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Sample records for dynamic combinatorial chemistry

  1. Evolution of dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cougnon, Fabien B L; Sanders, Jeremy K M

    2012-12-18

    Since its inception in the mid-1990s, dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC), the chemistry of complex systems under thermodynamic control, has proved valuable in identifying unexpected molecules with remarkable binding properties and in providing effective synthetic routes to complex species. Essentially, in this approach, one designs the experiment rather than the molecule. DCC has also provided us with insights into how some chemical systems respond to external stimuli. Using examples from the work of our laboratory and others, this Account shows how the concept of DCC, inspired by the evolution of living systems, has found an increasing range of applications in diverse areas and has evolved conceptually and experimentally. A dynamic combinatorial library (DCL) is a thermodynamically controlled mixture of interconverting species that can respond to various stimuli. The Cambridge version of dynamic combinatorial chemistry was initially inspired by the mammalian immune system and was conceived as a way to create and identify new unpredictable receptors. For example, an added template can select and stabilize a strongly binding member of the library which is then amplified at the expense of the unsuccessful library members, minimizing the free energy of the system. But researchers have exploited DCC in a variety of other ways: over the past two decades, this technique has contributed to the evolution of chemistry and to applications in the diverse fields of catalysis, fragrance release, and responsive materials. Among these applications, researchers have built intricate and well-defined architectures such as catenanes or hydrogen-bonded nanotubes, using the ability of complex chemical systems to reach a high level of organization. In addition, DCC has proved a powerful tool for the study of complex molecular networks and systems. The use of DCC is improving our understanding of chemical and biological systems. The study of folding or self-replicating macrocycles in

  2. Ternary resin-bound Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gromova, Anna V; Ciszewski, Joseph M; Miller, Benjamin L

    2012-02-18

    The ability to carry out simultaneous orthogonal exchange chemistries has opened new opportunities for increasing the numerical and structural diversity accessible to Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry. We present proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating this concept is transferrable to resin-bound DCC, facilitating the generation and analysis of libraries with greater structural diversity.

  3. [The research progress of dynamic combinatorial chemistry].

    PubMed

    He, Wei; She, Peng-Wei; Fang, Zheng; Guo, Kai

    2013-06-01

    As a novel branch of combinational chemistry, dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) can be viewed as a technique which combines library synthesis and screening in one pot. By addition of molecular target, ligangds, which show binding affinity or strong interaction with the molecular target, can be amplified an young but rapidly growing branch of combinatorial chemistry, has been widely used in organic chemistry, biochemistry, material fields. Ligands in the library can be amplified, since synthesis of the library is screened by a molecular target. Therefore, these structures could be identified easily. Consequently DCC has been widely used in the lead discovery, material chemistry and other fields. On the basis of the principle and method of DCC, this review emphasizes the three factors of DCC, including molecular targets (bio-enzyme, lectin, nucleic acid, organic molecule, inorganic molecule); reaction (disulphide chemistry, ammoniation reduction reaction, hydrazone chemistry, etc.) and analytical method. Meanwhile, limitation, current situation and future development of DCC were also discussed in this paper.

  4. Dynamic combinatorial libraries: new opportunities in systems chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Rosemary A R; Otto, Sijbren

    2011-01-21

    Combinatorial chemistry is a tool for selecting molecules with special properties. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry started off aiming to be just that. However, unlike ordinary combinatorial chemistry, the interconnectedness of dynamic libraries gives them an extra dimension. An understanding of these molecular networks at systems level is essential for their use as a selection tool and creates exciting new opportunities in systems chemistry. In this feature article we discuss selected examples and considerations related to the advanced exploitation of dynamic combinatorial libraries for their originally conceived purpose of identifying strong binding interactions. Also reviewed are examples illustrating a trend towards increasing complexity in terms of network behaviour and reversible chemistry. Finally, new applications of dynamic combinatorial chemistry in self-assembly, transport and self-replication are discussed.

  5. Dynamic combinatorial libraries: from exploring molecular recognition to systems chemistry.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianwei; Nowak, Piotr; Otto, Sijbren

    2013-06-26

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) is a subset of combinatorial chemistry where the library members interconvert continuously by exchanging building blocks with each other. Dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs) are powerful tools for discovering the unexpected and have given rise to many fascinating molecules, ranging from interlocked structures to self-replicators. Furthermore, dynamic combinatorial molecular networks can produce emergent properties at systems level, which provide exciting new opportunities in systems chemistry. In this perspective we will highlight some new methodologies in this field and analyze selected examples of DCLs that are under thermodynamic control, leading to synthetic receptors, catalytic systems, and complex self-assembled supramolecular architectures. Also reviewed are extensions of the principles of DCC to systems that are not at equilibrium and may therefore harbor richer functional behavior. Examples include self-replication and molecular machines.

  6. Dithioacetal Exchange: A New Reversible Reaction for Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Orrillo, A Gastón; Escalante, Andrea M; Furlan, Ricardo L E

    2016-05-10

    Reversibility of dithioacetal bond formation is reported under acidic mild conditions. Its utility for dynamic combinatorial chemistry was explored by combining it with orthogonal disulfide exchange. In such a setup, thiols are positioned at the intersection of both chemistries, constituting a connecting node between temporally separated networks. PMID:26990904

  7. Dithioacetal Exchange: A New Reversible Reaction for Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Orrillo, A Gastón; Escalante, Andrea M; Furlan, Ricardo L E

    2016-05-10

    Reversibility of dithioacetal bond formation is reported under acidic mild conditions. Its utility for dynamic combinatorial chemistry was explored by combining it with orthogonal disulfide exchange. In such a setup, thiols are positioned at the intersection of both chemistries, constituting a connecting node between temporally separated networks.

  8. Introducing Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: Probing the Substrate Selectivity of Acetylcholinesterase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelin, Marcus; Larsson, Rikard; Vongvilai, Pornrapee; Ramstrom, Olof

    2010-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, college students are introduced to dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) and apply it to determine the substrate selectivity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Initially, the students construct a chemical library of dynamically interchanging thioesters and thiols. Then, AChE is added and allowed to select and hydrolyze…

  9. Probing secondary interactions in biomolecular recognition by dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Sébastien; Dumy, Pascal

    2014-06-01

    Artificial multivalent recognition systems offer promising perspectives for developing synthetic compounds capable of interacting effectively and selectively with biomolecules in aqueous medium. The identification of multi-point binding ligands requires screening of a large number of complex structures, with different spacers, different ligands, and varying valency. This represents a challenge for rational design approaches. On the other hand, the use of dynamic covalent chemistry enables a target-driven one-pot screening approach for probing secondary interactions, thereby facilitating the identification of multivalent recognition systems that optimally combine multiple fragments. Herein we review the recent developments in the implementation of dynamic combinatorial chemistry for probing secondary interactions and thereby identify multi-point binding ligands of biomolecules.

  10. Discovery of an Aurora kinase inhibitor through site-specific dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cancilla, Mark T; He, Molly M; Viswanathan, Nina; Simmons, Robert L; Taylor, Meggin; Fung, Amy D; Cao, Kathy; Erlanson, Daniel A

    2008-07-15

    We demonstrate a fragment-based lead discovery method that combines site-directed ligand discovery with dynamic combinatorial chemistry. Our technique targets dynamic combinatorial screening to a specified region of a protein by using reversible disulfide chemistry. We have used this technology to rapidly identify inhibitors of the drug target Aurora A that span the purine-binding site and the adaptive pocket of the kinase. The binding mode of a noncovalent inhibitor has been further characterized through crystallography.

  11. Discovery of An Aurora Kinase Inhibitor Through Site-Specific Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Cancilla, M.T.; He, M.M.; Viswanathan, N.; Simmons, R.L.; Taylor, M.; Fung, A.D.; Cao, K.; Erlanson, D.A.

    2009-05-12

    We demonstrate a fragment-based lead discovery method that combines site-directed ligand discovery with dynamic combinatorial chemistry. Our technique targets dynamic combinatorial screening to a specified region of a protein by using reversible disulfide chemistry. We have used this technology to rapidly identify inhibitors of the drug target Aurora A that span the purine-binding site and the adaptive pocket of the kinase. The binding mode of a noncovalent inhibitor has been further characterized through crystallography.

  12. A novel protocol to accelerate dynamic combinatorial chemistry via isolation of ligand-target adducts from dynamic combinatorial libraries: a case study identifying competitive inhibitors of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheng; He, Wei; Li, Xin; Li, Zhengjiang; Chen, Beining; Ouyang, Pingkai; Guo, Kai

    2013-09-15

    A novel protocol based on size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and MS was established to accelerate dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) in this study. By isolating ligand-target adducts from the dynamic combinatorial library (DCL), ligands could be identified directly by MS after denaturation. Three new inhibitors for lysozyme were discovered by this SEC-MS protocol in a case study. Km Data for these new inhibitors was also determined.

  13. Discovery of linear receptors for multiple dihydrogen phosphate ions using dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Beeren, Sophie R; Sanders, Jeremy K M

    2011-03-23

    We describe the use of dynamic combinatorial chemistry to discover a new series of linear hydrazone-based receptors that bind multiple dihydrogen phosphate ions. Through the use of a template-driven, selection-based approach to receptor synthesis, dynamic combinatorial chemistry allows for the identification of unexpected host structures and binding motifs. Notably, we observed the unprecedented selection of these linear receptors in preference to competing macrocyclic hosts. Furthermore, linear receptors containing up to nine building blocks and three different building blocks were amplified in the dynamic combinatorial library. The receptors were formed using a dihydrazide building block based on an amino acid-disubstituted ferrocene scaffold. A detailed study of the linear pentamer revealed that it forms a helical ditopic receptor that employs four acylhydrazone hydrogen-bond donor motifs to cooperatively bind two dihydrogen phosphate ions.

  14. Protein-Directed Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: A Guide to Protein Ligand and Inhibitor Discovery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renjie; Leung, Ivanhoe K H

    2016-07-16

    Protein-directed dynamic combinatorial chemistry is an emerging technique for efficient discovery of novel chemical structures for binding to a target protein. Typically, this method relies on a library of small molecules that react reversibly with each other to generate a combinatorial library. The components in the combinatorial library are at equilibrium with each other under thermodynamic control. When a protein is added to the equilibrium mixture, and if the protein interacts with any components of the combinatorial library, the position of the equilibrium will shift and those components that interact with the protein will be amplified, which can then be identified by a suitable biophysical technique. Such information is useful as a starting point to guide further organic synthesis of novel protein ligands and enzyme inhibitors. This review uses literature examples to discuss the practicalities of applying this method to inhibitor discovery, in particular, the set-up of the combinatorial library, the reversible reactions that may be employed, and the choice of detection methods to screen protein ligands from a mixture of reversibly forming molecules.

  15. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry with hydrazones: cholate-based building blocks and libraries.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Mark G; Pittelkow, Michael; Watson, Stephen P; Sanders, Jeremy K M

    2010-03-01

    We describe an efficient and general strategy for the synthesis of dimethyl acetal functionalised steroidal hydrazides based on the cholic acid skeleton with the aim of using these compounds as building blocks for dynamic combinatorial chemistry. Deprotection of the acetal protected building blocks with TFA leads to formation of libraries containing macrocyclic N-acyl hydrazone oligomers. The isolation of several of these, and their characterisation using NMR is described. The effects on the equilibrium library distribution by varying the substituents at C-7 and C-12, extending the side-chain with glycine, and inverting the configuration at C-3 are discussed. Finally, we report the exchange properties of these macrocycles and demonstrate new examples of proof-reading and self-sorting in dynamic combinatorial libraries.

  16. Localized template-driven functionalization of nanoparticles by dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Piotr; Saggiomo, Vittorio; Salehian, Fatemeh; Colomb-Delsuc, Mathieu; Han, Yang; Otto, Sijbren

    2015-03-27

    We have developed a method for the localized functionalization of gold nanoparticles using imine-based dynamic combinatorial chemistry. By using DNA templates, amines were grafted on the aldehyde-functionalized nanoparticles only if and where the nanoparticles interacted with the template molecules. Functionalization of the nanoparticles was controlled solely by the DNA template; only amines capable of interacting with DNA were bound to the surface. Interestingly, even though our libraries contained only a handful of simple amines, the DNA sequence influenced their attachment to the surface. Our method opens up new opportunities for the synthesis of multivalent, nanoparticle-based receptors for biomacromolecules.

  17. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry: a tool to facilitate the identification of inhibitors for protein targets.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Milon; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2015-04-21

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) has emerged as a powerful strategy to identify ligands for biological targets given that it enables the target to direct the synthesis and amplification of its strongest binder(s) from the library of interconverting compounds. Since the first report of DCC applied to the discovery of binders for a protein, this elegant tool has been employed on a range of protein targets at various stages of medicinal-chemistry projects. A series of suitable, reversible reactions that are biocompatible have been established and the portfolio of analytical techniques is growing. Despite progress, in most cases, the libraries employed remain of moderate size. We present here the most recent advances in the field of DCC applied to protein targets, paying particular attention to the experimental conditions and analytical methods chosen.

  18. Generation of a Multicomponent Library of Disulfide Donor-Acceptor Architectures Using Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Drożdż, Wojciech; Kołodziejski, Michał; Markiewicz, Grzegorz; Jenczak, Anna; Stefankiewicz, Artur R

    2015-07-17

    We describe here the generation of new donor-acceptor disulfide architectures obtained in aqueous solution at physiological pH. The application of a dynamic combinatorial chemistry approach allowed us to generate a large number of new disulfide macrocyclic architectures together with a new type of [2]catenanes consisting of four distinct components. Up to fifteen types of structurally-distinct dynamic architectures have been generated through one-pot disulfide exchange reactions between four thiol-functionalized aqueous components. The distribution of disulfide products formed was found to be strongly dependent on the structural features of the thiol components employed. This work not only constitutes a success in the synthesis of topologically- and morphologically-complex targets, but it may also open new horizons for the use of this methodology in the construction of molecular machines.

  19. Generation of a Multicomponent Library of Disulfide Donor-Acceptor Architectures Using Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Drożdż, Wojciech; Kołodziejski, Michał; Markiewicz, Grzegorz; Jenczak, Anna; Stefankiewicz, Artur R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe here the generation of new donor-acceptor disulfide architectures obtained in aqueous solution at physiological pH. The application of a dynamic combinatorial chemistry approach allowed us to generate a large number of new disulfide macrocyclic architectures together with a new type of [2]catenanes consisting of four distinct components. Up to fifteen types of structurally-distinct dynamic architectures have been generated through one-pot disulfide exchange reactions between four thiol-functionalized aqueous components. The distribution of disulfide products formed was found to be strongly dependent on the structural features of the thiol components employed. This work not only constitutes a success in the synthesis of topologically- and morphologically-complex targets, but it may also open new horizons for the use of this methodology in the construction of molecular machines. PMID:26193265

  20. Discovering Echinococcus granulosus thioredoxin glutathione reductase inhibitors through site-specific dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Saiz, Cecilia; Castillo, Valerie; Fontán, Pablo; Bonilla, Mariana; Salinas, Gustavo; Rodríguez-Haralambides, Alejandra; Mahler, S Graciela

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we report a strategy using dynamic combinatorial chemistry for targeting the thioredoxin (Trx)-reductase catalytic site on Trx glutathione reductase (TGR), a pyridine nucleotide thiol-disulfide oxido-reductase. We chose Echinococcus granulosus TGR since it is a bottleneck enzyme of platyhelminth parasites and a validated pharmacological target. A dynamic combinatorial library (DCL) was constructed based on thiol-disulfide reversible exchange. We demonstrate the use of 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid (TNB) as a non-covalent anchor fragment in a DCL templated by E. granulosus TGR. The heterodimer of TNB and bisthiazolidine (2af) was identified, upon library analysis by HPLC (IC50 = 24 μM). Furthermore, 14 analogs were synthetically prepared and evaluated against TGR. This allowed the study of a structure-activity relationship and the identification of a disulfide TNB-tricyclic bisthiazolidine (2aj) as the best enzyme inhibitor in these series, with an IC50 = 24 μM. Thus, our results validate the use of DCL for targeting thiol-disulfide oxido-reductases.

  1. A fragment-based approach to probing adenosine recognition sites by using dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Scott, Duncan E; Dawes, Gwen J; Ando, Michiyo; Abell, Chris; Ciulli, Alessio

    2009-11-23

    A new strategy that combines the concepts of fragment-based drug design and dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) for targeting adenosine recognition sites on enzymes is reported. We demonstrate the use of 5'-deoxy-5'-thioadenosine as a noncovalent anchor fragment in dynamic combinatorial libraries templated by Mycobacterium tuberculosis pantothenate synthetase. A benzyl disulfide derivative was identified upon library analysis by HPLC. Structural and binding studies of protein-ligand complexes by X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry informed the subsequent optimisation of the DCC hit into a disulfide containing the novel meta-nitrobenzyl fragment that targets the pantoate binding site of pantothenate synthetase. Given the prevalence of adenosine-recognition motifs in enzymes, our results provide a proof-of-concept for using this strategy to probe adjacent pockets for a range of adenosine binding enzymes, including other related adenylate-forming ligases, kinases, and ATPases, as well as NAD(P)(H), CoA and FAD(H2) binding proteins.

  2. Structure-based design of inhibitors of the aspartic protease endothiapepsin by exploiting dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Milon; Radeva, Nedyalka; Köster, Helene; Park, Ahyoung; Potamitis, Constantinos; Zervou, Maria; Klebe, Gerhard; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2014-03-17

    Structure-based design (SBD) can be used for the design and/or optimization of new inhibitors for a biological target. Whereas de novo SBD is rarely used, most reports on SBD are dealing with the optimization of an initial hit. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) has emerged as a powerful strategy to identify bioactive ligands given that it enables the target to direct the synthesis of its strongest binder. We have designed a library of potential inhibitors (acylhydrazones) generated from five aldehydes and five hydrazides and used DCC to identify the best binder(s). After addition of the aspartic protease endothiapepsin, we characterized the protein-bound library member(s) by saturation-transfer difference NMR spectroscopy. Cocrystallization experiments validated the predicted binding mode of the two most potent inhibitors, thus demonstrating that the combination of de novo SBD and DCC constitutes an efficient starting point for hit identification and optimization.

  3. NMR methods in combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, M J; Wareing, J R

    1998-06-01

    The use of NMR spectroscopy in combinatorial chemistry has provided a versatile tool for monitoring combinatorial chemistry reactions and for assessing ligand-receptor interactions. The application of magic angle spinning NMR is widespread and has allowed structure determination to be performed on compounds attached to solid supports. A variety of two-dimensional NMR techniques have been applied to enhance the usability of the magic angle spinning NMR data. New developments for solution NMR analysis include high performance liquid chromatography, NMR, mass spectroscopy and flow NMR. NMR based methods currently being investigated may prove valuable as compound screening tools.

  4. Algorithmic Strategies in Combinatorial Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    GOLDMAN,DEBORAH; ISTRAIL,SORIN; LANCIA,GIUSEPPE; PICCOLBONI,ANTONIO; WALENZ,BRIAN

    2000-08-01

    Combinatorial Chemistry is a powerful new technology in drug design and molecular recognition. It is a wet-laboratory methodology aimed at ``massively parallel'' screening of chemical compounds for the discovery of compounds that have a certain biological activity. The power of the method comes from the interaction between experimental design and computational modeling. Principles of ``rational'' drug design are used in the construction of combinatorial libraries to speed up the discovery of lead compounds with the desired biological activity. This paper presents algorithms, software development and computational complexity analysis for problems arising in the design of combinatorial libraries for drug discovery. The authors provide exact polynomial time algorithms and intractability results for several Inverse Problems-formulated as (chemical) graph reconstruction problems-related to the design of combinatorial libraries. These are the first rigorous algorithmic results in the literature. The authors also present results provided by the combinatorial chemistry software package OCOTILLO for combinatorial peptide design using real data libraries. The package provides exact solutions for general inverse problems based on shortest-path topological indices. The results are superior both in accuracy and computing time to the best software reports published in the literature. For 5-peptoid design, the computation is rigorously reduced to an exhaustive search of about 2% of the search space; the exact solutions are found in a few minutes.

  5. Identification of inhibitors for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor by using dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhao; Fang, Zheng; He, Wei; Wang, Zhixiang; Gan, Haifeng; Tian, Qitao; Guo, Kai

    2016-04-01

    The novel analysis method consisting of size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and HRMS analysis was firstly applied in the discovery of potential inhibitors towards cancer drug targets. With vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR-2) as a target, dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs) were prepared by reacting aldehydes with amines. Four sensitive binders targeted VEGFR-2 were directly isolated from the library. Antitumor activity test in vitro and inhibition experiments toward angiogenesis were also carried out.

  6. Patenting inventions in combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Borson, D B

    2000-02-01

    I have intended to provide an overview of some patent strategies for protecting intellectual property in the combinatorial chemistry arts, along with examples taken from recently issued patents. The opinions in this paper are those of the author, and are not intended to be relied upon as legal advice. Specific questions about any particular patent or invention should be discussed with competent counsel before action is taken. If you would like to look at the patents discussed in this article, they are available on-line at http:¿www.patents.ibm.com/boolquery and at other locations.

  7. Dynamic combinatorial/covalent chemistry: a tool to read, generate and modulate the bioactivity of compounds and compound mixtures.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Andreas

    2014-03-21

    Reversible covalent bond formation under thermodynamic control adds reactivity to self-assembled supramolecular systems, and is therefore an ideal tool to assess complexity of chemical and biological systems. Dynamic combinatorial/covalent chemistry (DCC) has been used to read structural information by selectively assembling receptors with the optimum molecular fit around a given template from a mixture of reversibly reacting building blocks. This technique allows access to efficient sensing devices and the generation of new biomolecules, such as small molecule receptor binders for drug discovery, but also larger biomimetic polymers and macromolecules with particular three-dimensional structural architectures. Adding a kinetic factor to a thermodynamically controlled equilibrium results in dynamic resolution and in self-sorting and self-replicating systems, all of which are of major importance in biological systems. Furthermore, the temporary modification of bioactive compounds by reversible combinatorial/covalent derivatisation allows control of their release and facilitates their transport across amphiphilic self-assembled systems such as artificial membranes or cell walls. The goal of this review is to give a conceptual overview of how the impact of DCC on supramolecular assemblies at different levels can allow us to understand, predict and modulate the complexity of biological systems.

  8. Combinatorial Chemistry for Optical Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-García, M. E.; Luis, G. Pina; Rivero-Espejel, I. A.

    The recent interest in combinatorial chemistry for the synthesis of selective recognition materials for optical sensing applications is presented. The preparation, screening, and applications of libraries of ligands and chemosensors against molecular species and metal ions are first considered. Included in this chapter are also the developments involving applications of combinatorial approaches to the discovery of sol-gel and acrylic-based imprinted materials for optical sensing of antibiotics and pesticides, as well as libraries of doped sol-gels for high-throughput optical sensing of oxygen. The potential of combinatorial chemistry applied to the discovery of new sensing materials is highlighted.

  9. Development and mechanistic studies of an optimized receptor for trimethyllysine using iterative redesign by dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pinkin, Nicholas K; Waters, Marcey L

    2014-09-28

    A new small molecule receptor, A2N, has been identified that binds specifically to trimethyllysine (Kme3) with sub-micromolar affinity. This receptor was discovered through the iterative redesign of a monomer known to incorporate through dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) into a previously reported receptor for Kme3, A2B. In place of monomer B, the newly designed monomer N introduces an additional cation-π interaction into the binding pocket, resulting in more favorable binding to Kme3 by 1.3 kcal mol(-1), amounting to a 10-fold improvement in affinity and a 5-fold improvement in selectivity over Kme2. This receptor exhibits the tightest affinity and greatest selectivity for KMe3-containing peptides reported to date. Comparative studies of A2B and A2N provide mechanistic insight into the driving force for both the higher affinity and higher selectivity of A2N, indicating that the binding of KMe3 to A2N is both enthalpically and entropically more favorable. This work demonstrates the ability of iterative redesign coupled with DCC to develop novel selective receptors with the necessary affinity and selectivity required for biological applications.

  10. Identification of ligands for the Tau exon 10 splicing regulatory element RNA by using dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    López-Senín, Paula; Gómez-Pinto, Irene; Grandas, Anna; Marchán, Vicente

    2011-02-01

    We describe the use of dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) to identify ligands for the stem-loop structure located at the exon 10-5'-intron junction of Tau pre-mRNA, which is involved in the onset of several tauopathies including frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). A series of ligands that combine the small aminoglycoside neamine and heteroaromatic moieties (azaquinolone and two acridines) have been identified by using DCC. These compounds effectively bind the stem-loop RNA target (the concentration required for 50% RNA response (EC(50)): 2-58 μM), as determined by fluorescence titration experiments. Importantly, most of them are able to stabilize both the wild-type and the +3 and +14 mutated sequences associated with the development of FTDP-17 without producing a significant change in the overall structure of the RNA (as analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy), which is a key factor for recognition by the splicing regulatory machinery. A good correlation has been found between the affinity of the ligands for the target and their ability to stabilize the RNA secondary structure.

  11. Integrating virtual screening and combinatorial chemistry for accelerated drug discovery.

    PubMed

    López-Vallejo, Fabian; Caulfield, Thomas; Martínez-Mayorga, Karina; Giulianotti, Marc A; Nefzi, Adel; Houghten, Richard A; Medina-Franco, Jose L

    2011-07-01

    Virtual screening is increasingly being used in drug discovery programs with a growing number of successful applications. Experimental methodologies developed to speed up the drug discovery processes include high-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry. The complementarities between computational and experimental screenings have been recognized and reviewed in the literature. Computational methods have also been used in the combinatorial chemistry field, in particular in library design. However, the integration of computational and combinatorial chemistry screenings has been attempted only recently. Combinatorial libraries (experimental or virtual) represent a notable source of chemically related compounds. Advances in combinatorial chemistry and deconvolution strategies, have enabled the rapid exploration of novel and dense regions in the chemical space. The present review is focused on the integration of virtual and experimental screening of combinatorial libraries. Applications of virtual screening to discover novel anticancer agents and our ongoing efforts towards the integration of virtual screening and combinatorial chemistry are also discussed.

  12. DNA-Encoded Dynamic Combinatorial Chemical Libraries.

    PubMed

    Reddavide, Francesco V; Lin, Weilin; Lehnert, Sarah; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-06-26

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) explores the thermodynamic equilibrium of reversible reactions. Its application in the discovery of protein binders is largely limited by difficulties in the analysis of complex reaction mixtures. DNA-encoded chemical library (DECL) technology allows the selection of binders from a mixture of up to billions of different compounds; however, experimental results often show low a signal-to-noise ratio and poor correlation between enrichment factor and binding affinity. Herein we describe the design and application of DNA-encoded dynamic combinatorial chemical libraries (EDCCLs). Our experiments have shown that the EDCCL approach can be used not only to convert monovalent binders into high-affinity bivalent binders, but also to cause remarkably enhanced enrichment of potent bivalent binders by driving their in situ synthesis. We also demonstrate the application of EDCCLs in DNA-templated chemical reactions.

  13. The synergy between combinatorial chemistry and high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Diller, David J

    2008-05-01

    Despite the initial promise of combinatorial chemistry, particularly large library combinatorial chemistry, to greatly accelerate drug discovery, this approach has not been fully utilized as a means to build the compound collections of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. This review highlights some of the strengths of large library combinatorial chemistry as a means of generating molecules for lead discovery, such as providing rich and robust structure-activity relationships around each hit series. The challenges and concepts emerging from traditional high-throughput screening and fragment-based drug design, how these methods influence the design of large combinatorial libraries and the interpretation of the ensuing high-throughput screening data are also highlighted.

  14. Fragment Linking and Optimization of Inhibitors of the Aspartic Protease Endothiapepsin: Fragment-Based Drug Design Facilitated by Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Milon; Radeva, Nedyalka; Fanlo-Virgós, Hugo; Otto, Sijbren; Klebe, Gerhard; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2016-08-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) affords active compounds for biological targets. While there are numerous reports on FBDD by fragment growing/optimization, fragment linking has rarely been reported. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) has become a powerful hit-identification strategy for biological targets. We report the synergistic combination of fragment linking and DCC to identify inhibitors of the aspartic protease endothiapepsin. Based on X-ray crystal structures of endothiapepsin in complex with fragments, we designed a library of bis-acylhydrazones and used DCC to identify potent inhibitors. The most potent inhibitor exhibits an IC50 value of 54 nm, which represents a 240-fold improvement in potency compared to the parent hits. Subsequent X-ray crystallography validated the predicted binding mode, thus demonstrating the efficiency of the combination of fragment linking and DCC as a hit-identification strategy. This approach could be applied to a range of biological targets, and holds the potential to facilitate hit-to-lead optimization.

  15. Fragment Linking and Optimization of Inhibitors of the Aspartic Protease Endothiapepsin: Fragment-Based Drug Design Facilitated by Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Milon; Radeva, Nedyalka; Fanlo-Virgós, Hugo; Otto, Sijbren; Klebe, Gerhard; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2016-08-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) affords active compounds for biological targets. While there are numerous reports on FBDD by fragment growing/optimization, fragment linking has rarely been reported. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) has become a powerful hit-identification strategy for biological targets. We report the synergistic combination of fragment linking and DCC to identify inhibitors of the aspartic protease endothiapepsin. Based on X-ray crystal structures of endothiapepsin in complex with fragments, we designed a library of bis-acylhydrazones and used DCC to identify potent inhibitors. The most potent inhibitor exhibits an IC50 value of 54 nm, which represents a 240-fold improvement in potency compared to the parent hits. Subsequent X-ray crystallography validated the predicted binding mode, thus demonstrating the efficiency of the combination of fragment linking and DCC as a hit-identification strategy. This approach could be applied to a range of biological targets, and holds the potential to facilitate hit-to-lead optimization. PMID:27400756

  16. Simultaneous Disulfide and Boronic Acid Ester Exchange in Dynamic Combinatorial Libraries.

    PubMed

    Diemer, Sanna L; Kristensen, Morten; Rasmussen, Brian; Beeren, Sophie R; Pittelkow, Michael

    2015-09-10

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry has emerged as a promising tool for the discovery of complex receptors in supramolecular chemistry. At the heart of dynamic combinatorial chemistry are the reversible reactions that enable the exchange of building blocks between library members in dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs) ensuring thermodynamic control over the system. If more than one reversible reaction operates in a single dynamic combinatorial library, the complexity of the system increases dramatically, and so does its possible applications. One can imagine two reversible reactions that operate simultaneously or two reversible reactions that operate independently. Both these scenarios have advantages and disadvantages. In this contribution, we show how disulfide exchange and boronic ester transesterification can function simultaneous in dynamic combinatorial libraries under appropriate conditions. We describe the detailed studies necessary to establish suitable reaction conditions and highlight the analytical techniques appropriate to study this type of system.

  17. Nonlinear dynamics in combinatorial games: Renormalizing Chomp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Eric J.; Landsberg, Adam Scott

    2007-06-01

    We develop a new approach to combinatorial games that reveals connections between such games and some of the central ideas of nonlinear dynamics: scaling behaviors, complex dynamics and chaos, universality, and aggregation processes. We take as our model system the combinatorial game Chomp, which is one of the simplest in a class of "unsolved" combinatorial games that includes Chess, Checkers, and Go. We discover that the game possesses an underlying geometric structure that "grows" (reminiscent of crystal growth), and show how this growth can be analyzed using a renormalization procedure adapted from physics. In effect, this methodology allows one to transform a combinatorial game like Chomp into a type of dynamical system. Not only does this provide powerful insights into the game of Chomp (yielding a complete probabilistic description of optimal play in Chomp and an answer to a longstanding question about the nature of the winning opening move), but more generally, it offers a mathematical framework for exploring this unexpected relationship between combinatorial games and modern dynamical systems theory.

  18. Method and apparatus for combinatorial chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, Robert S.

    2009-06-23

    A method and apparatus are provided for performing light-directed reactions in spatially addressable channels within a plurality of channels. One aspect of the invention employs photoactivatable reagents in solutions disposed into spatially addressable flow streams to control the parallel synthesis of molecules immobilized within the channels. The reagents may be photoactivated within a subset of channels at the site of immobilized substrate molecules or at a light-addressable site upstream from the substrate molecules. The method and apparatus of the invention find particularly utility in the synthesis of biopolymer arrays, e.g., oligonucleotides, peptides and carbohydrates, and in the combinatorial synthesis of small molecule arrays for drug discovery.

  19. Method and apparatus for combinatorial chemistry

    DOEpatents

    Foote, Robert S.

    2007-02-20

    A method and apparatus are provided for performing light-directed reactions in spatially addressable channels within a plurality of channels. One aspect of the invention employs photoactivatable reagents in solutions disposed into spatially addressable flow streams to control the parallel synthesis of molecules immobilized within the channels. The reagents may be photoactivated within a subset of channels at the site of immobilized substrate molecules or at a light-addressable site upstream from the substrate molecules. The method and apparatus of the invention find particularly utility in the synthesis of biopolymer arrays, e.g., oligonucleotides, peptides and carbohydrates, and in the combinatorial synthesis of small molecule arrays for drug discovery.

  20. Method and apparatus for combinatorial chemistry

    DOEpatents

    Foote, Robert S.

    2012-06-05

    A method and apparatus are provided for performing light-directed reactions in spatially addressable channels within a plurality of channels. One aspect of the invention employs photoactivatable reagents in solutions disposed into spatially addressable flow streams to control the parallel synthesis of molecules immobilized within the channels. The reagents may be photoactivated within a subset of channels at the site of immobilized substrate molecules or at a light-addressable site upstream from the substrate molecules. The method and apparatus of the invention find particularly utility in the synthesis of biopolymer arrays, e.g., oligonucleotides, peptides and carbohydrates, and in the combinatorial synthesis of small molecule arrays for drug discovery.

  1. Transfer RNA modifications: nature's combinatorial chemistry playground.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Jane E; Alfonzo, Juan D

    2013-01-01

    Following synthesis, tRNAs are peppered by numerous chemical modifications which may differentially affect a tRNA's structure and function. Although modifications affecting the business ends of a tRNA are predictably important for cell viability, a majority of modifications play more subtle structural roles that can affect tRNA stability and folding. The current trend is that modifications act in concert and it is in the context of the specific sequence of a given tRNA that they impart their differing effects. Recent developments in the modification field have highlighted the diversity of modifications in tRNA. From these, the combinatorial nature of modifications in explaining previously described phenotypes derived from their absence has emerged as a growing theme.

  2. Mesofluidic devices for DNA-programmed combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Weisinger, Rebecca M; Marinelli, Robert J; Wrenn, S Jarrett; Harbury, Pehr B

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid combinatorial chemistry strategies that use DNA as an information-carrying medium are proving to be powerful tools for molecular discovery. In order to extend these efforts, we present a highly parallel format for DNA-programmed chemical library synthesis. The new format uses a standard microwell plate footprint and is compatible with commercially available automation technology. It can accommodate a wide variety of combinatorial synthetic schemes with up to 384 different building blocks per chemical step. We demonstrate that fluidic routing of DNA populations in the highly parallel format occurs with excellent specificity, and that chemistry on DNA arrayed into 384 well plates proceeds robustly, two requirements for the high-fidelity translation and efficient in vitro evolution of small molecules.

  3. Mesofluidic Devices for DNA-Programmed Combinatorial Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Weisinger, Rebecca M.; Marinelli, Robert J.; Wrenn, S. Jarrett; Harbury, Pehr B.

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid combinatorial chemistry strategies that use DNA as an information-carrying medium are proving to be powerful tools for molecular discovery. In order to extend these efforts, we present a highly parallel format for DNA-programmed chemical library synthesis. The new format uses a standard microwell plate footprint and is compatible with commercially available automation technology. It can accommodate a wide variety of combinatorial synthetic schemes with up to 384 different building blocks per chemical step. We demonstrate that fluidic routing of DNA populations in the highly parallel format occurs with excellent specificity, and that chemistry on DNA arrayed into 384 well plates proceeds robustly, two requirements for the high-fidelity translation and efficient in vitro evolution of small molecules. PMID:22479318

  4. From combinatorial chemistry to cancer targeting nanotherapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Li, Yuanpei; Xiao, Wenwu; Lee, Joyce S.; Gonik, Abby M.; Lam, Kit S.

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a number of amphiphilic polymers, comprised of a cluster of cholic acids (4 to 10) linked by a series of lysines and attached to one end of a linear polyethylene glycol chain (PEG, 2000-5000 Dalton). Under aqueous condition, such telodendrimers can self-assemble together with hydrophobic payloads to form highly stable micelles (15-150 nm diameter, size tunable). We used near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) optical imaging technique to study the in vivo passive accumulation of our nanocarriers (via EPR effect) in different types and stages of tumors. The results demonstrated that the micelle could preferentially accumulate in many types of tumor xenografts or synografts implanted in mice. Nanoparticle uptake in solid tumors was found to be much higher than that of lymphoma, which could be attributed to the relatively low microvascular density in the latter. We have also demonstrated that micelles smaller than 64 nm preferentially targeted xenografts with high efficiency and with low liver and lung uptake, whereas those micelles at 154 nm targeted the tumor poorly but with very high liver and lung uptake. Telodendrimers decorated with oligolysine or oligoaspartic acid resulted in high uptake of the nanoparticles into the liver. When decorated with cancer targeting ligands identified from the one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial library methods, the drug-loaded nanoparticles were rapidly taken up by the target cultured tumor cells causing cell death. In vivo near infra-red optical imaging studies with hydrophobic fluorescent dye demonstrated that xenograft uptake of the micelles was greatly enhanced by the cancer targeting peptide.

  5. Automated Combinatorial Chemistry in the Organic Chemistry Majors Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Christopher J.; Hanne, Larry F.

    2010-01-01

    A multidisciplinary experiment has been developed in which students each synthesize a combinatorial library of 48 hydrazones with the aid of a liquid-handling robot. Each product is then subjected to a Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay to assess its antibacterial activity. Students gain experience working with automation and at the…

  6. Sponge derived bromotyrosines: structural diversity through natural combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Hendrik; Marmann, Andreas; Lin, Wenhan; Proksch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Sponge derived bromotyrosines are a multifaceted class of marine bioactive compounds that are important for the chemical defense of sponges but also for drug discovery programs as well as for technical applications in the field of antifouling constituents. These compounds, which are mainly accumulated by Verongid sponges, exhibit a diverse range of bioactivities including antibiotic, cytotoxic and antifouling effects. In spite of the simple biogenetic building blocks, which consist only of brominated tyrosine and tyramine units, an impressive diversity of different compounds is obtained through different linkages between these precursors and through structural modifications of the side chains and/or aromatic rings resembling strategies that are known from combinatorial chemistry. As examples for bioactive, structurally divergent bromotyrosines psammaplin A, Aplysina alkaloids featuring aerothionin, aeroplysinin-1 and the dienone, and the bastadins, including the synthetically derived hemibastadin congeners, have been selected for this review. Whereas all of these natural products are believed to be involved in the chemical defense of sponges, some of them may also be of particular relevance to drug discovery due to their interaction with specific molecular targets in eukaryotic cells. These targets involve important enzymes and receptors, such as histone deacetylases (HDAC) and DNA methyltransferases (DNMT), which are inhibited by psammaplin A, as well as ryanodine receptors that are targeted by bastadine type compounds. The hemibastadins such as the synthetically derived dibromohemibastadin are of particular interest due to their antifouling activity. For the latter, a phenoloxidase which catalyzes the bioglue formation needed for firm attachment of fouling organisms to a given substrate was identified as a molecular target. The Aplysina alkaloids finally provide a vivid example for dynamic wound induced bioconversions of natural products that generate highly

  7. The rise, fall and reinvention of combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kodadek, Thomas

    2011-09-21

    Combinatorial chemistry provides a powerful tool for the rapid creation of large numbers of synthetic compounds. Ideally, these libraries should be a rich source of bioactive molecules, but there is the general feeling that the initial promise of combinatorial chemistry has not yet been realized. In particular, enthusiasm for conducting unbiased (non-structure-guided) screens of large libraries for protein or RNA ligands has waned. A central challenge in this area is to devise methods for the synthesis of chemically diverse, high-quality libraries of molecules with many of the desirable features of natural products. These include diverse functionality, a significant representation of chiral sp(3) centers that provide conformational bias to the molecule, significant skeletal diversity, and good pharmacokinetic properties. However, these libraries must be easy to make from cheap, readily available building blocks, ideally those that would support convenient hit optimization/structure reactivity relationship studies. Meeting these challenges will not be easy. Here I review some recent advances in this area and provide some thoughts on likely important developments in the next few years.

  8. Intrinsic information carriers in combinatorial dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Russ; Danos, Vincent; Feret, Jérôme; Krivine, Jean; Fontana, Walter

    2010-09-01

    Many proteins are composed of structural and chemical features--"sites" for short--characterized by definite interaction capabilities, such as noncovalent binding or covalent modification of other proteins. This modularity allows for varying degrees of independence, as the behavior of a site might be controlled by the state of some but not all sites of the ambient protein. Independence quickly generates a startling combinatorial complexity that shapes most biological networks, such as mammalian signaling systems, and effectively prevents their study in terms of kinetic equations-unless the complexity is radically trimmed. Yet, if combinatorial complexity is key to the system's behavior, eliminating it will prevent, not facilitate, understanding. A more adequate representation of a combinatorial system is provided by a graph-based framework of rewrite rules where each rule specifies only the information that an interaction mechanism depends on. Unlike reactions, which deal with molecular species, rules deal with patterns, i.e., multisets of molecular species. Although the stochastic dynamics induced by a collection of rules on a mixture of molecules can be simulated, it appears useful to capture the system's average or deterministic behavior by means of differential equations. However, expansion of the rules into kinetic equations at the level of molecular species is not only impractical, but conceptually indefensible. If rules describe bona fide patterns of interaction, molecular species are unlikely to constitute appropriate units of dynamics. Rather, we must seek aggregate variables reflective of the causal structure laid down by the rules. We call these variables "fragments" and the process of identifying them "fragmentation." Ideally, fragments are aspects of the system's microscopic population that the set of rules can actually distinguish on average; in practice, it may only be feasible to identify an approximation to this. Most importantly, fragments are

  9. Multiplexing of combinatorial chemistry in antimycin biosynthesis: expansion of molecular diversity and utility.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Lihan; Zheng, Qingfei; Han, Ying; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Daozhong; Awakawa, Takayoshi; Abe, Ikuro; Liu, Wen

    2013-11-18

    Diversity-oriented biosynthesis of a library of antimycin-like compounds (380 altogether) was accomplished by using multiplex combinatorial biosynthesis. The core strategy depends on the use of combinatorial chemistry at different biosynthetic stages. This approach is applicable for the diversification of polyketides, nonribosomal peptides, and the hybrids that share a similar biosynthetic logic.

  10. Dynamic chemistry of anion recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu

    2012-01-01

    In the past 40 years, anion recognition by synthetic receptors has grown into a rich and vibrant research topic, developing into a distinct branch of Supramolecular Chemistry. Traditional anion receptors comprise organic scaffolds functionalized with complementary binding groups that are assembled by multistep organic synthesis. Recently, a new approach to anion receptors has emerged, in which the host is dynamically self-assembled in the presence of the anionic guest, via reversible bond formation between functional building units. While coordination bonds were initially employed for the self-assembly of the anion hosts, more recent studies demonstrated that reversible covalent bonds can serve the same purpose. In both cases, due to their labile connections, the molecular constituents have the ability to assemble, dissociate, and recombine continuously, thereby creating a dynamic combinatorial library (DCL) of receptors. The anionic guests, through specific molecular recognition, may then amplify (express) the formation of a particular structure among all possible combinations (real or virtual) by shifting the equilibria involved towards the most optimal receptor. This approach is not limited to solution self-assembly, but is equally applicable to crystallization, where the fittest anion-binding crystal may be selected. Finally, the pros and cons of employing dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) vs molecular design for developing anion receptors, and the implications of both approaches to selective anion separations, will be discussed.

  11. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production Using New Combinatorial Chemistry Derived Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Baeck, Sung-Hyeon; Kleiman-Shwarsctein, Alan; Stucky, Galen D.; McFarland, Eric W.

    2004-10-25

    Solar photoelectrochemical water-splitting has long been viewed as one of the “holy grails” of chemistry because of its potential impact as a clean, renewable method of fuel production. Several known photocatalytic semiconductors can be used; however, the fundamental mechanisms of the process remain poorly understood and no known material has the required properties for cost effective hydrogen production. In order to investigate morphological and compositional variations in metal oxides as they relate to opto-electrochemical properties, we have employed a combinatorial methodology using automated, high-throughput, electrochemical synthesis and screening together with conventional solid-state methods. This report discusses a number of novel, high-throughput instruments developed during this project for the expeditious discovery of improved materials for photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Also described within this report are results from a variety of materials (primarily tungsten oxide, zinc oxide, molybdenum oxide, copper oxide and titanium dioxide) whose properties were modified and improved by either layering, inter-mixing, or doping with one or more transition metals. Furthermore, the morphologies of certain materials were also modified through the use of structure directing agents (SDA) during synthesis to create mesostructures (features 2-50 nm) that increased surface area and improved rates of hydrogen production.

  12. Parallel array and mixture-based synthetic combinatorial chemistry: tools for the next millennium.

    PubMed

    Houghten, R A

    2000-01-01

    Technological advances continue to be a central driving force in the acceleration of the drug discovery process. Combinatorial chemistry methods, developed over the past 15 years, represent a paradigm shift in drug discovery. Initially viewed as a curiosity by the pharmaceutical industry, combinatorial chemistry is now recognized as an essential tool that decreases the time of discovery and increases the throughput of chemical screening by as much as 1000-fold. The use of parallel array synthesis approaches and mixture-based combinatorial libraries for drug discovery is reviewed.

  13. Combinatorial chemistry, automation and molecular diversity: new trends in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Van Hijfte, L; Marciniak, G; Froloff, N

    1999-04-01

    Combinatorial chemistry has emerged as a set of novel strategies for the synthesis of large sets of compounds (combinatorial libraries) for biological evaluation. Within a few years combinatorial chemistry has undergone a series of changes in trends, which are closely related to two important factors in libraries: numbers and quality. While the number of compounds in a library may be easily expressed, it is a lot more difficult to indicate the degree of quality of a library. This degree of quality can be split into two aspects: purity and diversity. The changing trends in combinatorial chemistry with respect to the strategies, the technologies, the libraries themselves (numbers and purity aspects) and the molecular diversity are outlined in this paper.

  14. Combinatorial chemistry on solid support in the search for central nervous system agents.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Paweł; Pawłowski, Maciej; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles

    2009-08-01

    The advent of combinatorial chemistry was one of the most important developments, that has significantly contributed to the drug discovery process. Within just a few years, its initial concept aimed at production of libraries containing huge number of compounds (thousands to millions), so called screening libraries, has shifted towards preparation of small and medium-sized rationally designed libraries. When applicable, the use of solid supports for the generation of libraries has been a real breakthrough in enhancing productivity. With a limited amount of resin and simple manual workups, the split/mix procedure may generate thousands of bead-tethered compounds. Beads can be chemically or physically encoded to facilitate the identification of a hit after the biological assay. Compartmentalization of solid supports using small reactors like teabags, kans or pellicular discrete supports like Lanterns resulted in powerful sort and combine technologies, relying on codes 'written' on the reactor, and thus reducing the need for automation and improving the number of compounds synthesized. These methods of solid-phase combinatorial chemistry have been recently supported by introduction of solid-supported reagents and scavenger resins. The first part of this review discusses the general premises of combinatorial chemistry and some methods used in the design of primary and focused combinatorial libraries. The aim of the second part is to present combinatorial chemistry methodologies aimed at discovering bioactive compounds acting on diverse GPCR involved in central nervous system disorders.

  15. Application of computer assisted combinatorial chemistry in antivirial, antimalarial and anticancer agents design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burello, E.; Bologa, C.; Frecer, V.; Miertus, S.

    Combinatorial chemistry and technologies have been developed to a stage where synthetic schemes are available for generation of a large variety of organic molecules. The innovative concept of combinatorial design assumes that screening of a large and diverse library of compounds will increase the probability of finding an active analogue among the compounds tested. Since the rate at which libraries are screened for activity currently constitutes a limitation to the use of combinatorial technologies, it is important to be selective about the number of compounds to be synthesized. Early experience with combinatorial chemistry indicated that chemical diversity alone did not result in a significant increase in the number of generated lead compounds. Emphasis has therefore been increasingly put on the use of computer assisted combinatorial chemical techniques. Computational methods are valuable in the design of virtual libraries of molecular models. Selection strategies based on computed physicochemical properties of the models or of a target compound are introduced to reduce the time and costs of library synthesis and screening. In addition, computational structure-based library focusing methods can be used to perform in silico screening of the activity of compounds against a target receptor by docking the ligands into the receptor model. Three case studies are discussed dealing with the design of targeted combinatorial libraries of inhibitors of HIV-1 protease, P. falciparum plasmepsin and human urokinase as potential antivirial, antimalarial and anticancer drugs. These illustrate library focusing strategies.

  16. Discovery of bioactive molecules from CuAAC click-chemistry-based combinatorial libraries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueshun; Huang, Boshi; Liu, Xinyong; Zhan, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The rapid assembly and in situ screening of focused combinatorial fragment libraries using CuAAC click chemistry is a highly robust and efficient strategy for establishing SAR and for discovering bioactive molecules. This review outlines the current status of this methodology in drug discovery application. The inherent limitations, challenges and prospects are critically discussed. PMID:26315392

  17. [New methods in pharmaceutical research: combinatorial chemistry and high throughput screening].

    PubMed

    Schirlin, Daniel; Galvan, Martin; Le Fur, Gérard

    2007-01-01

    New lead-identification methodologies such as high-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry have been integrated into pharmaceutical research over the past 5-10 years. More rational use in the selection of potential preclinical candidates for some difficult targets has increased the chances of success.

  18. Dynamic combinatorial enrichment of polyconformational D-/L-peptide dimers.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Kirtikumar B; Lichtenecker, Roman J; Bullach, Anke; Mandal, Bhubaneswar; Arndt, Hans-Dieter

    2015-04-01

    D-/L-peptides such as gramicidin A (gA) adopt unique dimeric β-helical structures of different topologies. To overcome their conformational promiscuity and enrich individual components, a dynamic combinatorial approach assisted by thiol tags was developed. This method led to identification of the preferential formation of antiparallel dimers under a broad range of conditions, which was independent of peptide side-chain polarity. Exclusive formation of an antiparallel cyclic dimer was achieved in the presence of cesium ions.

  19. A "dial-a-receptor" dynamic combinatorial library.

    PubMed

    Hamieh, Saleh; Saggiomo, Vittorio; Nowak, Piotr; Mattia, Elio; Ludlow, R Frederick; Otto, Sijbren

    2013-11-18

    Making receptors to order: A small dynamic combinatorial library (DCL), formed from two dithiols in water, provides a continuous range of six receptors of different sizes. The majority of the 30 tested amines and ammonium ions amplified receptors from this library, thus spanning the complete receptor-size range and showing that this DCL provides a generic platform for the development of receptors for this important class of compounds.

  20. Combinatorial computational chemistry approach for materials design: applications in deNOx catalysis, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, lanthanoid complex, and lithium ion secondary battery.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Michihisa; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Endou, Akira; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Kubo, Momoji; Del Carpio, Carlos A; Miyamoto, Akira

    2007-02-01

    Computational chemistry can provide fundamental knowledge regarding various aspects of materials. While its impact in scientific research is greatly increasing, its contributions to industrially important issues are far from satisfactory. In order to realize industrial innovation by computational chemistry, a new concept "combinatorial computational chemistry" has been proposed by introducing the concept of combinatorial chemistry to computational chemistry. This combinatorial computational chemistry approach enables theoretical high-throughput screening for materials design. In this manuscript, we review the successful applications of combinatorial computational chemistry to deNO(x) catalysts, Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, lanthanoid complex catalysts, and cathodes of the lithium ion secondary battery.

  1. An allosteric receptor by simultaneous "casting" and "molding" in a dynamic combinatorial library.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianwei; Nowak, Piotr; Otto, Sijbren

    2015-01-12

    Allosteric synthetic receptors are difficult to access by design. Herein we report a dynamic combinatorial strategy towards such systems based on the simultaneous use of two different templates. Through a process of simultaneous casting (the assembly of a library member around a template) and molding (the assembly of a library member inside the binding pocket of a template), a Russian-doll-like termolecular complex was obtained with remarkable selectivity. Analysis of the stepwise formation of the complex indicates that binding of the two partners by the central macrocycle exhibits significant positive cooperativity. Such allosteric systems represent hubs that may have considerable potential in systems chemistry.

  2. Dynamic foldamer chemistry.

    PubMed

    Le Bailly, Bryden A F; Clayden, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Foldamers can be made more than pieces of static, conformationally uniform molecular architecture by designing into their structure the conformational dynamism characteristic of functional molecular machines. We show that these dynamic foldamers display biomimetic properties reminiscent of allosteric proteins and receptor molecules. They can translate chemical signals into conformational changes, and hence into chemical outputs such as control of reactivity and selectivity. Future developments could see dynamic foldamers operating in the membrane phase providing artificial mechanisms for communication and control that integrate synthetic chemistry into synthetic biology. PMID:26955864

  3. Efficient exploration of large combinatorial chemistry spaces by monomer-based similarity searching.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ning; Bakken, Gregory A

    2009-04-01

    In modern drug discovery, 2-D similarity searching is widely employed as a cost-effective way to screen large compound collections and select subsets of molecules that may have interesting biological activity prior to experimental screening. Nowadays, there is a growing interest in applying the existing 2-D similarity searching methods to combinatorial chemistry libraries to search for novel hits or to evolve lead series. A dilemma thus arises when many identical substructures recur in library products and they have to be considered repeatedly in descriptor calculations. The dilemma is exacerbated by the astronomical number of combinatorial products. This problem imposes a major barrier to similarity searching of large combinatorial chemistry spaces. An efficient approach, termed Monomer-based Similarity Searching (MoBSS), is proposed to remedy the problem. MoBSS calculates atom pair (AP) descriptors based on interatomic topological distances, which lend themselves to pair additivity. A fast algorithm is employed in MoBSS to rapidly compute product atom pairs from those of the constituent fragments. The details of the algorithm are presented along with a series of proof-of-concept studies, which demonstrate the speed, accuracy, and utility of the MoBSS approach.

  4. Synthesis of Chemiluminescent Esters: A Combinatorial Synthesis Experiment for Organic Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duarte, Robert; Nielson, Janne T.; Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2004-01-01

    A group of techniques aimed at synthesizing a large number of structurally diverse compounds is called combinatorial synthesis. Synthesis of chemiluminescence esters using parallel combinatorial synthesis and mix-and-split combinatorial synthesis is experimented.

  5. WORKSHOP ON NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN CHEMICAL SEPARATIONS FROM COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY AND RELATED SYNTHETIC STRATEGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Stephen G.

    1998-08-22

    The power of combinatorial chemistry and related high throughput synthetic strategies is currently being pursued as a fruitful way to develop molecules and materials with new properties. The strategy is motivated, for example in the pharmaceutical industry, by the difficulty of designing molecules to bind to specific sites on target biomolecules. By synthesizing a variety of similar structures, and then finding the one that has the most potent activity, new so-called lead structures will be found rapidly. Existing lead structures can be optimized. This relatively new approach has many implications for separation science. The most obvious is the call for more separations power: higher resolution, lower concentrations, higher speed. This pressure butresses the traditional directions of research into the development of more useful separations. The advent of chip-based, electroosmotically pumped systems1 will certainly accelerate progress in this traditional direction. The progress in combinatorial chemistry and related synthetic strategies gives rise to two other, broadly significant possibilities for large changes in separation science. One possibility results from the unique requirements of the synthesis of a huge number of products simultaneously. Can syntheses and separations be designed to work together to create strategies that lead to mixtures containing only desired products but without side products? The other possibility results from the need for molecular selectivity in separations. Can combinatorial syntheses and related strategies be used in the development of better separations media? A workshop in two parts was held. In one half-day session, pedagogical presentations educated across the barriers of discipline and scale. In the second half-day session, the participants broke into small groups to flesh out new ideas. A panel summarized the breakout discussions.

  6. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  7. Development of combinatorial chemistry methods for coatings: high-throughput weathering evaluation and scale-up of combinatorial leads.

    PubMed

    Potyrailo, Radislav A; Ezbiansky, Karin; Chisholm, Bret J; Morris, William G; Cawse, James N; Hassib, Lamyaa; Medford, George; Reitz, Hariklia

    2005-01-01

    Combinatorial screening of materials formulations followed by the scale-up of combinatorial leads has been applied for the development of high-performance coating materials for automotive applications. We replaced labor-intensive coating formulation, testing, and measurement with a "combinatorial factory" that includes robotic formulation of coatings, their deposition as 48 coatings on a 9x12-cm plastic substrate, accelerated performance testing, and automated spectroscopic and image analysis of resulting performance. This high-throughput (HT) performance testing and measurement of the resulting properties provided a powerful set of tools for the 10-fold accelerated discovery of these coating materials. Performance of coatings is evaluated with respect to their weathering, because this parameter is one of the primary considerations in end-use automotive applications. Our HT screening strategy provides previously unavailable capabilities of (1) high speed and reproducibility of testing by using robotic automation and (2) improved quantification by using optical spectroscopic analysis of discoloration of coating-substrate structure and automatic imaging of the integrity loss of coatings. Upon testing, the coatings undergo changes that are impossible to quantitatively predict using existing knowledge. Using our HT methodology, we have developed several cost-competitive coatings leads that match the performance of more costly coatings. These HT screening results for the best coating compositions have been validated on the traditional scales of coating formulation and weathering testing. These validation results have confirmed the improved weathering performance of combinatorially developed coatings over conventional coatings on the traditional scale. PMID:15762746

  8. Selective host molecules obtained by dynamic adaptive chemistry.

    PubMed

    Matache, Mihaela; Bogdan, Elena; Hădade, Niculina D

    2014-02-17

    Up till 20 years ago, in order to endow molecules with function there were two mainstream lines of thought. One was to rationally design the positioning of chemical functionalities within candidate molecules, followed by an iterative synthesis-optimization process. The second was the use of a "brutal force" approach of combinatorial chemistry coupled with advanced screening for function. Although both methods provided important results, "rational design" often resulted in time-consuming efforts of modeling and synthesis only to find that the candidate molecule was not performing the designed job. "Combinatorial chemistry" suffered from a fundamental limitation related to the focusing of the libraries employed, often using lead compounds that limit its scope. Dynamic constitutional chemistry has developed as a combination of the two approaches above. Through the rational use of reversible chemical bonds together with a large plethora of precursor libraries, one is now able to build functional structures, ranging from quite simple molecules up to large polymeric structures. Thus, by introduction of the dynamic component within the molecular recognition processes, a new perspective of deciphering the world of the molecular events has aroused together with a new field of chemistry. Since its birth dynamic constitutional chemistry has continuously gained attention, in particular due to its ability to easily create from scratch outstanding molecular structures as well as the addition of adaptive features. The fundamental concepts defining the dynamic constitutional chemistry have been continuously extended to currently place it at the intersection between the supramolecular chemistry and newly defined adaptive chemistry, a pivotal feature towards evolutive chemistry.

  9. Integrating medicinal chemistry, organic/combinatorial chemistry, and computational chemistry for the discovery of selective estrogen receptor modulators with Forecaster, a novel platform for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Therrien, Eric; Englebienne, Pablo; Arrowsmith, Andrew G; Mendoza-Sanchez, Rodrigo; Corbeil, Christopher R; Weill, Nathanael; Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Moitessier, Nicolas

    2012-01-23

    As part of a large medicinal chemistry program, we wish to develop novel selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) as potential breast cancer treatments using a combination of experimental and computational approaches. However, one of the remaining difficulties nowadays is to fully integrate computational (i.e., virtual, theoretical) and medicinal (i.e., experimental, intuitive) chemistry to take advantage of the full potential of both. For this purpose, we have developed a Web-based platform, Forecaster, and a number of programs (e.g., Prepare, React, Select) with the aim of combining computational chemistry and medicinal chemistry expertise to facilitate drug discovery and development and more specifically to integrate synthesis into computer-aided drug design. In our quest for potent SERMs, this platform was used to build virtual combinatorial libraries, filter and extract a highly diverse library from the NCI database, and dock them to the estrogen receptor (ER), with all of these steps being fully automated by computational chemists for use by medicinal chemists. As a result, virtual screening of a diverse library seeded with active compounds followed by a search for analogs yielded an enrichment factor of 129, with 98% of the seeded active compounds recovered, while the screening of a designed virtual combinatorial library including known actives yielded an area under the receiver operating characteristic (AU-ROC) of 0.78. The lead optimization proved less successful, further demonstrating the challenge to simulate structure activity relationship studies.

  10. Predictive Array Design. A method for sampling combinatorial chemistry library space.

    PubMed

    Lipkin, M J; Rose, V S; Wood, J

    2002-01-01

    A method, Predictive Array Design, is presented for sampling combinatorial chemistry space and selecting a subarray for synthesis based on the experimental design method of Latin Squares. The method is appropriate for libraries with three sites of variation. Libraries with four sites of variation can be designed using the Graeco-Latin Square. Simulated annealing is used to optimise the physicochemical property profile of the sub-array. The sub-array can be used to make predictions of the activity of compounds in the all combinations array if we assume each monomer has a relatively constant contribution to activity and that the activity of a compound is composed of the sum of the activities of its constitutive monomers.

  11. Salt-induced adaptation of a dynamic combinatorial library of pseudopeptidic macrocycles: unraveling the electrostatic effects in mixed aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Atcher, Joan; Moure, Alejandra; Bujons, Jordi; Alfonso, Ignacio

    2015-04-27

    Dynamic combinatorial libraries are powerful systems for studying adaptive behaviors and relationships, as models of more complex molecular networks. With this aim, we set up a chemically diverse dynamic library of pseudopeptidic macrocycles containing amino-acid side chains with differently charged residues (negative, positive, and neutral). The responsive ability of this complex library upon the increase of the ionic strength has been thoroughly studied. The families of the macrocyclic members concentrating charges of the same sign showed a large increase in its proportion as the ionic strength increases, whereas those with residues of opposite charges showed the reverse behavior. This observation suggested an electrostatic shielding effect of the salt within the library of macrocycles. The top-down deconvolution of the library allowed us to obtain the fundamental thermodynamic information connecting the library members (exchange equilibrium constants), as well as to parameterize the adaptation to the external stimulus. We also visualized the physicochemical driving forces for the process by structural analysis using NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. This knowledge permitted the full understanding of the whole dynamic library and also the de novo design of dynamic chemical systems with tailored co-adaptive relationships, containing competing or cooperating species. This study highlights the utility of dynamic combinatorial libraries in the emerging field of systems chemistry.

  12. Fuzzy electron density fragments in macromolecular quantum chemistry, combinatorial quantum chemistry, functional group analysis, and shape-activity relations.

    PubMed

    Mezey, Paul G

    2014-09-16

    example, in medicinal drug design, and (g) tools for combinatorial quantum chemistry approaches using fuzzy fragment databanks and rapid construction of a large number of approximate electron densities for large sets of related molecules, relevant in theoretical molecular and nanostructure design.

