Science.gov

Sample records for dynamic hopkinson bar

  1. A regularized model for impact in explicit dynamics applied to the split Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Peter; De Lorenzis, Laura; Unger, Jörg F.

    2016-10-01

    In the numerical simulation of impact phenomena, artificial oscillations can occur due to an instantaneous change of velocity in the contact area. In this paper, a nonlinear penalty regularization is used to avoid these oscillations. A particular focus is the investigation of higher order methods in space and time to increase the computational efficiency. The spatial discretization is realized by higher order spectral element methods that are characterized by a diagonal mass matrix. The time integration scheme is based on half-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme of fourth order. For the conditionally stable scheme, the critical time step is influenced by the penalty regularization. A framework is presented to adjust the penalty stiffness and the time step for a specific mesh to avoid oscillations. The methods presented in this paper are applied to 1D-simulations of a split Hopkinson pressure bar, which is commonly used for the investigation of materials under dynamic loading.

  2. Semicircular bend testing with split Hopkinson pressure bar for measuring dynamic tensile strength of brittle solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, F.; Xia, K.; Luo, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    We propose and validate an indirect tensile testing method to measure the dynamic tensile strength of rocks and other brittle solids: semicircular bend (SCB) testing with a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. A strain gauge is mounted near the failure spot on the specimen to determine the rupture time. The momentum trap technique is utilized to ensure single pulse loading for postmortem examination. Tests without and with pulse shaping are conducted on rock specimens. The evolution of tensile stress at the failure spot is determined via dynamic and quasistatic finite element analyses with the dynamic loads measured from SHPB as inputs. Given properly shaped incident pulse, far-field dynamic force balance is achieved and the peak of the loading matches in time with the rupture onset of the specimen. In addition, the dynamic tensile stress history at the failure spot obtained from the full dynamic finite element analysis agrees with the quasistatic analysis. The opposite occurs for the test without pulse shaping. These results demonstrate that when the far-field dynamic force balance is satisfied, the inertial effects associated with stress wave loading are minimized and thus one can apply the simple quasistatic analysis to obtain the tensile strength in the SCB-SHPB testing. This method provides a useful and cost effective way to measure indirectly the dynamic tensile strength of rocks and other brittle materials.

  3. Dynamic response of brittle materials from penetration and split Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frew, Danny Joe

    This research began with a study on the penetration of limestone targets with ogive-nose rod projectiles. Three sets of experiments were conducted with geometrically similar, steel rod projectiles that had length-to-diameter ratios of 10 and 7.1, 12.7, and 25.4-mm-diameters. Results from these penetration experiments and previously developed penetration models suggested that the limestone target exhibited strain-rate sensitivity. In order to investigate this hypothesis, an experimental/analytical program to study the dynamic material response of limestone was begun. As a first step, it was decided to focus on the dynamic material responses of brittle materials, such as limestone, under a state of one-dimensional stress. A split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) facility was built at the Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory, U.S. Army Waterways Experiment Station. Early in the experimental program it became clear that new modifications had to be made to the traditional SHPB apparatus and experimental techniques. In addition, it was decided to model the responses of the SHPB apparatus and the sample under test in order to guide the experimental designs and minimize the experimental trials. The conventional split Hopkinson pressure bar apparatus was modified by shaping the incident pulse such that the samples are in dynamic stress equilibrium and have nearly constant strain rate over most of the test duration. A thin disk of annealed or hard C11000 copper is placed on the impact surface of the incident bar in order to shape the incident pulse. After impact by the striker bar, the copper disk deforms plastically and spreads the pulse in the incident bar. An analytical model and data show that a wide variety of incident strain pulses can be produced by varying the geometry of the copper disks and the length and striking velocity of the striker bar. The pulse shaping model predictions are in good agreement with measurements. Analytic models predict that a ramp stress pulse

