER by T. beigelii were measured. Among five strains T. beigelii gave the better performance on the decolorization of Navy blue HER along with a 95% TOC reduction within 24h. A significant increase in the activities of NADH-DCIP (dichlorophenolindophenol) reductase and azoreductase in the cells obtained after complete decolorization presumably indicates involvement of these enzymes in decolorization process. UV-vis, TLC, HPLC and FTIR analysis of extracted products confirmed the biodegradation of Navy blue HER. Phytotoxicity study demonstrated no toxicity of the biodegraded products with respect to plants viz. Phaseolus mungo and Sorghum vulgare. In addition to Navy blue HER, this strain also shows ability to decolorize various industrial dyes, including Red HE7B, Golden yellow 4BD, Green HE4BD, Orange HE2R, Malachite green, Crystal violet and Methyl violet.

  12. 75 FR 52509 - Potassium Permanganate from the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Expedited Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-570-001] Potassium Permanganate from...'') initiated a sunset review of the antidumping duty order on potassium permanganate from the People's Republic... antidumping duty order on potassium permanganate from the PRC pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of...

  13. Ultrasonic enhancement of the simultaneous removal of quaternary toxic organic dyes by CuO nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon: Central composite design, kinetic and isotherm study.

    PubMed

    Dashamiri, Somayeh; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Dashtian, Kheibar; Rahimi, Mahmood Reza; Goudarzi, Alireza; Jannesar, Ramin

    2016-07-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (CuO-NPs-AC) were prepared and fully analyzed and characterized with FE-SEM, XRD and FT-IR. Subsequently, this novel material was used for simultaneous ultrasound-assisted adsorption of brilliant green (BG), auramine O (AO), methylene blue (MB) and eosin yellow (EY) dyes. Problems regard to dyes spectra overlap in quaternary solution of this dyes were omitted by derivative spectrophotometric method. The best pH in quaternary system was studied by using one at a time method to achieved maximum dyes removal percentage. Subsequently, sonication time, adsorbent dosage and initial dyes concentrations influence on dyes removal was optimized by central composite design (CCD) combined with desirability function approach (DFA). Desirability score of 0.978 show optimum conditions set at sonication time (4.2 min), adsorbent mass (0.029 g), initial dyes concentration (4.5 mg L(-1)). Under this optimum condition the removal percentage for MB, AO, EY and BG dyes 97.58, 94.66, 96.22 and 94.93, respectively. The adsorption rate well fitted by pseudo second-order while adsorption capacity according to the Langmuir model as best equilibrium isotherm model for BG, MB, AO and EY was 20.48, 21.26, 22.34 and 21.29 mg g(-1), respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Batchwise dyeing of bamboo cellulose fabric with reactive dye using ultrasonic energy.

    PubMed

    Larik, Safdar Ali; Khatri, Awais; Ali, Shamshad; Kim, Seong Hun

    2015-05-01

    Bamboo is a regenerated cellulose fiber usually dyed with reactive dyes. This paper presents results of the batchwise dyeing of bamboo fabric with reactive dyes by ultrasonic (US) and conventional (CN) dyeing methods. The study was focused at comparing the two methods for dyeing results, chemicals, temperature and time, and effluent quality. Two widely used dyes, CI Reactive Black 5 (bis-sulphatoethylsulphone) and CI Reactive Red 147 (difluorochloropyrimidine) were used in the study. The US dyeing method produced around 5-6% higher color yield (K/S) in comparison to the CN dyeing method. A significant savings in terms of fixation temperature (10°C) and time (15 min), and amounts of salt (10 g/L) and alkali (0.5-1% on mass of fiber) was realized. Moreover, the dyeing effluent showed considerable reductions in the total dissolved solids content (minimum around 29%) and in the chemical oxygen demand (minimum around 13%) for the US dyebath in comparison to the CN dyebath. The analysis of colorfastness tests demonstrated similar results by US and CN dyeing methods. A microscopic examination on the field emission scanning electron microscope revealed that the US energy did not alter the surface morphology of the bamboo fibers. It was concluded that the US dyeing of bamboo fabric produces better dyeing results and is a more economical and environmentally sustainable method as compared to CN dyeing method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 75 FR 54596 - Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review: Heavy Iron Construction Castings from Brazil

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-351-504] Final Results of Expedited... pursuant to section 751(c)(3)(B) of the Act and 19 CFR 351.218(e)(1)(ii)(B). As a result of this sunset... recurrence of a countervailable subsidy at the level indicated in the ``Final Results of Review'' section of...

  16. Adsorptive potential of cationic Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) dye onto natural untreated clay (NUC) from aqueous phase: Mass transfer analysis, kinetic and equilibrium profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, A.; Malkoc, E.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, natural untreated clay (NUC) was studied for the removal of Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) from aqueous solution in batch system. The effects of initial BY2 concentration, contact time, solution temperature and solution pH on BY2 adsorption were investigated. Nitrogen sorption measurements were employed to investigate the variation in surface and pore properties after dye adsorption. The adsorbent was characterized by means of FTIR, PSD, TEM, XRD and BET analysis. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Scatchard isotherm models. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 833.33 mg/g at 25 °C (at room temperature). The pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental datas compared with pseudo-first-order kinetic adsorption models. To explain mass transfer mechanism of BY2 adsorption, obtained experimental datas were applied Weber and Morris model, Body and Frusawa and Smith models. The results show that the adsorption process is controlled by film diffusion. The thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibbs free energy changes (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were determined. Adsorption of BY2 on NUC is exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The calculated activation energy of adsorption was found to be 5.24 kJ/mol for BY2. This value indicates that the adsorption process is a physisorption.

  17. The yellow x paper birch hybrid--a potential substitute for yellow birch on problem sites

    Treesearch

    Knud E. Clausen

    1977-01-01

    Yellow x paper birch hybrids and yellow birches with common female parents were compared after 5 growing seasons in an open field. Survival of the hybrids was 91 percent compared with 64 percent for the yellow birch trees. The hybrids were from 25 to 32 percent taller than the yellow birches and had 19-40 percent greater diameter. Because this hybrid not only grows...

  18. Improving the low temperature dyeability of polyethylene terephthalate fabric with dispersive dyes by atmospheric pressure plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elabid, Amel E. A.; Zhang, Jie; Shi, Jianjun; Guo, Ying; Ding, Ke; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fiber and textile is one of the largest synthetic polymer commodity in the world. The great energy consumption and pollution caused by the high temperature and pressure dyeing of PET fibers and fabrics with disperse dyes has been caused concern these years. In this study, an atmospheric pressure plasma with fine and uniform filament discharge operated at 20 kHz has been used to improve the low temperature dyeability of PET fabric at 95 °C with three cation disperse dyes: Red 73, Blue 183 and Yellow 211. The dyes uptake percentage of the treated PET fabrics was observed to increase as twice as much of untreated fabric. The color strength rate was increased more than 20%. The reducing of the water contact angle and the raising of the capillary height of treated PET fabric strip indicate its hydrophilicity improvement. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) results display nano to micro size of etching pits appeared uniformly on the fiber surface of the treated PET. Simultaneously, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicates an increase of the oxygen content in the surface caused by the introduction of polar groups such as Cdbnd O and COOH. The rough surface with improved polar oxygen groups showed hydrophilicity and affinity to C.I. dispersive dyes and is believed to be caused by the strong and very fine filament discharge appearing randomly at one place at an instant but evenly at many places at a longer period. This increases the diffusion and absorption of the C.I. disperse dyes on the PET fiber surface, which improve its low temperature dyeability.

  19. Triazine dyes are agonists of the NAADP receptor

    PubMed Central

    Billington, Richard A; Bak, Judit; Martinez-Coscolla, Ana; Debidda, Marcella; Genazzani, Armando A

    2004-01-01

    NAADP has been shown to be a potent calcium-releasing second messenger in a wide variety of cell types to date. However, research has been hampered by a lack of pharmacological agents, with which to investigate NAADP-induced calcium release, and by the molecular identity of its cellular target protein being unknown.In the present paper, the sea urchin egg model was used to investigate whether triazine dyes, which can act as nucleotide mimetics, can bind to the NAADP receptor, induce Ca2+ release and be used for affinity chromatography of the receptor.Indeed, all the triazine dyes tested (Reactive Red 120 (RR120), Reactive Green 19 (RG19), Reactive Green 5 (RG5), Cibacron Blue 3GA and Reactive Yellow 86) displayed micromolar affinities, except for Reactive Orange 14. Furthermore, unlike NAADP, RR120, RG19 and RG5 did not bind in an irreversible manner.The compound that displayed the highest affinity, RR120, was tested in a 45Ca2+ efflux assay. This compound released Ca2+ via the NAADP receptor, as shown by the ability of subthreshold NAADP concentrations to inhibit this release. Furthermore, heparin and ruthenium red were unable to block RR120-induced Ca2+ release.We have also shown that RG5 and RG19, immobilised on resins, retain the ability to bind to the receptor, and that this interaction can be disrupted by high salt concentrations. As a proof of principle, we have shown that this can be used to partially purify the NAADP receptor by at least 75-fold.In conclusion, triazine dyes interact with the NAADP receptor, and this could be exploited in future to create a new generation of pharmacological tools to investigate this messenger and, in combination with other techniques, to purify the receptor. PMID:15265807

  20. Stability and efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells based on papaya-leaf dye.

    PubMed

    Suyitno, Suyitno; Saputra, Trisma Jaya; Supriyanto, Agus; Arifin, Zainal

    2015-09-05

    The present article reports on the enhancement of the performance and stability of natural dye-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Natural dyes extracted from papaya leaves (PL) were investigated as sensitizers in TiO2-based DSSCs and evaluated in comparison with N719 dye. The acidity of the papaya-leaf extract dyes was tuned by adding benzoic acid. The TiO2 film-coated fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates were prepared using the doctor-blade method, followed by sintering at 450 °C. The counter electrode was coated by chemically deposited catalytic platinum. The working electrodes were immersed in N719 dye and papaya dye solutions with concentrations of 8 g/100 mL. The absorbance spectra of the dyes were obtained by ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy. The energy levels of the dyes were measured by the method of cyclic voltammetry. In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the characteristic functionalities of the dye molecules. The DSSC based on the N719 dye displayed a highest efficiency of 0.87% whereas those based on papaya-leaf dye achieved 0.28% at pH 3.5. The observed improved efficiency of the latter was attributed to the increased current density value. Furthermore, the DSSCs based on papaya-leaf dye with pH 3.5-4 exhibited better stability than those based on N719 dye. However, further studies are required to improve the current density and stability of natural dye-based DSSCs, including the investigation of alternative dye extraction routes, such as isolating the pure chlorophyll from papaya leaves and stabilizing it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Stability and efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells based on papaya-leaf dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyitno, Suyitno; Saputra, Trisma Jaya; Supriyanto, Agus; Arifin, Zainal

    2015-09-01

    The present article reports on the enhancement of the performance and stability of natural dye-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Natural dyes extracted from papaya leaves (PL) were investigated as sensitizers in TiO2-based DSSCs and evaluated in comparison with N719 dye. The acidity of the papaya-leaf extract dyes was tuned by adding benzoic acid. The TiO2 film-coated fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates were prepared using the doctor-blade method, followed by sintering at 450 °C. The counter electrode was coated by chemically deposited catalytic platinum. The working electrodes were immersed in N719 dye and papaya dye solutions with concentrations of 8 g/100 mL. The absorbance spectra of the dyes were obtained by ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy. The energy levels of the dyes were measured by the method of cyclic voltammetry. In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the characteristic functionalities of the dye molecules. The DSSC based on the N719 dye displayed a highest efficiency of 0.87% whereas those based on papaya-leaf dye achieved 0.28% at pH 3.5. The observed improved efficiency of the latter was attributed to the increased current density value. Furthermore, the DSSCs based on papaya-leaf dye with pH 3.5-4 exhibited better stability than those based on N719 dye. However, further studies are required to improve the current density and stability of natural dye-based DSSCs, including the investigation of alternative dye extraction routes, such as isolating the pure chlorophyll from papaya leaves and stabilizing it.

  2. Influence of humic acids on the adsorption of Basic Yellow 28 dye onto an iron organo-inorgano pillared clay and two hydrous ferric oxides.

    PubMed

    Zermane, Faiza; Cheknane, Benamar; Basly, Jean Philippe; Bouras, Omar; Baudu, Michel

    2013-04-01

    Effect of humic acids (HAs), macromolecules from natural organic matter, on the adsorption of Basic Yellow 28 is the aim of the present work. Three adsorbents were investigated in this study: an iron organo-inorgano pillared clay and two synthetic Hydrous Iron Oxide (Goethite and HFO). The surface charge was positive in the pH range of this study for the pillared clay; in contrast, it changes from positive to negative when the pH value increased (pH>9) for the two (oxy)hydroxides. Pseudo-first order kinetic rate constants and adsorption capacities increase from humic acid to BY 28. Adsorption isotherms of BY 28 and HA in single component were analysed using the Freundlich equation. Adsorption capacities increased sharply when the pH value of the dye solution was raised from 3 to 9. Increasing the pH medium from 3 to 9 reduces the HA adsorption capacities onto Fe-SMPM and iron oxyhydroxides, respectively. Fitting between measured and predicted sorption capacities of BY 28 and HA in a binary component system indicates that the Sheindorf-Rebuhn-Sheintuch (SRS) model, an extended Freundlich model, is able to describe the simultaneous adsorption of BY 28 and HA. Humic acids favourably affect the adsorption of BY 28, and a cooperative mechanism could be suggested. The synergetic effect existing between BY 28 and HA is shown by the interaction coefficients η12, which are generally high and increase with pH. Some phenomena have been advanced to explain this mechanism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adsorption of dyes by ACs prepared from waste tyre reinforcing fibre. Effect of texture, surface chemistry and pH.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Beatriz; Rocha, Raquel P; Pereira, Manuel F R; Figueiredo, José L; Barriocanal, Carmen

    2015-12-01

    This paper compares the importance of the texture and surface chemistry of waste tyre activated carbons in the adsorption of commercial dyes. The adsorption of two commercial dyes, Basic Astrazon Yellow 7GLL and Reactive Rifafix Red 3BN on activated carbons made up of reinforcing fibres from tyre waste and low-rank bituminous coal was studied. The surface chemistry of activated carbons was modified by means of HCl-HNO3 treatment in order to increase the number of functional groups. Moreover, the influence of the pH on the process was also studied, this factor being of great importance due to the amphoteric characteristics of activated carbons. The activated carbons made with reinforcing fibre and coal had the highest SBET, but the reinforcing fibre activated carbon samples had the highest mesopore volume. The texture of the activated carbons was not modified upon acid oxidation treatment, unlike their surface chemistry which underwent considerable modification. The activated carbons made with a mixture of reinforcing fibre and coal experienced the largest degree of oxidation, and so had more acid surface groups. The adsorption of reactive dye was governed by the mesoporous volume, whilst surface chemistry played only a secondary role. However, the surface chemistry of the activated carbons and dispersive interactions played a key role in the adsorption of the basic dye. The adsorption of the reactive dye was more favored in a solution of pH 2, whereas the basic dye was adsorbed more easily in a solution of pH 12. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Flesh color inheritance and gene interactions among canary yellow, pale yellow and red watermelon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two loci, C and i-C were previously reported to determine flesh color between canary yellow and red watermelon. Recently LCYB was found as a color determinant gene for canary yellow (C) and co-dominant CAPS marker was developed to identify canary yellow and red alleles. Another report suggested th...

  5. Beet yellow stunt

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beet yellow stunt virus (BYSV) is a potentially destructive yellows-type virus affecting plants in the family Asteraceae. The virus is a member of the genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae, and has been found in California and England. Initial symptoms consist of chlorosis of the older leaves,...

  6. Use of sugarcane molasses by Pycnoporus sanguineus for the production of laccase for dye decolorization.

    PubMed

    Marim, R A; Oliveira, A C C; Marquezoni, R S; Servantes, J P R; Cardoso, B K; Linde, G A; Colauto, N B; Valle, J S

    2016-10-17

    Pycnoporus sanguineus is a white-rot basidiomycete that produces laccase as the only oxidoreductase; enzyme synthesis depends on cultivation variables, and fungal species and strain. Laccases have wide substrate specificity, oxidize a broad range of compounds, and show potential for use in dye decolorization. We evaluated laccase production in a recently isolated strain of P. sanguineus cultivated with sugarcane molasses as the only carbon source, and urea or yeast extract as the nitrogen source [at various nitrogen concentrations (0.4, 1.4, 2.4, 3.4, and 4.4 g/L)], supplemented with copper (0, 150, 200, 250, and 300 µM), with or without agitation. The enzymatic extract produced at laccase peak activity was tested for dye decolorization capability on Remazol Brilliant Blue R, Reactive Black 5, Reactive Red 195, and Reactive Yellow 145. The nitrogen source did not affect enzyme production and the higher nitrogen concentration (3.4 g/L nitrogen as urea) increased enzymatic activity. The addition of up to 300 µM of Cu did not affect laccase production, whereas cultivation with agitation increased the activity peak by 17%. The highest laccase activity was ~50,000 U/L on the ninth day of cultivation. After 24 h, decolorization was 80% for Remazol Brilliant Blue R, 9% for Reactive Yellow 145, 6% for Reactive Red 195, and 2% for Reactive Black 5. The enzymatic extract of P. sanguineus provides a potential alternative to wastewater treatment. A better understanding of the behavior of this fungus under various culture conditions would allow improvement of the enzyme production bioprocess.

  7. Ultrasonic dyeing of cellulose nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Muzamil; Ahmed, Farooq; Jatoi, Abdul Wahab; Mahar, Rasool Bux; Khatri, Zeeshan; Kim, Ick Soo

    2016-07-01

    Textile dyeing assisted by ultrasonic energy has attained a greater interest in recent years. We report ultrasonic dyeing of nanofibers for the very first time. We chose cellulose nanofibers and dyed with two reactive dyes, CI reactive black 5 and CI reactive red 195. The cellulose nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning of cellulose acetate (CA) followed by deacetylation. The FTIR results confirmed complete conversion of CA into cellulose nanofibers. Dyeing parameters optimized were dyeing temperature, dyeing time and dye concentrations for each class of the dye used. Results revealed that the ultrasonic dyeing produced higher color yield (K/S values) than the conventional dyeing. The color fastness test results depicted good dye fixation. SEM analysis evidenced that ultrasonic energy during dyeing do not affect surface morphology of nanofibers. The results conclude successful dyeing of cellulose nanofibers using ultrasonic energy with better color yield and color fastness results than conventional dyeing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dielectric and thermal effects on the optical properties of natural dyes: a case study on solvated cyanin.

    PubMed

    Malcıoğlu, Osman Bariş; Calzolari, Arrigo; Gebauer, Ralph; Varsano, Daniele; Baroni, Stefano

    2011-10-05

    The optical properties of the flavylium state of the cyanin dye are simulated numerically by combining Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and linear-response time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The spectrum of the dye calculated in the gas phase is characterized by two peaks in the yellow and in the blue (green and violet), using a GGA-PBE (hybrid-B3LYP) DFT functional, which would bring about a greenish (bright orange) color incompatible with the dark purple hue observed in nature. Describing the effect of the water solvent through a polarizable continuum model does not modify qualitatively the resulting picture. An explicit simulation of both solvent and thermal effects using ab initio molecular dynamics results instead in a spectrum that is compatible with the observed coloration. This result is analyzed in terms of the spectroscopic effects of the molecular distortions induced by thermal fluctuations.

  9. Modification of wool surface by liposomes for dyeing with weld.

    PubMed

    Montazer, Majid; Zolfaghari, Alireza; Toliat, Taibeh; Moghadam, Mohammad Bameni

    2009-01-01

    In this research work, wool surface has been modified by liposome to investigate its effects on dyeing with weld, a yellow natural dye. To do this, samples were first treated with aluminium sulphate and afterward with different concentrations of liposomes at various temperatures for 30 minutes and, finally, dyed with weld at 75, 85, and 95 degrees C for 30, 45, and 60 minutes. K/S values of fabric samples were calculated and washing, light and rub fastness properties of the samples were indicated. The results proposed that the sample treated with 1% liposomes and dyed at 75 degrees C for 60 min has the highest K/S value. The central composite design (CCD) used for the experimental plan with three variables on the results of color strength and statistical analysis confirms the optimum conditions obtained by the experimental results. It was also found that washing, light, wet, and dry rub fastness properties of samples dyed with weld, including liposomes, have not significantly changed. The results of water drop absorption indicated that the hydrophobicity is higher for the samples pretreated with liposomes. The SEM picture of wool sample treated with mordant and liposomes and finally dyed with weld shows a coated layer on the fiber surface.

  10. 78 FR 692 - Certain Pasta From Turkey: Final Results of the Expedited Third Sunset Review of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-489-806] Certain Pasta From Turkey... Sunset Review of the countervailing duty order on certain pasta from Turkey. The Department finds that... pasta from Turkey was published on July 24, 1996. See Notice of Countervailing Duty Order: Certain Pasta...

  11. 78 FR 693 - Certain Pasta From Italy: Final Results of the Expedited Third Sunset Review of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-475-819] Certain Pasta From Italy... Sunset Review of the countervailing duty order on certain pasta from Italy. The Department finds that... pasta from Italy was published on July 24, 1996. See Notice of Countervailing Duty Order and Amended...

  12. Dye decolorization and detoxification potential of Ca-alginate beads immobilized manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad

    2015-12-10

    In view of compliance with increasingly stringent environmental legislation, an eco-friendly treatment technology of industrial dyes and effluents is a major environmental challenge in the color industry. In present study, a promising and eco-friendly entrapment approach was adopted to immobilize purified manganese peroxidase (MnP) produced from an indigenous strain of Ganoderma lucidum IBL-05 on Ca-alginate beads. The immobilized MnP was subsequently used for enhanced decolorization and detoxification of textile reactive dyes). MnP isolated from solid-state culture of G. lucidum IBL-05, presented highest immobilization yield (83.9 %) using alginate beads prepared at optimized conditions of 4 % (w/v) sodium alginate, 2 % (w/v) Calcium chloride (CaCl2) and 0.5 mg/ml enzyme concentration. Immobilization of MnP enhanced optimum temperature but caused acidic shift in optimum pH of the enzyme. The immobilized MnP showed optimum activity at pH 4.0 and 60 °C as compared to pH 5.0 and 35 °C for free enzyme. The kinetic parameters K(m) and V(max) of MnP were significantly improved by immobilization. The enhanced catalytic potential of immobilized MnP led to 87.5 %, 82.1 %, 89.4 %, 95.7 % and 83 % decolorization of Sandal-fix Red C4BLN, Sandal-fix Turq Blue GWF, Sandal-fix Foron Blue E2BLN, Sandal-fix Black CKF and Sandal-fix Golden Yellow CRL dyes, respectively. The insolubilized MnP was reusable for 7 repeated cycles in dye color removal. Furthermore, immobilized MnP also caused a significant reduction in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) (94.61-95.47 %), chemical oxygen demand (COD) (91.18-94.85 %), and total organic carbon (TOC) (89.58-95 %) of aqueous dye solutions. G. lucidum MnP was immobilized in Ca-alginate beads by entrapment method to improve its practical effectiveness. Ca-alginate bound MnP was catalytically more vigorous, thermo-stable, reusable and worked over wider ranges of pH and temperature as compared to its free counterpart. Results of cytotoxicity like

  13. Dyes for displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claussen, U.

    1984-01-01

    The improvement of contrast and visibility of LCD by two different means was undertaken. The two methods are: (1) development of fluorescent dyes to increase the visibility of fluorescent activated displays (FLAD); and (2) development of dichroic dyes to increase the contrast of displays. This work was done in close cooperation with the electronic industry, where the newly synthesized dyes were tested. The targets for the chemical synthesis were selected with the help of computer model calculations. A marketable range of dyes was developed. Since the interest of the electronic industries concerning FLAD was low, the investigations were stopped. Dichroic dyes, especially black mixtures with good light fastness, order parameter, and solubility in nematic phases were developed. The application of these dyes is restricted to indoor use because of an increase of viscosity below -10 C. Applications on a technical scale, e.g., for the automotive industry, will be possible if the displays work at temperatures down to -40 C. This problem requires a complex optimization of the dye/nematic phase system.

  14. The oxygen-rich pentaerythritol modified multi-walled carbon nanotube as an efficient adsorbent for aqueous removal of alizarin yellow R and alizarin red S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia-Ying; Jiang, Xin-Yu; Jiao, Fei-Peng; Yu, Jin-Gang

    2018-04-01

    A contrastive work on the removal of two organic dyes, alizarin yellow R (AYR) and alizarin red S (ARS), was carried out by utilizing pentaerythritol modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (ox-MWCNT-PER) as a highly efficient adsorbent. Various characterization methods such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), were applied for revealing the physical and chemical properties of the as-prepared material. In addition, the adsorption kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic parameters were also discussed. The results showed that the time required to achieve the adsorption equilibrium for both dyes was about 30 min, and the increase in temperature was not favorable to the adsorption process. It was worth noting that the adsorption capacity of ox-MWCNT-PER towards ARS dye was more significant than that towards AYR dye. And the maximum adsorption capacities for ARS and AYR were 257.73 mg g-1 and 45.39 mg g-1, respectively. The possible adsorption mechanism was also proposed, and the synergistic effects of the hydrogen bonding and the π-π electron stacking interactions between the adsorbents and adsorbates both contributed to the adsorption. It could be proposed that the ox-MWCNT-PER nanocomposite might have some positive effects in removing organic dyes from water treatment in the future.

  15. Natural Dye Extracted from Vitex negundo as a Potential Alternative to Synthetic Dyes for Dyeing of Silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Swamy, Venkataramanappa; Gowda, Kurikempanadoddi Ninge; Sudhakar, Rajagopal

    2016-04-01

    Since the last decade, the application of natural dyes on textile material has been gaining popularity all over the world, possibly because of the increasing awareness of issues concerning the environment, ecology and pollution control. The present paper investigates extraction of natural dye from leaves of the plant Vitex negundo, which is an abundant, cheap, and readily available agricultural by-product. Water extracts from V. negundo was used to dye silk fabrics. Optimum extraction conditions included pH 9, duration 120 min, and temperature 90 °C. Optimum dyeing conditions included dyeing pH 5 and duration of 60 min. Potash alum, tannic and tartaric acid were used as mordants, all of which are benign to human health and the environment. Color strength and color coordinates in terms of L*, a*, b*, C, and h were examined. A range of shades were obtained when fabrics were dyed with different mordants and mordanting techniques. The extracted dye was tested for some of the eco-parameters using atomic absorption spectrophotometry and GC/MS. The test results were compared with set standards to determine the eco-friendliness of natural dye. Their concentrations were found to be lower than the stipulated limits. Dyed samples were tested for antimicrobial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The dyed silk fabrics showed acceptable fastness properties and were also found to possess antibacterial activity. It can be concluded that the abundantly available agricultural by-product V. negundo has great potential to be effectively utilized as a natural dye for silk.

  16. Dye-ligand affinity systems.

    PubMed

    Denizli, A; Pişkin, E

    2001-10-30

    Dye-ligands have been considered as one of the important alternatives to natural counterparts for specific affinity chromatography. Dye-ligands are able to bind most types of proteins, in some cases in a remarkably specific manner. They are commercially available, inexpensive, and can easily be immobilized, especially on matrices bearing hydroxyl groups. Although dyes are all synthetic in nature, they are still classified as affinity ligands because they interact with the active sites of many proteins mimicking the structure of the substrates, cofactors, or binding agents for those proteins. A number of textile dyes, known as reactive dyes, have been used for protein purification. Most of these reactive dyes consist of a chromophore (either azo dyes, anthraquinone, or phathalocyanine), linked to a reactive group (often a mono- or dichlorotriazine ring). The interaction between the dye ligand and proteins can be by complex combination of electrostatic, hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding. Selection of the supporting matrix is the first important consideration in dye-affinity systems. There are several methods for immobilization of dye molecules onto the support matrix, in which usually several intermediate steps are followed. Both the adsorption and elution steps should carefully be optimized/designed for a successful separation. Dye-affinity systems in the form of spherical sorbents or as affinity membranes have been used in protein separation.

  17. Photostability of low cost dye-sensitized solar cells based on natural and synthetic dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, E. M.; Hafez, H. S.; Bakir, E.; Abdel-Mottaleb, M. S. A.

    2013-11-01

    This paper deals with the use of some natural pigments as well as synthetic dyes to act as sensitizers in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Anthocyanin dye extracted from rosella (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) flowers, the commercially available textile dye Remazole Red RB-133 (RR) and merocyanin-like dye based on 7-methyl coumarin are tested. The photostability of the three dyes is investigated under UV-Vis light exposure. The results show a relatively high stability of the three dyes. Moreover, the photostability of the solid dyes is studied over the TiO2 film electrodes. A very low decolorization rates are recorded as; rate constants k = 1.6, 2.1 and 1.9 × 10-3 min-1 for anthocyanin, RR and coumarin dyes, respectively. The stability results favor selecting anthocyanin as a promising sensitizer candidate in DSSCs based on natural products. Dyes-sensitized solar cells are fabricated and their conversion efficiency (η) is 0.27%, 0.14% and 0.001% for the anthocyanin, RR and coumarin dyes, respectively. Moreover, stability tests of the sealed cells based on anthocyanin and RR dyes are done under continuous light exposure of 100 mW cm-2, reveals highly stable DSSCs.