  13. Combinatorial chemistry has matured in the last three decades: dedicated to Professor Árpád Furka on the occasion of his 80th birthday.

    PubMed

    Dibó, Gábor

    2012-02-01

    Combinatorial chemistry was introduced in the 1980s. It provided the possibility to produce new compounds in practically unlimited number. New strategies and technologies have also been developed that made it possible to screen very large number of compounds and to identify useful components in mixtures containing millions of different substances. This dramatically changed the drug discovery process and the way of thinking of synthetic chemists. In addition, combinatorial strategies became useful in areas such as pharmaceutical research, agrochemistry, catalyst design, and materials research. Prof. Árpád Furka is one of the pioneers of combinatorial chemistry.

  14. A combinatorial chemistry method for fast screening of perovskite-based NO oxidation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Dal Young; Lim, Eunho; Kim, Young Jin; Cho, Byong K; Nam, In-Sik; Choung, Jin Woo; Yoo, Seungbeom

    2014-11-10

    A fast parallel screening method based on combinatorial chemistry (combichem) has been developed and applied in the screening tests of perovskite-based oxide (PBO) catalysts for NO oxidation to hit a promising PBO formulation for the oxidation of NO to NO2. This new method involves three consecutive steps: oxidation of NO to NO2 over a PBO catalyst, adsorption of NOx onto the PBO and K2O/Al2O3, and colorimetric assay of the NOx adsorbed thereon. The combichem experimental data have been used for determining the oxidation activity of NO over PBO catalysts as well as three critical parameters, such as the adsorption efficiency of K2O/Al2O3 for NO2 (α) and NO (β), and the time-average fraction of NO included in the NOx feed stream (ξ). The results demonstrated that the amounts of NO2 produced over PBO catalysts by the combichem method under transient conditions correlate well with those from a conventional packed-bed reactor under steady-state conditions. Among the PBO formulations examined, La0.5Ag0.5MnO3 has been identified as the best chemical formulation for oxidation of NO to NO2 by the present combichem method and also confirmed by the conventional packed-bed reactor tests. The superior efficiency of the combichem method for high-throughput catalyst screening test validated in this study is particularly suitable for saving the time and resources required in developing a new formulation of PBO catalyst whose chemical composition may have an enormous number of possible variations.

  15. Supramolecular interactions between library members modulate the behavior of dynamic combinatorial libraries.

    PubMed

    Orrillo, A Gastón; Furlan, Ricardo L E

    2010-01-01

    The presence of a supramolecular network of interactions between library members can lead to very different responses when libraries with identical molecular composition are exposed to the same template. Numerical simulations demonstrate that supramolecular interactions between library members of covalent dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs) can affect both degree and selectivity of the response of the library when a template molecule is added.

  16. Design and combinatorial synthesis of a novel kinase-focused library using click chemistry-based fragment assembly.

    PubMed

    Irie, Takayuki; Fujii, Ikuo; Sawa, Masaaki

    2012-01-01

    Fragment-based lead discovery is a new approach for lead generation that has emerged in the past decade. Because the initial fragments identified in the fragment screening typically show weak binding affinity, an intensive medicinal chemistry effort would be required to grow initial fragments into a potential lead compound. Here we demonstrate a kinase focused evolved fragment (KFEF) library, constructed by click chemistry-based fragment assembly, that is a valuable source of kinase inhibitors. This combinatorial assembly of two fragments, kinase-privileged alkyne fragments and diversified azide fragments, by two cycloaddition reactions shows a unique potential for the one-step synthesis of structurally diverse evolved fragments. The screening of this triazole-based KFEF library allowed the rapid identification of potent lead candidates for FLT3 and GSK3β kinase.

  17. Dynamic combinatorial synthesis of a catenane based on donor–acceptor interactions in water

    PubMed Central

    Au-Yeung, Ho Yu; Pantoş, G. Dan; Sanders, Jeremy K. M.

    2009-01-01

    A new type of neutral donor–acceptor [2]-catenane, containing both complementary units in the same ring was synthesized from a dynamic combinatorial library in water. The yield of the water soluble [2]-catenane is enhanced by increasing either building-block concentrations or ionic strength, or by the addition of an electron-rich template. NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that the template is intercalated between the 2 electron-deficient naphthalenediimide units of the catenane. PMID:19171892

  18. Identification of new potent GPR119 agonists by combining virtual screening and combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wellenzohn, Bernd; Lessel, Uta; Beller, Andreas; Isambert, Timo; Hoenke, Christoph; Nosse, Bernd

    2012-12-27

    Virtual screening in a huge collection of virtual combinatorial libraries has led to the identification of two new structural classes of GPR119 agonists with submicromolar in vitro potencies. Herein, we describe the virtual screening process involving feature trees fragment space searches followed by a 3D postprocessing step. The in silico findings were then filtered and prioritized, and finally, combinatorial libraries of target molecules were synthesized. Furthermore the so-called "activity-anchor principle" is introduced as an element to increase the chance to generate true hits. An activity anchor is a structural element expected to provide key contributions to a certain biological activity. Application of this technique has led to the discovery of two new GPR119-agonist hit series, one of which was further optimized to progress as a novel lead class.

  19. Identifying tumor cell growth inhibitors by combinatorial chemistry and zebrafish assays.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jing; Yang, Hongbo; Che, Chao; Zou, Haixia; Yang, Hanshuo; Wei, Yuquan; Quan, Junmin; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Zhen; Lin, Shuo

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play important roles in regulating cell cycle progression, and altered cell cycles resulting from over-expression or abnormal activation of CDKs observed in many human cancers. As a result, CDKs have become extensive studied targets for developing chemical inhibitors for cancer therapies; however, protein kinases share a highly conserved ATP binding pocket at which most chemical inhibitors bind, therefore, a major challenge in developing kinase inhibitors is achieving target selectivity. To identify cell growth inhibitors with potential applications in cancer therapy, we used an integrated approach that combines one-pot chemical synthesis in a combinatorial manner to generate diversified small molecules with new chemical scaffolds coupled with growth inhibition assay using developing zebrafish embryos. We report the successful identification of a novel lead compound that displays selective inhibitory effects on CDK2 activity, cancer cell proliferation, and tumor progression in vivo. Our approaches should have general applications in developing cell proliferation inhibitors using an efficient combinatorial chemical genetic method and integrated biological assays. The novel cell growth inhibitor we identified should have potential as a cancer therapeutic agent.

  20. Identifying Tumor Cell Growth Inhibitors by Combinatorial Chemistry and Zebrafish Assays

    PubMed Central

    Che, Chao; Zou, Haixia; Yang, Hanshuo; Wei, Yuquan; Quan, Junmin; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Zhen; Lin, Shuo

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play important roles in regulating cell cycle progression, and altered cell cycles resulting from over-expression or abnormal activation of CDKs observed in many human cancers. As a result, CDKs have become extensive studied targets for developing chemical inhibitors for cancer therapies; however, protein kinases share a highly conserved ATP binding pocket at which most chemical inhibitors bind, therefore, a major challenge in developing kinase inhibitors is achieving target selectivity. To identify cell growth inhibitors with potential applications in cancer therapy, we used an integrated approach that combines one-pot chemical synthesis in a combinatorial manner to generate diversified small molecules with new chemical scaffolds coupled with growth inhibition assay using developing zebrafish embryos. We report the successful identification of a novel lead compound that displays selective inhibitory effects on CDK2 activity, cancer cell proliferation, and tumor progression in vivo. Our approaches should have general applications in developing cell proliferation inhibitors using an efficient combinatorial chemical genetic method and integrated biological assays. The novel cell growth inhibitor we identified should have potential as a cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:19194508

  1. Selection dynamic of Escherichia coli host in M13 combinatorial peptide phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Zanconato, Stefano; Minervini, Giovanni; Poli, Irene; De Lucrezia, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Phage display relies on an iterative cycle of selection and amplification of random combinatorial libraries to enrich the initial population of those peptides that satisfy a priori chosen criteria. The effectiveness of any phage display protocol depends directly on library amino acid sequence diversity and the strength of the selection procedure. In this study we monitored the dynamics of the selective pressure exerted by the host organism on a random peptide library in the absence of any additional selection pressure. The results indicate that sequence censorship exerted by Escherichia coli dramatically reduces library diversity and can significantly impair phage display effectiveness. PMID:21512219

  2. Chemistry in dynamically evolving clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarafdar, S. P.; Prasad, S. S.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.; Villere, K. R.; Black, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    A unified model of chemical and dynamical evolution of isolated, initially diffuse and quiescent interstellar clouds is presented. The model uses a semiempirically derived dependence of the observed cloud temperatures on the visual extinction and density. Even low-mass, low-density, diffuse clouds can collapse in this model, because the inward pressure gradient force assists gravitational contraction. In contrast, previous isothermal collapse models required the low-mass diffuse clouds to be unrealistically cold before gravitational contraction could start. Theoretically predicted dependences of the column densities of various atoms and molecules, such as C and CO, on visual extinction in diffuse clouds are in accord with observations. Similarly, the predicted dependences of the fractional abundances of various chemical species (e.g., CO, H2CO, HCN, HCO(+)) on the total hydrogen density in the core of the dense clouds also agree with observations reported to date in the literature. Compared with previous models of interstellar chemistry, the present model has the potential to explain the wide spectrum of chemical and physical properties of both diffuse and dense clouds with a common formalism employing only a few simple initial conditions.

  3. Allosteric inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase dimerization discovered via combinatorial chemistry

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Kirk; Adler, Marc; Auld, Douglas S.; Baldwin, John J.; Blasko, Eric; Browne, Leslie J.; Chelsky, Daniel; Davey, David; Dolle, Ronald E.; Eagen, Keith A.; Erickson, Shawn; Feldman, Richard I.; Glaser, Charles B.; Mallari, Cornell; Morrissey, Michael M.; Ohlmeyer, Michael H. J.; Pan, Gonghua; Parkinson, John F.; Phillips, Gary B.; Polokoff, Mark A.; Sigal, Nolan H.; Vergona, Ronald; Whitlow, Marc; Young, Tish A.; Devlin, James J.

    2000-01-01

    Potent and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) (EC 1.14.13.39) were identified in an encoded combinatorial chemical library that blocked human iNOS dimerization, and thereby NO production. In a cell-based iNOS assay (A-172 astrocytoma cells) the inhibitors had low-nanomolar IC50 values and thus were >1,000-fold more potent than the substrate-based direct iNOS inhibitors 1400W and N-methyl-l-arginine. Biochemical studies confirmed that inhibitors caused accumulation of iNOS monomers in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. High affinity (Kd ≈ 3 nM) of inhibitors for isolated iNOS monomers was confirmed by using a radioligand binding assay. Inhibitors were >1,000-fold selective for iNOS versus endothelial NOS dimerization in a cell-based assay. The crystal structure of inhibitor bound to the monomeric iNOS oxygenase domain revealed inhibitor–heme coordination and substantial perturbation of the substrate binding site and the dimerization interface, indicating that this small molecule acts by allosterically disrupting protein–protein interactions at the dimer interface. These results provide a mechanism-based approach to highly selective iNOS inhibition. Inhibitors were active in vivo, with ED50 values of <2 mg/kg in a rat model of endotoxin-induced systemic iNOS induction. Thus, this class of dimerization inhibitors has broad therapeutic potential in iNOS-mediated pathologies. PMID:10677491

  4. Dynamic Mechanical and Nanofibrous Topological Combinatory Cues Designed for Periodontal Ligament Engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kang, Min Sil; Eltohamy, Mohamed; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Complete reconstruction of damaged periodontal pockets, particularly regeneration of periodontal ligament (PDL) has been a significant challenge in dentistry. Tissue engineering approach utilizing PDL stem cells and scaffolding matrices offers great opportunity to this, and applying physical and mechanical cues mimicking native tissue conditions are of special importance. Here we approach to regenerate periodontal tissues by engineering PDL cells supported on a nanofibrous scaffold under a mechanical-stressed condition. PDL stem cells isolated from rats were seeded on an electrospun polycaprolactone/gelatin directionally-oriented nanofiber membrane and dynamic mechanical stress was applied to the cell/nanofiber construct, providing nanotopological and mechanical combined cues. Cells recognized the nanofiber orientation, aligning in parallel, and the mechanical stress increased the cell alignment. Importantly, the cells cultured on the oriented nanofiber combined with the mechanical stress produced significantly stimulated PDL specific markers, including periostin and tenascin with simultaneous down-regulation of osteogenesis, demonstrating the roles of topological and mechanical cues in altering phenotypic change in PDL cells. Tissue compatibility of the tissue-engineered constructs was confirmed in rat subcutaneous sites. Furthermore, in vivo regeneration of PDL and alveolar bone tissues was examined under the rat premaxillary periodontal defect models. The cell/nanofiber constructs engineered under mechanical stress showed sound integration into tissue defects and the regenerated bone volume and area were significantly improved. This study provides an effective tissue engineering approach for periodontal regeneration-culturing PDL stem cells with combinatory cues of oriented nanotopology and dynamic mechanical stretch. PMID:26989897

  5. Dynamic Mechanical and Nanofibrous Topological Combinatory Cues Designed for Periodontal Ligament Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kang, Min Sil; Eltohamy, Mohamed; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Complete reconstruction of damaged periodontal pockets, particularly regeneration of periodontal ligament (PDL) has been a significant challenge in dentistry. Tissue engineering approach utilizing PDL stem cells and scaffolding matrices offers great opportunity to this, and applying physical and mechanical cues mimicking native tissue conditions are of special importance. Here we approach to regenerate periodontal tissues by engineering PDL cells supported on a nanofibrous scaffold under a mechanical-stressed condition. PDL stem cells isolated from rats were seeded on an electrospun polycaprolactone/gelatin directionally-oriented nanofiber membrane and dynamic mechanical stress was applied to the cell/nanofiber construct, providing nanotopological and mechanical combined cues. Cells recognized the nanofiber orientation, aligning in parallel, and the mechanical stress increased the cell alignment. Importantly, the cells cultured on the oriented nanofiber combined with the mechanical stress produced significantly stimulated PDL specific markers, including periostin and tenascin with simultaneous down-regulation of osteogenesis, demonstrating the roles of topological and mechanical cues in altering phenotypic change in PDL cells. Tissue compatibility of the tissue-engineered constructs was confirmed in rat subcutaneous sites. Furthermore, in vivo regeneration of PDL and alveolar bone tissues was examined under the rat premaxillary periodontal defect models. The cell/nanofiber constructs engineered under mechanical stress showed sound integration into tissue defects and the regenerated bone volume and area were significantly improved. This study provides an effective tissue engineering approach for periodontal regeneration—culturing PDL stem cells with combinatory cues of oriented nanotopology and dynamic mechanical stretch. PMID:26989897

  6. Dynamic Mechanical and Nanofibrous Topological Combinatory Cues Designed for Periodontal Ligament Engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kang, Min Sil; Eltohamy, Mohamed; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Complete reconstruction of damaged periodontal pockets, particularly regeneration of periodontal ligament (PDL) has been a significant challenge in dentistry. Tissue engineering approach utilizing PDL stem cells and scaffolding matrices offers great opportunity to this, and applying physical and mechanical cues mimicking native tissue conditions are of special importance. Here we approach to regenerate periodontal tissues by engineering PDL cells supported on a nanofibrous scaffold under a mechanical-stressed condition. PDL stem cells isolated from rats were seeded on an electrospun polycaprolactone/gelatin directionally-oriented nanofiber membrane and dynamic mechanical stress was applied to the cell/nanofiber construct, providing nanotopological and mechanical combined cues. Cells recognized the nanofiber orientation, aligning in parallel, and the mechanical stress increased the cell alignment. Importantly, the cells cultured on the oriented nanofiber combined with the mechanical stress produced significantly stimulated PDL specific markers, including periostin and tenascin with simultaneous down-regulation of osteogenesis, demonstrating the roles of topological and mechanical cues in altering phenotypic change in PDL cells. Tissue compatibility of the tissue-engineered constructs was confirmed in rat subcutaneous sites. Furthermore, in vivo regeneration of PDL and alveolar bone tissues was examined under the rat premaxillary periodontal defect models. The cell/nanofiber constructs engineered under mechanical stress showed sound integration into tissue defects and the regenerated bone volume and area were significantly improved. This study provides an effective tissue engineering approach for periodontal regeneration-culturing PDL stem cells with combinatory cues of oriented nanotopology and dynamic mechanical stretch.

  7. Photodissociation dynamics and atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, R. P.

    1993-07-01

    The paper uses data from the literature to explore photodissociation dynamics of molecules possessing three, four, and five atoms, as represented by O3 and CO2, NH3 and C2H2, and CH4, respectively. The results yield many details, even in regard to the disposal of energy into rotation, which have applications to atmospheric problems. For instance, experiments probing the translational energies of the O and the vibrational and rotational distributions in the CO suggest that a spin-forbidden channel operates as it does in ozone photolysis. The data for both O3 and CO2 suggest a relationship between the structure of the parent molecule and the dynamics of dissociation.

  8. Double-level "orthogonal" dynamic combinatorial libraries on transition metal template.

    PubMed

    Goral, V; Nelen, M I; Eliseev, A V; Lehn, J M

    2001-02-13

    Dynamic combinatorial libraries are mixtures of compounds that exist in a dynamic equilibrium and can be driven to compositional self adaptation via selective binding of a specific assembly of certain components to a molecular target. We present here an extension of this initial concept to dynamic libraries that consists of two levels, the first formed by the coordination of terpyridine-based ligands to the transition metal template, and the second, by the imine formation with the aldehyde substituents on the terpyridine moieties. Dialdehyde 7 has been synthesized, converted into a variety of ligands, oxime ethers L(11)-L(33) and acyl hydrazones L(44)-L(77), and subsequently into corresponding cobalt complexes. A typical complex, Co(L(22))(2)(2+) is shown to engage in rapid exchange with a competing ligand L(11) and with another complex, Co(L(22))(2)(2+) in 30% acetonitrile/water at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C. The exchange in the corresponding Co(III) complexes is shown to be much slower. Imine exchange in the acyl hydrazone complexes (L(44)-L(77)) is strongly controlled by pH and temperature. The two types of exchange, ligand and imine, can thus be used as independent equilibrium processes controlled by different types of external intervention, i.e., via oxidation/reduction of the metal template and/or change in the pH/temperature of the medium. The resulting double-level dynamic libraries are therefore named orthogonal, in similarity with the orthogonal protecting groups in organic synthesis. Sample libraries of this type have been synthesized and showed the complete expected set of components in electrospray ionization MS.

  9. High-throughput flow injection analysis mass spectroscopy with networked delivery of color-rendered results. 2. Three-dimensional spectral mapping of 96-well combinatorial chemistry racks.

    PubMed

    Görlach, E; Richmond, R; Lewis, I

    1998-08-01

    For the last two years, the mass spectroscopy section of the Novartis Pharma Research Core Technology group has analyzed tens of thousands of multiple parallel synthesis samples from the Novartis Pharma Combinatorial Chemistry program, using an in-house developed automated high-throughput flow injection analysis electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy system. The electrospray spectra of these samples reflect the many structures present after the cleavage step from the solid support. The overall success of the sequential synthesis is mirrored in the purity of the expected end product, but the partial success of individual synthesis steps is evident in the impurities in the mass spectrum. However this latter reaction information, which is of considerable utility to the combinatorial chemist, is effectively hidden from view by the very large number of analyzed samples. This information is now revealed at the workbench of the combinatorial chemist by a novel three-dimensional display of each rack's complete mass spectral ion current using the in-house RackViewer Visual Basic application. Colorization of "forbidden loss" and "forbidden gas-adduct" zones, normalization to expected monoisotopic molecular weight, colorization of ionization intensity, and sorting by row or column were used in combination to highlight systematic patterns in the mass spectroscopy data.

  10. A dynamic multiarmed bandit-gene expression programming hyper-heuristic for combinatorial optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Sabar, Nasser R; Ayob, Masri; Kendall, Graham; Qu, Rong

    2015-02-01

    Hyper-heuristics are search methodologies that aim to provide high-quality solutions across a wide variety of problem domains, rather than developing tailor-made methodologies for each problem instance/domain. A traditional hyper-heuristic framework has two levels, namely, the high level strategy (heuristic selection mechanism and the acceptance criterion) and low level heuristics (a set of problem specific heuristics). Due to the different landscape structures of different problem instances, the high level strategy plays an important role in the design of a hyper-heuristic framework. In this paper, we propose a new high level strategy for a hyper-heuristic framework. The proposed high-level strategy utilizes a dynamic multiarmed bandit-extreme value-based reward as an online heuristic selection mechanism to select the appropriate heuristic to be applied at each iteration. In addition, we propose a gene expression programming framework to automatically generate the acceptance criterion for each problem instance, instead of using human-designed criteria. Two well-known, and very different, combinatorial optimization problems, one static (exam timetabling) and one dynamic (dynamic vehicle routing) are used to demonstrate the generality of the proposed framework. Compared with state-of-the-art hyper-heuristics and other bespoke methods, empirical results demonstrate that the proposed framework is able to generalize well across both domains. We obtain competitive, if not better results, when compared to the best known results obtained from other methods that have been presented in the scientific literature. We also compare our approach against the recently released hyper-heuristic competition test suite. We again demonstrate the generality of our approach when we compare against other methods that have utilized the same six benchmark datasets from this test suite. PMID:24951713

  11. A dynamic multiarmed bandit-gene expression programming hyper-heuristic for combinatorial optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Sabar, Nasser R; Ayob, Masri; Kendall, Graham; Qu, Rong

    2015-02-01

    Hyper-heuristics are search methodologies that aim to provide high-quality solutions across a wide variety of problem domains, rather than developing tailor-made methodologies for each problem instance/domain. A traditional hyper-heuristic framework has two levels, namely, the high level strategy (heuristic selection mechanism and the acceptance criterion) and low level heuristics (a set of problem specific heuristics). Due to the different landscape structures of different problem instances, the high level strategy plays an important role in the design of a hyper-heuristic framework. In this paper, we propose a new high level strategy for a hyper-heuristic framework. The proposed high-level strategy utilizes a dynamic multiarmed bandit-extreme value-based reward as an online heuristic selection mechanism to select the appropriate heuristic to be applied at each iteration. In addition, we propose a gene expression programming framework to automatically generate the acceptance criterion for each problem instance, instead of using human-designed criteria. Two well-known, and very different, combinatorial optimization problems, one static (exam timetabling) and one dynamic (dynamic vehicle routing) are used to demonstrate the generality of the proposed framework. Compared with state-of-the-art hyper-heuristics and other bespoke methods, empirical results demonstrate that the proposed framework is able to generalize well across both domains. We obtain competitive, if not better results, when compared to the best known results obtained from other methods that have been presented in the scientific literature. We also compare our approach against the recently released hyper-heuristic competition test suite. We again demonstrate the generality of our approach when we compare against other methods that have utilized the same six benchmark datasets from this test suite.

  12. Combinatorial Solid-Phase Synthesis of Aromatic Oligoamides: A Research-Based Laboratory Module for Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Amelia A.

    2016-01-01

    A five-week, research-based experiment suitable for second-semester introductory organic laboratory students is described. Each student designs, prepares, and analyzes a combinatorial array of six aromatic oligoamides. Molecules are prepared on solid phase via a six-step synthetic sequence, and purities and identities are determined by analysis of…

  13. Dynamic adaptive chemistry for turbulent flame simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongtao; Ren, Zhuyin; Lu, Tianfeng; Goldin, Graham M.

    2013-02-01

    The use of large chemical mechanisms in flame simulations is computationally expensive due to the large number of chemical species and the wide range of chemical time scales involved. This study investigates the use of dynamic adaptive chemistry (DAC) for efficient chemistry calculations in turbulent flame simulations. DAC is achieved through the directed relation graph (DRG) method, which is invoked for each computational fluid dynamics cell/particle to obtain a small skeletal mechanism that is valid for the local thermochemical condition. Consequently, during reaction fractional steps, one needs to solve a smaller set of ordinary differential equations governing chemical kinetics. Test calculations are performed in a partially-stirred reactor (PaSR) involving both methane/air premixed and non-premixed combustion with chemistry described by the 53-species GRI-Mech 3.0 mechanism and the 129-species USC-Mech II mechanism augmented with recently updated NO x pathways, respectively. Results show that, in the DAC approach, the DRG reduction threshold effectively controls the incurred errors in the predicted temperature and species concentrations. The computational saving achieved by DAC increases with the size of chemical kinetic mechanisms. For the PaSR simulations, DAC achieves a speedup factor of up to three for GRI-Mech 3.0 and up to six for USC-Mech II in simulation time, while at the same time maintaining good accuracy in temperature and species concentration predictions.

  14. Chloroform-soluble schiff-base Zn(II) or Cd(II) complexes from a dynamic combinatorial library.

    PubMed

    Epstein, D M; Choudhary, S; Churchill, M R; Keil, K M; Eliseev, A V; Morrow, J R

    2001-03-26

    A dynamic combinatorial library of metal ion Schiff-base complexes have been studied for the extraction of Zn(II) or Cd(II) from aqueous solution into chloroform. Library components consist of different aminophenols and 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde. Extraction of both Zn(II) and Cd(II) into chloroform was observed from aqueous solutions containing 0.0500 mM M(NO3)2, 0.100 M aminophenol, 0.100 M 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, 0.100 M NaCl, and 5.00 mM buffer at pH 8.5. Extraction was dependent on pH but not on counterions including Cl-, Br-, or NO3-. Studies showed that equilibrium was attained between the Schiff-base complexes across the two-phase chloroform-water system after 24 h of stirring. Analysis of the extracted species by use of 1H NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry as well as solubility studies on characterized complexes suggested that the major extracted species is the neutral bis-Schiff-base metal ion complex. In libraries containing mixtures of two different aminophenols and 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, an enhanced extent of extraction of Zn(II) into chloroform is observed. Studies suggest that a Zn(II) complex, which is likely the mixed Schiff-base complex, has superior extraction properties compared to simple libraries with a single aminophenol component. The structures of two bis-Schiff-base complexes of Zn(II) and one of Cd(II) have been determined by X-ray crystallography. The geometries of the two Zn(II) complexes, which differ only by a methyl substituent on the Schiff-base ligand, are markedly different, supporting the use of combinatorial methods in coordination chemistry. Zn(SB14)2 crystallized as the sesquihydrate (C24H18N4O2Zn.1.5 H2O) in the space group C2/c, with cell dimensions a = 23.219(15) A, b = 11.299(7) A, c = 16.822(11) A, beta = 102.91(5) degrees, V = 4302(5) A3, and Z = 8. Zn(SB15)2 crystallized as a 1:1 methanol solvate (C26H22N4O2Zn.CH3OH) in the space group P2(1)/c with cell dimensions a = 13.981(5) A, b = 7.978(3) A, c = 22.568(8) A

  15. A review of mesospheric dynamics and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Viereck, R.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances made in understanding the chemistry and dynamics of the atmosphere in the approximate altitude range of 50 to 90 km are addressed. Attention is given to mesospheric structure and seasonal variations, gravity waves and gravity wave saturation, the effects of gravity waves on thermal, momentum and constituent fluxes, and the effect of gravity waves on airglow emissions. A review of research on tides and planetary waves and their effects on the mesosphere are presented as well as discussions on ozone hydroxyl, water vapor, and noctilucent cloud research. 217 refs.

  16. From dynamic combinatorial 'hit' to lead: in vitro and in vivo activity of compounds targeting the pathogenic RNAs that cause myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ofori, Leslie O; Hoskins, Jason; Nakamori, Masayuki; Thornton, Charles A; Miller, Benjamin L

    2012-07-01

    The myotonic dystrophies (DM) are human diseases in which the accumulation of toxic RNA (CUG or CCUG) repeats in the cell causes sequestration of splicing factors, including MBNL1, leading to clinical symptoms such as muscle wasting and myotonia. We previously used Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry to identify the first compounds known to inhibit (CUG)-MBNL1 binding in vitro. We now report transformation of those compounds into structures with activity in vivo. Introduction of a benzo[g]quinoline substructure previously unknown in the context of RNA recognition, as well as other modifications, provided several molecules with enhanced binding properties, including compounds with strong selectivity for CUG repeats over CAG repeats or CAG-CUG duplex RNA. Compounds readily penetrate cells, and improve luciferase activity in a mouse myoblast assay in which enzyme function is coupled to a release of nuclear CUG-RNA retention. Most importantly, two compounds are able to partially restore splicing in a mouse model of DM1. PMID:22492623

  17. Dynamic covalent chemistry of bisimines at the solid/liquid interface monitored by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielski, Artur; El Garah, Mohamed; Haar, Sébastien; Kovaříček, Petr; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Samorì, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic covalent chemistry relies on the formation of reversible covalent bonds under thermodynamic control to generate dynamic combinatorial libraries. It provides access to numerous types of complex functional architectures, and thereby targets several technologically relevant applications, such as in drug discovery, (bio)sensing and dynamic materials. In liquid media it was proved that by taking advantage of the reversible nature of the bond formation it is possible to combine the error-correction capacity of supramolecular chemistry with the robustness of covalent bonding to generate adaptive systems. Here we show that double imine formation between 4-(hexadecyloxy)benzaldehyde and different α,ω-diamines as well as reversible bistransimination reactions can be achieved at the solid/liquid interface, as monitored on the submolecular scale by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy imaging. Our modular approach enables the structurally controlled reversible incorporation of various molecular components to form sophisticated covalent architectures, which opens up perspectives towards responsive multicomponent two-dimensional materials and devices.

  18. Combinatorial Origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieleman, Peter; Waitukaitis, Scott; van Hecke, Martin

    To design rigidly foldable quadrilateral meshes one generally needs to solve a complicated set of constraints. Here we present a systematic, combinatorial approach to create rigidly foldable quadrilateral meshes with a limited number of different vertices. The number of discrete, 1 degree-of-freedom folding branches for some of these meshes scales exponentially with the number of vertices on the edge, whilst other meshes generated this way only have two discrete folding branches, regardless of mesh size. We show how these two different behaviours both emerge from the two folding branches present in a single generic 4-vertex. Furthermore, we model generic 4-vertices as a spherical linkage and exploit a previously overlooked symmetry to create non-developable origami patterns using the same combinatorial framework.

  19. Scent Transmutation: A New Way to Teach on Chemical Equilibrium, Distillation, and Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ji, Qing; El-Hamdi, Nadia S.; Miljanic´, Ognjen S?.

    2014-01-01

    Esters are volatile and pleasantly smelling compounds, commonly used as food additives. Using Ti(OBu)[subscript 4]-catalyzed acyl exchange, we demonstrate a scent transmutation experiment, in which two fragrant esters swap their acyl and alkoxy substituents and are, during the course of a reactive distillation, quantitatively converted into two…

  20. A knowledge-based approach in designing combinatorial or medicinal chemistry libraries for drug discovery. 1. A qualitative and quantitative characterization of known drug databases.

    PubMed

    Ghose, A K; Viswanadhan, V N; Wendoloski, J J

    1999-01-01

    OH and carboxamides are the most abundant functional groups in the drug database. The effective range of physicochemical properties presented here can be used in the design of drug-like combinatorial libraries as well as in developing a more efficient corporate medicinal chemistry library.

  1. Dynamics and Chemistry of Planet Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2010-03-01

    Sophisticated calculations of how planetesimals assembled into the terrestrial planets can be tested by using models of the chemistry of the solar nebula. Jade Bond (previously at University of Arizona and now at the Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ), Dante Lauretta (University of Arizona) and Dave O'Brien (Planetary Sciences Institute) combined planetary accretion simulations done by O'Brien, Alessandro Morbidelli (Observatoire de Nice, France), and Hal Levison (Southwest Research Institute, Boulder) with calculations of the solar nebula chemistry as a function of time and distance from the Sun to determine the overall chemical composition of the planets formed in the simulations. They then compared the simulated planets with the compositions of Earth and Mars. The simulated planets have chemical compositions similar to real planets, indicating that the accretion calculations are reasonable. Questions remain about the accretion of water and other highly volatile compounds, including C and N, which are essential for life.

  2. Organoactinide chemistry: synthesis, structure, and solution dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.G.

    1985-12-01

    This thesis considers three aspects of organoactinide chemistry. In chapter one, a bidentate phosphine ligand was used to kinetically stabilize complexes of the type Cp/sub 2/MX/sub 2/. Ligand redistribution processes are present throughout the synthetic work, as has often been observed in uranium cyclopentadienyl chemistry. The effects of covalent M-L bonding on the solution and solid state properties of U(III) coordination complexes are considered. In particular, the nature of the more subtle interaction between the metal and the neutral ligand are examined. Using relative basicity data obtained in solution, and solid state structural data (and supplemented by gas phase photoelectron measurements), it is demonstrated that the more electron rich U(III) centers engage in significant U ..-->.. L ..pi..-donation. Trivalent uranium is shown to be capable of acting either as a one- or two-electron reducing agent toward a wide variety of unsaturated organic and inorganic molecules, generating molecular classes unobtainable via traditional synthetic approaches, as well as offering an alternative synthetic approach to molecules accessible via metathesis reactions. Ligand redistribution processes are again observed, but given the information concerning ligand lability, this reactivity pattern is applied to the synthesis of pure materials inaccessible from redox chemistry. 214 refs., 33 figs., 10 tabs.

  3. Combinatorial Optimization Algorithms for Dynamic Multiple Fault Diagnosis in Automotive and Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodali, Anuradha

    In this thesis, we develop dynamic multiple fault diagnosis (DMFD) algorithms to diagnose faults that are sporadic and coupled. Firstly, we formulate a coupled factorial hidden Markov model-based (CFHMM) framework to diagnose dependent faults occurring over time (dynamic case). Here, we implement a mixed memory Markov coupling model to determine the most likely sequence of (dependent) fault states, the one that best explains the observed test outcomes over time. An iterative Gauss-Seidel coordinate ascent optimization method is proposed for solving the problem. A soft Viterbi algorithm is also implemented within the framework for decoding dependent fault states over time. We demonstrate the algorithm on simulated and real-world systems with coupled faults; the results show that this approach improves the correct isolation rate as compared to the formulation where independent fault states are assumed. Secondly, we formulate a generalization of set-covering, termed dynamic set-covering (DSC), which involves a series of coupled set-covering problems over time. The objective of the DSC problem is to infer the most probable time sequence of a parsimonious set of failure sources that explains the observed test outcomes over time. The DSC problem is NP-hard and intractable due to the fault-test dependency matrix that couples the failed tests and faults via the constraint matrix, and the temporal dependence of failure sources over time. Here, the DSC problem is motivated from the viewpoint of a dynamic multiple fault diagnosis problem, but it has wide applications in operations research, for e.g., facility location problem. Thus, we also formulated the DSC problem in the context of a dynamically evolving facility location problem. Here, a facility can be opened, closed, or can be temporarily unavailable at any time for a given requirement of demand points. These activities are associated with costs or penalties, viz., phase-in or phase-out for the opening or closing of a

  4. Combinatorial Optimization Algorithms for Dynamic Multiple Fault Diagnosis in Automotive and Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodali, Anuradha

    In this thesis, we develop dynamic multiple fault diagnosis (DMFD) algorithms to diagnose faults that are sporadic and coupled. Firstly, we formulate a coupled factorial hidden Markov model-based (CFHMM) framework to diagnose dependent faults occurring over time (dynamic case). Here, we implement a mixed memory Markov coupling model to determine the most likely sequence of (dependent) fault states, the one that best explains the observed test outcomes over time. An iterative Gauss-Seidel coordinate ascent optimization method is proposed for solving the problem. A soft Viterbi algorithm is also implemented within the framework for decoding dependent fault states over time. We demonstrate the algorithm on simulated and real-world systems with coupled faults; the results show that this approach improves the correct isolation rate as compared to the formulation where independent fault states are assumed. Secondly, we formulate a generalization of set-covering, termed dynamic set-covering (DSC), which involves a series of coupled set-covering problems over time. The objective of the DSC problem is to infer the most probable time sequence of a parsimonious set of failure sources that explains the observed test outcomes over time. The DSC problem is NP-hard and intractable due to the fault-test dependency matrix that couples the failed tests and faults via the constraint matrix, and the temporal dependence of failure sources over time. Here, the DSC problem is motivated from the viewpoint of a dynamic multiple fault diagnosis problem, but it has wide applications in operations research, for e.g., facility location problem. Thus, we also formulated the DSC problem in the context of a dynamically evolving facility location problem. Here, a facility can be opened, closed, or can be temporarily unavailable at any time for a given requirement of demand points. These activities are associated with costs or penalties, viz., phase-in or phase-out for the opening or closing of a

  5. Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Andrew S.; Griswold, Karl E.; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    Protein engineering by combinatorial site-directed mutagenesis evaluates a portion of the sequence space near a target protein, seeking variants with improved properties (stability, activity, immunogenicity, etc.). In order to improve the hit-rate of beneficial variants in such mutagenesis libraries, we develop methods to select optimal positions and corresponding sets of the mutations that will be used, in all combinations, in constructing a library for experimental evaluation. Our approach, OCoM (Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis), encompasses both degenerate oligonucleotides and specified point mutations, and can be directed accordingly by requirements of experimental cost and library size. It evaluates the quality of the resulting library by one- and two-body sequence potentials, averaged over the variants. To ensure that it is not simply recapitulating extant sequences, it balances the quality of a library with an explicit evaluation of the novelty of its members. We show that, despite dealing with a combinatorial set of variants, in our approach the resulting library optimization problem is actually isomorphic to single-variant optimization. By the same token, this means that the two-body sequence potential results in an NP-hard optimization problem. We present an efficient dynamic programming algorithm for the one-body case and a practically-efficient integer programming approach for the general two-body case. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in designing libraries for three different case study proteins targeted by previous combinatorial libraries - a green fluorescent protein, a cytochrome P450, and a beta lactamase. We found that OCoM worked quite efficiently in practice, requiring only 1 hour even for the massive design problem of selecting 18 mutations to generate 107 variants of a 443-residue P450. We demonstrate the general ability of OCoM in enabling the protein engineer to explore and evaluate trade-offs between quality and

  6. Dynamic and combinatorial control of gene expression by nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs)

    PubMed Central

    Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Germain, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are transcriptional regulators controlling the expression of specific subsets of genes in a ligand-dependent manner. The basic mechanism for switching on transcription of cognate target genes involves RAR binding at specific response elements and a network of interactions with coregulatory protein complexes, the assembly of which is directed by the C-terminal ligand-binding domain of RARs. In addition to this scenario, new roles for the N-terminal domain and the ubiquitin-proteasome system recently emerged. Moreover, the functions of RARs are not limited to the regulation of cognate target genes, as they can transrepress other gene pathways. Finally, RARs are also involved in nongenomic biological activities such as the activation of translation and of kinase cascades. Here we will review these mechanisms, focusing on how kinase signaling and the proteasome pathway cooperate to influence the dynamics of RAR transcriptional activity. PMID:19471584

  7. Controlling Chemistry in Dynamic Nanoscale Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesorka, Aldo; Lizana, Ludvig; Konkoli, Zoran; Czolkos, Ilja; Orwar, Owe

    The biological cell, the fundamental building block of the living world, is a complex maze of compartmentalized biochemical reactors that embed tens of thousands of chemical reactions running in parallel. Several, if not all, reactors are systematically interconnected by a web of nanofluidic transporters, such as nanotubes, vesicles, and membrane pores with ever-changing shapes and structures [1]. To initiate, terminate, or control chemical reactions, small-scale poly-/pleiomorphic systems undergo rapid and violent shape changes with energy barriers close to kBT , where, due to the small dimensions, diffusional mixing of reactants is rapid. The geometry, i.e. volume, and shape changes can be utilized to control both kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the system. This is in sharp contrast to the man-made macroscopic bioreactors, in which mixing of reactants is aided by mechanical means, such as stirring or sonication, under the assumption that reactions take place in volumes that do not change over time. Such reaction volumes are compact, like a sphere, a cube, or a cylinder, and do not provide for variation of shape. Ordinarily, reaction rates, mechanisms, and thermodynamic properties of chemical reactions in condensed media are based on these assumptions. A number of important questions and challenges arise from these facts. For example, how will we achieve fundamental understanding of how reactor shape affects chemistry on the nanoscale, how do we develop appropriate and powerful experimental model systems, and last but not least what impact will this knowledge have on the design and function of nanotechnological devices with new operation modes derived from natural principles.

  8. Acceleration of the chemistry solver for modeling DI engine combustion using dynamic adaptive chemistry (DAC) schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu; Liang, Long; Ge, Hai-Wen; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2010-03-01

    Acceleration of the chemistry solver for engine combustion is of much interest due to the fact that in practical engine simulations extensive computational time is spent solving the fuel oxidation and emission formation chemistry. A dynamic adaptive chemistry (DAC) scheme based on a directed relation graph error propagation (DRGEP) method has been applied to study homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine combustion with detailed chemistry (over 500 species) previously using an R-value-based breadth-first search (RBFS) algorithm, which significantly reduced computational times (by as much as 30-fold). The present paper extends the use of this on-the-fly kinetic mechanism reduction scheme to model combustion in direct-injection (DI) engines. It was found that the DAC scheme becomes less efficient when applied to DI engine simulations using a kinetic mechanism of relatively small size and the accuracy of the original DAC scheme decreases for conventional non-premixed combustion engine. The present study also focuses on determination of search-initiating species, involvement of the NOx chemistry, selection of a proper error tolerance, as well as treatment of the interaction of chemical heat release and the fuel spray. Both the DAC schemes were integrated into the ERC KIVA-3v2 code, and simulations were conducted to compare the two schemes. In general, the present DAC scheme has better efficiency and similar accuracy compared to the previous DAC scheme. The efficiency depends on the size of the chemical kinetics mechanism used and the engine operating conditions. For cases using a small n-heptane kinetic mechanism of 34 species, 30% of the computational time is saved, and 50% for a larger n-heptane kinetic mechanism of 61 species. The paper also demonstrates that by combining the present DAC scheme with an adaptive multi-grid chemistry (AMC) solver, it is feasible to simulate a direct-injection engine using a detailed n-heptane mechanism with 543 species

  9. Forcing of stratospheric chemistry and dynamics during the Dalton Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anet, J. G.; Muthers, S.; Rozanov, E.; Raible, C. C.; Peter, T.; Stenke, A.; Shapiro, A. I.; Beer, J.; Steinhilber, F.; Brönnimann, S.; Arfeuille, F.; Brugnara, Y.; Schmutz, W.

    2013-11-01

    The response of atmospheric chemistry and dynamics to volcanic eruptions and to a decrease in solar activity during the Dalton Minimum is investigated with the fully coupled atmosphere-ocean chemistry general circulation model SOCOL-MPIOM (modeling tools for studies of SOlar Climate Ozone Links-Max Planck Institute Ocean Model) covering the time period 1780 to 1840 AD. We carried out several sensitivity ensemble experiments to separate the effects of (i) reduced solar ultra-violet (UV) irradiance, (ii) reduced solar visible and near infrared irradiance, (iii) enhanced galactic cosmic ray intensity as well as less intensive solar energetic proton events and auroral electron precipitation, and (iv) volcanic aerosols. The introduced changes of UV irradiance and volcanic aerosols significantly influence stratospheric dynamics in the early 19th century, whereas changes in the visible part of the spectrum and energetic particles have smaller effects. A reduction of UV irradiance by 15%, which represents the presently discussed highest estimate of UV irradiance change caused by solar activity changes, causes global ozone decrease below the stratopause reaching as much as 8% in the midlatitudes at 5 hPa and a significant stratospheric cooling of up to 2 °C in the mid-stratosphere and to 6 °C in the lower mesosphere. Changes in energetic particle precipitation lead only to minor changes in the yearly averaged temperature fields in the stratosphere. Volcanic aerosols heat the tropical lower stratosphere, allowing more water vapour to enter the tropical stratosphere, which, via HOx reactions, decreases upper stratospheric and mesospheric ozone by roughly 4%. Conversely, heterogeneous chemistry on aerosols reduces stratospheric NOx, leading to a 12% ozone increase in the tropics, whereas a decrease in ozone of up to 5% is found over Antarctica in boreal winter. The linear superposition of the different contributions is not equivalent to the response obtained in a simulation

  10. Optimization of combinatorial mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Parker, Andrew S; Griswold, Karl E; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2011-11-01

    Protein engineering by combinatorial site-directed mutagenesis evaluates a portion of the sequence space near a target protein, seeking variants with improved properties (e.g., stability, activity, immunogenicity). In order to improve the hit-rate of beneficial variants in such mutagenesis libraries, we develop methods to select optimal positions and corresponding sets of the mutations that will be used, in all combinations, in constructing a library for experimental evaluation. Our approach, OCoM (Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis), encompasses both degenerate oligonucleotides and specified point mutations, and can be directed accordingly by requirements of experimental cost and library size. It evaluates the quality of the resulting library by one- and two-body sequence potentials, averaged over the variants. To ensure that it is not simply recapitulating extant sequences, it balances the quality of a library with an explicit evaluation of the novelty of its members. We show that, despite dealing with a combinatorial set of variants, in our approach the resulting library optimization problem is actually isomorphic to single-variant optimization. By the same token, this means that the two-body sequence potential results in an NP-hard optimization problem. We present an efficient dynamic programming algorithm for the one-body case and a practically-efficient integer programming approach for the general two-body case. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in designing libraries for three different case study proteins targeted by previous combinatorial libraries--a green fluorescent protein, a cytochrome P450, and a beta lactamase. We found that OCoM worked quite efficiently in practice, requiring only 1 hour even for the massive design problem of selecting 18 mutations to generate 10⁷ variants of a 443-residue P450. We demonstrate the general ability of OCoM in enabling the protein engineer to explore and evaluate trade-offs between quality and

  11. Ionic Liquids: Radiation Chemistry, Solvation Dynamics and Reactivity Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Wishart, J.F.

    2011-06-12

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs generally have low volatilities and are combustion-resistant, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of primary radiation chemistry, charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of reactions and product distributions. We study these issues by characterization of primary radiolysis products and measurements of their yields and reactivity, quantification of electron solvation dynamics and scavenging of electrons in different states of solvation. From this knowledge we wish to learn how to predict radiolytic mechanisms and control them or mitigate their effects on the properties of materials used in nuclear fuel processing, for example, and to apply IL radiation chemistry to answer questions about general chemical reactivity in ionic liquids that will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that the slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increase the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alter product distributions and subsequent chemistry. This difference from conventional solvents has profound effects on predicting and controlling radiolytic yields

  12. Forcing of stratospheric chemistry and dynamics during the Dalton Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anet, J. G.; Muthers, S.; Rozanov, E.; Raible, C. C.; Peter, T.; Stenke, A.; Shapiro, A. I.; Beer, J.; Steinhilber, F.; Brönnimann, S.; Arfeuille, F.; Brugnara, Y.; Schmutz, W.

    2013-06-01

    especially UV and volcanic eruptions dominate the changes in the ozone, temperature and dynamics while the NOx field is dominated by the EPP. Visible radiation changes have only very minor effects on both stratospheric dynamics and chemistry.

  13. Future Arctic ozone recovery: the importance of chemistry and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarz, Ewa; Maycock, Amanda; Abraham, Luke; Braesicke, Peter; Dessens, Olivier; Pyle, John

    2016-04-01

    Future trends in Arctic springtime total column ozone, and its chemical and dynamical drivers, are assessed using a 7 member ensemble from the Met Office Unified Model with United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols (UM-UKCA) simulating the period 1960-2100. The Arctic mean March total column ozone increases throughout the 21st century at a rate of ~11.5 DU/decade, and is projected to return to the 1980 level in the late 2030s. However, the integrations show that even past 2060 springtime Arctic ozone can episodically drop by ~50-100 DU below the long-term mean to near present day values. Consistent with the global decline in inorganic chlorine over the century, the estimated mean halogen induced chemical ozone loss in the Arctic lower atmosphere in spring decreases by around a factor of two between 1981-2000 and 2061-2080. However, in the presence of a cold and strong polar vortex elevated halogen losses well above the long-term mean continue to occur in the simulations into the second part of the century. The ensemble shows a radiatively-driven cooling trend modelled in the Arctic winter mid- and upper stratosphere, but there is less consistency across the seven ensemble members in the lower stratosphere. This is partly due to an increase in downwelling over the Arctic polar cap in winter, which increases transport of ozone into the polar region as well as drives adiabatic warming that partly offsets the radiatively-driven stratospheric cooling. However, individual years characterised by significantly suppressed downwelling, reduced transport and low temperatures continue into the future. We conclude that despite the future long-term recovery of Arctic ozone, the large interannual dynamical variability is expected to continue thereby facilitating episodic reductions in springtime ozone columns. Whilst our results suggest that the relative role of dynamical processes for determining Arctic springtime ozone will increase in the future, halogen chemistry will remain a

  14. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Thermal Induced Chemistry in Tatb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quenneville, J.; Germann, T. C.; Thompson, A. P.; Kober, E. M.

    2007-12-01

    A reactive force field (ReaxFF) is used with molecular dynamics to probe the chemistry induced by intense heating (`accelerated cook-off') of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). Large-system simulations are desired for TATB because of the high degree of carbon clustering expected in this material. Using small, 32-molecule simulations, we calculate the reaction rate as a function of temperature and compare the Arrhenius-predicted activation energy with experiment. Decomposition product evolution (mainly N2, H2O, CO2 and graphitic carbon clusters) is followed using a 576-molecule larger simulation, which also illustrates the effect of system size on both carbon clustering and reaction rate.

  15. Ionic Liquids: Radiation Chemistry, Solvation Dynamics and Reactivity Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Wishart,J.F.

    2008-09-29

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate

  16. IONIC LIQUIDS: RADIATION CHEMISTRY, SOLVATION DYNAMICS AND REACTIVITY PATTERNS.

    SciTech Connect

    WISHART,J.F.

    2007-10-01

    energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate the influence of ILs on charge transport processes. Methods. Picosecond pulse radiolysis studies at BNL

  17. Quantitative Reactivity Scales for Dynamic Covalent and Systems Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuntao; Li, Lijie; Ye, Hebo; Zhang, Ling; You, Lei

    2016-01-13

    Dynamic covalent chemistry (DCC) has become a powerful tool for the creation of molecular assemblies and complex systems in chemistry and materials science. Herein we developed for the first time quantitative reactivity scales capable of correlation and prediction of the equilibrium of dynamic covalent reactions (DCRs). The reference reactions are based upon universal DCRs between imines, one of the most utilized structural motifs in DCC, and a series of O-, N-, and S- mononucleophiles. Aromatic imines derived from pyridine-2-carboxyaldehyde exhibit capability for controlling the equilibrium through distinct substituent effects. Electron-donating groups (EDGs) stabilize the imine through quinoidal resonance, while electron-withdrawing groups (EWGs) stabilize the adduct by enhancing intramolecular hydrogen bonding, resulting in curvature in Hammett analysis. Notably, unique nonlinearity induced by both EDGs and EWGs emerged in Hammett plot when cyclic secondary amines were used. This is the first time such a behavior is observed in a thermodynamically controlled system, to the best of our knowledge. Unified quantitative reactivity scales were proposed for DCC and defined by the correlation log K = S(N) (R(N) + R(E)). Nucleophilicity parameters (R(N) and S(N)) and electrophilicity parameters (R(E)) were then developed from DCRs discovered. Furthermore, the predictive power of those parameters was verified by successful correlation of other DCRs, validating our reactivity scales as a general and useful tool for the evaluation and modeling of DCRs. The reactivity parameters proposed here should be complementary to well-established kinetics based parameters and find applications in many aspects, such as DCR discovery, bioconjugation, and catalysis. PMID:26652793

  18. Vesper - Venus Chemistry and Dynamics Orbiter - A NASA Discovery Mission Proposal: Submillimeter Investigation of Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Vesper conducts a focused investigation of the chemistry and dynamics of the middle atmosphere of our sister planet- from the base of the global cloud cover to the lower thermosphere. The middle atmosphere controls the stability of the Venus climate system. Vesper determines what processes maintain the atmospheric chemical stability, cause observed variability of chemical composition, control the escape of water, and drive the extreme super-rotation. The Vesper science investigation provides a unique perspective on the Earth environment due to the similarities in the middle atmosphere processes of both Venus and the Earth. Understanding key distinctions and similarities between Venus and Earth will increase our knowledge of how terrestrial planets evolve along different paths from nearly identical initial conditions.

  19. Future Arctic ozone recovery: the importance of chemistry and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarz, Ewa M.; Maycock, Amanda C.; Abraham, N. Luke; Braesicke, Peter; Dessens, Olivier; Pyle, John A.

    2016-09-01

    Future trends in Arctic springtime total column ozone, and its chemical and dynamical drivers, are assessed using a seven-member ensemble from the Met Office Unified Model with United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols (UM-UKCA) simulating the period 1960-2100. The Arctic mean March total column ozone increases throughout the 21st century at a rate of ˜ 11.5 DU decade-1, and is projected to return to the 1980 level in the late 2030s. However, the integrations show that even past 2060 springtime Arctic ozone can episodically drop by ˜ 50-100 DU below the corresponding long-term ensemble mean for that period, reaching values characteristic of the near-present-day average level. Consistent with the global decline in inorganic chlorine (Cly) over the century, the estimated mean halogen-induced chemical ozone loss in the Arctic lower atmosphere in spring decreases by around a factor of 2 between the periods 2001-2020 and 2061-2080. However, in the presence of a cold and strong polar vortex, elevated halogen-induced ozone losses well above the corresponding long-term mean continue to occur in the simulations into the second part of the century. The ensemble shows a significant cooling trend in the Arctic winter mid- and upper stratosphere, but there is less confidence in the projected temperature trends in the lower stratosphere (100-50 hPa). This is partly due to an increase in downwelling over the Arctic polar cap in winter, which increases transport of ozone into the polar region as well as drives adiabatic warming that partly offsets the radiatively driven stratospheric cooling. However, individual winters characterised by significantly suppressed downwelling, reduced transport and anomalously low temperatures continue to occur in the future. We conclude that, despite the projected long-term recovery of Arctic ozone, the large interannual dynamical variability is expected to continue in the future, thereby facilitating episodic reductions in springtime ozone columns

  20. Design of a Dynamic Undergraduate Green Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    The green chemistry course taught at Westminster College (PA) incorporates nontraditional teaching techniques and texts to educate future chemists about the importance of using green chemistry principles. The course is designed to introduce green chemistry concepts and demonstrate their inherent necessity by discussing historical missteps by the…

  1. Liquid-phase combinatorial library synthesis: recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barot, Kuldipsinh P; Nikolova, Stoyanka; Ivanov, Illiyan; Ghate, Manjunath D

    2014-01-01

    Liquid-phase combinatorial library synthesis is commonly developed into the viable alternatives or adjunct across the broad spectrum of polymer-supported organic chemistry. It includes the use of soluble polymer supports in the combinatorial synthesis of peptides and small-molecular library compounds which act as catalyst and reagent supports. It also includes high throughput biological screening with generation and evaluation of chemical leads for drug discovery development. In this review, liquid-phase combinatorial library synthesis is shown as the most efficient method of choice for the synthesis of most of the combinatorial library compounds with specific approaches from different groups that state potentials of solution-phase combinatorial synthesis.

  2. Reinvigorating natural product combinatorial biosynthesis with synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunji; Moore, Bradley S; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2015-09-01

    Natural products continue to play a pivotal role in drug-discovery efforts and in the understanding if human health. The ability to extend nature's chemistry through combinatorial biosynthesis--altering functional groups, regiochemistry and scaffold backbones through the manipulation of biosynthetic enzymes--offers unique opportunities to create natural product analogs. Incorporating emerging synthetic biology techniques has the potential to further accelerate the refinement of combinatorial biosynthesis as a robust platform for the diversification of natural chemical drug leads. Two decades after the field originated, we discuss the current limitations, the realities and the state of the art of combinatorial biosynthesis, including the engineering of substrate specificity of biosynthetic enzymes and the development of heterologous expression systems for biosynthetic pathways. We also propose a new perspective for the combinatorial biosynthesis of natural products that could reinvigorate drug discovery by using synthetic biology in combination with synthetic chemistry.

  3. Reinvigorating natural product combinatorial biosynthesis with synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunji; Moore, Bradley S.; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2016-01-01

    Natural products continue to play a pivotal role in drug discovery efforts and in understanding human health. The ability to extend nature’s chemistry through combinatorial biosynthesis – altering functional groups, regiochemistry, and scaffold backbones through manipulation of biosynthetic enzymes – offers unique opportunities to create natural product analogues. Incorporating emerging synthetic biology techniques has the potential to further accelerate the refinement of combinatorial biosynthesis as a robust platform for the diversification of natural chemical drug leads. Two decades after the field originated, we discuss the current limitations, realities, and the state of the art of combinatorial biosynthesis, including the engineering of substrate specificity of biosynthetic enzymes and the development heterologous expression systems for biosynthetic pathways. We also propose a new perspective for the combinatorial biosynthesis of natural products that could reinvigorate drug discovery by using synthetic biology in combination with synthetic chemistry. PMID:26284672

  4. Synthesis, dynamic combinatorial chemistry, and PCR amplification of 3'-5' and 3'-6' disulfide-linked oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Dennis Jul; Manuguerra, Ilenia; Kjelstrup, Michael Brøndum; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2014-12-22

    Disulfide dithymidines linked 3'-5' or 3'-6' were synthesized and incorporated into oligonucleotides through a combined phosphotriester and phosphoramidite solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis approach. The disulfide links are cleaved and formed reversibly in the presence of thiols and oligonucleotides. This link was shown to be sequence-adaptive in response to given templates in the presence of mercaptoethanol. The artificial 3'-5' and 3'-6' disulfide link was tolerated by polymerases in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). By using sequencing analysis, we show that single mutations frequently occurred randomly in the amplification products of the PCR.

  5. Combinatorial Geometry Printer Plotting.

    1987-01-05

    Picture generates plots of two-dimensional slices through the three-dimensional geometry described by the combinatorial geometry (CG) package used in such codes as MORSE and QAD-CG. These plots are printed on a standard line printer.

  6. Nonparametric Combinatorial Sequence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauthier, Fabian L.; Jordan, Michael I.; Jojic, Nebojsa

    This work considers biological sequences that exhibit combinatorial structures in their composition: groups of positions of the aligned sequences are "linked" and covary as one unit across sequences. If multiple such groups exist, complex interactions can emerge between them. Sequences of this kind arise frequently in biology but methodologies for analyzing them are still being developed. This paper presents a nonparametric prior on sequences which allows combinatorial structures to emerge and which induces a posterior distribution over factorized sequence representations. We carry out experiments on three sequence datasets which indicate that combinatorial structures are indeed present and that combinatorial sequence models can more succinctly describe them than simpler mixture models. We conclude with an application to MHC binding prediction which highlights the utility of the posterior distribution induced by the prior. By integrating out the posterior our method compares favorably to leading binding predictors.

  7. A combinatorial variation in surface chemistry and pore size of three-dimensional porous poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds modulates the behaviors of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingdi; Tan, Ke; Zhou, Yan; Ye, Zhaoyang; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-02-01

    Biomaterial properties play significant roles in controlling cellular behaviors. The objective of the present study was to investigate how pore size and surface chemistry of three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds regulate the fate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro in combination. First, on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) films, the hydrolytic treatment was found to stimulate the adhesion, spreading and proliferation of human MSCs (hMSCs) in comparison with pristine films, while the aminolysis showed mixed effects. Then, 3D porous PCL scaffolds with varying pore sizes (100-200μm, 200-300μm and 300-450μm) were fabricated and subjected to either hydrolysis or aminolysis. It was found that a pore size of 200-300μm with hydrolysis in 3D scaffolds was the most favorable condition for growth of hMSCs. Importantly, while a pore size of 200-300μm with hydrolysis for 1h supported the best osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, the chondrogenic differentiation was greatest in scaffolds with a pore size of 300-450μm and treated with aminolysis for 1h. Taken together, these results suggest that surface chemistry and pore size of 3D porous scaffolds may potentially have a synergistic impact on the behaviors of MSCs.

  8. Street Canyon Atmospheric Composition: Coupling Dynamics and Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, V.; Bloss, W. J.; Cai, X.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric composition within the urban environment, particularly within street canyons (formed by a road running between two rows of buildings), has a direct effect on the air quality of an environment in which a large majority of people live and work. The composition of air within a street canyon is determined by the composition of background air mixed in from above, advection of air into and out of the canyon, vehicle exhaust and other emissions from within the street, together with the mixing and chemical processing of pollutants within the canyon. This occurs on a timescale of a few seconds to minutes and as a result, within-canyon atmospheric processes can have a significant effect on atmospheric composition on such timescales. This paper outlines a modelling study of street canyon atmospheric composition, integrating the combined effects of emissions, dynamics and chemistry. This work builds upon an existing dynamical model of canyon atmospheric motion (Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model) by adding a detailed chemical reaction scheme. Previous studies have considered basic NOx-O3 cycles with only a small number of chemical reactions included. Initially, a zero-dimensional box model was used to develop and assess the accuracy of a suitable reduced chemical scheme to be included within the LES. The reduced chemical scheme, based upon a subset of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM), includes 51 chemical species and 136 reactions. Vehicle emissions taken from the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) were subsequently added to the box model. These elements were then combined with the canyon dynamics simulated by the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model. Results demonstrate that the enhanced model is a suitable tool to be used to further investigate the combined effects of mixing and chemical processing upon air quality within the street canyon. Subsequently, a number of key questions relating to urban atmospheric composition are addressed using the

  9. 3D virtual screening of large combinatorial spaces.

    PubMed

    Muegge, Ingo; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    A new method for 3D in silico screening of large virtual combinatorial chemistry spaces is described. The software PharmShape screens millions of individual compounds applying a multi-conformational pharmacophore and shape based approach. Its extension, PharmShapeCC, is capable of screening trillions of compounds from tens of thousands of combinatorial libraries. Key elements of PharmShape and PharmShapeCC are customizable pharmacophore features, a composite inclusion sphere, library core intermediate clustering, and the determination of combinatorial library consensus orientations that allow for orthogonal enumeration of libraries. The performance of the software is illustrated by the prospective identification of a novel CXCR5 antagonist and examples of finding novel chemotypes from synthesizing and evaluating combinatorial hit libraries identified from PharmShapeCC screens for CCR1, LTA4 hydrolase, and MMP-13.