  4. Dynamic compressive properties obtained from a split Hopkinson pressure bar test of Boryeong shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Minju; Cho, Jung-Woo; Kim, Yang Gon; Park, Jaeyeong; Jeong, Myeong-Sik; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic compressive properties of a Boryeong shale were evaluated by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar, and were compared with those of a Hwangdeung granite which is a typical hard rock. The results indicated that the dynamic compressive loading reduced the resistance to fracture. The dynamic compressive strength was lower in the shale than in the granite, and was raised with increasing strain rate by microcracking effect as well as strain rate strengthening effect. Since the number of microcracked fragments increased with increasing strain rate in the shale having laminated weakness planes, the shale showed the better fragmentation performance than the granite at high strain rates. The effect of transversely isotropic plane on compressive strength decreased with increasing strain rate, which was desirable for increasing the fragmentation performance. Thus, the shale can be more reliably applied to industrial areas requiring good fragmentation performance as the striking speed of drilling or hydraulic fracturing machines increased. The present dynamic compressive test effectively evaluated the fragmentation performance as well as compressive strength and strain energy density by controlling the air pressure, and provided an important idea on which rock was more readily fragmented under dynamically processing conditions such as high-speed drilling and blasting.

  5. Blast Quantification Using Hopkinson Pressure Bars.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Samuel D; Fay, Stephen D; Rigby, Samuel E; Tyas, Andrew; Warren, James A; Reay, Jonathan J; Fuller, Benjamin J; Gant, Matthew T A; Elgy, Ian D

    2016-07-05

    Near-field blast load measurement presents an issue to many sensor types as they must endure very aggressive environments and be able to measure pressures up to many hundreds of megapascals. In this respect the simplicity of the Hopkinson pressure bar has a major advantage in that while the measurement end of the Hopkinson bar can endure and be exposed to harsh conditions, the strain gauge mounted to the bar can be affixed some distance away. This allows protective housings to be utilized which protect the strain gauge but do not interfere with the measurement acquisition. The use of an array of pressure bars allows the pressure-time histories at discrete known points to be measured. This article also describes the interpolation routine used to derive pressure-time histories at un-instrumented locations on the plane of interest. Currently the technique has been used to measure loading from high explosives in free air and buried shallowly in various soils.

  6. Torsional Split Hopkinson Bar Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-10

    is the torsional wave speed . Also, one can relate the torque with the yield stress of the material, as seen in equation 2; where r is the radius of...be equal to the mechanical impedance of the bars. In other words, the product of density, speed of wave and polar moment of inertia must remain...pillow blocks used to mount the incident and transmitter bars are cast iron based- mounted Babbitt-lined bearing split, for 1 in. shaft diameter

  7. Dynamic Strength and Fracturing Behavior of Single-Flawed Prismatic Marble Specimens Under Impact Loading with a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xibing; Zhou, Tao; Li, Diyuan

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic impact tests are performed on prismatic marble specimens containing a single flaw using a modified split-Hopkinson pressure bar device. The effects of pre-existing flaws with different flaw angles and lengths on the dynamic mechanical properties are analyzed. The results demonstrate that the dynamic strength of marble is influenced by the flaw geometry. The dynamic fracturing process of flawed specimens is monitored and characterized with the aid of a high-speed camera. Cracking of marble specimens with a single pre-existing flaw under impact loading is analyzed based on experimental investigations. Cracking involves two major stages: formation of white patches and development of macrocracks. Six typical crack types are identified on the basis of their trajectories and initiation mechanisms. The presence of an artificial flaw may change the failure mode of marble from splitting-dominated for an intact specimen to shear-dominated for a flawed specimen under dynamic loading. Nevertheless, the geometry of the flaws appears to have a slight influence on the failure modes of flawed specimens under impact loading.

  8. Improved specimen recovery in tensile split Hopkinson bar

    PubMed Central

    Isakov, Matti; Hiermaier, Stefan; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an improved specimen recovery method for the tensile split Hopkinson bar (TSHB) technique. The method is based on the trapping of residual stress waves with the use of momentum trap bars. As is well known, successful momentum trapping in TSHB is highly sensitive to experimental uncertainties, especially on the incident bar side of the set-up. However, as is demonstrated in this paper, significant improvement in the reliability of specimen recovery is obtained by using two momentum trap bars in contact with the incident bar. This makes the trapping of the reflected wave insensitive to striker speed and removes the need for a precision set gap between the incident bar and the momentum trap. PMID:25071235

  9. Calibration of a Hopkinson Bar with a Transfer Standard

    DOE PAGES

    Bateman, Vesta I.; Leisher, William B.; Brown, Fred A.; ...