  18. Effect of Mixing Dyes and Solvent in Electrolyte Toward Characterization of Dye Sensitized Solar Cell Using Natural Dyes as The Sensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitasari, Nurrisma; Nurul Amalia, Silviyanti S.; Yudoyono, Gatut; Endarko

    2017-07-01

    Dye Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) using natural dyes (chlorophyll, curcumin from turmeric extract, and anthocyanin from mangosteen extract) have been successfully fabricated for determining the effect of variation natural dyes, mixing dyes and acetonitrile in electrolyte toward characterization of DSSC. DSSC consists of five parts namely ITO (Indium Tin Oxide) as a substrate; TiO2 as semiconductor materials; natural dyes as an electron donor; electrolyte as electron transfer; and carbon as a catalyst that can convert light energy into electric energy. Two types of gel electrolyte based on PEG that mixed with liquid electrolyte have utilized for analyzing the lifetime of DSSC. Type I used distilled water as a solvent whilst type II used acetonitrile as a solvent with addition of concentration of KI and iodine. The main purpose of study was to investigate influence of solvent in electrolyte, variation of natural dyes and mixing dyes toward an efficiency that resulted by DSSC. The result showed that electrolyte type II is generally better than type I with efficiency 0,0556 and 0,0456 %, respectively. An efficiency values which resulted from a variation of mixed three natural dyes showed the greatest efficiency compared to mixed two natural dyes and one dye, with an efficiency value can be achieved at 0,0194 % for chlorophyll; 0,111 % for turmeric; 0,0105 % for mangosteen; 0,0244% (mangosteen and chlorophyll); 0,0117 % (turmeric and mangosteen); 0,0158 % (turmeric and chlorophyll); and 0.0566 % (mixed three natural dyes).

  19. MALDI mass spectrometry of dye-peptide and dye-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Salih, B; Zenobi, R

    1998-04-15

    Immobilized sulfonate dyes are widely used for protein separation and purification, but the mode of interaction between the dye molecules and the proteins is largely unknown. Here we show that specific noncovalent dye-protein and dye-peptide complexes can be observed using MALDI mass spectrometry. We prove that the interaction is prodominantly electrostatic and that it involves protonated sites of the peptides and proteins, including the NH2 terminus, and deprotonated SO3 groups of the dyes. Furthermore, we show that MALDI-MS of such complexes with a nonacidic matrix, p-nitro-aniline, can be used to determine the number of accessible basic sites of a protein or peptide in its folded structure. Our results are in good agreement with measurements of the same property done with electrospray ionization.

  20. 78 FR 77425 - Raw Flexible Magnets From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-570-923] Raw Flexible Magnets From... the countervailing duty (``CVD'') order on raw flexible magnets (``RFM'') from the People's Republic... of Expedited Sunset Review of the Countervailing Duty Order on Raw Flexible Magnets from the People's...

  1. 76 FR 30655 - Certain Orange Juice From Brazil: Final Results of the Expedited Sunset Review of the Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-351-840] Certain Orange Juice From... Administration, International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. SUMMARY: On February 1, 2011, the Department of Commerce (the Department) initiated a sunset review of the antidumping duty order on certain...

  2. 77 FR 73021 - Lemon Juice From Argentina: Final Results of the Expedited First Sunset Review of the Suspended...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-357-818] Lemon Juice From Argentina... duty investigation on lemon juice from Argentina. The Department has conducted an expedited sunset... suspended antidumping duty investigation on lemon juice from Argentina, pursuant to section 751(c) of the...

  3. Insect enemies of yellow-poplar

    Treesearch

    Denver P. Burns; Denver P. Burns

    1970-01-01

    Yellow-poplar, like the other desirable hardwoods, is attacked by a variety of insects. However, only four species of insects are considered economically important: the tuliptree scale, the yellow-poplar weevil, the root-collar borer, and the Columbian timber beetle. These are native enemies of yellow-poplar (Liriodendvon tzllipifera L.) wherever the tree grows.

  4. Coumarin-indole conjugate donor-acceptor system: Synthesis, photophysical properties, anion sensing ability, theoretical and biological activity studies of two coumarin-indole based push-pull dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksungur, Tuğçe; Aydıner, Burcu; Seferoğlu, Nurgül; Özkütük, Müjgan; Arslan, Leyla; Reis, Yasemin; Açık, Leyla; Seferoğlu, Zeynel

    2017-11-01

    Two coumarin-indole conjugate fluorescent dyes having donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) (CI-1 and CI-2) were synthesized, and characterized using IR, 1H/13C NMR and HRMS. The absorption and emission properties of the dyes were determined in different solvents. The anion sensitivity and selectivity of the dyes were studied with some anions (CN-, F-, AcO-, Cl-, Br-, I-, HSO4- and H2PO4-) in DMSO, and their interaction mechanisms were evaluated by spectrophotometric and 1H NMR titration techniques. In addition, the molecular and electronic structures of CI-1, as well as the molecular complexes of CI-1, formed with the anions (F- and AcO-), were obtained theoretically and confirmed by DFT and TD-DFT calculations. CI-1 behaves as a colorimetric chemosensor for selective and sensitive detection of CN- in DMSO/H2O (9:1) over other competing anions such as F- and AcO-. However, only CN- interacts with chromophore CI-2 via Michael addition and the main absorption maxima shifts hypsochromically with an observed distinctive color change from orange to yellow. For using as a optic dye, the thermal stability properties of the dyes was determined by TGA (Thermal Gravimetric Analysis). Antimicrobial, antifungal and DNA-ligand interaction studies of the dyes were also examined. The dyes cause conformational changes on DNA and selectively bind to nucleotides of A/A and G/G.

  5. Metal oxide-encapsulated dye-sensitized photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hupp, Joseph T.; Son, Ho-Jin

    2016-01-12

    Dye-sensitized semiconducting metal oxide films for photoanodes, photoanodes incorporating the films and DSCs incorporating the photoanodes are provided. Also provided are methods for making the dye sensitized semiconducting metal oxide films. The methods of making the films are based on the deposition of an encapsulating layer of a semiconducting metal oxide around the molecular anchoring groups of photosensitizing dye molecules adsorbed to a porous film of the semiconducting metal oxide. The encapsulating layer of semiconducting metal oxide is formed in such a way that it is not coated over the chromophores of the adsorbed dye molecules and, therefore, allows themore » dye molecules to remain electrochemically addressable.« less

  6. 78 FR 2368 - Certain Pasta From Italy and Turkey; Final Results of Expedited Third Sunset Reviews of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-475-818; A-489-805] Certain Pasta... Department'') initiated five-year (``sunset'') reviews of the antidumping duty orders on certain pasta (``pasta'') from Italy and Turkey. As a result of these reviews, the Department finds that revocation of...

  7. 78 FR 69646 - Sodium Nitrite From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited First Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-570-926] Sodium Nitrite From the... Commerce (``the Department'') finds that revocation of the countervailing duty (``CVD'') order on sodium..., the Department initiated the first sunset review of the CVD order on sodium nitrite from the PRC...

  8. Sorption isotherms, kinetic and optimization process of amino acid proline based polymer nanocomposite for the removal of selected textile dyes from industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Raghunath, Sharista; Anand, K; Gengan, R M; Nayunigari, Mithil Kumar; Maity, Arjun

    2016-12-01

    In this article, adsorption and kinetic studies were carried out on three textile dyes, namely Reactive Blue 222 (RB 222), Reactive Red 195 (RR 195) and Reactive Yellow 145 (RY 145). The dyes studied in a mixture were adsorbed under various conditions onto PRO-BEN, a bentonite modified with a new cationic proline polymer (l-proline-epichlorohydrin polymer). The proline polymer was characterized by 1 H NMR, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and TEM. The PRO-BEN composite was characterized by FT-IR, dynamic light scattering (DLS) (zeta potential), TEM imaging, SEM/EDX and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (characterize the binding energy). During adsorption studies, factors involving pH, temperature, the initial concentrations of the dyes and the quantity of PRO-BEN used during adsorption were established. The results revealed that the adsorption mechanism was categorized by the Langmuir type 1 isotherm. The adsorption data followed the pseudo-second order kinetic model. The intraparticle diffusion model indicated that adsorption did not only depend on the intraparticle diffusion of the dyes. The thermodynamic parameters verified that the adsorption process was spontaneous and exothermic. The Gibbs free energy values indicated that physisorption had occurred. Successful adsorption of dyes from an industrial effluent was achieved. Desorption studies concluded that PRO-BEN desorbed the dyes better than alumina. This can thereby be viewed as a recyclable remediation material. The PRO-BEN composite could be a cost efficient alternative towards the removal of organic dyes in wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Pad ultrasonic batch dyeing of causticized lyocell fabric with reactive dyes.

    PubMed

    Babar, Aijaz Ahmed; Peerzada, Mazhar Hussain; Jhatial, Abdul Khalique; Bughio, Noor-Ul-Ain

    2017-01-01

    Conventionally, cellulosic fabric dyed with reactive dyes requires significant amount of salt. However, the dyeing of a solvent spun regenerated cellulosic fiber is a critical process. This paper presents the dyeing results of lyocell fabrics dyed with conventional pad batch (CPB) and pad ultrasonic batch (PUB) processes. The dyeing of lyocell fabrics was carried out with two commercial dyes namely Drimarine Blue CL-BR and Ramazol Blue RGB. Dyeing parameters including concentration of sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate and dwell time were compared for the two processes. The outcomes show that PUB dyed samples offered reasonably higher color yield and dye fixation than CPB dyed samples. A remarkable reduction of 12h in batching time, 18ml/l in NaOH and 05g/l in Na 2 CO 3 quantity was observed for PUB processed samples producing similar results compared to CPB process, making PUB a more economical, productive and an environment friendly process. Color fastness examination witnessed identical results for both PUB and CPB methods. No significant change in surface morphology of PUB processed samples was observed through scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. TiO2 nanofibers resembling 'yellow bristle grass' in morphology by a soft chemical transformation.

    PubMed

    Nandan, Sandeep; Deepak, T G; Nair, Shantikumar V; Nair, A Sreekumaran

    2015-05-28

    We synthesized a uniquely shaped one-dimensional (1-D) TiO2 nanostructure having the morphology of yellow bristle grass with high surface area by the titanate route under mild reaction conditions. The electrospun TiO2-SiO2 composite nanofibers upon treatment with concentrated NaOH at 80 °C under ambient pressure for 24 h resulted in sodium titanate (Na2Ti3O7) nanostructures. The Na2Ti3O7 nanostructures have an overall 1-D fibrous morphology but the highly porous fiber surfaces were decorated with layered thorn-like features (a morphology resembling that of yellow bristle grass) resulting in high surface area (113 m(2) g(-1)) and porosity. The Na2Ti3O7 nanostructures were converted into TiO2 nanostructures of the same morphology by acidification (0.1 N HCl) followed by low temperature sintering (110 °C) processes. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) constructed out of the material (cells of area 0.20 cm(2) and thickness 12 μm) showed a power conversion efficiency (η) of 8.02% in comparison with commercial P-25 TiO2 (η = 6.1%).

  11. Effect of electrode position on azo dye removal in an up-flow hybrid anaerobic digestion reactor with built-in bioelectrochemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Min-Hua; Cui, Dan; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Liang, Bin; Wang, Ai-Jie; Cheng, Hao-Yi

    2016-04-01

    In this study, two modes of hybrid anaerobic digestion (AD) bioreactor with built-in BESs (electrodes installed in liquid phase (R1) and sludge phase (R2)) were tested for identifying the effect of electrodes position on azo dye wastewater treatment. Alizarin yellow R (AYR) was used as a model dye. Decolorization efficiency of R1 was 90.41 ± 6.20% at influent loading rate of 800 g-AYR/ m3·d, which was 39% higher than that of R2. The contribution of bioelectrochemical reduction to AYR decolorization (16.23 ± 1.86% for R1 versus 22.24 ± 2.14% for R2) implied that although azo dye was mainly removed in sludge zone, BES further improved the effluent quality, especially for R1 where electrodes were installed in liquid phase. The microbial communities in the electrode biofilms (dominant by Enterobacter) and sludge (dominant by Enterococcus) were well distinguished in R1, but they were similar in R2. These results suggest that electrodes installed in liquid phase in the anaerobic hybrid system are more efficient than that in sludge phase for azo dye removal, which give great inspirations for the application of AD-BES hybrid process for various refractory wastewaters treatment.

  12. Visible light photocatalytic activities of template free porous graphitic carbon nitride-BiOBr composite catalysts towards the mineralization of reactive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagaraj, Thamaraiselvi; Thiripuranthagan, Sivakumar; Paskalis, Sahaya Murphin Kumar; Abe, Hideki

    2017-12-01

    Template free porous g-C3N4 (pGCN) and flower like bismuth oxybromide catalysts were synthesized by poly condensation and precipitation methods respectively. Various weight percentages of porous GCN-BiOBr composite catalysts (x% pGCN-BiOBr where x = 5, 10, 30, 50 & 70 wt% of pGCN) were synthesized by impregnation method. All the synthesized catalysts were characterized by X-Ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer, BET surface area analyzer, UV Visible diffuse reflectance spectrophotometer, X-Ray photoelectron spectrophotometer, SEM with Energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (SEM/EDAX) and elemental mapping, Transmission electron microscope, Photoluminescence spectrophotometer and Electrochemical impedance. Photocatalytic degradation of all the synthesized catalysts were tested towards the harmful reactive dyes such as reactive blue 198 (RB 198), reactive black 5 (RB 5) and reactive yellow 145 (RY 145) in presence of visible irradiation. Among the catalysts 30% pGCN-BiOBr resulted in the highest photocatalytic activity towards the degradation of all the three dyes in presence of UV, visible and solar irradiations. Kinetics studies on the photocatalytic mineralization of dyes indicated that it followed pseudo first order. HPLC, TOC and COD studies confirm that the dyes are mineralized into CO2, water and mineral salts.

  13. Quantum dots-based double imaging combined with organic dye imaging to establish an automatic computerized method for cancer Ki67 measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Wei; Qu, Ai-Ping; Liu, Wen-Lou; Chen, Jia-Mei; Yuan, Jing-Ping; Wu, Han; Li, Yan; Liu, Juan

    2016-02-03

    As a widely used proliferative marker, Ki67 has important impacts on cancer prognosis, especially for breast cancer (BC). However, variations in analytical practice make it difficult for pathologists to manually measure Ki67 index. This study is to establish quantum dots (QDs)-based double imaging of nuclear Ki67 as red signal by QDs-655, cytoplasmic cytokeratin (CK) as yellow signal by QDs-585, and organic dye imaging of cell nucleus as blue signal by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), and to develop a computer-aided automatic method for Ki67 index measurement. The newly developed automatic computerized Ki67 measurement could efficiently recognize and count Ki67-positive cancer cell nuclei with red signals and cancer cell nuclei with blue signals within cancer cell cytoplasmic with yellow signals. Comparisons of computerized Ki67 index, visual Ki67 index, and marked Ki67 index for 30 patients of 90 images with Ki67 ≤ 10% (low grade), 10% < Ki67 < 50% (moderate grade), and Ki67 ≥ 50% (high grade) showed computerized Ki67 counting is better than visual Ki67 counting, especially for Ki67 low and moderate grades. Based on QDs-based double imaging and organic dye imaging on BC tissues, this study successfully developed an automatic computerized Ki67 counting method to measure Ki67 index.

  14. 78 FR 46792 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Repeal of Sunset for Certain Protests of Task or Delivery Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2013. This section removes the sunset date for protests against certain orders under a task-order contract or delivery-order contract for title 10 agencies only... agencies covered by title 10 of the United States Code, namely DoD, NASA, and Coast Guard. This section...

  15. Spectroscopic detection of halogen bonding resolves dye regeneration in the dye-sensitized solar cell.

    PubMed

    Parlane, Fraser G L; Mustoe, Chantal; Kellett, Cameron W; Simon, Sarah J; Swords, Wesley B; Meyer, Gerald J; Kennepohl, Pierre; Berlinguette, Curtis P

    2017-11-24

    The interactions between a surface-adsorbed dye and a soluble redox-active electrolyte species in the dye-sensitized solar cell has a significant impact on the rate of regeneration of photo-oxidized dye molecules and open-circuit voltage of the device. Dyes must therefore be designed to encourage these interfacial interactions, but experimentally resolving how such weak interactions affect electron transfer is challenging. Herein, we use X-ray absorption spectroscopy to confirm halogen bonding can exist at the dye-electrolyte interface. Using a known series of triphenylamine-based dyes bearing halogen substituents geometrically positioned for reaction with halides in solution, halogen bonding was detected only in cases where brominated and iodinated dyes were photo-oxidized. This result implies that weak intermolecular interactions between photo-oxidized dyes and the electrolyte can impact device photovoltages. This result was unexpected considering the low concentration of oxidized dyes (less than 1 in 100,000) under full solar illumination.

  16. 76 FR 54206 - Gray Portland Cement and Clinker From Japan: Final Results of the Expedited Third Sunset Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... manufacturing cement, has no use other than grinding into finished cement. Microfine cement was specifically... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-588-815] Gray Portland Cement and... portland cement and clinker from Japan. As a result of this third sunset review, the Department finds that...

  17. Flocculation of both anionic and cationic dyes in aqueous solutions by the amphoteric grafting flocculant carboxymethyl chitosan-graft-polyacrylamide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Yang, Hu; Jiang, Ziwen; Cai, Tao; Li, Haijiang; Li, Haibo; Li, Aimin; Cheng, Rongshi

    2013-06-15

    In the current work, a series of amphoteric grafting chitosan-based flocculants (carboxymethyl chitosan-graft-polyacrylamide, denoted as CMC-g-PAM) was designed and prepared successfully. The flocculants were applied to eliminate various dyes from aqueous solutions. Among different graft copolymers, CMC-g-PAM11 with a PAM grafting ratio of 74% demonstrated the most efficient performance for removal of both the anionic dye (Methyl Orange, MO) and the cationic dye (Basic Bright Yellow, 7GL) under the corresponding favored conditions (80 mg/L of the flocculant at pH 4.0, and 160 mg/L at pH 11.0). In comparison with its precursors, chitosan and carboxymethyl chitosan, CMC-g-PAM11 showed higher removal efficiencies and wider flocculation windows. More importantly, the graft copolymer produced notably more compacted flocs based on image analysis in combination with fractal theory, which was of great significance in practical water treatment. Furthermore, the flocculation mechanism was discussed in detail. The grafted polyacrylamide chains were found to contribute much to the improved bridging and sweeping flocculation effects, but reduced charge neutralization flocculation for the effect of charge screening. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tuning the light emission of novel donor-acceptor phenoxazine dye-based materials towards the red spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damaceanu, Mariana-Dana; Constantin, Catalin-Paul

    2018-04-01

    A novel red fluorescent push-pull system able to generate an intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) complex was synthesized. The novel dye (R-POX) combines some structural features which are rarely encountered in the design of other push-pull systems: hexyl-substituted phenoxazine as donor moiety, divinylketone as π-linker, and p-fluorobenzene as electron acceptor group. The relationship between the structural motif, photo-physical and electrochemical properties by UV-Vis absorption, photoluminescence and cyclic voltammetry was thoroughly investigated both as red dopant in poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) or polyimide (PI) matrix, and non-doped host emitter. The molecular rigid cores of the synthesized dye formed supramolecular rod-like structures in condensed phase with a strong impact on the emissive centers. The aggregation was totally suppressed when the dye was used as dopant in an amorphous polymeric matrix, such as PMMA or PI. Electrochemical measurements revealed the dye ability for both hole and electron injection and transport. The fluorescence emission was found to be highly sensitive to solvent polarity, rendering blue-green, yellow, orange and red light emission in different organic solvents. The absolute fluorescence quantum yield reached 39.57% in solution, and dropped to 1.2% in solid state and to 14.01% when the dye was used as dopant in PMMA matrix. According to the available CIE 1931 standard, R-POX emitted pure and saturated red light of single wavelength with chromaticity coordinates very close to those of National Television System Committee (NTSC) standard red colour. The R-POX photo-optical features were compared to those of the commercial red emitter 6, 13-diphenylpentacene.

  19. Optical properties of natural dyes on the dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratiwi, D. D.; Nurosyid, F.; Supriyanto, A.; Suryana, R.

    2016-11-01

    This study reported several natural dyes for application in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). This study aims was to determine the effect of optical absorption properties of natural dyes on efficiency of DSSC. The sandwich structure of DSSC consist of TiO2 as working electrode, carbon layer as counter electrode, natural dyes as photosensitizer, and electrolyte as electron transfer media. The natural dyes used in this experiment were extracted from dragon fruit anthocyanin, mangosteen peels anthocyanin, and red cabbage anthocyanin. The absorbance of dyes solutions and the adsorption of the dye on the surface of TiO2 were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, the quantum efficiency versus wavelength was characterized using incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) measurement system, and the efficiency of DSSC was calculated using I-V meter. UV-Vis characteristic curves showed that wavelength absorption of anthocyanin dye of red cabbage was 450 - 580 nm, anthocyanin of mangosteen peels was 400 - 480 nm, and anthocyanin of dragon fruit was 400 - 650 nm. Absorption spectra of the dye adsorption on the surface of TiO2 which was resulted in the highest absorbance of red cabbage anthocyanin. IPCE characteristic curves with anthocyanin dye of red cabbage, mangosteen peels anthocyanin, and dragon fruit anthocyanin resulted quantum efficiency of 0.058%; 0.047%; and 0.043%, respectively at wavelength maximum about 430 nm. I-V characteristic curves with anthocyanin dye of red cabbage, mangosteen peels anthocyanin, and dragon fruit anthocyanin resulted efficiency of 0.054%; 0.042%; and 0.024%, respectively.

  20. Extension lifetime for dye-sensitized solar cells through multiple dye adsorption/desorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yi-Fang; Chen, Ruei-Tang; Shen, Po-Shen; Chen, Peter; Guo, Tzung-Fang

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we propose a novel concept of extending the lifetime of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) and reducing the costs of re-conditioning DSCs by recycling the FTO/TiO2 substrates. The photovoltaic performances of DSCs using substrates with various cycles of dye uptake and rinse off history are tested. The results show that dye adsorption and Voc are significantly increased under multiple dye adsorption/desorption process and resulted in the improvement of power conversion efficiency. Moreover, the dyeing kinetics is faster after multiple recycling processes, which is favorable for the industrial application. With surface analysis and charge transport characteristics, we also demonstrate the optimal functionality of TiO2/dye interface for the improved Voc and efficiency. The results confirm that the improved performances are due to increased dye loading and dense packing of dye molecules. Our results are beneficial for the understanding on the extension of DSCs lifetime after long-term operation in the application of DSC modules. This approach may also be applied in the replacement of newly synthesized photosensitizes to the active cells.

  1. Dyeing and characterization of regenerated cellulose nanofibers with vat dyes.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Muzamil; Ahmed, Farooq; Shaikh, Irfan; Phan, Duy-Nam; Khan, Qamar; Khatri, Zeeshan; Lee, Hoik; Kim, Ick Soo

    2017-10-15

    Recent advancement in dyeing of nanofibers has been accelerated to improve their aesthetic properties, however, achieving good color fastness remains a challenge. Therefore, we attempt to improve the color fastness properties nanofibers. Vat dyes are known for better color fastness and their application on nanofibers has not been investigated to date. Herein, we report dyeing of regenerated cellulose nanofibers (RCNF) that were produced from precursor of cellulose acetate (CA) followed by deacetylation process. The resultant RCNF was dyed with two different vat dyes and the color attributes were examined under spectrophotometer which showed outstanding color build-up. Morphological of CA before and after deacetylation and before and after vat dyeing was investigated under TEM, FE-SEM and SEM respectively. The vat dyed RCNF were further characterized by FTIR and WAXD. Excellent color fastness results demonstrate that vat dyed RCNF can potentially be considered for advanced apparel applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of New Laser Protective Dyes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-31

    Science’s Phase I research, the feasibility of thermally stabilizing cyanine and squarylium dyes for simulated polycarbonate injection-molding... SQUARYLIUM & CROCONIUM FIUORENE DYE SYNTHESIS SYNTHESIS OF NEW DYES DYE SYNTHESES IENGFICA TION ASYNTHESIS OF SUSSTITUTED DYES EVELOP OH TECHNOLOGIES...region, three dyes were successfully extruded into PETG and/or PC: (a.) the croconium dye SS-1044 (,%max = 834 um in PETG). (b.) the squarylium dye

  3. Yellow fever: an update.

    PubMed

    Monath, T P

    2001-08-01

    Yellow fever, the original viral haemorrhagic fever, was one of the most feared lethal diseases before the development of an effective vaccine. Today the disease still affects as many as 200,000 persons annually in tropical regions of Africa and South America, and poses a significant hazard to unvaccinated travellers to these areas. Yellow fever is transmitted in a cycle involving monkeys and mosquitoes, but human beings can also serve as the viraemic host for mosquito infection. Recent increases in the density and distribution of the urban mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, as well as the rise in air travel increase the risk of introduction and spread of yellow fever to North and Central America, the Caribbean and Asia. Here I review the clinical features of the disease, its pathogenesis and pathophysiology. The disease mechanisms are poorly understood and have not been the subject of modern clinical research. Since there is no specific treatment, and management of patients with the disease is extremely problematic, the emphasis is on preventative vaccination. As a zoonosis, yellow fever cannot be eradicated, but reduction of the human disease burden is achievable through routine childhood vaccination in endemic countries, with a low cost for the benefits obtained. The biological characteristics, safety, and efficacy of live attenuated, yellow fever 17D vaccine are reviewed. New applications of yellow fever 17D virus as a vector for foreign genes hold considerable promise as a means of developing new vaccines against other viruses, and possibly against cancers.

  4. Wind direction variability in Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Erik; Lothon, Marie; Lohou, Fabienne; Mahrt, Larry

    2014-05-01

    Understanding wind direction (WD) variability better is important for several reasons. Air pollution models need information about how variable wind direction is in different conditions (Davies and Thomson 1999). Accurate predictions of dispersion are important for human health and safety and allow for adaptation planning (Nagle et al. 2011). Other applications include horizontal diffusion, efficiency and fatigue of wind machines and air-sea interaction (Mahrt 2011). Most studies of wind direction variability have focused on nocturnal conditions because of greater variability in light winds. Modelling WD variability in transition periods when both mean wind speed and variance of the wind components are in a state of change can, however, also be very challenging and has not been the focus of earlier studies. The evening transitioning to the nocturnal boundary layer can play an important role in the diffusion process of pollutants and scalars emitted at surface and transported within the atmosphere. The Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign that took place in southern France in June and July 2011 focused on the decaying turbulence of the late afternoon boundary layer and related issues (Lothon et al. 2012). We analyse field measurements from BLLAST to investigate WD variability in the evening transition period. Standard deviations of horizontal wind direction fluctuations in the lowest 60 m of the boundary layer have been examined for dependence on mean wind speed, higher order moments and averaging time. Measurement results are interpreted using measured and idealized probability density functions of horizontal wind vectors. These are also used to develop analytical functions describing how WD variability depends on wind speed, variance and other controlling factors in the atmospheric boundary layer. References: Davies B.M., Thomson D.J., 1999. Comparison of some parameterizations of wind direction variability with observations

  5. 77 FR 75998 - Lemon Juice from Mexico: Preliminary Results of Full Sunset Review of the Suspended Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ...: Preliminary Results of Full Sunset Review of the Suspended Antidumping Duty Investigation AGENCY: Import... provided for in section 751(c)(5)(A) of the Act and in 19 CFR 351.218(e)(2). As a result of its analysis... ``Preliminary Results of Review'' section of this notice. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Maureen Price or...

  6. 76 FR 33243 - Sulfanilic Acid From India; Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review of Countervailing Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ...; Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review of Countervailing Duty Order AGENCY: Import Administration... to section 751(c)(3)(B) of the Act and 19 CFR 351.218(e)(1)(ii)(B). As a result of this review, the... countervailable subsidy at the level indicated the ``Final Results of Review'' section of this notice. DATES...

  7. Dyes and Redox Couples with Matched Energy Levels: Elimination of the Dye-Regeneration Energy Loss in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dianlu; Darabedian, Narek; Ghazarian, Sevak; Hao, Yuanqiang; Zhgamadze, Maxim; Majaryan, Natalie; Shen, Rujuan; Zhou, Feimeng

    2015-11-16

    In dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), a significant dye-regeneration force (ΔG(reg)(0)≥0.5 eV) is usually required for effective dye regeneration, which results in a major energy loss and limits the energy-conversion efficiency of state-of-art DSSCs. We demonstrate that when dye molecules and redox couples that possess similar conjugated ligands are used, efficient dye regeneration occurs with zero or close-to-zero driving force. By using Ru(dcbpy)(bpy)2(2+) as the dye and Ru(bpy)2(MeIm)2(3+//2+) as the redox couple, a short-circuit current (J(sc)) of 4 mA cm(-2) and an open-circuit voltage (V(oc)) of 0.9 V were obtained with a ΔG(reg)(0) of 0.07 eV. The same was observed for the N3 dye and Ru(bpy)2(SCN)2(1+/0) (ΔG(reg)(0)=0.0 eV), which produced an J(sc) of 2.5 mA cm(-2) and V(oc) of 0.6 V. Charge recombination occurs at pinholes, limiting the performance of the cells. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that high V(oc) values can be attained by significantly curtailing the dye-regeneration force. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. 77 FR 10477 - Silicon Metal From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited Third Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-570-806] Silicon Metal From the... review of the antidumping duty order on silicon metal from the People's Republic of China (``PRC...) sunset review of the antidumping duty order on silicon metal from the PRC, pursuant to section 751(c)(3...