  10. Increasing the dynamic control space of mammalian transcription devices by combinatorial assembly of homologous regulatory elements from different bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Bacchus, William; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory elements are widely utilized building blocks for constructing regulatory genetic circuits adapted for mammalian cells and have found their way into a broad range of biotechnological applications. Prokaryotic transcriptional repressors, fused to eukaryotic transactivation or repression domains, compose the transcription factor, which binds and adjusts transcription from chimeric promoters containing the repressor-specific operator sequence. Escherichia coli and Chlamydia trachomatis share common features in the regulatory mechanism of the biosynthesis of l-tryptophan. The repressor protein TrpR of C. trachomatis regulates the trpRBA operon and the TrpR of E. coli regulates the trpEDCBA operon, both requiring l-tryptophan as a co-repressor. Fusion of these bacterial repressors to the VP16 transactivation domain of Herpes simplex virus creates synthetic transactivators that could bind and activate chimeric promoters, assembled by placing repressor-specific operator modules adjacent to a minimal promoter, in an l-tryptophan-adjustable manner. Combinations of different transactivator and promoter variants from the same or different bacterial species resulted in a multitude of regulatory systems where l-tryptophan regulation properties, background noise, and maximal gene expression levels were significantly diverse. Different l-tryptophan analogues showed diverse regulatory capacity depending on the promoter/transactivator combination. We believe the systems approach to rationally choose promoters, transactivators and inducer molecules, to obtain desired and predefined genetic expression dynamics and control profiles, will significantly advance the design of new regulatory circuits as well as improving already existing ones. PMID:23178502

  11. Manipulating Combinatorial Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labelle, Gilbert

    This set of transparencies shows how the manipulation of combinatorial structures in the context of modern combinatorics can easily lead to interesting teaching and learning activities at every level of education from elementary school to university. The transparencies describe: (1) the importance and relations of combinatorics to science and…

  12. Research on universal combinatorial coding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Zhang, Zhuo; Mo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The conception of universal combinatorial coding is proposed. Relations exist more or less in many coding methods. It means that a kind of universal coding method is objectively existent. It can be a bridge connecting many coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding is lossless and it is based on the combinatorics theory. The combinational and exhaustive property make it closely related with the existing code methods. Universal combinatorial coding does not depend on the probability statistic characteristic of information source, and it has the characteristics across three coding branches. It has analyzed the relationship between the universal combinatorial coding and the variety of coding method and has researched many applications technologies of this coding method. In addition, the efficiency of universal combinatorial coding is analyzed theoretically. The multicharacteristic and multiapplication of universal combinatorial coding are unique in the existing coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding has theoretical research and practical application value.

  13. Research on universal combinatorial coding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Zhang, Zhuo; Mo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The conception of universal combinatorial coding is proposed. Relations exist more or less in many coding methods. It means that a kind of universal coding method is objectively existent. It can be a bridge connecting many coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding is lossless and it is based on the combinatorics theory. The combinational and exhaustive property make it closely related with the existing code methods. Universal combinatorial coding does not depend on the probability statistic characteristic of information source, and it has the characteristics across three coding branches. It has analyzed the relationship between the universal combinatorial coding and the variety of coding method and has researched many applications technologies of this coding method. In addition, the efficiency of universal combinatorial coding is analyzed theoretically. The multicharacteristic and multiapplication of universal combinatorial coding are unique in the existing coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding has theoretical research and practical application value. PMID:24772019

  14. Dynamic sulfur chemistry as a key tool in the design of self-healing polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roberto; Rekondo, Alaitz; Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Alaitz; Casuso, Pablo; Dupin, Damien; Cabañero, Germán; Grande, Hans J.; Odriozola, Ibon

    2016-08-01

    The rich variety of reversible or dynamic covalent chemistries based on sulfur offers a unique opportunity for the design of self-healing polymer networks. The reversibility of such chemical bonds can be used to create soft systems which can self-mend at ambient conditions. Here we focus on the mechanism of three different dynamic sulfur chemistries which have been used for the development of self-healing elastomers and hydrogels: thiolate/nanoparticle exchange, aromatic disulfide exchange and gold(I)-thiolate/disulfide exchange.

  15. Chemistry in interstellar space. [environment characteristics influencing reaction dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donn, B.

    1973-01-01

    The particular characteristics of chemistry in interstellar space are determined by the unique environmental conditions involved. Interstellar matter is present at extremely low densities. Large deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium are, therefore, to be expected. A relatively intense ultraviolet radiation is present in many regions. The temperatures are in the range from 5 to 200 K. Data concerning the inhibiting effect of small activation energies in interstellar clouds are presented in a table. A summary of measured activation energies or barrier heights for exothermic exchange reactions is also provided. Problems of molecule formation are discussed, taking into account gas phase reactions and surface catalyzed processes.

  16. Beyond Problem-Based Learning: Using Dynamic PBL in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overton, Tina L.; Randles, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of a novel pedagogy, dynamic problem-based learning. The pedagogy utilises real-world problems that evolve throughout the problem-based learning activity and provide students with choice and different data sets. This new dynamic problem-based learning approach was utilised to teach…

  17. Chemistry and dynamics of the Arctic winter 2015/2016: Simulations with the Chemistry-Climate Model EMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosrawi, Farahnaz; Kirner, Ole; Sinnhuber, Bjoern-Martin; Ruhnke, Roland; Hoepfner, Michael; Woiwode, Wolfgang; Oelhaf, Hermann; Santee, Michelle L.; Manney, Gloria L.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Murtagh, Donal; Braesicke, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Model simulations of the Arctic winter 2015/2016 were performed with the atmospheric chemistry-climate model ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) for the POLSTRACC (Polar Stratosphere in a Changing Climate) project. The POLSTRACC project is a HALO mission (High Altitude and LOng Range Research Aircraft) that aims to investigate the structure, composition and evolution of the Arctic Upper Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) in a changing climate. Especially, the chemical and physical processes involved in Arctic stratospheric ozone depletion, transport and mixing processes in the UTLS at high latitudes, polar stratospheric clouds as well as cirrus clouds are investigated. The model simulations were performed with a resolution of T42L90, corresponding to a quadratic Gaussian grid of approximately 2.8°× 2.8° degrees in latitude and longitude, and 90 vertical layers from the surface up to 0.01 hPa (approx. 80 km). A Newtonian relaxation technique of the prognostic variables temperature, vorticity, divergence and surface pressure towards ECMWF data was applied above the boundary layer and below 10 hPa, in order to nudge the model dynamics towards the observed meteorology. During the Arctic winter 2015/2016 a stable vortex formed in early December, with a cold pool where temperatures reached below the Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT) existence temperature of 195 K, thus allowing Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) to form. The early winter has been exceptionally cold and satellite observations indicate that sedimenting PSC particles have lead to denitrification as well as dehydration of stratospheric layers. In this presentation an overview of the chemistry and dynamics of the Arctic winter 2015/2016 as simulated with EMAC will be given and comparisons to satellite observations such as e.g. Aura/MLS and Odin/SMR will be shown.

  18. Shock-driven chemistry and reactive wave dynamics in benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, Stephen; Dattelbaum, Dana; Coe, Joshua; Los Alamos National Laboratory Team

    2015-06-01

    Benzene is a stable organic chemistry molecule because of its electronic structure - aromatic stability is derived from its delocalized, π-bonded, 6-membered planar ring structure. Benzene principal shock Hugoniot states have been reported previously by several groups, at both high and low pressures. Cusps (or discontinuities) in the shock Hugoniot provide evidence that chemical reactions take place under shockwave compression of benzene at input pressure conditions above 12 GPa. In other shock-driven experiments, spectral changes have been observed near this cusp condition, indicating that the cusp is associated with shock-driven chemical reaction(s). In this work, a series of gas-gun-driven plate impact experiments were performed to measure and quantify the details associated with shock-driven reactive flow in benzene. Using embedded electromagnetic gauges (with up to 10 Lagrangian gauge positions in-material in a single experiment) multiple, evolving wave structures have been measured in benzene when the inputs were above 12 GPa, with the details changing as the input pressure was increased. Detailed insights into the volume changes associated with the chemical reaction(s), reaction rates, and estimates of the bulk moduli of reaction intermediates and products were obtained. Using this new experimental data (along with the older experimental data from others), the benzene reactant and product Hugoniot loci have been modeled by thermodynamically complete equations of state.

  19. Ferritins: dynamic management of biological iron and oxygen chemistry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2005-03-01

    Ferritins are spherical, cage-like proteins with nanocavities formed by multiple polypeptide subunits (four-helix bundles) that manage iron/oxygen chemistry. Catalytic coupling yields diferric oxo/hydroxo complexes at ferroxidase sites in maxi-ferritin subunits (24 subunits, 480 kDa; plants, animals, microorganisms). Oxidation occurs at the cavity surface of mini-ferritins/Dps proteins (12 subunits, 240 kDa; bacteria). Oxidation products are concentrated as minerals in the nanocavity for iron-protein cofactor synthesis (maxi-ferritins) or DNA protection (mini-ferritins). The protein cage and nanocavity characterize all ferritins, although amino acid sequences diverge, especially in bacteria. Catalytic oxidation/di-iron coupling in the protein cage (maxi-ferritins, 480 kDa; plants, bacteria and animal cell-specific isoforms) or on the cavity surface (mini-ferritins/Dps proteins, 280 kDa; bacteria) initiates mineralization. Gated pores (eight or four), symmetrically arranged, control iron flow. The multiple ferritin functions combine pore, channel, and catalytic functions in compact protein structures required for life and disease response.

  20. Aqueous vanadium ion dynamics relevant to bioinorganic chemistry: A review.

    PubMed

    Kustin, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    Aqueous solutions of the four highest vanadium oxidation states exhibit four diverse colors, which only hint at the diverse reactions that these ions can undergo. Cationic vanadium ions form complexes with ligands; anionic vanadium ions form complexes with ligands and self-react to form isopolyanions. All vanadium species undergo oxidation-reduction reactions. With a few exceptions, elucidation of the dynamics of these reactions awaited the development of fast reaction techniques before the kinetics of elementary ligation, condensation, reduction, and oxidation of the aqueous vanadium ions could be investigated. As the biological roles played by endogenous and therapeutic vanadium expand, it is appropriate to bring the results of the diverse kinetics studies under one umbrella. To achieve this goal this review presents a systematic examination of elementary aqueous vanadium ion dynamics.

  1. Metascalable molecular dynamics simulation of nano-mechano-chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimojo, F.; Kalia, R. K.; Nakano, A.; Nomura, K.; Vashishta, P.

    2008-07-01

    We have developed a metascalable (or 'design once, scale on new architectures') parallel application-development framework for first-principles based simulations of nano-mechano-chemical processes on emerging petaflops architectures based on spatiotemporal data locality principles. The framework consists of (1) an embedded divide-and-conquer (EDC) algorithmic framework based on spatial locality to design linear-scaling algorithms, (2) a space-time-ensemble parallel (STEP) approach based on temporal locality to predict long-time dynamics, and (3) a tunable hierarchical cellular decomposition (HCD) parallelization framework to map these scalable algorithms onto hardware. The EDC-STEP-HCD framework exposes and expresses maximal concurrency and data locality, thereby achieving parallel efficiency as high as 0.99 for 1.59-billion-atom reactive force field molecular dynamics (MD) and 17.7-million-atom (1.56 trillion electronic degrees of freedom) quantum mechanical (QM) MD in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT) on adaptive multigrids, in addition to 201-billion-atom nonreactive MD, on 196 608 IBM BlueGene/L processors. We have also used the framework for automated execution of adaptive hybrid DFT/MD simulation on a grid of six supercomputers in the US and Japan, in which the number of processors changed dynamically on demand and tasks were migrated according to unexpected faults. The paper presents the application of the framework to the study of nanoenergetic materials: (1) combustion of an Al/Fe2O3 thermite and (2) shock initiation and reactive nanojets at a void in an energetic crystal.

  2. Dynamical mean-field theory for quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nan; Marianetti, C A; Millis, Andrew J; Reichman, David R

    2011-03-01

    The dynamical mean-field concept of approximating an unsolvable many-body problem in terms of the solution of an auxiliary quantum impurity problem, introduced to study bulk materials with a continuous energy spectrum, is here extended to molecules, i.e., finite systems with a discrete energy spectrum. The application to small clusters of hydrogen atoms yields ground state energies which are competitive with leading quantum chemical approaches at intermediate and large interatomic distances as well as good approximations to the excitation spectrum.

  3. Cryptographic Combinatorial Securities Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Christopher; Parkes, David C.

    We present a useful new mechanism that facilitates the atomic exchange of many large baskets of securities in a combinatorial exchange. Cryptography prevents information about the securities in the baskets from being exploited, enhancing trust. Our exchange offers institutions who wish to trade large positions a new alternative to existing methods of block trading: they can reduce transaction costs by taking advantage of other institutions’ available liquidity, while third party liquidity providers guarantee execution—preserving their desired portfolio composition at all times. In our exchange, institutions submit encrypted orders which are crossed, leaving a “remainder”. The exchange proves facts about the portfolio risk of this remainder to third party liquidity providers without revealing the securities in the remainder, the knowledge of which could also be exploited. The third parties learn either (depending on the setting) the portfolio risk parameters of the remainder itself, or how their own portfolio risk would change if they were to incorporate the remainder into a portfolio they submit. In one setting, these third parties submit bids on the commission, and the winner supplies necessary liquidity for the entire exchange to clear. This guaranteed clearing, coupled with external price discovery from the primary markets for the securities, sidesteps difficult combinatorial optimization problems. This latter method of proving how taking on the remainder would change risk parameters of one’s own portfolio, without revealing the remainder’s contents or its own risk parameters, is a useful protocol of independent interest.

  4. Dynamic coupling of bulk chemistry, trace elements and mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. H.; Heck, H. V.; Nowacki, A.; Wookey, J. M.; Elliott, T.; Porcelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    Fully dynamical models that not only track the evolution of chemical heterogeneities through the mantle, but also incorporate the effect of chemical heterogeneities on the dynamics of mantle convection are now emerging. Since in general analytical solutions to these complex problems are lacking, careful testing and investigations of the effect and usefulness of these models is needed. We extend our existing numerical mantle convection code that can track fluid flow in 3D spherical geometry and tracks both bulk chemical components (basal fraction) and different trace elements. The chemical components fractionate upon melting when and where the solidus is crossed. Now, the chemical information will effect the flow of the fluid in the following ways: The bulk composition will link to density and the (radioactive) trace element abundance to heat production. Results will be reported of the effect of different density structures; either starting with a primordial dense layer at the base of the mantle, having all density variation originate from melting (basalt production), or a combination between these two end-member scenarios. In particular we will focus on the connection between large scale bulk chemical structures in the (deep) mantle and the evolution of the distribution of noble gasses (He and Ar). The distribution of noble gasses depend upon 1) assumptions on the initial distributions in the mantle, 2) the mantle flow, 3) radioactive production and, 4) outgassing to the atmosphere upon melting close to the surface.

  5. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  6. Coupling dynamics and chemistry in the air pollution modelling of street canyons: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jian; Cai, Xiao-Ming; Bloss, William James

    2016-07-01

    Air pollutants emitted from vehicles in street canyons may be reactive, undergoing mixing and chemical processing before escaping into the overlying atmosphere. The deterioration of air quality in street canyons occurs due to combined effects of proximate emission sources, dynamical processes (reduced dispersion) and chemical processes (evolution of reactive primary and formation of secondary pollutants). The coupling between dynamics and chemistry plays a major role in determining street canyon air quality, and numerical model approaches to represent this coupling are reviewed in this article. Dynamical processes can be represented by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. The choice of CFD approach (mainly the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) models) depends on the computational cost, the accuracy required and hence the application. Simplified parameterisations of the overall integrated effect of dynamics in street canyons provide capability to handle relatively complex chemistry in practical applications. Chemical processes are represented by a chemical mechanism, which describes mathematically the chemical removal and formation of primary and secondary species. Coupling between these aspects needs to accommodate transport, dispersion and chemical reactions for reactive pollutants, especially fast chemical reactions with time scales comparable to or shorter than those of typical turbulent eddies inside the street canyon. Different approaches to dynamical and chemical coupling have varying strengths, costs and levels of accuracy, which must be considered in their use for provision of reference information concerning urban canopy air pollution to stakeholders considering traffic and urban planning policies. PMID:27149146

  7. Combinatorial optimization games

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, X.; Ibaraki, Toshihide; Nagamochi, Hiroshi

    1997-06-01

    We introduce a general integer programming formulation for a class of combinatorial optimization games, which immediately allows us to improve the algorithmic result for finding amputations in the core (an important solution concept in cooperative game theory) of the network flow game on simple networks by Kalai and Zemel. An interesting result is a general theorem that the core for this class of games is nonempty if and only if a related linear program has an integer optimal solution. We study the properties for this mathematical condition to hold for several interesting problems, and apply them to resolve algorithmic and complexity issues for their cores along the line as put forward in: decide whether the core is empty; if the core is empty, find an imputation in the core; given an imputation x, test whether x is in the core. We also explore the properties of totally balanced games in this succinct formulation of cooperative games.

  8. Multiplexed tracking of combinatorial genomic mutations in engineered cell populations.

    PubMed

    Zeitoun, Ramsey I; Garst, Andrew D; Degen, George D; Pines, Gur; Mansell, Thomas J; Glebes, Tirzah Y; Boyle, Nanette R; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-06-01

    Multiplexed genome engineering approaches can be used to generate targeted genetic diversity in cell populations on laboratory timescales, but methods to track mutations and link them to phenotypes have been lacking. We present an approach for tracking combinatorial engineered libraries (TRACE) through the simultaneous mapping of millions of combinatorially engineered genomes at single-cell resolution. Distal genomic sites are assembled into individual DNA constructs that are compatible with next-generation sequencing strategies. We used TRACE to map growth selection dynamics for Escherichia coli combinatorial libraries created by recursive multiplex recombineering at a depth 10(4)-fold greater than before. TRACE was used to identify genotype-to-phenotype correlations and to map the evolutionary trajectory of two individual combinatorial mutants in E. coli. Combinatorial mutations in the human ES2 ovarian carcinoma cell line were also assessed with TRACE. TRACE completes the combinatorial engineering cycle and enables more sophisticated approaches to genome engineering in both bacteria and eukaryotic cells than are currently possible. PMID:25798935

  9. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  10. On the relationship between total ozone and atmospheric dynamics and chemistry at mid-latitudes - Part 1: Statistical models and spatial fingerprints of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frossard, L.; Rieder, H. E.; Ribatet, M.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Di Rocco, S.; Davison, A. C.; Peter, T.

    2012-05-01

    We use models for mean and extreme values of total column ozone on spatial scales to analyze "fingerprints" of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry on long-term ozone changes at northern and southern mid-latitudes. The r-largest order statistics method is used for pointwise analysis of extreme events in low and high total ozone (termed ELOs and EHOs, respectively). For the corresponding mean value analysis a pointwise autoregressive moving average model (ARMA) is used. The statistical models include important atmospheric covariates to describe the dynamical and chemical state of the atmosphere: the solar cycle, the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO), ozone depleting substances (ODS) in terms of equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC), the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the Antarctic Oscillation (AAO), the El~Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and aerosol load after the volcanic eruptions of El Chichón and Mt. Pinatubo. The influence of the individual covariates on mean and extreme levels in total column ozone is derived on a grid cell basis. The results show that "fingerprints", i.e., significant influence, of dynamical and chemical features are captured in both the "bulk" and the tails of the ozone distribution, respectively described by means and EHOs/ELOs. While results for the solar cycle, QBO and EESC are in good agreement with findings of earlier studies, unprecedented spatial fingerprints are retrieved for the dynamical covariates.

  11. Accelerated electronic structure-based molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The initiation and progression of shock-induced chemistry in organic materials at moderate temperatures and pressures are slow on the time scales available to regular molecular dynamics simulations. Accessing the requisite time scales is particularly challenging if the interatomic bonding is modeled using accurate yet expensive methods based explicitly on electronic structure. We have combined fast, energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the parallel replica accelerated molecular dynamics formalism to study the relatively sluggish shock-induced chemistry of benzene around 13-20 GPa. We model interatomic bonding in hydrocarbons using self-consistent tight binding theory with an accurate and transferable parameterization. Shock compression and its associated transient, non-equilibrium effects are captured explicitly by combining the universal liquid Hugoniot with a simple shrinking-cell boundary condition. A number of novel methods for improving the performance of reactive electronic structure-based molecular dynamics by adapting the self-consistent field procedure on-the-fly will also be discussed. The use of accelerated molecular dynamics has enabled us to follow the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of carbon clusters in benzene under thermodynamic conditions pertinent to experiments.

  12. Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations of the shock-induced chemistry of phenylacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Cawkwell, M. J. Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.

    2015-02-14

    The initial chemical events that occur during the shock compression of liquid phenylacetylene have been investigated using self-consistent tight binding molecular dynamics simulations. The extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism enabled us to compute microcanonical trajectories with precise conservation of the total energy. Our simulations revealed that the first density-increasing step under shock compression arises from the polymerization of phenylacetylene molecules at the acetylene moiety. The application of electronic structure-based molecular dynamics with long-term conservation of the total energy enabled us to identify electronic signatures of reactivity via monitoring changes in the HOMO-LUMO gap, and to capture directly adiabatic shock heating, transient non-equilibrium states, and changes in temperature arising from exothermic chemistry in classical molecular dynamics trajectories.

  13. An Indexed Combinatorial Library: The Synthesis and Testing of Insect Repellents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, William H.; Gelato, Kathy A.; Pompizzi, Kristen M.; Scarbinsky, Aislinn M.; Albrecht, Brian K.; Reynolds, Elaine R.

    2001-04-01

    An indexed combinatorial library of amides was prepared by the reaction of amines and acid chlorides. A simple test for insect repellency using fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) allowed the determination of the most repellent sublibraries. The student-generated data were collected and analyzed to determine the most active amide(s) in the library. This experiment illustrates the fundamentals of combinatorial chemistry, a field that has undergone explosive growth in the last decade.

  14. Amplification without instability: applying fluid dynamical insights in chemistry and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Jonathan H.

    2013-11-01

    While amplification of small perturbations often arises from instability, transient amplification is possible locally even in asymptotically stable systems. That is, knowledge of a system's stability properties can mislead one's intuition for its transient behaviors. This insight, which has an interesting history in fluid dynamics, has more recently been rediscovered in ecology. Surprisingly, many nonlinear fluid dynamical and ecological systems share linear features associated with transient amplification of noise. This paper aims to establish that these features are widespread in many other disciplines concerned with noisy systems, especially chemistry, cell biology and molecular biology. Here, using classic nonlinear systems and the graphical language of network science, we explore how the noise amplification problem can be reframed in terms of activatory and inhibitory interactions between dynamical variables. The interaction patterns considered here are found in a great variety of systems, ranging from autocatalytic reactions and activator-inhibitor systems to influential models of nerve conduction, glycolysis, cell signaling and circadian rhythms.

  15. Development and evaluation of the aerosol dynamics and gas phase chemistry model ADCHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Swietlicki, E.; Schurgers, G.; Arneth, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Boy, M.; Kulmala, M.

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a model suited for detailed studies of aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry within urban plumes, from local scale (1 × 1 km2) to regional scale. This article describes and evaluates the trajectory model for Aerosol Dynamics, gas and particle phase CHEMistry and radiative transfer (ADCHEM). The model treats both vertical and horizontal dispersion perpendicular to an air mass trajectory (2-space dimensions). The Lagrangian approach enables a more detailed representation of the aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry and a finer spatial and temporal resolution compared to that of available regional 3D-CTMs. These features make it among others well suited for urban plume studies. The aerosol dynamics model includes Brownian coagulation, dry deposition, wet deposition, in-cloud processing, condensation, evaporation, primary particle emissions and homogeneous nucleation. The organic mass partitioning was either modeled with a 2-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) or with the traditional two-product model approach. In ADCHEM these models consider the diffusion limited and particle size dependent condensation and evaporation of 110 and 40 different organic compounds respectively. The gas phase chemistry model calculates the gas phase concentrations of 61 different species, using 130 different chemical reactions. Daily isoprene and monoterpene emissions from European forests were simulated separately with the vegetation model LPJ-GUESS, and included as input to ADCHEM. ADCHEM was used to simulate the ageing of the urban plumes from the city of Malmö in southern Sweden (280 000 inhabitants). Several sensitivity tests were performed concerning the number of size bins, size structure method, aerosol dynamic processes, vertical and horizontal mixing, coupled or uncoupled condensation and the secondary organic aerosol formation. The simulations show that the full-stationary size structure gives accurate results

  16. Development and evaluation of the aerosol dynamic and gas phase chemistry model ADCHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Swietlicki, E.; Schurgers, G.; Arneth, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Boy, M.; Kulmala, M.

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a model ideally suited for detailed studies on aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry within urban plumes, from local scale (1×1 km2) to regional or global scale. This article describes and evaluates the trajectory model for Aerosol Dynamics, gas and particle phase CHEMistry and radiative transfer (ADCHEM), which has been developed and used at Lund University since 2007. The model treats both vertical and horizontal dispersion perpendicular to an air mass trajectory (2-space dimensions), which is not treated in Lagrangian box-models (0-space dimensions). The Lagrangian approach enables a more detailed representation of the aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry and a finer spatial and temporal resolution compared to that of available regional 3D-CTMs. These features make it among others ideally suited for urban plume studies. The aerosol dynamics model includes Brownian coagulation, dry deposition, wet deposition, in-cloud processing, condensation, evaporation, primary particle emissions and homogeneous nucleation. The gas phase chemistry model calculates the gas phase concentrations of 63 different species, using 119 different chemical reactions. Daily isoprene and monoterpene emissions from European forests were simulated separately with the vegetation model LPJ-GUESS, and included as input to ADCHEM. ADCHEM was used to simulate the ageing of the urban plumes from the city of Malmö in Southern Sweden (280 000 inhabitants). Several sensitivity tests were performed concerning the number of size bins, size structure method, coupled or uncoupled condensation, the volatility basis set (VBS) or traditional 2-product model for secondary organic aerosol formation, different aerosol dynamic processes and vertical and horizontal mixing. The simulations show that the full-stationary size structure gives accurate results with little numerical diffusion when more than 50 size bins are used between 1.5 and 2500 nm

  17. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, R. H. H.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ganzeveld, L. N.; Kabat, P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Farmer, D. K.; van Heerwaarden, C. C.; Mammarella, I.

    2012-08-01

    We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the model for a case study in Hyytiälä, Finland, and find that it is able to satisfactorily reproduce the observed dynamics and gas-phase chemistry. We show that the exchange of organic aerosol between the free troposphere and the boundary layer (entrainment) must be taken into account in order to explain the observed diurnal cycle in organic aerosol (OA) concentration. An examination of the budgets of organic aerosol and terpene concentrations show that the former is dominated by entrainment, while the latter is mainly driven by emission and chemical transformation. We systematically investigate the role of the land surface, which governs both the surface energy balance partitioning and terpene emissions, and the large-scale atmospheric process of vertical subsidence. Entrainment is especially important for the dilution of organic aerosol concentrations under conditions of dry soils and low terpene emissions. Subsidence suppresses boundary layer growth while enhancing entrainment. Therefore, it influences the relationship between organic aerosol and terpene concentrations. Our findings indicate that the diurnal evolution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the boundary layer is the result of coupled effects of the land surface, dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer, chemistry, and free troposphere conditions. This has potentially some consequences for the design of both field campaigns and large-scale modeling studies.

  18. SMMH--A Parallel Heuristic for Combinatorial Optimization Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Domingues, Guilherme; Morie, Yoshiyuki; Gu, Feng Long; Nanri, Takeshi; Murakami, Kazuaki

    2007-12-26

    The process of finding one or more optimal solutions for answering combinatorial optimization problems bases itself on the use of algorithms instances. Those instances usually have to explore a very large search spaces. Heuristics search focusing on the use of High-Order Hopfield neural networks is a largely deployed technique for very large search space. It can be established a very powerful analogy towards the dynamics evolution of a physics spin-glass system while minimizing its own energy and the energy function of the network. This paper presents a new approach for solving combinatorial optimization problems through parallel simulations, based on a High-Order Hopfield neural network using MPI specification.

  19. SMMH - A Parallel Heuristic for Combinatorial Optimization Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Domingues, Guilherme; Morie, Yoshiyuki; Gu, Feng Long; Nanri, Takeshi; Murakami, Kazuaki

    2007-12-26

    The process of finding one or more optimal solutions for answering combinatorial optimization problems bases itself on the use of algorithms instances. Those instances usually have to explore a very large search spaces. Heuristics search focusing on the use of High-Order Hopfield neural networks is a largely deployed technique for very large search space. It can be established a very powerful analogy towards the dynamics evolution of a physics spin-glass system while minimizing its own energy and the energy function of the network. This paper presents a new approach for solving combinatorial optimization problems through parallel simulations, based on a High-Order Hopfield neural network using MPI specification.

  20. Chemistry of stannylene-based Lewis pairs: dynamic tin coordination switching between donor and acceptor character.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Kilian M; Freitag, Sarah; Schubert, Hartmut; Gerke, Birgit; Pöttgen, Rainer; Wesemann, Lars

    2015-03-16

    The coordination chemistry of cyclic stannylene-based intramolecular Lewis pairs is presented. The P→Sn adducts were treated with [Ni(COD)2] and [Pd(PCy3)2] (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene, PCy3 = tricyclohexylphosphine). In the isolated coordination compounds the stannylene moiety acts either as an acceptor or a donor ligand. Examples of a dynamic switch between these two coordination modes of the P-Sn ligand are illustrated and the structures in the solid state together with heteronuclear NMR spectroscopic findings are discussed. In the case of a Ni(0) complex, (119)Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy of the uncoordinated and coordinated phosphastannirane ligand is presented.

  1. Invention as a combinatorial process: evidence from US patents.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hyejin; Strumsky, Deborah; Bettencourt, Luis M A; Lobo, José

    2015-05-01

    Invention has been commonly conceptualized as a search over a space of combinatorial possibilities. Despite the existence of a rich literature, spanning a variety of disciplines, elaborating on the recombinant nature of invention, we lack a formal and quantitative characterization of the combinatorial process underpinning inventive activity. Here, we use US patent records dating from 1790 to 2010 to formally characterize invention as a combinatorial process. To do this, we treat patented inventions as carriers of technologies and avail ourselves of the elaborate system of technology codes used by the United States Patent and Trademark Office to classify the technologies responsible for an invention's novelty. We find that the combinatorial inventive process exhibits an invariant rate of 'exploitation' (refinements of existing combinations of technologies) and 'exploration' (the development of new technological combinations). This combinatorial dynamic contrasts sharply with the creation of new technological capabilities-the building blocks to be combined-that has significantly slowed down. We also find that, notwithstanding the very reduced rate at which new technologies are introduced, the generation of novel technological combinations engenders a practically infinite space of technological configurations. PMID:25904530

  2. Invention as a combinatorial process: evidence from US patents

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyejin; Strumsky, Deborah; Bettencourt, Luis M. A.; Lobo, José

    2015-01-01

    Invention has been commonly conceptualized as a search over a space of combinatorial possibilities. Despite the existence of a rich literature, spanning a variety of disciplines, elaborating on the recombinant nature of invention, we lack a formal and quantitative characterization of the combinatorial process underpinning inventive activity. Here, we use US patent records dating from 1790 to 2010 to formally characterize invention as a combinatorial process. To do this, we treat patented inventions as carriers of technologies and avail ourselves of the elaborate system of technology codes used by the United States Patent and Trademark Office to classify the technologies responsible for an invention's novelty. We find that the combinatorial inventive process exhibits an invariant rate of ‘exploitation’ (refinements of existing combinations of technologies) and ‘exploration’ (the development of new technological combinations). This combinatorial dynamic contrasts sharply with the creation of new technological capabilities—the building blocks to be combined—that has significantly slowed down. We also find that, notwithstanding the very reduced rate at which new technologies are introduced, the generation of novel technological combinations engenders a practically infinite space of technological configurations. PMID:25904530

  3. Interactions between Snow Chemistry, Mercury Inputs and Microbial Population Dynamics in an Arctic Snowpack

    PubMed Central

    Larose, Catherine; Prestat, Emmanuel; Cecillon, Sébastien; Berger, Sibel; Malandain, Cédric; Lyon, Delina; Ferrari, Christophe; Schneider, Dominique; Dommergue, Aurélien; Vogel, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the interactions between snowpack chemistry, mercury (Hg) contamination and microbial community structure and function in Arctic snow. Snowpack chemistry (inorganic and organic ions) including mercury (Hg) speciation was studied in samples collected during a two-month field study in a high Arctic site, Svalbard, Norway (79°N). Shifts in microbial community structure were determined by using a 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic microarray. We linked snowpack and meltwater chemistry to changes in microbial community structure by using co-inertia analyses (CIA) and explored changes in community function due to Hg contamination by q-PCR quantification of Hg-resistance genes in metagenomic samples. Based on the CIA, chemical and microbial data were linked (p = 0.006) with bioavailable Hg (BioHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) contributing significantly to the ordination of samples. Mercury was shown to influence community function with increases in merA gene copy numbers at low BioHg levels. Our results show that snowpacks can be considered as dynamic habitats with microbial and chemical components responding rapidly to environmental changes. PMID:24282515

  4. Does filler surface chemistry impact filler dispersion, polymer dynamics and conductivity in nanofilled solid polymer electrolytes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapatibhotla, Lalitha; Maranas, Janna

    2012-02-01

    We study the impact of nanofiller surface chemistry on filler dispersion, polymer dynamics and ionic conductivity in acidic α-Al2O3 filled PEO+LiClO4 solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs).SPEs are the key to light-weight and high energy density rechargeable Li ion batteries but suffer from low room temperature ionic conductivity. Addition of ceramic nanofillers improves conductivity of SPEs and their surface chemistry influences extent of conductivity enhancement. The ionic conductivity of acidic α-Al2O3 filled SPE is enhanced for salt concentrations at and below eutectic, while neutral γ-Al2O3 filler enhances conductivity only at eutectic composition. Li ion motion is coupled to segmental mobility of polymer and we study how this is affected by addition of α-Al2O3 using quasi-elastic neutron scattering. Aggregation extent of nanoparticles in SPE matrix, a less explored factor in filled SPEs, can affect segmental mobility of polymer. This can vary with surface chemistry of particles and we quantify this using small angle neutron scattering. All measurements are performed as a function of Li concentration, nanoparticle loading and temperature.

  5. Triazolinediones enable ultrafast and reversible click chemistry for the design of dynamic polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billiet, Stijn; de Bruycker, Kevin; Driessen, Frank; Goossens, Hannelore; van Speybroeck, Veronique; Winne, Johan M.; Du Prez, Filip E.

    2014-09-01

    With its focus on synthetic reactions that are highly specific and reliable, ‘click’ chemistry has become a valuable tool for many scientific research areas and applications. Combining the modular, covalently bonded nature of click-chemistry linkages with an ability to reverse these linkages and reuse the constituent reactants in another click reaction, however, is a feature that is not found in most click reactions. Here we show that triazolinedione compounds can be used in click-chemistry applications. We present examples of simple and ultrafast macromolecular functionalization, polymer-polymer linking and polymer crosslinking under ambient conditions without the need for a catalyst. Moreover, when triazolinediones are combined with indole reaction partners, the reverse reaction can also be induced at elevated temperatures, and the triazolinedione reacted with a different reaction partner, reversibly or irreversibly dependent on its exact nature. We have used this ‘transclick’ reaction to introduce thermoreversible links into polyurethane and polymethacrylate materials, which allows dynamic polymer-network healing, reshaping and recycling.

  6. Triazolinediones enable ultrafast and reversible click chemistry for the design of dynamic polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Billiet, Stijn; De Bruycker, Kevin; Driessen, Frank; Goossens, Hannelore; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Winne, Johan M; Du Prez, Filip E

    2014-09-01

    With its focus on synthetic reactions that are highly specific and reliable, 'click' chemistry has become a valuable tool for many scientific research areas and applications. Combining the modular, covalently bonded nature of click-chemistry linkages with an ability to reverse these linkages and reuse the constituent reactants in another click reaction, however, is a feature that is not found in most click reactions. Here we show that triazolinedione compounds can be used in click-chemistry applications. We present examples of simple and ultrafast macromolecular functionalization, polymer-polymer linking and polymer crosslinking under ambient conditions without the need for a catalyst. Moreover, when triazolinediones are combined with indole reaction partners, the reverse reaction can also be induced at elevated temperatures, and the triazolinedione reacted with a different reaction partner, reversibly or irreversibly dependent on its exact nature. We have used this 'transclick' reaction to introduce thermoreversible links into polyurethane and polymethacrylate materials, which allows dynamic polymer-network healing, reshaping and recycling. PMID:25143218

  7. On the relationship between total ozone and atmospheric dynamics and chemistry at mid-latitudes - Part 1: Statistical models and spatial fingerprints of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frossard, L.; Rieder, H. E.; Ribatet, M.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Di Rocco, S.; Davison, A. C.; Peter, T.

    2013-01-01

    We use statistical models for mean and extreme values of total column ozone to analyze "fingerprints" of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry on long-term ozone changes at northern and southern mid-latitudes on grid cell basis. At each grid cell, the r-largest order statistics method is used for the analysis of extreme events in low and high total ozone (termed ELOs and EHOs, respectively), and an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model is used for the corresponding mean value analysis. In order to describe the dynamical and chemical state of the atmosphere, the statistical models include important atmospheric covariates: the solar cycle, the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO), ozone depleting substances (ODS) in terms of equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC), the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the Antarctic Oscillation (AAO), the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and aerosol load after the volcanic eruptions of El Chichón and Mt. Pinatubo. The influence of the individual covariates on mean and extreme levels in total column ozone is derived on a grid cell basis. The results show that "fingerprints", i.e., significant influence, of dynamical and chemical features are captured in both the "bulk" and the tails of the statistical distribution of ozone, respectively described by mean values and EHOs/ELOs. While results for the solar cycle, QBO, and EESC are in good agreement with findings of earlier studies, unprecedented spatial fingerprints are retrieved for the dynamical covariates. Column ozone is enhanced over Labrador/Greenland, the North Atlantic sector and over the Norwegian Sea, but is reduced over Europe, Russia and the Eastern United States during the positive NAO phase, and vice-versa during the negative phase. The NAO's southern counterpart, the AAO, strongly influences column ozone at lower southern mid-latitudes, including the southern parts of South America and the Antarctic Peninsula, and the central southern mid-latitudes. Results

  8. Effects of Aircraft Wake Dynamics on Measured and Simulated NO(x) and HO(x) Wake Chemistry. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, D. C.; Lewellen, W. S.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution numerical large-eddy simulations of the near wake of a B757 including simplified NOx and HOx chemistry were performed to explore the effects of dynamics on chemistry in wakes of ages from a few seconds to several minutes. Dilution plays an important basic role in the NOx-O3 chemistry in the wake, while a more interesting interaction between the chemistry and dynamics occurs for the HOx species. These simulation results are compared with published measurements of OH and HO2 within a B757 wake under cruise conditions in the upper troposphere taken during the Subsonic Aircraft Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) mission in May 1996. The simulation provides a much finer grained representation of the chemistry and dynamics of the early wake than is possible from the 1 s data samples taken in situ. The comparison suggests that the previously reported discrepancy of up to a factor of 20 - 50 between the SUCCESS measurements of the [HO2]/[OH] ratio and that predicted by simplified theoretical computations is due to the combined effects of large mixing rates around the wake plume edges and averaging over volumes containing large species fluctuations. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using three-dimensional unsteady large-eddy simulations with coupled chemistry to study such phenomena.

  9. Mother nature's combinatorial libraries; their influence on the synthesis of drugs.

    PubMed

    Kingston, David G I; Newman, David J

    2002-03-01

    Natural products or secondary metabolites, whether from the microbial, plant or marine worlds, represent the results of evolutionary pressures to preserve and enhance the life of their producing organism. They have evolved into structurally and usually stereochemically complex compounds with specific bioactivities. They thus represent a diverse 'combinatorial library' that may have potential pharmaceutical use. In principle, the combination of this diverse library with the methods of combinatorial chemistry could lead to an unlimited supply of diverse and complex structures, and is recommended as a fruitful approach for future drug development. Examples of the application of combinatorial methods to nature's combinatorial library will be presented and discussed, with an emphasis on the antitumor, anti-infective and pain control disease areas.

  10. Statistical analysis of cellular detonation dynamics from numerical simulations: one-step chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, G. J.; Radulescu, M. I.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, two methods are developed for statistically analysing the nonlinear cellular dynamics from numerical simulations of gaseous detonations, one use of which is the systematic determination of detonation cell sizes from such simulations. Both these methods rely on signed vorticity records in which the individual families of transverse waves are captured independently. The first method involves an automated extraction of the main triple-point tracks from the vorticity records, allowing statistical analysis of the spacings between neighbouring tracks. The second method uses the autocorrelation function to spectrally analyse the vorticity records. These methods are then employed for a preliminary analysis of the cellular dynamics of the standard, idealized one-step chemistry model. Evidence is found for 'cell size doubling' bifurcations in the one-step model as the cellular dynamics become more irregular (e.g. as the activation is increased). It is also shown that the statistical models converge slowly due to systematic 'shot-to-shot' variation in the cellular dynamics for fixed parameters with different initial perturbations. Instead, it appears that a range of equally probable cell sizes can be obtained for given parameters.

  11. Combinatorial synthesis of ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J [Oak Ridge, TN; Walls, Claudia A [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn A [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-02-23

    A combinatorial library includes a gelcast substrate defining a plurality of cavities in at least one surface thereof; and a plurality of gelcast test materials in the cavities, at least two of the test materials differing from the substrate in at least one compositional characteristic, the two test materials differing from each other in at least one compositional characteristic.

  12. Combinatorial synthesis of ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Walls, Claudia A.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2006-11-14

    A combinatorial library includes a gelcast substrate defining a plurality of cavities in at least one surface thereof; and a plurality of gelcast test materials in the cavities, at least two of the test materials differing from the substrate in at least one compositional characteristic, the two test materials differing from each other in at least one compositional characteristic.

  13. Microfluidic platform for combinatorial synthesis in picolitre droplets.

    PubMed

    Theberge, Ashleigh B; Mayot, Estelle; El Harrak, Abdeslam; Kleinschmidt, Felix; Huck, Wilhelm T S; Griffiths, Andrew D

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a droplet-based microfluidic platform for miniaturized combinatorial synthesis. As a proof of concept, a library of small molecules for early stage drug screening was produced. We present an efficient strategy for producing a 7 × 3 library of potential thrombin inhibitors that can be utilized for other combinatorial synthesis applications. Picolitre droplets containing the first type of reagent (reagents A(1), A(2), …, A(m)) were formed individually in identical microfluidic chips and then stored off chip with the aid of stabilizing surfactants. These droplets were then mixed to form a library of droplets containing reagents A(1-m), each individually compartmentalized, which was reinjected into a second microfluidic chip and combinatorially fused with picolitre droplets containing the second reagent (reagents B(1), B(2), …, B(n)) that were formed on chip. The concept was demonstrated with a three-component Ugi-type reaction involving an amine (reagents A(1-3)), an aldehyde (reagents B(1-7)), and an isocyanide (held constant), to synthesize a library of small molecules with potential thrombin inhibitory activity. Our technique produced 10(6) droplets of each reaction at a rate of 2.3 kHz. Each droplet had a reaction volume of 3.1 pL, at least six orders of magnitude lower than conventional techniques. The droplets can then be divided into aliquots for different downstream screening applications. In addition to medicinal chemistry applications, this combinatorial droplet-based approach holds great potential for other applications that involve sampling large areas of chemical parameter space with minimal reagent consumption; such an approach could be beneficial when optimizing reaction conditions or performing combinatorial reactions aimed at producing novel materials.

  14. Why is combinatorial communication rare in the natural world, and why is language an exception to this trend?

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Phillips, Thomas C.; Blythe, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    In a combinatorial communication system, some signals consist of the combinations of other signals. Such systems are more efficient than equivalent, non-combinatorial systems, yet despite this they are rare in nature. Why? Previous explanations have focused on the adaptive limits of combinatorial communication, or on its purported cognitive difficulties, but neither of these explains the full distribution of combinatorial communication in the natural world. Here, we present a nonlinear dynamical model of the emergence of combinatorial communication that, unlike previous models, considers how initially non-communicative behaviour evolves to take on a communicative function. We derive three basic principles about the emergence of combinatorial communication. We hence show that the interdependence of signals and responses places significant constraints on the historical pathways by which combinatorial signals might emerge, to the extent that anything other than the most simple form of combinatorial communication is extremely unlikely. We also argue that these constraints can be bypassed if individuals have the socio-cognitive capacity to engage in ostensive communication. Humans, but probably no other species, have this ability. This may explain why language, which is massively combinatorial, is such an extreme exception to nature's general trend for non-combinatorial communication. PMID:24047871

  15. Why is combinatorial communication rare in the natural world, and why is language an exception to this trend?

    PubMed

    Scott-Phillips, Thomas C; Blythe, Richard A

    2013-11-01

    In a combinatorial communication system, some signals consist of the combinations of other signals. Such systems are more efficient than equivalent, non-combinatorial systems, yet despite this they are rare in nature. Why? Previous explanations have focused on the adaptive limits of combinatorial communication, or on its purported cognitive difficulties, but neither of these explains the full distribution of combinatorial communication in the natural world. Here, we present a nonlinear dynamical model of the emergence of combinatorial communication that, unlike previous models, considers how initially non-communicative behaviour evolves to take on a communicative function. We derive three basic principles about the emergence of combinatorial communication. We hence show that the interdependence of signals and responses places significant constraints on the historical pathways by which combinatorial signals might emerge, to the extent that anything other than the most simple form of combinatorial communication is extremely unlikely. We also argue that these constraints can be bypassed if individuals have the socio-cognitive capacity to engage in ostensive communication. Humans, but probably no other species, have this ability. This may explain why language, which is massively combinatorial, is such an extreme exception to nature's general trend for non-combinatorial communication.

  16. Molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry studies of the interactions in polymer matrix nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James Sherwood

    A combination of computational chemistry and molecular dynamics (MD) approaches was used to study two polymer-nanoparticle composite (PNPC) systems, first a model bead spring polymer with spherical nanoparticles and generalized interactions, and second, a Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-silica system with accurate quantum chemistry (QC) based force fields. The following molecular processes, which are fundamental to the reinforcement of polymer-nanoparticle composites (PNPC), were studied: (1) the effect of nanoparticle-polymer interactions and polymer molecular weight on nanoparticle dispersion and distribution, (2) the free energy and conformational changes when stretching individual PDMS chains in a melt, and (3) the effect of silica fillers with different surface modifications on the properties of PDMS chains at the interface. In the model PNPC consisting of spherical nanoparticles in a bead-spring polymer melt, it was found that when the polymer-nanoparticle interactions were relatively weak the polymer matrix promoted nanoparticle aggregation. Increasingly attractive nanoparticle-polymer interactions led to strong adsorption of the polymer chains on the surface of the nanoparticles and promoted dispersion of the nanoparticles and were independent of polymer molecular weight. A classical force field for PDMS and its oligomers has been derived on the basis of intermolecular binding energies, molecular geometries, molecular electrostatic potentials, and conformational energies obtained from quantum chemistry calculations and in MD simulations and it accurately reproduces the properties of PDMS melts of various molecular weights. MD simulations using umbrella sampling methods to sample the free energy of stretching a PDMS oligomer in a melt of PDMS oligomers found that the restoring forces were mainly a result of the changes in entropy of the chain as the chain was contracted or stretched, and only at severe extensions did energetic contributions due to deformation

  17. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process.

  18. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process. PMID:23818634

  19. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation

    PubMed Central

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D.; Schilling, Katherine A.; Loza, Christine L.; Craven, Jill S.; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process. PMID:23818634

  20. PINCA: A scalable parallel program for compressible gas dynamics with nonequilibrium chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Blottner, F.G.; Payne, J.L.; Soetrisno, M.; Imlay, S.T.

    1995-04-01

    This report documents an exploratory research work, funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) office at Sandia National Laboratories, to develop an advanced, general purpose, robust compressible flow solver for handling large, complex, chemically reacting gas dynamics problems. The deliverable of this project, a computer program called PINCA (Parallel INtegrated Computer Analysis) will run on massively parallel computers such as the Intel/Gamma and Intel/Paragon. With the development of this parallel compressible flow solver, engineers will be better able to address large three-dimensional scientific arid engineering problems involving multi-component gas mixtures with finite rate chemistry. These problems occur in high temperature industrial processes, combustion, and hypersonic: reentry of space-crafts.

  1. Upper atmosphere research satellite program. [to study the chemistry energetics, and dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A satellite program to conduct research on the chemistry, energetics, and dynamics of the upper atmosphere was developed. The scientific goals of the Upper Atmospheric Research Program, the program requirements, and the approach toward meeting those requirements are outlined. An initial series of two overlapping spacecraft missions is described. Both spacecraft are launched and recovered by the STS, one in the winter of 1983 at a 56 deg inclination, and the other a year later at a 70 deg inclination. The duration of each mission is 18 months, and each carries instruments to make global measurements of the temperature, winds, composition, irradation, and radiance in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere between the tropopause and 120 km altitude. The program requires a dedicated ground-based data system and a science team organization that leads to a strong interaction between the experiments and theory. The program includes supportive observations from other platforms such as rockets, balloons, and the Spacelab.

  2. Partial Overhaul and Initial Parallel Optimization of KINETICS, a Coupled Dynamics and Chemistry Atmosphere Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Howard; Willacy, Karen; Allen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    KINETICS is a coupled dynamics and chemistry atmosphere model that is data intensive and computationally demanding. The potential performance gain from using a supercomputer motivates the adaptation from a serial version to a parallelized one. Although the initial parallelization had been done, bottlenecks caused by an abundance of communication calls between processors led to an unfavorable drop in performance. Before starting on the parallel optimization process, a partial overhaul was required because a large emphasis was placed on streamlining the code for user convenience and revising the program to accommodate the new supercomputers at Caltech and JPL. After the first round of optimizations, the partial runtime was reduced by a factor of 23; however, performance gains are dependent on the size of the data, the number of processors requested, and the computer used.

  3. Combinatorial microfluidic droplet engineering for biomimetic material synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bawazer, Lukmaan A.; McNally, Ciara S.; Empson, Christopher J.; Marchant, William J.; Comyn, Tim P.; Niu, Xize; Cho, Soongwon; McPherson, Michael J.; Binks, Bernard P.; deMello, Andrew; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-01-01

    Although droplet-based systems are used in a wide range of technologies, opportunities for systematically customizing their interface chemistries remain relatively unexplored. This article describes a new microfluidic strategy for rapidly tailoring emulsion droplet compositions and properties. The approach uses a simple platform for screening arrays of droplet-based microfluidic devices and couples this with combinatorial selection of the droplet compositions. Through the application of genetic algorithms over multiple screening rounds, droplets with target properties can be rapidly generated. The potential of this method is demonstrated by creating droplets with enhanced stability, where this is achieved by selecting carrier fluid chemistries that promote titanium dioxide formation at the droplet interfaces. The interface is a mixture of amorphous and crystalline phases, and the resulting composite droplets are biocompatible, supporting in vitro protein expression in their interiors. This general strategy will find widespread application in advancing emulsion properties for use in chemistry, biology, materials, and medicine. PMID:27730209

  4. The Role of Disk Volatile Chemistry and Dynamics in Shaping the Compositions of Nascent Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piso, Ana-Maria; Oberg, Karin I.; Birnstiel, Tilman; Murray-Clay, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The elemental composition of planets define their chemistry, and could potentially be used as beacons for their formation location if the elemental gas and grain ratios of planet birth environments, i.e. protoplanetary disks, are well understood. In disks, the ratios of volatile elements (e.g., C/O) is regulated by the presence of snowlines of major volatiles at different distances from the central star. We explore the effects of dynamical processes, such as radial drift of solids and viscous gas accretion onto the central star, molecular compositions, and the ice morphology of dust grains in disks on the snowline locations of the main C, O and N carriers in a protoplanetary disk, and their consequences for the C/O/N ratio in gas and dust throughout the disk. We find that radial drift and accretion alone can reduce the snow line radii by 40-60% of the main C and O carriers, i.e. H2O, CO2 and CO, compared to static disks, substantially changing the disk regions where C/O is enhanced over the stellar value. A similar effect is seen for the major nitrogen carriers. We note that N/O enhancements in disk gas can be even more extreme than C/O in the outer disk due to the low volatility of N2 compared to all major C and O carriers. I will discuss these results together with the effects of additional dynamical processes, and outline a path toward a coupled drift-desorption-chemistry model that will provide robust quantitative results for volatile snowline locations and C/N/O abundance ratios as the disk evolves in time.

  5. An integrated microfluidic device for two-dimensional combinatorial dilution†

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yun-Ho; Hancock, Matthew J.; Kim, Sang Bok; Selimović, Šeila; Sim, Woo Young; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput preparation of multi-component solutions is an integral process in biology, chemistry and materials science for screening, diagnostics and analysis. Compact microfluidic systems enable such processing with low reagent volumes and rapid testing. Here we present a microfluidic device that incorporates two gradient generators, a tree-like generator and a new microfluidic active injection system, interfaced by intermediate solution reservoirs to generate diluted combinations of input solutions within an 8 × 8 or 10 × 10 array of isolated test chambers. Three input solutions were fed into the device, two to the tree-like gradient generator and one to pre-fill the test chamber array. The relative concentrations of these three input solutions in the test chambers completely characterized device behaviour and were controlled by the number of injection cycles and the flow rate. Device behaviour was modelled by computational fluid dynamics simulations and an approximate analytic formula. The device may be used for two-dimensional (2D) combinatorial dilution by adding two solutions in different relative concentrations to each of its three inputs. By appropriate choice of the two-component input solutions, test chamber concentrations that span any triangle in 2D concentration space may be obtained. In particular, explicit inputs are given for a coarse screening of a large region in concentration space followed by a more refined screening of a smaller region, including alternate inputs that span the same concentration region but with different distributions. The ability to probe arbitrary subspaces of concentration space and to control the distribution of discrete test points within those subspaces makes the device of potential benefit for high-throughput cell biology studies and drug screening. PMID:21837312

  6. Stem cells and combinatorial science.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yue Qin; Wong, Wan Qing; Yap, Yan Wen; Orner, Brendan P

    2007-09-01

    Stem cell-based technologies have the potential to help cure a number of cell degenerative diseases. Combinatorial and high throughput screening techniques could provide tools to control and manipulate the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. This review chronicles historic and recent progress in the stem cell field involving both pluripotent and multipotent cells, and it highlights relevant cellular signal transduction pathways. This review further describes screens using libraries of soluble, small-molecule ligands, and arrays of molecules immobilized onto surfaces while proposing future trends in similar studies. It is hoped that by reviewing both the stem cell and the relevant high throughput screening literature, this paper can act as a resource to the combinatorial science community.

  7. Implementation of a Research-Based Lab Module in a High School Chemistry Curriculum: A Study of Classroom Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilarz, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    For this study, a research-based lab module was implemented in two high school chemistry classes for the purpose of examining classroom dynamics throughout the process of students completing the module. A research-based lab module developed for use in undergraduate laboratories by the Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education (CASPiE) was…

  8. Identification and interrogation of combinatorial histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Karch, Kelly R; Denizio, Jamie E; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2013-01-01

    Histone proteins are dynamically modified to mediate a variety of cellular processes including gene transcription, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis. Regulation of these processes occurs through the recruitment of non-histone proteins to chromatin by specific combinations of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs). Mass spectrometry has emerged as an essential tool to discover and quantify histone PTMs both within and between samples in an unbiased manner. Developments in mass spectrometry that allow for characterization of large histone peptides or intact protein has made it possible to determine which modifications occur simultaneously on a single histone polypeptide. A variety of techniques from biochemistry, biophysics, and chemical biology have been employed to determine the biological relevance of discovered combinatorial codes. This review first describes advancements in the field of mass spectrometry that have facilitated histone PTM analysis and then covers notable approaches to probe the biological relevance of these modifications in their nucleosomal context.

  9. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  10. YCRD: Yeast Combinatorial Regulation Database

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Hsieh, Yen-Chen; Lai, Fu-Jou

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the precise transcriptional control of gene expression is typically achieved through combinatorial regulation using cooperative transcription factors (TFs). Therefore, a database which provides regulatory associations between cooperative TFs and their target genes is helpful for biologists to study the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Because there is no such kind of databases in the public domain, this prompts us to construct a database, called Yeast Combinatorial Regulation Database (YCRD), which deposits 434,197 regulatory associations between 2535 cooperative TF pairs and 6243 genes. The comprehensive collection of more than 2500 cooperative TF pairs was retrieved from 17 existing algorithms in the literature. The target genes of a cooperative TF pair (e.g. TF1-TF2) are defined as the common target genes of TF1 and TF2, where a TF’s experimentally validated target genes were downloaded from YEASTRACT database. In YCRD, users can (i) search the target genes of a cooperative TF pair of interest, (ii) search the cooperative TF pairs which regulate a gene of interest and (iii) identify important cooperative TF pairs which regulate a given set of genes. We believe that YCRD will be a valuable resource for yeast biologists to study combinatorial regulation of gene expression. YCRD is available at http://cosbi.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YCRD/ or http://cosbi2.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YCRD/. PMID:27392072

  11. YCRD: Yeast Combinatorial Regulation Database.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Hsieh, Yen-Chen; Lai, Fu-Jou

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the precise transcriptional control of gene expression is typically achieved through combinatorial regulation using cooperative transcription factors (TFs). Therefore, a database which provides regulatory associations between cooperative TFs and their target genes is helpful for biologists to study the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Because there is no such kind of databases in the public domain, this prompts us to construct a database, called Yeast Combinatorial Regulation Database (YCRD), which deposits 434,197 regulatory associations between 2535 cooperative TF pairs and 6243 genes. The comprehensive collection of more than 2500 cooperative TF pairs was retrieved from 17 existing algorithms in the literature. The target genes of a cooperative TF pair (e.g. TF1-TF2) are defined as the common target genes of TF1 and TF2, where a TF's experimentally validated target genes were downloaded from YEASTRACT database. In YCRD, users can (i) search the target genes of a cooperative TF pair of interest, (ii) search the cooperative TF pairs which regulate a gene of interest and (iii) identify important cooperative TF pairs which regulate a given set of genes. We believe that YCRD will be a valuable resource for yeast biologists to study combinatorial regulation of gene expression. YCRD is available at http://cosbi.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YCRD/ or http://cosbi2.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YCRD/. PMID:27392072

  12. Self-healing gels based on constitutional dynamic chemistry and their potential applications.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhao; Yang, Jian Hai; Zhou, Jinxiong; Xu, Feng; Zrínyi, Miklós; Dussault, Patrick H; Osada, Yoshihito; Chen, Yong Mei

    2014-12-01

    As representative soft materials with widespread applications, gels with various functions have been developed. However, traditional gels are vulnerable to stress-induced formation of cracks. The propagation of these cracks may affect the integrity of network structures of gels, resulting in the loss of functionality and limiting the service life of the gels. To address this challenge, self-healing gels that can restore their functionalities and structures after damage have been developed as "smart" soft materials. In this paper, we present an overview of the current strategies for synthesizing self-healing gels based on the concept of constitutional dynamic chemistry, which involves molecular structures capable of establishing dynamic networks based upon physical interactions or chemical reactions. The characterization methods of self-healing gels and the key factors that affect self-healing properties are analyzed. We also illustrate the emerging applications of self-healing gels, with emphasis on their usage in industry (coatings, sealants) and biomedicine (tissue adhesives, agents for drug or cell delivery). We conclude with a perspective on challenges facing the field, along with prospects for future development. PMID:25144925

  13. Fast Quantum Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shock-induced Chemistry in Organic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2014-03-01

    The responses of liquid formic acid and phenylacetylene to shock compression have been investigated via quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations with the self-consistent tight-binding code LATTE. Microcanonical Born-Oppenheimer trajectories with precise conservation of the total energy were computed without relying on an iterative self-consistent field optimization of the electronic degrees of freedom at each time step via the Fast Quantum Mechanical Molecular Dynamics formalism [A. M. N. Niklasson and M. J. Cawkwell, Phys. Rev. B, 86, 174308 (2012)]. The conservation of the total energy in our trajectories was pivotal for the capture of adiabatic shock heating as well as temperature changes arising from endo- or exothermic chemistry. Our self-consistent tight-binding parameterizations yielded very good predictions for the gas-phase geometries of formic acid and phenylacetylene molecules and the principal Hugoniots of the liquids. In accord with recent flyer-plate impact experiments, our simulations revealed i) that formic acid reacts at relatively low impact pressures but with no change in volume between products and reactants, and ii) a two-step polymerization process for phenylacetylene. Furthermore, the evolution of the HOMO-LUMO gap tracked on-the-fly during our simulations could be correlated with changes transient absorption measured during laser-driven shock compression experiments on these liquids.

  14. The use of dynamic adaptive chemistry in combustion simulation of gasoline surrogate fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Long; Raman, Sumathy; Farrell, John T.; Stevens, John G.

    2009-07-15

    A computationally efficient dynamic adaptive chemistry (DAC) scheme is described that permits on-the-fly mechanism reduction during reactive flow calculations. The scheme reduces a globally valid full mechanism to a locally, instantaneously applicable smaller mechanism. Previously we demonstrated its applicability to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) problems with n-heptane [L. Liang, J.G. Stevens, J.T. Farrell, Proc. Combust. Inst. 32 (2009) 527-534]. In this work we demonstrate the broader utility of the DAC scheme through the simulation of HCCI and shock tube ignition delay times (IDT) for three gasoline surrogates, including two- and three-component blends of primary reference fuels (PRF) and toluene reference fuels (TRF). Both a detailed 1099-species mechanism and a skeletal 150-species mechanism are investigated as the full mechanism to explore the impact of fuel complexity on the DAC scheme. For all conditions studied, pressure and key species profiles calculated using the DAC scheme are in excellent agreement with the results obtained using the full mechanisms. For the HCCI calculations using the 1099- and 150-species mechanisms, the DAC scheme achieves 70- and 15-fold CPU time reductions, respectively. For the IDT problems, corresponding speed-up factors of 10 and two are obtained. Practical guidance is provided for choosing the search-initiating species set, selecting the threshold, and implementing the DAC scheme in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) framework. (author)

  15. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Carbonate Chemistry in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, C.; Winn, C. D.; Kahng, S.

    2014-12-01

    The rapid increase in atmospheric and surface ocean CO2 concentrations has the potential to drastically alter the metabolic processes particularly in nearshore ecosystems. However, much of what is known about carbonate chemistry is based on observations and analysis of surface waters of the open ocean where spatial and temporal variability is far less dynamic than in nearshore coral reef ecosystems. Carbon system dynamics data from four consecutive years has been examined in the coastal and nearshore waters of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands. This data has been collected for the purpose of improving our understanding of the carbon system dynamics in this unique and pristine environment. The data collected includes continuous CTD data and discrete bottle samples, as well as continuous underway measurements. In addition to standard hydrographic profile data, water column alkalinity and pH have been measured on discrete water samples, and continuous underway measurements of pCO2 and pH have been obtained. This data is used to investigate the impact of NWHI coral reef ecosystems on the carbon system in and surrounding the archipelago. The data demonstrates that a significant "island mass effect" with respect to the oceanographic carbon system exists around the islands within the archipelago. In addition, spatial and temporal variability of several oceanographic features that exhibit a radial, latitudinal, or longitudinal gradient in the nearshore waters of the NWHI islands, islets, and atolls will be described. Finally, a shallow pH maximum coincident with the shallow oxygen maximum is observed, which suggests an open ocean feature substantially influenced by turbulence surrounding the islands within the monument. The data analysis and coral reef ecosystem monitoring will aid in developing a long-term plan to assist in the sustainability of Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

  16. GLARE: A tool for product-oriented design of combinatorial libraries.

    PubMed

    Truchon, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    Combinatorial chemistry with two or more diversity points often leads to an immense number of theoretical products. It is sensible to select the reagents based on the desired properties of the products in the hope of maximizing the usefulness of the synthesized molecules. The presented tool enables the filtering of reagents such that any further reagent selection will form products matching the desired properties. Virtual combinatorial library leading to thousands of billions of products can be rapidly assessed. The publicly available software ( http://glare.sourceforge.net ) and key algorithmic elements are discussed.