    1993-01-01

    A program requirement for field test temperatures that are beyond the test accelerometer operational limits of −30° F and +150° F required the calibration of accelerometers at high shock levels and at the temperature extremes of −50° F and +160° F. The purposes of these calibrations were to insure that the accelerometers operated at the field test temperatures and to provide an accelerometer sensitivity at each test temperature. Because there is no National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable calibration capability at shock levels of 5,000–15,000 g for the temperature extremes of −50° F and +160° F, a method for calibrating and certifying the Hopkinson barmore » with a transfer standard was developed. Time domain and frequency domain results are given that characterize the Hopkinson bar. The National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable accuracy for the standard accelerometer in shock is ±5%. The Hopkinson bar has been certified with an uncertainty of 6%.« less

  10. On split Hopkinson pressure bar testing of rubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, John

    2011-06-01

    Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) studies of rubber materials are difficult due to their ability to undergo large deformations at low levels of stress. Analytical, numerical and experimental investigations are reported. The tests were performed using polymer bars. A key stage in this is the experimental determination of the propagation coefficient. An analytical investigation of the experimental arrangements used to ascertain the propagation coefficient is reported. A finite element (FE) simulation of longitudinal stress waves in solid, circular, polymer bars is presented also. The viscoelastic material definition employed in the FE simulations is obtained by curve fitting Prony series expansions to the experimentally derived elastic modulus. In order to assess the accuracy of the experimental arrangement, an FE model of the full viscoelastic SHPB set-up is then used to simulate tests on hyper-elastic materials with specified properties. Finally, experimental data for rubber materials at strain rates of the order of 1000 s-1 are presented.

  11. On backward dispersion correction of Hopkinson pressure bar signals

    PubMed Central

    Tyas, A.; Ozdemir, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Elastic theory shows that wide spectrum signals in the Hopkinson pressure bar suffer two forms of distortion as they propagate from the loaded bar face. These must be accounted for if accurate determination of the impact load is to be possible. The first form of distortion is the well-known phase velocity dispersion effect. The second form, which can be equally deleterious, is the prediction that at high frequencies, the stress and strain generated in the bar varies with radial position on the cross section, even for a uniformly applied loading. We consider the consequences of these effects on our ability to conduct accurate backward dispersion correction of bar signals, that is, to derive the impact face load from the dispersed signal recorded at some other point on the bar. We conclude that there is an upper limit on the frequency for which the distortion effects can be accurately compensated, and that this can significantly affect the accuracy of experimental results. We propose a combination of experimental studies and detailed numerical modelling of the impact event and wave propagation along the bar to gain better understanding of the frequency content of the impact event, and help assess the accuracy of experimental predictions of impact face load. PMID:25071236

  12. Advances in the Hopkinson bar testing of irradiated/non-irradiated nuclear materials and large specimens.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Carlo; Cadoni, Ezio; Solomos, George

    2014-05-13

    A brief review of the technological advances of the Hopkinson bar technique in tension for the study of irradiated/non-irradiated nuclear materials and the development of this technology for large specimens is presented. Comparisons are made of the dynamic behaviour of non-irradiated and irradiated materials previously subjected to creep, low cycle fatigue and irradiation (2, 10 and 30 displacements per atom). In particular, complete results of the effect of irradiation on the dynamic mechanical properties of AISI304L steel, tested at 20, 400 and 550°C are presented. These high strain rate tests have been performed with a modified Hopkinson bar (MHB), installed inside a hot cell. Examples of testing large nuclear steel specimens with a very large Hopkinson bar are also shown. The results overall demonstrate the capability of the MHB to efficiently reproduce the material stress conditions in case of accidental internal and external dynamic loadings in nuclear reactors, thus contributing to the important process of their structural assessment.