  9. 76 FR 7150 - Notice of Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review of the Antidumping Duty Order: Glycine From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... 751(c)(3)(B) of the Act and section 351.218(e)(1)(ii)(A) of the Department's regulations, the...: Import Administration, International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. SUMMARY: On October 1... Act of 1930, as amended (``the Act''). See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 75 FR 60731...

  10. Sodium Fluorescein-Guided Resection under the YELLOW 560 nm Surgical Microscope Filter in Malignant Gliomas: Our First 38 Cases Experience.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ningning; Tian, Hailong; Huang, Dezhang; Meng, Xianbing; Guo, Wenqiang; Wang, Chaochao; Yin, Xin; Zhang, Hongying; Jiang, Bin; He, Zheng; Wang, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    Sodium fluorescein (FL) had been safely used in fluorescence-guided microsurgery for imaging various brain tumors. Under the YELLOW 560 nm surgical microscope filter, low-dose FL as a fluorescent dye helps in visualization. Our study investigated the safety and efficacy of this innovative technique in malignant glioma (MG) patients. 38 patients suffering from MGs confirmed by pathology underwent FL-guided resection under YELLOW 560 nm surgical microscope filter. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical characters, microsurgery procedure, extent of resection, pathology of MGs, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Thirty-eight patients had MGs (10 WHO grade III, 28 WHO grade IV). With YELLOW 560 nm surgical microscope filter combined with neuronavigation, sodium fluorescein-guided gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 35 (92.1%) patients and subtotal resection in 3 (7.69%). The sensitivity and specificity of FL were 94.4% and 88.6% regardless of radiographic localization. Intraoperatively, 10 biopsies (10/28 FL[+]) showed "low" or "high" fluorescence in non-contrast-enhancement region and are also confirmed by pathology. Our data showed 6-month PFS of 92.3% and median survival of 11 months. FL-guided resection of MGs under the YELLOW 560 nm surgical microscope filter combined with neuronavigation was safe and effective, especially in non-contrast-MRI regions. It is feasible for improving the extent of resection in MGs especially during emergency cases.

  11. Sodium Fluorescein-Guided Resection under the YELLOW 560 nm Surgical Microscope Filter in Malignant Gliomas: Our First 38 Cases Experience

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hailong; Huang, Dezhang; Meng, Xianbing; Guo, Wenqiang; Wang, Chaochao; Yin, Xin; Zhang, Hongying; Jiang, Bin; He, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Objective Sodium fluorescein (FL) had been safely used in fluorescence-guided microsurgery for imaging various brain tumors. Under the YELLOW 560 nm surgical microscope filter, low-dose FL as a fluorescent dye helps in visualization. Our study investigated the safety and efficacy of this innovative technique in malignant glioma (MG) patients. Patients and Method 38 patients suffering from MGs confirmed by pathology underwent FL-guided resection under YELLOW 560 nm surgical microscope filter. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical characters, microsurgery procedure, extent of resection, pathology of MGs, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Results Thirty-eight patients had MGs (10 WHO grade III, 28 WHO grade IV). With YELLOW 560 nm surgical microscope filter combined with neuronavigation, sodium fluorescein-guided gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 35 (92.1%) patients and subtotal resection in 3 (7.69%). The sensitivity and specificity of FL were 94.4% and 88.6% regardless of radiographic localization. Intraoperatively, 10 biopsies (10/28 FL[+]) showed “low” or “high” fluorescence in non-contrast-enhancement region and are also confirmed by pathology. Our data showed 6-month PFS of 92.3% and median survival of 11 months. Conclusion FL-guided resection of MGs under the YELLOW 560 nm surgical microscope filter combined with neuronavigation was safe and effective, especially in non-contrast-MRI regions. It is feasible for improving the extent of resection in MGs especially during emergency cases. PMID:29124069

  12. Dye ingredients and energy conversion efficiency at natural dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özbay Karakuş, Mücella; Koca, İrfan; Er, Orhan; Çetin, Hidayet

    2017-04-01

    In this work, natural dyes extracted from the same genus but different species flowers were used as sensitizer in Dye Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC). To clearly show dye ingredients effect on electrical characteristics, the same genus flowers were selected. The dye ingredients were analyzed by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS). The dyes were modified by a procedure that includes refluxing in acetone. All results indicate a relationship between gallic acid quantity in dyes and solar cell efficiency. To gain further insight, the solar cell parameters were obtained by using the single-diode and double-diode models and they were compared to each other. It was observed that the applied process causes a decrease in series resistance. How the modification process and gallic acid affect energy conversion efficiency were argued in detail in the frame of results that were obtained from solar cell models.

  13. Multicolor fluorescence of a styrylquinoline dye tuned by metal cations.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Yasuhiro; Ichimura, Chizuru; Sumiya, Shigehiro; Hirai, Takayuki

    2011-07-18

    A styrylquinoline dye with a dipicolylamine (DPA) moiety (1) has been synthesized. The dye 1 in acetonitrile demonstrates multicolor fluorescence upon addition of different metal cations. Compound 1 shows a green fluorescence without cations. Coordination of 1 with Cd(2+) shows a blue emission, while with Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) exhibits yellow and orange emissions, respectively. The different fluorescence spectra are due to the change in intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) properties of 1 upon coordination with different cations. The DPA and quinoline moieties of 1 behave as the electron donor and acceptor units, respectively, and both units act as the coordination site for metal cations. Cd(2+) coordinates with the DPA unit. This reduces the donor ability of the unit and decreases the energy level of HOMO. This results in an increase in HOMO-LUMO gap and blue shifts the emission. Hg(2+) or Pb(2+) coordinate with both DPA and quinoline units. The coordination with the quinoline unit decreases the energy level of LUMO. This results in a decrease in HOMO-LUMO gap and red shifts the emission. Addition of two different metal cations successfully creates intermediate colors; in particular, the addition of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) at once creates a bright white fluorescence. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Decolourisation of Red 5 MB dye by microbes isolated from textile dye effluent.

    PubMed

    Subashini, P; Hiranmaiyadav, R; Premalatha, M S

    2010-07-01

    One of the major environmental problems is the presence of dye materials in textile wastewater, which need to be removed before releasing into the environment. Some dyes are toxic and carcinogenic in nature. The discharge of the textile effluent into rivers and lakes leads to higher BOD causing threat to aquatic life. Development of efficient dye degradation requires suitable strain and its use under favorable condition to realize the degradation potential. In this study, three microorganisms were isolated from the Red 5 MB dye containing textile wastewater. They were identified and tested for the dye decolourisation provided with different sugars as carbon source. The percentage of dye decolorized by Bacillus subtilis, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus fumigatus were found to be about 40%, 75% and 53.8% respectively.

  15. Characterizing the marker-dye correction for Gafchromic(®) EBT2 film: a comparison of three analysis methods.

    PubMed

    McCaw, Travis J; Micka, John A; Dewerd, Larry A

    2011-10-01

    Gafchromic(®) EBT2 film has a yellow marker dye incorporated into the active layer of the film that can be used to correct the film response for small variations in thickness. This work characterizes the effect of the marker-dye correction on the uniformity and uncertainty of dose measurements with EBT2 film. The effect of variations in time postexposure on the uniformity of EBT2 is also investigated. EBT2 films were used to measure the flatness of a (60)Co field to provide a high-spatial resolution evaluation of the film uniformity. As a reference, the flatness of the (60)Co field was also measured with Kodak EDR2 films. The EBT2 films were digitized with a flatbed document scanner 24, 48, and 72 h postexposure, and the images were analyzed using three methods: (1) the manufacturer-recommended marker-dye correction, (2) an in-house marker-dye correction, and (3) a net optical density (OD) measurement in the red color channel. The field flatness was calculated from orthogonal profiles through the center of the field using each analysis method, and the results were compared with the EDR2 measurements. Uncertainty was propagated through a dose calculation for each analysis method. The change in the measured field flatness for increasing times postexposure was also determined. Both marker-dye correction methods improved the field flatness measured with EBT2 film relative to the net OD method, with a maximum improvement of 1% using the manufacturer-recommended correction. However, the manufacturer-recommended correction also resulted in a dose uncertainty an order of magnitude greater than the other two methods. The in-house marker-dye correction lowered the dose uncertainty relative to the net OD method. The measured field flatness did not exhibit any unidirectional change with increasing time postexposure and showed a maximum change of 0.3%. The marker dye in EBT2 can be used to improve the response uniformity of the film. Depending on the film analysis method used

  16. Dye-sensitized solar cells consisting of dye-bilayer structure stained with two dyes for harvesting light of wide range of wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inakazu, Fumi; Noma, Yusuke; Ogomi, Yuhei; Hayase, Shuzi

    2008-09-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) containing dye-bilayer structure of black dye and NK3705 (3-carboxymethyl-5-[3-(4-sulfobutyl)-2(3H)-bezothiazolylidene]-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone, sodium salt) in one TiO2 layer (2-TiO-BD-NK) are reported. The 2-TiO-BD-NK structure was fabricated by staining one TiO2 layer with these two dyes, step by step, under a pressurized CO2 condition. The dye-bilayer structure was observed by using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The short circuit current (Jsc) and the incident photon to current efficiency of the cell (DSC-2-TiO-BD-NK) was almost the sum of those of DSC stained with black dye only (DSC-1-TiO-BD) and DSC stained with NK3705 only (DSC-1-TiO-NK).

  17. Phylogeny of Yellow Fever Virus, Uganda, 2016.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Holly R; Kayiwa, John; Mossel, Eric C; Lutwama, Julius; Staples, J Erin; Lambert, Amy J

    2018-08-17

    In April 2016, a yellow fever outbreak was detected in Uganda. Removal of contaminating ribosomal RNA in a clinical sample improved the sensitivity of next-generation sequencing. Molecular analyses determined the Uganda yellow fever outbreak was distinct from the concurrent yellow fever outbreak in Angola, improving our understanding of yellow fever epidemiology.

  18. 76 FR 39238 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Extension of Sunset Date for Protests of Task and Delivery Orders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ...-AM08 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Extension of Sunset Date for Protests of Task and Delivery Orders... against the award of task or delivery orders by DoD, NASA, and the Coast Guard from May 27, 2011, to... protests against the award of task and delivery orders from May 27, 2011, to September 30, 2016, but only...

  19. 78 FR 61334 - Silicon Metal From the Russian Federation: Final Results of the Expedited Second Sunset Review of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ...\\ See Antidumping Duty Order: Silicon Metal From Russia, 68 FR 14578 (March 26, 2003) (Antidumping Duty... the antidumping duty order on silicon metal from Russia. As a result of this sunset review, the... includes silicon metal from Russia containing between 89.00 and 96.00 percent silicon by weight, but...

  20. Yellow-poplar seedfall pattern

    Treesearch

    LaMont G. Engle

    1960-01-01

    Knowing the pattern of seedfall can be helpful when trying to regenerate yellow-poplar. This is especially true if the stand contains only scattered yellow-poplar seed trees. Information obtained from seed collections in Indiana shows that most of the seed falls north and northeast of seed trees.

  1. Efficient dye regeneration at low driving force achieved in triphenylamine dye LEG4 and TEMPO redox mediator based dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenxing; Vlachopoulos, Nick; Hao, Yan; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit

    2015-06-28

    Minimizing the driving force required for the regeneration of oxidized dyes using redox mediators in an electrolyte is essential to further improve the open-circuit voltage and efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Appropriate combinations of redox mediators and dye molecules should be explored to achieve this goal. Herein, we present a triphenylamine dye, LEG4, in combination with a TEMPO-based electrolyte in acetonitrile (E(0) = 0.89 V vs. NHE), reaching an efficiency of up to 5.4% under one sun illumination and 40% performance improvement compared to the previously and widely used indoline dye D149. The origin of this improvement was found to be the increased dye regeneration efficiency of LEG4 using the TEMPO redox mediator, which regenerated more than 80% of the oxidized dye with a driving force of only ∼0.2 eV. Detailed mechanistic studies further revealed that in addition to electron recombination to oxidized dyes, recombination of electrons from the conducting substrate and the mesoporous TiO2 film to the TEMPO(+) redox species in the electrolyte accounts for the reduced short circuit current, compared to the state-of-the-art cobalt tris(bipyridine) electrolyte system. The diffusion length of the TEMPO-electrolyte based DSSCs was determined to be ∼0.5 μm, which is smaller than the ∼2.8 μm found for cobalt-electrolyte based DSSCs. These results show the advantages of using LEG4 as a sensitizer, compared to previously record indoline dyes, in combination with a TEMPO-based electrolyte. The low driving force for efficient dye regeneration presented by these results shows the potential to further improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSSCs by utilizing redox couples and dyes with a minimal need of driving force for high regeneration yields.

  2. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is used...

  3. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and... Related Products § 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.250 for white corn meal except that cleaned yellow corn is used instead of...

  4. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is used...

  5. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and... Related Products § 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.250 for white corn meal except that cleaned yellow corn is used instead of...

  6. Efficient azo dye decolorization in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with built-in bioelectrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Cui, Min-Hua; Cui, Dan; Gao, Lei; Cheng, Hao-Yi; Wang, Ai-Jie

    2016-10-01

    A continuous stirred tank reactor with built-in bioelectrochemical system (CSTR-BES) was developed for azo dye Alizarin Yellow R (AYR) containing wastewater treatment. The decolorization efficiency (DE) of the CSTR-BES was 97.04±0.06% for 7h with sludge concentration of 3000mg/L and initial AYR concentration of 100mg/L, which was superior to that of the sole CSTR mode (open circuit: 54.87±4.34%) and the sole BES mode (without sludge addition: 91.37±0.44%). The effects of sludge concentration and sodium acetate (NaAc) concentration on azo dye decolorization were investigated. The highest DE of CSTR-BES for 4h was 87.66±2.93% with sludge concentration of 12,000mg/L, NaAc concentration of 2000mg/L and initial AYR concentration of 100mg/L. The results in this study indicated that CSTR-BES could be a practical strategy for upgrading conventional anaerobic facilities against refractory wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimization of potent hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase inhibitors isolated from the yellow dyes thioflavine S and primuline.

    PubMed

    Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J; Belon, Craig A; Neuenswander, Ben; Ndjomou, Jean; Hanson, Alicia M; Shanahan, Matthew A; Schoenen, Frank J; Blagg, Brian S J; Aubé, Jeffrey; Frick, David N

    2012-04-12

    A screen for hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 helicase inhibitors revealed that the commercial dye thioflavine S was the most potent inhibitor of NS3-catalyzed DNA and RNA unwinding in the 827-compound National Cancer Institute Mechanistic Set. Thioflavine S and the related dye primuline were separated here into their pure components, all of which were oligomers of substituted benzothiazoles. The most potent compound (P4), a benzothiazole tetramer, inhibited unwinding >50% at 2 ± 1 μM, inhibited the subgenomic HCV replicon at 10 μM, and was not toxic at 100 μM. Because P4 also interacted with DNA, more specific analogues were synthesized from the abundant dimeric component of primuline. Some of the 32 analogues prepared retained ability to inhibit HCV helicase but did not appear to interact with DNA. The most potent of these specific helicase inhibitors (compound 17) was active against the replicon and inhibited the helicase more than 50% at 2.6 ± 1 μM. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  8. Hair dye poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hair tint poisoning ... Different types of hair dye contain different harmful ingredients. The harmful ingredients in permanent dyes are: Naphthylamine Other aromatic amino compounds Phenylenediamines Toluene ...

  9. 76 FR 19747 - Solid Urea From the Russian Federation and Ukraine: Final Results of the Expedited Sunset Reviews...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... reviews of the antidumping duty orders on solid urea from the Russian Federation (Russia) and Ukraine... initiation of the sunset reviews of the antidumping duty orders \\1\\ on solid urea from Russia and Ukraine... reviews of the antidumping duty orders on solid urea from Russia and Ukraine. Scope of the Orders The...

  10. 77 FR 71168 - Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... Chairs From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Sunset Review and Revocation of Order AGENCY... duty order on folding metal tables and chairs from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). Because...: Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From the People's Republic of China, 67 FR 43277 (June 27, 2002). \\2\\ See...

  11. 76 FR 64900 - Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... Tube From Turkey: Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review of Countervailing Duty Order AGENCY: Import... welded carbon steel pipe and tube from Turkey pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as... INFORMATION: Background The CVD order on welded carbon steel pipe and tube from Turkey was published in the...

  12. 76 FR 37786 - Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway: Preliminary Results of Full Third Sunset Review of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... Salmon From Norway: Preliminary Results of Full Third Sunset Review of Countervailing Duty Order AGENCY... (CVD) order on fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff... the CVD order on fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway pursuant to section 751(c) of the Act...

  13. Bichromophoric dyes for wavelength shifting of dye-protein fluoromodules.

    PubMed

    Pham, Ha H; Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Brotherton, Wendy L; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Zanotti, Kimberly J; Waggoner, Alan S; Armitage, Bruce A

    2015-03-28

    Dye-protein fluoromodules consist of fluorogenic dyes and single chain antibody fragments that form brightly fluorescent noncovalent complexes. This report describes two new bichromophoric dyes that extend the range of wavelengths of excitation or emission of existing fluoromodules. In one case, a fluorogenic thiazole orange (TO) was attached to an energy acceptor dye, Cy5. Upon binding to a protein that recognizes TO, red emission due to efficient energy transfer from TO to Cy5 replaces the green emission observed for monochromophoric TO bound to the same protein. Separately, TO was attached to a coumarin that serves as an energy donor. The same green emission is observed for coumarin-TO and TO bound to a protein, but efficient energy transfer allows violet excitation of coumarin-TO, versus longer wavelength, blue excitation of monochromophoric TO. Both bichromophores exhibit low nanomolar KD values for their respective proteins, >95% energy transfer efficiency and high fluorescence quantum yields.

  14. Bichromophoric Dyes for Wavelength Shifting of Dye-Protein Fluoromodules

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Ha H.; Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Brotherton, Wendy L.; Schmidt, Brigitte F.; Zanotti, Kimberly J.; Waggoner, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Dye-protein fluoromodules consist of fluorogenic dyes and single chain antibody fragments that form brightly fluorescent noncovalent complexes. This report describes two new bichromophoric dyes that extend the range of wavelengths of excitation or emission of existing fluoromodules. In one case, a fluorogenic thiazole orange (TO) was attached to an energy acceptor dye, Cy5. Upon binding to a protein that recognizes TO, red emission due to efficient energy transfer from TO to Cy5 replaces the green emission observed for monochromophoric TO bound to the same protein. Separately, TO was attached to a coumarin that serves as an energy donor. The same green emission is observed for coumarin-TO and TO bound to a protein, but efficient energy transfer allows violet excitation of coumarin-TO, versus longer wavelength, blue excitation of monochromophoric TO. Both bichromophores exhibit low nanomolar KD values for their respective proteins, >95% energy transfer efficiency and high fluorescence quantum yields. PMID:25679477

  15. Bioremediation of dyes by fungi isolated from contaminated dye effluent sites for bio-usability

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Babita; Kumar, Vivek; Singh, Jagvijay; Bisht, Sandeep; Teotia, Priyanku; Sharma, Shivesh; Kela, Ritu

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradation and detoxification of dyes, Malachite green, Nigrosin and Basic fuchsin have been carried out using two fungal isolates Aspergillus niger, and Phanerochaete chrysosporium, isolated from dye effluent soil. Three methods were selected for biodegradation, viz. agar overlay and liquid media methods; stationary and shaking conditions at 25 °C. Aspergillus niger recorded maximum decolorization of the dye Basic fuchsin (81.85%) followed by Nigrosin (77.47%), Malachite green (72.77%) and dye mixture (33.08%) under shaking condition. Whereas, P. chrysosporium recorded decolorization to the maximum with the Nigrosin (90.15%) followed by Basic fuchsin (89.8%), Malachite green (83.25%) and mixture (78.4%). The selected fungal strains performed better under shaking conditions compared to stationary method; moreover the inoculation of fungus also brought the pH of the dye solutions to neutral from acidic. Seed germination bioassay study exhibited that when inoculated dye solutions were used, seed showed germination while uninoculated dyes inhibited germination even after four days of observation. Similarly, microbial growth was also inhibited by uninoculated dyes. The excellent performance of A. niger and P. chrysporium in the biodegradation of textile dyes of different chemical structures suggests and reinforces the potential of these fungi for environmental decontamination. PMID:25477943

  16. Dye-sensitized solar cells using natural dyes as sensitizers from Malaysia local fruit `Buah Mertajam'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambali, N. A. M. Ahmad; Roshidah, N.; Hashim, M. Norhafiz; Mohamad, I. S.; Saad, N. Hidayah; Norizan, M. N.

    2015-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the high conversion efficiency, low cost, green technology and easy to fabricate dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using natural anthocyanin dyes as sensitizers. The DSSCs was fabricated by using natural anthocyanin dyes which were extracted from different parts of the plants inclusive `Buah Mertajam', `Buah Keriang Dot', `Bunga Geti', Hibiscus, Red Spinach and Henna. The natural anthocyanin dyes that found in flower, leaves and fruits were extracted by the simple procedures. This anthocyanin dye is used to replace the expensive chemical synthetic dyes due to its ability to effectively attach into the surface of Titanium dioxide (TiO2). A natural anthocyanin dyes molecule adsorbs to each particle of the TiO2 and acts as the absorber of the visible light. A natural anthocyanin dye from Buah Mertajam shows the best performance with the conversion efficiency of 5.948% and fill factor of 0.708 followed by natural anthocyanin dyes from `Buah Keriang Dot', `Bunga Geti', Hibiscus, Red Spinach and Henna. Buah Mertajam or scientifically known as eriglossum rubiginosum is a local Malaysia fruit.

  17. Use of dyes in cariology.

    PubMed

    van de Rijke, J W

    1991-04-01

    The property of dyes to enhance contrast by their colour can be used in clinical dentistry and in investigations in vitro or in vivo. They have been used for indication of affected dental tissues, improvement of diagnostic methods, enhancement of patient awareness and information about specific processes. The development of particular dye systems, aimed at clinical application, is often laborious because of toxic effects, lack of specificity, irreversible staining or difficulties with removal of the dye. Clinically used dyes are often visually observed, which means a qualitative assessment of the staining, while quantification of the staining, if performed at all, is confined mostly to laboratory experiments. In this paper the application of dyes, arranged according to their specific purpose in cariology, is discussed, and a brief historical overview is given of the development of two particular dye applications for which commercial dye systems are now available. If certain requirements are met, dyes can be of great help in detection and quantification when used with several diagnostic methods.

  18. Effect of electrode position on azo dye removal in an up-flow hybrid anaerobic digestion reactor with built-in bioelectrochemical system

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Min-Hua; Cui, Dan; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Liang, Bin; Wang, Ai-Jie; Cheng, Hao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, two modes of hybrid anaerobic digestion (AD) bioreactor with built-in BESs (electrodes installed in liquid phase (R1) and sludge phase (R2)) were tested for identifying the effect of electrodes position on azo dye wastewater treatment. Alizarin yellow R (AYR) was used as a model dye. Decolorization efficiency of R1 was 90.41 ± 6.20% at influent loading rate of 800 g-AYR/ m3·d, which was 39% higher than that of R2. The contribution of bioelectrochemical reduction to AYR decolorization (16.23 ± 1.86% for R1 versus 22.24 ± 2.14% for R2) implied that although azo dye was mainly removed in sludge zone, BES further improved the effluent quality, especially for R1 where electrodes were installed in liquid phase. The microbial communities in the electrode biofilms (dominant by Enterobacter) and sludge (dominant by Enterococcus) were well distinguished in R1, but they were similar in R2. These results suggest that electrodes installed in liquid phase in the anaerobic hybrid system are more efficient than that in sludge phase for azo dye removal, which give great inspirations for the application of AD-BES hybrid process for various refractory wastewaters treatment. PMID:27121278

  19. What Time is Your Sunset? Accounting for Refraction in Sunrise/set Prediction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Teresa; Bartlett, Jennifer Lynn; Chizek Frouard, Malynda; Hilton, James; Phlips, Alan; Edgar, Roman

    2018-01-01

    Algorithms that predict sunrise and sunset times currently have an uncertainty of one to four minutes at mid-latitudes (0° - 55° N/S) due to limitations in the atmospheric models they incorporate. At higher latitudes, slight changes in refraction can cause significant discrepancies, including difficulties determining whether the Sun appears to rise or set. While different components of refraction are known, how they affect predictions of sunrise/set has not yet been quantified. A better understanding of the contributions from temperature profile, pressure, humidity, and aerosols could significantly improve the standard prediction.We present a sunrise/set calculator that interchanges the refraction component by varying the refraction model. We, then, compared these predictions with data sets of observed rise/set times taken from Mount Wilson Observatory in California, University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, and onboard the SS James Franco in the Atlantic. A thorough investigation of the problem requires a more substantial data set of observed rise/set times and corresponding meteorological data from around the world.We have developed a mobile application, Sunrise & Sunset Observer, so that anyone can capture this astronomical and meteorological data using their smartphone video recorder as part of a citizen science project. The Android app for this project is available in the Google Play store. Videos can also be submitted through the project website (riseset.phy.mtu.edu). Data analysis will lead to more complete models that will provide higher accuracy rise/set predictions to benefit astronomers, navigators, and outdoorsmen everywhere.

  20. Quantitative Determination of Four Azo Dyes in Rat Plasma with Solid-Phase Extraction and UFLC-MS-MS Analysis: Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Huang, Changshun; Chen, Yijun; Lu, Zihui; Zhou, Haidong; Chen, Chunru; Wu, Jin; Chen, Xiaohong; Jin, Micong

    2016-06-05

    A rapid and sensitive ultra-fast liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method, followed by simple protein precipitation and solid-phase extraction, has been developed and validated for the quantitative determination of four azo dyes (Para red, Solvent yellow 2, Solvent red 1 and Sudan red 7B) in rat plasma using D 5 -Sudan I as the internal standard. The optimal separation was accomplished on an Agilent Eclipse Plus C18 column (100 × 2.1 mm, 1.8 μm) with gradient elution using the mobile phase including acetonitrile and water (containing 0.1% formic acid). The flow rate was 0.45 mL/min. The detection was conducted by means of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in positive ion mode with multiple reaction monitoring. The calibration curves showed good linearity, with correlation coefficients >0.998 for all of the analytes within the concentration range. The lower limits of quantification (LLOQs) of Para red, Solvent yellow 2, Solvent red 1 and Sudan red 7B in rat plasma were 1.0, 0.1, 0.1 and 0.1 μg/L, respectively. The intra- and interday relative standard deviations were ≤9.6 and ≤12.4%, respectively, and the accuracy was in the range of -5.8 to -9.5%. The average recoveries were between 81.49 and 118.65%, and the matrix effects were satisfactory in the biological matrices. The fully validated method has been successfully applied in measuring levels of the four azo dyes in rat plasma following oral administration of 20.0 mg/kg of analytes in rats, which was suitable for the pharmacokinetic studies of the azo dyes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Cloth dye poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this damage. Poisoning from dye containing an alkali may result in continuing injury to these tissues for weeks or months. If the person swallowed a nonpoisonous household dye, recovery is likely.

  2. Biobleaching of Industrial Important Dyes with Peroxidase Partially Purified from Garlic

    PubMed Central

    Osuji, Akudo Chigozirim; Eze, Sabinus Oscar O.; Osayi, Emmanuel Emeka; Chilaka, Ferdinand Chiemeka

    2014-01-01

    An acidic peroxidase was extracted from garlic (Allium sativum) and was partially purified threefold by ammonium sulphate precipitation, dialysis, and gel filtration chromatography using sephadex G-200. The specific activity of the enzyme increased from 4.89 U/mg after ammonium sulphate precipitation to 25.26 U/mg after gel filtration chromatography. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme were 50°C and 5.0, respectively. The Km and V max for H2O2 and o-dianisidine were 0.026 mM and 0.8 U/min, and 25 mM and 0.75 U/min, respectively. Peroxidase from garlic was effective in decolourizing Vat Yellow 2, Vat Orange 11, and Vat Black 27 better than Vat Green 9 dye. For all the parameters monitored, the decolourization was more effective at a pH range, temperature, H2O2 concentration, and enzyme concentration of 4.5–5.0, 50°C, 0.6 mM, and 0.20 U/mL, respectively. The observed properties of the enzyme together with its low cost of extraction (from local sources) show the potential of this enzyme for practical application in industrial wastewater treatment especially with hydrogen peroxide. These Vat dyes also exhibited potentials of acting as peroxidase inhibitors at alkaline pH range. PMID:25401128

  3. Biobleaching of industrial important dyes with peroxidase partially purified from garlic.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Akudo Chigozirim; Eze, Sabinus Oscar O; Osayi, Emmanuel Emeka; Chilaka, Ferdinand Chiemeka

    2014-01-01

    An acidic peroxidase was extracted from garlic (Allium sativum) and was partially purified threefold by ammonium sulphate precipitation, dialysis, and gel filtration chromatography using sephadex G-200. The specific activity of the enzyme increased from 4.89 U/mg after ammonium sulphate precipitation to 25.26 U/mg after gel filtration chromatography. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme were 50°C and 5.0, respectively. The Km and V max for H2O2 and o-dianisidine were 0.026 mM and 0.8 U/min, and 25 mM and 0.75 U/min, respectively. Peroxidase from garlic was effective in decolourizing Vat Yellow 2, Vat Orange 11, and Vat Black 27 better than Vat Green 9 dye. For all the parameters monitored, the decolourization was more effective at a pH range, temperature, H2O2 concentration, and enzyme concentration of 4.5-5.0, 50°C, 0.6 mM, and 0.20 U/mL, respectively. The observed properties of the enzyme together with its low cost of extraction (from local sources) show the potential of this enzyme for practical application in industrial wastewater treatment especially with hydrogen peroxide. These Vat dyes also exhibited potentials of acting as peroxidase inhibitors at alkaline pH range.