  17. Variational methods for direct/inverse problems of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penenko, Vladimir; Penenko, Alexey; Tsvetova, Elena

    2013-04-01

    We present a variational approach for solving direct and inverse problems of atmospheric hydrodynamics and chemistry. It is important that the accurate matching of numerical schemes has to be provided in the chain of objects: direct/adjoint problems - sensitivity relations - inverse problems, including assimilation of all available measurement data. To solve the problems we have developed a new enhanced set of cost-effective algorithms. The matched description of the multi-scale processes is provided by a specific choice of the variational principle functionals for the whole set of integrated models. Then all functionals of variational principle are approximated in space and time by splitting and decomposition methods. Such approach allows us to separately consider, for example, the space-time problems of atmospheric chemistry in the frames of decomposition schemes for the integral identity sum analogs of the variational principle at each time step and in each of 3D finite-volumes. To enhance the realization efficiency, the set of chemical reactions is divided on the subsets related to the operators of production and destruction. Then the idea of the Euler's integrating factors is applied in the frames of the local adjoint problem technique [1]-[3]. The analytical solutions of such adjoint problems play the role of integrating factors for differential equations describing atmospheric chemistry. With their help, the system of differential equations is transformed to the equivalent system of integral equations. As a result we avoid the construction and inversion of preconditioning operators containing the Jacobi matrixes which arise in traditional implicit schemes for ODE solution. This is the main advantage of our schemes. At the same time step but on the different stages of the "global" splitting scheme, the system of atmospheric dynamic equations is solved. For convection - diffusion equations for all state functions in the integrated models we have developed the

  18. Analysis of Combinatorial Epigenomic States.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Paul D

    2016-03-18

    Hundreds of distinct chemical modifications to DNA and histone amino acids have been described. Regulation exerted by these so-called epigenetic marks is vital to normal development, stability of cell identity through mitosis, and nongenetic transmission of traits between generations through meiosis. Loss of this regulation contributes to many diseases. Evidence indicates epigenetic marks function in combinations, whereby a given modification has distinct effects on local genome control, depending on which additional modifications are locally present. This review summarizes emerging methods for assessing combinatorial epigenomic states, as well as challenges and opportunities for their refinement.

  19. Observing transiting exoplanets: Removing systematic errors to constrain atmospheric chemistry and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellem, Robert Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The > 1500 confirmed exoplanets span a wide range of planetary masses ( 1 MEarth -20 MJupiter), radii ( 0.3 R Earth -2 RJupiter), semi-major axes ( 0.005-100 AU), orbital periods ( 0.3-1 x 105 days), and host star spectral types. The effects of a widely-varying parameter space on a planetary atmosphere's chemistry and dynamics can be determined through transiting exoplanet observations. An exoplanet's atmospheric signal, either in absorption or emission, is on the order of 0.1% which is dwarfed by telescope-specific systematic error sources up to 60%. This thesis explores some of the major sources of error and their removal from space- and ground-based observations, specifically Spitzer /IRAC single-object photometry, IRTF/SpeX and Palomar/TripleSpec low-resolution single-slit near-infrared spectroscopy, and Kuiper/Mont4k multi-object photometry. The errors include pointing-induced uncertainties, airmass variations, seeing-induced signal loss, telescope jitter, and system variability. They are treated with detector efficiency pixel-mapping, normalization routines, a principal component analysis, binning with the geometric mean in Fourier-space, characterization by a comparison star, repeatability, and stellar monitoring to get within a few times of the photon noise limit. As a result, these observations provide strong measurements of an exoplanet's dynamical day-to-night heat transport, constrain its CH4 abundance, investigate emission mechanisms, and develop an observing strategy with smaller telescopes. The reduction methods presented here can also be applied to other existing and future platforms to identify and remove systematic errors. Until such sources of uncertainty are characterized with bright systems with large planetary signals for platforms such as the James Webb Space Telescope, for example, one cannot resolve smaller objects with more subtle spectral features, as expected of exo-Earths.

  20. Bifurcation characteristics and flame dynamics of a ducted non-premixed flame with finite rate chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Subhas Chandra; Sujith, Raman

    2015-09-01

    The influence of system parameters such as the flame location, Peclet number and Damköhler number on the bifurcation characteristics and flame dynamics of a ducted non-premixed flame with finite rate chemistry is presented in this paper. In the bifurcation plot with flame location as the bifurcation parameter, subcritical Hopf bifurcation is found for lower values of flame location and supercritical Hopf bifurcation for higher values of flame location, for all the Damköhler numbers used in this study. The flame shapes are captured at eight different phases of a cycle of time series data of acoustic velocity at both the fold and Hopf points for bifurcation with flame location as the parameter. We find that the range of flame height variations at the Hopf point is more than the range of flame height variations obtained at the fold point. We also find that the flame oscillates in the same phase as pressure fluctuation but in a phase different from both velocity and heat release rate fluctuations in the region of hysteresis for bifurcation with flame location. The non-dimensional hysteresis width is plotted as a function of Damköhler number for variation of flame location in the subcritical region. An inverse power law relation is found between the non-dimensional hysteresis width and the Damköhler number. The bifurcation plot with Peclet number as parameter shows a subcritical Hopf bifurcation.

  1. Active Upper-atmosphere Chemistry and Dynamics from Polar Circulation Reversal on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teanby, Nicholas A.; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph; Nixon, Conor A.; DeKok, Remco; Vinatier, Sandrine; Coustenis, Athena; Sefton-Nash, Elliot; Calcutt, Simon B.; Flasar, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Saturn's moon Titan has a nitrogen atmosphere comparable to Earth's, with a surface pressure of 1.4 bar. Numerical models reproduce the tropospheric conditions very well but have trouble explaining the observed middle-atmosphere temperatures, composition and winds. The top of the middle-atmosphere circulation has been thought to lie at an altitude of 450 to 500 kilometres, where there is a layer of haze that appears to be separated from the main haze deck. This 'detached' haze was previously explained as being due to the colocation of peak haze production and the limit of dynamical transport by the circulation's upper branch. Herewe report a build-up of trace gases over the south pole approximately two years after observing the 2009 post-equinox circulation reversal, from which we conclude that middle-atmosphere circulation must extend to an altitude of at least 600 kilometres. The primary drivers of this circulation are summer-hemisphere heating of haze by absorption of solar radiation and winter-hemisphere cooling due to infrared emission by haze and trace gases; our results therefore imply that these effects are important well into the thermosphere (altitudes higher than 500 kilometres). This requires both active upper-atmosphere chemistry, consistent with the detection of high-complexity molecules and ions at altitudes greater than 950 kilometres, and an alternative explanation for the detached haze, such as a transition in haze particle growth from monomers to fractal structures.

  2. Active upper-atmosphere chemistry and dynamics from polar circulation reversal on Titan.

    PubMed

    Teanby, Nicholas A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Nixon, Conor A; de Kok, Remco; Vinatier, Sandrine; Coustenis, Athena; Sefton-Nash, Elliot; Calcutt, Simon B; Flasar, F Michael

    2012-11-29

    Saturn's moon Titan has a nitrogen atmosphere comparable to Earth's, with a surface pressure of 1.4 bar. Numerical models reproduce the tropospheric conditions very well but have trouble explaining the observed middle-atmosphere temperatures, composition and winds. The top of the middle-atmosphere circulation has been thought to lie at an altitude of 450 to 500 kilometres, where there is a layer of haze that appears to be separated from the main haze deck. This 'detached' haze was previously explained as being due to the co-location of peak haze production and the limit of dynamical transport by the circulation's upper branch. Here we report a build-up of trace gases over the south pole approximately two years after observing the 2009 post-equinox circulation reversal, from which we conclude that middle-atmosphere circulation must extend to an altitude of at least 600 kilometres. The primary drivers of this circulation are summer-hemisphere heating of haze by absorption of solar radiation and winter-hemisphere cooling due to infrared emission by haze and trace gases; our results therefore imply that these effects are important well into the thermosphere (altitudes higher than 500 kilometres). This requires both active upper-atmosphere chemistry, consistent with the detection of high-complexity molecules and ions at altitudes greater than 950 kilometres, and an alternative explanation for the detached haze, such as a transition in haze particle growth from monomers to fractal structures.

  3. Ozone budgets from the Dynamics and Chemistry of Marine Stratocumulus experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Pearson, R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements from the Dynamics and Chemistry of marine Stratocumulus experiment have been used to study components of the regional ozone budget. The surface destruction rate is determined by eddy correlation of ozone and vertical velocity measured by a low-flying aircraft. Significant variability is found in the measured surface resistance; it is partially correlated with friction velocity but appears to have other controlling influences as well. The mean resistance is 4190 s/m which is higher (slower destruction) than most previous estimates for seawater. Flux and mean measurements throughout the marine boundary layer are used to estimate the net rate of in situ photochemical production/destruction of ozone. Averaged over the flights, ozone concentration is found to be near steady state, and a net of photochemical destruction of 0.02-0.07 ng/cu m per sec is diagnosed. This is an important confirmation of photochemical model results for the remote marine boundary layer. Ozone vertical distributions above the boundary layer show a strongly layered structure with very sharp gradients. These distributions are possibly related to the stratospheric ozone source.

  4. NON-EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY OF DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING PRESTELLAR CORES. II. IONIZATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Willacy, Karen; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J.

    2012-07-20

    We study the effect that non-equilibrium chemistry in dynamical models of collapsing molecular cloud cores has on measurements of the magnetic field in these cores, the degree of ionization, and the mean molecular weight of ions. We find that OH and CN, usually used in Zeeman observations of the line-of-sight magnetic field, have an abundance that decreases toward the center of the core much faster than the density increases. As a result, Zeeman observations tend to sample the outer layers of the core and consistently underestimate the core magnetic field. The degree of ionization follows a complicated dependence on the number density at central densities up to 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} for magnetic models and 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} in non-magnetic models. At higher central densities, the scaling approaches a power law with a slope of -0.6 and a normalization which depends on the cosmic-ray ionization rate {zeta} and the temperature T as ({zeta}T){sup 1/2}. The mean molecular weight of ions is systematically lower than the usually assumed value of 20-30, and, at high densities, approaches a value of 3 due to the asymptotic dominance of the H{sup +}{sub 3} ion. This significantly lower value implies that ambipolar diffusion operates faster.

  5. Reversible control of pore size and surface chemistry of mesoporous silica through dynamic covalent chemistry: philicity mediated catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dheeraj Kumar; Pavan Kumar, B. V. V. S.; Eswaramoorthy, M.

    2015-08-01

    Here, we report the synthesis of adaptive hybrid mesoporous silica having the ability to reconfigure its pore properties such as pore size and philicity in response to the external environment. Decyl chains were reversibly appended to the pore walls of silica through imine motifs as dynamic covalent modules to switch the pore size and philicity in response to pH. This switching of pore properties was used to gate the access of reactants to the gold nanoparticles immobilized inside the nanopores, thus enabling us to turn-on/turn-off the catalytic reaction. The use of such dynamic covalent modules to govern pore properties would enable the realization of intelligent hybrids capable of controlling many such chemical processes in response to stimuli.Here, we report the synthesis of adaptive hybrid mesoporous silica having the ability to reconfigure its pore properties such as pore size and philicity in response to the external environment. Decyl chains were reversibly appended to the pore walls of silica through imine motifs as dynamic covalent modules to switch the pore size and philicity in response to pH. This switching of pore properties was used to gate the access of reactants to the gold nanoparticles immobilized inside the nanopores, thus enabling us to turn-on/turn-off the catalytic reaction. The use of such dynamic covalent modules to govern pore properties would enable the realization of intelligent hybrids capable of controlling many such chemical processes in response to stimuli. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02959g

  6. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Yee, L. D.; Schilling, K.; Loza, C. L.; Craven, J. S.; Zuend, A.; Ziemann, P. J.; Seinfeld, J.

    2013-12-01

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multi-generation gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a mid-experiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. The results of the current work have a number of implications for SOA models. While the dynamics of an aerosol size distribution reflects the mechanism of growth, we demonstrate here that it provides a key constraint in interpreting laboratory and ambient SOA formation. This work, although carried out specifically for the long chain alkane, dodecane, is expected to be widely applicable to other major classes of SOA precursors. SOA consists of a myriad of organic compounds containing various functional groups, which can generally undergo heterogeneous/multiphase reactions forming low-volatility products such as oligomers and other high molecular mass compounds. If particle-phase chemistry is indeed

  7. Probing the chemistry, structure, and dynamics of the water-silica interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, Glenn K.

    Despite its natural abundance and wide-ranging technological relevance, much remains unknown or unclear about water-silica interfaces. Computer simulation stands to bridge the gaps of knowledge left by experiment, and a recently developed Dissociative Water Potential has enabled the simulation of large amorphous silica surfaces in contact with water without having to impose a model of surface chemistry a priori. Earlier work with this model has revealed the existence of several protonated surface sites such as SiOH2 + and Si-(OH+)-Si that have yet to be extensively characterized. However, both experiment and quantum mechanical simulation have provided an increasing body of evidence that suggests these sites exist, and these sites may play key roles in some of the unexplained phenomena observed in water-silica systems. To this end, this Dissociative Water Potential has been applied to develop a comprehensive picture of the chemistry, structure, and dynamics of the water-silica interface that is unbiased by any expectation of what sites should form. The bridging OH site, Si-(OH+)-Si, does form and is characterized as a highly acidic site that occurs predominantly on strained Si-O-Si bridges near the interface. Similarly, the transient formation of SiOH2 + is observed, and this site is found to be more acidic than Si-(OH +)-Si. In addition to H3O+ that forms near the interface, all of these sites readily deprotonate and are expected to play a role in the enhanced proton conductivity experimentally observed in hydrated mesoporous silica. The reactions between water and silica are particularly relevant to the engineering of nuclear waste forms, and the role of water-silica interactions are also explored within the context of the degradation of silica-based waste forms exposed to radiation. Despite the significant simulation effort employed in glassy waste form research, no molecular models of radiation damage in silica include the effects of moisture. This deficiency is

  8. Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry-based New Concept of Molecular Beacons for High Efficient Development of Fluorescent Probes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xingmao; Yu, Chunmeng; Wang, Gang; Fan, Jiayun; Zhang, Jianyun; Qi, Yanyu; Liu, Kaiqiang; Fang, Yu

    2015-06-01

    Inspired by the concept of constitutional dynamic chemistry, we propose a new and well-adaptable strategy for developing molecular beacon (MB)-like fluorescent probes. To demonstrate the strategy, we synthesized and used an amino group containing pyrenyl derivative of cholesterol (CP) for the construction of new fluorescent probes with EDTA and sulfuric acid. The probes as created were successfully used for n-hexane purity checking and Ba(2+)and Pb(2+)sensing, respectively.

  9. Crystallization of macromolecular complexes: combinatorial complex crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stura, Enrico A.; Graille, Marc; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste

    2001-11-01

    antigens. We find that such binding involves only the well conserved framework region of the variable domain of the antibody heavy chain (VH) and does not affect the conformation of the hypervariable loops that define the antigen recognition site. Thus this domain could be used to complex to Fab or Fv fragments derived from a wide variety of antibodies. While protein A complexes with the VH domain, protein L recognizes the VL region of immunoglobulins. Our recent study of the interaction between an Fab and a domain of protein L shows that the situation is very similar. Indeed this domain binds to the VL framework region outside the antigen binding site. Since individual domains from each of these three multi-domain proteins bind to well separated and independent locations on immunoglobulins, they can be combined to search for a suitable crystalline lattice. This allows us to propose a combinatorial method as a rational way to exploit antibody complexation for the crystallographic structure determination of proteins that are otherwise difficult to crystallize. The overall method has strong parallels with other combinatorial methods used elsewhere in biology and chemistry, and we propose that together with stoichiometry variation screening (SVS), it may further enhance the probability of crystallization.

  10. Active upper-atmosphere chemistry and dynamics from polar circulation reversal on Titan.

    PubMed

    Teanby, Nicholas A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Nixon, Conor A; de Kok, Remco; Vinatier, Sandrine; Coustenis, Athena; Sefton-Nash, Elliot; Calcutt, Simon B; Flasar, F Michael

    2012-11-29

    Saturn's moon Titan has a nitrogen atmosphere comparable to Earth's, with a surface pressure of 1.4 bar. Numerical models reproduce the tropospheric conditions very well but have trouble explaining the observed middle-atmosphere temperatures, composition and winds. The top of the middle-atmosphere circulation has been thought to lie at an altitude of 450 to 500 kilometres, where there is a layer of haze that appears to be separated from the main haze deck. This 'detached' haze was previously explained as being due to the co-location of peak haze production and the limit of dynamical transport by the circulation's upper branch. Here we report a build-up of trace gases over the south pole approximately two years after observing the 2009 post-equinox circulation reversal, from which we conclude that middle-atmosphere circulation must extend to an altitude of at least 600 kilometres. The primary drivers of this circulation are summer-hemisphere heating of haze by absorption of solar radiation and winter-hemisphere cooling due to infrared emission by haze and trace gases; our results therefore imply that these effects are important well into the thermosphere (altitudes higher than 500 kilometres). This requires both active upper-atmosphere chemistry, consistent with the detection of high-complexity molecules and ions at altitudes greater than 950 kilometres, and an alternative explanation for the detached haze, such as a transition in haze particle growth from monomers to fractal structures. PMID:23192150

  11. Seasonal dynamics of water and air chemistry in an indoor chlorinated swimming pool.

    PubMed

    Zare Afifi, Mehrnaz; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2015-01-01

    Although swimming is known to be beneficial in terms of cardiovascular health, as well as for some forms of rehabilitation, swimming is also known to present risks to human health, largely in the form of exposure to microbial pathogens and disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Relatively little information is available in the literature to characterize the seasonal dynamics of air and water chemistry in indoor chlorinated swimming pools. To address this issue, water samples were collected five days per week from an indoor chlorinated swimming pool facility at a high school during the academic year and once per week during summer over a fourteen-month period. The samples were analyzed for free and combined chlorine, urea, volatile DBPs, pH, temperature and total alkalinity. Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometry (MIMS) was used to identify and measure the concentrations of eleven aqueous-phase volatile DBPs. Variability in the concentrations of these DBPs was observed. Factors that influenced variability included bather loading and mixing by swimmers. These compounds have the ability to adversely affect water and air quality and human health. A large fraction of the existing literature regarding swimming pool air quality has focused on trichloramine (NCl₃). For this work, gas-phase NCl₃ was analyzed by an air sparging-DPD/KI method. The results showed that gas-phase NCl₃ concentration is influenced by bather loading and liquid-phase NCl₃ concentration. Urea is the dominant organic-N compound in human urine and sweat, and is known to be an important precursor for producing NCl₃ in swimming pools. Results of daily measurements of urea indicated a link between bather load and urea concentration in the pool.

  12. Reconstructing monsoon dynamics on the Tibetan Plateau using ostracod shell chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, N.; De Baere, B.; Yang, Q.; Francois, R. H. G. M.; Jochum, K. P.; Frenzel, P.; Schwalb, A.

    2014-12-01

    Ostracod shells have widely been used as source material for geochemical analysis of stable isotope and trace element composition in paleolimnological reconstruction of lake hydrochemistry and climate as they provide insight into past water balance and solute evolution of lakes. During five fieldtrips to the Tibetan Plateau, taking place between 2008 and 2012, we collected live and sub-recent ostracods from 333 sites. Hydrochemical parameters, such as temperature, electrical conductivity, pH as well as major and minor ion concentrations were measured at each site and show high variability between sites. Adult intact individuals from the most common ostracod taxa were selected and their shell chemistry analyzed. The trace elemental data for the living ostracods compared to the hydrological data provides a calibration dataset for further hydrological and thus climatological reconstruction. Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios in ostracod shells provide information about past water temperature and salinity resulting from changes in precipitation vs. evaporation ratios and monsoon activity. Furthermore, Mn/Ca, Fe/Ca and U/Ca ratios are being explored as redox indicators to reconstruct oxygenation cycles. To reconstruct the monsoon dynamics on the Tibetan Plateau, sediment cores from different lakes on an east-west transect were taken: two long sediment cores from lakes Nam Co and Tangra Yumco, covering the past 20,000 years, and a short core from Lake Taro Co. The lakes feature an alkaline environment but show significant differences in their electrical conductivity ranging from 0.99 mS/cm (Taro Co) and 1.8 mS/cm (Nam Co) to 12 mS/cm (Tangra Yumco). The chemical composition of valves of the most common ostracod species in these lakes, Leucocytherella sinensis, was analyzed using laser ablation ICP-MS. The reconstruction provides a more extensive insight in past precipitation - evaporation balance and lake level change and provides clues about the interaction between the

  13. The spring 2011 final stratospheric warming above Eureka: anomalous dynamics and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, C.; Strong, K.; Zhao, X.; Bourassa, A. E.; Daffer, W. H.; Degenstein, D.; Drummond, J. R.; Farahani, E. E.; Fraser, A.; Lloyd, N. D.; Manney, G. L.; McLinden, C. A.; Rex, M.; Roth, C.; Strahan, S. E.; Walker, K. A.; Wohltmann, I.

    2012-08-01

    In spring 2011, the Arctic polar vortex was stronger than in any other year on record. As the polar vortex started to break up in April, ozone and NO2 columns were measured with UV-visible spectrometers above the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) in Eureka, Canada (80.05° N, 86.42° W) using the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. These ground-based column measurements were complemented by Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Optical Spectrograph and Infra-Red Imager System (OSIRIS) satellite measurements, Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) simulations, and dynamical parameters. On 8 April 2011, NO2 columns above PEARL from the DOAS, OMI, and GMI datasets were approximately twice as large as in previous years. On this day, temperatures and ozone volume mixing ratios above Eureka were high, suggesting enhanced chemical production of NO2 from NO. Additionally, GMI NOx and N2O fields suggest that downward transport along the vortex edge and horizontal transport from lower latitudes also contributed to the enhanced NO2. The anticyclone that transported lower-latitude NOx above PEARL became frozen-in and persisted in dynamical and GMI N2O fields until the end of the measurement period on 31 May 2011. Ozone isolated within this frozen-in anticyclone (FrIAC) in the middle stratosphere was depleted due to reactions with the enhanced NOx. Ozone loss was calculated using the passive tracer technique, with passive ozone profiles from the Lagrangian Chemistry and Transport Model, ATLAS. At 600 K, ozone losses between 1 December 2010 and 20 May 2011 reached 4.2 parts per million by volume (ppmv) (58%) and 4.4 ppmv (61%), when calculated using GMI and OSIRIS ozone profiles, respectively. This middle-stratosphere gas-phase ozone loss led to a more rapid decrease in ozone column amounts in April/May 2011 compared with previous years. Ground-based, OMI, and GMI ozone total columns within the FrIAC all decreased by more than 100 DU

  14. Mapping the Materials Genome through Combinatorial Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Krishna

    2012-02-01

    The recently announced White House Materials Genome Initiative provides an exciting challenge to the materials science community. To meet that challenge one needs to address a critical question, namely what is the materials genome? Some guide on how to the answer this question can be gained by recognizing that a ``gene'' is a carrier of information. In the biological sciences, discovering how to manipulate these genes has generated exciting discoveries in fundamental molecular biology as well as significant advances in biotechnology. Scaling that up to molecular, cellular length scales and beyond, has spawned from genomics, fields such as proteomics, metabolomics and essentially systems biology. The ``omics'' approach requires that one needs to discover and track these ``carriers of information'' and then correlate that information to predict behavior. A similar challenge lies in materials science, where there is a diverse array of modalities of materials ``discovery'' ranging from new materials chemistries and molecular arrangements with novel properties, to the development and design of new micro- and mesoscale structures. Hence to meaningfully adapt the spirit of ``genomics'' style research in materials science, we need to first identify and map the ``genes'' across different materials science applications On the experimental side, combinatorial experiments have opened a new approach to generate data in a high throughput manner, but without a clear way to link that to models, the full value of that data is not realized. Hence along with experimental and computational materials science, we need to add a ``third leg'' to our toolkit to make the ``Materials Genome'' a reality, the science of Materials Informatics. In this presentation we provide an overview of how information science coupled to materials science can in fact achieve the goal of mapping the ``Materials Genome''.

  15. Parallel chemistry in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Long, Alan

    2012-09-01

    The tool chest of techniques, methodologies, and equipment for conducting parallel chemistry is larger than ever before. Improvements in the laboratory and developments in computational chemistry have enabled compound library design at the desks of medicinal chemists. This unit includes a brief background in combinatorial/parallel synthesis chemistry, along with a discussion of evolving technologies for both solid- and solution-phase chemistry. In addition, there are discussions on designing compound libraries, acquisition/procurement of compounds and/or reagents, the chemistry and equipment used for chemical production, purification, sample handling, and data analysis.

  16. The DACCIWA Project: Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud interactions in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippertz, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Massive economic and population growth and urbanisation are expected to lead to a tripling of anthropogenic emissions from southern West Africa (SWA) between 2000 and 2030, the impacts of which on human health, ecosystems, food security and the regional climate are largely unknown. An assessment of these impacts is complicated by (a) a superposition with effects of global climate change, (b) the strong dependence of SWA on the sensitive West African monsoon, (c) incomplete scientific understanding of interactions between emissions, clouds, radiation, precipitation and regional circulations and (d) by a lack of observations to advance our understanding and improve predictions. The purpose of this contribution is to introduce the research consortium DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud interactions in West Africa), which comprises 16 partners in six European and West African countries. The interdisciplinary DACCIWA team will build on the scientific and logistical foundations established by the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) project and collaborate closely with operational centres. DACCIWA will receive funding of about M8.75€ from the European Commission as part of Framework Programme 7 from 2015 until 2018. The DACCIWA project will conduct extensive fieldwork in SWA to collect high-quality observations, spanning the entire process chain from surface-based natural and anthropogenic emissions to impacts on health, ecosystems and climate. This will include a major field campaign in summer 2015 with three research aircrafts and two ground-based supersites. Combining the resulting benchmark dataset with a wide range of modelling activities will allow us: (a) to assess all relevant physical and chemical processes, (b) to improve the monitoring of climate and compositional parameters from space, (c) to determine health impacts from air pollution, and (d) to develop the next generation of weather and climate models capable of representing coupled

  17. The spring 2011 final stratospheric warming above Eureka: anomalous dynamics and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, C.; Strong, K.; Zhao, X.; Bourassa, A. E.; Daffer, W. H.; Degenstein, D.; Drummond, J. R.; Farahani, E. E.; Fraser, A.; Lloyd, N. D.; Manney, G. L.; McLinden, C. A.; Rex, M.; Roth, C.; Strahan, S. E.; Walker, K. A.; Wohltmann, I.

    2013-01-01

    In spring 2011, the Arctic polar vortex was stronger than in any other year on record. As the polar vortex started to break up in April, ozone and NO2 columns were measured with UV-visible spectrometers above the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) in Eureka, Canada (80.05° N, 86.42° W) using the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. These ground-based column measurements were complemented by Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Optical Spectrograph and Infra-Red Imager System (OSIRIS) satellite measurements, Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) simulations, and meteorological quantities. On 8 April 2011, NO2 columns above PEARL from the DOAS, OMI, and GMI datasets were approximately twice as large as in previous years. On this day, temperatures and ozone volume mixing ratios above Eureka were high, suggesting enhanced chemical production of NO2 from NO. Additionally, GMI NOx (NO + NO2) and N2O fields suggest that downward transport along the vortex edge and horizontal transport from lower latitudes also contributed to the enhanced NO2. The anticyclone that transported lower-latitude NOx above PEARL became frozen-in and persisted in dynamical and GMI N2O fields until the end of the measurement period on 31 May 2011. Ozone isolated within this frozen-in anticyclone (FrIAC) in the middle stratosphere was lost due to reactions with the enhanced NOx. Below the FrIAC (from the tropopause to 700 K), NOx driven ozone loss above Eureka was larger than in previous years, according to GMI monthly average ozone loss rates. Using the passive tracer technique, with passive ozone profiles from the Lagrangian Chemistry and Transport Model, ATLAS, ozone losses since 1 December 2010 were calculated at 600 K. In the air mass that was above Eureka on 20 May 2011, ozone losses reached 4.2 parts per million by volume (ppmv) (58%) and 4.4 ppmv (61%), when calculated using GMI and OSIRIS ozone profiles, respectively. This gas-phase ozone loss

  18. Combinatorial Synthesis and Discovery of an Antibiotic Compound. An Experiment Suitable for High School and Undergraduate Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolkenberg, Scott E.; Su, Andrew I.

    2001-06-01

    An exercise demonstrating solution-phase combinatorial chemistry and its application to drug discovery is described. The experiment involves the synthesis of six libraries of three hydrazones, screening the libraries for antibiotic activity, and deconvolution to determine the active individual compound. The laboratory was designed for a high school classroom, though it can easily be expanded to suit a college introductory organic laboratory course.

  19. Pentaerythrityltetramine scaffolds for solid-phase combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Virta, Pasi; Leppänen, Marika; Lönnberg, Harri

    2004-03-19

    Straightforward synthesis for two pentaerythrityltetramine precursors, 2,2-bis(azidomethyl)propane-1,3-diamine (1) and 2-[N-(allyloxycarbonyl)aminomethyl]-2-azidomethylpropane-1,3-diamine (2), has been described. Both propane-1,3-diamines have been attached by reductive amination to a solid-supported backbone amide linker derived from 4-(4-formyl-3,5-dimethoxyphenoxy)butyric acid. The presence of the two methoxy substituents on the linker is essential to avoid cross-linking between two linkers. The remaining free primary amino group of the propane-1,3-diamine moiety may then be selectively acylated with an appropriately protected amino acid using conventional N,N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide/1-hydroxybenzotriazole (DCC/HOBt) activation without any interference by the secondary amino function. The latter group may be subsequently acylated by an anhydride method. Sequential reduction of the azido group and removal of the allyloxycarbonyl protection from 2 allow further coupling of two different amino acids, and hence, this handle may be utilized in construction of branched structures containing four different amino acids or peptides. Solid-supported 1 may, in turn, be used for the synthesis of similar constructs containing two identical branches. It is worth noting that no acid-labile protecting groups are required in this approach, and hence, this dimension may be saved for the cleavage of the linker. The applicability of the scaffolds to library synthesis has been demonstrated by preparation of 11 pentaerythrityl-branched tetra- and octapeptides.

  20. New methods in combinatorial chemistry-robotics and parallel synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cargill, J F; Lebl, M

    1997-06-01

    Technological advances in the automation of parallel synthesis are following the model set by the semiconductor industry: miniaturization, increasing speed, lower costs. Recent work includes preparation of high-density reaction blocks, development of ink-jet dispensing to polypropylene sheets and synthesis inside customized microchips.

  1. Implications of dynamic imine chemistry for the sustainable synthesis of nitrogen heterocycles via transimination followed by intramolecular cyclisation.

    PubMed

    Laha, Joydev K; Tummalapalli, K S Satyanarayana; Jethava, Krupal P

    2016-02-28

    An exploration of a tandem approach to the sustainable synthesis of N-heterocycles from readily available N-aryl benzylamines or imines and ortho-substituted anilines is described, which demonstrates, for the first time, an important synthetic application of dynamic imine chemistry. The key features to the successful development of this protocol include the utilisation of N-aryl benzylamines as imine precursors in transimination, the occurrence of transimination in acetonitrile in the absence of any catalysts, an intramolecular nucleophilic addition occurring in the newly formed imine causing irreversible transimination, and the tandem event occurring under green conditions.

  2. Supramolecular assembly/reassembly processes: molecular motors and dynamers operating at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2011-04-01

    Among the many significant advances within the field of supramolecular chemistry over the past decades, the development of the so-called ``dynamers'' features a direct relevance to materials science. Defined as ``combinatorial dynamic polymers'', dynamers are constitutional dynamic systems and materials resulting from the application of the principles of supramolecular chemistry to polymer science. Like supramolecular materials in general, dynamers are reversible dynamic multifunctional architectures, capable of modifying their constitution by exchanging, recombining, incorporating components. They may exhibit a variety of novel properties and behave as adaptive materials. In this review we focus on the design of responsive switchable monolayers, i.e. monolayers capable to undergo significant changes in their physical or chemical properties as a result of external stimuli. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies provide direct evidence with a sub-nanometre resolution, on the formation and dynamic response of these self-assembled systems featuring controlled geometries and properties.

  3. Inducible and combinatorial gene manipulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Dogbevia, Godwin K.; Marticorena-Alvarez, Ricardo; Bausen, Melanie; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T.

    2015-01-01

    We have deployed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches to manipulate gene expression in mouse brain. Here, we show a combinatorial genetic approach for inducible, cell type-specific gene expression and Cre/loxP mediated gene recombination in different brain regions. Our chemical-genetic approach will help to investigate ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘how’ gene(s) control neuronal circuit dynamics, and organize, for example, sensory signal processing, learning and memory, and behavior. PMID:25954155

  4. Applications of dynamic nuclear polarization to the study of reactions and reagents in organic and biomolecular chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Christian; Bowen, Sean

    2010-08-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is an important spectroscopic tool for the identification and structural characterization of molecules in chemistry and biochemistry. The most significant limitation of NMR compared to other spectroscopies is its relatively low sensitivity, which thus often requires long measurement times or large amounts of sample. A way of increasing sensitivity of single scan NMR spectra by several orders of magnitude is through hyperpolarization of nuclear spins. Dynamic nuclear polarization allows hyperpolarization of most spins in small molecules encountered in chemistry and biochemistry. NMR spectra of small amounts of samples from natural source, or from chemical synthesis can readily be acquired. Perhaps more interestingly, the availability of the entire hyperpolarized NMR signal in one single scan allows the measurement of transient processes in real time, if applied together with a stopped-flow technique. Through observation of chemical shift, different reactant and product species can be distinguished, and kinetics and mechanisms, for example in enzyme catalyzed reactions, can be elucidated. Real-time hyperpolarization-enhanced NMR is uniquely amenable to correlating atomic positions not only through space, but also over time between reactant and product species. Such correlations carry mechanistic information about a reaction, and can prove reaction pathways. Applications of this technique are emerging in different areas of chemistry concerned with rapid reactions, including not only enzymatic processes, but also chemical catalysis and protein folding.

  5. Exploring Interactive and Dynamic Simulations Using a Computer Algebra System in an Advanced Placement Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    The article describes the use of Mathematica, a computer algebra system (CAS), in a high school chemistry course. Mathematica was used to generate a graph, where a slider controls the value of parameter(s) in the equation; thus, students can visualize the effect of the parameter(s) on the behavior of the system. Also, Mathematica can show the…

  6. Virtual Laboratory in the Role of Dynamic Visualisation for Better Understanding of Chemistry in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herga, Nataša Rizman; Cagran, Branka; Dinevski, Dejan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding chemistry includes the ability to think on three levels: the macroscopic level, the symbolic level, and the level of particles--sub-microscopic level. Pupils have the most difficulty when trying to understand the sub-microscopic level because it is outside their range of experience. A virtual laboratory enables a simultaneous…

  7. Do High School Chemistry Examinations Inhibit Deeper Level Understanding of Dynamic Reversible Chemical Reactions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeldon, R.; Atkinson, R.; Dawes, A.; Levinson, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Chemistry examinations can favour the deployment of algorithmic procedures like Le Chatelier's Principle (LCP) rather than reasoning using chemical principles. This study investigated the explanatory resources which high school students use to answer equilibrium problems and whether the marks given for examination answers…

  8. Probing Student Teachers' Subject Content Knowledge in Chemistry: Case Studies Using Dynamic Computer Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toplis, Rob

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports case study research into the knowledge and understanding of chemistry for six secondary science student teachers. It combines innovative student-generated computer animations, using "ChemSense" software, with interviews to probe understanding of four common chemical processes used in the secondary school curriculum. Findings…

  9. Combinatorial Methodology for Screening Selectivity in Polymeric Pervaporation Membranes.

    PubMed

    Godbole, Rutvik V; Ma, Lan; Doerfert, Michael D; Williams, Porsche; Hedden, Ronald C

    2015-11-01

    Combinatorial methodology is described for rapid screening of selectivity in polymeric pervaporation membrane materials for alcohol-water separations. The screening technique is demonstrated for ethanol-water separation using a model polyacrylate system. The materials studied are cross-linked random copolymers of a hydrophobic comonomer (n-butyl acrylate, B) and a hydrophilic comonomer (2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, H). A matrix of materials is prepared that has orthogonal variations in two key variables, H:B ratio and cross-linker concentration. For mixtures of ethanol and water, equilibrium selectivities and distribution coefficients are obtained by combining swelling measurements with high-throughput HPLC analysis. Based on the screening results, two copolymers are selected for further study as pervaporation membranes to quantify permeability selectivity and the flux of ethanol. The screening methodology described has good potential to accelerate the search for new membrane materials, as it is adaptable to a broad range of polymer chemistries.

  10. Analysis of temporal variability in land-atmosphere interactions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry during the 2012 PEGASOS field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzeveld, Laurens; Krol, Maarten; Bosveld, Fred; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Rohrer, Franz; Wahner, Andreas; Descari, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    Surface and airborne measurements collected during the 2012 PEGASOS intensive field campaign over the Netherlands and the Po valley, Italy, offer an optimal source of information to further improve our knowledge on the role boundary layer exchange processes in atmospheric chemistry. The use of a zeppelin, sampling close to the surface ( ~50m) up to ~600m altitude and measuring in the early morning, provided detailed measurements of vertical gradients as well as the temporal evolution in chemical composition and relevant meteorological parameters. This allows more detailed analysis of the role of the morning transition and entrainment of residual air masses previously being identified to be essential to daytime chemical processing in the boundary layer. Analysis of these measurements is supported by the use of a number of modelling systems including a selection of 1-D model approaches. In addition, these 1-D models are applied to directly link the observations to the representation of these processes in the 3-D atmospheric chemistry models used to address the overall PEGASOS research goals. In this presentation, results of simulations with an 1-D chemistry-climate model system covering the full measurement period will be presented. Assimilation of meteorological and chemical composition re-analysis data as well as a detailed representation of atmosphere-biosphere and boundary layer exchange processes in this 1-D system allow to assess the role of local scale land-atmosphere interactions versus long-range transport during the PESOSAS field campaigns. In this presentation we will focus on an assessment to what extent daytime boundary layer dynamics and chemistry depends on the short- and more long-term history of the system, e.g., residual layer processing and the role of changes in soil moisture status on land-atmosphere interactions.

  11. Combinatorial Heterogeneous Catalysis-A New Path in an Old Field.

    PubMed

    Senkan, Selim

    2001-01-19

    Combinatorial catalysis is the systematic preparation, processing, and testing of large diversities of chemically and physically different materials libraries in a high-throughput fashion. It also embodies microfabrication, robotics, automation, instrumentation, computational chemistry, and large-scale information management (informatics), and as such carries the promise of a renaissance in catalytic reaction engineering. Significant progress has already been made in demonstrating the speed and economic advantage of combinatorial approaches by the discovery of superior catalytic materials in a matter of hours and days, as opposed to the months and years required using traditional methods. Combinatorial methods can also significantly contribute to our understanding of catalytic function by increasing our chances of discovering totally new and unexpected catalytic materials, and by expediting the recognition of trends and patterns of structure-activity relations, from which new catalytic materials can be designed more efficiently. Combinatorial catalysis undoubtedly will be the new paradigm of catalysis research as the industry faces increasing global competition and pressure for the development of environmentally friendly processes at a time when resources for research are diminishing.

  12. A Synthesis of Fluid Dynamics and Quantum Chemistry for the Design of Nanoelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDougall, Preston J.

    1998-01-01

    In 1959, during a famous lecture entitled "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom", Richard Feynman focused on the startling technical possibilities that would exist at the limit of miniaturization, that being atomically precise devices with dimensions in the nanometer range. A nanometer is both a convenient unit of length for medium to large sized molecules, and the root of the name of the new interdisciplinary field of "nanotechnology". Essentially, "nanoelectronics" denotes the goal of shrinking electronic devices, such as diodes and transistors, as well as integrated circuits of such devices that can perform logical operations, down to dimensions in the range of 100 nanometers. The thirty-year hiatus in the development of nanotechnology can figuratively be seen as a period of waiting for the bottom-up and atomically precise construction skills of synthetic chemistry to meet the top-down reductionist aspirations of device physics. The sub-nanometer domain of nineteenth-century classical chemistry has steadily grown, and state-of-the-art supramolecular chemistry can achieve atomic precision in non-repeating molecular assemblies of the size desired for nanotechnology. For nanoelectronics in particular, a basic understanding of the electron transport properties of molecules must also be developed. Quantum chemistry provides powerful computational methods that can accurately predict the properties of small to medium sized molecules on a desktop workstation, and those of large molecules if one has access to a supercomputer. Of the many properties of a molecule that quantum chemistry routinely predicts, the ability to carry a current is one that had not even been considered until recently. "Currently", there is a controversy over just how to define this key property. Reminiscent of the situation in high-Tc superconductivity, much of the difficulty arises from the different models that are used to simplify the complex electronic structure of real materials. A model

  13. Combinatorial gene regulation by modulation of relative pulse timing

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Sohn, Chang Ho; Dalal, Chiraj K.; Cai, Long; Elowitz, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of individual living cells have revealed that many transcription factors activate in dynamic, and often stochastic, pulses within the same cell. However, it has remained unclear whether cells might modulate the relative timing of these pulses to control gene expression. Here, using quantitative single-cell time-lapse imaging of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the pulsatile transcription factors Msn2 and Mig1 combinatorially regulate their target genes through modulation of their relative pulse timing. The activator Msn2 and repressor Mig1 pulsed in either a temporally overlapping or non-overlapping manner during their transient response to different inputs, with only the non-overlapping dynamics efficiently activating target gene expression. Similarly, under constant environmental conditions, where Msn2 and Mig1 exhibit sporadic pulsing, glucose concentration modulated the temporal overlap between pulses of the two factors. Together, these results reveal a time-based mode of combinatorial gene regulation. Regulation through relative signal timing is common in engineering and neurobiology, and these results suggest that it could also function broadly within the signaling and regulatory systems of the cell. PMID:26466562

  14. Combinatorial Biosynthesis of Polyketides – A Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Fong T.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2012-01-01

    Since their discovery, polyketide synthases have been attractive targets of biosynthetic engineering to make “unnatural” natural products. Although combinatorial biosynthesis has made encouraging advances over the past two decades, the field remains in its infancy. In this enzyme-centric perspective, we discuss the scientific and technological challenges that could accelerate the adoption of combinatorial biosynthesis as a method of choice for the preparation of encoded libraries of bioactive small molecules. Borrowing a page from the protein structure prediction community, we propose a periodic challenge program to vet the most promising methods in the field, and to foster the collective development of useful tools and algorithms. PMID:22342766

  15. Combinatorial biosynthesis of polyketides--a perspective.

    PubMed

    Wong, Fong T; Khosla, Chaitan

    2012-04-01

    Since their discovery, polyketide synthases have been attractive targets of biosynthetic engineering to make 'unnatural' natural products. Although combinatorial biosynthesis has made encouraging advances over the past two decades, the field remains in its infancy. In this enzyme-centric perspective, we discuss the scientific and technological challenges that could accelerate the adoption of combinatorial biosynthesis as a method of choice for the preparation of encoded libraries of bioactive small molecules. Borrowing a page from the protein structure prediction community, we propose a periodic challenge program to vet the most promising methods in the field, and to foster the collective development of useful tools and algorithms.

  16. Extended Lagrangian quantum molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry in hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sanville, Edward J; Bock, Nicolas; Challacombe, William M; Cawkwell, Marc J; Niklasson, Anders M N; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Sheffield, Stephen; Sewell, Thomas D

    2010-01-01

    A set of interatomic potentials for hydrocarbons that are based upon the self-consistent charge transfer tight-binding approximation to density functional theory have been developed and implemented into the quantum molecular dynamics code ''LATTE''. The interatomic potentials exhibit an outstanding level of transferability and have been applied in molecular dynamics simulations of tert-butylacetylene under thermodynamic conditions that correspond to its single-shock Hugoniot. We have achieved precise conservation of the total energy during microcanonical molecular dynamics trajectories under incomplete convergence via the extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism. In good agreement with the results of a series of flyer-plate impact experiments, our SCC-TB molecular dynamics simulations show that tert-butylactylene molecules polymerize at shock pressures around 6.1 GPa.

  17. A New Approach for Proving or Generating Combinatorial Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Luis

    2010-01-01

    A new method for proving, in an immediate way, many combinatorial identities is presented. The method is based on a simple recursive combinatorial formula involving n + 1 arbitrary real parameters. Moreover, this formula enables one not only to prove, but also generate many different combinatorial identities (not being required to know them "a…

  18. Hypergraph-Based Combinatorial Optimization of Matrix-Vector Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Michael Maclean

    2009-01-01

    Combinatorial scientific computing plays an important enabling role in computational science, particularly in high performance scientific computing. In this thesis, we will describe our work on optimizing matrix-vector multiplication using combinatorial techniques. Our research has focused on two different problems in combinatorial scientific…

  19. The Chemistry and Dynamics of the Molecular Outflow in BHR71

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovill, M. S.; Bourke, T. L.; Bergin, E. A.

    2002-12-01

    We present observations of BHR71, in rotational transitions of 12CO, 13CO and C18O and selected additional molecules. BHR71 is an isolated Bok Globule 200 pc from the Sun with an embedded protostellar system, that also contains a highly collimated outflow with unusually active chemistry. Our observations are used to probe the physical and chemical structure of this outflow. We derive the excitation temperature and opacity for several positions in the outflow using the multi-transitional CO data. With this information we estimate the mass to be 1.7 Msun and the excitation temperature to be 15 K in the outflow, slightly elevated above the temperature in the ambient gas (10 K). There is evidence for even higher temperatures towards a position in the blue lobe that is coincident with knots of H2 emission. CO column densities calculated with these temperatures are used to analyze the chemical abundances in the outflow relative to the ambient gas. SiO, CS, HCN, and H2CO all show increased abundances relative to the ambient and molecular ions (HCO+, DCO+, and N+H+) show depletion. These abundances agree qualitatively with those estimated for L1157, the only other outflow that has been extensively studied with regards to the chemistry. However, we find significant disagreements in the magnitude of the abundance changes. BHR71 abundances show agreement with chemical theory. This work was supported in part by NSF grant AST-9731923 to the SAO Summer Intern program.

  20. Machine learning of single molecule free energy surfaces and the impact of chemistry and environment upon structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansbach, Rachael A.; Ferguson, Andrew L.

    2015-03-01

    The conformational states explored by polymers and proteins can be controlled by environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure, and solvent) and molecular chemistry (e.g., molecular weight and side chain identity). We introduce an approach employing the diffusion map nonlinear machine learning technique to recover single molecule free energy landscapes from molecular simulations, quantify changes to the landscape as a function of external conditions and molecular chemistry, and relate these changes to modifications of molecular structure and dynamics. In an application to an n-eicosane chain, we quantify the thermally accessible chain configurations as a function of temperature and solvent conditions. In an application to a family of polyglutamate-derivative homopeptides, we quantify helical stability as a function of side chain length, resolve the critical side chain length for the helix-coil transition, and expose the molecular mechanisms underpinning side chain-mediated helix stability. By quantifying single molecule responses through perturbations to the underlying free energy surface, our approach provides a quantitative bridge between experimentally controllable variables and microscopic molecular behavior, guiding and informing rational engineering of desirable molecular structure and function.

  1. Machine learning of single molecule free energy surfaces and the impact of chemistry and environment upon structure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mansbach, Rachael A; Ferguson, Andrew L

    2015-03-14

    The conformational states explored by polymers and proteins can be controlled by environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure, and solvent) and molecular chemistry (e.g., molecular weight and side chain identity). We introduce an approach employing the diffusion map nonlinear machine learning technique to recover single molecule free energy landscapes from molecular simulations, quantify changes to the landscape as a function of external conditions and molecular chemistry, and relate these changes to modifications of molecular structure and dynamics. In an application to an n-eicosane chain, we quantify the thermally accessible chain configurations as a function of temperature and solvent conditions. In an application to a family of polyglutamate-derivative homopeptides, we quantify helical stability as a function of side chain length, resolve the critical side chain length for the helix-coil transition, and expose the molecular mechanisms underpinning side chain-mediated helix stability. By quantifying single molecule responses through perturbations to the underlying free energy surface, our approach provides a quantitative bridge between experimentally controllable variables and microscopic molecular behavior, guiding and informing rational engineering of desirable molecular structure and function.

  2. Incorporating modeling and simulations in undergraduate biophysical chemistry course to promote understanding of structure-dynamics-function relationships in proteins.

    PubMed

    Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-01-01

    A project-based biophysical chemistry laboratory course, which is offered to the biochemistry and molecular biology majors in their senior year, is described. In this course, the classroom study of the structure-function of biomolecules is integrated with the discovery-guided laboratory study of these molecules using computer modeling and simulations. In particular, modern computational tools are employed to elucidate the relationship between structure, dynamics, and function in proteins. Computer-based laboratory protocols that we introduced in three modules allow students to visualize the secondary, super-secondary, and tertiary structures of proteins, analyze non-covalent interactions in protein-ligand complexes, develop three-dimensional structural models (homology model) for new protein sequences and evaluate their structural qualities, and study proteins' intrinsic dynamics to understand their functions. In the fourth module, students are assigned to an authentic research problem, where they apply their laboratory skills (acquired in modules 1-3) to answer conceptual biophysical questions. Through this process, students gain in-depth understanding of protein dynamics-the missing link between structure and function. Additionally, the requirement of term papers sharpens students' writing and communication skills. Finally, these projects result in new findings that are communicated in peer-reviewed journals.

  3. Molecular dynamics based chemistry models of hypervelocity collisions of O(3P) + SO2(X, 1A1) in DSMC.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Neal; Levin, Deborah A; van Duin, Adri C T

    2013-01-28

    A significant process in the formation of the unique atmosphere of Io, a Jovian moon, is collision-induced dissociation of sulfur dioxide. The direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC) is used to model the rarefied gas dynamics of the Ionian atmosphere. However, there is a lack of reliable reaction and collision cross sections needed for hypervelocity conditions. In this work, collisions between SO(2) and O were studied using molecular dynamics/quasi-classical trajectories methods with the potential of Murrell and a force field for reactive systems (ReaxFF). Dissociation to SO was found to be the significant reacting process, but at higher collision energies, complete atomization of SO(2) was found to frequently occur. In contrast, dissociation to O(2) was found to be mostly negligible and formation of SO(3) occurred only at low impact velocities. The chemistry and collision models developed from the Murrell and ReaxFF methods were implemented in DSMC simulations and compared to the baseline DSMC collision and reaction models. It was found that the selection of both the dissociation reaction cross section and the non-reactive collision model has a significant effect on the counterflow, shock gas dynamic structure. PMID:23387593

  4. Coordination chemistry strategies for dynamic helicates: time-programmable chirality switching with labile and inert metal helicates.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hiroyuki; Tsukube, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    'Chirality switching' is one of the most important chemical processes controlling many biological systems. DNAs and proteins often work as time-programmed functional helices, in which specific external stimuli alter the helical direction and tune the time scale of subsequent events. Although a variety of organic foldamers and their hybrids with natural helices have been developed, we highlight coordination chemistry strategies for development of structurally and functionally defined metal helicates. These metal helicates have characteristic coordination geometries, redox reactivities and spectroscopic/magnetic properties as well as complex chiralities. Several kinds of inert metal helicates maintain rigid helical structures and their stereoisomers are separable by optical resolution techniques, while labile metal helicates offer dynamic inversion of their helical structures via non-covalent interactions with external chemical signals. The latter particularly have dynamically ordered helical structures, which are controlled by the combinations of metal centres and chiral ligands. They further function as time-programmable switches of chirality-derived dynamic rotations, translations, stretching and shape flipping, which are useful applications in nanoscience and related technology.

  5. Comparison of Chain Conformation of Poly(vinyl alcohol) in Solutions and Melts from Quantum Chemistry Based Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Matsuda, Tsunetoshi; Yoon, Do; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Confirmations of 2,4-dihydroxypentane (DHP), a model molecule for poly(vinyl alcohol), have been studied by quantum chemistry (QC) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. QC calculations at the 6-311G MP2 level show the meso tt conformer to be lowest in energy followed by the racemic tg, due to intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxy groups. The Dreiding force field has been modified to reproduce the QC conformer energies for DHP. MD simulations using this force field have been carried out for DHP molecules in the gas phase, melt, and CHCl3 and water solutions. Extensive intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed for the gas phase and CHCl3 solution, but not for the melt or aqueous solution, Such a condensed phase effect due to intermolecular interactions results in a drastic change in chain conformations, in agreement with experiments.

  6. Synthesis of a Two-Dimensional Covalent Organic Monolayer through Dynamic Imine Chemistry at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wenyang; Shao, Feng; Szczerbiński, Jacek; McCaffrey, Ryan; Zenobi, Renato; Jin, Yinghua; Schlüter, A Dieter; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional covalent organic monolayer was synthesized from simple aromatic triamine and dialdehyde building blocks by dynamic imine chemistry at the air/water interface (Langmuir-Blodgett method). The obtained monolayer was characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy, which unambiguously confirmed the formation of a large (millimeter range), unimolecularly thin aromatic polyimine sheet. The imine-linked chemical structure of the obtained monolayer was characterized by tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and the peak assignment was supported by spectra simulated by density functional theory. Given the modular nature and broad substrate scope of imine formation, the work reported herein opens up many new possibilities for the synthesis of customizable 2D polymers and systematic studies of their structure-property relationships.

  7. A combinatorial code for pattern formation in Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yakoby, N.; Bristow, C.A.; Gong, D.; Schafer, X.; Lembong, J.; Zartman, J.J.; Halfon, M.S.; Schüpbach, T.; Shvartsman, S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Two-dimensional patterning of the follicular epithelium in Drosophila oogenesis is required for the formation of three-dimensional eggshell structures. Our analysis of a large number of published gene expression patterns in the follicle cells suggested that they follow a simple combinatorial code, based on six spatial building blocks and the operations of union, difference, intersection, and addition. The building blocks are related to the distribution of the inductive signals, provided by the highly conserved EGFR and DPP pathways. We demonstrated the validity of the code by testing it against a set of newly identified expression patterns, obtained in a large-scale transcriptional profiling experiment. Using the proposed code, we distinguished 36 distinct patterns for 81 genes expressed in the follicular epithelium and characterized their joint dynamics over four stages of oogenesis. This work provides the first systematic analysis of the diversity and dynamics of two-dimensional gene expression patterns in a developing tissue. PMID:19000837

  8. More Combinatorial Proofs via Flagpole Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeTemple, Duane; Reynolds, H. David, II

    2006-01-01

    Combinatorial identities are proved by counting the number of arrangements of a flagpole and guy wires on a row of blocks that satisfy a set of conditions. An identity is proved by first deriving and then equating two expressions that each count the number of permissible arrangements. Identities for binomial coefficients and recursion relations…

  9. Students' Verification Strategies for Combinatorial Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashiach Eizenberg, Michal; Zaslavsky, Orit

    2004-01-01

    We focus on a major difficulty in solving combinatorial problems, namely, on the verification of a solution. Our study aimed at identifying undergraduate students' tendencies to verify their solutions, and the verification strategies that they employ when solving these problems. In addition, an attempt was made to evaluate the level of efficiency…

  10. Quantum Resonance Approach to Combinatorial Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that quantum resonance can be used for combinatorial optimization. The advantage of the approach is in independence of the computing time upon the dimensionality of the problem. As an example, the solution to a constraint satisfaction problem of exponential complexity is demonstrated.

  11. A Model of Students' Combinatorial Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Elise

    2013-01-01

    Combinatorial topics have become increasingly prevalent in K-12 and undergraduate curricula, yet research on combinatorics education indicates that students face difficulties when solving counting problems. The research community has not yet addressed students' ways of thinking at a level that facilitates deeper understanding of how students…

  12. Scanning SQUID microscopy of local superconductivity in inhomogeneous combinatorial ceramics.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Mitra; Stir, Manuela; Kirtley, John R; Hulliger, Jürg

    2014-11-24

    Although combinatorial solid-state chemistry promises to be an efficient way to search for new superconducting compounds, the problem of determining which compositions are strongly diamagnetic in a mixed-phase sample is challenging. By means of reactions in a system of randomly mixed starting components (Ca, Sr, Ba, La, Y, Pb, Bi, Tl, and Cu oxides), samples were produced that showed an onset of diamagnetic response above 115 K in bulk measurements. Imaging of this diamagnetic response in ceramic samples by scanning SQUID microscopy (SSM) revealed local superconducting areas with sizes down to as small as the spatial resolution of a few micrometers. In addition, locally formed superconducting matter was extracted from mixed-phase samples by magnetic separation. The analysis of single grains (d<80 μm) by X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, and bulk SQUID measurements allowed Tl2Ca3Ba2Cu4O12, TlCaBaSrCu2O(7-δ), BaPb(0.5)Bi(0.25)Tl(0.25)O(3-δ), TlBa2Ca2Cu3O9, Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8, and YBa2Cu3O7 phases to be identified. SSM, in combination with other diagnostic techniques, is therefore shown to be a useful instrument to analyze inhomogeneous reaction products in the solid-state chemistry of materials showing magnetic properties.

  13. Some aspects of metallic ion chemistry and dynamics in the mesosphere and thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the formation of sporadic layers of metallic ion and the dumping of these ions into the upper mesosphere is discussed in terms of the tidal wind, classical (i.e., windshear) and other more complex, perhaps highly nonlinear layer formation mechanisms, and a possible circulation mechanism for these ions. Optical, incoherent scatter radar, rocket, and satellite derived evidence for various layer formation mechanisms and for the metallic ion circulation system is reviewed. The results of simple one dimensional numerical model calculations of sporadic E and intermediate layer formation are presented along with suggestions for more advanced models of intense or blanketing sporadic E. The flux of metallic ions dumped by the tidal wind system into the mesosphere is estimated and compared with estimates of total particle flux of meteoric origin. Possible effects of the metallic ion flux and of meteoric dust on D region ion chemistry are discussed.

  14. The Interaction Between Dynamics and Chemistry of Ozone in the Set-up Phase of the Northern Hemisphere Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Bevilacqua, R.; Margitan, J. J.; Douglass, A. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Hoppel, K.; Sen, B.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The morphology and evolution of the stratospheric ozone (O3) distribution at high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) are examined for the late summer and fall seasons of 1999. This time period sets the O3 initial condition for the SOLVE/THESEO field mission performed during winter 1999-2000. In situ and satellite data are used along with a three-dimensional model of chemistry and transport (CTM) to determine the key processes that control the distribution of O3 in the lower-to-middle stratosphere. O3 in the vortex at the beginning of the winter season is found to be nearly constant from 500 to above 800 K with a value at 3 ppmv +/- approx. 10%. Values outside the vortex are up to a factor of 2 higher and increase significantly with potential temperature. The seasonal time series of data from POAM shows that relatively low O3 mixing ratios, which characterize the vortex in late fall, are already present at high latitudes at the end of summer before the vortex circulation sets up. Analysis of the CTM output shows that the minimum O3 and increase in variance in late summer are the result of: 1) stirring of polar concentric O3 gradients by nascent wave-driven transport, and 2) an acceleration of net photochemical loss with decreasing solar illumination. The segregation of low O3 mixing ratios into the vortex as the circulation strengthens through the fall suggests a possible feedback role between O3 chemistry and the vortex formation dynamics. Trajectory calculations from O3 sample points early in the fall, however, show only a weak correlation between initial O3 mixing ratio and potential vorticity later in the season consistent with order-of-magnitude calculations for the relative importance of O3 in the fall radiative balance at high latitudes. The possible connection between O3 chemistry and the dynamics of vortex formation does suggest that these feedbacks and sensitivities need to be better understood in order to make confident predictions of the recovery

  15. Do high school chemistry examinations inhibit deeper level understanding of dynamic reversible chemical reactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeldon, R.; Atkinson, R.; Dawes, A.; Levinson, R.

    2012-07-01

    Background and purpose : Chemistry examinations can favour the deployment of algorithmic procedures like Le Chatelier's Principle (LCP) rather than reasoning using chemical principles. This study investigated the explanatory resources which high school students use to answer equilibrium problems and whether the marks given for examination answers require students to use approaches beyond direct application of LCP. Sample : The questionnaire was administered to 162 students studying their first year of advanced chemistry (age 16/17) in three high achieving London high schools. Design and methods : The students' explanations of reversible chemical systems were inductively coded to identify the explanatory approaches used and interviews with 13 students were used to check for consistency. AS level examination questions on reversible reactions were analysed to identify the types of explanations sought and the students' performance in these examinations was compared to questionnaire answers. Results : 19% of students used a holistic explanatory approach: when the rates of forward and reverse reactions are correctly described, recognising their simultaneous and mutually dependent nature. 36% used a mirrored reactions approach when the connected nature of the forward and reverse reactions is identified, but not their mutual dependency. 42% failed to recognize the interdependence of forward and reverse reactions (reactions not connected approach). Only 4% of marks for AS examination questions on reversible chemical systems asked for responses which went beyond either direct application of LCP or recall of equilibrium knowledge. 37% of students attained an A grade in their AS national examinations. Conclusions : Examinations favour the application of LCP making it possible to obtain the highest grade with little understanding of reversible chemical systems beyond a direct application of this algorithm. Therefore students' understanding may be attenuated so that they are

  16. CCAT: Combinatorial Code Analysis Tool for transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peng; Singh, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial interplay among transcription factors (TFs) is an important mechanism by which transcriptional regulatory specificity is achieved. However, despite the increasing number of TFs for which either binding specificities or genome-wide occupancy data are known, knowledge about cooperativity between TFs remains limited. To address this, we developed a computational framework for predicting genome-wide co-binding between TFs (CCAT, Combinatorial Code Analysis Tool), and applied it to Drosophila melanogaster to uncover cooperativity among TFs during embryo development. Using publicly available TF binding specificity data and DNaseI chromatin accessibility data, we first predicted genome-wide binding sites for 324 TFs across five stages of D. melanogaster embryo development. We then applied CCAT in each of these developmental stages, and identified from 19 to 58 pairs of TFs in each stage whose predicted binding sites are significantly co-localized. We found that nearby binding sites for pairs of TFs predicted to cooperate were enriched in regions bound in relevant ChIP experiments, and were more evolutionarily conserved than other pairs. Further, we found that TFs tend to be co-localized with other TFs in a dynamic manner across developmental stages. All generated data as well as source code for our front-to-end pipeline are available at http://cat.princeton.edu. PMID:24366875

  17. Carbonate Chemistry Dynamics in an Area of Active Gas Seepage: the Hudson Canyon, US Atlantic Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Tigreros Kodovska, F.; Kessler, J. D.; Leonte, M.; Chepigin, A.; Kellermann, M. Y.; Arrington, E. C.; Valentine, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The fate of oceanic methane and its impact on the global climate has been of particular interest to the global community. The potential for vast amounts of methane to be emitted from the seafloor into the atmosphere due to gas hydrate decomposition has been under scientific evaluation. However, despite the great extent of these geological reservoirs, much of the methane released from the seafloor in deep ocean environments does not reach the atmosphere. Once dissolved in ocean water, the emitted methane can be microbially converted to either carbon dioxide or assimilated to biomass. Here, we will present results from a research cruise to the Hudson Canyon, northern US Atlantic Margin, where we investigated changes in ocean water carbonate chemistry induced by the oxidation of methane released from gas seeps. We will be presenting high precision pH data as well as methane and DIC concentrations, natural stable isotopes, and methane oxidation rates collected inside and adjacent to the Hudson Canyon in the summer of 2014.