  13. Hopkinson bar techniques for the intermediate strain rate testing of bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Cloete, T J; Paul, G; Ismail, E B

    2014-05-13

    Detailed knowledge of the dynamic viscoelastic properties of bone is required to understand the mechanisms of macroscopic bone fracture in humans, and other terrestrial mammals, during impact loading events (e.g. falls, vehicle accidents, etc.). While the dynamic response of bone has been studied for several decades, high-quality data remain limited, and it is only within the last decade that techniques for conducting dynamic compression tests on bone at near-constant strain rates have been developed. Furthermore, there appears to be a lack of published bone data in the intermediate strain rate (ISR) range (i.e. 1-100 s(-1)), which represents a regime in which many dynamic bone fractures occur. In this paper, preliminary results for the dynamic compression of bovine cortical bone in the ISR regime are presented. The results are obtained using two Hopkinson-bar-related techniques, namely the conventional split Hopkinson bar arrangement incorporating a novel cone-in-tube striker design, and the recently developed wedge bar apparatus. The experimental results show a rapid transition in the strain rate sensitive behaviour of bovine cortical bone in the ISR range. Finally, a new viscoelastic model is proposed that captures the observed transition behaviour.

  14. Hopkinson bar techniques for the intermediate strain rate testing of bovine cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Cloete, T. J.; Paul, G.; Ismail, E. B.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the dynamic viscoelastic properties of bone is required to understand the mechanisms of macroscopic bone fracture in humans, and other terrestrial mammals, during impact loading events (e.g. falls, vehicle accidents, etc.). While the dynamic response of bone has been studied for several decades, high-quality data remain limited, and it is only within the last decade that techniques for conducting dynamic compression tests on bone at near-constant strain rates have been developed. Furthermore, there appears to be a lack of published bone data in the intermediate strain rate (ISR) range (i.e. 1–100 s−1), which represents a regime in which many dynamic bone fractures occur. In this paper, preliminary results for the dynamic compression of bovine cortical bone in the ISR regime are presented. The results are obtained using two Hopkinson-bar-related techniques, namely the conventional split Hopkinson bar arrangement incorporating a novel cone-in-tube striker design, and the recently developed wedge bar apparatus. The experimental results show a rapid transition in the strain rate sensitive behaviour of bovine cortical bone in the ISR range. Finally, a new viscoelastic model is proposed that captures the observed transition behaviour. PMID:24711493

  15. The use of a beryllium Hopkinson bar to characterize a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Davie, N.T.

    1996-03-01

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend our understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. In this paper, the beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration with a laser doppler vibrometer as the reference measurement is described. The in-axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer for frequencies of dc-50 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 70,000 g as determined from measurements with a beryllium Hopkinson bar are presented. Preliminary results of characterizations of the accelerometers subjected to cross-axis shocks in a split beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration are presented.

  16. Two-wave photon Doppler velocimetry measurements in direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Lewis J.; Jardine, Andrew P.

    2015-09-01

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently advantages are gained at a significant cost: the fact that input bar data is unavailable removes all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. Recently photon Doppler velocimetry methods have been developed, which can replace strain gauges on Hopkinson bars. In this paper we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system, with the same level of convenience. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and improving the accuracy and convenience of Doppler velocimetry on Hopkinson bars. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains.

  17. Propagation behavior of the stress wave in a hollow Hopkinson transmission bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, G.; Shen, X.; Guo, C.; Vecchio, K. S.; Jiang, F.

    2017-06-01

    In order to investigate the stress wave propagation behavior through a hollow elastic bar that is used in a Hopkinson-bar-loaded fracture testing system, three-point bending fracture experiments were performed in such a system. The effects of sample span and diameter and wall thickness of the hollow elastic bar on the stress wave propagation behavior were studied numerically using the software of ANSYS/LS-DYNA. The experimental results demonstrated that the incident, reflected, and transmitted pulses calculated by the finite element method are coincident with those obtained from the Hopkinson-bar-loaded fracture tests. Compared to the solid transmission bar, the amplitude of the transmitted pulse is relatively larger in the hollow transmission bar under the same loading conditions and decreases with increasing wall thickness. On the other hand, when the inside diameter is fixed, the effect of the wall thickness on the stress wave characteristics is more obvious.