  4. Cytotoxicity of yellow sand in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Kim, K S; Kwak, N J; Lee, K H; Kweon, S A; Lim, Y

    2003-02-01

    The present study was carried out to observe the cytotoxicity of yellow sand in comparison with silica and titanium dioxide in a rat alveolar type II cell line (RLE-6TN). Yellow sand (China Loess) was obtained from the loess layer in the Gunsu Province of China. The mean particle diameter of yellow sand was about 0.003 +/- 0.001 mm. Major elements of yellow sand were Si(27.7 +/- 0.6%), Al(6.01 +/- 0.17%), and Ca(5.83 +/- 0.23%) in that order. Silica and yellow sand significantly decreased cell viability and increased [Ca2+]i. All three particles increased the generation of H2O2. TiO2 did not change Fenton activity, while silica induced a slight increase of Fenton activity. In contrast, yellow sand induced a significant increase of Fenton activity. Silica, yellow sand and TiO2 induced significant nitrite formations in RLE-6TN cells. Silica showed the highest increase in nitrite formation, while yellow sand induced the least formation of nitrite. Silica and yellow sand increased the release of TNF-a. Based on these results, we suggest that yellow sand can induce cytotoxicity in RLE-6TN cells and reactive oxygen species, Fenton activity and reactive nitrogen species might be involved in this toxicity.

  5. Molecular engineering of fluorescein dyes as complementary absorbers in dye co-sensitized solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Pepe, Giulio; Cole, Jacqueline M.; Waddell, Paul G.; ...

    2016-09-22

    Fluorescein dye derivatives exhibit extended optical absorption up to 500 nm, rendering these compounds suitable as co-absorbers in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). A molecular engineering approach is presented, which embraces this intrinsic optical attribute of fluoresceins, while modifying the dye chemistry to enhance their light harvesting efficiency, in order to effectively tailor them for DSC applications. This approach first realizes relationships between the molecular structure and the optoelectronic properties for a series of five a priori known (parent) fluorescein dyes: 5-carboxyfluorescein (1), a mixture of m-carboxyfluorescein where m = 5 or 6 (2), 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (3), 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (4), amore » mixture of n-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate where n = 5 or 6 (5). The first step in this approach combines, where available, experimental and computational methods so that electronic structure calculations can also be validated for representative fluorescein dyes. Such calculations can then be used reliably to predict the structure and properties of fluorescein dyes for cases where experimental data are lacking. Structure-function relationships established from this initial step inform the selection of parent dye 1 that is taken forward to the second step in molecular engineering: in silico chemical derivation to re-functionalize 1 for DSC applications. For this purpose, computational calculations are used to extend the charge conjugation in 1 between its donor and acceptor moieties. These structural modifications result in a bathochromic shift of the lowest excitation by ~1.3-1.9 eV (100-170 nm), making the dye optically absorb in the visible region. Further calculations on dye molecules adsorbed onto the surface of a TiO 2 cluster are used to investigate the dye sensitization behavior via dye adsorption energies and anchoring modes. The results of this theoretical investigation lead to two molecularly engineered

  6. Molecular engineering of fluorescein dyes as complementary absorbers in dye co-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pepe, Giulio; Cole, Jacqueline M.; Waddell, Paul G.

    Fluorescein dye derivatives exhibit extended optical absorption up to 500 nm, rendering these compounds suitable as co-absorbers in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). A molecular engineering approach is presented, which embraces this intrinsic optical attribute of fluoresceins, while modifying the dye chemistry to enhance their light harvesting efficiency, in order to effectively tailor them for DSC applications. This approach first realizes relationships between the molecular structure and the optoelectronic properties for a series of five a priori known (parent) fluorescein dyes: 5-carboxyfluorescein (1), a mixture of m-carboxyfluorescein where m = 5 or 6 (2), 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (3), 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (4), amore » mixture of n-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate where n = 5 or 6 (5). The first step in this approach combines, where available, experimental and computational methods so that electronic structure calculations can also be validated for representative fluorescein dyes. Such calculations can then be used reliably to predict the structure and properties of fluorescein dyes for cases where experimental data are lacking. Structure-function relationships established from this initial step inform the selection of parent dye 1 that is taken forward to the second step in molecular engineering: in silico chemical derivation to re-functionalize 1 for DSC applications. For this purpose, computational calculations are used to extend the charge conjugation in 1 between its donor and acceptor moieties. These structural modifications result in a bathochromic shift of the lowest excitation by ~1.3-1.9 eV (100-170 nm), making the dye optically absorb in the visible region. Further calculations on dye molecules adsorbed onto the surface of a TiO 2 cluster are used to investigate the dye sensitization behavior via dye adsorption energies and anchoring modes. The results of this theoretical investigation lead to two molecularly engineered

  7. Yellow phosphorus-induced Brugada phenocopy.

    PubMed

    Dharanipradab, Mayakrishnan; Viswanathan, Stalin; Kumar, Gokula Raman; Krishnamurthy, Vijayalatchumy; Stanley, Daphene Divya

    Metallic phosphides (of aluminum and phosphide) and yellow phosphorus are commonly used rodenticide compounds in developing countries. Toxicity of yellow phosphorus mostly pertains to the liver, kidney, heart, pancreas and the brain. Cardiotoxicity with associated Brugada ECG pattern has been reported only in poisoning with metallic phosphides. Brugada phenocopy and hepatic dysfunction were observed in a 29-year-old male following yellow phosphorus consumption. He had both type 1 (day1) and type 2 (day2) Brugada patterns in the electrocardiogram, which resolved spontaneously by the third day without hemodynamic compromise. Toxins such as aluminum and zinc phosphide have been reported to induce Brugada ECG patterns due to the generation of phosphine. We report the first case of yellow phosphorus-related Brugada phenocopy, without hemodynamic compromise or malignant arrhythmia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Development auxiliaries for dyeing polyester with disperse dyes at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrion-Fite, F. J.; Radei, S.

    2017-10-01

    High-molecular weight organic compounds known as carriers are widely used to expedite polyester dyeing at atmospheric pressure at 100 °C. However, carriers are usually poorly biodegradable and can partially plasticize fibres. Also, dyeing at temperatures above 100 °C in the absence of a carrier entails using expensive equipment. In this work, we developed an alternative method for dyeing polyester at temperatures below 100 °C that reduces energy expenses, dispenses with the need to invest in new equipment and avoids the undesirable effects of non-biodegradable carriers. The method uses disperse dyes in a microemulsion containing a low proportion of a non-toxic organic solvent and either of two alternative development auxiliaries (coumarin and o-vanillin) that is prepared with the aid of ultrasound.

  9. Dye-sensitized TiO2-catalyzed photodegradation of sulfamethoxazole under blue or yellow light.

    PubMed

    Lu, Norman; Yeh, Yun-Peng; Wang, Guan-Bo; Feng, Tsung-Yao; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Chen, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Visible light-induced photocatalysis is potentially advantageous and could be an efficient approach to degrade contaminants because it can be used to selectively target specific wavelength for decomposition of organic contaminants in water and wastewater. This study demonstrates the photodegradation of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) using [Pt(3,3'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bpy)(1,2-benzenedithiolate)] (Complex 1)-sensitized and [Pt(4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bpy)(1,2-benzenedithiolate)] (Complex 2)-sensitized titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) under blue or yellow light (420 or 580 nm, respectively) irradiation in water. The Complex 1-sensitized TiO 2 photocatalytic oxidation of SMX reached almost 100 % removal under 420 nm irradiation for 3 h in water. In addition, the formation of hydroxyl radicals can be facilitated by bubbling O 2 during the photodegradation in which an effective decomposition of SMX was observed. Based on HPLC and UV-Vis studies of the decomposed products, it was found that SMX underwent cleavage of aromatic rings during the photodegradation process.

  10. Natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed as photo sensitizer for titanium dioxide based dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ananth, S; Vivek, P; Arumanayagam, T; Murugakoothan, P

    2014-07-15

    Natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed were used as photo sensitizer to fabricate titanium dioxide nanoparticles based dye sensitized solar cells. Pure titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in anatase phase were synthesized by sol-gel technique and pre dye treated TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized using modified sol-gel technique by mixing lawsone pigment rich natural dye during the synthesis itself. This pre dye treatment with natural dye has yielded colored TiO2 nanoparticles with uniform adsorption of natural dye, reduced agglomeration, less dye aggregation and improved morphology. The pure and pre dye treated TiO2 nanoparticles were subjected to structural, optical, spectral and morphological studies. Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) fabricated using the pre dye treated and pure TiO2 nanoparticles sensitized by natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed showed a promising solar light to electron conversion efficiency of 1.47% and 1% respectively. The pre dye treated TiO2 based DSSC showed an improved efficiency of 47% when compared to that of conventional DSSC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Triphenylamine based organic dyes for dye sensitized solar cells: A theoretical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mohankumar, V.; Pandian, Muthu Senthil; Ramasamy, P., E-mail: ramasamyp@ssn.edu.in

    2016-05-23

    The geometry, electronic structure and absorption spectra for newly designed triphenylamine based organic dyes were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) with the Becke 3-Parameter-Lee-Yang-parr(B3LYP) functional, where the 6-31G(d,p) basis set was employed. All calculations were performed using the Gaussian 09 software package. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs in the molecule. Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectrum was simulated by TD-DFT in gas phase. The calculation shows that all of the dyes can potentially be good sensitizers for DSSC. The LUMOs are just above the conduction band of TiO{sub 2}more » and their HOMOs are under the reduction potential energy of the electrolytes (I{sup −}/I{sub 3}{sup −}) which can facilitate electron transfer from the excited dye to TiO{sub 2} and charge regeneration process after photo oxidation respectively. The simulated absorption spectrum of dyes match with solar spectrum. Frontier molecular orbital results show that among all the three dyes, the “dye 3” can be used as potential sensitizer for DSSC.« less

  12. Green dyeing process of modified cotton fibres using natural dyes extracted from Tamarix aphylla (L.) Karst. leaves.

    PubMed

    Baaka, Noureddine; Mahfoudhi, Adel; Haddar, Wafa; Mhenni, Mohamed Farouk; Mighri, Zine

    2017-01-01

    This research work involves an eco-friendly dyeing process of modified cotton with the aqueous extract of Tamarix aphylla leaves. During this process, the dyeing step was carried out on modified cotton by several cationising agents in order to improve its dyeability. The influence of the main dyeing conditions (dye bath pH, dyeing time, dyeing temperature, salt addition) on the performances of this dyeing process were studied. The dyeing performances of this process were appreciated by measuring the colour yield (K/S) and the fastness properties of the dyed samples. The effect of mordant type with different mordanting methods on dyeing quality was also studied. The results showed that mordanting gave deeper shades and enhanced fastness properties. In addition, environmental indicators (BOD 5 , COD and COD/BOD 5 ) were used to describe potential improvements in the biodegradability of the dyebath wastewater. Further, HPLC was used to identify the major phenolic compounds in the extracted dye.

  13. Perinatal Yellow Fever: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Lilian Martins Oliveira; Romanelli, Roberta Maia Castro; de Carvalho, Andréa Lucchesi; Teixeira, Daniela Caldas; de Carvalho, Luis Fernando Andrade; Cury, Verônica Ferreira; Filho, Marcelo Pereira Lima; Perígolo, Graciele; Heringer, Tiago Pires

    2018-04-09

    An outbreak of yellow fever in Brazil made it possible to assess different presentations of disease such as perinatal transmission. A pregnant woman was admitted to hospital with yellow fever symptoms. She was submitted to cesarean section and died due to fulminant hepatitis. On the 6th day the newborn developed liver failure and died 13 days later. Yellow fever PCR was positive for both.

  14. An evaluation of yellow-flowering magnolias and magnolia rootstocks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Yellow-flowering magnolias were evaluated for flower color, bloom duration and growth rate in USDA Hardiness Zone 6b. Of the thirty selections evaluated, all were reported to have yellow blooms; however, tepal color ranged from light pink with some yellow coloration, to creamy yellow to dark yellow....

  15. Molecular engineering of cyanine dyes to design a panchromatic response in Co-sensitized dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Pepe, Giulio; Cole, Jacqueline M.; Waddell, Paul G.; ...

    2016-04-05

    Cyanines are optically tunable dyes with high molar extinction coefficients, suitable for applications in co-sensitized dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs); yet, barely thus applied. This might be due to the lack of a rational molecular design strategy that efficiently exploits cyanine properties. This study computationally re-designs these dyes, to broaden their optical absorption spectrum and create dye···TiO 2 binding and co-sensitization functionality. This is achieved via a stepwise molecular engineering approach. Firstly, the structural and optical properties of four parent dyes are experimentally and computationally investigated: 3,3’-diethyloxacarbocyanine iodide, 3,3’-diethylthiacarbocyanine iodide, 3,3’-diethylthiadicarbocyanine iodide and 3,3’-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide. Secondly, the molecules are theoretically modifiedmore » and their energetics are analyzed and compared to the parent dyes. A dye···TiO 2 anchoring group (carboxylic or cyanoacrylic acid), absent from the parent dyes, is chemically substituted at different molecular positions to investigate changes in optical absorption. We find that cyanoacrylic acid substitution at the para-quinoidal position affects the absorption wavelength of all parent dyes, with an optimal bathochromic shift of ca. 40 nm. The theoretical lengthening of the polymethine chain is also shown to effect dye absorption. Two molecularly engineered dyes are proposed as promising co-sensitizers. Finally, corresponding dye···TiO 2 adsorption energy calculations corroborate their applicability, demonstrating the potential of cyanine dyes in DSC research.« less

  16. Development and optimization of a novel sample preparation method cored on functionalized nanofibers mat-solid-phase extraction for the simultaneous efficient extraction of illegal anionic and cationic dyes in foods.

    PubMed

    Qi, Feifei; Jian, Ningge; Qian, Liangliang; Cao, Weixin; Xu, Qian; Li, Jian

    2017-09-01

    A simple and efficient three-step sample preparation method was developed and optimized for the simultaneous analysis of illegal anionic and cationic dyes (acid orange 7, metanil yellow, auramine-O, and chrysoidine) in food samples. A novel solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure based on nanofibers mat (NFsM) was proposed after solvent extraction and freeze-salting out purification. The preferred SPE sorbent was selected from five functionalized NFsMs by orthogonal experimental design, and the optimization of SPE parameters was achieved through response surface methodology (RSM) based on the Box-Behnken design (BBD). Under the optimal conditions, the target analytes could be completely adsorbed by polypyrrole-functionalized polyacrylonitrile NFsM (PPy/PAN NFsM), and the eluent was directly analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). The limits of detection (LODs) were between 0.002 and 0.01 mg kg -1 , and satisfactory linearity with correlation coefficients (R > 0.99) for each dye in all samples was achieved. Compared with the Chinese standard method and the published methods, the proposed method was simplified greatly with much lower requirement of sorbent (5.0 mg) and organic solvent (2.8 mL) and higher sample preparation speed (10 min/sample), while higher recovery (83.6-116.5%) and precision (RSDs < 7.1%) were obtained. With this developed method, we have successfully detected illegal ionic dyes in three common representative foods: yellow croaker, soybean products, and chili seasonings. Graphical abstract Schematic representation of the process of the three-step sample preparation.

  17. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.265 for...

  18. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.265 for...

  19. Monolithic dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1993-03-30

    A fluid dye laser amplifier for amplifying a dye beam by pump beams has a channel structure defining a channel through which a laseable fluid flows and the dye and pump beams pass transversely to one another through a lasing region. The channel structure is formed with two pairs of mutually spaced-apart and mutually confronting glass windows, which are interlocked and make surface-contacts with one another and surround the lasing region. One of the glass window pairs passes the dye beam and the other passes the pump beams therethrough and through the lasing region. Where these glass window pieces make surface-contacts, glue is used to join the pieces together to form a monolithic structure so as to prevent the dye in the fluid passing through the channel from entering the space between the mutually contacting glass window pieces.

  20. Monolithic dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    A fluid dye laser amplifier for amplifying a dye beam by pump beams has a channel structure defining a channel through which a laseable fluid flows and the dye and pump beams pass transversely to one another through a lasing region. The channel structure is formed with two pairs of mutually spaced-apart and mutually confronting glass windows, which are interlocked and make surface-contacts with one another and surround the lasing region. One of the glass window pairs passes the dye beam and the other passes the pump beams therethrough and through the lasing region. Where these glass window pieces make surface-contacts, glue is used to join the pieces together to form a monolithic structure so as to prevent the dye in the fluid passing through the channel from entering the space between the mutually contacting glass window pieces.

  1. The BLLAST field experiment: Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothon, M.; Lohou, F.; Pino, D.; Couvreux, F.; Pardyjak, E. R.; Reuder, J.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Durand, P.; Hartogensis, O.; Legain, D.; Augustin, P.; Gioli, B.; Faloona, I.; Yagüe, C.; Alexander, D. C.; Angevine, W. M.; Bargain, E.; Barrié, J.; Bazile, E.; Bezombes, Y.; Blay-Carreras, E.; van de Boer, A.; Boichard, J. L.; Bourdon, A.; Butet, A.; Campistron, B.; de Coster, O.; Cuxart, J.; Dabas, A.; Darbieu, C.; Deboudt, K.; Delbarre, H.; Derrien, S.; Flament, P.; Fourmentin, M.; Garai, A.; Gibert, F.; Graf, A.; Groebner, J.; Guichard, F.; Jimenez Cortes, M. A.; Jonassen, M.; van den Kroonenberg, A.; Lenschow, D. H.; Magliulo, V.; Martin, S.; Martinez, D.; Mastrorillo, L.; Moene, A. F.; Molinos, F.; Moulin, E.; Pietersen, H. P.; Piguet, B.; Pique, E.; Román-Cascón, C.; Rufin-Soler, C.; Saïd, F.; Sastre-Marugán, M.; Seity, Y.; Steeneveld, G. J.; Toscano, P.; Traullé, O.; Tzanos, D.; Wacker, S.; Wildmann, N.; Zaldei, A.

    2014-04-01

    Due to the major role of the sun in heating the earth's surface, the atmospheric planetary boundary layer over land is inherently marked by a diurnal cycle. The afternoon transition, the period of the day that connects the daytime dry convective to the night-time stable boundary layer, still raises several scientific issues. This phase of the diurnal cycle is challenging from both modeling and observational perspectives: it is transitory, most of the forcings are small or null and the turbulence regime changes from fully convective regime, close to homogeneous and isotropic, toward a more heterogeneous and intermittent state. These issues motivated the BLLAST (Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence) field campaign that was conducted from 14 June to 8 July 2011 in southern France, in an area of complex and heterogeneous terrain. A wide range of integrated instrument platforms including full-size aircraft, remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS), remote sensing instruments, radiosoundings, tethered balloons, surface flux stations, and various meteorological towers were deployed over different surface types. The boundary layer, from the earth's surface to the free troposphere, was probed during the entire day, with a focus and intense observations from midday until sunset. The BLLAST field campaign also provided an opportunity to test innovative measurement systems, like new miniaturized sensors, and a new technique for frequent radiosoundings of the low troposphere. Twelve fair weather days displaying various meteorological conditions were extensively documented during the field experiment. The boundary layer growth varied from one day to another depending on many contributions including stability, advection, subsidence, the state of the residual layer of the previous day, as well as local, meso- or synoptic scale conditions. Ground-based measurements combined with tethered-balloon and airborne observations captured the turbulence decay from the surface

  2. Study of the sensitising potential of various textile dyes using a biphasic murine local lymph node assay.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, V; Platzek, T; Fink, H; Sonnenburg, A; Stahlmann, R

    2010-09-01

    Disperse Blue 35 (10%); and group 4, very weak: Disperse yellow 3 and Disperse Orange 3 (increase at 30% or no increase at 30%). In conclusion, our study shows that the biphasic LLNA protocol was proficient enough to study the sensitisation potential of tested textile dyes and provides data allowing to discriminate them according to their potency.

  3. 17DD yellow fever vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Reinaldo M.; Maia, Maria de Lourdes S.; Farias, Roberto Henrique G.; Camacho, Luiz Antonio B.; Freire, Marcos S.; Galler, Ricardo; Yamamura, Anna Maya Yoshida; Almeida, Luiz Fernando C.; Lima, Sheila Maria B.; Nogueira, Rita Maria R.; Sá, Gloria Regina S.; Hokama, Darcy A.; de Carvalho, Ricardo; Freire, Ricardo Aguiar V.; Filho, Edson Pereira; Leal, Maria da Luz Fernandes; Homma, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To verify if the Bio-Manguinhos 17DD yellow fever vaccine (17DD-YFV) used in lower doses is as immunogenic and safe as the current formulation. Results: Doses from 27,476 IU to 587 IU induced similar seroconversion rates and neutralizing antibodies geometric mean titers (GMTs). Immunity of those who seroconverted to YF was maintained for 10 mo. Reactogenicity was low for all groups. Methods: Young and healthy adult males (n = 900) were recruited and randomized into 6 groups, to receive de-escalating doses of 17DD-YFV, from 27,476 IU to 31 IU. Blood samples were collected before vaccination (for neutralization tests to yellow fever, serology for dengue and clinical chemistry), 3 to 7 d after vaccination (for viremia and clinical chemistry) and 30 d after vaccination (for new yellow fever serology and clinical chemistry). Adverse events diaries were filled out by volunteers during 10 d after vaccination. Volunteers were retested for yellow fever and dengue antibodies 10 mo later. Seropositivity for dengue was found in 87.6% of volunteers before vaccination, but this had no significant influence on conclusions. Conclusion: In young healthy adults Bio-Manguinhos/Fiocruz yellow fever vaccine can be used in much lower doses than usual. International Register ISRCTN 38082350. PMID:23364472

  4. Impact of Time-Restricted Feeding and Dawn-to-Sunset Fasting on Circadian Rhythm, Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gagan, Sood K.

    2017-01-01

    Obesity now affects millions of people and places them at risk of developing metabolic syndrome, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and even hepatocellular carcinoma. This rapidly emerging epidemic has led to a search for cost-effective methods to prevent the metabolic syndrome and NAFLD as well as the progression of NAFLD to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In murine models, time-restricted feeding resets the hepatic circadian clock and enhances transcription of key metabolic regulators of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Studies of the effect of dawn-to-sunset Ramadan fasting, which is akin to time-restricted feeding model, have also identified significant improvement in body mass index, serum lipid profiles, and oxidative stress parameters. Based on the findings of studies conducted on human subjects, dawn-to-sunset fasting has the potential to be a cost-effective intervention for obesity, metabolic syndrome, and NAFLD. PMID:29348746

  5. Plasma dye coating as straightforward and widely applicable procedure for dye immobilization on polymeric materials.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Lieselot; Vancoillie, Gertjan; Minshall, Peter; Lava, Kathleen; Steyaert, Iline; Schoolaert, Ella; Van De Walle, Elke; Dubruel, Peter; De Clerck, Karen; Hoogenboom, Richard

    2018-03-16

    Here, we introduce a novel concept for the fabrication of colored materials with significantly reduced dye leaching through covalent immobilization of the desired dye using plasma-generated surface radicals. This plasma dye coating (PDC) procedure immobilizes a pre-adsorbed layer of a dye functionalized with a radical sensitive group on the surface through radical addition caused by a short plasma treatment. The non-specific nature of the plasma-generated surface radicals allows for a wide variety of dyes including azobenzenes and sulfonphthaleins, functionalized with radical sensitive groups to avoid significant dye degradation, to be combined with various materials including PP, PE, PA6, cellulose, and PTFE. The wide applicability, low consumption of dye, relatively short procedure time, and the possibility of continuous PDC using an atmospheric plasma reactor make this procedure economically interesting for various applications ranging from simple coloring of a material to the fabrication of chromic sensor fabrics as demonstrated by preparing a range of halochromic materials.

  6. Preparation and characterization of ZnO-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite for photocatalytic disinfection of bacteria and detoxification of cyanide under visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Karunakaran, C., E-mail: karunakaranc@rediffmail.com; Abiramasundari, G.; Gomathisankar, P.

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} ZnO-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite, obtained by modified ammonia-evaporation-induced synthetic method, absorbs visible light. {yields} ZnO-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles catalyze bacteria disinfection and cyanide detoxification under sunlight. {yields} ZnO-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite is selective in photocatalysis. -- Abstract: ZnO-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite was prepared by modified ammonia-evaporation-induced synthetic method. It was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray, UV-visible diffuse reflectance, photoluminescence and electrochemical impedance spectroscopies. Incorporation of ZnO leads to visible light absorption, larger charge transfer resistance and lower capacitance. The nanocomposite effectively catalyzes the inactivation of E. coli under visible light. Further,more » the prepared nanocomposite displays selective photocatalysis. While its photocatalytic efficiency to detoxify cyanide with visible light is higher than that of TiO{sub 2} P25, its efficiency to degrade methylene blue, sunset yellow and rhodamine B dyes under UV-A light is less than that of TiO{sub 2} P25.« less

  7. Transforming Benzophenoxazine Laser Dyes into Chromophores for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: A Molecular Engineering Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Schröder, Florian A. Y. N.; Cole, Jacqueline M.; Waddell, Paul G.

    2015-02-03

    The re-functionalization of a series of four well-known industrial laser dyes, based on benzophenoxazine, is explored with the prospect of molecularly engineering new chromophores for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) applications. Such engineering is important since a lack of suitable dyes is stifling the progress of DSC technology. The conceptual idea involves making laser dyes DSC-active by chemical modification, while maintaining their key property attributes that are attractive to DSC applications. This molecular engineering follows a step-wise approach. Firstly, molecular structures and optical absorption properties are determined for the parent laser dyes: Cresyl Violet (1); Oxazine 170 (2); Nile Blue Amore » (3), Oxazine 750 (4). These reveal structure-property relationships which define the prerequisites for computational molecular design of DSC dyes; the nature of their molecular architecture (D-π-A) and intramolecular charge transfer. Secondly, new DSC dyes are computationally designed by the in silico addition of a carboxylic acid anchor at various chemical substitution points in the parent laser dyes. A comparison of the resulting frontier molecular orbital energy levels with the conduction band edge of a TiO2 DSC photoanode and the redox potential of two electrolyte options I-/I3- and Co(II/III)tris(bipyridyl) suggests promise for these computationally designed dyes as co-sensitizers for DSC applications.« less

  8. Effect of dye extracting solvents and sensitization time on photovoltaic performance of natural dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Khalid; Pervez, M. Firoz; Mia, M. N. H.; Mortuza, A. A.; Rahaman, M. S.; Karim, M. R.; Islam, Jahid M. M.; Ahmed, Farid; Khan, Mubarak A.

    In this study, natural dye sensitizer based solar cells were successfully fabricated and photovoltaic performance was measured. Sensitizer (turmeric) sources, dye extraction process, and photoanode sensitization time of the fabricated cells were analyzed and optimized. Dry turmeric, verdant turmeric, and powder turmeric were used as dye sources. Five distinct types of solvents were used for extraction of natural dye from turmeric. Dyes were characterized by UV-Vis spectrophotometric analysis. The extracted turmeric dye was used as a sensitizer in the dye sensitized solar cell's (DSSC) photoanode assembly. Nano-crystalline TiO2 was used as a film coating semiconductor material of the photoanode. TiO2 films on ITO glass substrate were prepared by simple doctor blade technique. The influence of the different parameters VOC, JSC, power density, FF, and η% on the photovoltaic characteristics of DSSCs was analyzed. The best energy conversion performance was obtained for 2 h adsorption time of dye on TiO2 nano-porous surface with ethanol extracted dye from dry turmeric.