  18. FOREWORD: Focus on Combinatorial Materials Science Focus on Combinatorial Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikyo, Toyohiro

    2011-10-01

    About 15 years have passed since the introduction of modern combinatorial synthesis and high-throughput techniques for the development of novel inorganic materials; however, similar methods existed before. The most famous was reported in 1970 by Hanak who prepared composition-spread films of metal alloys by sputtering mixed-material targets. Although this method was innovative, it was rarely used because of the large amount of data to be processed. This problem is solved in the modern combinatorial material research, which is strongly related to computer data analysis and robotics. This field is still at the developing stage and may be enriched by new methods. Nevertheless, given the progress in measurement equipment and procedures, we believe the combinatorial approach will become a major and standard tool of materials screening and development. The first article of this journal, published in 2000, was titled 'Combinatorial solid state materials science and technology', and this focus issue aims to reintroduce this topic to the Science and Technology of Advanced Materials audience. It covers recent progress in combinatorial materials research describing new results in catalysis, phosphors, polymers and metal alloys for shape memory materials. Sophisticated high-throughput characterization schemes and innovative synthesis tools are also presented, such as spray deposition using nanoparticles or ion plating. On a technical note, data handling systems are introduced to familiarize researchers with the combinatorial methodology. We hope that through this focus issue a wide audience of materials scientists can learn about recent and future trends in combinatorial materials science and high-throughput experimentation.

  19. ULTRAFAST CHEMISTRY: Using Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy for Interrogation of Structural Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nibbering, Erik T. J.; Fidder, Henk; Pines, Ehud

    2005-05-01

    Time-resolved infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy elucidates molecular structure evolution during ultrafast chemical reactions. Following vibrational marker modes in real time provides direct insight into the structural dynamics, as is evidenced in studies on intramolecular hydrogen transfer, bimolecular proton transfer, electron transfer, hydrogen bonding during solvation dynamics, bond fission in organometallic compounds and heme proteins, cis-trans isomerization in retinal proteins, and transformations in photochromic switch pairs. Femtosecond IR spectroscopy monitors the site-specific interactions in hydrogen bonds. Conversion between excited electronic states can be followed for intramolecular electron transfer by inspection of the fingerprint IR- or Raman-active vibrations in conjunction with quantum chemical calculations. Excess internal vibrational energy, generated either by optical excitation or by internal conversion from the electronic excited state to the ground state, is observable through transient frequency shifts of IR-active vibrations and through nonequilibrium populations as deduced by Raman resonances.

  20. Nitrogen Dynamics in a Northeast Forest Ecosystem - Spatial and Temporal Patterns in Stream Water and Soil Solution Chemistry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittman, J. A.; Driscoll, C. T.

    2005-05-01

    Distinct patterns in soil solution and stream water chemistry are manifested across landscape position at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. The objective of this study was to examine the spatial and temporal patterns in the concentrations and fluxes of nitrogen (N) species and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in soil solutions and stream water along an elevational gradient (525-775m) at the HBEF. A 12 year record (1992-2003) of measurements of soil water and stream chemistry in Watershed 6 (W6), the biogeochemical reference watershed at the HBEF, were used in this analysis. Solutions were largely comprised of NO3- and DON, as NH4+ concentrations were generally low particularly in mineral soil solutions and stream water. Dissolved organic N and DOC concentrations were elevated in the high elevation spruce-fir-white birch portion of the watershed, while NO3- was the dominate N species in the lower elevation hardwood portion of the watershed. Surprisingly, seasonal patterns of NO3- in soil leachate were not as strong as one might expect given the importance and availability of NO3- as a plant and microbial nutrient. However, distinct seasonal patterns were evident for NO3- in stream water, suggesting the importance of hydrological flow paths and/or in-stream processes in regulating watershed NO3- loss. Understanding patterns of N and DOC dynamics in stream and soil solution is critical for evaluating the response of forest ecosystems to changes in the deposition of anthropogenic N and the potential for nutrient retention within terrestrial ecosystems.

  1. Dynamic Covalent Chemistry-based Sensing: Pyrenyl Derivatives of Phenylboronic Acid for Saccharide and Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xingmao; Fan, Jiayun; Wang, Min; Wang, Zhaolong; Peng, Haonan; He, Gang; Fang, Yu

    2016-08-01

    We synthesized two specially designed pyrenyl (Py) derivatives of phenylboronic acid, PSNB1 and PSNB2, of which PSNB2 self-assemble to form dynamic aggregate in methanol-water mixture (1:99, v/v) via intermolecular H-bonding and pi-pi stacking. Interestingly, the dynamic aggregate shows smart response to presence of fructose (F) as evidenced by fluorescence color change from green to blue. More interestingly, the fluorescence emission of the resulted PSNB2-F changes from blue to green with the addition of formaldehyde (FA). The reason behind is formation of a PSNB2-F dimer via FA cross-linking. Based upon the reactions as found, sensitive and fast sensing of F and FA in water was realized, of which the experimental DLs could be significantly lower than 10 μM for both analytes, and the response times are less than 1 min. It is believed that not only the materials as created may have the potential to find real-life applications but also the strategy as developed can be adopted to develop other dynamic materials.

  2. Dynamic Covalent Chemistry-based Sensing: Pyrenyl Derivatives of Phenylboronic Acid for Saccharide and Formaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xingmao; Fan, Jiayun; Wang, Min; Wang, Zhaolong; Peng, Haonan; He, Gang; Fang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    We synthesized two specially designed pyrenyl (Py) derivatives of phenylboronic acid, PSNB1 and PSNB2, of which PSNB2 self-assemble to form dynamic aggregate in methanol-water mixture (1:99, v/v) via intermolecular H-bonding and pi-pi stacking. Interestingly, the dynamic aggregate shows smart response to presence of fructose (F) as evidenced by fluorescence color change from green to blue. More interestingly, the fluorescence emission of the resulted PSNB2-F changes from blue to green with the addition of formaldehyde (FA). The reason behind is formation of a PSNB2-F dimer via FA cross-linking. Based upon the reactions as found, sensitive and fast sensing of F and FA in water was realized, of which the experimental DLs could be significantly lower than 10 μM for both analytes, and the response times are less than 1 min. It is believed that not only the materials as created may have the potential to find real-life applications but also the strategy as developed can be adopted to develop other dynamic materials. PMID:27498703

  3. Dynamic Covalent Chemistry-based Sensing: Pyrenyl Derivatives of Phenylboronic Acid for Saccharide and Formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xingmao; Fan, Jiayun; Wang, Min; Wang, Zhaolong; Peng, Haonan; He, Gang; Fang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    We synthesized two specially designed pyrenyl (Py) derivatives of phenylboronic acid, PSNB1 and PSNB2, of which PSNB2 self-assemble to form dynamic aggregate in methanol-water mixture (1:99, v/v) via intermolecular H-bonding and pi-pi stacking. Interestingly, the dynamic aggregate shows smart response to presence of fructose (F) as evidenced by fluorescence color change from green to blue. More interestingly, the fluorescence emission of the resulted PSNB2-F changes from blue to green with the addition of formaldehyde (FA). The reason behind is formation of a PSNB2-F dimer via FA cross-linking. Based upon the reactions as found, sensitive and fast sensing of F and FA in water was realized, of which the experimental DLs could be significantly lower than 10 μM for both analytes, and the response times are less than 1 min. It is believed that not only the materials as created may have the potential to find real-life applications but also the strategy as developed can be adopted to develop other dynamic materials. PMID:27498703

  4. Ultrafast spectroscopy of prototypes of electronically nonadiabatic dynamics in solution chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Carlos

    Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy of the equilibrated hydrated electron has been recorded with 35-femtosecond time resolution, revealing unprecedented transient features on the 30-80 fs time scales, which exhibit a solvent deuterium isotope effect (τ(D2O)/τ(H2O)~1.4). These previously unresolved dynamics have been assigned to inertial solvation dynamics of the photoexcited excess electron. The results support the importance of librational water motion in the relaxation dynamics of the hydrated electron. High excitation-pulse-intensity measurements reveal evidence of a two-photon channel involving ejection of the hydrated electron from its initial site to a different site in the solvent. Further pump-probe spectroscopy of the equilibrated solvated electron in alcohols has been studied with ~300 fs time resolution. At low pump power the observed dynamics are assigned to s→p excitation and subsequent relaxation of a localized solvated electron. In contrast, at high pump power, two-photon absorption apparently produces mobile 'conduction band' electrons, which are subsequently trapped and relax at a remote site from the initial equilibrated electron as observed for the hydrated electron. The two-photon excitation channel is also observed to induce an ultrafast proton-transfer reaction from the solvent to the excess electron. The metal-metal, charge-transfer (MMCT) absorption bands of the mixed-valence compounds (NH3)5RuIIINCRuII(CN)5/sp- (RuRu) and (NH3)5RuIIINCFeII(CN)5/sp- (RuFe) are studied with sufficient time resolution to measure the back-electron transfer (b-ET) time. In RuRu, the b-ET occurs in 85 ± 10 fs in H2O and increases to 122 ± 20 fs in D2O. Similar b-ET rates in these solvents are also observed for RuFe. The deuterium isotope effect is shown to originate from the solvent demonstrating that hydrogenic solvent motions are directly coupled to the electron transfer event. The pump-probe spectroscopy on the MMCT band also provides information on the

  5. High throughput combinatorial screening of semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Samuel S.

    2011-11-01

    This article provides an overview of an advanced combinatorial material discovery platform developed recently for screening semiconductor materials with properties that may have applications ranging from radiation detectors to solar cells. Semiconductor thin-film libraries, each consisting of 256 materials of different composition arranged into a 16×16 matrix, were fabricated using laser-assisted evaporation process along with a combinatorial mechanism to achieve variations. The composition and microstructure of individual materials on each thin-film library were characterized with an integrated scanning micro-beam x-ray fluorescence and diffraction system, while the band gaps were determined by scanning optical reflection and transmission of the libraries. An ultrafast ultraviolet photon-induced charge probe was devised to measure the mobility and lifetime of individual thin-film materials on semiconductor libraries. Selected results on the discovery of semiconductors with desired band gaps and transport properties are illustrated.

  6. Assessment of structural diversity in combinatorial synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fergus, Suzanne; Bender, Andreas; Spring, David R

    2005-06-01

    This article covers the combinatorial synthesis of small molecules with maximal structural diversity to generate a collection of pure compounds that are attractive for lead generation in a phenotypic, high-throughput screening approach. Nature synthesises diverse small molecules, but there are disadvantages with using natural product sources. The efficient chemical synthesis of structural diversity (and complexity) is the aim of diversity-oriented synthesis, and recent progress is reviewed. Specific highlights include a discussion of strategies to obtain structural diversity and an analysis of molecular descriptors used to classify compounds. The assessment of how successful one synthesis is versus another is subjective, therefore we test-drive software to assess structural diversity in combinatorial synthesis, which is freely available via a web interface.

  7. Combinatorial biosynthesis--potential and problems.

    PubMed

    Floss, Heinz G

    2006-06-25

    Because of their ecological functions, natural products have been optimized in evolution for interaction with biological systems and receptors. However, they have not necessarily been optimized for other desirable drug properties and thus can often be improved by structural modification. Using examples from the literature, this paper reviews the opportunities for increasing structural diversity among natural products by combinatorial biosynthesis, i.e., the genetic manipulation of biosynthetic pathways. It distinguishes between combinatorial biosynthesis in a narrower sense to generate libraries of modified structures, and metabolic engineering for the targeted formation of specific structural analogs. Some of the problems and limitations encountered with these approaches are also discussed. Work from the author's laboratory on ansamycin antibiotics is presented which illustrates some of the opportunities and limitations.

  8. Exploiting Quantum Resonance to Solve Combinatorial Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail; Fijany, Amir

    2006-01-01

    Quantum resonance would be exploited in a proposed quantum-computing approach to the solution of combinatorial optimization problems. In quantum computing in general, one takes advantage of the fact that an algorithm cannot be decoupled from the physical effects available to implement it. Prior approaches to quantum computing have involved exploitation of only a subset of known quantum physical effects, notably including parallelism and entanglement, but not including resonance. In the proposed approach, one would utilize the combinatorial properties of tensor-product decomposability of unitary evolution of many-particle quantum systems for physically simulating solutions to NP-complete problems (a class of problems that are intractable with respect to classical methods of computation). In this approach, reinforcement and selection of a desired solution would be executed by means of quantum resonance. Classes of NP-complete problems that are important in practice and could be solved by the proposed approach include planning, scheduling, search, and optimal design.

  9. Chemistry and biochemistry of 13C hyperpolarized magnetic resonance using dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Keshari, Kayvan R.; Wilson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of transient chemical phenomena by conventional NMR has proved elusive, particularly for non-1H nuclei. For 13C, hyperpolarization using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique has emerged as a powerful means to improve SNR. The recent development of rapid dissolution DNP methods has facilitated previously impossible in vitro and in vivo study of small molecules. This review presents the basics of the DNP technique, identification of appropriate DNP substrates, and approaches to increase hyperpolarized signal lifetimes. Also addressed are the biochemical events to which DNP-NMR has been applied, with descriptions of several probes that have met with in vivo success. PMID:24363044

  10. The Combinatorial Trace Method in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Mike; Martinez, Natalie C.

    2013-01-01

    On any finite graph, the number of closed walks of length k is equal to the sum of the kth powers of the eigenvalues of any adjacency matrix. This simple observation is the basis for the combinatorial trace method, wherein we attempt to count (or bound) the number of closed walks of a given length so as to obtain information about the graph's…

  11. Combinatorial and algorithm aspects of hyperbolic polynomials

    SciTech Connect

    Gurvits, Leonid I.

    2004-01-01

    Univariate polynomials with real roots appear quite often in modern combinatorics, especially in the context of integer polytopes. We discovered in this paper rather unexpected and very likely far-reaching connections between hyperbolic polynomials and many classical combinatorial and algorithmic problems. There are still several open problems. The most interesting is a hyperbolic generalization of the van der Waerden conjecture for permanents of doubly stochastic matrices.

  12. Chemistry and Dynamics in the Taurus Molecular Cloud-1(TMC-1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yunhee; Lee, J.; Bourke, T. L.; Evans, N. J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of a low-mass star-forming region, Taurus Molecular Cloud-1 (TMC-1), with the Spitzer data combined with the 1.2 mm MAMBO data. The MAMBO map, which presents the best the column density distribution, is the first map to cover the whole TMC-1 ridge in dust continuum. In addition, CS (J=2-1), N2H+ (J=1-0), C17O (J=2-1), C18O (J=2-1) are observed at the FCRAO and the SRAO. We also carried out chemical modeling to investigate relative molecular distribution in the TMC-1 ridge. Based on Spitzer observations, there is no young stellar object along the TMC-1 ridge while five Class II and one Class I objects were identified outside the ridge. The comparison between the column densities calculated from the dust continuum and the C17O 2-1 line emission shows that CO is depleted much more significantly at the ammonia peak than at the cyanopolyyne peak while the column densities calculated from the dust continuum are similar at the two peaks. N2H+ is not depleted at the both peaks. According to our chemical calculation, this differential chemical distribution at the two peaks can be explained by different dynamical timescales at the same density, i.e., by different dynamical processes.

  13. Adaptive Random Testing with Combinatorial Input Domain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yansheng

    2014-01-01

    Random testing (RT) is a fundamental testing technique to assess software reliability, by simply selecting test cases in a random manner from the whole input domain. As an enhancement of RT, adaptive random testing (ART) has better failure-detection capability and has been widely applied in different scenarios, such as numerical programs, some object-oriented programs, and mobile applications. However, not much work has been done on the effectiveness of ART for the programs with combinatorial input domain (i.e., the set of categorical data). To extend the ideas to the testing for combinatorial input domain, we have adopted different similarity measures that are widely used for categorical data in data mining and have proposed two similarity measures based on interaction coverage. Then, we propose a new version named ART-CID as an extension of ART in combinatorial input domain, which selects an element from categorical data as the next test case such that it has the lowest similarity against already generated test cases. Experimental results show that ART-CID generally performs better than RT, with respect to different evaluation metrics. PMID:24772036

  14. Plume and wake dynamics, mixing, and chemistry behind an HSCT aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miake-Lye, R. C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Brown, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The chemical evolution and mixing and vortical motion of a High Speed Civil Transport's engine exhausts must be analyzed in order to track the gas and its speciation as emissions are mixed to atmospheric scales. Attention is presently given to an analytic model of the wake dynamical processes which accounts for the roll-up of the trailing vorticity, its breakup due to the Crow instability, and the subsequent evolution and motion of the reconnected vorticity. The concentrated vorticity is noted to wrap up the buoyant exhaust and suppress its continued mixing and dilution. The species tracked encompass those which could be heterogeneously reactive on the surfaces of the condensed ice particles, and those capable of reacting with exhaust soot particle surfaces to form active contrail and/or cloud condensation nuclei.

  15. Spatiotemporal dynamics of spring and stream water chemistry in a high-mountain area.

    PubMed

    Zelazny, Mirosław; Astel, Aleksander; Wolanin, Anna; Małek, Stanisław

    2011-05-01

    The present study deals with the application of the self-organizing map (SOM) technique in the exploration of spatiotemporal dynamics of spring and stream water samples collected in the Chochołowski Stream Basin located in the Tatra Mountains (Poland). The SOM-based classification helped to uncover relationships between physical and chemical parameters of water samples and factors determining the quality of water in the studied high-mountain area. In the upper part of the Chochołowski Stream Basin, located on the top of the crystalline core of the Tatras, concentrations of the majority of ionic substances were the lowest due to limited leaching. Significantly higher concentration of ionic substances was detected in spring and stream samples draining sedimentary rocks. The influence of karst-type springs on the quality of stream water was also demonstrated. PMID:21168942

  16. Spatiotemporal dynamics of spring and stream water chemistry in a high-mountain area.

    PubMed

    Zelazny, Mirosław; Astel, Aleksander; Wolanin, Anna; Małek, Stanisław

    2011-05-01

    The present study deals with the application of the self-organizing map (SOM) technique in the exploration of spatiotemporal dynamics of spring and stream water samples collected in the Chochołowski Stream Basin located in the Tatra Mountains (Poland). The SOM-based classification helped to uncover relationships between physical and chemical parameters of water samples and factors determining the quality of water in the studied high-mountain area. In the upper part of the Chochołowski Stream Basin, located on the top of the crystalline core of the Tatras, concentrations of the majority of ionic substances were the lowest due to limited leaching. Significantly higher concentration of ionic substances was detected in spring and stream samples draining sedimentary rocks. The influence of karst-type springs on the quality of stream water was also demonstrated.

  17. The chemical mechanism of the limonene ozonolysis reaction in the SOA formation: A quantum chemistry and direct dynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tingli; Wang, Yudong; Zhang, Chenxi; Sun, Xiaomin; Wang, Wenxing

    2011-03-01

    The ozonolysis of limonene is one of the most important processes for secondary organic aerosol formation and a detailed understanding of the atmospheric chemistry of d-limonene is highly urgent. In this paper, the reaction of d-limonene with O 3 has been studied using high level molecular orbital theory. A detailed description of the possible ozonolysis mechanism in the presence of H 2O or NO is provided. The main products obtained are keto-limonene, limononic acid and 7OH-lim, which are low vapor pressure compounds. On the basis of the quantum chemical information, the direct dynamic calculation is performed and the rate constants are calculated over a temperature range of 200˜800 K using the transition state theory and canonical varitional transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling effect. The four-parameter formula of rate constants with the temperature is fitted and the lifetimes of the reaction species in the troposphere are estimated according to the rate constants, which can provide helpful information to the model simulation study.

  18. Molecular modeling of the structural and dynamical properties of secondary plant cell walls: influence of lignin chemistry.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Landry; Mazeau, Karim

    2012-04-12

    A modeling of lignified secondary plant cell walls adapted to grass has been achieved, using molecular dynamics for time up to 180 ns, applied to systems composed of cellulose, xylan, water, and lignin. The overall model, which was 70 nm thick for a volume of 74.4 nm(3), consisted of two crystalline cellulose layers, each being two molecules deep, separated by an interlayer space where the three other components were located. Whereas the cellulose and xylan chemistry was fixed, 18 lignin systems were considered that varied not only in guaiacyl, syringyl, and p-hydroxyphenyl composition, but also in chain length, linkage types, and the presence or absence of coumaryl units. The stabilized models showed a well-defined interface between xylan and cellulose, but some interpenetration of xylan into the lignin part of the models. A survey of the 18 models showed that their lignin component was amorphous and that their density profile was very variable and essentially model dependent. This variability was also reflected in the co-orientation of the lignin phenyl rings with respect to the cellulose surfaces, some systems showing some orientation whereas others did not. The pattern of void distribution accessible to water varied from one system to the next, but the overall void volume was systematically established at around 3%, accepting around 200 water molecules. The estimated mobility of the water molecules interacting with lignin was 1.5 times greater than that interacting with carbohydrates.

  19. Code interoperability and standard data formats in quantum chemistry and quantum dynamics: The Q5/D5Cost data model.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Elda; Evangelisti, Stefano; Laganà, Antonio; Monari, Antonio; Rampino, Sergio; Verdicchio, Marco; Baldridge, Kim K; Bendazzoli, Gian Luigi; Borini, Stefano; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Angeli, Celestino; Kallay, Peter; Lüthi, Hans P; Ruud, Kenneth; Sanchez-Marin, José; Scemama, Anthony; Szalay, Peter G; Tajti, Attila

    2014-03-30

    Code interoperability and the search for domain-specific standard data formats represent critical issues in many areas of computational science. The advent of novel computing infrastructures such as computational grids and clouds make these issues even more urgent. The design and implementation of a common data format for quantum chemistry (QC) and quantum dynamics (QD) computer programs is discussed with reference to the research performed in the course of two Collaboration in Science and Technology Actions. The specific data models adopted, Q5Cost and D5Cost, are shown to work for a number of interoperating codes, regardless of the type and amount of information (small or large datasets) to be exchanged. The codes are either interfaced directly, or transfer data by means of wrappers; both types of data exchange are supported by the Q5/D5Cost library. Further, the exchange of data between QC and QD codes is addressed. As a proof of concept, the H + H2 reaction is discussed. The proposed scheme is shown to provide an excellent basis for cooperative code development, even across domain boundaries. Moreover, the scheme presented is found to be useful also as a production tool in the grid distributed computing environment.

  20. Flow path functioning identified from fundamental dynamics in sub-hourly, non-conservative stream chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, N. A.; Jones, T.

    2013-12-01

    Within upland streams, concentration & load of many solutes (e.g. H+, DOC) varies very rapidly through storm periods. The shape & features of concentration or load chemographs are an expression of the fundamental dynamics in hydrologic & biogeochemical delivery mechanisms integrated at basin scales. If storm-period chemographs are grossly under-sampled so that time-series does not represent the true chemograph shape, then numerical descriptors of this shape or of the dynamic relationship between controlling variables (e.g. rainfall) & the chemograph will be distorted from true values (Littlewood 1992 IH Rpt 117; Littlewood & Croke 2013 Hydrol Res). Distortions of these dynamic response characteristics or DRCs (model parameters) can then lead to misinterpretation of hydrologic & biogeochemical processes via errors in relative contributions of identified flow paths, rates of propagation along these paths etc. A transfer function (TF) approach can be used to illustrate minimum sampling intensities needed to avoid these errors. Given 15-min observations, CAPTAIN-RIV identification routines for continuous-time TFs give Time Constants (TCs) of only 2 hrs for fast components of responses of rainfall to H+ load in Llyn Brianne streams (Chappell et al 2013 BHS). Given that Time Series Analysis dictates a sampling intensity five times finer than the TC, sampling at 24 min intervals or shorter was needed & achieved in this example. Considerable work is now focused on modeling of chemically-conservative river constituents (namely chloride & water isotopes) to help determine differences in residence times, storage & other DRCs of rainfall-streamflow & associated solute paths (Hrachowitz et al 2013 Hydrol Earth Syst Sci). Comparatively little modeling has focused on high frequency (i.e. sub-hourly), non-conservative river solutes (e.g. H+, DOC). Modeling of these basin-integrated variables should be considered complementary to that for conservative solutes, given: (1) their

  1. Numerical modeling of chemistry and gas dynamics during shock-induced ethylene combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, L.J.; Milne, A.M.; Murray, B.A.

    1996-02-01

    The authors present the results of a numerical study of shock-induced ethylene combustion. They compare the accuracy and efficiency of a variety of methods when applied to this combustion problem. For a full kinetics scheme they consider the speed of a range of alternative ordinary differential equation solvers. They find that for the coupled ODE-hydrodynamic problem an extrapolated linearly implicit Euler method is the fastest of the methods used, but that otherwise a fourth-order Rosenbrock scheme is the fastest solution method. The identity of the fastest method changes because of the start up conditions having to be recalculated at the start of every step in a coupled ODE-hydrodynamics module. The authors then apply a detailed reduction strategy to a chemical kinetics reaction data set and find that it cannot be reduced by many reactions as it is already a fairly compact set. They then introduce an induction parameter model based on the two parameter model of Taki and Fujiwara and the work of Oran et al. They derive functions that model the induction times and the energy release rates predicted using the chemical kinetics data set. They show some results of coupled gas dynamics and reactive flow calculations using these models and compare with experiment. They find that the induction parameter model reproduces the experimental results well while using less than 5% of the computational time of the chemical kinetics model.

  2. Adsorption of Hydrogen Molecules on Carbon Nanotubes Using Quantum Chemistry and Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Faginas-Lago, N; Yeni, D; Huarte, F; Wang, Y; Alcamí, M; Martin, F

    2016-08-18

    Physisorption and storage of molecular hydrogen on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) of various diameters and chiralities are studied by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a force field validated using DFT-D2 and CCSD(T) calculations. A nonrigid carbon nanotube model is implemented with stretching (C-C) and valence angle potentials (C-C-C) formulated as Morse and Harmonic cosine potentials, respectively. Our results evidence that the standard Lennard-Jones potential fails to describe the H2-H2 binding energies. Therefore, our simulations make use of a potential that contains two-body term with parameters obtained from fitting CCSD(T)/CBS binding energies. From our MD simulations, we have analyzed the interaction energies, radial distribution functions, gravimetric densities (% wt), and the distances of the adsorbed H2 layers to the three zigzag type of nanotubes (5,0), (10,0), and (15,0) at 100 and 300 K. PMID:27467122

  3. Chemistry and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Heme b-HemQ and Coproheme-HemQ

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a novel pathway for heme b biosynthesis in Gram-positive bacteria has been proposed. The final poorly understood step is catalyzed by an enzyme called HemQ and includes two decarboxylation reactions leading from coproheme to heme b. Coproheme has been suggested to act as both substrate and redox active cofactor in this reaction. In the study presented here, we focus on HemQs from Listeria monocytogenes (LmHemQ) and Staphylococcus aureus (SaHemQ) recombinantly produced as apoproteins in Escherichia coli. We demonstrate the rapid and two-phase uptake of coproheme by both apo forms and the significant differences in thermal stability of the apo forms, coproheme-HemQ and heme b-HemQ. Reduction of ferric high-spin coproheme-HemQ to the ferrous form is shown to be enthalpically favored but entropically disfavored with standard reduction potentials of −205 ± 3 mV for LmHemQ and −207 ± 3 mV for SaHemQ versus the standard hydrogen electrode at pH 7.0. Redox thermodynamics suggests the presence of a pronounced H-bonding network and restricted solvent mobility in the heme cavity. Binding of cyanide to the sixth coproheme position is monophasic but relatively slow (∼1 × 104 M–1 s–1). On the basis of the available structures of apo-HemQ and modeling of both loaded forms, molecular dynamics simulation allowed analysis of the interaction of coproheme and heme b with the protein as well as the role of the flexibility at the proximal heme cavity and the substrate access channel for coproheme binding and heme b release. Obtained data are discussed with respect to the proposed function of HemQ in monoderm bacteria. PMID:27599156

  4. Chemistry and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Heme b-HemQ and Coproheme-HemQ.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Dalla Sega, Marco; Scheiblbrandner, Stefan; Jandova, Zuzana; Schaffner, Irene; Mlynek, Georg; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtmüller, Paul G; Oostenbrink, Chris; Obinger, Christian

    2016-09-27

    Recently, a novel pathway for heme b biosynthesis in Gram-positive bacteria has been proposed. The final poorly understood step is catalyzed by an enzyme called HemQ and includes two decarboxylation reactions leading from coproheme to heme b. Coproheme has been suggested to act as both substrate and redox active cofactor in this reaction. In the study presented here, we focus on HemQs from Listeria monocytogenes (LmHemQ) and Staphylococcus aureus (SaHemQ) recombinantly produced as apoproteins in Escherichia coli. We demonstrate the rapid and two-phase uptake of coproheme by both apo forms and the significant differences in thermal stability of the apo forms, coproheme-HemQ and heme b-HemQ. Reduction of ferric high-spin coproheme-HemQ to the ferrous form is shown to be enthalpically favored but entropically disfavored with standard reduction potentials of -205 ± 3 mV for LmHemQ and -207 ± 3 mV for SaHemQ versus the standard hydrogen electrode at pH 7.0. Redox thermodynamics suggests the presence of a pronounced H-bonding network and restricted solvent mobility in the heme cavity. Binding of cyanide to the sixth coproheme position is monophasic but relatively slow (∼1 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)). On the basis of the available structures of apo-HemQ and modeling of both loaded forms, molecular dynamics simulation allowed analysis of the interaction of coproheme and heme b with the protein as well as the role of the flexibility at the proximal heme cavity and the substrate access channel for coproheme binding and heme b release. Obtained data are discussed with respect to the proposed function of HemQ in monoderm bacteria. PMID:27599156

  5. Chemistry and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Heme b-HemQ and Coproheme-HemQ.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Dalla Sega, Marco; Scheiblbrandner, Stefan; Jandova, Zuzana; Schaffner, Irene; Mlynek, Georg; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtmüller, Paul G; Oostenbrink, Chris; Obinger, Christian

    2016-09-27

    Recently, a novel pathway for heme b biosynthesis in Gram-positive bacteria has been proposed. The final poorly understood step is catalyzed by an enzyme called HemQ and includes two decarboxylation reactions leading from coproheme to heme b. Coproheme has been suggested to act as both substrate and redox active cofactor in this reaction. In the study presented here, we focus on HemQs from Listeria monocytogenes (LmHemQ) and Staphylococcus aureus (SaHemQ) recombinantly produced as apoproteins in Escherichia coli. We demonstrate the rapid and two-phase uptake of coproheme by both apo forms and the significant differences in thermal stability of the apo forms, coproheme-HemQ and heme b-HemQ. Reduction of ferric high-spin coproheme-HemQ to the ferrous form is shown to be enthalpically favored but entropically disfavored with standard reduction potentials of -205 ± 3 mV for LmHemQ and -207 ± 3 mV for SaHemQ versus the standard hydrogen electrode at pH 7.0. Redox thermodynamics suggests the presence of a pronounced H-bonding network and restricted solvent mobility in the heme cavity. Binding of cyanide to the sixth coproheme position is monophasic but relatively slow (∼1 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)). On the basis of the available structures of apo-HemQ and modeling of both loaded forms, molecular dynamics simulation allowed analysis of the interaction of coproheme and heme b with the protein as well as the role of the flexibility at the proximal heme cavity and the substrate access channel for coproheme binding and heme b release. Obtained data are discussed with respect to the proposed function of HemQ in monoderm bacteria.

  6. Venus O2 visible and IR nightglow: Implications for lower thermosphere dynamics and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Borucki, W. J.

    1994-02-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research thermospheric general circulation model for the Venus thermosphere is modified to examine two observed night airglow features, both of which serve as sensitive tracers of the thermospheric circulation. New O2 nightglow data from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) star tracker (O2 Herzberg II at 400-800 nm) and ground-based telescopes (O2 IR at 1.27 microns) yield additional model constraints for estimating Venus winds over 100-130 km. Atomic oxygen, produced by dayside CO2 photolysis peaking near 110 km, and transported to the nightside by the global wind system, is partially destroyed through three-body recombination, yielding the O2 Herzberg II visible nightglow. This emission is very sensitive to horizontal winds at altitudes between 100 and 130 km. Other trace species catalytic reactions also contribute to the production of the very strong nightside infrared (1.27 microns) emission. This paper examines the dynamical and chemical implications of these new data using the Venus thermospheric general circulation model (VTGCM) as an analysis tool. Three-dimensional calculations are presented for both solar maximum and solar medium conditions, corresponding to early PVO (1979-1981) and PVO entry (mid-1992) time periods. Very distinct periods are identified in which zonal winds are alternately weak and strong in the Venus lower thermosphere. VTGCM sensitivity studies are conducted to assess the impacts of potential changes in thermospheric zonal and day-to-night winds, and eddy diffusion on the corresponding nightglow intensities. It appears that cyclostrophic balance extends above 80 km periodically, owing to a reversal of the upper mesosphere latitudinal temperature gradient, and thereby producing strong zonal winds and correspondingly modified O2 nightglow distributions that are observed.

  7. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    SciTech Connect

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, Ditte; Rusanen, A.; Boy, Michael; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Zelenyuk, Alla; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-11

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle- phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: 1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), 2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and 3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers.

  8. The Chemistry and Flow Dynamics of Molecular Biological Tools Used to Confirm In Situ Bioremediation of Benzene, TBA, and MTBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, K. P.; Mackay, D. M.; Scow, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    In situ bioremediation has typically been confirmed by collecting sediment and groundwater samples to directly demonstrate a degradation process in a laboratory microcosm. However, recent advances in molecular biological tools present options for demonstrating degradation processes with field-based tools that are less time-consuming. We have been investigating the capability of some of these molecular biological tools to evaluate in situ biodegradation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and benzene at two field sites in California. At both sites, we have deployed Bio-Traps® (“traps”), made of Bio-Sep® beads in slotted PVC pipe, which provide ideal environments for microbial colonization. Stable Isotope Probing can be accomplished by sorbing the13C-labeled organic contaminant of concern onto Bio-Sep® beads (“baiting”); incorporation of 13C into the biomass collected by the trap would indicate that the microbial community was capable of degrading the labeled compound. In addition, we examined the chemistry and flow dynamics of these traps and present those results here. We performed a field experiment and a lab experiment to, in part, define the rate that different baits leached off various traps. At a TBA- and MTBE-contaminated site at Vandenberg AFB, Lompoc, CA, the TBA-dominant plume was effectively treated by recirculation/oxygenation of groundwater, decreasing TBA and MTBE concentrations to detection limits along predicted flowpaths created by two pairs of recirculation wells. We used the generated aerobic treatment zone to deploy traps baited with 13C-labeled MTBE or TBA in a novel, ex situ experimental setup. The groundwater flow extracted from the aerobic treatment zone was split through several chambers, each containing a trap and monitoring of influent and effluent. The chamber effluent was measured throughout a six-week deployment and analyzed for both TBA and MTBE; the majority of mass leached from the baited traps did

  9. Particulate matter chemistry and dynamics in the Twilight Zone at VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, James K.B.; Wood, T.J.

    2008-03-25

    Understanding particle dynamics in the 'Twilight Zone' is critical to prediction of the ocean's carbon cycle. As part of the VERTIGO (VERtical Transformations In the Global Ocean) project, this rarely sampled regime extending from the base of the euphotic layer to 1000 m, was characterized by double-paired day/night Multiple Unit Large Volume in-situ Filtration System (MULVFS) deployments and by {approx}100 high-frequency CTD/transmissometer/turbidity sensor profiles. VERTIGO studies lasting three weeks, contrasted oligotrophic station ALOHA (22.75{sup o}N 158{sup o}W), sampled in June-July 2004, with a biologically productive location (47{sup o}N 161{sup o}E) near station K2 in the Oyashio, occupied July-August 2005. Profiles of major and minor particulate components (C{sub org}, N, P, Ca, Si, Sr, Ba, Mn) in <1, 1-51, and >51 {micro}m size fractions, in-water optics, neutrally buoyant sediment trap (NBST) fluxes, and zooplankton data were intercompared. MULVFS total C{sub org} and C-Star particle beam attenuation coefficient (C{sub P}) were consistently related at both sites with a 27 {micro}M m{sup -1} conversion factor. 26 At K2, C{sub P} profiles further showed a multitude of transient spikes throughout the water column and spike abundance profiles closely paralleled the double peaked abundance profiles of zooplankton. Also at K2, copepods contributed {approx}40% and 10%, night and day, respectively to >51 {micro}m C{sub org} of MULVFS samples in the mixed layer, but few copepods were collected in deeper waters; however, non-swimming radiolarians were quantitatively sampled. A recent hypothesis regarding POC differences between pumps and bottles is examined in light of these results. Particulate >51 {micro}m C{sub org}, N, and P at both ALOHA and K2 showed strong attenuation with depth at both sites. Notable at ALOHA were unusually high levels of >51 {micro}m Sr (up to 4 nM) in the mixed layer, a reflection of high abundances of SrSO{sub 4} precipitating

  10. Particulate matter chemistry and dynamics in the twilight zone at VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, James K. B.; Wood, T. J.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding particle dynamics in the 'Twilight Zone' is critical to prediction of the ocean's carbon cycle. As part of the VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) project, this rarely sampled regime extending from the base of the euphotic layer to 1000 m, was characterized by double-paired day/night Multiple Unit Large Volume in-situ Filtration System (MULVFS) deployments and by ˜100 high-frequency CTD/transmissometer/turbidity sensor profiles. VERTIGO studies lasting 3 weeks, contrasted oligotrophic station ALOHA (22.75°N 158°W), sampled in June-July 2004, with a biologically productive location (47 °N 161°E) near station K2 in the Oyashio, occupied July-August 2005. Profiles of major and minor particulate components (C org, N, P, Ca, Si, Sr, Ba, Mn) in <1, 1-51, and >51 μm size fractions, in-water optics, neutrally buoyant sediment trap (NBST) fluxes, and zooplankton data were intercompared. MULVFS total C org and C-Star particle beam attenuation coefficient ( C P) were consistently related at both sites with a 27 μM m -1 conversion factor. At K2, C P profiles further showed a multitude of transient spikes throughout the water column and spike abundance profiles closely paralleled the double peaked abundance profiles of zooplankton. Also at K2, copepods contributed ˜40% and 10%, night and day, respectively to >51 μm C org of MULVFS samples in the mixed layer, but few copepods were collected in deeper waters; however, non-swimming radiolarians were quantitatively sampled. A recent hypothesis regarding POC differences between pumps and bottles is examined in light of these results. Particulate >51 μm C org, N, and P at both ALOHA and K2 showed strong attenuation with depth at both sites. Notable at ALOHA were unusually high levels of >51 μm Sr (up to 4 nM) in the mixed layer, a reflection of high abundances of SrSO 4 precipitating Acantharia. Notable at K2 were major changes in water column inventories of many particulate components to 700 m

  11. Combinatorial brain decoding of people's whereabouts during visuospatial navigation

    PubMed Central

    Op de Beeck, Hans P.; Vermaercke, Ben; Woolley, Daniel G.; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Complex behavior typically relies upon many different processes which are related to activity in multiple brain regions. In contrast, neuroimaging analyses typically focus upon isolated processes. Here we present a new approach, combinatorial brain decoding, in which we decode complex behavior by combining the information which we can retrieve from the neural signals about the many different sub-processes. The case in point is visuospatial navigation. We explore the extent to which the route travelled by human subjects (N = 3) in a complex virtual maze can be decoded from activity patterns as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Preliminary analyses suggest that it is difficult to directly decode spatial position from regions known to contain an explicit cognitive map of the environment, such as the hippocampus. Instead, we were able to indirectly derive spatial position from the pattern of activity in visual and motor cortex. The non-spatial representations in these regions reflect processes which are inherent to navigation, such as which stimuli are perceived at which point in time and which motor movement is executed when (e.g., turning left at a crossroad). Highly successful decoding of routes followed through the maze was possible by combining information about multiple aspects of navigation events across time and across multiple cortical regions. This “proof of principle” study highlights how visuospatial navigation is related to the combined activity of multiple brain regions, and establishes combinatorial brain decoding as a means to study complex mental events that involve a dynamic interplay of many cognitive processes. PMID:23730269

  12. Recursive deconvolution of combinatorial chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Erb, E; Janda, K D; Brenner, S

    1994-11-22

    A recursive strategy that solves for the active members of a chemical library is presented. A pentapeptide library with an alphabet of Gly, Leu, Phe, and Tyr (1024 members) was constructed on a solid support by the method of split synthesis. One member of this library (NH2-Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu) is a native binder to a beta-endorphin antibody. A variation of the split synthesis approach is used to build the combinatorial library. In four vials, a member of the library's alphabet is coupled to a solid support. After each coupling, a portion of the resin from each of the four reaction vials was set aside and catalogued. The solid support from each vial is then combined, mixed, and redivided. The steps of (i) coupling, (ii) saving and cataloging, and (iii) randomizing were repeated until a pentapeptide library was obtained. The four pentapeptide libraries where the N-terminal amino acid is defined were screened against the beta-endorphin antibody and quantitated via an ELISA. The amino acid of the four pools that demonstrated the most binding was then coupled to the four tetrapeptide partial libraries that had been set aside and catalogued during the split synthesis. This recursive deconvolution was repeated until the best binders were deduced. Besides the anticipated native binder, two other members of the library displayed significant binding. This recursive method of deconvolution does not use a molecular tag, requires only one split synthesis, and can be applied to the deconvolution of nonlinear small-molecule combinatorial libraries and linear oligomeric combinatorial libraries, since it is based only on the procedure of the synthesis. PMID:7972077

  13. On schemes of combinatorial transcription logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchler, Nicolas E.; Gerland, Ulrich; Hwa, Terence

    2003-04-01

    Cells receive a wide variety of cellular and environmental signals, which are often processed combinatorially to generate specific genetic responses. Here we explore theoretically the potentials and limitations of combinatorial signal integration at the level of cis-regulatory transcription control. Our analysis suggests that many complex transcription-control functions of the type encountered in higher eukaryotes are already implementable within the much simpler bacterial transcription system. Using a quantitative model of bacterial transcription and invoking only specific protein-DNA interaction and weak glue-like interaction between regulatory proteins, we show explicit schemes to implement regulatory logic functions of increasing complexity by appropriately selecting the strengths and arranging the relative positions of the relevant protein-binding DNA sequences in the cis-regulatory region. The architectures that emerge are naturally modular and evolvable. Our results suggest that the transcription regulatory apparatus is a "programmable" computing machine, belonging formally to the class of Boltzmann machines. Crucial to our results is the ability to regulate gene expression at a distance. In bacteria, this can be achieved for isolated genes via DNA looping controlled by the dimerization of DNA-bound proteins. However, if adopted extensively in the genome, long-distance interaction can cause unintentional intergenic cross talk, a detrimental side effect difficult to overcome by the known bacterial transcription-regulation systems. This may be a key factor limiting the genome-wide adoption of complex transcription control in bacteria. Implications of our findings for combinatorial transcription control in eukaryotes are discussed. Abbreviations: TF, transcription factor RNAP, RNA polymerase DNF, disjunctive normal form CNF, conjunctive normal form

  14. 2D and 3D Eulerian Simulations of the Dynamics and Gas and Aerosol Chemistry of a Young Biomass Burning Smoke Plume from a Savannah Fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, M. J.; Prinn, R. G.

    2007-12-01

    The growth of aerosol particles and production of ozone in young smoke plumes is the result of a complex interaction between the mean flow in the smoke plume, turbulent diffusion, gas-phase oxidation, coagulation, and mass transfer between phases. Models allow us to separate the effects of these processes and predict their impact on the global environment. We present the results of two and three-dimensional Eulerian simulations of the dynamics and chemistry of the smoke plume formed by the Timbavati savannah fire studied during SAFARI 2000 (Hobbs et al., 2003, JGR, doi:10.1029/2002JD002352). The dynamical model is an extension of an Eulerian cloud-resolving model that has previously been used to study the role of deep convective clouds on tropospheric chemistry (Wang and Prinn, 2000, JGR, 105(D17) 22,269-22,297). The model includes a source of sensible heat, gases, and particles at the surface to simulate the savannah fire. The new gas and aerosol chemistry model includes heterogeneous chemistry, kinetic mass transfer, coagulation and the formation of secondary organic and inorganic aerosol. Photolysis rates are calculated based on the solution of the radiative transfer equation within the plume, including the scattering and absorption of radiation by the smoke aerosols. Our preliminary 2D Eulerian results using standard chemistry and UV fluxes show that the model can simulate the lower but not the higher levels of O3 observed. Also, the simulated 2D O3 field shows a wave-like pattern in the downwind direction, even though the emissions from the fire are held constant. This suggests that plume heterogeneity in the downwind direction may account for some of the observed variability in O3. We will present results of runs incorporating higher resolution calculation of photolysis rates, heterogeneous HONO formation, and gas phase reactions involving the uncharacterized organic compounds observed in the gas phase of the Timbavati plume in order to better simulate these

  15. Apparatus for combinatorial screening of electrochemical materials

    DOEpatents

    A high throughput combinatorial screening method and apparatus for the evaluation of electrochemical materials using a single voltage source is disclosed wherein temperature changes arising from the application of an electrical load to a cell array are used to evaluate the relative electrochemical efficiency of the materials comprising the array. The apparatus may include an array of electrochemical cells that are connected to each other in parallel or in series, an electronic load for applying a voltage or current to the electrochemical cells , and a device , external to the cells, for monitoring the relative temperature of each cell when the load is applied.

    2009-12-15

    A high throughput combinatorial screening method and apparatus for the evaluation of electrochemical materials using a single voltage source (2) is disclosed wherein temperature changes arising from the application of an electrical load to a cell array (1) are used to evaluate the relative electrochemical efficiency of the materials comprising the array. The apparatus may include an array of electrochemical cells (1) that are connected to each other in parallel or in series, an electronic load (2) for applying a voltage or current to the electrochemical cells (1), and a device (3), external to the cells, for monitoring the relative temperature of each cell when the load is applied.

  16. Aerospace applications of integer and combinatorial optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, S. L.; Kincaid, R. K.

    1995-01-01

    Research supported by NASA Langley Research Center includes many applications of aerospace design optimization and is conducted by teams of applied mathematicians and aerospace engineers. This paper investigates the benefits from this combined expertise in solving combinatorial optimization problems. Applications range from the design of large space antennas to interior noise control. A typical problem, for example, seeks the optimal locations for vibration-damping devices on a large space structure and is expressed as a mixed/integer linear programming problem with more than 1500 design variables.

  17. Aerospace Applications of Integer and Combinatorial Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, S. L.; Kincaid, R. K.

    1995-01-01

    Research supported by NASA Langley Research Center includes many applications of aerospace design optimization and is conducted by teams of applied mathematicians and aerospace engineers. This paper investigates the benefits from this combined expertise in formulating and solving integer and combinatorial optimization problems. Applications range from the design of large space antennas to interior noise control. A typical problem, for example, seeks the optimal locations for vibration-damping devices on an orbiting platform and is expressed as a mixed/integer linear programming problem with more than 1500 design variables.

  18. Aerospace applications on integer and combinatorial optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, S. L.; Kincaid, R. K.

    1995-01-01

    Research supported by NASA Langley Research Center includes many applications of aerospace design optimization and is conducted by teams of applied mathematicians and aerospace engineers. This paper investigates the benefits from this combined expertise in formulating and solving integer and combinatorial optimization problems. Applications range from the design of large space antennas to interior noise control. A typical problem. for example, seeks the optimal locations for vibration-damping devices on an orbiting platform and is expressed as a mixed/integer linear programming problem with more than 1500 design variables.

  19. Combinatorial nuclear level-density model

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, Peter; Aberg, Sven; Uhrenhoit, Henrik; Ickhikawa, Takatoshi

    2008-01-01

    A microscopic nuclear level-density model is presented. The model is a completely combinatorial (micro-canonical) model based on the folded-Yukawa single-particle potential and includes explicit treatment of pairing, rotational and vibrational states. The microscopic character of all states enables extraction of level distribution functions with respect to pairing gaps, parity and angular momentum. The results of the model are compared to available experimental data: neutron separation energy level spacings, data on total level-density functions from the Oslo method and data on parity ratios.

  20. Developing New Antibiotics with Combinatorial Biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Nicola L.

    2000-11-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs), a class of enzymes found in soil bacteria that produce antibiotics such as erythromycin, string together acetate units using basic organic reactions. The manipulation of the sequence of these reactions at the genetic level has resulted in an alteration of the corresponding chemical structure of the antibiotic produced by the bacteria. This process, called combinatorial biosynthesis, allows the generation of many presently unknown complex structures that can be tested for antibacterial activity, thereby contributing to the race against antibiotic-resistant infectious bacteria.

  1. Some useful combinatorial formulas for bosonic operators

    SciTech Connect

    Blasiak, P.; Penson, K.A.; Solomon, A.I.; Horzela, A.; Duchamp, G.H.E.

    2005-05-01

    We give a general expression for the normally ordered form of a function F[w(a,a{sup {dagger}})] where w is a function of boson creation and annihilation operators satisfying [a,a{sup {dagger}}]=1. The expectation value of this expression in a coherent state becomes an exact generating function of Feynman-type graphs associated with the zero-dimensional quantum field theory defined by F(w). This enables one to enumerate explicitly the graphs of given order in the realm of combinatorially defined sequences. We give several examples of the use of this technique, including the applications to Kerr-type and superfluidity-type Hamiltonians.

  2. Automation in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Reader, John C

    2004-01-01

    The implementation of appropriate automation can make a significant improvement in productivity at each stage of the drug discovery process, if it is incorporated into an efficient overall process. Automated chemistry has evolved rapidly from the 'combinatorial' techniques implemented in many industrial laboratories in the early 1990's which focused primarily on the hit discovery phase, and were highly dependent on solid-phase techniques and instrumentation derived from peptide synthesis. Automated tools and strategies have been developed which can impact the hit discovery, hit expansion and lead optimization phases, not only in synthesis, but also in reaction optimization, work-up, and purification of compounds. This article discusses the implementation of some of these techniques, based especially on experiences at Millennium Pharmaceuticals Research and Development Ltd.

  3. Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy & Dynamics Lecture: Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy for Chemical Kinetics, Molecular Structure, and Analytical Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pate, Brooks

    2013-03-01

    Advances in high-speed digital electronics have enabled a new generation of molecular rotational spectroscopy techniques that provide instantaneous broadband spectral coverage. These techniques use a chirped excitation pulse to coherently excite the molecular sample over a spectral bandwidth of 10 GHz or larger through rapid passage. The subsequent time-domain emission is recorded using high-speed digitizers (up to 100 Gigasample/s) and the frequency domain spectrum is produced by fast Fourier transformation. The chirped-pulse Fourier transform (CP-FT) method has been implemented in the microwave frequency range (2-40 GHz) for studies of cold samples in pulsed jet sources and in the mm-wave/terahertz (THz) frequency range for studies of samples at room-temperature. The method has opened new applications for molecular rotational spectroscopy in the area of chemical kinetics where dynamic rotational spectroscopy is used to measure the rates of unimolecular isomerization reactions in highly excited molecules prepared by pulsed infrared laser excitation. In these applications, the isomerization rate is obtained from an analysis of the overall line shapes which are modified by chemical exchange leading to coalescence behavior similar to the effect in NMR spectroscopy. The sensitivity of the method and the ability to extend it to low frequency (2-8 GHz) have significantly increased the size range of molecules and molecular clusters for structure determination using isotopic substitution to build up the 3D molecular structures atom-by-atom. Application to the structure of water clusters with up to 15 water molecules will be presented. When coupled with advances in solid-state mm-wave/THz devices, this method provides a direct digital technique for analytical chemistry of room-temperature gases based on molecular rotational spectroscopy. These high-throughput methods can analyze complex sample mixtures with unmatched chemical selectivity and short analysis times. Work

  4. Asymmetric Proteome Equalization of the Skeletal Muscle Proteome Using a Combinatorial Hexapeptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Rivers, Jenny; Hughes, Chris; McKenna, Thérèse; Woolerton, Yvonne; Vissers, Johannes P. C.; Langridge, James I.; Beynon, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Immobilized combinatorial peptide libraries have been advocated as a strategy for equalization of the dynamic range of a typical proteome. The technology has been applied predominantly to blood plasma and other biological fluids such as urine, but has not been used extensively to address the issue of dynamic range in tissue samples. Here, we have applied the combinatorial library approach to the equalization of a tissue where there is also a dramatic asymmetry in the range of abundances of proteins; namely, the soluble fraction of skeletal muscle. We have applied QconCAT and label-free methodology to the quantification of the proteins that bind to the beads as the loading is progressively increased. Although some equalization is achieved, and the most abundant proteins no longer dominate the proteome analysis, at high protein loadings a new asymmetry of protein expression is reached, consistent with the formation of complex assembles of heat shock proteins, cytoskeletal elements and other proteins on the beads. Loading at different ionic strength values leads to capture of different subpopulations of proteins, but does not completely eliminate the bias in protein accumulation. These assemblies may impair the broader utility of combinatorial library approaches to the equalization of tissue proteomes. However, the asymmetry in equalization is manifest at either low and high ionic strength values but manipulation of the solvent conditions may extend the capacity of the method. PMID:22205978

  5. Combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  6. Combinatorial design of textured mechanical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2016-07-27

    The structural complexity of metamaterials is limitless, but, in practice, most designs comprise periodic architectures that lead to materials with spatially homogeneous features. More advanced applications in soft robotics, prosthetics and wearable technology involve spatially textured mechanical functionality, which requires aperiodic architectures. However, a naive implementation of such structural complexity invariably leads to geometrical frustration (whereby local constraints cannot be satisfied everywhere), which prevents coherent operation and impedes functionality. Here we introduce a combinatorial strategy for the design of aperiodic, yet frustration-free, mechanical metamaterials that exhibit spatially textured functionalities. We implement this strategy using cubic building blocks-voxels-that deform anisotropically, a local stacking rule that allows cooperative shape changes by guaranteeing that deformed building blocks fit together as in a three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle, and three-dimensional printing. These aperiodic metamaterials exhibit long-range holographic order, whereby the two-dimensional pixelated surface texture dictates the three-dimensional interior voxel arrangement. They also act as programmable shape-shifters, morphing into spatially complex, but predictable and designable, shapes when uniaxially compressed. Finally, their mechanical response to compression by a textured surface reveals their ability to perform sensing and pattern analysis. Combinatorial design thus opens up a new avenue towards mechanical metamaterials with unusual order and machine-like functionalities.

  7. Combinatorial design of textured mechanical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2016-07-28

    The structural complexity of metamaterials is limitless, but, in practice, most designs comprise periodic architectures that lead to materials with spatially homogeneous features. More advanced applications in soft robotics, prosthetics and wearable technology involve spatially textured mechanical functionality, which requires aperiodic architectures. However, a naive implementation of such structural complexity invariably leads to geometrical frustration (whereby local constraints cannot be satisfied everywhere), which prevents coherent operation and impedes functionality. Here we introduce a combinatorial strategy for the design of aperiodic, yet frustration-free, mechanical metamaterials that exhibit spatially textured functionalities. We implement this strategy using cubic building blocks-voxels-that deform anisotropically, a local stacking rule that allows cooperative shape changes by guaranteeing that deformed building blocks fit together as in a three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle, and three-dimensional printing. These aperiodic metamaterials exhibit long-range holographic order, whereby the two-dimensional pixelated surface texture dictates the three-dimensional interior voxel arrangement. They also act as programmable shape-shifters, morphing into spatially complex, but predictable and designable, shapes when uniaxially compressed. Finally, their mechanical response to compression by a textured surface reveals their ability to perform sensing and pattern analysis. Combinatorial design thus opens up a new avenue towards mechanical metamaterials with unusual order and machine-like functionalities. PMID:27466125

  8. Combinatorial design of textured mechanical metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2016-07-01

    The structural complexity of metamaterials is limitless, but, in practice, most designs comprise periodic architectures that lead to materials with spatially homogeneous features. More advanced applications in soft robotics, prosthetics and wearable technology involve spatially textured mechanical functionality, which requires aperiodic architectures. However, a naive implementation of such structural complexity invariably leads to geometrical frustration (whereby local constraints cannot be satisfied everywhere), which prevents coherent operation and impedes functionality. Here we introduce a combinatorial strategy for the design of aperiodic, yet frustration-free, mechanical metamaterials that exhibit spatially textured functionalities. We implement this strategy using cubic building blocks—voxels—that deform anisotropically, a local stacking rule that allows cooperative shape changes by guaranteeing that deformed building blocks fit together as in a three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle, and three-dimensional printing. These aperiodic metamaterials exhibit long-range holographic order, whereby the two-dimensional pixelated surface texture dictates the three-dimensional interior voxel arrangement. They also act as programmable shape-shifters, morphing into spatially complex, but predictable and designable, shapes when uniaxially compressed. Finally, their mechanical response to compression by a textured surface reveals their ability to perform sensing and pattern analysis. Combinatorial design thus opens up a new avenue towards mechanical metamaterials with unusual order and machine-like functionalities.

  9. Combinatorial Multiobjective Optimization Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossley, William A.; Martin. Eric T.

    2002-01-01

    The research proposed in this document investigated multiobjective optimization approaches based upon the Genetic Algorithm (GA). Several versions of the GA have been adopted for multiobjective design, but, prior to this research, there had not been significant comparisons of the most popular strategies. The research effort first generalized the two-branch tournament genetic algorithm in to an N-branch genetic algorithm, then the N-branch GA was compared with a version of the popular Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA). Because the genetic algorithm is well suited to combinatorial (mixed discrete / continuous) optimization problems, the GA can be used in the conceptual phase of design to combine selection (discrete variable) and sizing (continuous variable) tasks. Using a multiobjective formulation for the design of a 50-passenger aircraft to meet the competing objectives of minimizing takeoff gross weight and minimizing trip time, the GA generated a range of tradeoff designs that illustrate which aircraft features change from a low-weight, slow trip-time aircraft design to a heavy-weight, short trip-time aircraft design. Given the objective formulation and analysis methods used, the results of this study identify where turboprop-powered aircraft and turbofan-powered aircraft become more desirable for the 50 seat passenger application. This aircraft design application also begins to suggest how a combinatorial multiobjective optimization technique could be used to assist in the design of morphing aircraft.

  10. A combinatorial morphospace for angiosperm pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mander, Luke

    2016-04-01

    The morphology of angiosperm (flowering plant) pollen is extraordinarily diverse. This diversity results from variations in the morphology of discrete anatomical components. These components include the overall shape of a pollen grain, the stratification of the exine, the number and form of any apertures, the type of dispersal unit, and the nature of any surface ornamentation. Different angiosperm pollen morphotypes reflect different combinations of these discrete components. In this talk, I ask the following question: given the anatomical components of angiosperm pollen that are known to exist in the plant kingdom, how many unique biologically plausible combinations of these components are there? I explore this question from the perspective of enumerative combinatorics using an algorithm I have written in the Python programming language. This algorithm (1) calculates the number of combinations of these components; (2) enumerates those combinations; and (3) graphically displays those combinations. The result is a combinatorial morphospace that reflects an underlying notion that the process of morphogenesis in angiosperm pollen can be thought of as an n choose k counting problem. I compare the morphology of extant and fossil angiosperm pollen grains to this morphospace, and suggest that from a combinatorial point of view angiosperm pollen is not as diverse as it could be, which may be a result of developmental constraints.

  11. Microbatteries for Combinatorial Studies of Conventional Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Whitacre, Jay; Bugga, Ratnakumar

    2003-01-01

    Integrated arrays of microscopic solid-state batteries have been demonstrated in a continuing effort to develop microscopic sources of power and of voltage reference circuits to be incorporated into low-power integrated circuits. Perhaps even more importantly, arrays of microscopic batteries can be fabricated and tested in combinatorial experiments directed toward optimization and discovery of battery materials. The value of the combinatorial approach to optimization and discovery has been proven in the optoelectronic, pharmaceutical, and bioengineering industries. Depending on the specific application, the combinatorial approach can involve the investigation of hundreds or even thousands of different combinations; hence, it is time-consuming and expensive to attempt to implement the combinatorial approach by building and testing full-size, discrete cells and batteries. The conception of microbattery arrays makes it practical to bring the advantages of the combinatorial approach to the development of batteries.

  12. Heterogeneous chemistry and reaction dynamics of the atmospheric oxidants, O3, NO3, and OH, on organic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chapleski, Robert C; Zhang, Yafen; Troya, Diego; Morris, John R

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry of the most important atmospheric oxidants, O3, NO3, and OH, plays a central role in regulating atmospheric gas concentrations, processing aerosols, and aging materials. Recent experimental and computational studies have begun to reveal the detailed reaction mechanisms and kinetics for gas-phase O3, NO3, and OH when they impinge on organic surfaces. Through new research approaches that merge the fields of traditional surface science with atmospheric chemistry, researchers are developing an understanding for how surface structure and functionality affect interfacial chemistry with this class of highly oxidizing pollutants. Together with future research initiatives, these studies will provide a more complete description of atmospheric chemistry and help others more accurately predict the properties of aerosols, the environmental impact of interfacial oxidation, and the concentrations of tropospheric gases.

  13. Dynamic mixtures: challenges and opportunities for the amplification and sensing of scents.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Nature generates compounds as complicated mixtures, but surprisingly little is known about the synergies or inhibitory effects of compound mixtures, which is likely to become an important research area in life sciences in the near future. Some recently developed concepts in dynamic combinatorial/covalent chemistry (DCC) have been applied to amplify (increase the intensity and long-lastingness of perception) and sense (selectively detect and discriminate) individual bioactive volatile molecules in compound mixtures. This Concept article focuses on the potential of DCC to impact and modulate the biological and chemical properties of mixtures of bioactive volatile compounds to gain a more fundamental understanding of the properties of compound mixtures in molecular recognition.

  14. Quantum-chemistry based calibration of the alkali metal cation series (Li(+)-Cs(+)) for large-scale polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Dudev, Todor; Devereux, Mike; Meuwly, Markus; Lim, Carmay; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Gresh, Nohad

    2015-02-15

    The alkali metal cations in the series Li(+)-Cs(+) act as major partners in a diversity of biological processes and in bioinorganic chemistry. In this article, we present the results of their calibration in the context of the SIBFA polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics procedure. It relies on quantum-chemistry (QC) energy-decomposition analyses of their monoligated complexes with representative O-, N-, S-, and Se- ligands, performed with the aug-cc-pVTZ(-f) basis set at the Hartree-Fock level. Close agreement with QC is obtained for each individual contribution, even though the calibration involves only a limited set of cation-specific parameters. This agreement is preserved in tests on polyligated complexes with four and six O- ligands, water and formamide, indicating the transferability of the procedure. Preliminary extensions to density functional theory calculations are reported.