  18. High Strain Rate Response Testing with the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwiessler, R.; Kenkmann, T.; Poelchau, M. H.; Nau, S.; Hess, S.

    2016-08-01

    We present a newly developed split Hopkinson pressure bar which is used to quantify the rate dependent uniaxial stress-strain response of rocks in the high strain rate regime as well as results of our first study on a sandstone and Carrara marble.

  19. Application of the Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Seismic Property Characterization of Hydrate-bearing Sand Undergoing Water Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, S.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2011-05-03

    Conventional resonant bar tests allow the measurement of seismic properties of rocks and sediments at low frequencies (several kilohertz). However, the tests require a long, slender sample which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface and weak and fractured formations. We present an alternative low-frequency measurement technique to the conventional resonant bar tests. This technique involves a jacketed core sample placed between a pair of long, metal extension rods with attached seismic source and receiver—the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the added length and mass to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The proposed “Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB)” test is applied in two steps. In the first step, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the system are measured. Then, numerical inversions for the compressional and shear wave velocities and attenuation are performed. We initially applied the SHRB test to synthetic materials (plastics) for testing its accuracy, then used it for measuring the seismic velocities and attenuation of a rock core containing supercritical CO{sub 2}, and a sediment core while methane hydrate formed in the pore space.

  20. A Miniaturized Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar for Very High Strain Rate Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    AFRL-MN-EG-TR-2005-7014 A Miniaturized Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar for Very High Strain Rate Testing Clive R. Siviour Physics and Chemistry of...Very High Strain Rate Testing 5. FUNDING NUMBERS PE: 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Clive R. Siviour, Jennifer L. Jordan PR: 2302...Measurements of material properties at very high rates of strain give an important insight into the structure of these materials, as well as

  1. Special Workshop: Kolsky/Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar Testing of Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Exposition on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, Cocoa Beach, FL, on 27 January 2005. This special report is a collection of the pertinent information from...SHPB Ceramic Testing of Armor Ceramics, Cocoa Beach, FL, January 27, 2005 11 Special Workshop – Kolsky/Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar Testing of...Further development of armor ceramics would significantly benefit from valid Figures of Merit (FoM) and would certainly facilitate a systematic

  2. Application of photon Doppler velocimetry to direct impact Hopkinson pressure bars

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, Lewis J. Jardine, Andrew P.

    2016-02-15

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion, and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently, these advantages are gained at the expense of all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the experimental determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. In this paper, we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using photon Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and the precision of measurements. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains in fully dense metals, and improvement for all strains in slow and non-equilibrating materials.

  3. Response of split Hopkinson bar apparatus signal to end-surface damage, numerical and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouamoul, A.; Bolduc, M.

    2012-08-01

    A Split Hopkinson bar apparatus is a widely used method to obtain material properties at high strain rates. These properties are essential in the development of new materials as well as their associated constitutive models. During routine tests, the surfaces of the bars at the specimen/bars interface were damaged. To check if the damage influenced the signal response, control tests were done using the well characterized Al 6061-T6. Results showed that artefacts were added to the signal. This paper presents the experimental and numerical approaches developed to understand the effects of surface damage. The approach used consists of introducing series of known gaps between input and output bar to simulate a variation of surface damage. The numerical simulations, performed using a hydrocode, were done to confirm that signal response could not be associated with other several types of error in the system.

  4. High Strain Rate Characterization of Laminate Composites Using Direct-Tension Split Hopkinson Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkala, S.; Hommeida, A.; Brar, N. S.

    1999-06-01

    Data on high strain rate response of laminate composites is required to numerically simulate penetration/perforation events. Tension specimens of laminate composites can only be fabricated in dog-bone shape and, therefore, a direct tension Hopkinson bar configuration is more appropriate for acquiring high strain data. Launching a 6.35-mm wall thickness aluminum tube around 25.4 diameter aluminum incident bar produces the tension pulse in the incident bar. Ends of the composite specimens in the dog-bone configuration are placed in specially designed grips, which are screwed in the incident and transmitter bars. The configuration allows testing of specimens with threaded ends. Stress-strain data on 6061-T6 aluminum and titanium 6-4 at a strain rate of 10^3/s agree with the published data. High strain rate data on laminate composite specimens reinforced with graphite and glass fibers will be presented.