  9. Acene-modified triphenylamine dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenjie; Tan, Dazhi; Deng, Wei-Qiao

    2012-06-04

    A series of metal-free acene-modified triphenylamine dyes (benzene to pentacene, denoted as TPA-AC1 to TPA-AC5) are investigated as organic sensitizers for application in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A combination of density functional theory (DFT), density functional tight-binding (DFTB), and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) approaches is employed. The effects of acene units on the spectra and electrochemical properties of the acene-modified TPA organic dyes are demonstrated. The dye/(TiO(2))(46) anatase nanoparticle systems are also simulated to show the electronic structures at the interface. The results show that from TPA-AC1 to TPA-AC5 with increasing sizes of the acenes, the absorption and fluorescence spectra are systematically broadened and red-shifted, but the oscillator strength and electron injection properties are reduced. The molecular orbital contributions show increasing localization on the bridging acene units from TPA-AC1 to TPA-AC5. From the theoretical examination of some key parameters including free enthalpy related to the electron injection, light-harvesting efficiency, and the shift of semiconductor conduction band, TPA-AC3 with an anthracene moiety demonstrates a balance of the above crucial factors. TPA-AC3 is expected to be a promising dye with desirable energetic and spectroscopic parameters in the DSSC field, which is consistent with recent experimental work. This study is expected to deepen our understanding of TPA-based organic dyes and assist the molecular design of new metal-free dyes for the further optimization of DSSCs. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Ultrasonic-assisted dyeing of Nylon-6 nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Jatoi, Abdul Wahab; Ahmed, Farooq; Khatri, Muzamil; Tanwari, Anwaruddin; Khatri, Zeeshan; Lee, Hoik; Kim, Ick Soo

    2017-11-01

    We first time report ultrasonic dyeing of the Nylon 6 nanofibers with two disperse dyes CI Disperse blue 56 and CI Disperse Red 167:1 by utilising ultrasonic energy during dyeing process. The Nylon 6 nanofibers were fabricated via electrospinning and dyed via batchwise method with and without sonication. Results revealed that ultrasonic dyeing produce higher color yield (K/S values) and substantially reduces dyeing time from 60min for conventional dyeing to 30min can be attributed to breakage of dye aggregate, transient cavitation near nanofiber surface and mass transfer within/between nanofibers. Color fastness results exhibited good to very good dye fixation. SEM images exhibit insignificant effect of sonication on morphology of the nanofibers. Our research results demonstrate ultrasonic dyeing as a better dyeing technique for Nylon 6 nanofibers with higher color yield and substantially reduced dyeing time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Yellow-Poplar Site Index Curves

    Treesearch

    Donald E. Beck

    1962-01-01

    Yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) occurs naturally throughout the eastern and central United States from southern New England west to Michigan and south to Florida and Louisiana. Because of its wide occurrence, yellow-poplar grows under a variety of climatic, edaphic, and biotic conditions. Combinations of these different environmental...

  12. 38 CFR 21.9700 - Yellow Ribbon Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Yellow Ribbon Program. 21... Ribbon Program. (a) Establishment. The “Yellow Ribbon G.I. Education Enhancement Program”, known as the “Yellow Ribbon Program,” permits an institution of higher learning (IHL), at the IHL's option, to enter...

  13. 38 CFR 21.9700 - Yellow Ribbon Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Yellow Ribbon Program. 21... Ribbon Program. (a) Establishment. The “Yellow Ribbon G.I. Education Enhancement Program”, known as the “Yellow Ribbon Program,” permits an institution of higher learning (IHL), at the IHL's option, to enter...

  14. 38 CFR 21.9700 - Yellow Ribbon Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Yellow Ribbon Program. 21... Ribbon Program. (a) Establishment. The “Yellow Ribbon G.I. Education Enhancement Program”, known as the “Yellow Ribbon Program,” permits an institution of higher learning (IHL), at the IHL's option, to enter...

  15. 38 CFR 21.9700 - Yellow Ribbon Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Yellow Ribbon Program. 21... Ribbon Program. (a) Establishment. The “Yellow Ribbon G.I. Education Enhancement Program”, known as the “Yellow Ribbon Program,” permits an institution of higher learning (IHL), at the IHL's option, to enter...

  16. 38 CFR 21.9700 - Yellow Ribbon Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Yellow Ribbon Program. 21... Ribbon Program. (a) Establishment. The “Yellow Ribbon G.I. Education Enhancement Program”, known as the “Yellow Ribbon Program,” permits an institution of higher learning (IHL), at the IHL's option, to enter...

  17. A detection algorithm for scale analysis of post-sunset low-latitude plasma depletions as observed by the Swarm constellation mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervalishvili, Guram; Stolle, Claudia; Xiong, Chao

    2016-04-01

    ESA's constellation mission Swarm was successfully launched on 22 November 2013. The three satellites achieved their final constellation on 17 April 2014 and since then Swarm-A and Swarm-C orbiting the Earth at about 470 km (flying side-by-side) and Swarm-B at about 520 km altitude. The satellites carry instruments to monitor the F-region electron density with a sampling frequency of 2 Hz. This paper will present a detection algorithm for low-latitude post-sunset plasma bubbles (depletions), which uses local minima and maxima to detect depletions directly from electron density readings from Swarm. Our analyses were performed in the magnetic latitude (MLat) and local time (MLT) coordinate system. The detection procedure also captures the amplitude of depletion, which is called depth in the following. The width of a bubble corresponds to the length the satellite is located inside a depletion. We discuss the global distribution of depth and width of plasma bubbles and its seasonal and local time dependence for all three Swarm satellites from April 2015 through September 2015. As expected, on global average the bubble occurrence rate is highest for combined equinoxes (Mar, Apr, Sep, and Oct) and smallest for June solstice (May, Jun, Jul, and Aug). MLT distribution of the bubble occurrence number shows a sharp increase at about 19 MLT and decreases towards post-midnight hours. Interestingly, there is an inverse relation between depth and width of bubbles as function of MLT. This is true for all seasons and for all Swarm satellites. The bubble depth (width) is decreasing (increasing) from post-sunset to post-midnight for December solstice (Jan, Feb, Nov, and Dec) and combined equinoxes with about the same amplitude values for bubbles depth (width). Therefore we suggest that at post midnight when the depletions are less steep the structures of the depletions is broader than early after sunset. However for June solstice the depletions are less deep and the bubble depth and

  18. Fatal Yellow Fever in Travelers to Brazil, 2018.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Davidson H; Angelo, Kristina; Caumes, Eric; van Genderen, Perry J J; Florescu, Simin A; Popescu, Corneliu P; Perret, Cecilia; McBride, Angela; Checkley, Anna; Ryan, Jenny; Cetron, Martin; Schlagenhauf, Patricia

    2018-03-23

    Yellow fever virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes yellow fever, an acute infectious disease that occurs in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. Most patients with yellow fever are asymptomatic, but among the 15% who develop severe illness, the case fatality rate is 20%-60%. Effective live-attenuated virus vaccines are available that protect against yellow fever (1). An outbreak of yellow fever began in Brazil in December 2016; since July 2017, cases in both humans and nonhuman primates have been reported from the states of São Paulo, Minas Gerais, and Rio de Janeiro, including cases occurring near large urban centers in these states (2). On January 16, 2018, the World Health Organization updated yellow fever vaccination recommendations for Brazil to include all persons traveling to or living in Espírito Santo, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro states, and certain cities in Bahia state, in addition to areas where vaccination had been recommended before the recent outbreak (3). Since January 2018, 10 travel-related cases of yellow fever, including four deaths, have been reported in international travelers returning from Brazil. None of the 10 travelers had received yellow fever vaccination.

  19. Molecular design of donor-acceptor dyes for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells I: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    El-Shishtawy, Reda M; Asiri, Abdullah M; Aziz, Saadullah G; Elroby, Shaaban A K

    2014-06-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have drawn great attention as low cost and high performance alternatives to conventional photovoltaic devices. The molecular design presented in this work is based on the use of pyran type dyes as donor based on frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) and theoretical UV-visible spectra in combination with squaraine type dyes as an acceptor. Density functional theory has been used to investigate several derivatives of pyran type dyes for a better dye design based on optimization of absorption, regeneration, and recombination processes in gas phase. The frontier molecular orbital (FMO) of the HOMO and LUMO energy levels plays an important role in the efficiency of DSSCs. These energies contribute to the generation of exciton, charge transfer, dissociation and exciton recombination. The computations of the geometries and electronic structures for the predicted dyes were performed using the B3LYP/6-31+G** level of theory. The FMO energies (EHOMO, ELUMO) of the studied dyes are calculated and analyzed in the terms of the UV-visible absorption spectra, which have been examined using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) techniques. This study examined absorption properties of pyran based on theoretical UV-visible absorption spectra, with comparisons between TD-DFT using B3LYP, PBE, and TPSSH functionals with 6-31+G (d) and 6-311++G** basis sets. The results provide a valuable guide for the design of donor-acceptor (D-A) dyes with high molar absorptivity and current conversion in DSSCs. The theoretical results indicated 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran dye (D2-Me) can be effectively used as a donor dye for DSSCs. This dye has a low energy gap by itself and a high energy gap with squaraine acceptor type dye, the design that reduces the recombination and improves the photocurrent generation in solar cell.

  20. 75 FR 81966 - Top of the Stove Stainless Steel Cooking Ware From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... Stainless Steel Cooking Ware From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Sunset Reviews and Revocation of... reviews of the antidumping and countervailing duty orders on top of the stove stainless steel cooking ware... the stove stainless steel cooking ware from Korea includes all non-electric cooking ware of stainless...

  1. Dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, T.A.

    1980-03-04

    A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell is comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent. 3 figs.

  2. Dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, Terje A. [Berkeley, CA

    1980-03-04

    A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent.

  3. Oxazine laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Field, George F.

    1992-01-01

    New oxazine compounds useful as dye laser media in solution, are superiior to prior art materials. The oxazine dyes useful when pumped by the 578.2 nm copper line to operate in the 700-800 nm range are described by formula I ##STR1##

  4. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of dye-sensitized solar cells: identification of the dye-electrolyte interaction.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Hanna; Leandri, Valentina; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit; Bergquist, Jonas; Shevchenko, Denys

    2015-05-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have great potential to provide sustainable electricity from sunlight. The photoanode in DSCs consists of a dye-sensitized metal oxide film deposited on a conductive substrate. This configuration makes the photoanode a perfect sample for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). We applied LDI-MS for the study of molecular interactions between a dye and electrolyte on the surface of a TiO2 photoanode. We found that a dye containing polyoxyethylene groups forms complexes with alkali metal cations from the electrolyte, while a dye substituted with alkoxy groups does not. Guanidinium ion forms adducts with neither of the two dyes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Preparation of Nanoporous TiO2 for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) Using Various Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuliarto, Brian; Fanani, Fahiem; Fuadi, M. Kasyful; Nugraha

    2010-10-01

    This article reports the development of organic dyes as an attempt to reduce material costs of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC). Indonesia, a country with variety and considerable number of botanical resources, is suitable to perform the research. Indonesian black rice, curcuma, papaya leaf, and the combination were chosen as organic dyes source. Dyes were extracted using organic solvent and adsorbed on mesoporous Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) which has been optimized in our laboratory. The best dyes light absorbance and performance obtained from papaya leaf as chlorophyll dyes that gives two peaks at 432 nm and 664 nm from UV-Vis Spectrophotometry and performance under 100 mW/cm2 Xenon light solar simulator gives VOC = 0.566 Volt, JSC = 0.24 mA/cm2, Fill Factor = 0.33, and efficiency of energy conversion 0,045%.

  6. Surface geology of the northern Midway-Sunset Field and adjacent Temblor Range, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wylie, A.S. Jr.; Sturm, D.H.; Gardiner, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    New surface mapping at a 1:12000 scale adjacent to the 2 billion barrel Midway Sunset Field has revealed complex intraformational stratigraphy within the upper Miocene Santa Margarita Formation (Tms). Locally known as the Potter and Spellacy Formations in the subsurface, these sandstone and conglomerate heavy oil reservoirs produce the majority of Midway Sunset daily production of 164,000 barrels of oil via thermal EOR processes. The Tms consists mostly of conglomerate inserted into the Belridge Diatomite (Tmb) interval. The stratigraphically lower intervals of the Tms clearly fill deeply incised valleys or submarine canyons cut into Tmb and locally into the underlyingmore » Antelope Shale (Tma). The basal intervals of Tms; are very coarse grained, containing boulders of granitic and metamorphic rock as large as 4 meters that were derived from the Salinian block west of the San Andreas Fault. The upper intervals of Tms are more sheet-like and interbedded containing clasts less than 50 cm in length. The incised valleys have a spacing of about one mile in outcrop, with a gap located in the area of the older Republic Sandstone (Tmr). Paleocurrents from Tms regionally suggest sediment transport to the northeast. The sedimentary structures of Tms suggest deposition in deep-water conditions, probably a slope (bathyal) setting. Shelf environments should have been present to the southwest (now stripped away by erosion) and submarine-fan and basin-floor environments to the northeast.« less

  7. Surface geology of the northern Midway-Sunset Field and adjacent Temblor Range, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wylie, A.S. Jr.; Sturm, D.H.; Gardiner, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    New surface mapping at a 1:12000 scale adjacent to the 2 billion barrel Midway Sunset Field has revealed complex intraformational stratigraphy within the upper Miocene Santa Margarita Formation (Tms). Locally known as the Potter and Spellacy Formations in the subsurface, these sandstone and conglomerate heavy oil reservoirs produce the majority of Midway Sunset daily production of 164,000 barrels of oil via thermal EOR processes. The Tms consists mostly of conglomerate inserted into the Belridge Diatomite (Tmb) interval. The stratigraphically lower intervals of the Tms clearly fill deeply incised valleys or submarine canyons cut into Tmb and locally into the underlyingmore » Antelope Shale (Tma). The basal intervals of Tms; are very coarse grained, containing boulders of granitic and metamorphic rock as large as 4 meters that were derived from the Salinian block west of the San Andreas Fault. The upper intervals of Tms are more sheet-like and interbedded containing clasts less than 50 cm in length. The incised valleys have a spacing of about one mile in outcrop, with a gap located in the area of the older Republic Sandstone (Tmr). Paleocurrents from Tms regionally suggest sediment transport to the northeast. The sedimentary structures of Tms suggest deposition in deep-water conditions, probably a slope (bathyal) setting. Shelf environments should have been present to the southwest (now stripped away by erosion) and submarine-fan and basin-floor environments to the northeast.« less

  8. Theoretical Study of Electron Transfer Properties of Squaraine Dyes for Dye Sensitized Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juwita, Ratna; Tsai, Hui-Hsu Gavin

    2018-01-01

    The environmental issues and high cost of Ru create many scientists to explore cheaper and safer sensitizer as alternative for dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Dyes play an important role in solar energy conversion efficiency. The squaraine (SQ) dyes has good spectral match with the solar spectra, therefore, SQ dyes have great potential for the applications in DSCs. SQ01_CA is an unsymmetrical SQ dye, reported by Grätzel and colleagues in 2007, featuring a D-π-spacer-A framework and has a carboxylic acid anchoring group. The electron donating ability of indolium in SQ01_CA and SQ01_CAA dyes is relatively weak, better performance may be achieved by introducing an additional donor moiety into indolium [1]. In this study, we investigate six unsymmetrical SQ dyes adsorbed on a (TiO2)38 cluster [2] using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT to study electron transfer properties of squaraine dyes on their photophysical. SQ01_CA, WH-SQ01_CA, and WH-SQ02_CA use a carboxylic acid group as its electron acceptor. Furthermore, SQ01_CAA, WH-SQ01_CAA, and WH-SQ02_CAA use a cyanoacrylic acid group as its electron acceptor. WH-SQ01_CA and WH-SQ01_CAA have an alkyl, while WH-SQ02_CA and WH-SQ02_CAA have alkoxyl substituted diarylamines to the indolium donor of sensitizer SQ01_CA. Our calculations show with additional diarylamines in donor tail of WH-SQ02_CAA, the SQ dyes have red-shifted absorption and have slightly larger probability of electron density transferred to TiO2 moiety. Furthermore, an additional -CN group as electron a withdrawing group in the acceptor exhibits red-shifted absorption and enhances the electron density transferred to TiO2 and anchoring moiety after photo-excitation. The tendency of calculated probabilities of electron density being delocalized into TiO2 and driving force for excited-state electron injection of these studied SQ dyes is compatible with their experimentally observed.

  9. Yield of Unthinned Yellow-Poplar

    Treesearch

    Donald E. Beck; Lino Della-Bianca

    1970-01-01

    Cubic-foot and board-foot yields of unthinned yellow-poplar (Liriodendron Tulipiferi L.) stands are described in relation to stand age, site index, and number of trees per acre. The yield tables are based on analysis of diameter distributions and height-diameter relationships obtained from 141 natural, unthinned yellow-poplar stands in the...

  10. Textile dye decolorization using cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Amit; Madamwar, Datta

    2005-03-01

    Cyanobacterial cultures isolated from sites polluted by industrial textile effluents were screened for their ability to decolorize cyclic azo dyes. Gloeocapsa pleurocapsoides and Phormidium ceylanicum decolorized Acid Red 97 and FF Sky Blue dyes by more than 80% after 26 days. Chroococcus minutus was the only culture which decolorized Amido Black 10B (55%). Chlorophyll a synthesis in all cultures was strongly inhibited by the dyes. Visible spectroscopy and TLC confirmed that color removal was due to degradation of the dyes.

  11. A tidal explanation for the sunrise/sunset anomaly in HALOE low-latitude nitric oxide observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Daniel R.; Russell, James M., III

    2000-10-01

    The difference in sunrise and sunset low-latitude nitric oxide (NO) mixing ratios in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) is shown to be consistent with a perturbation induced by the migrating diurnal tide. The vertical wind of the tide can induce factor of 2 changes over 12 hours at the equator. The vertical, latitudinal and temporal structure of NO perturbations closely matches the structure of vertical winds from a tidal model. In addition, previous observations of the seasonal and interannual variation in the tidal wind appear to correlate with NO variations.

  12. Treatment of a non-azo dye aqueous solution by CWAO in continuous reactor using a Ni catalyst derived from hydrotalcite-like precursor.

    PubMed

    Vallet, Ana; Besson, Michèle; Ovejero, Gabriel; García, Juan

    2012-08-15

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of a Basic Yellow 11 (BY11) aqueous solution, chosen as a model of a hardly biodegradable non-azo dye was carried out in a continuous-flow trickle-bed reactor, using nickel supported over hydrotalcite precursor calcined at 550°C. An increase in the reaction temperature (120-180°C), and a decrease in dye concentration (1000-3000 ppm) or liquid flow rate (0.1-0.7 mL min(-1)) enhanced the CWAO performance in a 30 and 19% for the variation of the temperature and concentration respectively. After a small leaching observed within the first hours, the catalyst proved to be very stable during the 65-day reaction. The CWAO process was found to be very efficient, achieving BY11 conversion up to 95% and TOC conversion up to 85% at 0.1 mL min(-1) and 180°C under 5 MPa air. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Plant Guide: Yellow beeplant (Cleome lutea Hook)

    Treesearch

    Derek Tilley; Jim Cane; Loren St. John; Dan Ogle; Nancy Shaw

    2012-01-01

    Yellow beeplant is a valuable native forage species for bees wasps and butterflies. Over 140 species of native bees have been observed foraging for nectar or pollen on yellow beeplant in southern Utah (Cane, 2008). Yellow beeplant is an annual forb which could provide food to insects in the first growing season of a range seeding (Ogle and others, 2011a). This...

  14. Fluorometric procedures for dye tracing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, James F.; Cobb, Ernest D.; Kilpatrick, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    This manual describes the current fluorometric procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey in dye tracer studies such as time of travel, dispersion, reaeration, and dilution-type discharge measurements. The advantages of dye tracing are (1) low detection and measurement limits and (2) simplicity and accuracy in measuring dye tracer concentrations using fluorometric techniques. The manual contains necessary background information about fluorescence, dyes, and fluorometers and a description of fluorometric operation and calibration procedures as a guide for laboratory and field use. The background information should be useful to anyone wishing to experiment with dyes, fluorometer components, or procedures different from those described. In addition, a brief section on aerial photography is included because of its possible use to supplement ground-level fluorometry.

  15. Fluorometric procedures for dye tracing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, James F.

    1968-01-01

    This manual describes the current fluorometric procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey in dye tracer studies such as time of travel, dispersion, reaeration, and dilution-type discharge measurements. The advantages of dye tracing are (1) low detection and measurement limits and (2) simplicity and accuracy in measuring dye tracer concentrations using fluorometric techniques. The manual contains necessary background information about fluorescence, dyes, and fluorometers and a description of fluorometric operation and calibration procedures as a guide for laboratory and field use. The background information should be useful to anyone wishing to experiment with dyes, fluorometer components, or procedures different from those described. In addition, a brief section on aerial photography is included because of its possible use to supplement ground-level fluorometry.

  16. Why is my alfalfa yellow?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2016, many parts of the Midwest experienced far wetter than normal summer weather and by August or September, many growers were asking, “Why is my alfalfa yellow?” When all or part of an alfalfa field is yellow, it is a certain sign that something has gone wrong. In this case the problem in most ...

  17. Financial maturity of yellow birch

    Treesearch

    William B. Leak

    1969-01-01

    The methods used to compute financial maturity of yellow birch sawtimber are similar to those used for paper birch sawtimber, except for minor differences in detail. The procedure followed for yellow-birch veneer-log trees was also similar, except that local veneer grades and local veneer-log prices were used as the basis for the financial maturity computations.

  18. Improved Charge-Transfer Fluorescent Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Improved charge-transfer fluorescent dyes have been developed for use as molecular probes. These dyes are based on benzofuran nuclei with attached phenyl groups substituted with, variously, electron donors, electron acceptors, or combinations of donors and acceptors. Optionally, these dyes could be incorporated as parts of polymer backbones or as pendant groups or attached to certain surfaces via self-assembly-based methods. These dyes exhibit high fluorescence quantum yields -- ranging from 0.2 to 0.98, depending upon solvents and chemical structures. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes of the fluorescence emitted by these dyes vary with (and, hence, can be used as indicators of) the polarities of solvents in which they are dissolved: In solvents of increasing polarity, fluorescence spectra shift to longer wavelengths, fluorescence quantum yields decrease, and fluorescence lifetimes increase. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes are also expected to be sensitive to viscosities and/or glass-transition temperatures. Some chemical species -- especially amines, amino acids, and metal ions -- quench the fluorescence of these dyes, with consequent reductions in intensities, quantum yields, and lifetimes. As a result, the dyes can be used to detect these species. Another useful characteristic of these dyes is a capability for both two-photon and one-photon absorption. Typically, these dyes absorb single photons in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum (wavelengths < 400 nm) and emit photons in the long-wavelength ultraviolet, visible, and, when dissolved in some solvents, near-infrared regions. In addition, these dyes can be excited by two-photon absorption at near-infrared wavelengths (600 to 800 nm) to produce fluorescence spectra identical to those obtained in response to excitation by single photons at half the corresponding wavelengths (300 to 400 nm). While many prior fluorescent dyes exhibit high quantum yields

  19. Cross-reactions among hair dye allergens.

    PubMed

    Basketter, David A; English, John

    2009-01-01

    p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) is an important hair dye allergen, but there remains a reasonable suspicion that other hair dye chemicals may also be responsible for a proportion of the clinical burden of hair dye allergy. To assess to what extent presently assessed additional patch test agents contribute to the diagnosis of non-PPD hair dye allergy. A retrospective analysis was conducted of patch test results with hair dye allergens, focusing on the extent to which patients who were positive for allergic reactions to other hair dye allergens also had a concomitant positive reaction to PPD. For the hair dye allergens other than p-toluenediamine (PTD), reactions in the absence of a concomitant positive reaction to PPD were very rare. Positive reactors to PTD were also positive for reactions to PPD in 5 of every 6 cases. Pyrogallol positives often occurred in the absence of a PPD positive, but were never judged to be of clinical relevance. Hair dye chemicals other than PPD may be of importance, but the presently tested materials, with the possible exception of PTD, are normally positive only when a PPD-positive reaction is also present, suggesting that their use in patch testing in hair dye allergy is likely to be of limited value.

  20. Viscerotropic disease following yellow fever vaccination in Peru.

    PubMed

    Whittembury, Alvaro; Ramirez, Gladys; Hernández, Herminio; Ropero, Alba Maria; Waterman, Steve; Ticona, María; Brinton, Margo; Uchuya, Jorge; Gershman, Mark; Toledo, Washington; Staples, Erin; Campos, Clarense; Martínez, Mario; Chang, Gwong-Jen J; Cabezas, Cesar; Lanciotti, Robert; Zaki, Sherif; Montgomery, Joel M; Monath, Thomas; Hayes, Edward

    2009-10-09

    Five suspected cases of yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD) clustered in space and time following a vaccination campaign in Ica, Peru in 2007. All five people received the same lot of 17DD live attenuated yellow fever vaccine before their illness; four of the five died of confirmed YEL-AVD. The surviving case was classified as probable YEL-AVD. Intensive investigation yielded no abnormalities of the implicated vaccine lot and no common risk factors. This is the first described space-time cluster of yellow fever viscerotropic disease involving more than two cases. Mass yellow fever vaccination should be avoided in areas that present extremely low risk of yellow fever.

  1. New energy transfer dyes for DNA sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, L G; Spurgeon, S L; Heiner, C R; Benson, S C; Rosenblum, B B; Menchen, S M; Graham, R J; Constantinescu, A; Upadhya, K G; Cassel, J M

    1997-01-01

    We have synthesized a set of four energy transfer dyes and demonstrated their use in automated DNA sequencing. The donor dyes are the 5- or 6-carboxy isomers of 4'-aminomethylfluorescein and the acceptor dyes are a novel set of four 4,7-dichloro-substituted rhodamine dyes which have narrower emission spectra than the standard, unsubstituted rhodamines. A rigid amino acid linker, 4-aminomethylbenzoic acid, was used to separate the dyes. The brightness of each dye in an automated sequencing instrument equipped with a dual line argon ion laser (488 and 514 nm excitation) was 2-2.5 times greater than the standard dye-primers with a 2 times reduction in multicomponent noise. The overall improvement in signal-to-noise was 4- to 5-fold. The utility of the new dye set was demonstrated by sequencing of a BAC DNA with an 80 kb insert. Measurement of the extinction coefficients and the relative quantum yields of the dichlororhodamine components of the energy transfer dyes showed their values were reduced by 20-25% compared with the dichlororhodamine dyes alone. PMID:9207029

  2. The chemical bonds effect of anthocyanin and chlorophyll dyes on TiO2 for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahliha, A. H.; Nurosyid, F.; Supriyanto, A.; Kusumaningsih, T.

    2017-11-01

    Anthocyanin and chlorophyll dyes have been blended as the photosensitizer of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC). The results study showed the effect of chemical bond dyes on TiO2 and the efficiency of DSSC. Ratio blend of the anthocyanin and chlorophyll dyes are 1:1. The absorbance of dyes and TiO2 were characterized using UV-Vis Spectrophotometer. The chemical bonds contained in TiO2-dyes were characterized using FT-IR spectrophotometer. The efficiency of DSSC was calculated using I-V meter. The absorption spectra of chlorophyll: anthocyanin blend dye solutions and TiO2 films can increase after the dye adsorption. Absorbance characterization of anthocyanin and chlorophyll dye blend solutions showed three peaks at the wavelength of 412 nm; 535.5 nm; and 656.5 nm. Absorbance characterization of spinach before being blend with anthocyanin dyes solutions showed two peaks at the wavelength of 431 nm and 665.5 nm. The absorption spectra of TiO2 films can increase after the dyes adsorption at the wavelength of 400 nm. FT-IR spectra of TiO2 founded the functional groups C-Br, C=C, and O-H. The functional groups founded in anthocyanin: chlorophyll dye blended on the surface of TiO2 are C-Br, C-O, O-H, C-H, C=C, C=O, and O-H. The result showed that the greatest efficiency of 0.0544% at dye red cabbage-spinach. Adsorption blends of anthocyanin and chlorophyll dyes on the surface of TiO2 can be used as the photosensitizer for DSSC.

  3. [Effect of transparent yellow and orange colored contact lenses on color discrimination in the yellow color range].

    PubMed

    Schürer, M; Walter, A; Brünner, H; Langenbucher, A

    2015-08-01

    Colored transparent filters cause a change in color perception and have an impact on the perceptible amount of different colors and especially on the ability to discriminate between them. Yellow or orange tinted contact lenses worn to enhance contrast vision by reducing or blocking short wavelengths also have an effect on color perception. The impact of the yellow and orange tinted contact lenses Wöhlk SPORT CONTRAST on color discrimination was investigated with the Erlangen colour measurement system in a study with 14 and 16 subjects, respectively. In relation to a yellow reference color located at u' = 0.2487/v' = 0.5433, measurements of color discrimination thresholds were taken in up to 6 different color coordinate axes. Based on these thresholds, color discrimination ellipses were calculated. These results are given in the Derrington, Krauskopf and Lennie (DKL) color system. Both contact lenses caused a shift of the reference color towards higher saturated colors. Color discrimination ability with the yellow and orange colored lenses was significantly enhanced along the blue-yellow axis in comparison to the reference measurements without a tinted filter. Along the red-green axis only the orange lens caused a significant reduction of color discrimination threshold distance to the reference color. Yellow and orange tinted contact lenses enhance the ability of color discrimination. If the transmission spectra and the induced changes are taken into account, these results can also be applied to other filter media, such as blue filter intraocular lenses.