  15. Dynamical amplification of the stratospheric solar response simulated with the Chemistry-Climate Model LMDz-Reprobus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, M.; Keckhut, P.; Lefebvre, S.; Claud, C.; Cugnet, D.; Hauchecorne, A.; Lefèvre, F.; Lefebvre, M.-P.; Jumelet, J.; Lott, F.; Hourdin, F.; Thuillier, G.; Poulain, V.; Bossay, S.; Lemennais, P.; David, C.; Bekki, S.

    2012-02-01

    The impact of the 11-year solar cycle on the stratosphere and, in particular, on the polar regions is investigated using simulations from the Chemistry Climate Model (CCM) LMDz-Reprobus. The annual solar signal clearly shows a stratospheric response largely driven by radiative and photochemical processes, especially in the upper stratosphere. A month-by-months analysis suggests that dynamical feedbacks play an important role in driving the stratospheric response on short timescales. CCM outputs on a 10 days frequency indicate how, in the northern hemisphere, changes in solar heating in the winter polar stratosphere may influence the upward propagation of planetary waves and thus their deposition of momentum, ultimately modifying the strength of the mean stratospheric overtuning circulation at middle and high latitudes. The model results emphasize that the main temperature and wind responses in the northern hemisphere can be explained by a different timing in the occurrence of Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) that are caused by small changes in planetary wave propagation depending on solar conditions. The differences between simulations forced by different solar conditions indicate successive positive and negative responses during the course of the winter. The solar minimum simulation generally indicates a slightly stronger polar vortex early in the winter while the solar maximum simulation experiences more early SSWs with a stronger wave-mean flow interaction and reduced zonal wind at mid-latitudes in the upper stratosphere. The opposite response is observed during mid-winter, in February, with more SSWs simulated for solar minimum conditions while solar maximum conditions are associated with a damped planetary wave activity and a reinforced vortex after the initial stratospheric warming period. In late winter, the response is again reversed, as noticed in the temperature differences, with major SSW mostly observed in the solar maximum simulation and less

  16. The application of combinatorial approach to the optimization of dielectric/ferroelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hauyee

    Combinatorial approaches are methods developed to facilitate the rapid discovery and optimization of materials by the simultaneous synthesis and screening of a large number of compounds within a short period of time. This work describes its application to dielectric and ferroelectric thin film materials, in particular, (Ba,SrCa)TiO3. New methods and instruments for thin film fabrication and measurement are developed to handle the synthesis and analysis of up to thousands of samples simultaneously. Thin films are fabricated with a novel multilayer precursor method. Precursors of the various elemental components within the target compound, such as BaF 2 and TiO2 for BaTiO3, are deposited at room temperature as separate layers. These multilayers are thermally processed under a two step procedure. A low temperature treatment over a period of days interdiffuses the layers to form a homogeneous amorphous intermediate. This is followed by a high temperature crystallization step, which forms the final crystalline product. Effects of dopants on the dielectric constant and loss of (BaSr)TiO 3 are studied with the discrete combinatorial approach, where up to thousands of discrete thin film samples are fabricated on an individual single crystal substrate. A continuous combinatorial sample resembling a ternary phase diagram of (Ba,Sr,Ca)TiO3 is also fabricated in search of the lowest loss compositions that are useful for various applications such as the storage node capacitors in dynamic random access memories. These combinatorial samples of (BaSr,Ca)TiO3 are measured with the newly developed scanning evanescent microwave microscope (SEMM). This instrument is capable of rapid and accurate non-contact characterization of the thin film dielectric constants and losses. The measured results show good agreement with results from more conventional methods such as the interdigital electrodes measurements. Various issues concerning the combinatorial approach in materials science are

  17. Bifurcation-based approach reveals synergism and optimal combinatorial perturbation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanwei; Li, Shanshan; Liu, Zengrong; Wang, Ruiqi

    2016-06-01

    Cells accomplish the process of fate decisions and form terminal lineages through a series of binary choices in which cells switch stable states from one branch to another as the interacting strengths of regulatory factors continuously vary. Various combinatorial effects may occur because almost all regulatory processes are managed in a combinatorial fashion. Combinatorial regulation is crucial for cell fate decisions because it may effectively integrate many different signaling pathways to meet the higher regulation demand during cell development. However, whether the contribution of combinatorial regulation to the state transition is better than that of a single one and if so, what the optimal combination strategy is, seem to be significant issue from the point of view of both biology and mathematics. Using the approaches of combinatorial perturbations and bifurcation analysis, we provide a general framework for the quantitative analysis of synergism in molecular networks. Different from the known methods, the bifurcation-based approach depends only on stable state responses to stimuli because the state transition induced by combinatorial perturbations occurs between stable states. More importantly, an optimal combinatorial perturbation strategy can be determined by investigating the relationship between the bifurcation curve of a synergistic perturbation pair and the level set of a specific objective function. The approach is applied to two models, i.e., a theoretical multistable decision model and a biologically realistic CREB model, to show its validity, although the approach holds for a general class of biological systems.

  18. Characterizing the combinatorial beam angle selection problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, Mark; Ziegenhein, Peter; Oelfke, Uwe

    2012-10-01

    The beam angle selection (BAS) problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy is often interpreted as a combinatorial optimization problem, i.e. finding the best combination of η beams in a discrete set of candidate beams. It is well established that the combinatorial BAS problem may be solved efficiently with metaheuristics such as simulated annealing or genetic algorithms. However, the underlying parameters of the optimization process, such as the inclusion of non-coplanar candidate beams, the angular resolution in the space of candidate beams, and the number of evaluated beam ensembles as well as the relative performance of different metaheuristics have not yet been systematically investigated. We study these open questions in a meta-analysis of four strategies for combinatorial optimization in order to provide a reference for future research related to the BAS problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning. We introduce a high-performance inverse planning engine for BAS. It performs a full fluence optimization for ≈3600 treatment plans per hour while handling up to 50 GB of dose influence data (≈1400 candidate beams). For three head and neck patients, we compare the relative performance of a genetic, a cross-entropy, a simulated annealing and a naive iterative algorithm. The selection of ensembles with 5, 7, 9 and 11 beams considering either only coplanar or all feasible candidate beams is studied for an angular resolution of 5°, 10°, 15° and 20° in the space of candidate beams. The impact of different convergence criteria is investigated in comparison to a fixed termination after the evaluation of 10 000 beam ensembles. In total, our simulations comprise a full fluence optimization for about 3000 000 treatment plans. All four combinatorial BAS strategies yield significant improvements of the objective function value and of the corresponding dose distributions compared to standard beam configurations with equi

  19. Combinatorial Transcription Control in Gene Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwa, Terence; Buchler, Nicolas E.; Gerland, Ulrich

    2003-03-01

    We develop a simple thermodynamic model for the regulation of gene transcription and explore the limits of combinatorial control. Our model is based on the ``regulated recruitment'' mechanism [M. Ptashne and A. Gann, Nature 386 (1997) 569], assuming weak contact interaction between the regulatory proteins together with specific protein-DNA interactions. We further assume "programmability" in the strengths of these interactions within a biophysically allowed range [U. Gerland, J.D. Moroz, and T.Hwa, PNAS 99 (2002) 12015], through the choices and the locations of the protein-binding DNA sequences in the regulatory region. Within our thermodynamic model, we demonstrate the implementability of various binary logic functions (including XOR) by computing the degree of gene transcription (output) for all combinations of regulatory protein concentrations (input).

  20. Combinatorial and computational challenges for biocatalyst design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Frances H.

    2001-01-01

    Nature provides a fantastic array of catalysts extremely well suited to supporting life, but usually not so well suited for technology. Whether biocatalysis will have a significant technological impact depends on our finding robust routes for tailoring nature's catalysts or redesigning them anew. Laboratory evolution methods are now used widely to fine-tune the selectivity and activity of enzymes. The current rapid development of these combinatorial methods promises solutions to more complex problems, including the creation of new biosynthetic pathways. Computational methods are also developing quickly. The marriage of these approaches will allow us to generate the efficient, effective catalysts needed by the pharmaceutical, food and chemicals industries and should open up new opportunities for producing energy and chemicals from renewable resources.

  1. Available pathways database (APD): an essential resource for combinatorial biology.

    PubMed

    Pirrung, M C; Silva, C M; Jaeger, J

    2000-10-01

    A relational database, the Available Pathways Database (APD), has been constructed of microbial natural products, their producing strains, and their biosynthetic pathways. The database allows the ready selection of donor strains for combinatorial biology experiments. It provides the same type of resource for combinatorial biology as the Available Chemicals Directory (ACD) does for combinatorial chemical library generation. Its cataloging ability can also provide insight into novel aspects of biosynthetic routes. In particular, no 10-unit Type I polyketides were found in the compilation of this edition of the APD (Version I). PMID:11076562

  2. Polysiloxane-Based Autonomic Self-Healing Elastomers Obtained through Dynamic Boronic Ester Bonds Prepared by Thiol-Ene "Click" Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yujing; Gou, Zhiming; Zhang, Changqiao; Feng, Shengyu

    2016-07-01

    Cross-linked silicone elastomers constructed with dynamic-covalent boronic esters are first synthesized by photoinitiated radical thiol-ene "click" chemistry. The resultant samples can be cut with a sharp knife into two pieces and then healed via the reversibility of the boronic ester cross-linkages to restore the original silicone sample within 30 min. Regulation of luminescent properties is achieved by incorporating organic dye into the elastomers through a "one-pot" thiol-ene reaction. The proposed synthesis procedure demonstrates a new strategy to produce boronic acid silicone materials capable of self-healing without external forces. PMID:27159536

  3. Incorporating Modeling and Simulations in Undergraduate Biophysical Chemistry Course to Promote Understanding of Structure-Dynamics-Function Relationships in Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-01-01

    A project-based biophysical chemistry laboratory course, which is offered to the biochemistry and molecular biology majors in their senior year, is described. In this course, the classroom study of the structure-function of biomolecules is integrated with the discovery-guided laboratory study of these molecules using computer modeling and…

  4. Geometric differential evolution for combinatorial and programs spaces.

    PubMed

    Moraglio, A; Togelius, J; Silva, S

    2013-01-01

    Geometric differential evolution (GDE) is a recently introduced formal generalization of traditional differential evolution (DE) that can be used to derive specific differential evolution algorithms for both continuous and combinatorial spaces retaining the same geometric interpretation of the dynamics of the DE search across representations. In this article, we first review the theory behind the GDE algorithm, then, we use this framework to formally derive specific GDE for search spaces associated with binary strings, permutations, vectors of permutations and genetic programs. The resulting algorithms are representation-specific differential evolution algorithms searching the target spaces by acting directly on their underlying representations. We present experimental results for each of the new algorithms on a number of well-known problems comprising NK-landscapes, TSP, and Sudoku, for binary strings, permutations, and vectors of permutations. We also present results for the regression, artificial ant, parity, and multiplexer problems within the genetic programming domain. Experiments show that overall the new DE algorithms are competitive with well-tuned standard search algorithms.

  5. Combinatorial semantics strengthens angular-anterior temporal coupling.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, Nicola; Paz-Alonso, Pedro M; Duñabeitia, Jon Andoni; Carreiras, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    The human semantic combinatorial system allows us to create a wide number of new meanings from a finite number of existing representations. The present study investigates the neural dynamics underlying the semantic processing of different conceptual constructions based on predictions from previous neuroanatomical models of the semantic processing network. In two experiments, participants read sentences for comprehension containing noun-adjective pairs in three different conditions: prototypical (Redundant), nonsense (Anomalous) and low-typical but composable (Contrastive). In Experiment 1 we examined the processing costs associated to reading these sentences and found a processing dissociation between Anomalous and Contrastive word pairs, compared to prototypical (Redundant) stimuli. In Experiment 2, functional connectivity results showed strong co-activation across conditions between inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (MTG), as well as between these two regions and middle frontal gyrus (MFG), anterior temporal cortex (ATC) and fusiform gyrus (FG), consistent with previous neuroanatomical models. Importantly, processing of low-typical (but composable) meanings relative to prototypical and anomalous constructions was associated with a stronger positive coupling between ATC and angular gyrus (AG). Our results underscore the critical role of IFG-MTG co-activation during semantic processing and how other relevant nodes within the semantic processing network come into play to handle visual-orthographic information, to maintain multiple lexical-semantic representations in working memory and to combine existing representations while creatively constructing meaning.

  6. Droplet pairing and coalescence control for generation of combinatorial signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Eujin; Rogers, Matthew; Stone, Howard

    2013-03-01

    A co-flowing aqueous phase with an immiscible oil phase in a microchannel generates uniformly spaced, monodisperse droplets, which retain their shape by not touching each other or by being stabilized with surfactants at the oil-water interface. However, droplet coalescence is required in many advanced applications, which can be achieved by a complex channel geometry or size differences in the droplets, and as well as by procedures to reduce the effect of a surfactant. These approaches, again, hinder the stability of droplets further downstream. We designed a microchannel which consistently inserts gas-bubble between droplets so that pairing and coalescence of droplets occurs even in the presence of surfactant, and yet prevents unwanted merging with other droplets. Aqueous droplets placed between the bubbles alter their relative speeds and spacing, and consequently we study the change in the number of droplet pairings in relation to the characteristics of the bubbles and the volume of aqueous droplets. By integrating this approach with droplets of different materials, we can program the output sequence of droplet compositions, and such complex combinatorial signals generated are aimed for concentration gradient generation and dynamic stimulation of biological cells with chemicals.

  7. Geometric differential evolution for combinatorial and programs spaces.

    PubMed

    Moraglio, A; Togelius, J; Silva, S

    2013-01-01

    Geometric differential evolution (GDE) is a recently introduced formal generalization of traditional differential evolution (DE) that can be used to derive specific differential evolution algorithms for both continuous and combinatorial spaces retaining the same geometric interpretation of the dynamics of the DE search across representations. In this article, we first review the theory behind the GDE algorithm, then, we use this framework to formally derive specific GDE for search spaces associated with binary strings, permutations, vectors of permutations and genetic programs. The resulting algorithms are representation-specific differential evolution algorithms searching the target spaces by acting directly on their underlying representations. We present experimental results for each of the new algorithms on a number of well-known problems comprising NK-landscapes, TSP, and Sudoku, for binary strings, permutations, and vectors of permutations. We also present results for the regression, artificial ant, parity, and multiplexer problems within the genetic programming domain. Experiments show that overall the new DE algorithms are competitive with well-tuned standard search algorithms. PMID:23270388

  8. Combinatorial and high-throughput screening approaches for strain engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenshan; Jiang, Rongrong

    2015-03-01

    Microbes have long been used in the industry to produce valuable biochemicals. Combinatorial engineering approaches, new strain engineering tools derived from inverse metabolic engineering, have started to attract attention in recent years, including genome shuffling, error-prone DNA polymerase, global transcription machinery engineering (gTME), random knockout/overexpression libraries, ribosome engineering, multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE), customized optimization of metabolic pathways by combinatorial transcriptional engineering (COMPACTER), and library construction of "tunable intergenic regions" (TIGR). Since combinatorial approaches and high-throughput screening methods are fundamentally interconnected, color/fluorescence-based, growth-based, and biosensor-based high-throughput screening methods have been reviewed. We believe that with the help of metabolic engineering tools and new combinatorial approaches, plus effective high-throughput screening methods, researchers will be able to achieve better results on improving microorganism performance under stress or enhancing biochemical yield.

  9. A general method for greatly improving the affinity of antibodies by using combinatorial libraries

    PubMed Central

    Rajpal, Arvind; Beyaz, Nurten; Haber, Lauric; Cappuccilli, Guido; Yee, Helena; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Takeuchi, Toshihiko; Lerner, Richard A.; Crea, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Look-through mutagenesis (LTM) is a multidimensional mutagenesis method that simultaneously assesses and optimizes combinatorial mutations of selected amino acids. The process focuses on a precise distribution within one or more complementarity determining region (CDR) domains and explores the synergistic contribution of amino acid side-chain chemistry. LTM was applied to an anti-TNF-α antibody, D2E7, which is a challenging test case, because D2E7 was highly optimized (Kd = 1 nM) by others. We selected and incorporated nine amino acids, representative of the major chemical functionalities, individually at every position in each CDR and across all six CDRs (57 aa). Synthetic oligonucleotides, each introducing one amino acid mutation throughout the six CDRs, were pooled to generate segregated libraries containing single mutations in one, two, and/or three CDRs for each VH and VL domain. Corresponding antibody libraries were displayed on the cell surface of yeast. After positive binding selection, 38 substitutions in 21 CDR positions were identified that resulted in higher affinity binding to TNF-α. These beneficial mutations in both VH and VL were represented in two combinatorial beneficial mutagenesis libraries and selected by FACS to produce a convergence of variants that exhibit between 500- and 870-fold higher affinities. Importantly, these enhanced affinities translate to a 15- to 30-fold improvement in in vitro TNF-α neutralization in an L929 bioassay. Thus, this LTM/combinatorial beneficial mutagenesis strategy generates a comprehensive energetic map of the antibody-binding site in a facile and rapid manner and should be broadly applicable to the affinity maturation of antibodies and other proteins. PMID:15939870

  10. DNA-mediated gold nanoparticle signal transducers for combinatorial logic operations and heavy metal ions sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhuan; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wentao; Yu, Shaoxuan; Yue, Xiaoyue; Zhu, Wenxin; Zhang, Daohong; Wang, Yanru; Wang, Jianlong

    2015-10-15

    Herein, the structure of two DNA strands which are complementary except fourteen T-T and C-C mismatches was programmed for the design of the combinatorial logic operation by utilizing the different protective capacities of single chain DNA, part-hybridized DNA and completed-hybridized DNA on unmodified gold nanoparticles. In the presence of either Hg(2+) or Ag(+), the T-Hg(2+)-T or C-Ag(+)-C coordination chemistry could lead to the formation of part-hybridized DNA which keeps gold nanoparticles from clumping after the addition of 40 μL 0.2M NaClO4 solution, but the protection would be screened by 120 μL 0.2M NaClO4 solution. While the coexistence of Hg(2+), Ag(+) caused the formation of completed-hybridized DNA and the protection for gold nanoparticles lost in either 40 μL or 120 μL NaClO4 solutions. Benefiting from sharing of the same inputs of Hg(2+) and Ag(+), OR and AND logic gates were easily integrated into a simple colorimetric combinatorial logic operation in one system, which make it possible to execute logic gates in parallel to mimic arithmetic calculations on a binary digit. Furthermore, two other logic gates including INHIBIT1 and INHIBIT2 were realized to integrated with OR logic gate both for simultaneous qualitative discrimination and quantitative determination of Hg(2+) and Ag(+). Results indicate that the developed logic system based on the different protective capacities of DNA structure on gold nanoparticles provides a new pathway for the design of the combinatorial logic operation in one system and presents a useful strategy for development of advanced sensors, which may have potential applications in multiplex chemical analysis and molecular-scale computer design. PMID:25985196

  11. Combinatorial-computational-chemoinformatics (C3) approach to finding and analyzing low-energy tautomers.

    PubMed

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej

    2010-06-01

    Finding the most stable tautomer or a set of low-energy tautomers of molecules is critical in many aspects of molecular modelling or virtual screening experiments. Enumeration of low-energy tautomers of neutral molecules in the gas-phase or typical solvents can be performed by applying available organic chemistry knowledge. This kind of enumeration is implemented in a number of software packages and it is relatively reliable. However, in esoteric cases such as charged molecules in uncommon, non-aqueous solvents there is simply not enough available knowledge to make reliable predictions of low energy tautomers. Over the last few years we have been developing an approach to address the latter problem and we successfully applied it to discover the most stable anionic tautomers of nucleic acid bases that might be involved in the process of DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. The approach involves three steps: (1) combinatorial generation of a library of tautomers, (2) energy-based screening of the library using electronic structure methods, and (3) analysis of the information generated in step (2). In steps 1-3 we employ combinatorial, computational and chemoinformatics techniques, respectively. Therefore, this hybrid approach is named "Combinatorial*Computational*Chemoinformatics", or just abbreviated as C(3) (or C-cube) approach. This article summarizes our developments and most interesting methodological aspects of the C(3) approach. It can serve as an example how to identify the most stable tautomers of molecular systems for which common chemical knowledge had not been sufficient to make definite predictions.

  12. DNA-mediated gold nanoparticle signal transducers for combinatorial logic operations and heavy metal ions sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhuan; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wentao; Yu, Shaoxuan; Yue, Xiaoyue; Zhu, Wenxin; Zhang, Daohong; Wang, Yanru; Wang, Jianlong

    2015-10-15

    Herein, the structure of two DNA strands which are complementary except fourteen T-T and C-C mismatches was programmed for the design of the combinatorial logic operation by utilizing the different protective capacities of single chain DNA, part-hybridized DNA and completed-hybridized DNA on unmodified gold nanoparticles. In the presence of either Hg(2+) or Ag(+), the T-Hg(2+)-T or C-Ag(+)-C coordination chemistry could lead to the formation of part-hybridized DNA which keeps gold nanoparticles from clumping after the addition of 40 μL 0.2M NaClO4 solution, but the protection would be screened by 120 μL 0.2M NaClO4 solution. While the coexistence of Hg(2+), Ag(+) caused the formation of completed-hybridized DNA and the protection for gold nanoparticles lost in either 40 μL or 120 μL NaClO4 solutions. Benefiting from sharing of the same inputs of Hg(2+) and Ag(+), OR and AND logic gates were easily integrated into a simple colorimetric combinatorial logic operation in one system, which make it possible to execute logic gates in parallel to mimic arithmetic calculations on a binary digit. Furthermore, two other logic gates including INHIBIT1 and INHIBIT2 were realized to integrated with OR logic gate both for simultaneous qualitative discrimination and quantitative determination of Hg(2+) and Ag(+). Results indicate that the developed logic system based on the different protective capacities of DNA structure on gold nanoparticles provides a new pathway for the design of the combinatorial logic operation in one system and presents a useful strategy for development of advanced sensors, which may have potential applications in multiplex chemical analysis and molecular-scale computer design.

  13. Combinatorial Dyson-Schwinger equations and inductive data types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this contribution is to explain the analogy between combinatorial Dyson-Schwinger equations and inductive data types to a readership of mathematical physicists. The connection relies on an interpretation of combinatorial Dyson-Schwinger equations as fixpoint equations for polynomial functors (established elsewhere by the author, and summarised here), combined with the now-classical fact that polynomial functors provide semantics for inductive types. The paper is expository, and comprises also a brief introduction to type theory.

  14. Multinomial Combinatorial Group Representations of the Octahedral and Cubic Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, K

    2003-12-22

    We consider the full multinomial combinatorics of all irreducible representations of the octahedral (cubic) symmetry as a function of partitions for vertex, face and edge colorings. Full combinatorial tables for all irreducible representations and all multinomial partitions are constructed. These enumerations constitute multinomial expansions of character-based cycle index polynomials, and grow in combinatorial complexity as a function of edge or vertex coloring partitions.

  15. Discrepancy sets and pseudorandom generators for combinatorial rectangles

    SciTech Connect

    Armoni, R.; Saks, M.; Zhou, Shiyu; Wigderson, A.

    1996-12-31

    A common subproblem of DNF approximate counting and derandomizing RL is the discrepancy problem for combinatorial rectangles. We explicitly construct a poly(n)-size sample space that approximates the volume of any combinatorial rectangle in [n]{sup n} to within o(1) error (improving on the constructions of [EGLNV92]). The construction extends the techniques of [LLSZ95] for the analogous hitting set problem most notably via discrepancy preserving reductions.

  16. Combinatorial QSAR of ambergris fragrance compounds.

    PubMed

    Kovatcheva, Assia; Golbraikh, Alexander; Oloff, Scott; Xiao, Yun-De; Zheng, Weifan; Wolschann, Peter; Buchbauer, Gerhard; Tropsha, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    A combinatorial quantitative structure-activity relationships (Combi-QSAR) approach has been developed and applied to a data set of 98 ambergris fragrance compounds with complex stereochemistry. The Combi-QSAR approach explores all possible combinations of different independent descriptor collections and various individual correlation methods to obtain statistically significant models with high internal (for the training set) and external (for the test set) accuracy. Seven different descriptor collections were generated with commercially available MOE, CoMFA, CoMMA, Dragon, VolSurf, and MolconnZ programs; we also included chirality topological descriptors recently developed in our laboratory (Golbraikh, A.; Bonchev, D.; Tropsha, A. J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci. 2001, 41, 147-158). CoMMA descriptors were used in combination with MOE descriptors. MolconnZ descriptors were used in combination with chirality descriptors. Each descriptor collection was combined individually with four correlation methods, including k-nearest neighbors (kNN) classification, Support Vector Machines (SVM), decision trees, and binary QSAR, giving rise to 28 different types of QSAR models. Multiple diverse and representative training and test sets were generated by the divisions of the original data set in two. Each model with high values of leave-one-out cross-validated correct classification rate for the training set was subjected to extensive internal and external validation to avoid overfitting and achieve reliable predictive power. Two validation techniques were employed, i.e., the randomization of the target property (in this case, odor intensity) also known as the Y-randomization test and the assessment of external prediction accuracy using test sets. We demonstrate that not every combination of the data modeling technique and the descriptor collection yields a validated and predictive QSAR model. kNN classification in combination with CoMFA descriptors was found to be the best QSAR

  17. The Interaction Between Dynamics and Chemistry of Ozone in the Set-Up Phase of the Northern Hemisphere Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S.R.; Douglass, A. R.; Bevilacqua, R.; Margitan, J. J.; Sen, B.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding stratospheric ozone loss to the point of accurately predicting ozone in the future requires correctly distinguishing chemical from transport-induced changes in ozone. For example, evaluating the impact of chlorine reduction in controlling stratospheric ozone loss requires estimating the amount of ozone lost in chemical reactions in the polar winter and spring. The Northern Hemisphere winter polar region is a particularly crucial and interesting area because it appears that the Northern vortex may currently be poised near the threshold of extreme ozone destruction such as that which now occurs annually in the Antarctic ozone "hole." In this presentation we explore the interaction of ozone transport and chemistry through the Northern late summer and fall seasons as the vortex circulation becomes established. This phase of the seasonal cycle determines the starting point for heterogeneous processes and chlorine-driven loss that take control in the winter vortex. Using a combination of profile data from POAM, HALOE, and in situ measurements, we show that relatively low ozone at high latitudes in the middle stratosphere is associated with vortex airmasses and that these ozone abundances evolve photochemically from characteristically higher values at the end of the summer. The zonal variance of ozone mixing ratio also increases greatly at this time consistent with increasing wave-driven transport. Comparison with a three-dimensional chemistry-transport model is used to generalize the findings from the limited set of observations and quantify the relative roles of transport and chemistry in determining the ozone mixing ratio distributions.

  18. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  19. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of chemistry to be used in chemistry courses of secondary schools. Three experiments concerning differential thermal analysis are among these notes presented. (HM)

  20. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  1. Colour Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, J.; Rattee, I. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the course offerings in pure color chemistry at two universities and the three main aspects of study: dyestuff chemistry, color measurement, and color application. Indicates that there exists a constant challenge to ingenuity in the subject discipline. (CC)

  2. Scalable combinatorial tools for health disparities research.

    PubMed

    Langston, Michael A; Levine, Robert S; Kilbourne, Barbara J; Rogers, Gary L; Kershenbaum, Anne D; Baktash, Suzanne H; Coughlin, Steven S; Saxton, Arnold M; Agboto, Vincent K; Hood, Darryl B; Litchveld, Maureen Y; Oyana, Tonny J; Matthews-Juarez, Patricia; Juarez, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Despite staggering investments made in unraveling the human genome, current estimates suggest that as much as 90% of the variance in cancer and chronic diseases can be attributed to factors outside an individual's genetic endowment, particularly to environmental exposures experienced across his or her life course. New analytical approaches are clearly required as investigators turn to complicated systems theory and ecological, place-based and life-history perspectives in order to understand more clearly the relationships between social determinants, environmental exposures and health disparities. While traditional data analysis techniques remain foundational to health disparities research, they are easily overwhelmed by the ever-increasing size and heterogeneity of available data needed to illuminate latent gene x environment interactions. This has prompted the adaptation and application of scalable combinatorial methods, many from genome science research, to the study of population health. Most of these powerful tools are algorithmically sophisticated, highly automated and mathematically abstract. Their utility motivates the main theme of this paper, which is to describe real applications of innovative transdisciplinary models and analyses in an effort to help move the research community closer toward identifying the causal mechanisms and associated environmental contexts underlying health disparities. The public health exposome is used as a contemporary focus for addressing the complex nature of this subject. PMID:25310540

  3. Combinatorial approaches for inverse metabolic engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Skretas, Georgios; Kolisis, Fragiskos N.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional metabolic engineering analyzes biosynthetic and physiological pathways, identifies bottlenecks, and makes targeted genetic modifications with the ultimate goal of increasing the production of high-value products in living cells. Such efforts have led to the development of a variety of organisms with industrially relevant properties. However, there are a number of cellular phenotypes important for research and the industry for which the rational selection of cellular targets for modification is not easy or possible. In these cases, strain engineering can be alternatively carried out using “inverse metabolic engineering”, an approach that first generates genetic diversity by subjecting a population of cells to a particular mutagenic process, and then utilizes genetic screens or selections to identify the clones exhibiting the desired phenotype. Given the availability of an appropriate screen for a particular property, the success of inverse metabolic engineering efforts usually depends on the level and quality of genetic diversity which can be generated. Here, we review classic and recently developed combinatorial approaches for creating such genetic diversity and discuss the use of these methodologies in inverse metabolic engineering applications. PMID:24688681

  4. Combinatorial control of heterogeneous cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piermarocchi, C.; Duxbury, P.; Paternostro, G.; Feala, J.; Tiziani, S.; Axelrod, J.; Chaudhury, A.; Choi, J.; McCulloch, A.; Cortes, J.

    2010-03-01

    In medicine, a recent pharmacological approach involves systematic discovery of combinatorial therapies, in which different drugs are simultaneously used to control different pathways associated with a cellular function. This control must occur with minimal response in other non-target cells exposed to treatment, i.e. it has to be selective. We have investigated the statistics of selective control of the human apoptosis (cell death) signaling network. We have built a model for a heterogeneous population of cells, characterized by a signaling network with identical topology, but having different link strengths. The control of the life/death signal is realized by acting with external perturbations, modeling the effect of drugs, on the nodes and on the signaling flow. Concepts from statistical physics and information theory, including entropy, frustration, and non-linearity have been used to characterize the general properties of selective control. This knowledge was used as a guide in designing algorithms for identifying selective perturbations. Some of these algorithms have been implemented in vitro in high throughput experiments on real cell lines where a large number of combinations of different drugs can be tested.

  5. Combinatorial effects of odorants on mouse behavior

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Luis R.; Kondoh, Kunio; Ye, Xiaolan; Yoon, Kyoung-hye; Hernandez, Marcus; Buck, Linda B.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which odors induce instinctive behaviors are largely unknown. Odor detection in the mouse nose is mediated by >1, 000 different odorant receptors (ORs) and trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs). Odor perceptions are encoded combinatorially by ORs and can be altered by slight changes in the combination of activated receptors. However, the stereotyped nature of instinctive odor responses suggests the involvement of specific receptors and genetically programmed neural circuits relatively immune to extraneous odor stimuli and receptor inputs. Here, we report that, contrary to expectation, innate odor-induced behaviors can be context-dependent. First, different ligands for a given TAAR can vary in behavioral effect. Second, when combined, some attractive and aversive odorants neutralize one another’s behavioral effects. Both a TAAR ligand and a common odorant block aversion to a predator odor, indicating that this ability is not unique to TAARs and can extend to an aversive response of potential importance to survival. In vitro testing of single receptors with binary odorant mixtures indicates that behavioral blocking can occur without receptor antagonism in the nose. Moreover, genetic ablation of a single receptor prevents its cognate ligand from blocking predator odor aversion, indicating that the blocking requires sensory input from the receptor. Together, these findings indicate that innate odor-induced behaviors can depend on context, that signals from a single receptor can block innate odor aversion, and that instinctive behavioral responses to odors can be modulated by interactions in the brain among signals derived from different receptors. PMID:27208093

  6. Scalable Combinatorial Tools for Health Disparities Research

    PubMed Central

    Langston, Michael A.; Levine, Robert S.; Kilbourne, Barbara J.; Rogers, Gary L.; Kershenbaum, Anne D.; Baktash, Suzanne H.; Coughlin, Steven S.; Saxton, Arnold M.; Agboto, Vincent K.; Hood, Darryl B.; Litchveld, Maureen Y.; Oyana, Tonny J.; Matthews-Juarez, Patricia; Juarez, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite staggering investments made in unraveling the human genome, current estimates suggest that as much as 90% of the variance in cancer and chronic diseases can be attributed to factors outside an individual’s genetic endowment, particularly to environmental exposures experienced across his or her life course. New analytical approaches are clearly required as investigators turn to complicated systems theory and ecological, place-based and life-history perspectives in order to understand more clearly the relationships between social determinants, environmental exposures and health disparities. While traditional data analysis techniques remain foundational to health disparities research, they are easily overwhelmed by the ever-increasing size and heterogeneity of available data needed to illuminate latent gene x environment interactions. This has prompted the adaptation and application of scalable combinatorial methods, many from genome science research, to the study of population health. Most of these powerful tools are algorithmically sophisticated, highly automated and mathematically abstract. Their utility motivates the main theme of this paper, which is to describe real applications of innovative transdisciplinary models and analyses in an effort to help move the research community closer toward identifying the causal mechanisms and associated environmental contexts underlying health disparities. The public health exposome is used as a contemporary focus for addressing the complex nature of this subject. PMID:25310540

  7. Improved Crystallographic Structures using Extensive Combinatorial Refinement

    PubMed Central

    Nwachukwu, Jerome C.; Southern, Mark R.; Kiefer, James R.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Adams, Paul D.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Nettles, Kendall W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Identifying errors and alternate conformers, and modeling multiple main-chain conformers in poorly ordered regions are overarching problems in crystallographic structure determination that have limited automation efforts and structure quality. Here, we show that implementation of a full factorial designed set of standard refinement approaches, which we call ExCoR (Extensive Combinatorial Refinement), significantly improves structural models compared to the traditional linear tree approach, in which individual algorithms are tested linearly, and only incorporated if the model improves. ExCoR markedly improved maps and models, and reveals building errors and alternate conformations that were masked by traditional refinement approaches. Surprisingly, an individual algorithm that renders a model worse in isolation could still be necessary to produce the best overall model, suggesting that model distortion allows escape from local minima of optimization target function, here shown to be a hallmark limitation of the traditional approach. ExCoR thus provides a simple approach to improving structure determination. PMID:24076406

  8. Combinatorial molecular optimization of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Abdolhosseini Qomi, M.J.; Krakowiak, K.J.; Bauchy, M.; Stewart, K.L.; Shahsavari, R.; Jagannathan, D.; Brommer, D.B.; Baronnet, A.; Buehler, M.J.; Yip, S.; Ulm, F.-J; Van Vliet, K.J.; Pellenq, R.J-.M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its ubiquitous presence in the built environment, concrete’s molecular-level properties are only recently being explored using experimental and simulation studies. Increasing societal concerns about concrete’s environmental footprint have provided strong motivation to develop new concrete with greater specific stiffness or strength (for structures with less material). Herein, a combinatorial approach is described to optimize properties of cement hydrates. The method entails screening a computationally generated database of atomic structures of calcium-silicate-hydrate, the binding phase of concrete, against a set of three defect attributes: calcium-to-silicon ratio as compositional index and two correlation distances describing medium-range silicon-oxygen and calcium-oxygen environments. Although structural and mechanical properties correlate well with calcium-to-silicon ratio, the cross-correlation between all three defect attributes reveals an indentation modulus-to-hardness ratio extremum, analogous to identifying optimum network connectivity in glass rheology. We also comment on implications of the present findings for a novel route to optimize the nanoscale mechanical properties of cement hydrate. PMID:25248305

  9. De novo proteins from designed combinatorial libraries

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Michael H.; Das, Aditi; Go, Abigail; Bradley, Luke H.; Wei, Yinan

    2004-01-01

    Combinatorial libraries of de novo amino acid sequences can provide a rich source of diversity for the discovery of novel proteins with interesting and important activities. Randomly generated sequences, however, rarely fold into well-ordered proteinlike structures. To enhance the quality of a library, features of rational design must be used to focus sequence diversity into those regions of sequence space that are most likely to yield folded structures. This review describes how focused libraries can be constructed by designing the binary pattern of polar and nonpolar amino acids to favor proteins that contain abundant secondary structure, while simultaneously burying hydrophobic side chains and exposing hydrophilic side chains to solvent. The “binary code” for protein design was used to construct several libraries of de novo proteins, including both α-helical and β-sheet structures. The recently determined solution structure of a binary patterned four-helix bundle is well ordered, thereby demonstrating that sequences that have neither been selected by evolution (in vivo or in vitro) nor designed by computer can form nativelike proteins. Examples are presented demonstrating how binary patterned libraries have successfully produced well-ordered structures, cofactor binding, catalytic activity, self-assembled monolayers, amyloid-like nanofibrils, and protein-based biomaterials. PMID:15215517

  10. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  11. Strategies and applications of combinatorial methods and high throughput screening to the discovery of non-noble metal catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricker, Maureen L.; Sachtler, J. W. Adriaan; Gillespie, Ralph D.; McGonegal, Charles P.; Vega, Honorio; Bem, Dave S.; Holmgren, Jennifer S.

    2004-02-01

    The integrated End-to-End™ combinatorial process for catalyst preparation and screening, with emphasis on its capability to vary both process and compositional parameters will be demonstrated. Additionally, each step of the combinatorial screening process has been validated against results from traditional screening methods. The greatest challenge of all has been the adherence to the core concepts of the combinatorial approach. Catalyst libraries have been made and tested for naphthalene dehydrogenation chemistry. The preparation of these libraries has included the application of high throughput techniques for: metal impregnation; catalyst finishing; catalyst screening. The catalyst screening system has been used to find a non-noble metal catalyst system that can replace Pt in dehydrogenation applications in the petroleum industry. A proprietary catalytic composition was developed for the dehydrogenation of methylcyclohexane (MCH) to toluene starting with four non-noble metals of different proportions and four different supports (alumina, titania, zirconia and silica) prepared in different ways and applying a statistical design of experiments. These data demonstrate that all steps of catalyst preparation and screening are performed in a rapid, useful, high throughput manner. Data will be presented from the catalyst screening efforts will demonstrate that optimized metal composition is dependent on the support type.

  12. Combinatorially-generated library of 6-fluoroquinolone analogs as potential novel antitubercular agents: a chemometric and molecular modeling assessment.

    PubMed

    Minovski, Nikola; Perdih, Andrej; Solmajer, Tom

    2012-05-01

    The virtual combinatorial chemistry approach as a methodology for generating chemical libraries of structurally-similar analogs in a virtual environment was employed for building a general mixed virtual combinatorial library with a total of 53.871 6-FQ structural analogs, introducing the real synthetic pathways of three well known 6-FQ inhibitors. The druggability properties of the generated combinatorial 6-FQs were assessed using an in-house developed drug-likeness filter integrating the Lipinski/Veber rule-sets. The compounds recognized as drug-like were used as an external set for prediction of the biological activity values using a neural-networks (NN) model based on an experimentally-determined set of active 6-FQs. Furthermore, a subset of compounds was extracted from the pool of drug-like 6-FQs, with predicted biological activity, and subsequently used in virtual screening (VS) campaign combining pharmacophore modeling and molecular docking studies. This complex scheme, a powerful combination of chemometric and molecular modeling approaches provided novel QSAR guidelines that could aid in the further lead development of 6-FQs agents.

  13. A General Method for Insertion of Functional Proteins within Proteins via Combinatorial Selection of Permissive Junctions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yingjie; Zeng, Wenwen; Ye, Hui; Han, Kyung Ho; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Novick, Scott; Wilson, Ian A; Griffin, Patrick R; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Lerner, Richard A

    2015-08-20

    A major goal of modern protein chemistry is to create new proteins with different functions. One approach is to amalgamate secondary and tertiary structures from different proteins. This is difficult for several reasons, not the least of which is the fact that the junctions between secondary and tertiary structures are not degenerate and usually affect the function and folding of the entire complex. Here, we offer a solution to this problem by coupling a large combinatorial library of about 10(7) different N- and C-terminal junctions to a powerful system that selects for function. Using this approach, the entire Leptin and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were inserted into an antibody. Complexes with full retention of function in vivo and in vitro, although rare, were found easily by using an autocrine selection system to search for hormonal activity. Such large diversity systems, when coupled to robust selection systems, should enable construction of novel therapeutic proteins.

  14. Genetic engineering of modular PKSs: from combinatorial biosynthesis to synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Kira J

    2016-02-01

    Multienzyme polyketide synthases (PKSs) are molecular-scale assembly lines which construct complex natural products in bacteria. The underlying modular architecture of these gigantic catalysts inspired, from the moment of their discovery, attempts to modify them by genetic engineering to produce analogues of predictable structure. These efforts have resulted in hundreds of metabolites new to nature, as detailed in this review. However, in the face of many failures, the heady days of imagining the possibilities for a truly 'combinatorial biosynthesis' of polyketides have faded. It is now more appropriate to talk about 'PKS synthetic biology' with its more modest goals of delivering specific derivatives of known structure in combination with and as a complement to synthetic chemistry approaches. The reasons for these failures will be discussed in terms of our growing understanding of the three-dimensional architectures and mechanisms of these systems. Finally, some thoughts on the future of the field will be presented.

  15. Combinatorial enzymatic assay for the screening of a new class of bacterial cell wall inhibitors.

    PubMed

    El Zoeiby, Ahmed; Beaumont, Mélanie; Dubuc, Eric; Sanschagrin, François; Voyer, Normand; Levesque, Roger C

    2003-04-01

    We have developed a screening assay by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) to identify inhibitors for the bacterial essential enzymes MurA, -B, and -C. Libraries of compounds were synthesized using the mix-and-split combinatorial chemistry approach. Screening of the pooled compounds using the developed assay revealed the presence of many pools active in vitro. Pools of interest were tested for antibacterial activity. Individual molecules in the active pools were synthesized and retested with the TLC assay and with bacteria. We focused on the best five compounds for further analysis. They were tested for inhibition on each of the three enzymes separately, and showed no inhibition of MurA or MurB activity but were all inhibitors of MurC enzyme. This approach yielded interesting lead compounds for the development of novel antibacterial agents. PMID:12628682

  16. Genetic engineering of modular PKSs: from combinatorial biosynthesis to synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Kira J

    2016-02-01

    Multienzyme polyketide synthases (PKSs) are molecular-scale assembly lines which construct complex natural products in bacteria. The underlying modular architecture of these gigantic catalysts inspired, from the moment of their discovery, attempts to modify them by genetic engineering to produce analogues of predictable structure. These efforts have resulted in hundreds of metabolites new to nature, as detailed in this review. However, in the face of many failures, the heady days of imagining the possibilities for a truly 'combinatorial biosynthesis' of polyketides have faded. It is now more appropriate to talk about 'PKS synthetic biology' with its more modest goals of delivering specific derivatives of known structure in combination with and as a complement to synthetic chemistry approaches. The reasons for these failures will be discussed in terms of our growing understanding of the three-dimensional architectures and mechanisms of these systems. Finally, some thoughts on the future of the field will be presented. PMID:26555805

  17. HTS by NMR of Combinatorial Libraries: A Fragment-Based Approach to Ligand Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bainan; Zhang, Ziming; Noberini, Roberta; Barile, Elisa; Giulianotti, Marc; Pinilla, Clemencia; Houghten, Richard A.; Pasquale, Elena B.; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Fragment-based ligand design (FBLD) approaches have become more widely used in drug discovery projects from both academia and industry, and are even often preferred to traditional high-throughput screening (HTS) of large collection of compounds (>105). A key advantage of FBLD approaches is that these often rely on robust biophysical methods such as NMR spectroscopy for detection of ligand binding, hence are less prone to artifacts that too often plague the results from HTS campaigns. In this article, we introduce a screening strategy that takes advantage of both the robustness of protein NMR spectroscopy as the detection method, and the basic principles of combinatorial chemistry to enable the screening of large libraries of fragments (>105 compounds) preassembled on a common backbone. We used the method to identify compounds that target protein-protein interactions. PMID:23352136

  18. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  19. Forensic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-07-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  20. Approaches towards the automated interpretation and prediction of electrospray tandem mass spectra of non-peptidic combinatorial compounds.

    PubMed

    Klagkou, Katerina; Pullen, Frank; Harrison, Mark; Organ, Andy; Firth, Alistair; Langley, G John

    2003-01-01

    Combinatorial chemistry is widely used within the pharmaceutical industry as a means of rapid identification of potential drugs. With the growth of combinatorial libraries, mass spectrometry (MS) became the key analytical technique because of its speed of analysis, sensitivity, accuracy and ability to be coupled with other analytical techniques. In the majority of cases, electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) has become the default ionisation technique. However, due to the absence of fragment ions in the resulting spectra, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is required to provide structural information for the identification of an unknown analyte. This work discusses the first steps of an investigation into the fragmentation pathways taking place in electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The ultimate goal for this project is to set general fragmentation rules for non-peptidic, pharmaceutical, combinatorial compounds. As an aid, an artificial intelligence (AI) software package is used to facilitate interpretation of the spectra. This initial study has focused on determining the fragmentation rules for some classes of compound types that fit the remit as outlined above. Based on studies carried out on several combinatorial libraries of these compounds, it was established that different classes of drug molecules follow unique fragmentation pathways. In addition to these general observations, the specific ionisation processes and the fragmentation pathways involved in the electrospray mass spectra of these systems were explored. The ultimate goal will be to incorporate our findings into the computer program and allow identification of an unknown, non-peptidic compound following insertion of its ES-MS/MS spectrum into the AI package. The work herein demonstrates the potential benefit of such an approach in addressing the issue of high-throughput, automated MS/MS data interpretation.

  1. Combinatorial Optimization by Amoeba-Based Neurocomputer with Chaotic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aono, Masashi; Hirata, Yoshito; Hara, Masahiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    We demonstrate a computing system based on an amoeba of a true slime mold Physarum capable of producing rich spatiotemporal oscillatory behavior. Our system operates as a neurocomputer because an optical feedback control in accordance with a recurrent neural network algorithm leads the amoeba's photosensitive branches to search for a stable configuration concurrently. We show our system's capability of solving the traveling salesman problem. Furthermore, we apply various types of nonlinear time series analysis to the amoeba's oscillatory behavior in the problem-solving process. The results suggest that an individual amoeba might be characterized as a set of coupled chaotic oscillators.

  2. Combinatorial effects on clumped isotopes and their significance in biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Laurence Y.

    2016-01-01

    The arrangement of isotopes within a collection of molecules records their physical and chemical histories. Clumped-isotope analysis interrogates these arrangements, i.e., how often rare isotopes are bound together, which in many cases can be explained by equilibrium and/or kinetic isotope fractionation. However, purely combinatorial effects, rooted in the statistics of pairing atoms in a closed system, are also relevant, and not well understood. Here, I show that combinatorial isotope effects are most important when two identical atoms are neighbors on the same molecule (e.g., O2, N2, and D-D clumping in CH4). When the two halves of an atom pair are either assembled with different isotopic preferences or drawn from different reservoirs, combinatorial effects cause depletions in clumped-isotope abundance that are most likely between zero and -1‰, although they could potentially be -10‰ or larger for D-D pairs. These depletions are of similar magnitude, but of opposite sign, to low-temperature equilibrium clumped-isotope effects for many small molecules. Enzymatic isotope-pairing reactions, which can have site-specific isotopic fractionation factors and atom reservoirs, should express this class of combinatorial isotope effect, although it is not limited to biological reactions. Chemical-kinetic isotope effects, which are related to a bond-forming transition state, arise independently and express second-order combinatorial effects related to the abundance of the rare isotope. Heteronuclear moeties (e.g., Csbnd O and Csbnd H), are insensitive to direct combinatorial influences, but secondary combinatorial influences are evident. In general, both combinatorial and chemical-kinetic factors are important for calculating and interpreting clumped-isotope signatures of kinetically controlled reactions. I apply this analytical framework to isotope-pairing reactions relevant to geochemical oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen cycling that may be influenced by combinatorial

  3. Chemistry and dynamics of the lower troposphere over North America and the North Atlantic Ocean in fall 1997 observed using an airborne UV DIAL system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Fenn, Marta A.; Kooi, Susan A.; Browell, Edward V.; Fuelberg, Henry

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's airborne UV Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system participated in the Subsonic Assessment, Ozone and Nitrogen Oxide Experiment (SONEX) mission from October 13 to November 12, 1997. The purpose of the mission was to study the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere in and near the North Atlantic flight corridor to better understand this region of the atmosphere and how civilian air travel in the corridor might be affecting the atmospheric chemistry. Bases of operations included NASA Ames, California (37.4 deg N, 122.1 deg W); Bangor, Maine (44.8 deg N, 68.8 deg W); Shannon, Ireland (52.7 deg N, 8.9 deg W); and Lajes, Terceira Island, Azores (38.8 deg N, 27.1 deg W). Since the UV DIAL system observes in the nadir as well as the zenith, aerosol and ozone data were obtained from near the Earth's surface to the lower stratosphere. A number of interesting features were noted relating to both chemistry and dynamics of the troposphere, which are reported here.

  4. Prominent Chemists Team Up to Review Frontiers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Rudy M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a symposium which focused on the influence of inorganic chemistry on organic synthesis, the impact of organic chemistry on biochemistry and vice versa, chemical reaction dynamics, and advances in inorganic chemistry. Explains the purpose of the symposium was to illustrate the intellectual dynamism of modern chemistry. (MVL)

  5. Recent advances in combinatorial biosynthesis for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Huihua; Liu, Zihe; Zhao, Huimin; Ang, Ee Lui

    2015-01-01

    Because of extraordinary structural diversity and broad biological activities, natural products have played a significant role in drug discovery. These therapeutically important secondary metabolites are assembled and modified by dedicated biosynthetic pathways in their host living organisms. Traditionally, chemists have attempted to synthesize natural product analogs that are important sources of new drugs. However, the extraordinary structural complexity of natural products sometimes makes it challenging for traditional chemical synthesis, which usually involves multiple steps, harsh conditions, toxic organic solvents, and byproduct wastes. In contrast, combinatorial biosynthesis exploits substrate promiscuity and employs engineered enzymes and pathways to produce novel “unnatural” natural products, substantially expanding the structural diversity of natural products with potential pharmaceutical value. Thus, combinatorial biosynthesis provides an environmentally friendly way to produce natural product analogs. Efficient expression of the combinatorial biosynthetic pathway in genetically tractable heterologous hosts can increase the titer of the compound, eventually resulting in less expensive drugs. In this review, we will discuss three major strategies for combinatorial biosynthesis: 1) precursor-directed biosynthesis; 2) enzyme-level modification, which includes swapping of the entire domains, modules and subunits, site-specific mutagenesis, and directed evolution; 3) pathway-level recombination. Recent examples of combinatorial biosynthesis employing these strategies will also be highlighted in this review. PMID:25709407

  6. Recent advances in combinatorial biosynthesis for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huihua; Liu, Zihe; Zhao, Huimin; Ang, Ee Lui

    2015-01-01

    Because of extraordinary structural diversity and broad biological activities, natural products have played a significant role in drug discovery. These therapeutically important secondary metabolites are assembled and modified by dedicated biosynthetic pathways in their host living organisms. Traditionally, chemists have attempted to synthesize natural product analogs that are important sources of new drugs. However, the extraordinary structural complexity of natural products sometimes makes it challenging for traditional chemical synthesis, which usually involves multiple steps, harsh conditions, toxic organic solvents, and byproduct wastes. In contrast, combinatorial biosynthesis exploits substrate promiscuity and employs engineered enzymes and pathways to produce novel "unnatural" natural products, substantially expanding the structural diversity of natural products with potential pharmaceutical value. Thus, combinatorial biosynthesis provides an environmentally friendly way to produce natural product analogs. Efficient expression of the combinatorial biosynthetic pathway in genetically tractable heterologous hosts can increase the titer of the compound, eventually resulting in less expensive drugs. In this review, we will discuss three major strategies for combinatorial biosynthesis: 1) precursor-directed biosynthesis; 2) enzyme-level modification, which includes swapping of the entire domains, modules and subunits, site-specific mutagenesis, and directed evolution; 3) pathway-level recombination. Recent examples of combinatorial biosynthesis employing these strategies will also be highlighted in this review.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of organometallic reaction dynamics, and, Enhancing achievement in chemistry for African American students through innovations in pedagogy aligned with supporting assessment and curriculum and integrated under an alternative research paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebane, Sheryl Dee

    Part I. Molecular dynamics simulation of organometallic reaction dynamics. To study the interplay of solute and solvent dynamics, large-scale molecular dynamics simulations were employed. Lennard-Jones and electrostatic models of potential energies from solvent-only studies were combined with solute potentials generated from ab-initio calculations. Radial distribution functions and other measures revealed the polar solvent's response to solute dynamics following CO dissociation. In future studies, the time-scale for solvent coordination will be confirmed with ultrafast spectroscopy data. Part II. Enhancing achievement in chemistry for African American students through innovations in pedagogy aligned with supporting assessment and curriculum and integrated under an alternative research paradigm. Much progress has been made in the area of research in education that focuses on teaching and learning in science. Much effort has also centered on documenting and exploring the disparity in academic achievement between underrepresented minority students and students comprising a majority in academic circles. However, few research projects have probed educational inequities in the context of mainstream science education. In order to enrich this research area and to better reach underserved learning communities, the educational experience of African American students in an ethnically and academically diverse high school science class has been examined throughout one, largely successful, academic year. The bulk of data gathered during the study was obtained through several qualitative research methods and was interpreted using research literature that offered fresh theoretical perspectives on equity that may better support effective action.

  8. Surface layer ozone and nitric oxides in the Arctic: The inuence of boundary layer dynamics, snowpack chemistry, surface exchanges, and seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Brie A.

    The snowpack is a region of active chemistry. Aqueous chemistry in a quasi-liquid layer on snow grains and gas-phase chemical reactions in snow interstitial air can lead to the production or destruction of important trace gases. Physical transport parameters such as wind pumping and diffusion affect the vertical distribution of gases within the snowpack. The resulting emission or uptake of trace gases at the atmosphere-snowpack interface can have significant in uence on the chemistry of the lower atmosphere. In this work the dynamic interactions between the snowpack and atmosphere are examined from multiple perspectives. The primary focus is on ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the Arctic, a region undergoing widespread environmental change. To investigate an ice-sheet location with year round snow cover, data from a two-year campaign at Summit, Greenland are implemented. At Summit this study examines (1) the processes contributing to vigorous chemistry in snow interstitial air, and (2) the role of the boundary layer over snow in determining surface layer NOx. Physical and chemical processes are shown to contribute to distinct seasonal and diurnal cycles of O3, NO, and NO2 in the snowpack. Boundary layer depths estimated from sonic anemometer turbulence quantities are used alongside sodar-derived values to show that the depth of the stable to weakly stable boundary layer at Summit was not a primary factor in determining NO x in early summer. Motivated by observations of an increase in the length of the snow-free season in the Arctic in recent decades, data from a one-year experiment at the seasonally-snow covered location of Toolik Lake, AK are also incorporated. This study shows the first observations of springtime ozone depletion events at a location over 200 km from the coast in the Arctic. FLEXPART analysis is used to illustrate that these inland events are linked to transport conditions. Lastly at this location, eddy-covariance O3 uxes were calculated to

  9. Vertical dynamics of the aquifer microbial community associated with groundwater chemistry in the artificial recharge site in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Hee Sun; Hyun, Sung Pil; Kim, Boa; Shin, Doyun; Ha, Kyoochul

    2014-05-01

    Artificial groundwater recharge offers an opportunity to better manage groundwater resources by storing water in aquifers and increasing the amount of groundwater available for abstraction during high demand periods. It is important to understand the linkage of microbial ecology to groundwater chemistry to assess changes in groundwater quality caused by artificial groundwater recharge. In this study, we investigated how the structure and diversity of this subsurface microbial community correlates with and impacts upon groundwater chemistry. Groundwater samples at two different depths (10 and 33 m) were collected from three monitoring wells (MLW 1, MLW 2 and MLW 3) in the artificial groundwater recharge demonstration site in Changwon, Korea. The groundwater samples were filtered with 0.45 um membrane filters and then used for the anion and cation analysis. A 4L of each groundwater sample was immediately filtered with 0.2 um membrane filters and the filters were used for DNA extraction using Fast DNA Spin Kit for soil (MP Bio, USA). Further molecular work processes including pyrosequencing were carried out at Chunlab, Inc. (Seoul, Korea). Pyrosequencing results showed all major phyla were OD 1, OD3, and OD 11 in shallow groundwater samples while Proteobacteria (β-proteobacteria and δ-proteobacteria) and Bacterioidetes were dominant phyla in deep groundwater. The Shannon diversity index indicated that the microbial community was much more diverse in shallow groundwater than in deep groundwater. Heat map and hierarchical cluster analysis based on the relative abundance of OTUs at genus level showed a clear distinction between shallow and deep groundwater. Differences in the vertical community structure were driven by the major species such as Sufuicurvum sp., Pseudomonas sp., Acidiferrobacter sp., Gallionella sp., and Ferribacterium sp. The results show that several distinct factors such as iron and sulfate concentration control the vertical composition of microbial

  10. An algorithmically optimized combinatorial library screened by digital imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Goldman, E R; Youvan, D C

    1992-12-01

    Combinatorial cassettes based on a phylogenetic "target set" were used to simultaneously mutagenize seven amino acid residues on one face of a transmembrane alpha helix comprising a bacteriochlorophyll binding site in the light harvesting II antenna of Rhodobacter capsulatus. This pigmented protein provides a model system for developing complex mutagenesis schemes, because simple absorption spectroscopy can be used to assay protein expression, structure, and function. Colony screening by Digital Imaging Spectroscopy showed that 6% of the optimized library bound bacteriochlorophyll in two distinct spectroscopic classes. This is approximately 200 times the throughput (ca. 0.03%) of conventional combinatorial cassette mutagenesis using [NN(G/C)]. "Doping" algorithms evaluated in this model system are generally applicable and should enable simultaneous mutagenesis at more positions in a protein than currently possible, or alternatively, decrease the screening size of combinatorial libraries.

  11. Combinatorial vector fields and the valley structure of fitness landscapes.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Bärbel M R; Stadler, Peter F

    2010-12-01

    Adaptive (downhill) walks are a computationally convenient way of analyzing the geometric structure of fitness landscapes. Their inherently stochastic nature has limited their mathematical analysis, however. Here we develop a framework that interprets adaptive walks as deterministic trajectories in combinatorial vector fields and in return associate these combinatorial vector fields with weights that measure their steepness across the landscape. We show that the combinatorial vector fields and their weights have a product structure that is governed by the neutrality of the landscape. This product structure makes practical computations feasible. The framework presented here also provides an alternative, and mathematically more convenient, way of defining notions of valleys, saddle points, and barriers in landscape. As an application, we propose a refined approximation for transition rates between macrostates that are associated with the valleys of the landscape.

  12. Massively parallel high-order combinatorial genetics in human cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alan S L; Choi, Gigi C G; Cheng, Allen A; Purcell, Oliver; Lu, Timothy K

    2015-09-01

    The systematic functional analysis of combinatorial genetics has been limited by the throughput that can be achieved and the order of complexity that can be studied. To enable massively parallel characterization of genetic combinations in human cells, we developed a technology for rapid, scalable assembly of high-order barcoded combinatorial genetic libraries that can be quantified with high-throughput sequencing. We applied this technology, combinatorial genetics en masse (CombiGEM), to create high-coverage libraries of 1,521 two-wise and 51,770 three-wise barcoded combinations of 39 human microRNA (miRNA) precursors. We identified miRNA combinations that synergistically sensitize drug-resistant cancer cells to chemotherapy and/or inhibit cancer cell proliferation, providing insights into complex miRNA networks. More broadly, our method will enable high-throughput profiling of multifactorial genetic combinations that regulate phenotypes of relevance to biomedicine, biotechnology and basic science.

  13. Massively parallel high-order combinatorial genetics in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Alan S L; Choi, Gigi C G; Cheng, Allen A; Purcell, Oliver; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-01-01

    The systematic functional analysis of combinatorial genetics has been limited by the throughput that can be achieved and the order of complexity that can be studied. To enable massively parallel characterization of genetic combinations in human cells, we developed a technology for rapid, scalable assembly of high-order barcoded combinatorial genetic libraries that can be quantified with high-throughput sequencing. We applied this technology, combinatorial genetics en masse (CombiGEM), to create high-coverage libraries of 1,521 two-wise and 51,770 three-wise barcoded combinations of 39 human microRNA (miRNA) precursors. We identified miRNA combinations that synergistically sensitize drug-resistant cancer cells to chemotherapy and/or inhibit cancer cell proliferation, providing insights into complex miRNA networks. More broadly, our method will enable high-throughput profiling of multifactorial genetic combinations that regulate phenotypes of relevance to biomedicine, biotechnology and basic science. PMID:26280411

  14. View Discovery in OLAP Databases through Statistical Combinatorial Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Burke, Edward J.; Critchlow, Terence J.

    2009-05-01

    The capability of OLAP database software systems to handle data complexity comes at a high price for analysts, presenting them a combinatorially vast space of views of a relational database. We respond to the need to deploy technologies sufficient to allow users to guide themselves to areas of local structure by casting the space of ``views'' of an OLAP database as a combinatorial object of all projections and subsets, and ``view discovery'' as an search process over that lattice. We equip the view lattice with statistical information theoretical measures sufficient to support a combinatorial optimization process. We outline ``hop-chaining'' as a particular view discovery algorithm over this object, wherein users are guided across a permutation of the dimensions by searching for successive two-dimensional views, pushing seen dimensions into an increasingly large background filter in a ``spiraling'' search process. We illustrate this work in the context of data cubes recording summary statistics for radiation portal monitors at US ports.

  15. The Lens of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thalos, Mariam

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry possesses a distinctive theoretical lens--a distinctive set of theoretical concerns regarding the dynamics and transformations of a perplexing variety of organic and nonorganic substances--to which it must be faithful. Even if it is true that chemical facts bear a special (reductive) relationship to physical facts, nonetheless it will…

  16. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new chemistry expermiments are described. Broad areas covered include atomic structure, solubility, gaseous diffusion, endothermic reactions, alcohols, equilibrium, atomic volumes, and some improvised apparatus. (PS)

  17. Parallel solution combustion synthesis for combinatorial materials studies.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhen-Lin; Geng, Bin; Bao, Jun; Gao, Chen

    2005-01-01

    A parallel solution combustion synthesis technique was developed for combinatorial materials studies. The vigorous combustion reactions were successfully limited in the microreactors by using a substrate-net-mask microreactor system and the lowest adoptable furnace temperature. Using this technique, a luminescent materials library of Y3Al5O12/Tb(chi) was synthesized with the aid of an ink-jet delivery system. Structure and luminescence characterizations were implemented using X-ray diffraction and UV/X-ray spectroscopies, respectively. The results show that this technique is reliable and applicable to combinatorial study of powder materials with high synthesis temperature.