  5. Experimental and numerical investigations on the use of polymer Hopkinson pressure bars.

    PubMed

    Harrigan, John J; Ahonsi, Bright; Palamidi, Elisavet; Reid, Steve R

    2014-08-28

    Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) testing has traditionally been carried out using metal bars. For testing low stiffness materials such as rubbers or low strength materials such as low density cellular solids considered primarily herein, there are many advantages to replacing the metal bars with polymer bars. An investigation of a number of aspects associated with the accuracy of SHPB testing of these materials is reported. Test data are used to provide qualitative comparisons of accuracy using different bar materials and wave-separation techniques. Sample results from SHPB tests are provided for balsa, Rohacell foam and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene. The techniques used are verified by finite-element (FE) analysis. Experimentally, the material properties of the bars are determined from impact tests in the form of a complex elastic modulus without curve fitting to a rheological model. For the simulations, a rheological model is used to define the bar properties by curve fitting to the experimentally derived properties. Wave propagation in a polymer bar owing to axial impact of a steel bearing ball is simulated. The results indicate that the strain histories can be used to determine accurately the viscoelastic properties of polymer bars. An FE model of the full viscoelastic SHPB set-up is then used to simulate tests on hyperelastic materials.

  6. Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Sonic-Frequency Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements of Small, Isotropic Geologic Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver - the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB) test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples and a natural rock sample.

  7. Split Hopkinson resonant bar test for sonic-frequency acoustic velocity and attenuation measurements of small, isotropic geological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Seiji

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver—the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 °C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described split Hopkinson resonant bar test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples, and a natural rock sample.

  8. Copper damage modeling with the tensile hopkinson bar and gas gun

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D. L.; Thissell, W. R.; Trujillo, C. P.; Schwartz, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile damage nucleation in recovered copper tensile Hopkinson bar specimens has been modeled using the 2D EPIC code. The model has also been successfully applied to spallation gas gun data to greatly expand the pressure range. The split tensile Hopkinson pressure bar permits the creation of damage at fairly high strain rates (10{sup 4}/s) with large plastic strains (100%). Careful momentum trapping allows incipient damage states to be arrested and recovered for metallurgical examination. The use of notched samples allows the pressure - flow stress, or triaxiality, to be varied from 1/3 to about 1.2 to study the interplay of pressure and deviatoric stress. In this paper, we will concentrate on modeling the nucleation of ductile damage in pure copper (Hitachi). With the same material, we also study spallation in a gas gun experiment to obtain the nucleation stress under high pressure and small plastic strain. The goal of the modeling is to obtain a unified nucleation model suitable for both.

  9. High Strain Rate Testing of Rocks using a Split-Hopkinson-Pressure Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwiessler, Ruprecht; Kenkmann, Thomas; Poelchau, Michael; Nau, Siegfried; Hess, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic mechanical testing of rocks is important to define the onset of rate dependency of brittle failure. The strain rate dependency occurs through the propagation velocity limit (Rayleigh wave speed) of cracks and their reduced ability to coalesce, which, in turn, significantly increases the strength of the rock. We use a newly developed pressurized air driven Split-Hopkinson-Pressure Bar (SHPB), that is specifically designed for the investigation of high strain rate testing of rocks, consisting of several 10 to 50 cm long strikers and bar components of 50 mm in diameter and 2.5 meters in length each. The whole set up, composed of striker, incident- and transmission bar is available in aluminum, titanium and maraging steel to minimize the acoustic impedance contrast, determined by the change of density and speed of sound, to the specific rock of investigation. Dynamic mechanical parameters are obtained in compression as well as in spallation configuration, covering a wide spectrum from intermediate to high strain rates (100-103 s-1). In SHPB experiments [1] one-dimensional longitudinal compressive pulses of diverse shapes and lengths - formed with pulse shapers - are used to generate a variety of loading histories under 1D states of stress in cylindrical rock samples, in order to measure the respective stress-strain response at specific strain rates. Subsequent microstructural analysis of the deformed samples is aimed at quantification fracture orientation, fracture pattern, fracture density, and fracture surface properties as a function of the loading rate. Linking mechanical and microstructural data to natural dynamic deformation processes has relevance for the understanding of earthquakes, landslides, impacts, and has several rock engineering applications. For instance, experiments on dynamic fragmentation help to unravel super-shear rupture events that pervasively pulverize rocks up to several hundred meters from the fault core [2, 3, 4]. The dynamic, strain