  4. Dyeing regions of oxidative hair dyes in human hair investigated by nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Toru; Yamada, Hiromi; Yamamoto, Toshihiko; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Fukushima, Kazuhiko

    2013-06-01

    To develop more effective oxidative hair coloring products, it is important to understand the localization of colored chromophores, which are formed from oxidative dyes, in the fine structure of hair. However, the dyeing regions of oxidative hair dyes in the fine structure of hair have not been extensively examined. In this study, we investigated the distribution and localization of colored chromophores formed by an oxidative hair coloring product in the fine structure of human hair by using a stable isotope-labeled oxidative dye with nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). First, formation of the colored chromophore from a deuterium-labeled oxidative dye was examined by visible spectra similarly to a study of its formation using nonlabeled oxidative dye. Furthermore, the formation of binuclear indo dye containing deuterium in its chemical structure was confirmed using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) analysis. As a result of the NanoSIMS image on a cross-sectional dyed hair, although deuterium ions were detected in whole hair cross-section, quite a few of them were detected at particulate regions. These particulate regions of the dyed black hair in which deuterium ions were intensely detected were identified as melanin granules, by comparing the dyeing behaviors of black and white hair. NanoSIMS analysis revealed that melanin granules of black human hair are important dyeing regions in oxidative hair coloring. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Inclusion of aggregation effect to evaluate the performance of organic dyes in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kenan; Zhang, Weiyi; Heng, Panpan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Jinglai

    2018-05-01

    Two new indoline-based D-A-π-A dyes, D3F and D3F2 (see Scheme 1), are developed on the basis of the reported D3 by insertion of one or two F atoms on benzothiadiazole group. Our central aim is to explore high-efficiency organic dyes applied in dye-sensitized solar cells by inclusion of a simple group rather than by employment of new complicated groups. The performance of two new designed organic dyes, D3F and D3F2, is compared with that of D3 from various aspects including absorption spectrum, light harvesting efficiency, driving force, and open-circuit voltage. Besides the isolated dye, the interfacial property between dye and TiO2 surface is studied. D3F and D3F2 do not show absolute superiority than D3 not only for the isolated dyes but also for the monomeric adsorption system. However, D3F and D3F2 would effectively reduce the influence of aggregation resulting in the much smaller intermolecular electronic coupling. Although the aggregation has attracted much attention recently, it is studied alone in most of studies. To comprehensively evaluate the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells, it is necessary to consider aggregation along with electron injection time from dye into TiO2 rather than only static items, such as, band gap and absorption region.

  6. Fluorometric procedures for dye tracing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, James E.; Cobb, Ernest D.; Kilpatrick, Frederick A.

    1984-01-01

    This manual describes the current fluorometric procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey in dye tracer studies such as time of travel, dispersion, reaeration, and dilution-type discharge measurements. The outstanding characteristics of dye tracing are: (1) the low detection and measurement limits, and (2) the simplicity and accuracy of measuring dye tracer concentrations using fluorometric techniques. The manual contains necessary background information about fluorescence, dyes, and fluorometers and a description of fluorometric operation and calibration procedures as a general guide for laboratory and field use. The background information should be useful to anyone wishing to experiment with dyes, fluorometer components, or procedures different from those described. In addition, a brief section is included on aerial photography because of its possible use to supplement ground-level fluorometry.

  7. The Interior Olivary Complex of Guinea Pig: Cytoarchitecture and Cellular Morphology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    The oscillatory phenomenon ap- dye -coupling [471 between 1.0. cells might have been pre- peared in a sampling of neurons from all of the...information derived from injections of the ing of multiple cells from the Lucifer yellow injection into fluorescent dye Lucifer yellow revealed that...aggregates of only one 1.0. neuron [41. The early Golgi analyses also rv- inferior olive neurons are dye -coupled, presumably through vealed at least two

  8. Theoretical structures and binding energies of RNA-RNA/cyanine dyes and spectroscopic properties of cyanine dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaeh, Salsabila; Chong, Wei Lim; Dokmaisrijan, Supaporn; Payaka, Apirak; Yana, Janchai; Nimmanpipug, Piyarat; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Dumri, Kanchana; Anh, Dau Hung

    2014-10-01

    Cyanine dyes have been widely used as a fluorescence probe for biomolecules and protein labeling. The mostly used cyanine dyes for nucleic acids labeling are DiSC2(3), DiSC2(5), and DiSC2(7). The possible structures and binding energies of RNA-RNA/Cyanine dyes were predicted theoretically using AutoDock Vina. The results showed that cyanine dyes and bases of RNA-RNA have the van der Waals and pi-pi interactions. The maximum absorption wavelength in the visible region obtained from the TD-DFT calculations of all cyanine dyes in the absence of the RNA-RNA double strand showed the bathochromic shift.

  9. Minimizing yellow-bellied sapsucker damage

    Treesearch

    Gayne G. Erdmann; Ralph M., Jr. Peterson

    1992-01-01

    The yellow-bellied sapsucker is a migratory woodpecker that feeds on a wide variety of orchard, shade, and forest trees. Instead of drilling holes to find insects like other woodpeckers, sapsuckers drill holes in living trees to feed on sap and phloem tissues. Yellow and paper birches are their favorite summer food sources on their nesting grounds in Upper Michigan and...

  10. Silvical Characteristics of Yellow-Poplar

    Treesearch

    David F. Olson

    1969-01-01

    Yellow-poplar (Liriorlentlron tulipifera L.) is also commonly known as tulip poplar, tulip tree, white-poplar, whitewood, and "poplar" (60). It gets its name from the tulip-like flowers which it bears in the late spring. Because of the excellent form and rapid growth of the tree, plus the fine working qualities of the wood, yellow-poplar is one of the most...

  11. Decolorizing of azo dye Reactive red 24 aqueous solution using exfoliated graphite and H2O2 under ultrasound irradiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Li, Ji-Tai; Sun, Han-Wen

    2008-07-01

    At its natural pH (6.95), the decolorization of Reactive red 24 in ultrasound, ultrasound/H2O2, exfoliated graphite, ultrasound/exfoliated graphite, exfoliated graphite/H2O2 and ultrasound/exfoliated graphite/H2O2 systems were compared. An enhancement was observed for the decolorization in ultrasound/exfoliated graphite/H2O2 system. The effect of solution pH, H2O2 and exfoliated graphite dosages, and temperature on the decolorization of Reactive red 24 was investigated. The sonochemical treatment in combination with exfoliated graphite/H2O2 showed a synergistic effect for the decolorization of Reactive red 24. The results indicated that under proper conditions, there was a possibility to remove Reactive red 24 very efficient from aqueous solution. The decolorization of other azo dyes (Reactive red 2, Methyl orange, Acid red 1, Acid red 73, Acid red 249, Acid orange 7, Acid blue 113, Acid brown 75, Acid green 20, Acid yellow 42, Acid mordant brown 33, Acid mordant yellow 10 and Direct green 1) was also investigated, at their natural pH.

  12. Nitration of Naphthol: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowery, Dwight F.

    1982-01-01

    Products of nitrations, upon distillation or steam distillation, may produce dermatitis in some students. A procedure for nitration of beta-naphthol producing a relatively non-volatile product not purified by steam distillation is described. Nitration of alpha-naphthol by the same procedure yields Martius Yellow dye which dyes wool yellow or…

  13. Metal-free organic dyes for TiO2 and ZnO dye-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Selopal, Gurpreet Singh; Wu, Hui-Ping; Lu, Jianfeng; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Wang, Mingkui; Vomiero, Alberto; Concina, Isabella; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang

    2016-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of new metal-free organic dyes (namely B18, BTD-R, and CPTD-R) which designed with D-π-A concept to extending the light absorption region by strong conjugation group of π-linker part and applied as light harvester in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). We compared the photovoltaic performance of these dyes in two different photoanodes: a standard TiO2 mesoporous photoanode and a ZnO photoanode composed of hierarchically assembled nanostructures. The results demonstrated that B18 dye has better photovoltaic properties compared to other two dyes (BTD-R and CPTD-R) and each dye has higher current density (Jsc) when applied to hierarchical ZnO nanocrystallites than the standard TiO2 mesoporous film. Transient photocurrent and photovoltage decay measurements (TCD/TVD) were applied to systematically study the charge transport and recombination kinetics in these devices, showing the electron life time (τR) of B18 dye in ZnO and TiO2 based DSSCs is higher than CPTD-R and BTD-R based DSSCs, which is consistent with the photovoltaic performances. The conversion efficiency in ZnO based DSSCs can be further boosted by 35%, when a compact ZnO blocking layer (BL) is applied to inhibit electron back reaction. PMID:26738698

  14. Effectiveness of dye sensitised solar cell under low light condition using wide band dye

    SciTech Connect

    Sahmer, Ahmad Zahrin, E-mail: ahmadzsahmer@gmail.com; Mohamed, Norani Muti, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my; Zaine, Siti Nur Azella, E-mail: ct.azella@gmail.com

    2015-07-22

    Dye sensistised solar cell (DSC) based on nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} has the potential to be used in indoor consumer power application. In realizing this, the DSC must be optimized to generate power under low lighting condition and under wider visible light range. The use of wide band dye N749 which has a wider spectrum sensitivity increases the photon conversion to electron between the visible light spectrums of 390nm to 700nm. This paper reports the study on the effectiveness of the dye solar cell with N749 dye under low light condition in generating usable power which can be used for indoormore » consumer application. The DSC was fabricated using fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass with screen printing method and the deposited TiO{sub 2} film was sintered at 500°C. The TiO{sub 2} coated FTO glass was then soaked in the N749 dye, assembled into test cell, and tested under the standard test condition at irradiance of 1000 W/m{sup 2} with AM1.5 solar soaker. The use of the 43T mesh for the dual pass screen printing TiO{sub 2} paste gives a uniform TiO{sub 2} film layer of 16 µm. The low light condition was simulated using 1/3 filtered irradiance with the solar soaker. The fabricated DSC test cell with the N749 dye was found to have a higher efficiency of 6.491% under low light condition compared to the N719 dye. Under the standard test condition at 1 sun the N749 test cell efficiency is 4.55%. The increases in efficiency is attributed to the wider spectral capture of photon of the DSC with N749 dye. Furthermore, the use of N749 dye is more effective under low light condition as the V{sub OC} decrement is less significant compared to the latter.« less

  15. Benzidine Dyes Action Plan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Action Plan addresses the use of benzidine-based dyes and benzidine congener-based dyes, both metalized and non-metalized, in products that would result in consumer exposure, such as for use to color textiles.

  16. Bioremediation of coractive blue dye by using Pseudomonas spp. isolated from the textile dye wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunar, N. M.; Mon, Z. K.; Rahim, N. A.; Leman, A. M.; Airish, N. A. M.; Khalid, A.; Ali, R.; Zaidi, E.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2018-04-01

    Wastewater released from the textile industry contains variety substances, mainly dyes that contains a high concentration of color and organic. In this study the potential for bacterial decolorization of coractive blue dye was examined that isolated from textile wastewater. The optimum conditions were determined for pH, temperature and initial concentration of the dye. The bacteria isolated was Pseudomonas spp. The selected bacterium shows high decolorization in static condition at an optimum of pH 7.0. The Pseudomonas spp. could decolorize coractive blue dye by 70% within 24 h under static condition, with the optimum of pH 7.0. Decolorization was confirmed by using UV-VIS spectrophotometer. This present study suggests the potential of Pseudomonas spp. as an approach in sustainable bioremediation that provide an efficient method for decolorizing coractive blue dye.

  17. Step-by-Step Heating of Dye Solution for Efficient Solar Energy Harvesting in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Syed Afaq Ali; Sayyad, Muhammad Hassan; Abdulkarim, Salem; Qiao, Qiquan

    2018-05-01

    A step-by-step heat treatment was applied to ruthenium-based N719 dye solution for its potential application in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The effects were analyzed and compared with standard untreated devices. A significant increase in short circuit current density was observed by employing a step-by-step heating method for dye solution in DSSCs. This increase of J sc is attributed to the enhancement in dye adsorption by the surface of the semiconductor and the higher number of charge carriers generated. DSSCs fabricated by a heated dye solution have achieved an overall power conversion efficiency of 8.41% which is significantly higher than the efficiency of 7.31% achieved with DSSCs fabricated without heated dye. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and capacitance voltage studies were performed to understand the better performance of the device fabricated with heated dye. Furthermore, transient photocurrent and transient photovoltage measurements were also performed to gain an insight into interfacial charge carrier recombinations.

  18. Design of Far-Red Sensitizing Squaraine Dyes Aiming Towards the Fine Tuning of Dye Molecular Structure.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Takuya; Fujikawa, Naotaka; Ogomi, Yuhei; Pandey, Shyam S; Ma, Tingli; Hayase, Shuzi

    2016-04-01

    Model squaraine dyes having sharp and narrow absorptions mainly in the far-red wavelength region has been logically designed, synthesized and used for their application as sensitizer in the dyesensitized solar cells (DSSC). In order to have fine control on energetics, dyes having same mother core and alkyl chain length varying only in molecular symmetry and position of substituent were designed. It has been found that even keeping all other structural factor constant, only positional variation of substituent leads to not only in the variation of energetics by 0.1 eV but affects the photovoltaic characteristics also. Optimum concentration of dye de-aggregating agent was found to be 100 times with respect to the sensitizing dye concentration. Amongst dyes utilized in this work best performance was obtained for unsymmetrical dye SQ-40 giving a photoconversion efficiency of 4.01% under simulated solar irradiation at global AM 1.5.

  19. Influence of styryl dyes on blood erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizomov, Negmat; Barakaeva, Mubaro; Kurtaliev, Eldar N.; Rahimov, Sherzod I.; Khakimova, Dilorom P.; Khodjayev, Gayrat; Yashchuk, Valeriy N.

    2008-08-01

    It was studied the influence of F, Sbt, Sil, Sbo monomer and homodimer Dst-5, Dst-10, Dbt-5, Dbt-10, Dil-10, Dbo-10 styryl dyes on blood erythrocytes of white rats. It was shown that the homodimer styryl dyes Dst-5, Dbt-5 and Dbo-10 decrease the erythrocytes quantity by 1.5-2 times more as compared with monomer dyes Sbt and Sbo. The main cause of dyes different action is the different oxidation degree of intracellular hemoglobin evoked by these dyes. It was established that the observed effects was connected with different penetration of these dyes through membrane of erythrocytes and with interaction of these dyes with albumin localized in membranes of cells.

  20. The BLLAST field experiment: Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothon, M.; Lohou, F.; Pino, D.; Couvreux, F.; Pardyjak, E. R.; Reuder, J.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Durand, P.; Hartogensis, O.; Legain, D.; Augustin, P.; Gioli, B.; Lenschow, D. H.; Faloona, I.; Yagüe, C.; Alexander, D. C.; Angevine, W. M.; Bargain, E.; Barrié, J.; Bazile, E.; Bezombes, Y.; Blay-Carreras, E.; van de Boer, A.; Boichard, J. L.; Bourdon, A.; Butet, A.; Campistron, B.; de Coster, O.; Cuxart, J.; Dabas, A.; Darbieu, C.; Deboudt, K.; Delbarre, H.; Derrien, S.; Flament, P.; Fourmentin, M.; Garai, A.; Gibert, F.; Graf, A.; Groebner, J.; Guichard, F.; Jiménez, M. A.; Jonassen, M.; van den Kroonenberg, A.; Magliulo, V.; Martin, S.; Martinez, D.; Mastrorillo, L.; Moene, A. F.; Molinos, F.; Moulin, E.; Pietersen, H. P.; Piguet, B.; Pique, E.; Román-Cascón, C.; Rufin-Soler, C.; Saïd, F.; Sastre-Marugán, M.; Seity, Y.; Steeneveld, G. J.; Toscano, P.; Traullé, O.; Tzanos, D.; Wacker, S.; Wildmann, N.; Zaldei, A.

    2014-10-01

    Due to the major role of the sun in heating the earth's surface, the atmospheric planetary boundary layer over land is inherently marked by a diurnal cycle. The afternoon transition, the period of the day that connects the daytime dry convective boundary layer to the night-time stable boundary layer, still has a number of unanswered scientific questions. This phase of the diurnal cycle is challenging from both modelling and observational perspectives: it is transitory, most of the forcings are small or null and the turbulence regime changes from fully convective, close to homogeneous and isotropic, toward a more heterogeneous and intermittent state. These issues motivated the BLLAST (Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence) field campaign that was conducted from 14 June to 8 July 2011 in southern France, in an area of complex and heterogeneous terrain. A wide range of instrumented platforms including full-size aircraft, remotely piloted aircraft systems, remote-sensing instruments, radiosoundings, tethered balloons, surface flux stations and various meteorological towers were deployed over different surface types. The boundary layer, from the earth's surface to the free troposphere, was probed during the entire day, with a focus and intense observation periods that were conducted from midday until sunset. The BLLAST field campaign also provided an opportunity to test innovative measurement systems, such as new miniaturized sensors, and a new technique for frequent radiosoundings of the low troposphere. Twelve fair weather days displaying various meteorological conditions were extensively documented during the field experiment. The boundary-layer growth varied from one day to another depending on many contributions including stability, advection, subsidence, the state of the previous day's residual layer, as well as local, meso- or synoptic scale conditions. Ground-based measurements combined with tethered-balloon and airborne observations captured the

  1. Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) with natural dyes extracted from Jatropha leaves and purple Chrysanthemum flowers as sensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Dahlang; Satriani, Wilda; Gareso, P. L.; Abdullah, B.

    2018-03-01

    DSSC (Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell) prototype has been investigated using Jatropha leaves and purple Chrysanthemum flowers as natural dyes. DSSC consists of working electrode and counter electrode. A working electrode composed of semiconductor nanoparticles TiO2 that has been coated with dye molecules. Dye molecules serve as light photon catchers, while semiconductor nanoparticles TiO2 function to absorb and forward photons into electrons. In the electrode counter given catalyst carbon, serves to accelerate the reaction kinetics of triiodide reduction process on transparent conductive oxide (TCO). DSSC using TiO2 as a semiconductor material and natural dyes as sensitizer from Jatropha leaves and purple Chrysanthemum flowers are successful produced. The physical properties of the working electrode have been determined by using XRD and the chemical properties of the TiO2 powder and dye powder using FTIR and dye solution using UV-Vis. The resulted fabrications are also examined its I-V characteristics. The best performance is generated by mixed dye 1.91 x 10-3 % compared than those DSSC for dye extracted from Jatropha leaves or purple Chrysanthemum. The characterization results show that the higher of the absorption wavelength of the DSSC efficiency is high.

  2. Comparative Testis Tissue Proteomics Using 2-Dye Versus 3-Dye DIGE Analysis.

    PubMed

    Holland, Ashling

    2018-01-01

    Comparative tissue proteomics aims to analyze alterations of the proteome in response to a stimulus. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) is a modified and advanced form of 2D gel electrophoresis. DIGE is a powerful biochemical method that compares two or three protein samples on the same analytical gel, and can be used to establish differentially expressed protein levels between healthy normal and diseased pathological tissue sample groups. Minimal DIGE labeling can be used via a 2-dye system with Cy3 and Cy5 or a 3-dye system with Cy2, Cy3, and Cy5 to fluorescently label samples with CyDye flours pre-electrophoresis. DIGE circumvents gel-to-gel variability by multiplexing samples to a single gel and through the use of a pooled internal standard for normalization. This form of quantitative high-resolution proteomics facilitates the comparative analysis and evaluation of tissue protein compositions. Comparing tissue groups under different conditions is crucially important for advancing the biomedical field by characterization of cellular processes, understanding pathophysiological development and tissue biomarker discovery. This chapter discusses 2D-DIGE as a comparative tissue proteomic technique and describes in detail the experimental steps required for comparative proteomic analysis employing both options of 2-dye and 3-dye DIGE minimal labeling.

  3. Molecular modification of coumarin dyes for more efficient dye sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-de-Armas, Rocio; San-Miguel, Miguel A.; Oviedo, Jaime

    2012-05-21

    In this work, new coumarin based dyes for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) have been designed by introducing several substituent groups in different positions of the NKX-2311 structure. Two types of substitutions have been considered: the introduction of three electron-donating groups (-OH, -NH{sub 2}, and -OCH{sub 3}) and two different substituents with steric effect: -CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}- and -CH{sub 2}-HC=CH-. The electronic absorption spectra (position and width of the first band and absorption threshold) and the position of the LUMO level related to the conduction band have been used as theoretical criteria to evaluate the efficiency of the newmore » dyes. The introduction of a -NH{sub 2} group produces a redshift of the absorption maximum position and the absorption threshold, which could improve the cell efficiency. In contrast, the introduction of -CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}- does not modify significantly the electronic structure of NKX-2311, but it might prevent aggregation. Finally, -CH{sub 2}-HC=CH- produces important changes both in the electronic spectrum and in the electronic structure of the dye, and it would be expected as an improvement of cell efficiency for these dyes.« less

  4. Dermatology Internet Yellow Page advertising.

    PubMed

    Francis, Shayla; Kozak, Katarzyna Z; Heilig, Lauren; Lundahl, Kristy; Bowland, Terri; Hester, Eric; Best, Arthur; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2006-07-01

    Patients may use Internet Yellow Pages to help select a physician. We sought to describe dermatology Internet Yellow Page advertising. Dermatology advertisements in Colorado, California, New York, and Texas at 3 Yellow Page World Wide Web sites were systematically examined. Most advertisements (76%; 223/292) listed only one provider, 56 listed more than one provider, and 13 listed no practitioner names. Five advertisements listed provider names without any credentialing letters, 265 listed at least one doctor of medicine or osteopathy, and 9 listed only providers with other credentials (6 doctors of podiatric medicine and 3 registered nurses). Most advertisements (61%; 179/292) listed a doctor of medicine or osteopathy claiming board certification, 78% (139/179) in dermatology and 22% (40/179) in other medical specialties. Four (1%; 4/292) claims of board certification could not be verified (one each in dermatology, family practice, dermatologic/cosmetologic surgery, and laser surgery). Board certification could be verified for most doctors of medicine and osteopathy not advertising claims of board certification (68%; 41/60; 32 dermatology, 9 other specialties). A total of 50 advertisements (17%) contained unverifiable or no board certification information, and 47 (16%) listed a physician with verifiable board certification in a field other than dermatology. All Internet Yellow Page World Wide Web sites and all US states were not examined. Nonphysicians, physicians board certified in medical specialties other than dermatology, and individuals without verifiable board certification in any medical specialty are advertising in dermatology Internet Yellow Pages. Many board-certified dermatologists are not advertising this certification.

  5. 21 CFR 573.1020 - Yellow prussiate of soda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.1020 Yellow prussiate of soda. Yellow prussiate of soda (sodium... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Yellow prussiate of soda. 573.1020 Section 573...

  6. 21 CFR 573.1020 - Yellow prussiate of soda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.1020 Yellow prussiate of soda. Yellow prussiate of soda (sodium... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Yellow prussiate of soda. 573.1020 Section 573...

  7. 21 CFR 573.1020 - Yellow prussiate of soda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.1020 Yellow prussiate of soda. Yellow prussiate of soda (sodium... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Yellow prussiate of soda. 573.1020 Section 573...

  8. 21 CFR 573.1020 - Yellow prussiate of soda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.1020 Yellow prussiate of soda. Yellow prussiate of soda (sodium... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Yellow prussiate of soda. 573.1020 Section 573...

  9. 21 CFR 573.1020 - Yellow prussiate of soda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.1020 Yellow prussiate of soda. Yellow prussiate of soda (sodium... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yellow prussiate of soda. 573.1020 Section 573...

  10. Novel energy relay dyes for high efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Ko, Min Jae; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-02-01

    4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and Hoechst 33342 (H33342) were used as novel energy relay dyes (ERDs) for an efficient energy transfer to the N719 dye in I-/I3- based liquid-junction dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The introduction of the ERDs, either as an additive in the electrolyte or as a co-adsorbent, greatly enhanced the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs), mainly because of an increase in short-circuit current density (Jsc). This was attributed to the effects of non-radiative Förster-type excitation energy transfer as well as the radiative (emission)-type fluorescent energy transfer to the sensitizers. The net PCEs for the N719-sensitized DSSCs with DAPI and H33342 were 10.65% and 10.57%, and showed an improvement of 12.2% and 11.4% over control devices, respectively.4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and Hoechst 33342 (H33342) were used as novel energy relay dyes (ERDs) for an efficient energy transfer to the N719 dye in I-/I3- based liquid-junction dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The introduction of the ERDs, either as an additive in the electrolyte or as a co-adsorbent, greatly enhanced the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs), mainly because of an increase in short-circuit current density (Jsc). This was attributed to the effects of non-radiative Förster-type excitation energy transfer as well as the radiative (emission)-type fluorescent energy transfer to the sensitizers. The net PCEs for the N719-sensitized DSSCs with DAPI and H33342 were 10.65% and 10.57%, and showed an improvement of 12.2% and 11.4% over control devices, respectively. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the materials and instrumentation, device fabrication, measurement and calculations of the quantum yield (Qd), calculations of the Förster radius (R0), optimization of the ERDs mixed with electrolyte according to Type-A strategy; normalized absorption profiles of the N3, Ru505, and Z907 dyes and the emission profiles of DAPI and H33342

  11. Yellow fever: the recurring plague.

    PubMed

    Tomori, Oyewale

    2004-01-01

    Despite the availability of a safe and efficacious vaccine, yellow fever (YF) remains a disease of significant public health importance, with an estimated 200,000 cases and 30,000 deaths annually. The disease is endemic in tropical regions of Africa and South America; nearly 90% of YF cases and deaths occur in Africa. It is a significant hazard to unvaccinated travelers to these endemic areas. Virus transmission occurs between humans, mosquitoes, and monkeys. The mosquito, the true reservoir of YF, is infected throughout its life, and can transmit the virus transovarially through infected eggs. Man and monkeys, on the other hand, play the role of temporary amplifiers of the virus available for mosquito infection. Recent increases in the density and distribution of the urban mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, as well as the rise in air travel increase the risk of introduction and spread of yellow fever to North and Central America, the Caribbean, the Middle East, Asia, Australia, and Oceania. It is an acute infectious disease characterized by sudden onset with a two-phase development, separated by a short period of remission. The clinical spectrum of yellow fever varies from very mild, nonspecific, febrile illness to a fulminating, sometimes fatal disease with pathognomic features. In severe cases, jaundice, bleeding diathesis, with hepatorenal involvement are common. The case fatality rate of severe yellow fever is 50% or higher. The pathogenesis and pathophysiology of the disease are poorly understood and have not been the subject of modern clinical research. There is no specific treatment for YF, making the management of YF patients extremely problematic. YF is a zoonotic disease that cannot be eradicated, therefore instituting preventive vaccination through routine childhood vaccination in endemic countries, can significantly reduce the burden of the disease. The distinctive properties of lifelong immunity after a single dose of yellow fever vaccination are the

  12. Feasibility of solar-pumped dye lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Kim, Kyung C.; Kim, Kyong H.

    1987-01-01

    Dye laser gains were measured at various pump-beam irradiances on a dye cell in order to evaluate the feasibility of solar pumping. Rhodamine 6G dye was considered as a candidate for the solar-pumped laser because of its high utilization of the solar spectrum and high quantum efficiency. Measurements show that a solar concentration of 20,000 is required to reach the threshold of the dye.

  13. Effect of electron withdrawing unit for dye-sensitized solar cell based on D-A-π-A organic dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Dong Yuel; Chang, Dong Min; Kim, Young Sik, E-mail: youngkim@hongik.ac.kr

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • To gain the red-shifted absorption spectra, withdrawing unit was substituted in dye. • By the introduction of additional withdrawing unit, LUMOs level of dye are decreased. • Decreasing LUMOs level of dye caused the red-shifted absorption spectra of dye. • Novel acceptor, DCRD, showed better photovoltaic properties than cyanoacetic acid. - Abstract: In this work, two novel D-A-π-A dye sensitizers with triarylamine as an electron donor, isoindigo and cyano group as electron withdrawing units and cyanoacetic acid and 2-(1,1-dicyanomethylene) rhodanine as an electron acceptor for an anchoring group (TICC, TICR) were designed and investigated with the ID6 dyemore » as the reference. The difference in HOMO and LUMO levels were compared according to the presence or absence of isoindigo in ID6 (TC and ID6). To gain insight into the factors responsible for photovoltaic performance, we used density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. Owing to different LUMO levels for each acceptor, the absorption band and molar extinction coefficient of each dye was different. Among the dyes, TICR showed more red-shifted and broader absorption spectra than other dyes and had a higher molar extinction coefficient than the reference. It is expected that TICR would show better photovoltaic properties than the other dyes, including the reference dye.« less

  14. Continuous-wave organic dye lasers and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Ofer; Chua, Song-Liang; Zhen, Bo

    2014-09-16

    An organic dye laser produces a continuous-wave (cw) output without any moving parts (e.g., without using flowing dye streams or spinning discs of solid-state dye media to prevent photobleaching) and with a pump beam that is stationary with respect to the organic dye medium. The laser's resonant cavity, organic dye medium, and pump beam are configured to excite a lasing transition over a time scale longer than the associated decay lifetimes in the organic dye medium without photobleaching the organic dye medium. Because the organic dye medium does not photobleach when operating in this manner, it may be pumped continuouslymore » so as to emit a cw output beam. In some examples, operation in this manner lowers the lasing threshold (e.g., to only a few Watts per square centimeter), thereby facilitating electrical pumping for cw operation.« less

  15. The dye-sensitized solar cell database.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Vishwesh; Raju, Rajesh; Oikonomopoulos, Solon P; Alsberg, Bjørn K

    2018-04-03

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have garnered a lot of attention in recent years. The solar energy to power conversion efficiency of a DSSC is influenced by various components of the cell such as the dye, electrolyte, electrodes and additives among others leading to varying experimental configurations. A large number of metal-based and metal-free dye sensitizers have now been reported and tools using such data to indicate new directions for design and development are on the rise. DSSCDB, the first of its kind dye-sensitized solar cell database, aims to provide users with up-to-date information from publications on the molecular structures of the dyes, experimental details and reported measurements (efficiencies and spectral properties) and thereby facilitate a comprehensive and critical evaluation of the data. Currently, the DSSCDB contains over 4000 experimental observations spanning multiple dye classes such as triphenylamines, carbazoles, coumarins, phenothiazines, ruthenium and porphyrins. The DSSCDB offers a web-based, comprehensive source of property data for dye sensitized solar cells. Access to the database is available through the following URL: www.dyedb.com .