  18. Combinatorial measurements of Hall effect and resistivity in oxide films.

    PubMed

    Clayhold, J A; Kerns, B M; Schroer, M D; Rench, D W; Logvenov, G; Bollinger, A T; Bozovic, I

    2008-03-01

    A system for the simultaneous measurement of the Hall effect in 31 different locations as well as the measurement of the resistivity in 30 different locations on a single oxide thin film grown with a composition gradient is described. Considerations for designing and operating a high-throughput system for characterizing highly conductive oxides with Hall coefficients as small as 10(-10) m3/C are discussed. Results from measurements on films grown using combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy show the usefulness of characterizing combinatorial libraries via both the resistivity and the Hall effect. PMID:18377026

  19. A combinatorial approach to the discovery of advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Dong

    This thesis discusses the application of combinatorial methods to the search of advanced materials. The goal of this research is to develop a "parallel" or "fast sequential" methodology for both the synthesis and characterization of materials with novel electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Our hope is to dramatically accelerate the rate at which materials are generated and studied. We have developed two major combinatorial methodologies to this end. One involves generating thin film materials libraries using a combination of various thin film deposition and masking strategies with multi-layer thin film precursors. The second approach is to generate powder materials libraries with solution precursors delivered with a multi-nozzle inkjet system. The first step in this multistep combinatorial process involves the design and synthesis of high density libraries of diverse materials aimed at exploring a large segment of the compositional space of interest based on our understanding of the physical and structural properties of a particular class of materials. Rapid, sensitive measurements of one or more relevant physical properties of each library member result in the identification of a family of "lead" compositions with a desired property. These compositions are then optimized by continuously varying the stoichiometries of a more focused set of precursors. Materials with the optimal composition are then synthesized in quantities sufficient for detailed characterization of their structural and physical properties. Finally, the information obtained from this process should enhance our predictive ability in subsequent experiments. Combinatorial methods have been successfully used in the synthesis and discovery of materials with novel properties. For example, a class of cobaltite based giant magnetoresistance (GMR) ceramics was discovered; Application of this method to luminescence materials has resulted in the discovery of a few highly efficient tricolor

  20. Fast Combinatorial Algorithm for the Solution of Linearly Constrained Least Squares Problems

    DOEpatents

    Van Benthem, Mark H.; Keenan, Michael R.

    2008-11-11

    A fast combinatorial algorithm can significantly reduce the computational burden when solving general equality and inequality constrained least squares problems with large numbers of observation vectors. The combinatorial algorithm provides a mathematically rigorous solution and operates at great speed by reorganizing the calculations to take advantage of the combinatorial nature of the problems to be solved. The combinatorial algorithm exploits the structure that exists in large-scale problems in order to minimize the number of arithmetic operations required to obtain a solution.

  1. Theory of site-specific interactions of the combinatorial transcription factors with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, R.

    2010-05-01

    We derive a functional relationship between the mean first passage time associated with the concurrent binding of multiple transcription factors (TFs) at their respective combinatorial cis-regulatory module sites (CRMs) and the number n of TFs involved in the regulation of the initiation of transcription of a gene of interest. Our results suggest that the overall search time τs that is required by the n TFs to locate their CRMs which are all located on the same DNA chain scales with n as τs~nα where α ~ (2/5). When the jump size k that is associated with the dynamics of all the n TFs along DNA is higher than that of the critical jump size kc that scales with the size of DNA N as kc ~ N2/3, we observe a similar power law scaling relationship and also the exponent α. When k < kc, α shows a strong dependence on both n and k. Apparently there is a critical number of combinatorial TFs nc ~ 20 that is required to efficiently regulate the initiation of transcription of a given gene below which (2/5) < α < 1 and beyond which α > 1. These results seem to be independent of the initial distances between the TFs and their corresponding CRMs and also suggest that the maximum number of TFs involved in a given combinatorial regulation of the initiation of transcription of a gene of interest seems to be restricted by the degree of condensation of the genomic DNA. The optimum number mopt of roadblock protein molecules per genome at which the search time associated with these n TFs to locate their binding sites is a minimum seems to scale as mopt~Lnα/2 where L is the sliding length of TFs whose maximum value seems to be such that L <= 104 bps for the E. coli bacterial genome.

  2. The effect of breaking gravity waves on the dynamics and chemistry of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (invited review)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of breaking gravity waves on the dynamics and chemical composition of the 60 to 110 km region is investigated with a two dimensional model that includes a parameterization of gravity wave momentum deposition and diffusion. The dynamical model is described by Garcia and Solomon (1983) and Solomon and Garcia (1983) and includes a complete chemical scheme for the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The parameterization of Lindzen (1981) is used to calculate the momentum deposited and the turbulent diffusion produced by the gravity waves. It is found that wave momentum deposition drives a very vigorous mean meridional circulation, produces a very cold summer mesopause and reverse the zonal wind jets above about 85 km. The seasonal variation of the turbulent diffusion coefficient is consistent with the behavior of mesospheric turbulences inferred from MST radar echoes. The large degree of consistency between model results and various types of dynamical and chemical data supports very strongly the hypothesis that breaking gravity waves play a major role in determining the zonally-averaged dynamical and chemical structure of the 60 to 110 km region of the atmosphere.

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and content information related to chemistry. Topics include polarizing power; calorimetry and momentum; microcomputers in school chemistry; a constant-volume dispenser for liquids, floating magnets, and crystal lattices; preparation of chromium; and solvent polarity and…

  4. Influence of Dynamics and Chemistry on the Diurnal Variation of VOCs in the Planetary Boundary Layer above a Mixed Forest Canopy in the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, A. B.; Su, L.; Patton, E. G.; Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Mak, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The planetary boundary layer (PBL) is a region of inherent interest because reactive VOCs emitted from the forest canopy are mixed with the residual and free tropospheric air masses, oxidized, and/or otherwise removed in this region. The characterization of diurnal variation of VOCs in the PBL is limited due to the lack of appropriate sampling platforms that are able to probe all the regions of interest: from the surface to the entrainment zone. Here we present the application of the Whole Air Sample Profiler (WASP) system during the 2013 Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS) campaign. A total of 41 research flights (RFs) were carried out during the 2013 SAS campaign between June 1 and June 14 over the Alabama Aquatic Biodiversity Center (AABC) site and the SEARCH site. During each RF, ambient air sampling started from 50-100 m above the canopy top and stopped at ~1200 m above the mean sea level (a.m.s.l). The air samples were subsequently analyzed by using a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS). Here we analyze the vertical profiles and averaged diurnal variation of the mixing ratios of several reactive VOC species, including isoprene, the sum of monoterpenes, and first generation oxidation products of isoprene: methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein (MVK+MACR). A MiXed Layer Chemistry (MXLCH) model, guided by the meteorological and chemical observations during the SAS campaign, is used to study the influence of boundary layer dynamics and new isoprene oxidation mechanism on the diurnal variation of major biogenic VOCs emitted from the forest canopy. The new scheme includes OH recycling through two pathways under low-NOx regime: (1) hydroxyl peroxy radicals (HOC5H8OO•; ISOPO2) unimolecular isomerization, and (2) ISOPO2+HO2. The model is able to reproduce the evolution of the boundary layer dynamics (including potential temperature, and boundary layer height) during the selected simulation dates. Based on the model results, budget

  5. NON-EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY OF DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING PRESTELLAR CORES. I. BASIC MAGNETIC AND NON-MAGNETIC MODELS AND PARAMETER STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Willacy, Karen; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J.

    2012-07-01

    We combine dynamical and non-equilibrium chemical modeling of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores and investigate the evolution of molecular abundances in the contracting core. We model both magnetic cores, with varying degrees of initial magnetic support, and non-magnetic cores, with varying collapse delay times. We explore, through a parameter study, the competing effects of various model parameters in the evolving molecular abundances, including the elemental C/O ratio, the temperature, and the cosmic-ray ionization rate. We find that different models show their largest quantitative differences at the center of the core, whereas the outer layers, which evolve slower, have abundances which are severely degenerate among different dynamical models. There is a large range of possible abundance values for different models at a fixed evolutionary stage (central density), which demonstrates the large potential of chemical differentiation in prestellar cores. However, degeneracies among different models, compounded with uncertainties induced by other model parameters, make it difficult to discriminate among dynamical models. To address these difficulties, we identify abundance ratios between particular molecules, the measurement of which would have maximal potential for discrimination among the different models examined here. In particular, we find that the ratios between NH{sub 3} and CO, NH{sub 2} and CO, and NH{sub 3} and HCO{sup +} are sensitive to the evolutionary timescale, and that the ratio between HCN and OH is sensitive to the C/O ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that measurements of the central deviation (central depletion or enhancement) of abundances of certain molecules are good indicators of the dynamics of the core.

  6. Combinatorial thin film composition mapping using three dimensional deposition profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suram, Santosh K.; Zhou, Lan; Becerra-Stasiewicz, Natalie; Kan, Kevin; Jones, Ryan J. R.; Kendrick, Brian M.; Gregoire, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Many next-generation technologies are limited by material performance, leading to increased interest in the discovery of advanced materials using combinatorial synthesis, characterization, and screening. Several combinatorial synthesis techniques, such as solution based methods, advanced manufacturing, and physical vapor deposition, are currently being employed for various applications. In particular, combinatorial magnetron sputtering is a versatile technique that provides synthesis of high-quality thin film composition libraries. Spatially addressing the composition of these thin films generally requires elemental quantification measurements using techniques such as energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy or X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Since these measurements are performed ex-situ and post-deposition, they are unable to provide real-time design of experiments, a capability that is required for rapid synthesis of a specific composition library. By using three quartz crystal monitors attached to a stage with translational and rotational degrees of freedom, we measure three-dimensional deposition profiles of deposition sources whose tilt with respect to the substrate is robotically controlled. We exhibit the utility of deposition profiles and tilt control to optimize the deposition geometry for specific combinatorial synthesis experiments.

  7. Combinatorial structure of k-semiprimitive matrix families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al'pin, Yu A.; Al'pina, V. S.

    2016-05-01

    Protasov's Theorem on the combinatorial structure of k-primitive families of non-negative matrices is generalized to k-semiprimitive matrix families. The main tool is the binary relation of colour compatibility on the vertices of the coloured graph of the matrix family. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  8. Identities for Generalized Fibonacci Numbers: A Combinatorial Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plaza, A.; Falcon, S.

    2008-01-01

    This note shows a combinatorial approach to some identities for generalized Fibonacci numbers. While it is a straightforward task to prove these identities with induction, and also by arithmetical manipulations such as rearrangements, the approach used here is quite simple to follow and eventually reduces the proof to a counting problem. (Contains…

  9. Extreme events in total ozone over Arosa - Part 2: Fingerprints of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry and effects on mean values and long-term changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Peter, T.; Ribatet, M.; Davison, A. C.; Stübi, R.; Weihs, P.; Holawe, F.

    2010-10-01

    In this study the frequency of days with extreme low (termed ELOs) and extreme high (termed EHOs) total ozone values and their influence on mean values and trends are analyzed for the world's longest total ozone record (Arosa, Switzerland). The results show (i) an increase in ELOs and (ii) a decrease in EHOs during the last decades and (iii) that the overall trend during the 1970s and 1980s in total ozone is strongly dominated by changes in these extreme events. After removing the extremes, the time series shows a strongly reduced trend (reduction by a factor of 2.5 for trend in annual mean). Excursions in the frequency of extreme events reveal "fingerprints" of dynamical factors such as ENSO or NAO, and chemical factors, such as cold Arctic vortex ozone losses, as well as major volcanic eruptions of the 20th century (Gunung Agung, El Chichón, Mt. Pinatubo). Furthermore, atmospheric loading of ozone depleting substances leads to a continuous modification of column ozone in the Northern Hemisphere also with respect to extreme values (partly again in connection with polar vortex contributions). Application of extreme value theory allows the identification of many more such "fingerprints" than conventional time series analysis of annual and seasonal mean values. The analysis shows in particular the strong influence of dynamics, revealing that even moderate ENSO and NAO events have a discernible effect on total ozone. Overall the approach to extremal modelling provides new information on time series properties, variability, trends and the influence of dynamics and chemistry, complementing earlier analyses focusing only on monthly (or annual) mean values.

  10. Extreme events in total ozone over Arosa - Part 2: Fingerprints of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry and effects on mean values and long-term changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Peter, T.; Ribatet, M.; Davison, A. C.; Stübi, R.; Weihs, P.; Holawe, F.

    2010-05-01

    In this study the frequency of days with extreme low (termed ELOs) and extreme high (termed EHOs) total ozone values and their influence on mean values and trends are analyzed for the world's longest total ozone record (Arosa, Switzerland). The results show (a) an increase in ELOs and (b) a decrease in EHOs during the last decades and (c) that the overall trend during the 1970s and 1980s in total ozone is strongly dominated by changes in these extreme events. After removing the extremes, the time series shows a strongly reduced trend (reduction by a factor of 2.5 for trend in annual mean). Excursions in the frequency of extreme events reveal "fingerprints" of dynamical factors such as ENSO or NAO, and chemical factors, such as cold Arctic vortex ozone losses, as well as major volcanic eruptions of the 20th century (Gunung Agung, El Chichón, Mt. Pinatubo). Furthermore, atmospheric loading of ozone depleting substances leads to a continuous modification of column ozone in the Northern Hemisphere also with respect to extreme values (partly again in connection with polar vortex contributions). Application of extreme value theory allows the identification of many more such "fingerprints" than conventional time series analysis of annual and seasonal mean values. The analysis shows in particular the strong influence of dynamics, revealing that even moderate ENSO and NAO events have a discernible effect on total ozone. Overall the approach to extremal modelling provides new information on time series properties, variability, trends and the influence of dynamics and chemistry, complementing earlier analyses focusing only on monthly (or annual) mean values.

  11. Structure-based design of combinatorial mutagenesis libraries

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Deeptak; Grigoryan, Gevorg; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The development of protein variants with improved properties (thermostability, binding affinity, catalytic activity, etc.) has greatly benefited from the application of high-throughput screens evaluating large, diverse combinatorial libraries. At the same time, since only a very limited portion of sequence space can be experimentally constructed and tested, an attractive possibility is to use computational protein design to focus libraries on a productive portion of the space. We present a general-purpose method, called “Structure-based Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis” (SOCoM), which can optimize arbitrarily large combinatorial mutagenesis libraries directly based on structural energies of their constituents. SOCoM chooses both positions and substitutions, employing a combinatorial optimization framework based on library-averaged energy potentials in order to avoid explicitly modeling every variant in every possible library. In case study applications to green fluorescent protein, β-lactamase, and lipase A, SOCoM optimizes relatively small, focused libraries whose variants achieve energies comparable to or better than previous library design efforts, as well as larger libraries (previously not designable by structure-based methods) whose variants cover greater diversity while still maintaining substantially better energies than would be achieved by representative random library approaches. By allowing the creation of large-scale combinatorial libraries based on structural calculations, SOCoM promises to increase the scope of applicability of computational protein design and improve the hit rate of discovering beneficial variants. While designs presented here focus on variant stability (predicted by total energy), SOCoM can readily incorporate other structure-based assessments, such as the energy gap between alternative conformational or bound states. PMID:25611189

  12. Paths and partitions: Combinatorial descriptions of the parafermionic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Pierre

    2009-09-01

    The Zk parafermionic conformal field theories, despite the relative complexity of their modes algebra, offer the simplest context for the study of the bases of states and their different combinatorial representations. Three bases are known. The classic one is given by strings of the fundamental parafermionic operators whose sequences of modes are in correspondence with restricted partitions with parts at distance k -1 differing at least by 2. Another basis is expressed in terms of the ordered modes of the k -1 different parafermionic fields, which are in correspondence with the so-called multiple partitions. Both types of partitions have a natural (Bressoud) path representation. Finally, a third basis, formulated in terms of different paths, is inherited from the solution of the restricted solid-on-solid model of Andrews-Baxter-Forrester. The aim of this work is to review, in a unified and pedagogical exposition, these four different combinatorial representations of the states of the Zk parafermionic models. The first part of this article presents the different paths and partitions and their bijective relations; it is purely combinatorial, self-contained, and elementary; it can be read independently of the conformal-field-theory applications. The second part links this combinatorial analysis with the bases of states of the Zk parafermionic theories. With the prototypical example of the parafermionic models worked out in detail, this analysis contributes to fix some foundations for the combinatorial study of more complicated theories. Indeed, as we briefly indicate in ending, generalized versions of both the Bressoud and the Andrews-Baxter-Forrester paths emerge naturally in the description of the minimal models.

  13. Combinatorial Immunoprofiling in Latent Tuberculosis Infection. Toward Better Risk Stratification

    PubMed Central

    Peikert, Tobias; Van Keulen, Virginia P.; Erskine, Courtney L.; Bornhorst, Cathy L.; Andrist, Boleyn R.; McCoy, Kevin; Pease, Larry R.; Abraham, Roshini S.; Knutson, Keith L.; Kita, Hirohito; Schrum, Adam G.; Limper, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Most immunocompetent patients diagnosed with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) will not progress to tuberculosis (TB) reactivation. However, current diagnostic tools cannot reliably distinguish nonprogressing from progressing patients a priori, and thus LTBI therapy must be prescribed with suboptimal patient specificity. We hypothesized that LTBI diagnostics could be improved by generating immunomarker profiles capable of categorizing distinct patient subsets by a combinatorial immunoassay approach. Objectives: A combinatorial immunoassay analysis was applied to identify potential immunomarker combinations that distinguish among unexposed subjects, untreated patients with LTBI, and treated patients with LTBI and to differentiate risk of reactivation. Methods: IFN-γ release assay (IGRA) was combined with a flow cytometric assay that detects induction of CD25+CD134+ coexpression on TB antigen–stimulated T cells from peripheral blood. The combinatorial immunoassay analysis was based on receiver operating characteristic curves, technical cut-offs, 95% bivariate normal density ellipse prediction, and statistical analysis. Risk of reactivation was estimated with a prediction formula. Measurements and Main Results: Sixty-five out of 150 subjects were included. The combinatorial immunoassay approach identified at least four different T-cell subsets. The representation of these immune phenotypes was more heterogeneous in untreated patients with LTBI than in treated patients with LTBI or unexposed groups. Patients with IGRA(+) CD4+CD25+CD134+ T-cell phenotypes had the highest estimated reactivation risk (4.11 ± 2.11%). Conclusions: These findings suggest that immune phenotypes defined by combinatorial assays may potentially have a role in identifying those at risk of developing TB; this potential role is supported by risk of reactivation modeling. Prospective studies will be needed to test this novel approach. PMID:26030344

  14. Structure-based design of combinatorial mutagenesis libraries.

    PubMed

    Verma, Deeptak; Grigoryan, Gevorg; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-05-01

    The development of protein variants with improved properties (thermostability, binding affinity, catalytic activity, etc.) has greatly benefited from the application of high-throughput screens evaluating large, diverse combinatorial libraries. At the same time, since only a very limited portion of sequence space can be experimentally constructed and tested, an attractive possibility is to use computational protein design to focus libraries on a productive portion of the space. We present a general-purpose method, called "Structure-based Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis" (SOCoM), which can optimize arbitrarily large combinatorial mutagenesis libraries directly based on structural energies of their constituents. SOCoM chooses both positions and substitutions, employing a combinatorial optimization framework based on library-averaged energy potentials in order to avoid explicitly modeling every variant in every possible library. In case study applications to green fluorescent protein, β-lactamase, and lipase A, SOCoM optimizes relatively small, focused libraries whose variants achieve energies comparable to or better than previous library design efforts, as well as larger libraries (previously not designable by structure-based methods) whose variants cover greater diversity while still maintaining substantially better energies than would be achieved by representative random library approaches. By allowing the creation of large-scale combinatorial libraries based on structural calculations, SOCoM promises to increase the scope of applicability of computational protein design and improve the hit rate of discovering beneficial variants. While designs presented here focus on variant stability (predicted by total energy), SOCoM can readily incorporate other structure-based assessments, such as the energy gap between alternative conformational or bound states.

  15. Combinatorial Investigations of High Temperature CuNb Oxide Phases for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Skorupska, Katarzyna; Maggard, Paul A; Eichberger, Rainer; Schwarzburg, Klaus; Shahbazi, Paria; Zoellner, Brandon; Parkinson, Bruce A

    2015-12-14

    High-throughput combinatorial methods have been useful in identifying new oxide semiconductors with the potential to be applied to solar water splitting. Most of these techniques have been limited to producing and screening oxide phases formed at temperatures below approximately 550 °C. We report the development of a combinatorial approach to discover and optimize high temperature phases for photoelectrochemical water splitting. As a demonstration material, we chose to produce thin films of high temperature CuNb oxide phases by inkjet printing on two different substrates: fluorine-doped tin oxide and crystalline Si, which required different sample pyrolysis procedures. The selection of pyrolysis parameters, such as temperature/time programs, and the use of oxidizing, nonreactive or reducing atmospheres determines the composition of the thin film materials and their photoelectrochemical performance. XPS, XRD, and SEM analyses were used to determine the composition and oxidation states within the copper niobium oxide phases and to then guide the production of target Cu(1+)Nb(5+)-oxide phases. The charge carrier dynamics of the thin films produced by the inkjet printing are compared with pure CuNbO3 microcrystalline material obtained from inorganic bulk synthesis. PMID:26505910

  16. Combinatorial Investigations of High Temperature CuNb Oxide Phases for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Skorupska, Katarzyna; Maggard, Paul A; Eichberger, Rainer; Schwarzburg, Klaus; Shahbazi, Paria; Zoellner, Brandon; Parkinson, Bruce A

    2015-12-14

    High-throughput combinatorial methods have been useful in identifying new oxide semiconductors with the potential to be applied to solar water splitting. Most of these techniques have been limited to producing and screening oxide phases formed at temperatures below approximately 550 °C. We report the development of a combinatorial approach to discover and optimize high temperature phases for photoelectrochemical water splitting. As a demonstration material, we chose to produce thin films of high temperature CuNb oxide phases by inkjet printing on two different substrates: fluorine-doped tin oxide and crystalline Si, which required different sample pyrolysis procedures. The selection of pyrolysis parameters, such as temperature/time programs, and the use of oxidizing, nonreactive or reducing atmospheres determines the composition of the thin film materials and their photoelectrochemical performance. XPS, XRD, and SEM analyses were used to determine the composition and oxidation states within the copper niobium oxide phases and to then guide the production of target Cu(1+)Nb(5+)-oxide phases. The charge carrier dynamics of the thin films produced by the inkjet printing are compared with pure CuNbO3 microcrystalline material obtained from inorganic bulk synthesis.

  17. Combinatorial regulation of lipoprotein lipase by microRNAs during mouse adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bouvy-Liivrand, Maria; Heinäniemi, Merja; John, Elisabeth; Schneider, Jochen G; Sauter, Thomas; Sinkkonen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression directly through base pairing to their targets or indirectly through participating in multi-scale regulatory networks. Often miRNAs take part in feed-forward motifs where a miRNA and a transcription factor act on shared targets to achieve accurate regulation of processes such as cell differentiation. Here we show that the expression levels of miR-27a and miR-29a inversely correlate with the mRNA levels of lipoprotein lipase (Lpl), their predicted combinatorial target, and its key transcriptional regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg) during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. More importantly, we show that Lpl, a key lipogenic enzyme, can be negatively regulated by the two miRNA families in a combinatorial fashion on the mRNA and functional level in maturing adipocytes. This regulation is mediated through the Lpl 3′UTR as confirmed by reporter gene assays. In addition, a small mathematical model captures the dynamics of this feed-forward motif and predicts the changes in Lpl mRNA levels upon network perturbations. The obtained results might offer an explanation to the dysregulation of LPL in diabetic conditions and could be extended to quantitative modeling of regulation of other metabolic genes under similar regulatory network motifs. PMID:24457907

  18. FASTAptamer: A Bioinformatic Toolkit for High-throughput Sequence Analysis of Combinatorial Selections

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Khalid K; Chang, Jonathan L; Burke, Donald H

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequence (HTS) analysis of combinatorial selection populations accelerates lead discovery and optimization and offers dynamic insight into selection processes. An underlying principle is that selection enriches high-fitness sequences as a fraction of the population, whereas low-fitness sequences are depleted. HTS analysis readily provides the requisite numerical information by tracking the evolutionary trajectory of individual sequences in response to selection pressures. Unlike genomic data, for which a number of software solutions exist, user-friendly tools are not readily available for the combinatorial selections field, leading many users to create custom software. FASTAptamer was designed to address the sequence-level analysis needs of the field. The open source FASTAptamer toolkit counts, normalizes and ranks read counts in a FASTQ file, compares populations for sequence distribution, generates clusters of sequence families, calculates fold-enrichment of sequences throughout the course of a selection and searches for degenerate sequence motifs. While originally designed for aptamer selections, FASTAptamer can be applied to any selection strategy that can utilize next-generation DNA sequencing, such as ribozyme or deoxyribozyme selections, in vivo mutagenesis and various surface display technologies (peptide, antibody fragment, mRNA, etc.). FASTAptamer software, sample data and a user's guide are available for download at http://burkelab.missouri.edu/fastaptamer.html. PMID:25734917

  19. Ligand-Based Peptide Design and Combinatorial Peptide Libraries to Target G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Christian W.; Muttenthaler, Markus; Freissmuth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are considered to represent the most promising drug targets; it has been repeatedly said that a large fraction of the currently marketed drugs elicit their actions by binding to GPCRs (with cited numbers varying from 30–50%). Closer scrutiny, however, shows that only a modest fraction of (~60) GPCRs are, in fact, exploited as drug targets, only ~20 of which are peptide-binding receptors. The vast majority of receptors in the humane genome have not yet been explored as sites of action for drugs. Given the drugability of this receptor class, it appears that opportunities for drug discovery abound. In addition, GPCRs provide for binding sites other than the ligand binding sites (referred to as the “orthosteric site”). These additional sites include (i) binding sites for ligands (referred to as “allosteric ligands”) that modulate the affinity and efficacy of orthosteric ligands, (ii) the interaction surface that recruits G proteins and arrestins, (iii) the interaction sites of additional proteins (GIPs, GPCR interacting proteins that regulate G protein signaling or give rise to G protein-independent signals). These sites can also be targeted by peptides. Combinatorial and natural peptide libraries are therefore likely to play a major role in identifying new GPCR ligands at each of these sites. In particular the diverse natural peptide libraries such as the venom peptides from marine cone-snails and plant cyclotides have been established as a rich source of drug leads. High-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches allow for progressing from these starting points to potential drug candidates. This will be illustrated by focusing on the ligand-based drug design of oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) receptor ligands using natural peptide leads as starting points. PMID:20687879

  20. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, Alfred E.; Huggins, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the outer envelopes of cool evolved stars has become an active area of research. The physical properties of CS envelopes are presented. Observations of many wavelengths bands are relevant. A summary of observations and a discussion of theoretical considerations concerning the chemistry are summarized. Recent theoretical considerations show that the thermal equilibrium model is of limited use for understanding the chemistry of the outer CS envelopes. The theoretical modeling of the chemistry of CS envelopes provides a quantitive test of chemical concepts which have a broader interest than the envelopes themselves.

  1. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multi-layer model ADCHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, D.; Rusanen, A.; Boy, M.; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, B.; Zelenyuk, A.; Pagels, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: (1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), (2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and (3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers. ADCHAM is able to capture the observed α-pinene SOA mass increase in the presence of NH3(g). Organic salts of ammonium and carboxylic acids predominantly form during the early stage of SOA formation. These salts contribute substantially to the initial growth of the homogeneously nucleated particles. The model simulations of evaporating α-pinene SOA particles support the recent experimental findings that these particles have a semi-solid tar like amorphous phase state. ADCHAM is able to reproduce the main features of the observed slow evaporation rates if low-volatility and viscous oligomerized SOA material accumulates in the particle surface layer upon evaporation. The evaporation rate is mainly governed by the reversible decomposition of oligomers back to monomers. Finally, we demonstrate that the mass transfer limited uptake of condensable organic compounds onto wall deposited particles or directly onto the Teflon chamber walls of smog chambers can have profound influence on the

  2. Chemistry and isotopic composition of precipitation and surface waters in Khumbu valley (Nepal Himalaya): N dynamics of high elevation basins.

    PubMed

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Polesello, Stefano; Sacchi, Elisa

    2014-07-01

    We monitored the chemical and isotopic compositions of wet depositions, at the Pyramid International Laboratory (5050 ma.s.l.), and surrounding surface waters, in the Khumbu basin, to understand precipitation chemistry and to obtain insights regarding ecosystem responses to atmospheric inputs. The major cations in the precipitation were NH4(+) and Ca(2+), whereas the main anion was HCO3(-), which constituted approximately 69% of the anions, followed by NO3(-), SO4(2-) and Cl(-). Data analysis suggested that Na(+), Cl(-) and K(+) were derived from the long-range transport of marine aerosols. Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and HCO3(-) were related to rock and soil dust contributions and the NO3(-) and SO4(2-) concentrations were derived from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, NH4(+) was derived from gaseous NH3 scavenging. The isotopic composition of weekly precipitation ranged from -1.9 to -23.2‰ in δ(18)O, and from -0.8 to -174‰ in δ(2)H, with depleted values characterizing the central part of the monsoon period. The chemical composition of the stream water was dominated by calcite and/or gypsum dissolution. However, the isotopic composition of the stream water did not fully reflect the composition of the monsoon precipitation, which suggested that other water sources contributed to the stream flow. Precipitation contents for all ions were the lowest ones among those measured in high elevation sites around the world. During the monsoon periods the depositions were not substantially influenced by anthropogenic inputs, while in pre- and post-monsoon seasons the Himalayas could not represent an effective barrier for airborne pollution. In the late monsoon phase, the increase of ionic contents in precipitation could also be due to a change in the moisture source. The calculated atmospheric N load (0.30 kg ha(-1) y(-1)) was considerably lower than the levels that were measured in other high-altitude environments. Nevertheless, the NO3(-) concentrations in the surface waters

  3. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    , in addition, of the pressure, temperature, and velocity. A near term goal of the experimental program should be to confirm the nonlinear effects of sulfur speciation, and if present, to provide an explanation for them. It is also desirable to examine if the particulate matter retains any sulfur. The recommendation is to examine the effects on SOx production of variations in fuel-bound sulfur and aromatic content (which may affect the amount of particulates formed). These experiments should help us to understand if there is a coupling between particulate formation and SO, concentration. Similarly, any coupling with NOx can be examined either by introducing NOx into the combustion air or by using fuel-bound nitrogen. Also of immediate urgency is the need to establish and validate a detailed mechanism for sulfur oxidation/aerosol formation, whose chemistry is concluded to be homogeneous, because there is not enough surface area for heterogeneous effects. It is envisaged that this work will involve both experimental and theoretical programs. The experimental work will require, in addition to the measurements described above, fundamental studies in devices such as flow reactors and shock tubes. Complementing this effort should be modeling and theoretical activities. One impediment to the successful modeling of sulfur oxidation is the lack of reliable data for thermodynamic and transport properties for several species, such as aqueous nitric acid, sulfur oxides, and sulfuric acid. Quantum mechanical calculations are recommended as a convenient means of deriving values for these properties. Such calculations would also help establish rate constants for several important reactions for which experimental measurements are inherently fraught with uncertainty. Efforts to implement sufficiently detailed chemistry into computational fluid dynamic codes should be continued. Zero- and one-dimensional flow models are also useful vehicles for elucidating the minimal set of species and

  4. Parallel Combinatorial Synthesis of Azo Dyes: A Combinatorial Experiment Suitable for Undergraduate Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gung, Benjamin W.; Taylor, Richard T.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment in the parallel synthesis of azo dyes that demonstrates the concepts of structure-activity relationships and chemical diversity with vivid colors is described. It is seen that this experiment is suitable for the second-semester organic chemistry laboratory and also for the one-semester organic laboratory.

  5. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Several ideas are proposed for chemistry teachers to try in their classrooms. Subjects included are polymerization of acrylate, polymerization of styrene, conductivity, pollution, preparation of chlorine, redox equations, chemiluminescence, and molecular sieves. (PS)

  6. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  7. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  8. Precolumbian Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janet Bond

    1995-01-01

    Describes the content and development of a curriculum that provides an approach to descriptive chemistry and the history of technology through consideration of the pottery, metallurgy, pigments, dyes, agriculture, and medicine of pre-Columbian people. (DDR)

  9. Catalytic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach for making chemistry relevant to everyday life. Involves the study of kinetics using the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by vegetable juices. Allows students to design and carry out experiments and then draw conclusions from their results. (JRH)

  10. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in chemistry instruction, including among others, a rapid method to determine available chlorine in bleach, simple flame testing apparatus, and a simple apparatus demonstrating the technique of flash photolysis. (SK)

  11. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  12. Time-resolved radiation chemistry: Dynamics of electron attachment to uracil following UV excitation of iodide-uracil complexes

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sarah B.; Yandell, Margaret A.; Stephansen, Anne B.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2014-12-14

    Electron attachment to uracil was investigated by applying time-resolved photoelectron imaging to iodide-uracil (I{sup –}U) complexes. In these studies, an ultraviolet pump pulse initiated charge transfer from the iodide to the uracil, and the resulting dynamics of the uracil temporary negative ion were probed. Five different excitation energies were used, 4.00 eV, 4.07 eV, 4.14 eV, 4.21 eV, and 4.66 eV. At the four lowest excitation energies, which lie near the vertical detachment energy of the I{sup –}U complex (4.11 eV), signatures of both the dipole bound (DB) as well as the valence bound (VB) anion of uracil were observed. In contrast, only the VB anion was observed at 4.66 eV, in agreement with previous experiments in this higher energy range. The early-time dynamics of both states were highly excitation energy dependent. The rise time of the DB anion signal was ∼250 fs at 4.00 eV and 4.07 eV, ∼120 fs at 4.14 eV and cross-correlation limited at 4.21 eV. The VB anion rise time also changed with excitation energy, ranging from 200 to 300 fs for excitation energies 4.00–4.21 eV, to a cross-correlation limited time at 4.66 eV. The results suggest that the DB state acts as a “doorway” state to the VB anion at 4.00–4.21 eV, while direct attachment to the VB anion occurs at 4.66 eV.

  13. Pb-free electronics: from nanotechnology to combinatorial materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Gonzalez, Alfredo J.

    The elimination of lead (Pb) from the electronics industry due to a government directive caused problems on the manufacturing and use of electronic components. The current alloys used to attach components have a significant higher processing temperature (~30-40°C) that those containing Pb. The higher processing temperatures cause damage to the electronic components; printed circuit boards (PCB) and represents an increase in energetic costs for the manufacurer. Tin whiskers are out-of-plane structures that grow from tin (Sn) plated surfaces and cause short circuits and metal vapor arc. The electrical connection of components to the PCB relies on leads that are close to each other and are manufactured from tin-plated copper. Materials have shown a tendency to modify their bulk properties depending on powder particle size. Nanoparticle's coalescence temperature tends to decrease as particle size decreases. Exploiting this behavior, a nanoparticle based solder paste has been developed for attaching electronic components at a lower processing temperature to avoid thermally induced damage and reduce energy consumption. Tin nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via a wet chemistry route using tin (II) chloride dihydrated (metal precursor), 1,10-Phenanthroline (surfactant), and sodium borohydride (reducing agent). A flux system was developed based on Ethylene Glycol. Results showed acceptable coalescence of the non-capped nanoparticles at temperatures as low as 200°C with a processing time of 20 minutes. Synthesized nanoparticles with capping agent required higher flux content thus resulting in a poor metallic load paste. A reduction in processing temperature of approximately 40°C have been found when comparing the developed solder paste with typical SAC lead-free solders (~240°C). The electrical behavior was found to be an order of magnitude below that of bulk tin. Compositional libraries have been developed in an attempt to screen, via a high through-put method

  14. Manipulation of gold colloidal nanoparticles with atomic force microscopy in dynamic mode: influence of particle–substrate chemistry and morphology, and of operating conditions

    PubMed Central

    Darwich, Samer; Rao, Akshata; Gnecco, Enrico; Jayaraman, Shrisudersan; Haidara, Hamidou

    2011-01-01

    Summary One key component in the assembly of nanoparticles is their precise positioning to enable the creation of new complex nano-objects. Controlling the nanoscale interactions is crucial for the prediction and understanding of the behaviour of nanoparticles (NPs) during their assembly. In the present work, we have manipulated bare and functionalized gold nanoparticles on flat and patterned silicon and silicon coated substrates with dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM). Under ambient conditions, the particles adhere to silicon until a critical drive amplitude is reached by oscillations of the probing tip. Beyond that threshold, the particles start to follow different directions, depending on their geometry, size and adhesion to the substrate. Higher and respectively, lower mobility was observed when the gold particles were coated with methyl (–CH3) and hydroxyl (–OH) terminated thiol groups. This major result suggests that the adhesion of the particles to the substrate is strongly reduced by the presence of hydrophobic interfaces. The influence of critical parameters on the manipulation was investigated and discussed viz. the shape, size and grafting of the NPs, as well as the surface chemistry and the patterning of the substrate, and finally the operating conditions (temperature, humidity and scan velocity). Whereas the operating conditions and substrate structure are shown to have a strong effect on the mobility of the particles, we did not find any differences when manipulating ordered vs random distributed particles. PMID:21977418

  15. Visualizing the chemistry and structure dynamics in lithium-ion batteries by in-situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xun-Li; An, Ke; Cai, Lu; Feng, Zhili; Nagler, Stephen E.; Daniel, Claus; Rhodes, Kevin J.; Stoica, Alexandru D.; Skorpenske, Harley D.; Liang, Chengdu; Zhang, Wei; Kim, Joon; Qi, Yue; Harris, Stephen J.

    2012-10-19

    We report an in-situ neutron diffraction study of a large format pouch battery cell. The succession of Li-Graphite intercalation phases was fully captured under an 1C charge-discharge condition (i.e., charge to full capacity in 1 hour). However, the lithiation and dilithiation pathways are distinctively different and, unlike in slowing charging experiments with which the Li-Graphite phase diagram was established, no LiC24 phase was found during charge at 1C rate. Approximately 75 mol. % of the graphite converts to LiC6 at full charge, and a lattice dilation as large as 4% was observed during a charge-discharge cycle. Our work demonstrates the potential of in-situ, time and spatially resolved neutron diffraction study of the dynamic chemical and structural changes in “real-world” batteries under realistic cycling conditions, which should provide microscopic insights on degradation and the important role of diffusion kinetics in energy storage materials.

  16. Towards Teaching Chemistry as a Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laszlo, Pierre

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents views on the teaching of chemistry and directions for its further development. A detailed critical analysis is offered for the inadequacy of much of the current teaching, weighed that it is by a conventional, traditional and, as it turns out, rather outdated sense of the material to be covered. The ambient meta-discourse on the nature of chemistry is unduly dominated by the physicalist assumption, believing chemistry to be reducible to physics, which I hold to be unrefutable and thus parascientific. This all-too-tenuous link is countered with a parallel, bolstered by a slew of examples and analogies, between chemistry and linguistics: it is both more legitimate, in terms of the supporting evidence, considerably more effective than a physicalist approach. Chemical teaching needs to hybridize the bottom-up and the top-down communication vectors between the students and their teacher. It can only benefit from infusion of a strong dose of history. Chemistry ought to be taught in like manner to a language, on the dual evidence of the existence of an iconic chemical language, of formulas and equations; and of chemical science being language-like and a combinatorial art.

  17. Quantum Mechanical Energy-based Screening of Combinatorially Generated Library of Tautomers. TauTGen. A Tautomer Generator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S

    2007-03-01

    Many computational methods have been derived from quantum mechanics for molecular and extended systems. We advocate that these methods will soon become indispensable research tools of combinatorial chemistry. Although applications of these combinatorial methods driven by quantum-mechanics-derived computational engines seem to be distant, our recent experience suggests the opposite. We developed algorithms and codes to search for the most stable tautomers of molecules. In our approach, we: (i) create large libraries of molecular tautomers using combinatorial methods, and (ii) prescreen these libraries using quantum chemical electronic structure methods. We have identified many adiabatically bound and previously unknown tautomers of anionic nucleic acid bases. Our results unraveled that ordering of nucleic acid bases according to their affinity to an excess electron is: G > U > T > C > A , when all biologically relevant tautomers are considered. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the: (i) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.) and (ii) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grant DS/8221-4-0140-4 (M.H.). M.H. thanks for financial support from the European Union Social Funds ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/O5. M.H. is a holder of the award from the Fundation for Polish Science (FNP). R.A.B. acknowledges the financial support from Nanoquant EC Marie Curie Research Training Network, contract number: MRTN-506842. Computing resources were available through: (i) the Academic Computer Center in Gdansk (TASK) (ii) a Computational Grand Challenge Application grant from the Molecular Sciences Computing Facility (MSCF) in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and (iii) the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The MSCF is funded by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research. PNNL is operated by Battelle

  18. Size and surface chemistry of nanoparticles lead to a variant behavior in the unfolding dynamics of human carbonic anhydrase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Irem; Lundqvist, Martin; Cabaleiro-Lago, Celia

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption induced conformational changes of human carbonic anhydrase I (HCAi) and pseudo wild type human carbonic anhydrase II truncated at the 17th residue at the N-terminus (trHCAii) were studied in presence of nanoparticles of different sizes and polarities. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies showed that the binding to apolar surfaces is affected by the nanoparticle size in combination with the inherent protein stability. 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence revealed that HCAs adsorb to both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces, however the dynamics of the unfolding at the nanoparticle surfaces drastically vary with the polarity. The size of the nanoparticles has opposite effects depending on the polarity of the nanoparticle surface. The apolar nanoparticles induce seconds timescale structural rearrangements whereas polar nanoparticles induce hours timescale structural rearrangements on the same charged HCA variant. Here, a simple model is proposed where the difference in the timescales of adsorption is correlated with the energy barriers for initial docking and structural rearrangements which are firmly regulated by the surface polarity. Near-UV circular dichorism (CD) further supports that both protein variants undergo structural rearrangements at the nanoparticle surfaces regardless of being ``hard'' or ``soft''. However, the conformational changes induced by the apolar surfaces differ for each HCA isoform and diverge from the previously reported effect of silica nanoparticles.The adsorption induced conformational changes of human carbonic anhydrase I (HCAi) and pseudo wild type human carbonic anhydrase II truncated at the 17th residue at the N-terminus (trHCAii) were studied in presence of nanoparticles of different sizes and polarities. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies showed that the binding to apolar surfaces is affected by the nanoparticle size in combination with the inherent protein stability. 8-Anilino

  19. ISOGENIE: Linking geochemistry, isotopic chemistry and microbial dynamics & community composition in a thawing permafrost peatland, Stordalen Mire, Abisco, Sweden.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanton, J.; Crill, P. M.; Rich, V.; McCalley, C. K.; Hodgkins, S. B.; Tyson, G.; Logan, T.; Wehr, R.; Mondav, R.; Li, C.; Frolking, S.; Saleska, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    As permafrost thaws, increasing CH4 emissions from northern wetlands are likely to cause positive feedback to atmospheric warming. One of the over-arching goals of this project is to connect geochemical processes, particularly focusing on methane production, to underlying microbial population dynamics and genomics. Recent transformative technical advances in both high throughput investigations of microbial communities and high temporal resolution biogeochemical isotope measurements now permit a uniquely comprehensive approach to opening the microbial "black boxes" that impact carbon cycling on global scales. This project links detailed microbial sampling with detailed geochemical and isotopic sampling on seasonal and diel timescales and has an extensive modeling component. Gas exchange is monitored across the wetland gradients in a series of automated chambers and isotopes of emitted and belowground methane and carbon dioxide are measured with a QC laser system. The mire is in a state of partial thaw. With this thaw is an apparent ecological session in wetland community structure and associated changes in organic matter lability, rates of methane production and microbial community. Our group's study sites range from palsa with underlying permanently frozen peat, to recently collapsed and flooded palsa, to flooded palsa colonized by Sphagnum, to flooded eriophorum sites, to sites populated by Carex, to open water lakes. Across this environmental gradient pH ranges from 4 to 6.5. This change is driven by changes in hydrology as the surface of the thawing permafrost subsides and an adjacent lake drains into the mire. Along this environmental gradient, from palsa to Carex, the lability of the peat increases significantly as determined in incubations of peat material and monitoring of methane and carbon dioxide production rates. Coincident with this environmental gradient is a decrease in the apparent fractionation factor between methane and carbon dioxide and methane

  20. A Combinatorial Approach to Determine Mechanisms of Atmospheric Copper Sulfidation

    SciTech Connect

    BARBOUR,J. CHARLES; BRAITHWAITE,JEFFREY W.; COPELAND,ROBERT GUILD; DUNN,ROBERTO G.; MINOR,KENNETH G.; MISSERT,NANCY A.; NELSON,JEFFREY S.; SULLIVAN,JOHN P.

    1999-10-07

    Parallel microscopic experimentation (the combinatorial approach often used in solid-state science) was applied to characterize atmospheric copper corrosion behavior. Specifically, this technique permitted relative sulfidation rates to be determined for copper containing different levels of point defects and impurities (In, Al, O, and D). Corrosion studies are inherently difficult because of complex interactions between material interfaces and the environment. The combinatorial approach was demonstrated using micron-scale Cu lines that were exposed to a humid air environment containing sub-ppm levels of H{sub 2}S. The relative rate of Cu{sub 2}S growth was determined by measuring the change in resistance of the line. The data suggest that vacancy trapping by In and Al impurities slow the sulfidation rate. Increased sulfidation rates were found for samples containing excess point defects or deuterium. Furthermore, the sulfidation rate of 14 {micro}m wide Cu lines was increased above that for planar films.

  1. Quasi-combinatorial energy landscapes for nanoalloy structure optimisation.

    PubMed

    Schebarchov, D; Wales, D J

    2015-11-14

    We formulate nanoalloy structure prediction as a mixed-variable optimisation problem, where the homotops can be associated with an effective, quasi-combinatorial energy landscape in permutation space. We survey this effective landscape for a representative set of binary systems modelled by the Gupta potential. In segregating systems with small lattice mismatch, we find that homotops have a relatively straightforward landscape with few local optima - a scenario well-suited for local (combinatorial) optimisation techniques that scale quadratically with system size. Combining these techniques with multiple local-neighbourhood structures yields a search for multiminima, and we demonstrate that generalised basin-hopping with a metropolis acceptance criterion in the space of multiminima can then be effective for global optimisation of binary and ternary nanoalloys.

  2. Single-molecule decoding of combinatorially modified nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Shema, Efrat; Jones, Daniel; Shoresh, Noam; Donohue, Laura; Ram, Oren; Bernstein, Bradley E

    2016-05-01

    Different combinations of histone modifications have been proposed to signal distinct gene regulatory functions, but this area is poorly addressed by existing technologies. We applied high-throughput single-molecule imaging to decode combinatorial modifications on millions of individual nucleosomes from pluripotent stem cells and lineage-committed cells. We identified definitively bivalent nucleosomes with concomitant repressive and activating marks, as well as other combinatorial modification states whose prevalence varies with developmental potency. We showed that genetic and chemical perturbations of chromatin enzymes preferentially affect nucleosomes harboring specific modification states. Last, we combined this proteomic platform with single-molecule DNA sequencing technology to simultaneously determine the modification states and genomic positions of individual nucleosomes. This single-molecule technology has the potential to address fundamental questions in chromatin biology and epigenetic regulation. PMID:27151869

  3. Combinatorial geometry domain decomposition strategies for Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Zhang, B.; Deng, L.; Mo, Z.; Liu, Z.; Shangguan, D.; Ma, Y.; Li, S.; Hu, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Analysis and modeling of nuclear reactors can lead to memory overload for a single core processor when it comes to refined modeling. A method to solve this problem is called 'domain decomposition'. In the current work, domain decomposition algorithms for a combinatorial geometry Monte Carlo transport code are developed on the JCOGIN (J Combinatorial Geometry Monte Carlo transport INfrastructure). Tree-based decomposition and asynchronous communication of particle information between domains are described in the paper. Combination of domain decomposition and domain replication (particle parallelism) is demonstrated and compared with that of MERCURY code. A full-core reactor model is simulated to verify the domain decomposition algorithms using the Monte Carlo particle transport code JMCT (J Monte Carlo Transport Code), which has being developed on the JCOGIN infrastructure. Besides, influences of the domain decomposition algorithms to tally variances are discussed. (authors)

  4. Elements of informatics for combinatorial solid-state materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, S.; Ohnishi, T.; Lippmaa, M.; Koinuma, H.

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of using combinatorial techniques for materials science studies is to achieve higher experimental throughput than what is possible when samples are synthesized and characterized one at a time. The instrumentation needed for performing high-throughput synthesis and characterization has seen rapid development in recent years. The software tools needed to connect all parts of the materials development process are still largely lacking. In this paper we discuss the requirements of a combinatorial informatics system for materials science experiments. Specifically, we focus on solid-state thin film synthesis. We also describe an implementation of such a system that is based on widely-available open-source software. The system offers features such as remote access via a Web browser, an electronic notebook-style Web interface, automatic upload of new measurement or processing results and rapid preview of experimental data.

  5. Laguerre-type derivatives: Dobinski relations and combinatorial identities

    SciTech Connect

    Penson, K. A.; Blasiak, P.; Horzela, A.; Duchamp, G. H. E.; Solomon, A. I.

    2009-08-15

    We consider properties of the operators D(r,M)=a{sup r}(a{sup {dagger}}a){sup M} (which we call generalized Laguerre-type derivatives), with r=1,2,..., M=0,1,..., where a and a{sup {dagger}} are boson annihilation and creation operators, respectively, satisfying [a,a{sup {dagger}}]=1. We obtain explicit formulas for the normally ordered form of arbitrary Taylor-expandable functions of D(r,M) with the help of an operator relation that generalizes the Dobinski formula. Coherent state expectation values of certain operator functions of D(r,M) turn out to be generating functions of combinatorial numbers. In many cases the corresponding combinatorial structures can be explicitly identified.

  6. Long-term changes and trends in total ozone over the northern mid-latitudes: Influence of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry and contribution from extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Ribatet, M.; di Rocco, S.; Frossard, L.; Jancso, L. M.; Peter, T.; Davison, A. C.

    2010-12-01

    Downward trends in global stratospheric ozone during recent decades have been shown to be directly linked to increasing surface UV-radiation. In the past, long-term ozone trends were determined from homogenized data series by fitting with multiple linear regression models, in which suitable independent variables (so-called explanatory variables) were used to represent atmospheric variability, such as the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO), the 11-year solar cycle, and a linear trend attributed to anthropogenic ozone depletion. Previous studies have identified a number of other processes influencing total ozone at mid-latitudes, such as synoptic-scale meteorological variability, decadal or long-term climate variability, described e.g. by the Northern Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the Arctic Oscillation (AO), atmospheric circulation indices ENSO, temperature at the 470-K isentrope level, and volcanic eruptions. Due to the successful implementation of the Montreal Protocol the discussion about a recovery or possible “super recovery” started within the scientific community. Here we address long-term changes and trends in a different framework. As statistical analysis showed that previously used concepts assuming a Gaussian distribution of total ozone data do not address the internal data structure concerning extremes adequately methods from extreme value theory are applied on local (various long-term ground based total ozone records) and regional (high resolution homogenized satellite data) scale. Within the extreme value theory framework days with extreme low (ELOs) and high (EHOs) total ozone are analyzed and their frequency is linked to changes in atmospheric chemistry and dynamics. The results show: (i) an increase in ELOs and (ii) a decrease in EHOs during the last decades and (iii) that the overall trend during the 1970s and 1980s in total ozone is strongly dominated by changes in these extreme events. After removing the extremes, the different time series show a

  7. Atmospheric Chemistry Data Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This presentation poster covers data products from the Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) of the Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC). Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer products (TOMS) introduced in the presentation include TOMS Version 8 as well as Aura, which provides 25 years of TOMS and Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) data. The presentation lists a number of atmospheric chemistry and dynamics data sets at DAAC.

  8. Radiation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  9. Thermal analysis of combinatorial solid geometry models using SINDA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerencser, Diane; Radke, George; Introne, Rob; Klosterman, John; Miklosovic, Dave

    1993-01-01

    Algorithms have been developed using Monte Carlo techniques to determine the thermal network parameters necessary to perform a finite difference analysis on Combinatorial Solid Geometry (CSG) models. Orbital and laser fluxes as well as internal heat generation are modeled to facilitate satellite modeling. The results of the thermal calculations are used to model the infrared (IR) images of targets and assess target vulnerability. Sample analyses and validation are presented which demonstrate code products.

  10. Dynamic Processes in Biology, Chemistry, and Materials Science: Opportunities for UltraFast Transmission Electron Microscopy - Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kabius, Bernd C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Diehl, Barbara L.; Stach, Eric A.

    2012-07-25

    This report summarizes a 2011 workshop that addressed the potential role of rapid, time-resolved electron microscopy measurements in accelerating the solution of important scientific and technical problems. A series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Academy of Science workshops have highlighted the critical role advanced research tools play in addressing scientific challenges relevant to biology, sustainable energy, and technologies that will fuel economic development without degrading our environment. Among the specific capability needs for advancing science and technology are tools that extract more detailed information in realistic environments (in situ or operando) at extreme conditions (pressure and temperature) and as a function of time (dynamic and time-dependent). One of the DOE workshops, Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next Generation Instrumentation and Beyond, specifically addressed the importance of electron-based characterization methods for a wide range of energy-relevant Grand Scientific Challenges. Boosted by the electron optical advancement in the last decade, a diversity of in situ capabilities already is available in many laboratories. The obvious remaining major capability gap in electron microscopy is in the ability to make these direct in situ observations over a broad spectrum of fast (µs) to ultrafast (picosecond [ps] and faster) temporal regimes. In an effort to address current capability gaps, EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, organized an Ultrafast Electron Microscopy Workshop, held June 14-15, 2011, with the primary goal to identify the scientific needs that could be met by creating a facility capable of a strongly improved time resolution with integrated in situ capabilities. The workshop brought together more than 40 leading scientists involved in applying and/or advancing electron microscopy to address important scientific problems of relevance to DOE’s research

  11. Carbonate chemistry dynamics and biological processes along a river-sea gradient (Gulf of Trieste, northern Adriatic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrosso, Gianmarco; Giani, Michele; Cibic, Tamara; Karuza, Ana; Kralj, Martina; Del Negro, Paola

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we investigated, for two years and with a bi-monthly frequency, how physical, chemical, and biological processes affect the marine carbonate system in a coastal area characterized by high alkalinity riverine discharge (Gulf of Trieste, northern Adriatic Sea, Mediterranean Sea). By combining synoptic measurements of the carbonate system with in situ determinations of the primary production (14C incorporation technique) and secondary prokaryotic carbon production (3H-leucine incorporation) along a river-sea gradient, we showed that the conservative mixing between river endmember and off-shore waters was the main driver of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) distribution and seasonal variation. However, during spring and summer seasons also the influence of biological uptake and release of DIC was significant. In the surface water of June 2012, the spreading and persistence of nutrient-rich freshwater stimulated the primary production (3.21 μg C L- 1 h- 1) and net biological DIC decrease (- 100 μmol kg- 1), reducing the dissolved CO2 concentration and increasing the pHT. Below the pycnocline of August 2012, instead, an elevated bacterial carbon production rate (0.92 μg C L- 1 h- 1) was related with net DIC increase (92 μmol kg- 1), low dissolved oxygen concentration, and strong pHT reduction, suggesting the predominance of bacterial heterotrophic respiration over primary production. The flux of carbon dioxide estimated at the air-sea interface exerted a low influence on the seasonal variation of the carbonate system. A complex temporal and spatial dynamic of the air-sea CO2 exchange was also detected, due to the combined effects of seawater temperature, river discharge, and water circulation. On annual scale the system was a sink of atmospheric CO2. However, in summer and during elevated riverine discharges, the area close to the river's mouth acted as a source of carbon dioxide. Also the wind speed was crucial in controlling the air-sea CO2

  12. View discovery in OLAP databases through statistical combinatorial optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Hengartner, Nick W; Burke, John; Critchlow, Terence; Joslyn, Cliff; Hogan, Emilie

    2009-01-01

    OnLine Analytical Processing (OLAP) is a relational database technology providing users with rapid access to summary, aggregated views of a single large database, and is widely recognized for knowledge representation and discovery in high-dimensional relational databases. OLAP technologies provide intuitive and graphical access to the massively complex set of possible summary views available in large relational (SQL) structured data repositories. The capability of OLAP database software systems to handle data complexity comes at a high price for analysts, presenting them a combinatorially vast space of views of a relational database. We respond to the need to deploy technologies sufficient to allow users to guide themselves to areas of local structure by casting the space of 'views' of an OLAP database as a combinatorial object of all projections and subsets, and 'view discovery' as an search process over that lattice. We equip the view lattice with statistical information theoretical measures sufficient to support a combinatorial optimization process. We outline 'hop-chaining' as a particular view discovery algorithm over this object, wherein users are guided across a permutation of the dimensions by searching for successive two-dimensional views, pushing seen dimensions into an increasingly large background filter in a 'spiraling' search process. We illustrate this work in the context of data cubes recording summary statistics for radiation portal monitors at US ports.

  13. Rapid combinatorial screening by synchrotron X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eba, Hiromi; Sakurai, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    An X-ray imaging system, which does not require any scans of the sample or an X-ray beam and which, therefore, dramatically reduces the amount of time required, was employed to evaluate combinatorial libraries efficiently. Two-dimensional X-ray fluorescence (XRF) images of an 8 mm × 8 mm area were observed for combinatorial substrates of manganese-cobalt spinel MnCo 2O 4 and lithium ferrite LiFeO 2 via an exposure time of 1-3 s using synchrotron X-rays. Thus, XRF signals from a whole substrate could be observed at once in a short space of time. In order to observe the chemical environment simultaneously for all materials arranged on the substrate, the fluorescent X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) was measured by repeating the imaging during the monochromator scans across the absorption edge for metals. This is extremely efficient because XAFS spectra for all materials placed on the common substrate are obtained from only a single energy scan. One can determine the valence numbers, as well as other aspects of the chemical environment of the metal included in each material, from the differences in spectral features and the energy shifts. Hence, combinatorial libraries can be screened very rapidly, and therefore efficiently, using the X-ray imaging system.

  14. Controlling Combinatorial Complexity in Software and Malware Behavior Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Pleszkoch, Mark G; Linger, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all software is out of intellectual control in that no one knows its full behavior. Software Behavior Computation (SBC) is a new technology for understanding everything software does. SBC applies the mathematics of denotational semantics implemented by function composition in Functional Trace Tables (FTTs) to compute the behavior of programs, expressed as disjoint cases of conditional concurrent assignments. In some circumstances, combinatorial explosions in the number of cases can occur when calculating the behavior of sequences of multiple branching structures. This paper describes computational methods that avoid combinatorial explosions. The predicates that control branching structures such as ifthenelses can be organized into three categories: 1) Independent, resulting in no behavior case explosion, 2) Coordinated, resulting in two behavior cases, or 3) Goaloriented, with potential exponential growth in the number of cases. Traditional FTT-based behavior computation can be augmented by two additional computational methods, namely, Single-Value Function Abstractions (SVFAs) and, introduced in this paper, Relational Trace Tables (RTTs). These methods can be applied to the three predicate categories to avoid combinatorial growth in behavior cases while maintaining mathematical correctness.

  15. A Robust and Versatile Method of Combinatorial Chemical Synthesis of Gene Libraries via Hierarchical Assembly of Partially Randomized Modules.

    PubMed

    Popova, Blagovesta; Schubert, Steffen; Bulla, Ingo; Buchwald, Daniela; Kramer, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in gene library generation is to guarantee a large functional size and diversity that significantly increases the chances of selecting different functional protein variants. The use of trinucleotides mixtures for controlled randomization results in superior library diversity and offers the ability to specify the type and distribution of the amino acids at each position. Here we describe the generation of a high diversity gene library using tHisF of the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima as a scaffold. Combining various rational criteria with contingency, we targeted 26 selected codons of the thisF gene sequence for randomization at a controlled level. We have developed a novel method of creating full-length gene libraries by combinatorial assembly of smaller sub-libraries. Full-length libraries of high diversity can easily be assembled on demand from smaller and much less diverse sub-libraries, which circumvent the notoriously troublesome long-term archivation and repeated proliferation of high diversity ensembles of phages or plasmids. We developed a generally applicable software tool for sequence analysis of mutated gene sequences that provides efficient assistance for analysis of library diversity. Finally, practical utility of the library was demonstrated in principle by assessment of the conformational stability of library members and isolating protein variants with HisF activity from it. Our approach integrates a number of features of nucleic acids synthetic chemistry, biochemistry and molecular genetics to a coherent, flexible and robust method of combinatorial gene synthesis.