  10. A modified split Hopkinson torsional bar system for correlated study of τ-γ relations, shear localization and microstructural evolution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong; Zhang, Husheng; Shen, Letian; Xu, Yongbo; Bai, Yilong; Dodd, Bradley

    2014-05-13

    The conventional split Hopkinson torsional bar (SHTB) system consists of two bars, which can successfully produce the data for the construction of dynamic torsional shear stress and strain relationships. However, the system cannot provide reliable information on the progression of the deformed micro-structure during the test. The reverberation of waves in the bars and the tested specimen can spoil the microstructural pattern formed during the effective loading. This paper briefly reviews a modified version of the SHTB system consisting of four bars that has been developed. This modified system can eliminate the reverberation of waves in the specimen and provide only a single rectangular torsional stress pulse, thus it can properly freeze the microstructure formed during the effective period of loading in the specimen. By using the advantage of the modified SHTB system, together with a new design of specimen, it is possible to perform a correlated study of the dynamic stress-strain response, shear localization and the evolution of the microstructure at a fixed view-field (position) on a given specimen during the sequence of the loading time. The principles, experimental set-up and procedure, calibration and some preliminary results of the correlated study are reported in this paper.

  11. A modified Hopkinson pressure bar experiment to evaluate a damped piezoresistive MEMS accelerometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Frew, Danny Joe; Duong, Henry

    2009-03-01

    We conducted a series of modified Hopkinson pressure bar (HPB) experiments to evaluate a new, damped, high-shock accelerometer that has recently been developed by PCB Piezotronics Inc. Pulse shapers were used to create a long duration, non-dispersive stress pulse in an aluminum bar that interacted with a tungsten disk at the end of the incident bar. We measured stress at the aluminum bar-disk interface with a quartz gage and measured acceleration at the free-end of the disk with an Endevco brand 7270A and the new PCB 3991 accelerometers. The rise-time of the incident stress pulse in the aluminum bar was long enough and the disk length short enough so that the response of the disk can be approximated closely as rigid-body motion; an experimentally verified analytical model has been shown previously to support this assumption. Since the cross-sectional area and mass of the disk were known, we calculated acceleration of the rigid-disk from the quartz-gage force measurement and Newton's Second Law of Motion. Comparisons of accelerations calculated from the quartz-gage data and measured acceleration data show excellent agreement for acceleration pulses with the PCB accelerometer for peak amplitudes between 4,000 and 40,000 Gs , rise times as short as 40 microsec, and pulse durations between 150 and 320 microsec.

  12. Design of a split Hopkinson pressure bar with partial lateral confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Andrew D.; Clarke, Sam D.; Rigby, Sam E.; Tyas, Andrew; Warren, James A.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the design of a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) where partial lateral confinement of the specimen is provided by the inertia of a fluid annulus contained in a long steel reservoir. In contrast to unconfined testing, or a constant cell pressure applied before axial loading, lateral restraint is permitted to develop throughout the axial loading: this enables the high-strain-rate shear behaviour of soils to be characterised under conditions which are more representative of buried explosive events. A pressure transducer located in the wall of the reservoir allows lateral stresses to be quantified, and a dispersion-correction technique is used to provide accurate measurements of axial stress and strain. Preliminary numerical modelling is utilised to inform the experimental design, and the capability of the apparatus is demonstrated with specimen results for a dry quartz sand.