  16. Influence of the Yellow Sea Warm Current on phytoplankton community in the central Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Chiang, Kuo-Ping; Liu, Su-Mei; Wei, Hao; Zhao, Yuan; Huang, Bang-Qin

    2015-12-01

    In early spring, a hydrological front emerges in the central Yellow Sea, resulting from the intrusion of the high temperature and salinity Yellow Sea Warm Current (YSWC). The present study, applying phytoplankton pigments and flow cytometry measurements in March of 2007 and 2009, focuses on the biogeochemical effects of the YSWC. The nutrients fronts were coincident with the hydrological front, and a positive linear relationship between nitrate and salinity was found in the frontal area. This contrast with the common situation of coastal waters where high salinity values usually correlate with poor nutrients. We suggested nutrient concentrations of the YSWC waters might have been enhanced by mixing with the local nutrient-rich waters when it invaded the Yellow Sea from the north of the Changjiang estuary. In addition, our results indicate that the relative abundance of diatoms ranged from 26% to 90%, showing a higher value in the YSCC than in YSWC waters. Similar distributions were found between diatoms and dinoflagellates, however the cyanobacteria and prasinophytes showed an opposite distribution pattern. Good correlations were found between the pigments and flow cytometry observations on the picophytoplankton groups. Prasinophytes might be the major contributor to pico-eukaryotes in the central Yellow Sea as similar distributional patterns and significant correlations between them. It seems that the front separates the YSWC from the coastal water, and different phytoplankton groups are transported in these water masses and follow their movement. These results imply that the YSWC plays important roles in the distribution of nutrients, phytoplankton biomass and also in the community structure of the central Yellow Sea.

  17. 49 CFR 173.188 - White or yellow phosphorus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false White or yellow phosphorus. 173.188 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.188 White or yellow phosphorus. Phosphorus, white or yellow, when offered for... pound) of phosphorus with screw-top closures; or (2) Steel drums (1A1) not over 250 L (66 gallons...

  18. 49 CFR 173.188 - White or yellow phosphorus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false White or yellow phosphorus. 173.188 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.188 White or yellow phosphorus. Phosphorus, white or yellow, when offered for... pound) of phosphorus with screw-top closures; or (2) Steel drums (1A1) not over 250 L (66 gallons...

  19. 21 CFR 137.280 - Bolted yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bolted yellow corn meal. 137.280 Section 137.280... Flours and Related Products § 137.280 Bolted yellow corn meal. Bolted yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.255 for bolted white corn meal except that cleaned...

  20. 21 CFR 137.280 - Bolted yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bolted yellow corn meal. 137.280 Section 137.280... Flours and Related Products § 137.280 Bolted yellow corn meal. Bolted yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.255 for bolted white corn meal except that cleaned...

  1. Synthesis of nano silver on cellulosic denim fabric producing yellow colored garment with antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Maryan, Ali Sadeghian; Montazer, Majid; Harifi, Tina

    2015-01-22

    In this study, an aged-look denim fabric with antibacterial property was prepared in one single step process. For this purpose, the simultaneous antibacterial finishing and discoloration of denim fabric was carried out through reduction of indigo dye and silver nitrate by glucose in alkaline media using a conventional garment washing machine. The uniform distribution of silver nanoparticles on the fiber surface was confirmed by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The treated fabrics were also characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Due to the color changes during the process, the color coordinates of the treated samples were also measured. Findings suggest the potential of the proposed method in producing old-look denim fabric with desirable yellow appearance and reasonable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli with low toxicity for human. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Microencapsulated Fluorescent Dye Penetrant.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    Microencapsulated fluorescent dye pentrant materials were evaluated for feasibility as a technique to detect cracks on metal surfaces when applied as...a free flowing dry powder. Various flourescent dye solutions in addition to a commercial penetrant (Zyglo ZL-30) were microencapsulated and tested on

  3. High-throughput screening of dye-ligands for chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Punekar, Narayan S

    2014-01-01

    Dye-ligand-based chromatography has become popular after Cibacron Blue, the first reactive textile dye, found application for protein purification. Many other textile dyes have since been successfully used to purify a number of proteins and enzymes. While the exact nature of their interaction with target proteins is often unclear, dye-ligands are thought to mimic the structural features of their corresponding substrates, cofactors, etc. The dye-ligand affinity matrices are therefore considered pseudo-affinity matrices. In addition, dye-ligands may simply bind with proteins due to electrostatic, hydrophobic, and hydrogen-bonding interactions. Because of their low cost, ready availability, and structural stability, dye-ligand affinity matrices have gained much popularity. Choice of a large number of dye structures offers a range of matrices to be prepared and tested. When presented in the high-throughput screening mode, these dye-ligand matrices provide a formidable tool for protein purification. One could pick from the list of dye-ligands already available or build a systematic library of such structures for use. A high-throughput screen may be set up to choose best dye-ligand matrix as well as ideal conditions for binding and elution, for a given protein. The mode of operation could be either manual or automated. The technology is available to test the performance of dye-ligand matrices in small volumes in an automated liquid-handling workstation. Screening a systematic library of dye-ligand structures can help establish a structure-activity relationship. While the origins of dye-ligand chromatography lay in exploiting pseudo-affinity, it is now possible to design very specific biomimetic dye structures. High-throughput screening will be of value in this endeavor as well.

  4. Metal-free organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells: from structure: property relationships to design rules.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Amaresh; Fischer, Markus K R; Bäuerle, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) have attracted considerable attention in recent years as they offer the possibility of low-cost conversion of photovoltaic energy. This Review focuses on recent advances in molecular design and technological aspects of metal-free organic dyes for applications in dye-sensitized solar cells. Special attention has been paid to the design principles of these dyes and on the effect of various electrolyte systems. Cosensitization, an emerging technique to extend the absorption range, is also discussed as a way to improve the performance of the device. In addition, we report on inverted dyes for photocathodes, which constitutes a relatively new approach for the production of tandem cells. Special consideration has been paid to the correlation between the molecular structure and physical properties to their performance in DSSCs.

  5. Mediator-assisted decolorization and detoxification of textile dyes/dye mixture by Cyathus bulleri laccase.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Meenu; Mishra, Saroj; Sreekrishnan, T R

    2008-12-01

    Laccase from basidiomycete fungus Cyathus bulleri was evaluated for its ability to decolorize a number of reactive and acidic dyes in the presence of natural and synthetic mediators. The extent of decolorization was monitored at different mediator/dye concentrations and incubation time. Among the synthetic mediators, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) was effective at low mediator/dye ratios and resulted in 80-95% decolorization at rates that varied from 226 +/- 4 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for Reactive Orange 1 to 1,333 +/- 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for Reactive Red 198. Other synthetic mediators like 1-hydroxybenzotriazole and violuric acid showed both concentration- and time-dependent increases in percent decolorization. Natural mediators like vanillin, on the other hand, were found to be less effective on all the dyes except Reactive Orange 1. Computed rates of decolorization were about twofold lower than that with ABTS. The laccase-ABTS system also led to nearly 80% decolorization for the simulated dye mixture. No clear correlation between laccase activity on the mediator and its ability to decolorize dyes was found, but pH had a significant effect: Optimum pH for decolorization coincided with the optimum pH for mediator oxidation. The treated samples were also evaluated for toxicity in model microbial systems. The laccase-mediator system appears promising for treatment of textile wastewaters.

  6. Yellow Fever Outbreak, Southern Sudan, 2003

    PubMed Central

    Onyango, Clayton O.; Grobbelaar, Antoinette A.; Gibson, Georgina V.F.; Sang, Rosemary C.; Sow, Abdourahmane; Swanepoel, Robert

    2004-01-01

    In May 2003, an outbreak of fatal hemorrhagic fever, caused by yellow fever virus, occurred in southern Sudan. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the virus belonged to the East African genotype, which supports the contention that yellow fever is endemic in East Africa with the potential to cause large outbreaks in humans. PMID:15498174

  7. Various Measures of the Effectiveness of Yellow Goggles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-08

    technique which is widely used r.o improve vision under these conditions is the use of yellow goggles. Skiers commonly don yellow goggles...different laboratory studies are presented. Two of the studies were of depth perception, since skiers believe that yellow goggles help them...selected for measurement because of practical considerations and theoretical implications. EXPERIMENTS ON DEPTH PERCEPTION Background Since skiers

  8. Investigation of hair dye deposition, hair color loss, and hair damage during multiple oxidative dyeing and shampooing cycles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojin; McMullen, Roger L; Kulcsar, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Color fastness is a major concern for consumers and manufacturers of oxidative hair dye products. Hair dye loss results from multiple wash cycles in which the hair dye is dissolved by water and leaches from the hair shaft. In this study, we carried out a series of measurements to help us better understand the kinetics of the leaching process and pathways associated with its escape from the fiber. Hair dye leaching kinetics was measured by suspending hair in a dissolution apparatus and monitoring the dye concentration in solution (leached dye) with an ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The physical state of dye deposited in hair fibers was evaluated by a reflectance light microscopy technique, based on image stacking, allowing enhanced depth of field imaging. The dye distribution within the fiber was monitored by infrared spectroscopic imaging of hair fiber cross sections. Damage to the ultrafine structure of the hair cuticle (surface, endocuticle, and cell membrane complex) and cortex (cell membrane complex) was determined in hair cross sections and on the hair fiber surface with atomic force microscopy. Using differential scanning calorimetry, we investigated how consecutive coloring and leaching processes affect the internal proteins of hair. Further, to probe the surface properties of hair we utilized contact angle measurements. This study was conducted on both pigmented and nonpigmented hair to gain insight into the influence of melanin on the hair dye deposition and leaching processes. Both types of hair were colored utilizing a commercial oxidative hair dye product based on pyrazole chemistry.

  9. Highly-sensitive electrochemical sensing platforms for food colourants based on the property-tuning of porous carbon.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qin; Xia, Shanhong; Tong, Jianhua; Wu, Kangbing

    2015-08-05

    It is very challenging to develop highly-sensitive analytical platforms for toxic synthetic colourants that widely added in food samples. Herein, a series of porous carbon (PC) was prepared using CaCO3 nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) as the hard template and starch as the carbon precursor. Characterizations of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicated that the morphology and porous structure were controlled by the weight ratio of starch and nano-CaCO3. The electrochemical behaviours of four kinds of widely-used food colourants, Sunset yellow, Tartrazine, Ponceau 4R and Allura red, were studied. On the surface of PC samples, the oxidation signals of colourants enhanced obviously, and more importantly, the signal enhancement abilities of PC were also dependent on the starch/nano-CaCO3 weight ratio. The greatly-increased electron transfer ability and accumulation efficiency were the main reason for the enhanced signals of colourants, as confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronocoulometry. The prepared PC-2 sample by 1:1 starch/nano-CaCO3 weight ratio was more active for the oxidation of food colourtants, and increased the signals by 89.4-fold, 79.3-fold, 47.3-fold and 50.7-fold for Sunset yellow, Tartrazine, Ponceau 4R and Allura red. As a result, a highly-sensitive electrochemical sensing platform was developed, and the detection limits were 1.4, 3.5, 2.1 and 1.7 μg L(-1) for Sunset yellow, Tartrazine, Ponceau 4R and Allura red. The practical application of this new sensing platform was demonstrated using drink samples, and the detected results consisted with the values that obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of organic dyes with various electron-accepting substituents for p-type dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Weidelener, Martin; Powar, Satvasheel; Kast, Hannelore; Yu, Ze; Boix, Pablo P; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Geiger, Thomas; Kuster, Simon; Nüesch, Frank; Bach, Udo; Mishra, Amaresh; Bäuerle, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Four new donor-π-acceptor dyes differing in their acceptor group have been synthesized and employed as model systems to study the influence of the acceptor groups on the photophysical properties and in NiO-based p-type dye-sensitized solar cells. UV/Vis absorption spectra showed a broad range of absorption coverage with maxima between 331 and 653 nm. Redox potentials as well as HOMO and LUMO energies of the dyes were determined from cyclic voltammetry measurements and evaluated concerning their potential use as sensitizers in p-type dye-sensitized solar cells (p-DSCs). Quantum-chemical density functional theory calculations gave further insight into the frontier orbital distributions, which are relevant for the electronic processes in p-DSCs. In p-DSCs using an iodide/triiodide-based electrolyte, the polycyclic 9,10-dicyano-acenaphtho[1,2-b]quinoxaline (DCANQ) acceptor-containing dye gave the highest power conversion efficiency of 0.08%, which is comparable to that obtained with the perylenemonoimide (PMI)-containing dye. Interestingly, devices containing the DCANQ-based dye achieve a higher V(OC) of 163 mV compared to 158 mV for the PMI-containing dye. The result was further confirmed by impedance spectroscopic analysis showing higher recombination resistance and thus a lower recombination rate for devices containing the DCANQ dye than for PMI dye-based devices. However, the use of the strong electron-accepting tricyanofurane (TCF) group played a negative role in the device performance, yielding an efficiency of only 0.01% due to a low-lying LUMO energy level, thus resulting in an insufficient driving force for efficient dye regeneration. The results demonstrate that a careful molecular design with a proper choice of the acceptor unit is essential for development of sensitizers for p-DSCs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) reengineering using TiO2 with natural dye (anthocyanin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subodro, Rohmat; Kristiawan, Budi; Ramelan, Ari Handono; Wahyuningsih, Sayekti; Munawaroh, Hanik; Hanif, Qonita Awliya; Saputri, Liya Nikmatul Maula Zulfa

    2017-01-01

    This research on Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) reengineering was carried out using TiO2 with natural dye (anthocyanin). The fabrication of active carbon layer/TiO2 DSSC solar cell was based on natural dye containing anthocyanins such as mangosteen peel, red rose flower, black glutinous rice, and purple eggplant peel. DSSC was prepared with TiO2 thin layer doped with active carbon; Natural dye was analyzed using UV-Vis and TiO2 was analyzed using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), meanwhile scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to obtain the size of the crystal. Keithley instrument test was carried out to find out I-V characteristics indicating that the highest efficiency occurred in DSSCs solar cell with 24-hour soaking with mangosteen peel 0.00047%.

  12. Visible to near infra red absorption in natural dye (Mondo Grass Berry) for Dye Sensitized Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitigala, Duleepa; Desilva, L. A. A.; Perera, A. G. U.

    2012-03-01

    The development of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) is an exciting field in the low cost renewable energy production. Two major draw backs in the DSSCs are the narrow spectral response and the short term stability. Research on development of artificial dyes for broadening the response is important in finding a solution. Work presented here shows a broad spectral response with a natural dye extracted from a Mondo Grass berry (Ophiopogonjaponicus).The dye is extracted by crushing the berries and filtering to remove the pulp. A DSSC sensitized with Mondo Grass dye, and with TiO2 film screen printed on a Florien doped Tin Oxide (FTO) glass and baked for 30 minutes at 450 C as the working electrode and Iodine/triiodide red-ox electrolyte as the hole collector was tested for its performance. An open circuit photovoltage of 495 mV and a short circuit photocurrent of 0.6 mA/cm2were observed under a simulated lamp equivalent to 1 sun illumination. The broad spectral response from 400 nm to 750 nm was also observed for the Mondo Grass dye compared to other natural dyes consists of anthocyanins or tannins.

  13. Effect of the co-sensitization sequence on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells with porphyrin and organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Suhua; Lu, Xuefeng; Sun, Hong; Zhou, Gang; Chang, Yuan Jay; Wang, Zhong-Sheng

    2016-01-14

    To obtain a broad spectral response in the visible region, TiO2 film is co-sensitized with a porphyrin dye (FNE57 or FNE59) and an organic dye (FNE46). It is found that the stepwise co-sensitization in one single dye solution followed by in another single dye solution is better than the co-sensitization in a cocktail solution in terms of photovoltaic performance. The stepwise co-sensitization first with a porphyrin dye and then with an organic dye outperforms that in a reverse order. DSSC devices based on co-sensitizers FNE57 + FNE46 and FNE59 + FNE46 with a quasi-solid-state gel electrolyte generate power conversion efficiencies of 7.88% and 8.14%, respectively, which exhibits remarkable efficiency improvements of 61% and 35%, as compared with devices sensitized with the porphyrin dyes FNE57 and FNE59, respectively. Co-sensitization brings about a much improved short-circuit photocurrent due to the complementary absorption of the two sensitizers. The observed enhancement of incident monochromatic photon-to-electron conversion efficiency from individual dye sensitization to co-sensitization is attributed to the improved charge collection efficiency rather than to the light harvesting efficiency. Interestingly, the open-circuit photovoltage for the co-sensitization system comes between the higher voltage for the porphyrin dye (FNE57 or FNE59) and the lower voltage for the organic dye (FNE46), which is well correlated with their electron lifetimes. This finding indicates that not only the spectral complementation but also the electron lifetime should be considered to select dyes for co-sensitization.

  14. [Application of natural plant pigment in hair dyes].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu-Li; Luo, Jiao-Yang; Zhao, Hong-Zheng; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Yang, Shi-Hai; Yang, Mei-Hua

    2016-09-01

    With the development of living condition, more and more people tend to show unique personality, thus hair dyes as hair cosmetics are highly favored. By the year 2012, the global sales of hair dye had exceeded $15 billion, with a sustained growth at a rate of 8%-10% annually. However, the harm caused by long-term use of hair dyes has aroused widespread public concern, so people begin to seek non-toxic or low toxic natural plant hair dyes. The types of commonly used hair dyes and the corresponding dyeing mechanisms were summarized in this manuscript, and the representative natural botanic dyes were listed. Thereafter, their effective fractions, constituents and application status were described. In addition, the values of botanic hair dyes and their broad market prospect were discussed. Finally, the problems that exist in the research and development of plant hair dyes were issued. This review may help to provide thought for developing novel, green and ecological natural plant hair dyes. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  15. New dye-labeled terminators for improved DNA sequencing patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, B B; Lee, L G; Spurgeon, S L; Khan, S H; Menchen, S M; Heiner, C R; Chen, S M

    1997-01-01

    We have used two new dye sets for automated dye-labeled terminator DNA sequencing. One set consists of four, 4,7-dichlororhodamine dyes (d-rhodamines). The second set consists of energy-transfer dyes that use the 5-carboxy-d-rhodamine dyes as acceptor dyes and the 5- or 6-carboxy isomers of 4'-aminomethylfluorescein as the donor dye. Both dye sets utilize a new linker between the dye and the nucleotide, and both provide more even peak heights in terminator sequencing than the dye-terminators consisting of unsubstituted rhodamine dyes. The unsubstituted rhodamine terminators produced electropherograms in which weak G peaks are observed after A peaks and occasionally C peaks. The number of weak G peaks has been reduced or eliminated with the new dye terminators. The general improvement in peak evenness improves accuracy for the automated base-calling software. The improved signal-to-noise ratio of the energy-transfer dye-labeled terminators combined with more even peak heights results in successful sequencing of high molecular weight DNA templates such as bacterial artificial chromosome DNA. PMID:9358158

  16. Dimension yields from yellow-poplar lumber

    Treesearch

    R. C. Gilmore; J. D. Danielson

    1984-01-01

    The available supply of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.), its potential for new uses, and its continuing importance to the furniture industry have created a need to accumulate additional information about this species. As an aid to better utilization of this species, charts for determining cutting stock yields from yellow poplar lumber are presented for each...

  17. The complete nucleotide sequence of the Barley yellow dwarf virus-RMV genome reveals it to be a new Polerovirus distantly related to other yellow dwarf viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The yellow dwarf viruses (YDVs) of the Luteoviridae family represent the most widespread group of cereal viruses worldwide. They include the Barley yellow dwarf viruses (BYDVs) of genus Luteovirus, the Cereal yellow dwarf viruses (CYDVs) and Wheat yellow dwarf virus (WYDV) of genus Polerovirus. All ...

  18. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.441 Section... Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color is color which is deeper than that of Strict Middling Tinged Color. [57 FR 34498, Aug. 5, 1992] ...

  19. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.441 Section... Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color is color which is deeper than that of Strict Middling Tinged Color. [57 FR 34498, Aug. 5, 1992] ...

  20. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.441 Section... Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color is color which is deeper than that of Strict Middling Tinged Color. [57 FR 34498, Aug. 5, 1992] ...

  1. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.441 Section... Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color is color which is deeper than that of Strict Middling Tinged Color. [57 FR 34498, Aug. 5, 1992] ...

  2. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.441 Section... Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color is color which is deeper than that of Strict Middling Tinged Color. [57 FR 34498, Aug. 5, 1992] ...

  3. Newer approach of using alternatives to (Indium doped) metal electrodes, dyes and electrolytes in dye sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patni, Neha; Sharma, Pranjal; Pillai, Shibu G.

    2018-04-01

    This work demonstrates the PV study of dye sensitised solar cells by fabricating the (PV) cell using the ITO, FTO and AZO glass substrate. Dyes used for the fabrication were extracted from beetroot and spinach and a cocktail dye by mixing both of the dyes was also prepared. Similarly the three dufferent electrolytes used were iodide-triiodide couple, polyaniline and mixture of polyaniline and iodide couple. Mixed dye and mixed electrolyte has emerged as the highest efficient cell. The electrical characterisation shows that the highest power conversion efficiency of 1.86% was achieved by FTO substrate, followed by efficiency of 1.83% by AZO substrate and efficiency of 1.63% with ITO substrate using mixed dye and mixed electrolyte approach. This justifies that FTO and AZO shows better efficiency and hence proposed to be used as an alternative to indium free system.

  4. THE TRANSMISSION OF YELLOW FEVER

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nelson C.

    1930-01-01

    1. Saimiri sciureus has been infected with yellow fever virus, both by the inoculation of infectious blood and by the bites of infective mosquitoes. Some of the monkeys have died, showing lesions, including hepatic necrosis, suggesting yellow fever as seen in human beings and in rhesus monkeys. Virus has been transferred back to M. rhesus from infected Saimiri both by blood inoculation and by mosquito bites. The virus undoubtedly has been maintained through four direct passages in Saimiri. Reinoculations of infectious material into recovered monkeys have not given rise to invasion of the blood stream by virus. Sera from recovered animals have protected M. rhesus against the inoculation of virus. 2. It has been possible to pass the virus to and from Ateleus ater by the injection of blood or liver and by the bites of mosquitoes. The livers from two infected animals have shown no necrosis. The serum from one recovered monkey proved to be protective for M. rhesus. 3. Only three out of twelve Lagothrix lagotricha have reacted to yellow fever virus by a rise in temperature. Probably none have died as a result of the infection. In only one instance has the virus been transferred back to M. rhesus. The sera of recovered animals have had a protective action against yellow fever virus. PMID:19869721

  5. Effect of composition of chlorophyll and ruthenium dyes mixture (hybrid) on the dye-sensitized solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratiwi, D. D.; Nurosyid, F.; Kusumandari; Supriyanto, A.; Suryana, R.

    2018-03-01

    The fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) has been conducted by varying the composition of natural dye from moss chlorophyll (Bryophyte) and synthesis dye from ruthenium complex N719. The sandwich structure of DSSC consists of the working electrode using TiO2, dye, electrolyte, and counter electrode using carbon. The composition of chlorophyll and synthesis dyes mixture were 100% and 0%, 80% and 20%, 60% and 40%, 40% and 60%, and 20% and 80%. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of moss chlorophyll showed the first peak in the wavelength range of 450-500 nm and the second peak at wavelength of 650-700 nm. The peak value of absorbance at wavelengths of 450-500 nm was 6.1004 and at wavelengths of 650-700 nm was 3.5835. The IPCE characteristic curves showed the absorption peak of photon for DSSCs occurred at wavelength of 550-650 nm. It considered that photon in this wavelength can contribute dominantly to produce the optimum electrons. The I-V characteristics of DSSCs with composition of chlorophyll and synthesis dyes mixture of 100% and 0%, 80% and 20%, 60% and 40%, 40% and 60%, and 20% and 80% resulted the efficiency of 0.0022; 0.0194; 0.0239; 0.0342; and 0.0414, respectively. It suggested that the addition of a little composition of the ruthenium complex dye into moss chlorophyll dye can increase the efficiency significantly.

  6. Removal of industrial dyes and heavy metals by Beauveria bassiana: FTIR, SEM, TEM and AFM investigations with Pb(II).

    PubMed

    Gola, Deepak; Malik, Anushree; Namburath, Maneesh; Ahammad, Shaikh Ziauddin

    2017-10-01

    Presence of industrial dyes and heavy metal as a contaminant in environment poses a great risk to human health. In order to develop a potential technology for remediation of dyes (Reactive remazol red, Yellow 3RS, Indanthrene blue and Vat novatic grey) and heavy metal [Cu(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI) and Pb(II)] contamination, present study was performed with entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana (MTCC no. 4580). High dye removal (88-97%) was observed during the growth of B. bassiana while removal percentage for heavy metals ranged from 58 to 75%. Further, detailed investigations were performed with Pb(II) in terms of growth kinetics, effect of process parameters and mechanism of removal. Growth rate decreased from 0.118 h -1 (control) to 0.031 h -1 , showing 28% reduction in biomass at 30 mg L -1 Pb(II) with 58.4% metal removal. Maximum Pb(II) removal was observed at 30 °C, neutral pH and 30 mg L -1 initial metal concentration. FTIR analysis indicated the changes induced by Pb(II) in functional groups on biomass surface. Further, microscopic analysis (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM)) was performed to understand the changes in cell surface morphology of the fungal cell. SEM micrograph showed a clear deformation of fungal hyphae, whereas AFM studies proved the increase in surface roughness (RSM) in comparison to control cell. Homogenous bioaccumulation of Pb(II) inside the fungal cell was clearly depicted by TEM-high-angle annular dark field coupled with EDX. Present study provides an insight into the mechanism of Pb(II) bioremediation and strengthens the significance of using entomopathogenic fungus such as B. bassiana for metal and dye removal.

  7. [Rapid screening and identification of 22 allergenic disperse dyes in ecological textiles by high performance liquid chromatography-linear ion trap/orbitrap mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Niu, Zengyuan; Luo, Xin; Ye, Xiwen; Xiu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Li; Wang, Xin; Chen, Jing

    2015-10-01

    A rapid screening method based on high performance liquid chromatography-linear ion trap/orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-LTQ/Orbitrap MS) for 22 disperse dyes in ecological textiles has been established. The target compounds were extracted by pyridine/water (1:1, v/v) by shaking extraction in 90 degrees C water bath. The extracts were then separated by a CAPCELL PAK C18 column (100 mm x 2.0 mm, 5 μm) using gradient elution with acetonitrile-5 mmol/L ammonium acetate containing 0.01% (v/v) formic acid as mobile phases, and finally analyzed by HPLC-LTQ/Orbitrap in positive and negative ESI modes. The retention time and accurate mass of parent ion were used for fast screening of 22 disperse dyes, while the confirmatory analysis was obtained by fragments generated by collision-induced dissociation (CID) MS/MS. Target analysis exhibited high mass accuracy (< 5 x 10(-6)). Each target showed a good linearity in its own concentration range and the correlation coefficient was higher than 0.99. The LOQs were 0.125-2.5 mg/kg. Except for Disperse Yellow 49, the average recoveries of most disperse dyes at three spiked levels were 65%-120%, and the relative standard deviations (n = 6) were less than 15%. The method was applied for screening 40 different kinds of textiles, and Disperse Orange 37/76 was detected in one of them. With high selectivity and strong anti-jamming ability, this method is simple, rapid, accurate, and it can be used for the inspection of disperse dyes in textiles.

  8. Organic and Inorganic Dyes in Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Films

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayer films are a versatile functionalization method of surfaces and rely on the alternated adsorption of oppositely charged species. Among such species, charged dyes can also be alternated with oppositely charged polymers, which is challenging from a fundamental point of view, because polyelectrolytes require a minimal number of charges, whereas even monovalent dyes can be incorporated during the alternated adsorption process. We will not only focus on organic dyes but also on their inorganic counterparts and on metal complexes. Such films offer plenty of possible applications in dye sensitized solar cells. In addition, dyes are massively used in the textile industry and in histology to stain textile fibers or tissues. However, the excess of non bound dyes poses serious environmental problems. It is hence of the highest interest to design materials able to adsorb such dyes in an almost irreversible manner. Polyelectrolyte multilayer films, owing to their ion exchange behavior can be useful for such a task allowing for impressive overconcentration of dyes with respect to the dye in solution. The actual state of knowledge of the interactions between charged dyes and adsorbed polyelectrolytes is the focus of this review article.