  16. A Robust and Versatile Method of Combinatorial Chemical Synthesis of Gene Libraries via Hierarchical Assembly of Partially Randomized Modules

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Blagovesta; Schubert, Steffen; Bulla, Ingo; Buchwald, Daniela; Kramer, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in gene library generation is to guarantee a large functional size and diversity that significantly increases the chances of selecting different functional protein variants. The use of trinucleotides mixtures for controlled randomization results in superior library diversity and offers the ability to specify the type and distribution of the amino acids at each position. Here we describe the generation of a high diversity gene library using tHisF of the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima as a scaffold. Combining various rational criteria with contingency, we targeted 26 selected codons of the thisF gene sequence for randomization at a controlled level. We have developed a novel method of creating full-length gene libraries by combinatorial assembly of smaller sub-libraries. Full-length libraries of high diversity can easily be assembled on demand from smaller and much less diverse sub-libraries, which circumvent the notoriously troublesome long-term archivation and repeated proliferation of high diversity ensembles of phages or plasmids. We developed a generally applicable software tool for sequence analysis of mutated gene sequences that provides efficient assistance for analysis of library diversity. Finally, practical utility of the library was demonstrated in principle by assessment of the conformational stability of library members and isolating protein variants with HisF activity from it. Our approach integrates a number of features of nucleic acids synthetic chemistry, biochemistry and molecular genetics to a coherent, flexible and robust method of combinatorial gene synthesis. PMID:26355961

  17. High-flexibility combinatorial peptide synthesis with laser-based transfer of monomers in solid matrix material.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Felix F; Foertsch, Tobias C; Popov, Roman; Mattes, Daniela S; Schlageter, Martin; Sedlmayr, Martyna; Ridder, Barbara; Dang, Florian-Xuan; von Bojničić-Kninski, Clemens; Weber, Laura K; Fischer, Andrea; Greifenstein, Juliane; Bykovskaya, Valentina; Buliev, Ivan; Bischoff, F Ralf; Hahn, Lothar; Meier, Michael A R; Bräse, Stefan; Powell, Annie K; Balaban, Teodor Silviu; Breitling, Frank; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Laser writing is used to structure surfaces in many different ways in materials and life sciences. However, combinatorial patterning applications are still limited. Here we present a method for cost-efficient combinatorial synthesis of very-high-density peptide arrays with natural and synthetic monomers. A laser automatically transfers nanometre-thin solid material spots from different donor slides to an acceptor. Each donor bears a thin polymer film, embedding one type of monomer. Coupling occurs in a separate heating step, where the matrix becomes viscous and building blocks diffuse and couple to the acceptor surface. Furthermore, we can consecutively deposit two material layers of activation reagents and amino acids. Subsequent heat-induced mixing facilitates an in situ activation and coupling of the monomers. This allows us to incorporate building blocks with click chemistry compatibility or a large variety of commercially available non-activated, for example, posttranslationally modified building blocks into the array's peptides with >17,000 spots per cm(2). PMID:27296868

  18. High-flexibility combinatorial peptide synthesis with laser-based transfer of monomers in solid matrix material

    PubMed Central

    Loeffler, Felix F.; Foertsch, Tobias C.; Popov, Roman; Mattes, Daniela S.; Schlageter, Martin; Sedlmayr, Martyna; Ridder, Barbara; Dang, Florian-Xuan; von Bojničić-Kninski, Clemens; Weber, Laura K.; Fischer, Andrea; Greifenstein, Juliane; Bykovskaya, Valentina; Buliev, Ivan; Bischoff, F. Ralf; Hahn, Lothar; Meier, Michael A. R.; Bräse, Stefan; Powell, Annie K.; Balaban, Teodor Silviu; Breitling, Frank; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Laser writing is used to structure surfaces in many different ways in materials and life sciences. However, combinatorial patterning applications are still limited. Here we present a method for cost-efficient combinatorial synthesis of very-high-density peptide arrays with natural and synthetic monomers. A laser automatically transfers nanometre-thin solid material spots from different donor slides to an acceptor. Each donor bears a thin polymer film, embedding one type of monomer. Coupling occurs in a separate heating step, where the matrix becomes viscous and building blocks diffuse and couple to the acceptor surface. Furthermore, we can consecutively deposit two material layers of activation reagents and amino acids. Subsequent heat-induced mixing facilitates an in situ activation and coupling of the monomers. This allows us to incorporate building blocks with click chemistry compatibility or a large variety of commercially available non-activated, for example, posttranslationally modified building blocks into the array's peptides with >17,000 spots per cm2. PMID:27296868

  19. 2D and 3D spatially addressed arrays for high-throughput automated synthesis of combinatorial libraries.

    PubMed

    Patek, Marcel; Safar, Pavel; Smrcina, Martin; Wegrzyniak, Eric; Bjergarde, Kirsten; Weichsel, Aleksandra; Strop, Peter

    2004-01-01

    One of the key elements in the drug discovery process is the use of automation to synthesize libraries of compounds for biological screening. The "split-and-mix" approaches in combinatorial chemistry have been recognized as extremely powerful techniques to access large numbers of compounds, while requiring only few reaction steps. However, the need for effective encoding/deconvolution strategies and demands for larger amounts of compounds have somewhat limited the use of these techniques in the pharmaceutical industry. In this paper, we describe a concept of directed sort and combine synthesis with spatially arranged arrays of macroscopic supports. Such a concept attempts to balance the number of reaction steps, the confidence in compound identity, and the quantity of synthesized compounds. Using three-dimensional arrays of frames each containing a two-dimensional array of macroscopic solid supports, we have conceptualized and developed a modular semiautomated system with a capacity of up to 100 000 compounds per batch. Modularity of this system enables flexibility either to produce large diverse combinatorial libraries or to synthesize more focused smaller libraries, both as single compounds in 12-15 micromol quantities. This method using sortable and spatially addressed arrays is exemplified by the synthesis of a 15 360 compound library.

  20. High-flexibility combinatorial peptide synthesis with laser-based transfer of monomers in solid matrix material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, Felix F.; Foertsch, Tobias C.; Popov, Roman; Mattes, Daniela S.; Schlageter, Martin; Sedlmayr, Martyna; Ridder, Barbara; Dang, Florian-Xuan; von Bojničić-Kninski, Clemens; Weber, Laura K.; Fischer, Andrea; Greifenstein, Juliane; Bykovskaya, Valentina; Buliev, Ivan; Bischoff, F. Ralf; Hahn, Lothar; Meier, Michael A. R.; Bräse, Stefan; Powell, Annie K.; Balaban, Teodor Silviu; Breitling, Frank; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Laser writing is used to structure surfaces in many different ways in materials and life sciences. However, combinatorial patterning applications are still limited. Here we present a method for cost-efficient combinatorial synthesis of very-high-density peptide arrays with natural and synthetic monomers. A laser automatically transfers nanometre-thin solid material spots from different donor slides to an acceptor. Each donor bears a thin polymer film, embedding one type of monomer. Coupling occurs in a separate heating step, where the matrix becomes viscous and building blocks diffuse and couple to the acceptor surface. Furthermore, we can consecutively deposit two material layers of activation reagents and amino acids. Subsequent heat-induced mixing facilitates an in situ activation and coupling of the monomers. This allows us to incorporate building blocks with click chemistry compatibility or a large variety of commercially available non-activated, for example, posttranslationally modified building blocks into the array's peptides with >17,000 spots per cm2.

  1. High-flexibility combinatorial peptide synthesis with laser-based transfer of monomers in solid matrix material.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Felix F; Foertsch, Tobias C; Popov, Roman; Mattes, Daniela S; Schlageter, Martin; Sedlmayr, Martyna; Ridder, Barbara; Dang, Florian-Xuan; von Bojničić-Kninski, Clemens; Weber, Laura K; Fischer, Andrea; Greifenstein, Juliane; Bykovskaya, Valentina; Buliev, Ivan; Bischoff, F Ralf; Hahn, Lothar; Meier, Michael A R; Bräse, Stefan; Powell, Annie K; Balaban, Teodor Silviu; Breitling, Frank; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander

    2016-06-14

    Laser writing is used to structure surfaces in many different ways in materials and life sciences. However, combinatorial patterning applications are still limited. Here we present a method for cost-efficient combinatorial synthesis of very-high-density peptide arrays with natural and synthetic monomers. A laser automatically transfers nanometre-thin solid material spots from different donor slides to an acceptor. Each donor bears a thin polymer film, embedding one type of monomer. Coupling occurs in a separate heating step, where the matrix becomes viscous and building blocks diffuse and couple to the acceptor surface. Furthermore, we can consecutively deposit two material layers of activation reagents and amino acids. Subsequent heat-induced mixing facilitates an in situ activation and coupling of the monomers. This allows us to incorporate building blocks with click chemistry compatibility or a large variety of commercially available non-activated, for example, posttranslationally modified building blocks into the array's peptides with >17,000 spots per cm(2).

  2. Quantum Adiabatic Optimization and Combinatorial Landscapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Knysh, S.; Morris, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of the Quantum Adiabatic Evolution (QAE) algorithm on a variant of Satisfiability problem for an ensemble of random graphs parametrized by the ratio of clauses to variables, gamma = M / N. We introduce a set of macroscopic parameters (landscapes) and put forward an ansatz of universality for random bit flips. We then formulate the problem of finding the smallest eigenvalue and the excitation gap as a statistical mechanics problem. We use the so-called annealing approximation with a refinement that a finite set of macroscopic variables (verses only energy) is used, and are able to show the existence of a dynamic threshold gamma = gammad, beyond which QAE should take an exponentially long time to find a solution. We compare the results for extended and simplified sets of landscapes and provide numerical evidence in support of our universality ansatz.

  3. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  4. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  5. Evaluating the CALIOPE air quality modelling system: dynamics and chemistry over Europe and Iberian Peninsula for 2004 at high horizontal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piot, M.; Pay, M. T.; Jorba, O.; Baldasano, J. M.; Jiménez-Guerrero, P.; López, E.; Pérez, C.; Gassó, S.

    2009-04-01

    Often in Europe, population exposure to air pollution exceeds standards set by the EU and the World Health Organization (WHO). Urban/suburban areas are predominantly impacted upon, although exceedances of particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) and Ozone (O3) also take place in rural areas. In the frame of the CALIOPE project (Baldasano et al., 2008a), a high-resolution air quality forecasting system, WRF-ARW/HERMES/CMAQ/DREAM, has been developed and applied to the European domain (12km x 12km, 1hr) as well as to the Iberian Peninsula domain (4km x 4km, 1hr) to provide air quality forecasts for Spain (http://www.bsc.es/caliope/). The simulation of such high-resolution model system has been made possible by its implementation on the MareNostrum supercomputer. To reassure potential users and reduce uncertainties, the model system must be evaluated to assess its performances in terms of air quality levels and dynamics reproducibility. The present contribution describes a thorough quantitative evaluation study performed for a reference year (2004). The CALIOPE modelling system is configured with 38 vertical layers reaching up to 50 hPa for the meteorological core. Atmospheric initial and boundary conditions are obtained from the NCEP final analysis data. The vertical resolution of the CMAQ chemistry-transport model for gas-phase and aerosols has been increased from 8 to 15 layers in order to simulate vertical exchanges more accurately. Gas phase boundary conditions are provided by the LMDz-INCA2 global climate-chemistry model (see Hauglustaine et al., 2004). The DREAM model simulates long-range transport of mineral dust over the domains under study. For the European simulation, emissions are disaggregated from the EMEP expert emission inventory for 2004 to the utilized resolution using the criteria implemented in the HERMES emission model (Baldasano et al., 2008b). The HERMES model system, using a bottom-up approach, was adopted to estimate emissions for the Iberian

  6. Yb 3+-doped oxide crystals for diode-pumped solid state lasers: crystal growth, optical spectroscopy, new criteria of evaluation and combinatorial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulon, G.

    2003-04-01

    Our recent scientific program has involved the general evaluation of Yb 3+-doped oxide crystals for diode-pumped solid state lasers. Among crystalline families which provide the best expected performances, some have been grown: sesquioxide, oxyapatite, niobate and garnet fibres pulled either from the Laser Heated Pedestal Growth (LHPG) or the Micro-Pulling Down ( μ-PD) technique, tungstates by the top nucleated floating crystal (TNFC) and garnet and oxiapatite by the Czochralski (CZ) technique. Optical spectra of all crystals have been performed. In addition, a combinatorial chemistry approach has been pointed out to study the radiative lifetime and the concentration quenching processes in these laser crystals.

  7. Coupled phases and combinatorial selection in fluctuating hydrothermal pools: a scenario to guide experimental approaches to the origin of cellular life.

    PubMed

    Damer, Bruce; Deamer, David

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal fields on the prebiotic Earth are candidate environments for biogenesis. We propose a model in which molecular systems driven by cycles of hydration and dehydration in such sites undergo chemical evolution in dehydrated films on mineral surfaces followed by encapsulation and combinatorial selection in a hydrated bulk phase. The dehydrated phase can consist of concentrated eutectic mixtures or multilamellar liquid crystalline matrices. Both conditions organize and concentrate potential monomers and thereby promote polymerization reactions that are driven by reduced water activity in the dehydrated phase. In the case of multilamellar lipid matrices, polymers that have been synthesized are captured in lipid vesicles upon rehydration to produce a variety of molecular systems. Each vesicle represents a protocell, an "experiment" in a natural version of combinatorial chemistry. Two kinds of selective processes can then occur. The first is a physical process in which relatively stable molecular systems will be preferentially selected. The second is a chemical process in which rare combinations of encapsulated polymers form systems capable of capturing energy and nutrients to undergo growth by catalyzed polymerization. Given continued cycling over extended time spans, such combinatorial processes will give rise to molecular systems having the fundamental properties of life.

  8. Coupled phases and combinatorial selection in fluctuating hydrothermal pools: a scenario to guide experimental approaches to the origin of cellular life.

    PubMed

    Damer, Bruce; Deamer, David

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal fields on the prebiotic Earth are candidate environments for biogenesis. We propose a model in which molecular systems driven by cycles of hydration and dehydration in such sites undergo chemical evolution in dehydrated films on mineral surfaces followed by encapsulation and combinatorial selection in a hydrated bulk phase. The dehydrated phase can consist of concentrated eutectic mixtures or multilamellar liquid crystalline matrices. Both conditions organize and concentrate potential monomers and thereby promote polymerization reactions that are driven by reduced water activity in the dehydrated phase. In the case of multilamellar lipid matrices, polymers that have been synthesized are captured in lipid vesicles upon rehydration to produce a variety of molecular systems. Each vesicle represents a protocell, an "experiment" in a natural version of combinatorial chemistry. Two kinds of selective processes can then occur. The first is a physical process in which relatively stable molecular systems will be preferentially selected. The second is a chemical process in which rare combinations of encapsulated polymers form systems capable of capturing energy and nutrients to undergo growth by catalyzed polymerization. Given continued cycling over extended time spans, such combinatorial processes will give rise to molecular systems having the fundamental properties of life. PMID:25780958

  9. Coupled Phases and Combinatorial Selection in Fluctuating Hydrothermal Pools: A Scenario to Guide Experimental Approaches to the Origin of Cellular Life

    PubMed Central

    Damer, Bruce; Deamer, David

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal fields on the prebiotic Earth are candidate environments for biogenesis. We propose a model in which molecular systems driven by cycles of hydration and dehydration in such sites undergo chemical evolution in dehydrated films on mineral surfaces followed by encapsulation and combinatorial selection in a hydrated bulk phase. The dehydrated phase can consist of concentrated eutectic mixtures or multilamellar liquid crystalline matrices. Both conditions organize and concentrate potential monomers and thereby promote polymerization reactions that are driven by reduced water activity in the dehydrated phase. In the case of multilamellar lipid matrices, polymers that have been synthesized are captured in lipid vesicles upon rehydration to produce a variety of molecular systems. Each vesicle represents a protocell, an “experiment” in a natural version of combinatorial chemistry. Two kinds of selective processes can then occur. The first is a physical process in which relatively stable molecular systems will be preferentially selected. The second is a chemical process in which rare combinations of encapsulated polymers form systems capable of capturing energy and nutrients to undergo growth by catalyzed polymerization. Given continued cycling over extended time spans, such combinatorial processes will give rise to molecular systems having the fundamental properties of life. PMID:25780958

  10. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, D.; Rusanen, A.; Boy, M.; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, B.; Zelenyuk, A.; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-01

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas-phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2 (MCMv3.2), an aerosol dynamics and particle-phase chemistry module (which considers acid-catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion-limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study (1) the evaporation of liquid dioctyl phthalate (DOP) particles, (2) the slow and almost particle-size-independent evaporation of α-pinene ozonolysis secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, (3) the mass-transfer-limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), and (4) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers. ADCHAM is able to capture the observed α-pinene SOA mass increase in the presence of NH3(g). Organic salts of ammonium and carboxylic acids predominantly form during the early stage of SOA formation. In the smog chamber experiments, these salts contribute substantially to the initial growth of the homogeneously nucleated particles. The model simulations of evaporating α-pinene SOA particles support the recent experimental findings that these particles have a semi-solid tar-like amorphous-phase state. ADCHAM is able to reproduce the main features of the observed slow evaporation rates if the concentration of low-volatility and viscous oligomerized SOA material at the particle surface increases upon evaporation. The evaporation rate is mainly governed by the reversible decomposition of oligomers back to monomers. Finally, we demonstrate that the mass-transfer-limited uptake of condensable organic compounds

  11. Combinatorial chemistry in nematodes: modular assembly of primary metabolism-derived building blocks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was the first animal to have its genome fully sequenced and has become an important model organism for biomedical research. However, like many other animal model systems, its metabolome remained largely uncharacterized, until recent investigations demonstrated the importance of small molecule-based signalling cascades for virtually every aspect of nematode biology. These studies have revealed that nematodes are amazingly skilled chemists: using simple building blocks from conserved primary metabolism and a strategy of modular assembly, C. elegans and other nematode species create complex molecular architectures to regulate their development and behaviour. These nematode-derived modular metabolites (NDMMs) are based on the dideoxysugars ascarylose or paratose, which serve as scaffolds for attachment of moieties from lipid, amino acid, carbohydrate, citrate, and nucleoside metabolism. Mutant screens and comparative metabolomics based on NMR spectroscopy and MS have so-far revealed several 100 different ascarylose (“ascarosides”) and a few paratose (“paratosides”) derivatives, many of which represent potent signalling molecules that can be active at femtomolar levels, regulating development, behaviour, body shape, and many other life history traits. NDMM biosynthesis appears to be carefully regulated as assembly of different modules proceeds with very high specificity. Preliminary biosynthetic studies have confirmed the primary metabolism origin of some NDMM building blocks, whereas the mechanisms that underlie their highly specific assembly are not understood. Considering their functions and biosynthetic origin, NDMMs represent a new class of natural products that cannot easily be classified as “primary” or “secondary”. We believe that the identification of new variants of primary metabolism-derived structures that serve important signalling functions in C. elegans and other nematodes provides a strong incentive for a comprehensive re-analysis of metabolism in higher animals, including humans. PMID:26059053

  12. Synthesis of New Water-Soluble Metal-Binding Polymers combinatorial Chemistry Approach

    SciTech Connect

    R. Bryan Miller

    2004-05-07

    (1) Synthesis of Fused Tetraheterocyclic Azepines: (2) Synthesis of Linear Bidentate Diisoxazole and Bidentate Isoxazole-Furyl/Thienyl/Pyridyl Motifs: (3) Synthesis of Pyrazolo[3,4-g] [2,1] dihydrobenzoisoxazol(in)es: (4) Synthesis of Spiro-Fused (C5)-Isozazoline-(C4)-Pyrazolones:

  13. LIGNIFICATION: ARE LIGNINS BIOSYNTHESIZED VIA SIMPLE COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY OR VIA PROTEINACEOUS CONTROL AND TEMPLATE REPLICATION?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignification is the plant cell wall process by which lignin polymers are produced from phenolic monomers. These monomers are primarily the three hydroxycinnamyl (p-coumaryl, coniferyl and sinapyl) alcohols. Structural analysis of cell wall lignins and mechanistic studies of possible biosynthetic pa...

  14. Combinatorial chemistry in nematodes: modular assembly of primary metabolism-derived building blocks.

    PubMed

    von Reuss, Stephan H; Schroeder, Frank C

    2015-07-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was the first animal to have its genome fully sequenced and has become an important model organism for biomedical research. However, like many other animal model systems, its metabolome remained largely uncharacterized, until recent investigations demonstrated the importance of small molecule-based signalling cascades for virtually every aspect of nematode biology. These studies have revealed that nematodes are amazingly skilled chemists: using simple building blocks from conserved primary metabolism and a strategy of modular assembly, C. elegans and other nematode species create complex molecular architectures to regulate their development and behaviour. These nematode-derived modular metabolites (NDMMs) are based on the dideoxysugars ascarylose or paratose, which serve as scaffolds for attachment of moieties from lipid, amino acid, carbohydrate, citrate, and nucleoside metabolism. Mutant screens and comparative metabolomics based on NMR spectroscopy and MS have so-far revealed several 100 different ascarylose ("ascarosides") and a few paratose ("paratosides") derivatives, many of which represent potent signalling molecules that can be active at femtomolar levels, regulating development, behaviour, body shape, and many other life history traits. NDMM biosynthesis appears to be carefully regulated as assembly of different modules proceeds with very high specificity. Preliminary biosynthetic studies have confirmed the primary metabolism origin of some NDMM building blocks, whereas the mechanisms that underlie their highly specific assembly are not understood. Considering their functions and biosynthetic origin, NDMMs represent a new class of natural products that cannot easily be classified as "primary" or "secondary". We believe that the identification of new variants of primary metabolism-derived structures that serve important signalling functions in C. elegans and other nematodes provides a strong incentive for a comprehensive re-analysis of metabolism in higher animals, including humans.

  15. Fluorescent sensors for specific RNA: a general paradigm using chemistry and combinatorial biology.

    PubMed

    Sparano, Brian A; Koide, Kazunori

    2007-04-18

    Here, we describe a new paradigm for the development of small molecule-based RNA sensors. We prepared a series of potential PET (photoinduced electron transfer) sensors on the basis of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorophore conjugated with two aniline derivatives as electron donors (quenchers). NMR and fluorescent spectroscopic analyses of these DCF derivatives revealed the correlation between the conformations, the PET, and the fluorescent intensities of these DCF derivatives, enabling us to select a sensor candidate. RNA aptamers were raised against the aniline-based quencher via in vitro selection (SELEX). One of these aptamers enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the DCF-aniline conjugate in a concentration-dependent manner. To demonstrate the power and generality of this approach, additional in vitro selection was performed and aptamers from this selection were found to have similar activities. These results show that one can develop fluorescence-inducing reporter RNA and morph it into remotely related sequences without prior structural insight into RNA-ligand binding.

  16. Spring carbonate chemistry dynamics of surface waters in the northern East China Sea: Water mixing, biological uptake of CO2, and chemical buffering capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Wei-Dong; Chen, Jian-Fang; Jin, Hai-Yan; Li, Hong-Liang; Liu, Jin-Wen; He, Xian-Qiang; Bai, Yan

    2014-09-01

    We investigated sea surface total alkalinity (TAlk), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved oxygen (DO), and satellite-derived chlorophyll-a in the connection between the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea (ECS) during April to early May 2007. In spring, Changjiang dilution water (CDW), ECS offshore water, and together with Yellow Sea water (YSW) occupied the northern ECS. Using 16 day composite satellite-derived chlorophyll-a images, several algal blooms were identified in the CDW and ECS offshore water. Correspondingly, biological DIC drawdown of 73 ± 20 μmol kg-1, oversaturated DO of 10-110 μmol O2 kg-1, and low fugacity of CO2 of 181-304 μatm were revealed in these two waters. YSW also showed CO2 uptake in spring, due to the very low temperature. However, its intrusion virtually counteracted CO2 uptake in the northern ECS. In the CDW and the ECS offshore water, Revelle factor was 9.3-11.7 and 8.9-10.6, respectively, while relatively high Revelle factor values of 11.4-13.0 were revealed in YSW. In the ECS offshore water, the observed relationship between DIC drawdown and oversaturated DO departed from the Redfield ratio, indicating an effect of chemical buffering capacity on the carbonate system during air-sea reequilibration. Given the fact that the chemical buffering capacity slows down the air-sea reequilibration of CO2, the early spring DIC drawdown may have durative effects on the sea surface carbonate system until early summer. Although our study is subject to limited temporal and spatial coverage of sampling, these insights are fundamental to understanding sea surface carbonate chemistry dynamics in this important ocean margin.

  17. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, experiments, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and information on a variety of chemistry topics including, for example, inert gases, light-induced reactions, calculators, identification of substituted acetophenones, the elements, analysis of copper minerals, extraction of metallic strontium, equilibrium, halogens, and…

  18. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and classroom materials/activities. These include: game for teaching ionic formulas; method for balancing equations; description of useful redox series; computer programs (with listings) for water electrolysis simulation and for determining chemical…

  19. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  20. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the alkylation of aniline, the preparation and properties of perbromate, using scrap copper in chemistry instruction, a safe method of burning hydrogen, and the use of an ion-charge model as an alternative to the mole concept in secondary school instruction. (AL)

  1. Confectionary Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Elise Hilf

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities and demonstrations that enable teachers to use various types of confections as tactile experiences to spark chemistry students' interest and generate enthusiasm for learning. Presents uses of candy in teaching about atomic structure, spontaneous nuclear decay, chemical formulas, fractoluminescence, the effect of a molecular…

  2. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes several chemistry projects, including solubility, formula for magnesium oxide, dissociation of dinitrogen tetroxide, use of 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene, migration of ions, heats of neutralizations, use of pocket calculators, sonic cleaning, oxidation states of manganese, and cell potentials. Includes an extract from Chemical Age on…

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials/activities. These include: experiments on colloids, processing of uranium ore, action of heat on carbonates; color test for phenols and aromatic amines; solvent properties of non-electrolytes; stereoscopic applications/methods; a valency balance;…

  4. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes some laboratory apparatus, chemistry experiments and demonstrations, such as a Kofler block melting point apparatus, chromatographic investigation of the phosphoric acid, x-ray diffraction, the fountain experiment, endothermic sherbet, the measurement of viscosity, ionization energies and electronic configurations. (GA)

  5. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

  6. Real-time Monitoring of Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization Using Silicon Photonic Microring Resonators: Implications for Combinatorial Screening of Polymer Brush Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Limpoco, F. Ted; Bailey, Ryan C.

    2011-01-01

    We directly monitor in parallel and in real-time the temporal profiles of polymer brushes simultaneously grown via multiple ATRP reaction conditions on a single substrate using arrays of silicon photonic microring resonators. In addition to probing relative polymerization rates, we also show the ability to evaluate the dynamic properties of the in situ grown polymers. Taken together, this presents a powerful new platform for studying modified interfaces that may allow for the combinatorial optimization of surface initiated polymerization conditions. PMID:21899288

  7. Analytical reduction of combinatorial complexity arising from multiple protein modification sites

    PubMed Central

    Birtwistle, Marc R.

    2015-01-01

    Combinatorial complexity is a major obstacle to ordinary differential equation (ODE) modelling of biochemical networks. For example, a protein with 10 sites that can each be unphosphorylated, phosphorylated or bound to adaptor protein requires 310 ODEs. This problem is often dealt with by making ad hoc assumptions which have unclear validity and disallow modelling of site-specific dynamics. Such site-specific dynamics, however, are important in many biological systems. We show here that for a common biological situation where adaptors bind modified sites, binding is slow relative to modification/demodification, and binding to one modified site hinders binding to other sites, for a protein with n modification sites and m adaptor proteins the number of ODEs needed to simulate the site-specific dynamics of biologically relevant, lumped bound adaptor states is independent of the number of modification sites and equal to m + 1, giving a significant reduction in system size. These considerations can be relaxed considerably while retaining reasonably accurate descriptions of the true system dynamics. We apply the theory to model, using only 11 ODEs, the dynamics of ligand-induced phosphorylation of nine tyrosines on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and primary recruitment of six signalling proteins (Grb2, PI3K, PLCγ1, SHP2, RasA1 and Shc1). The model quantitatively accounts for experimentally determined site-specific phosphorylation and dephosphorylation rates, differential affinities of binding proteins for the phosphorylated sites and binding protein expression levels. Analysis suggests that local concentration of site-specific phosphatases such as SHP2 in membrane subdomains by a factor of approximately 107 is critical for effective site-specific regulation. We further show how our framework can be extended with minimal effort to consider binding cooperativity between Grb2 and c-Cbl, which is important for receptor trafficking. Our theory has potentially broad

  8. Time-dependent combinatory effects of active mechanical loading and passive topographical cues on cell orientation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Huang, Hanyang; Wei, Kang; Zhao, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Mechanical stretching and topographical cues are both effective mechanical stimulations for regulating cell morphology, orientation, and behaviors. The competition of these two mechanical stimulations remains largely underexplored. Previous studies have suggested that a small cyclic mechanical strain is not able to reorient cells that have been pre-aligned by relatively large linear microstructures, but can reorient those pre-aligned by small linear micro/nanostructures if the characteristic dimension of these structures is below a certain threshold. Likewise, for micro/nanostructures with a given characteristic dimension, the strain must exceed a certain magnitude to overrule the topographic cues. There are however no in-depth investigations of such "thresholds" due to the lack of close examination of dynamic cell orientation during and shortly after the mechanical loading. In this study, the time-dependent combinatory effects of active and passive mechanical stimulations on cell orientation are investigated by developing a micromechanical stimulator. The results show that the cells pre-aligned by linear micro/nanostructures can be altered by cyclic in-plane strain, regardless of the structure size. During the loading, the micro/nanostructures can resist the reorientation effects by cyclic in-plane strain while the resistive capability (measured by the mean orientation angle change and the reorientation speed) increases with the increasing characteristic dimension. The micro/nanostructures also can recover the cell orientation after the cessation of cyclic in-plane strain, while the recovering capability increases with the characteristic dimension. The previously observed thresholds are largely dependent on the observation time points. In order to accurately evaluate the combinatory effects of the two mechanical stimulations, observations during the active loading with a short time interval or endpoint observations shortly after the loading are preferred. This

  9. Time-dependent combinatory effects of active mechanical loading and passive topographical cues on cell orientation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Huang, Hanyang; Wei, Kang; Zhao, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Mechanical stretching and topographical cues are both effective mechanical stimulations for regulating cell morphology, orientation, and behaviors. The competition of these two mechanical stimulations remains largely underexplored. Previous studies have suggested that a small cyclic mechanical strain is not able to reorient cells that have been pre-aligned by relatively large linear microstructures, but can reorient those pre-aligned by small linear micro/nanostructures if the characteristic dimension of these structures is below a certain threshold. Likewise, for micro/nanostructures with a given characteristic dimension, the strain must exceed a certain magnitude to overrule the topographic cues. There are however no in-depth investigations of such "thresholds" due to the lack of close examination of dynamic cell orientation during and shortly after the mechanical loading. In this study, the time-dependent combinatory effects of active and passive mechanical stimulations on cell orientation are investigated by developing a micromechanical stimulator. The results show that the cells pre-aligned by linear micro/nanostructures can be altered by cyclic in-plane strain, regardless of the structure size. During the loading, the micro/nanostructures can resist the reorientation effects by cyclic in-plane strain while the resistive capability (measured by the mean orientation angle change and the reorientation speed) increases with the increasing characteristic dimension. The micro/nanostructures also can recover the cell orientation after the cessation of cyclic in-plane strain, while the recovering capability increases with the characteristic dimension. The previously observed thresholds are largely dependent on the observation time points. In order to accurately evaluate the combinatory effects of the two mechanical stimulations, observations during the active loading with a short time interval or endpoint observations shortly after the loading are preferred. This

  10. Sugar amino acid based scaffolds--novel peptidomimetics and their potential in combinatorial synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Tushar K; Jayaprakash, Sarva; Ghosh, Subhash

    2002-08-01

    To meet the growing demands for the development of new molecular entities for discovering new drugs and materials, organic chemists have started looking for new concepts to supplement traditional approaches. In one such approach, the expertise gained over the years in the area of organic synthesis and the rational drug-design concepts are combined together to create "nature-like" and yet unnatural organic molecules that are expected to provide leads in discovering new molecules. Emulating the basic principles followed by nature to build its vast repertoire of biomolecules, organic chemists are developing many novel multifunctional building blocks. Sugar amino acids constitute an important class of such polyfunctional scaffolds where the carboxyl, amino and hydroxyl groups provide an excellent opportunity for organic chemists to create structural diversities akin to nature's molecular arsenal. Recent advances in the area of combinatorial chemistry give unprecedented technological support for rapid compilations of sugar amino acid-based libraries exploiting the diversities of carbohydrate molecules and well-developed solid-phase peptide synthesis methods. This review chronicles the development of sugar amino acids as a novel class of peptidomimetic building blocks and their applications in generating desired secondary structures in peptides as well as in creating mimics of natural biopolymers. PMID:12180903

  11. Combinatorial development of biomaterials for clonal growth of human pluripotent stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Ying; Saha, Krishanu; Bogatyrev, Said R.; Yang, Jing; Hook, Andrew L.; Kalcioglu, Z. Ilke; Cho, Seung-Woo; Mitalipova, Maisam; Pyzocha, Neena; Rojas, Fredrick; van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Davies, Martyn C.; Alexander, Morgan R.; Langer, Robert; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2010-09-01

    Both human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells can self-renew indefinitely in culture; however, present methods to clonally grow them are inefficient and poorly defined for genetic manipulation and therapeutic purposes. Here we develop the first chemically defined, xeno-free, feeder-free synthetic substrates to support robust self-renewal of fully dissociated human embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells. Material properties including wettability, surface topography, surface chemistry and indentation elastic modulus of all polymeric substrates were quantified using high-throughput methods to develop structure-function relationships between material properties and biological performance. These analyses show that optimal human embryonic stem cell substrates are generated from monomers with high acrylate content, have a moderate wettability and employ integrin αvβ3 and αvβ5 engagement with adsorbed vitronectin to promote colony formation. The structure-function methodology employed herein provides a general framework for the combinatorial development of synthetic substrates for stem cell culture.

  12. Decoding Split and Pool Combinatorial Libraries with Electron-Transfer Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Mohosin; Pascal, Bruce D.; Steckler, Caitlin; Aquino, Claudio; Micalizio, Glenn C.; Kodadek, Thomas; Chalmers, Michael J.

    2013-07-01

    Screening of bead-based split and pool combinatorial chemistry libraries is a powerful approach to aid the discovery of new chemical compounds able to interact with, and modulate the activities of, protein targets of interest. Split and pool synthesis provides for large and well diversified chemical libraries, in this case comprised of oligomers generated from a well-defined starting set. At the end of the synthesis, each bead in the library displays many copies of a unique oligomer sequence. Because the sequence of the oligomer is not known at the time of screening, methods for decoding of the sequence of each screening "hit" are essential. Here we describe an electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) based tandem mass spectrometry approach for the decoding of mass-encoded split and pool libraries. We demonstrate that the newly described "chiral oligomers of pentenoic amides (COPAs)" yield non-sequence-specific product ions upon collisional activated dissociation; however, complete sequence information can be obtained with ETD. To aid in the decoding of libraries from MS and MS/MS data, we have incorporated 79Br/81Br isotope "tags" to differentiate N- and C-terminal product ions. In addition, we have created "Hit-Find," a software program that allows users to generate libraries in silico . The user can then search all possible members of the chemical library for those that fall within a user-defined mass error.

  13. Combinatorial synthesis and sensorial properties of mercapto primary alcohols and analogues.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Catherine; Guyot-Declerck, Christine; Collin, Sonia

    2003-06-01

    Combinatorial chemistry was used to extend the knowledge of beer thiols by synthesizing 13 mercapto primary alcohols and 6 other compounds (mercapto ketones and corresponding alcohols). Their respective mass spectra, retention indices on two columns, odor descriptors, and best estimated-gas chromatography-lowest amounts detected sniffing (BE-GC-LoADS) are reported. The descriptor "cheese", commonly associated with mercapto aldehydes and thioesters, was rarely used for mercapto alcohols or mercapto ketones. Polyfunctional thiols containing at least six carbon atoms usually gave a delicate odor of rhubarb/carrot, whereas most of the mercapto primary alcohols of intermediate size were described as onion-like, plastic-like, or pungent. Sensorial analysis of beers spiked with copper(II) ions allowed confirmation of the participation of thiols in the overall odor of fresh beer. The finding of 4-mercapto-4-methyl-2-pentanone and 3-mercaptohexanol in an XAD-2 Amberlite resin beer extract indicates a requirement for a more efficient thiol extraction procedure allowing identification of relevant polyfunctional thiols for brewing scientists.

  14. Film loss-free cleaning chemicals for EUV mask lifetime elongation developed through combinatorial chemical screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaehyuck; Kim, Jinsu; Lowe, Jeff; Dattilo, Davide; Koh, Soowan; Choi, Jun Yeol; Dietze, Uwe; Shoki, Tsutomu; Kim, Byung Gook; Jeon, Chan-Uk

    2015-10-01

    EUV masks include many different layers of various materials rarely used in optical masks, and each layer of material has a particular role in enhancing the performance of EUV lithography. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how the mask quality and patterning performance can change during mask fabrication, EUV exposure, maintenance cleaning, shipping, or storage. SPM (Sulfuric acid peroxide mixture) which has been extensively used for acid cleaning of photomask and wafer has serious drawback for EUV mask cleaning. It shows severe film loss of tantalum-based absorber layers and limited removal efficiency of EUV-generated carbon contaminants on EUV mask surface. Here, we introduce such novel cleaning chemicals developed for EUV mask as almost film loss free for various layers of the mask and superior carbon removal performance. Combinatorial chemical screening methods allowed us to screen several hundred combinations of various chemistries and additives under several different process conditions of temperature and time, eventually leading to development of the best chemistry selections for EUV mask cleaning. Recently, there have been many activities for the development of EUV pellicle, driven by ASML and core EUV scanner customer companies. It is still important to obtain film-loss free cleaning chemicals because cleaning cycle of EUV mask should be much faster than that of optic mask mainly due to EUV pellicle lifetime. More frequent cleaning, combined with the adoption of new materials for EUV masks, necessitates that mask manufacturers closely examine the performance change of EUV masks during cleaning process. We have investigated EUV mask quality changes and film losses during 50 cleaning cycles using new chemicals as well as particle and carbon contaminant removal characteristics. We have observed that the performance of new chemicals developed is superior to current SPM or relevant cleaning chemicals for EUV mask cleaning and EUV mask lifetime elongation.

  15. Combinatorial signals by inflammatory cytokines and chemokines mediate leukocyte interactions with extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Vaday, G G; Franitza, S; Schor, H; Hecht, I; Brill, A; Cahalon, L; Hershkoviz, R; Lider, O

    2001-06-01

    On their extravasation from the vascular system into inflamed tissues, leukocytes must maneuver through a complex insoluble network of molecules termed the extracellular matrix (ECM). Leukocytes navigate toward their target sites by adhering to ECM glycoproteins and secreting degradative enzymes, while constantly orienting themselves in response to specific signals in their surroundings. Cytokines and chemokines are key biological mediators that provide such signals for cell navigation. Although the individual effects of various cytokines have been well characterized, it is becoming increasingly evident that the mixture of cytokines encountered in the ECM provides important combinatorial signals that influence cell behavior. Herein, we present an overview of previous and ongoing studies that have examined how leukocytes integrate signals from different combinations of cytokines that they encounter either simultaneously or sequentially within the ECM, to dynamically alter their navigational activities. For example, we describe our findings that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha acts as an adhesion-strengthening and stop signal for T cells migrating toward stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha, while transforming growth factor-beta down-regulates TNF-alpha-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 secretion by monocytes. These findings indicate the importance of how one cytokine, such as TNF-alpha, can transmit diverse signals to different subsets of leukocytes, depending on its combination with other cytokines, its concentration, and its time and sequence of exposure. The combinatorial effects of multiple cytokines thus affect leukocytes in a step-by-step manner, whereby cells react to cytokine signals in their immediate vicinity by altering their adhesiveness, directional movement, and remodeling of the ECM. PMID:11404372

  16. The Evaluation of the Spanish Air Quality Modelling System: CALIOPE. Dynamics and Chemistry over Europe and Iberian Peninsula for 2004 at high horizontal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piot, M.; Pay, M.; Jorba, O.; Lopez, E.; Pirez, C.; Gasso, S.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    In Europe, human exposure to air pollution often exceeds standards set by the EU commission (Directives 1996/62/EC, 2002/3/EC, 2008/50/EC) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Urban/suburban areas are predominantly impacted upon, although exceedances of particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) and Ozone (O3) also take place in rural areas. Within the CALIOPE project, a high-resolution air quality forecasting system, namely WRF-ARW/HERMES04/CMAQ/BSC-DREAM, has been developed and applied to the European domain (12x12 sq. km, 1hr) as well as the Spanish domain (4x4 sq. km, 1hr). The simulation of such high-resolution model system has been made possible by its implementation on the MareNostrum supercomputer. This contribution describes a thorough quantitative evaluation study performed for the reference year 2004. The WRF-ARW meteorological model contains 38 vertical layers reaching up to 50 hPa. The vertical resolution of the CMAQ chemistry-transport model for gas-phase and aerosols has been increased from 8 to 15 layers in order to simulate vertical exchanges more accurately. Gas phase boundary conditions are provided by the LMDz-INCA2 global climate-chemistry model. For the European simulation, emissions are disaggregated from the EMEP emission inventory for 2004 to the utilized resolution using the criteria implemented in the HERMES04 emission model. The HERMES04 model system, running through a bottom-up approach, is used to estimate emissions for Spain at a 1x1 sq. km horizontal resolution, every hour. In order to evaluate the performances of the CALIOPE system, the model simulation for Europe was compared with ground-based measurements from the EMEP and the Spanish air quality networks (total of 60 stations for O3, 43 for NO2, 31 for SO2, 25 for PM10 and 16 for PM2.5). The model simulation for Europe satisfactorily reproduces O3 concentrations throughout the year (annual correlation: 0.66) with relatively small errors: MNGE values range from 13% to 26%, and MNBE

  17. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Mamon, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies of circumstellar chemistry are discussed for both red-giant and protostellar winds. The generalized photochemical model is able to account for the recently discovered silicon-bearing molecules in the prototypical, C-rich, AGB star IRC + 10216. The surprising occurrence of CO in protostellar winds that are largely atomic is interpreted to be the result of the high density and the rapid decrease of the temperature with distance that is expected for such winds.

  18. Combinatorial Gene Regulatory Functions Underlie Ultraconserved Elements in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Warnefors, Maria; Hartmann, Britta; Thomsen, Stefan; Alonso, Claudio R.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are discrete genomic elements conserved across large evolutionary distances. Although UCEs have been linked to multiple facets of mammalian gene regulation their extreme evolutionary conservation remains largely unexplained. Here, we apply a computational approach to investigate this question in Drosophila, exploring the molecular functions of more than 1,500 UCEs shared across the genomes of 12 Drosophila species. Our data indicate that Drosophila UCEs are hubs for gene regulatory functions and suggest that UCE sequence invariance originates from their combinatorial roles in gene control. We also note that the gene regulatory roles of intronic and intergenic UCEs (iUCEs) are distinct from those found in exonic UCEs (eUCEs). In iUCEs, transcription factor (TF) and epigenetic factor binding data strongly support iUCE roles in transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In contrast, analyses of eUCEs indicate that they are two orders of magnitude more likely than the expected to simultaneously include protein-coding sequence, TF-binding sites, splice sites, and RNA editing sites but have reduced roles in transcriptional or epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, we use a Drosophila cell culture system and transgenic Drosophila embryos to validate the notion of UCE combinatorial regulatory roles using an eUCE within the Hox gene Ultrabithorax and show that its protein-coding region also contains alternative splicing regulatory information. Taken together our experiments indicate that UCEs emerge as a result of combinatorial gene regulatory roles and highlight common features in mammalian and insect UCEs implying that similar processes might underlie ultraconservation in diverse animal taxa. PMID:27247329

  19. Star clusters evolution simulation on basement of linguo- combinatorial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatyev, Mikhail B.

    2015-08-01

    Each of the clusters of star systems can be described using linguo- combinatorial approach through a formula that determines the number of arbitrary factors in the structure of equivalent equations as the number of combinations of n by m + 1, where n - number of stars in the cluster, m - number of constraints imposed on the stars cluster(M.Ignatyev “The linguo- combinatorial simulation in modern physics”\\\\ J. of Modern Physics,USA, 2012, Vol.1, No 1, p.7-11). Such clusters can be multiple, they can be combined into larger clusters or clusters can decay based on the effect of the collective. For example, if we have two clusters are characterized by the number of arbitrary coefficients S1 and S2, wherem1 + 1 m2 + 1S1 = C S2 = Cn1 n2then by imposing general restrictions mcol we will havem1 + m2 + mcol +1Scol = Cn1 + n2At the same time, depending on the specific parameters can be Scol > S1 + S2, when the union in collective increases the adaptive capabilities, and can be Scol < S1 + S2, where adaptive capacity of less than the sum of the collective adaptation a possibly initial clusters. In the first case, we can observe the effect of the formation of new large clusters, in the second case - the collapse of large clusters into smaller ones. The report deals with the simulation of the evolution of star clusters on the basement of linguo- combinatorial approach.

  20. Combinatorial Gene Regulatory Functions Underlie Ultraconserved Elements in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Warnefors, Maria; Hartmann, Britta; Thomsen, Stefan; Alonso, Claudio R

    2016-09-01

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are discrete genomic elements conserved across large evolutionary distances. Although UCEs have been linked to multiple facets of mammalian gene regulation their extreme evolutionary conservation remains largely unexplained. Here, we apply a computational approach to investigate this question in Drosophila, exploring the molecular functions of more than 1,500 UCEs shared across the genomes of 12 Drosophila species. Our data indicate that Drosophila UCEs are hubs for gene regulatory functions and suggest that UCE sequence invariance originates from their combinatorial roles in gene control. We also note that the gene regulatory roles of intronic and intergenic UCEs (iUCEs) are distinct from those found in exonic UCEs (eUCEs). In iUCEs, transcription factor (TF) and epigenetic factor binding data strongly support iUCE roles in transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In contrast, analyses of eUCEs indicate that they are two orders of magnitude more likely than the expected to simultaneously include protein-coding sequence, TF-binding sites, splice sites, and RNA editing sites but have reduced roles in transcriptional or epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, we use a Drosophila cell culture system and transgenic Drosophila embryos to validate the notion of UCE combinatorial regulatory roles using an eUCE within the Hox gene Ultrabithorax and show that its protein-coding region also contains alternative splicing regulatory information. Taken together our experiments indicate that UCEs emerge as a result of combinatorial gene regulatory roles and highlight common features in mammalian and insect UCEs implying that similar processes might underlie ultraconservation in diverse animal taxa. PMID:27247329

  1. Combinatorial effects of arginine and fluoride on oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X; Cheng, X; Wang, L; Qiu, W; Wang, S; Zhou, Y; Li, M; Li, Y; Cheng, L; Li, J; Zhou, X; Xu, X

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries is closely associated with the microbial disequilibrium between acidogenic/aciduric pathogens and alkali-generating commensal residents within the dental plaque. Fluoride is a widely used anticaries agent, which promotes tooth hard-tissue remineralization and suppresses bacterial activities. Recent clinical trials have shown that oral hygiene products containing both fluoride and arginine possess a greater anticaries effect compared with those containing fluoride alone, indicating synergy between fluoride and arginine in caries management. Here, we hypothesize that arginine may augment the ecological benefit of fluoride by enriching alkali-generating bacteria in the plaque biofilm and thus synergizes with fluoride in controlling dental caries. Specifically, we assessed the combinatory effects of NaF/arginine on planktonic and biofilm cultures of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis with checkerboard microdilution assays. The optimal NaF/arginine combinations were selected, and their combinatory effects on microbial composition were further examined in single-, dual-, and 3-species biofilm using bacterial species-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We found that arginine synergized with fluoride in suppressing acidogenic S. mutans in both planktonic and biofilm cultures. In addition, the NaF/arginine combination synergistically reduced S. mutans but enriched S. sanguinis within the multispecies biofilms. More importantly, the optimal combination of NaF/arginine maintained a "streptococcal pressure" against the potential growth of oral anaerobe P. gingivalis within the alkalized biofilm. Taken together, we conclude that the combinatory application of fluoride and arginine has a potential synergistic effect in maintaining a healthy oral microbial equilibrium and thus represents a promising ecological approach to caries management.

  2. Computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  3. Absolutely maximally entangled states, combinatorial designs, and multiunitary matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyeneche, Dardo; Alsina, Daniel; Latorre, José I.; Riera, Arnau; Życzkowski, Karol

    2015-09-01

    Absolutely maximally entangled (AME) states are those multipartite quantum states that carry absolute maximum entanglement in all possible bipartitions. AME states are known to play a relevant role in multipartite teleportation, in quantum secret sharing, and they provide the basis novel tensor networks related to holography. We present alternative constructions of AME states and show their link with combinatorial designs. We also analyze a key property of AME states, namely, their relation to tensors, which can be understood as unitary transformations in all of their bipartitions. We call this property multiunitarity.

  4. Multifunctional combinatorial-designed nanoparticles for nucleic acid therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in biomedical sciences, especially in the field of human genetics, is increasingly considered to facilitate a new frontier in development of novel disease-modifying therapeutics. One of major challenges in the development of nucleic acid therapeutics is efficient and specific delivery of the molecules to the target tissue and cell upon systemic administration. In this report, I discuss our strategy to develop combinatorial-designed multifunctional nanoparticle assemblies based on natural biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for nucleic acid delivery in: (1) overcoming tumor drug resistance and (2) genetic modulation of macrophage functional phenotype from M1 to M2 in treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  5. Nitrogen containing privileged structures and their solid phase combinatorial synthesis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Amit; Yadav, Mange Ram; Giridhar, Rajani; Prajapati, Navnit; Tripathi, Avinash C; Saraf, Shailendra K

    2013-06-01

    The existence of preferred molecular scaffolds that possess inherent biological activity, called privileged structures, is now well recognized. Such privileged structures not only provide enhanced drug-like properties but also give new hits for developing leads. The synthesis of combinatorial libraries, especially with the insertion of privileged substructures into heterocyclic moieties containing nitrogen, provides for a greater probability of the discovery of novel lead compounds using chemical transformation. The review focuses on the progress in the solid-phase synthetic strategies of nitrogen containing privileged structures over the years.

  6. A macromolecular prodrug strategy for combinatorial drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan-Nan; Lin, Jiantao; Gao, Di; Zhang, Li-Ming

    2014-03-01

    A novel macromolecular prodrug strategy was developed for the combinatorial delivery of two poorly water-soluble drugs, dexamethasone and doxorubicin. In this work, dexamethasone was firstly conjugated onto a water-soluble modified polysaccharide by an acid-labile hydrazone linkage. The resultant macromolecular prodrug had an amphiphilic character and could self-assemble into spherical polymeric micelles in aqueous system. With these micelles, doxorubicin was then encapsulated into their hydrophobic cores. For the conjugated dexamethasone and encapsulated doxorubicin, they could exhibit independent and acid-sensitive release characteristics. For the doxorubicin-loaded prodrug micelles, they were easily be internalized by living cells and showed obvious antitumor activity. PMID:24407691

  7. Combinatorial antibody libraries: new advances, new immunological insights.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Immunochemists have become quite proficient in engineering existing antibody molecules to control their pharmacological properties. However, in terms of generating new antibodies, the combinatorial antibody library has become a central feature of modern immunochemistry. These libraries are essentially an immune system in a test tube and enable the selection of antibodies without the constraints of whole animal or cell-based systems. This Review provides an overview of how antibody libraries are constructed and discusses what can be learnt from these synthetic systems. In particular, the Review focuses on new biological insights from antibody libraries - such as the concept of 'SOS antibodies' - and the growing use of intracellular antibodies to perturb cellular functions.

  8. Yeast surface display for screening combinatorial polypeptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Boder, E T; Wittrup, K D

    1997-06-01

    Display on the yeast cell wall is well suited for engineering mammalian cell-surface and secreted proteins (e.g., antibodies, receptors, cytokines) that require endoplasmic reticulum-specific post-translational processing for efficient folding and activity. C-terminal fusion to the Aga2p mating adhesion receptor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for the selection of scFv antibody fragments with threefold decreased antigen dissociation rate from a randomly mutated library. A eukaryotic host should alleviate expression biases present in bacterially propagated combinatorial libraries. Quantitative flow cytometric analysis enables fine discrimination of kinetic parameters for protein binding to soluble ligands.

  9. Customized optimization of metabolic pathways by combinatorial transcriptional engineering.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongbo; Du, Jing; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction of a heterologous metabolic pathway into a platform microorganism for applications in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology is often technically straightforward. However, the major challenge is to balance the flux in the pathway to obtain high yield and productivity in a target microorganism. To address this limitation, we recently developed a simple, efficient, and programmable approach named "customized optimization of metabolic pathways by combinatorial transcriptional engineering" (COMPACTER) for balancing the flux in a pathway under distinct metabolic backgrounds. Here we use two examples including a cellobiose-utilizing pathway and a xylose-utilizing pathway to illustrate the key steps in the COMPACTER method.

  10. Discovery of methanol electro-oxidation catalysts by combinatorial analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mallouk, T.E.; Reddington, E.; Pu, C.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogen fuel cells are likely to become a major energy source in the next century, but they are not ideal for all applications. A safe alternative fuel with a high energy density will be necessary for transportation and mobile applications. Direct methanol-air fuel cells (DMFCs) are an attractive alternative to hydrogen fuel cells because of the high energy density and low cost of methanol as a fuel. However, in order for DMFCs to become commercially viable, better electrocatalysts for the anode reaction need to be developed. This paper describes a combinatorial technique for generating an array of electrodes with varying metal compositions.

  11. LOGICAL REASONING ABILITY AND STUDENT PERFORMANCE IN GENERAL CHEMISTRY.

    PubMed

    Bird, Lillian

    2010-03-01

    Logical reasoning skills of students enrolled in General Chemistry at the University of Puerto Rico in Río Piedras were measured using the Group Assessment of Logical Thinking (GALT) test. The results were used to determine the students' cognitive level (concrete, transitional, formal) as well as their level of performance by logical reasoning mode (mass/volume conservation, proportional reasoning, correlational reasoning, experimental variable control, probabilistic reasoning and combinatorial reasoning). This information was used to identify particular deficiencies and gender effects, and to determine which logical reasoning modes were the best predictors of student performance in the general chemistry course. Statistical tests to analyze the relation between (a) operational level and final grade in both semesters of the course; (b) GALT test results and performance in the ACS General Chemistry Examination; and (c) operational level and student approach (algorithmic or conceptual) towards a test question that may be answered correctly using either strategy, were also performed.

  12. Historical Account And Branching To Rarefied Gas Dynamics Of Atomic and Molecular Beams : A Continuing And Fascinating Odyssey Commemorated By Nobel Prizes Awarded To 23 Laureates In Physics And Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campargue, Roger

    2005-05-01

    This Historical Account derived in part from D. R. Herschbach was presented as an opening lecture of the Molecular Beam Session organized at the 24th International Symposium on Rarefied Gas Dynamics held in Bari, Italy, in July 2004. The emphasis is on the impressive results due to the molecular beam techniques in the last century. The first section summarizes the historical beam experiments performed by 14 Nobel Prize laureates having used the thermally effusive sources to establish the basic principles of Modern Physics. The second section is on the branching of Molecular Beams to Rarefied Gas Dynamics having permitted to investigate the physics of supersonic free jets and transform the molecular beam techniques. Finally, the last section relates the spectacular molecular beam experiments in helium free jet ultracooling, molecular spectroscopy, chemical reaction dynamics, clustering and modification of low density matter, and biomolecule mass spectrometry, rewarded by nine Nobel Prizes in Chemistry from 1986 to 2002.

  13. Combinatorial techniques to efficiently investigate and optimize organic thin film processing and properties.

    PubMed

    Wieberger, Florian; Kolb, Tristan; Neuber, Christian; Ober, Christopher K; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2013-04-08

    In this article we present several developed and improved combinatorial techniques to optimize processing conditions and material properties of organic thin films. The combinatorial approach allows investigations of multi-variable dependencies and is the perfect tool to investigate organic thin films regarding their high performance purposes. In this context we develop and establish the reliable preparation of gradients of material composition, temperature, exposure, and immersion time. Furthermore we demonstrate the smart application of combinations of composition and processing gradients to create combinatorial libraries. First a binary combinatorial library is created by applying two gradients perpendicular to each other. A third gradient is carried out in very small areas and arranged matrix-like over the entire binary combinatorial library resulting in a ternary combinatorial library. Ternary combinatorial libraries allow identifying precise trends for the optimization of multi-variable dependent processes which is demonstrated on the lithographic patterning process. Here we verify conclusively the strong interaction and thus the interdependency of variables in the preparation and properties of complex organic thin film systems. The established gradient preparation techniques are not limited to lithographic patterning. It is possible to utilize and transfer the reported combinatorial techniques to other multi-variable dependent processes and to investigate and optimize thin film layers and devices for optical, electro-optical, and electronic applications.

  14. To Think without Thinking: The Implications of Combinatory Play and the Creative Process for Neuroaesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The author considers combinatory play as an intersection between creativity, play, and neuroaesthetics. She discusses combinatory play as vital to the creative process in art and science, particularly with regard to the incubation of new ideas. She reviews findings from current neurobiological research and outlines the way that the brain activates…

  15. A multi-objective stochastic approach to combinatorial technology space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Chirag B.

    Historically, aerospace development programs have frequently been marked by performance shortfalls, cost growth, and schedule slippage. New technologies included in systems are considered to be one of the major sources of this programmatic risk. Decisions regarding the choice of technologies to include in a design are therefore crucial for a successful development program. This problem of technology selection is a challenging exercise in multi-objective decision making. The complexity of this selection problem is compounded by the geometric growth of the combinatorial space with the number of technologies being considered and the uncertainties inherent in the knowledge of the technological attributes. These problems are not typically addressed in the selection methods employed in common practice. Consequently, a method is desired to aid the selection of technologies for complex systems design with consideration of the combinatorial complexity, multi-dimensionality, and the presence of uncertainties. Several categories of techniques are explored to address the shortcomings of current approaches and to realize the goal of an efficient and effective combinatorial technology space exploration method. For the multi-objective decision making, a posteriori preference articulation is implemented. To realize this, a stochastic algorithm for Pareto optimization is formulated based on the concepts of SPEA2. Techniques to address the uncertain nature of technology impact on the system are also examined. Monte Carlo simulations using the surrogate models are used for uncertainty quantification. The concepts of graph theory are used for modeling and analyzing compatibility constraints among technologies and assessing their impact on the technology combinatorial space. The overall decision making approach is enabled by the application of an uncertainty quantification technique under the framework of an efficient probabilistic Pareto optimization algorithm. As a result, multiple

  16. Combinatorial RNAi against HIV-1 using extended short hairpin RNAs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying Poi; von Eije, Karin Jasmijn; Schopman, Nick C T; Westerink, Jan-Tinus; ter Brake, Olivier; Haasnoot, Joost; Berkhout, Ben

    2009-10-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a widely used gene suppression tool that holds great promise as a novel antiviral approach. However, for error-prone viruses including human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1), a combinatorial approach against multiple conserved sequences is required to prevent the emergence of RNAi-resistant escape viruses. Previously, we constructed extended short hairpin RNAs (e-shRNAs) that encode two potent small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) (e2-shRNAs). We showed that a minimal hairpin stem length of 43 base pairs (bp) is needed to obtain two functional siRNAs. In this study, we elaborated on the e2-shRNA design to make e-shRNAs encoding three or four antiviral siRNAs. We demonstrate that siRNA production and the antiviral effect is optimal for e3-shRNA of 66 bp. Further extension of the hairpin stem results in a loss of RNAi activity. The same was observed for long hairpin RNAs (lhRNAs) that target consecutive HIV-1 sequences. Importantly, we show that HIV-1 replication is durably inhibited in T cells stably transduced with a lentiviral vector containing the e3-shRNA expression cassette. These results show that e-shRNAs can be used as a combinatorial RNAi approach to target error-prone viruses. PMID:19672247

  17. Combinatorial RNAi Against HIV-1 Using Extended Short Hairpin RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying Poi; von Eije, Karin Jasmijn; Schopman, Nick CT; Westerink, Jan-Tinus; Brake, Olivier ter; Haasnoot, Joost; Berkhout, Ben

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a widely used gene suppression tool that holds great promise as a novel antiviral approach. However, for error-prone viruses including human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1), a combinatorial approach against multiple conserved sequences is required to prevent the emergence of RNAi-resistant escape viruses. Previously, we constructed extended short hairpin RNAs (e-shRNAs) that encode two potent small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) (e2-shRNAs). We showed that a minimal hairpin stem length of 43 base pairs (bp) is needed to obtain two functional siRNAs. In this study, we elaborated on the e2-shRNA design to make e-shRNAs encoding three or four antiviral siRNAs. We demonstrate that siRNA production and the antiviral effect is optimal for e3-shRNA of 66 bp. Further extension of the hairpin stem results in a loss of RNAi activity. The same was observed for long hairpin RNAs (lhRNAs) that target consecutive HIV-1 sequences. Importantly, we show that HIV-1 replication is durably inhibited in T cells stably transduced with a lentiviral vector containing the e3-shRNA expression cassette. These results show that e-shRNAs can be used as a combinatorial RNAi approach to target error-prone viruses. PMID:19672247

  18. De novo Amyloid Proteins from Designed Combinatorial Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Michael W.; Wang, Weixun; Patterson, Jennifer; Mancias, Joseph D.; Beasley, James R.; Hecht, Michael H.

    1999-09-01

    Amyloid deposits are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and the prion diseases. The amyloid fibrils isolated from these different diseases share similar structural features. However, the protein sequences that assemble into these fibrils differ substantially from one disease to another. To probe the relationship between amino acid sequence and the propensity to form amyloid, we studied a combinatorial library of sequences designed de novo. All sequences in the library were designed to share an identical pattern of alternating polar and nonpolar residues, but the precise identities of these side chains were not constrained and were varied combinatorially. The resulting proteins self-assemble into large oligomers visible by electron microscopy as amyloid-like fibrils. Like natural amyloid, the de novo fibrils are composed of β -sheet secondary structure and bind the diagnostic dye, Congo red. Thus, binary patterning of polar and nonpolar residues arranged in alternating periodicity can direct protein sequences to form fibrils resembling amyloid. The model amyloid fibrils assemble and disassemble reversibly, providing a tractable system for both basic studies into the mechanisms of fibril assembly and the development of molecular therapies that interfere with this assembly.

  19. A combinatorial approach to the design of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Luis; Milanič, Martin; Legarreta, Leire; Medvedev, Paul; Malaina, Iker; de la Fuente, Ildefonso M

    2015-05-01

    We present two new problems of combinatorial optimization and discuss their applications to the computational design of vaccines. In the shortest λ-superstring problem, given a family S1,...,S(k) of strings over a finite alphabet, a set Τ of "target" strings over that alphabet, and an integer λ, the task is to find a string of minimum length containing, for each i, at least λ target strings as substrings of S(i). In the shortest λ-cover superstring problem, given a collection X1,...,X(n) of finite sets of strings over a finite alphabet and an integer λ, the task is to find a string of minimum length containing, for each i, at least λ elements of X(i) as substrings. The two problems are polynomially equivalent, and the shortest λ-cover superstring problem is a common generalization of two well known combinatorial optimization problems, the shortest common superstring problem and the set cover problem. We present two approaches to obtain exact or approximate solutions to the shortest λ-superstring and λ-cover superstring problems: one based on integer programming, and a hill-climbing algorithm. An application is given to the computational design of vaccines and the algorithms are applied to experimental data taken from patients infected by H5N1 and HIV-1.

  20. A combinatorial approach to the design of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Luis; Milanič, Martin; Legarreta, Leire; Medvedev, Paul; Malaina, Iker; de la Fuente, Ildefonso M

    2015-05-01

    We present two new problems of combinatorial optimization and discuss their applications to the computational design of vaccines. In the shortest λ-superstring problem, given a family S1,...,S(k) of strings over a finite alphabet, a set Τ of "target" strings over that alphabet, and an integer λ, the task is to find a string of minimum length containing, for each i, at least λ target strings as substrings of S(i). In the shortest λ-cover superstring problem, given a collection X1,...,X(n) of finite sets of strings over a finite alphabet and an integer λ, the task is to find a string of minimum length containing, for each i, at least λ elements of X(i) as substrings. The two problems are polynomially equivalent, and the shortest λ-cover superstring problem is a common generalization of two well known combinatorial optimization problems, the shortest common superstring problem and the set cover problem. We present two approaches to obtain exact or approximate solutions to the shortest λ-superstring and λ-cover superstring problems: one based on integer programming, and a hill-climbing algorithm. An application is given to the computational design of vaccines and the algorithms are applied to experimental data taken from patients infected by H5N1 and HIV-1. PMID:24859149