  9. Dye system for dye laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    A dye of the DCM family, [2-methyl-6-[2-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-methyl-6-quinolinyl)ethenyl]-4H-pyran -4-ylidene]-propanedinitrile, dissolved in 2-phenoxyethanol, is non-mutagenic, stable and efficient, particularly in a pumped continuous wave laser system.

  10. Yellow Fever Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... way to prevent yellow fever is to avoid mosquito bites by:staying in well-screened or air-conditioned areas, wearing clothes that cover most of your body, using an effective insect repellent, such as those containing DEET.

  11. The Chemistry of Plant and Animal Dyes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sequin-Frey, Margareta

    1981-01-01

    Provides a brief history of natural dyes. Chemical formulas are provided for flavonoids, luteolin, genistein, brazilin, tannins, terpenes, naphthoquinone, anthraquinone, and dyes with an alkaloid structure. Also discusses chemical background of different dye processes. (CS)

  12. Hair cosmetics: dyes.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Tapia, A; Gonzalez-Guerra, E

    2014-11-01

    Hair plays a significant role in body image, and its appearance can be changed relatively easily without resort to surgical procedures. Cosmetics and techniques have therefore been used to change hair appearance since time immemorial. The cosmetics industry has developed efficient products that can be used on healthy hair or act on concomitant diseases of the hair and scalp. Dyes embellish the hair by bleaching or coloring it briefly, for temporary periods of longer duration, or permanently, depending on the composition of a dye (oxidative or nonoxidative) and its degree of penetration of the hair shaft. The dermatologist's knowledge of dyes, their use, and their possible side effects (contact eczema, cancer, increased porosity, brittleness) can extend to an understanding of cosmetic resources that also treat hair and scalp conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  13. Yellow fever cases in Asia: primed for an epidemic.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Sean; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah; Lim, Poh Lian

    2016-07-01

    There is currently an emerging outbreak of yellow fever in Angola. Cases in infected travellers have been reported in a number of other African countries, as well as in China, representing the first ever documented cases of yellow fever in Asia. There is a large Chinese workforce in Angola, many of whom may be unvaccinated, increasing the risk of ongoing importation of yellow fever into Asia via busy commercial airline routes. Large parts of the region are hyperendemic for the related Flavivirus dengue and are widely infested by Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito vector of urban yellow fever transmission. The combination of sustained introduction of viraemic travellers, an ecology conducive to local transmission, and an unimmunized population raises the possibility of a yellow fever epidemic in Asia. This represents a major global health threat, particularly in the context of a depleted emergency vaccine stockpile and untested surveillance systems in the region. In this review, the potential for a yellow fever outbreak in Asia is discussed with reference to the ecological and historical forces that have shaped global yellow fever epidemiology. The limitations of surveillance and vector control in the region are highlighted, and priorities for outbreak preparedness and response are suggested. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Tephra Blanket Record of a Violent Strombolian Eruption, Sunset Crater, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, K. D.; Ort, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    New fieldwork provides a detailed description of the widespread tephra of the ~1085 CE Sunset Crater eruption in the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Arizona, and refines interpretation of the eruptive sequence. The basal fine-lapilli tephra-fall-units I-IV are considered in detail. Units I and II are massive, with Unit I composed of angular to spiny clasts and II composed of more equant, oxidized clasts. Units III and IV have inversely graded bases and massive tops and are composed of angular to spiny iridescent and mixed iridescent and oxidized angular clasts, respectively. Xenoliths are rare in all units (<0.1%): sedimentary xenoliths are consistent with the known shallow country rock (Moenkopi and Kaibab Fms); magmatic xenoliths are pumiceous rhyolite mingled with basalt. Unit II is less sideromelane rich (20%) than Units I, III, and IV (60-80%). Above these units are at least two more coarse tephra-fall units. Variably preserved ash and fine-lapilli laminae cap the tephra blanket. This deposit is highly susceptible to reworking, and likely experienced both syn- and post-eruptive aeolian redistribution. It appears as either well sorted, alternating planar-parallel beds of ash and fine lapilli with rare wavy beds, or as cross- or planar-bedded ash. The tephra blanket as a whole is stratigraphically underlain by a fissure-fed lava flow and lapilli-fall units are intercalated with two larger flows. Mean grain size is coarsest in Unit I but coarsens in Units II-IV. Units I, III, and IV are moderately to poorly sorted with no skew. Unit II is better sorted and more coarse-skewed. Units I and III are slightly more platykurtic than II and IV. Without considering possible spatial effects introduced by dispersion patterns, bootstrap ANOVA confidence intervals suggest at least Unit II sorting and skewness are from distinct populations. Isopachs indicate Units I and II were associated with a 10-km-long fissure source. After or during Unit II's deposition, activity localized

  15. Biology and biological control of Dalmatian and yellow toadflax

    Treesearch

    Sharlene E. Sing; Rosemarie De Clerck-Floate; Richard W. Hansen; Hal Pearce; Carol Bell Randall; Ivo Tosevski; Sarah M. Ward

    2016-01-01

    Dalmatian toadflax, Linaria dalmatica (L.) Mill., and yellow toadflax, Linaria vulgaris Mill., are exotic weeds of rangeland, grassland, forests, and cropland. Both Dalmatian and yellow toadflax are short-lived perennial forbs that are easily recognized by their yellow snapdragon- like flowers (Figure 1a, 1b). Both species propagate by seed and vegetatively...

  16. Solvent-free fluidic organic dye lasers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Young; Mager, Loic; Cham, Tran Thi; Dorkenoo, Kokou D; Fort, Alain; Wu, Jeong Weon; Barsella, Alberto; Ribierre, Jean-Charles

    2013-05-06

    We report on the demonstration of liquid organic dye lasers based on 9-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole (EHCz), so-called liquid carbazole, doped with green- and red-emitting laser dyes. Both waveguide and Fabry-Perot type microcavity fluidic organic dye lasers were prepared by capillary action under solvent-free conditions. Cascade Förster-type energy transfer processes from liquid carbazole to laser dyes were employed to achieve color-variable amplified spontaneous emission and lasing. Overall, this study provides the first step towards the development of solvent-free fluidic organic semiconducting lasers and demonstrates a new kind of optoelectronic applications for liquid organic semiconductors.

  17. 33 CFR 117.225 - Yellow Mill Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Yellow Mill Channel. 117.225 Section 117.225 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Connecticut § 117.225 Yellow Mill Channel. The...

  18. Benzo[a]carbazole-Based Donor-π-Acceptor Type Organic Dyes for Highly Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xing; Zhu, Yi-Zhou; Chang, Wen-Ying; Song, Jian; Pan, Bin; Lu, Lin; Gao, Huan-Huan; Zheng, Jian-Yu

    2015-05-06

    A novel class of metal-free organic dyes based on benzo[a]carbazole have been designed, synthesized, and used in dye-sensitized solar cells for the first time. These types of dyes consisted of a cyanoacrylic acid moiety as the electron acceptor/anchoring group and different electron-rich spacers such as thiophene (JY21), furan (JY22), and oligothiophene (JY23) as the π-linkers. The photophysical, electrochemical, and photovoltaic properties, as well as theoretical calculations of these dyes were investigated. The photovoltaic performances of these dyes were found to be highly relevant to the π-conjugated linkers. In particular, dye JY23 exhibited a broad IPCE response with a photocurrent signal up to about 740 nm covering the most region of the UV-visible light. A DSSC based on JY23 showed the best photovoltaic performance with a Jsc of 14.8 mA cm(-2), a Voc of 744 mV, and a FF of 0.68, achieving a power conversion efficiency of 7.54% under standard AM 1.5 G irradiation.

  19. International travel between global urban centres vulnerable to yellow fever transmission.

    PubMed

    Brent, Shannon E; Watts, Alexander; Cetron, Martin; German, Matthew; Kraemer, Moritz Ug; Bogoch, Isaac I; Brady, Oliver J; Hay, Simon I; Creatore, Maria I; Khan, Kamran

    2018-05-01

    To examine the potential for international travel to spread yellow fever virus to cities around the world. We obtained data on the international flight itineraries of travellers who departed yellow fever-endemic areas of the world in 2016 for cities either where yellow fever was endemic or which were suitable for viral transmission. Using a global ecological model of dengue virus transmission, we predicted the suitability of cities in non-endemic areas for yellow fever transmission. We obtained information on national entry requirements for yellow fever vaccination at travellers' destination cities. In 2016, 45.2 million international air travellers departed from yellow fever-endemic areas of the world. Of 11.7 million travellers with destinations in 472 cities where yellow fever was not endemic but which were suitable for virus transmission, 7.7 million (65.7%) were not required to provide proof of vaccination upon arrival. Brazil, China, India, Mexico, Peru and the United States of America had the highest volumes of travellers arriving from yellow fever-endemic areas and the largest populations living in cities suitable for yellow fever transmission. Each year millions of travellers depart from yellow fever-endemic areas of the world for cities in non-endemic areas that appear suitable for viral transmission without having to provide proof of vaccination. Rapid global changes in human mobility and urbanization make it vital for countries to re-examine their vaccination policies and practices to prevent urban yellow fever epidemics.

  20. Spray drift reduction under Southern European conditions: a pilot study in the Ecopest Project in Greece.

    PubMed

    Kasiotis, Konstantinos M; Glass, C Richard; Tsakirakis, Angelos N; Machera, Kyriaki

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this work was to generate spray drift data from pesticide application in the field comparing spray drift from traditional equipment with emerging, anti-drift technologies. The applications were carried out in the Kopais area in central Greece. Currently few data exist as regards to pesticide spray drift in Southern European conditions. This work details the data for ground and airborne deposition of spray drift using the methodology developed in the UK by the Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA). Three trials were performed in two days using sunset yellow dye which deposited on dosimeters placed at specific distances from the edge of the sprayer boom. The application was carried out with a tractor mounted boom sprayer, which was of local manufacture, as were the nozzles of Trial I, being flat fan brass nozzles. For Trials II and III anti-drift nozzles were used. The boom sprayers were used with the settings as employed by the farmers for the routine pesticide applications. The results of this work indicate that drift was significantly reduced when anti-drift nozzles were utilized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A New Laccase Based Biosensor for Tartrazine.

    PubMed

    Mazlan, Siti Zulaikha; Lee, Yook Heng; Hanifah, Sharina Abu

    2017-12-09

    Laccase enzyme, a commonly used enzyme for the construction of biosensors for phenolic compounds was used for the first time to develop a new biosensor for the determination of the azo-dye tartrazine. The electrochemical biosensor was based on the immobilization of laccase on functionalized methacrylate-acrylate microspheres. The biosensor membrane is a composite of the laccase conjugated microspheres and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) coated on a carbon-paste screen-printed electrode. The reaction involving tartrazine can be catalyzed by laccase enzyme, where the current change was measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at 1.1 V. The anodic peak current was linear within the tartrazine concentration range of 0.2 to 14 μM ( R ² = 0.979) and the detection limit was 0.04 μM. Common food ingredients or additives such as glucose, sucrose, ascorbic acid, phenol and sunset yellow did not interfere with the biosensor response. Furthermore, the biosensor response was stable up to 30 days of storage period at 4 °C. Foods and beverage were used as real samples for the biosensor validation. The biosensor response to tartrazine showed no significant difference with a standard HPLC method for tartrazine analysis.

  2. A New Laccase Based Biosensor for Tartrazine

    PubMed Central

    Mazlan, Siti Zulaikha; Lee, Yook Heng; Hanifah, Sharina Abu

    2017-01-01

    Laccase enzyme, a commonly used enzyme for the construction of biosensors for phenolic compounds was used for the first time to develop a new biosensor for the determination of the azo-dye tartrazine. The electrochemical biosensor was based on the immobilization of laccase on functionalized methacrylate-acrylate microspheres. The biosensor membrane is a composite of the laccase conjugated microspheres and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) coated on a carbon-paste screen-printed electrode. The reaction involving tartrazine can be catalyzed by laccase enzyme, where the current change was measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at 1.1 V. The anodic peak current was linear within the tartrazine concentration range of 0.2 to 14 μM (R2 = 0.979) and the detection limit was 0.04 μM. Common food ingredients or additives such as glucose, sucrose, ascorbic acid, phenol and sunset yellow did not interfere with the biosensor response. Furthermore, the biosensor response was stable up to 30 days of storage period at 4 °C. Foods and beverage were used as real samples for the biosensor validation. The biosensor response to tartrazine showed no significant difference with a standard HPLC method for tartrazine analysis. PMID:29232842

  3. Effect of Donor Strength and Bulk on Thieno[3,4-b]-pyrazine-Based Panchromatic Dyes in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Liyanage, Nalaka P; Cheema, Hammad; Baumann, Alexandra R; Zylstra, Alexa R; Delcamp, Jared H

    2017-06-22

    Near-infrared-absorbing organic dyes are critically needed in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Thieno[3,4-b]pyrazine (TPz) based dyes can access the NIR spectral region and show power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of up to 8.1 % with sunlight being converted at wavelengths up to 800 nm for 17.6 mA cm -2 of photocurrent in a co-sensitized DSC device. Precisely controlling dye excited-state energies is critical for good performances in NIR DSCs. Strategies to control TPz dye energetics with stronger donor groups and TPz substituent choice are evaluated here. Additionally, donor size influence versus dye loading on TPz dyes is analyzed with respect to the TiO 2 surface protection designed to prevent recombination of electrons in TiO 2 with the redox shuttle. Importantly, the dyes evaluated were demonstrated to work well with low Li + concentration electrolytes, with iodine and cobalt redox shuttle systems, and efficiently as part of co-sensitized devices. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  5. Lost trust: a yellow fever patient response.

    PubMed

    Runge, John S

    2013-12-13

    In the 19th century, yellow fever thrived in the tropical, urban trade centers along the American Gulf Coast. Industrializing and populated, New Orleans and Memphis made excellent habitats for the yellow fever-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and the virulence they imparted on their victims. Known for its jaundice and black, blood-filled vomit, the malady terrorized the region for decades, sometimes claiming tens of thousands of lives during the near annual summertime outbreaks. In response to the failing medical community, a small, pronounced population of sick and healthy laypeople openly criticized the efforts to rid the Gulf region of yellow jack. Utilizing newspapers and cartoons to vocalize their opinions, these critics doubted and mocked the medical community, contributing to the regional and seasonal dilemma yellow fever posed for the American South. These sentient expressions prove to be an early example of patient distrust toward caregivers, a current problem in clinical heath care.

  6. Lost Trust: A Yellow Fever Patient Response

    PubMed Central

    Runge, John S.

    2013-01-01

    In the 19th century, yellow fever thrived in the tropical, urban trade centers along the American Gulf Coast. Industrializing and populated, New Orleans and Memphis made excellent habitats for the yellow fever-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and the virulence they imparted on their victims. Known for its jaundice and black, blood-filled vomit, the malady terrorized the region for decades, sometimes claiming tens of thousands of lives during the near annual summertime outbreaks. In response to the failing medical community, a small, pronounced population of sick and healthy laypeople openly criticized the efforts to rid the Gulf region of yellow jack. Utilizing newspapers and cartoons to vocalize their opinions, these critics doubted and mocked the medical community, contributing to the regional and seasonal dilemma yellow fever posed for the American South. These sentient expressions prove to be an early example of patient distrust toward caregivers, a current problem in clinical heath care. PMID:24348220

  7. 21 CFR 137.290 - Self-rising yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Self-rising yellow corn meal. 137.290 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.290 Self-rising yellow corn meal. Self-rising yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.270 for self-rising white corn meal...

  8. 21 CFR 137.290 - Self-rising yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Self-rising yellow corn meal. 137.290 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.290 Self-rising yellow corn meal. Self-rising yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.270 for self-rising white corn meal...

  9. Competition between nonindigenous ruffe and native yellow perch in laboratory studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Kolar, Cynthia S.

    1996-01-01

    The ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus is a European percid that was accidently introduced in Duluth Harbor, Lake Superior. This nonindigenous species is closely related to yellow perch Perca flavescens, and because the two species have similar diets and habitat requirements, they are potential competitors. Laboratory studies in aquaria and pools were conducted to determine whether ruffe can compete with yellow perch for food. Ruffe had capture rates similar to those of yellow perch when food was unlimited. Ruffe spent more time than yellow perch over a feeding container before leaving it and searching again, and they also required less time to ingest (or handle) prey. However, the presence of yellow perch shortened the time ruffe spent over foraging areas when food was more limited. In addition, yellow perch were more active than ruffe, as indicated by their more frequent visits to a feeding container. Hence, the outcome of exploitative competition was not conclusive; ruffe appear to have the advantage in some behaviors, yellow perch in others. Ruffe were much more aggressive than yellow perch, and interference competition may be important in the interactions between these species. Our results indicate that ruffe might compete with native yellow perch.

  10. Modulation of π-spacer of carbazole-carbazole based organic dyes toward high efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitpakdee, Chirawat; Jungsuttiwong, Siriporn; Sudyoadsuk, Taweesak; Promarak, Vinich; Kungwan, Nawee; Namuangruk, Supawadee

    2017-03-01

    The effects of type and position of π-linker in carbazole-carbazole based dyes on their performance in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were investigated by DFT and TDDFT methods. The calculated electronic energy level, electron density composition, charge injection and charge recombination properties were compared with those of the high performance CCT3A dye synthesized recently. It is found that that mixing a benzothiadizole (B) unit with two thiophene (T) units in the π-spacer can greatly shift absorption wavelength to near infrared region and enhance the light harvesting efficiency (LHE) resulting in increasing of short-circuit current density (Jsc), whereas a thienothiophene unit does not affect those properties. However, a B should be not directly connected to the anchoring group of the dye because it brings electrolyte to the TiO2 surface which may increase charge recombination rate and consequently decrease open circuit voltage (Voc). This work shows how type and position of the π-linker affect the performance of DSSCs, and how to modulate those properties. We predicted that the designed dye derived from insertion of the B unit in between the two T units would have higher performance than CCT3A dye. The insight understanding from this study is useful for further design of higher performance dyes by molecular engineering.

  11. Influence of Background Genome on Enzymatic Characteristics of Yellow (Ay/-, Avy/-) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, George L.; Pitot, Henry C.

    1973-01-01

    Identification of the fundamental polypeptide difference between yellow (Ay/-, Avy/-) and non-yellow mice is important for biomedical research because of the influence of the yellow genotype on normal and neoplastic growth and obesity. The complexity of the "yellow mouse syndrome" makes attainment of this objective dependent on the separation of those pleiotropic enzyme differences which are secondary, and depend on the background genome, from those which are primary, and depend primarily on the agouti locus genotype.—Four of nine hepatic enzyme activities assayed simultaneously differed between eight-week-old yellow (Ay/-, Avy/-) and non-yellow (A/-, a/a) male inbred and F1 hybrid mice. Among these four, only cytoplasmic malic enzyme activity was elevated in all yellow mice, as compared with the non-yellow sibs, regardless of background genome. Glucokinase, serine dehydratase, and tyrosine α-ketoglutarate transaminase activities were also changed in yellow mice, but these alterations depended on the background genome.—The ratio of malic enzyme activity to citrate-cleavage enzyme activity, possibly related to the altered fat metabolism of yellow mice, was influenced by background genome as well as by the yellow genotype.——Significant deviations of enzyme activities from mid-parent values among F1 hybrids were associated with particular background genomes; the number of such deviations was larger among yellow mice than among non-yellows and this difference was greater among C3H F1 hybrids than among C57BL/6 F1 hybrids. PMID:4405752

  12. Synthesis and investigation of antimicrobial activity and spectrophotometric and dyeing properties of some novel azo disperse dyes based on naphthalimides.

    PubMed

    Shaki, Hanieh; Gharanjig, Kamaladin; Khosravi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel disperse dyes containing azo group were synthesized through a diazotization and coupling process. The 4-amino-N-2-aminomethylpyridine-1,8-naphthalimide was diazotized by nitrosylsulphuric acid and coupled with various aromatic amines such as N,N-diethylaniline, N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, and 2-methylindole. Chemical structures of the synthesized dyes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR), carbon nuclear magnetic resonance ((13) C NMR), elemental analysis, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectroscopy. The spectrophotometric data of all dyes were evaluated in various solvents with different polarity. Eventually, the dyes were applied on polyamide fabrics in order to investigate their dyeing properties. The fastness properties of the dyed fabrics such as wash, light, and rubbing fastness degrees were measured by standard methods. Moreover, the color gamut of the synthesized dyes was measured on polyamide fabrics. Results indicated that some of the synthesized dyes were able to dye polyamide fabrics with deep shades. They had very good wash and rubbing fastness degrees and moderate-to-good light fastness on polyamide fabrics. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the synthesized dyes were evaluated in soluble state and on the dyed fabrics. The results indicated that dye 2 containing N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline as coupler had the highest activity against all the bacteria and fungi used. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  13. Natural dye extracted from karkadah and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells: experimental and density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Reda, S M; Soliman, K A

    2016-02-01

    This work presents an experimental and theoretical study of cyanidin natural dye as a sensitizer for ZnO dye-sensitized solar cells. ZnO nanoparticles were prepared using ammonia and oxalic acid as a capping agent. The calculated average size of the synthesized ZnO with different capping agents was found to be 32.1 nm. Electronic properties of cyanidin and delphinidin dye were studied using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT with a B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level. By comparing the theoretical results with the experimental data, the cyanidin dye can be used as a sensitizer in dye-sensitized solar cells. An efficiency of 0.006% under an AM-1.5 illumination at 100  mW/cm(2) was attained. The influence of dye adsorption time on the solar cell performance is discussed.

  14. Optical properties of anthocyanin dyes on TiO2 as photosensitizers for application of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahliha, A. H.; Nurosyid, F.; Supriyanto, A.; Kusumaningsih, T.

    2018-03-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is one of the alternative energy that can convert light energy into electrical energy. The component of DSSC consists of FTO substrates, TiO2, electrolyte, dye sensitizer, and counter electrode. This study aim was to determine the effect of optical properties of anthocyanin dyes on efficiency of DSSC. The dye sensitizer used can be extracted from anthocyanin pigments such as dragon fruit, black rice, and red cabbage. The red cabbage sensitizer shows lower absorbance value in the visible range (450-580 nm), than dragon fruit and black rice. The chemical structure of each dye molecules has an R group (carbonyl and hydroxyl) that forms a bond with the oxide layer. Red cabbage dye cell has the highest efficiency, 0.06% then dragon fruit and black rice, 0.02% and 0.03%.

  15. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY POINT OF USE REVERSE OSMOSIS. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT SUNSET RANCH DEVELOPMENT IN HOMEDALE, ID. SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the point of use arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Sunset Ranch Development in Homedale, ID. The objectives of the project are to evaluate t...

  16. Adsorption Properties of p -Methyl Red Monomeric-to-Pentameric Dye Aggregates on Anatase (101) Titania Surfaces: First-Principles Calculations of Dye/TiO 2 Photoanode Interfaces for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Cole, Jacqueline M.

    2014-08-29

    The optical and electronic properties of dye aggregates of p-methyl red on a TiO2 anatase (101) surface were modeled as a function of aggregation order (monomer to pentameric dye) via first principles calculations. A progressive red-shifting and intensity increase toward the visible region in UV/vis absorption spectra is observed from monomeric-to-tetrameric dyes, with each molecule in a given aggregate binding to one of the four possible TiO2 (101) adsorption sites. The pentamer exhibits a blue-shifted peak wave- length in the UV/vis absorption spectra and less absorption intensity in the visible region in comparison; a corresponding manifestation of H-aggregation occurs sincemore » one of these five molecules cannot occupy an adsorption site. This finding is consistent with experiment. Calculated density of states (DOS) and partial DOS spectra reveal similar dye…TiO2 nanocomposite conduction band characteristics but different valence band features. Associated molecular orbital distributions reveal dye-to-TiO2 interfacial charge transfer in all five differing aggregate orders; meanwhile, the level of intramolecular charge transfer in the dye becomes progressively localized around its azo- and electron-donating groups, up to the tetrameric dye/TiO2 species. Dye adsorption energies and dye coverage levels are calculated and compared with experiment. Overall, the findings of this case study serve to aid the molecular design of azo dyes towards better performing DSSC devices wherein they are incorporated. In addition, they provide a helpful example reference for understanding the effects of dye aggregation on the adsorbate…TiO2 interfacial optical and electronic properties.« less

  17. Co-sensitization of natural dyes for improved efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, K. Ashok; Subalakshmi, K.; Senthilselvan, J.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a new approach of co-sensitized DSSC based on natural dyes is investigated to explore the possible way to improve the power conversion efficiency. To realize this purpose 10 DSSC devices were fabricated using mono-sensitization and co-sensitization of ethanolic extracts of natural dye sensitizers obtained from Cactus fruit, Jambolana fruit, Curcumin and Bermuda grass. The optical absorption spectrum of the mono and hybrid dye extracts were studied by UV-Visible absorption spectrum. It shows the characteristic absorption peaks in visible region corresponds to the presence of natural pigments of anthocyanin, betacyanin and chlorophylls. Absorption spectrum of hybrid dyes reveals a wide absorption band in visible region with improved extinction co-efficient and it is favorable for increased light harvesting nature. The power conversion efficiency of DSSC devices were calculated using J-V curve and the maximum efficiency achieved in the present work is noted to be ~0.61% for Cactus-Bermuda co-sensitized DSSC.

  18. International travel between global urban centres vulnerable to yellow fever transmission

    PubMed Central

    Brent, Shannon E; Watts, Alexander; Cetron, Martin; German, Matthew; Kraemer, Moritz UG; Bogoch, Isaac I; Brady, Oliver J; Hay, Simon I; Creatore, Maria I

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the potential for international travel to spread yellow fever virus to cities around the world. Methods We obtained data on the international flight itineraries of travellers who departed yellow fever-endemic areas of the world in 2016 for cities either where yellow fever was endemic or which were suitable for viral transmission. Using a global ecological model of dengue virus transmission, we predicted the suitability of cities in non-endemic areas for yellow fever transmission. We obtained information on national entry requirements for yellow fever vaccination at travellers’ destination cities. Findings In 2016, 45.2 million international air travellers departed from yellow fever-endemic areas of the world. Of 11.7 million travellers with destinations in 472 cities where yellow fever was not endemic but which were suitable for virus transmission, 7.7 million (65.7%) were not required to provide proof of vaccination upon arrival. Brazil, China, India, Mexico, Peru and the United States of America had the highest volumes of travellers arriving from yellow fever-endemic areas and the largest populations living in cities suitable for yellow fever transmission. Conclusion Each year millions of travellers depart from yellow fever-endemic areas of the world for cities in non-endemic areas that appear suitable for viral transmission without having to provide proof of vaccination. Rapid global changes in human mobility and urbanization make it vital for countries to re-examine their vaccination policies and practices to prevent urban yellow fever epidemics. PMID:29875519

  19. YELLOW SUPERGIANTS IN THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY (M31)

    SciTech Connect

    Drout, Maria R.; Massey, Philip; Meynet, Georges

    2009-09-20

    The yellow supergiant content of nearby galaxies can provide a critical test of stellar evolution theory, bridging the gap between the hot, massive stars and the cool red supergiants. But, this region of the color-magnitude diagram is dominated by foreground contamination, requiring membership to somehow be determined. Fortunately, the large negative systemic velocity of M31, coupled to its high rotation rate, provides the means for separating the contaminating foreground dwarfs from the bona fide yellow supergiants within M31. We obtained radial velocities of {approx}2900 individual targets within the correct color-magnitude range corresponding to masses of 12 M{sub sun} and higher.more » A comparison of these velocities to those expected from M31's rotation curve reveals 54 rank-1 (near certain) and 66 rank-2 (probable) yellow supergiant members, indicating a foreground contamination >= 96%. We expect some modest contamination from Milky Way halo giants among the remainder, particularly for the rank-2 candidates, and indeed follow-up spectroscopy of a small sample eliminates four rank 2's while confirming five others. We find excellent agreement between the location of yellow supergiants in the H-R diagram and that predicted by the latest Geneva evolutionary tracks that include rotation. However, the relative number of yellow supergiants seen as a function of mass varies from that predicted by the models by a factor of >10, in the sense that more high-mass yellow supergiants are predicted than those are actually observed. Comparing the total number (16) of >20 M{sub sun} yellow supergiants with the estimated number (24,800) of unevolved O stars indicates that the duration of the yellow supergiant phase is {approx}3000 years. This is consistent with what the 12 M{sub sun} and 15 M{sub sun} evolutionary tracks predict, but disagrees with the 20,000-80,000 year timescales predicted by the models for higher masses.« less

  20. Development of New Laser Protective Dyes. Phase 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    DYE LASERS, PROTECTION, LASERS, DYES , HAZARDS, SYNTHESIS, EYE SAFETY, OPTICAL MATERIALS, PLASTICS, LENSES, THERMAL STABILITY, CYANINE DYES , POLYCARBONATES, INJECTION MOLDING, NEAR INFRARED RADIATION, FLUORENES.