  13. Formation of Gaps at the Specimen-Bar Interfaces in Numerical Simulations of Compression Hopkinson Bar Tests on Soft, Nearly Incompressible Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    and contact algorithm parameters was studied. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Hopkinson bar, gaps, nearly incompressible, Mooney - Rivlin , inertial effects 16...11 3. The Mooney - Rivlin Constitutive Model for the Specimen 14 3.1 Incompressible and Compressible Versions...14 3.2 Calibration of the Mooney - Rivlin Model for Ballistic Gelatin

  14. Strain localization during tensile Hopkinson bar testing of commercially pure titanium and Ti6Al4V titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moćko, Wojciech; Kruszka, Leopold; Brodecki, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the analysis was to determine the strain localization for various specimen shapes (type A and type B according to PN-EN ISO 26203-1 standard) and different loading conditions, i.e. quasi- static and dynamic. Commercially pure titanium (Grade 2) and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V (Grade 5) were selected for the tests. Tensile loadings were applied out using servo-hydraulic testing machine and tensile Hopkinson bar with pre-tension. The results were recorded using ARAMIS system cameras and fast camera Phantom V1210, respectively at quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. Further, specimens outline was determined on the basis of video data using TEMA MOTION software. The strain distribution on the specimen surface was estimated using digital image correlation method. The larger radius present in the specimen of type B in comparison to specimen of type A, results in slight increase of the elongation for commercially pure titanium at both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. However this effect disappears for Ti6Al4V alloy. The increase of the elongation corresponds to the stronger necking effect. Material softening due to increase of temperature induced by plastic work was observed at dynamic loading conditions. Moreover lower elongation at fracture point was found at high strain rates for both materials.

  15. Crack initiation at high loading rates applying the four-point bending split Hopkinson pressure bar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henschel, Sebastian; Krüger, Lutz

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic crack initiation with crack-tip loading rates of K˙ ≈ 2.106MPa√ms-1 in a high strength G42CrMoS4 steel was investigated. To this end, a previously developed split Hopkinson pressure bar with four-point bending was utilised. V-notched and pre-cracked Charpy specimens were tested. The detection of dynamic crack initiation was performed by analysing the dynamic force equilibrium between the incident and the transmission bar. Additionally, the signal of a near-field strain gauge and high-speed photography were used to determine the instant of crack initiation. To account for vibrations of the sample, a dynamic analysis of the stress intensity factor was performed. The dynamic and static analyses of the tests produced nearly the same results when a force equilibrium was achieved. Fracture-surface analysis revealed that elongated MnS inclusions strongly affected both the dynamic crack initiation and growth. Blunting of the precrack did not take place when a group of MnS inclusions was located directly at the precrack tip. Due to the direction of the elongated MnS inclusions perpendicular to the direction of crack growth, the crack could be deflected. The comparison with a 42CrMo4 steel without elongated MnS inclusions revealed the detrimental effect in terms of resistance to crack initiation. Taking the loading-rate dependency into consideration, it was shown that there was no pronounced embrittlement due to the high loading rates.

  16. The use of a beryllium Hopkinson bar to characterize in-axis and cross-axis accelerometer response in shock environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.

    1997-05-01

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A beryllium Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend the understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations and with and without mechanical isolation, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. In this paper, recent measurements with beryllium single and split-Hopkinson bar configurations are described. The in axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer in mechanical isolation for frequencies of dc-30 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 6,000 g as determined from measurements with a beryllium Hopkinson bar with a certified laser doppler vibrometer as the reference measurement are presented. Results of characterizations of the accelerometers subjected to cross axis shocks in a split beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration are also presented.

  17. Characterization and modeling of mechanical behavior of single crystal titanium deformed by split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, B. M.; Lebensohn, R. A.; Trujillo, C. P.; Martinez, D. T.; Addessio, F. L.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Lookman, T.; Cerreta, E. K.

    2016-03-28

    Single crystal titanium samples were dynamically loaded using split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) and the resulting microstructures were examined. Characterization of the twins and dislocations present in the microstructure was conducted to understand the pathway for observed mechanical behavior. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to measure textures and quantify twinning. Microstructures were profusely twinned after loading, and twin variants and corresponding textures were different as a function of initial orientation. Focused ion beam (FIB) foils were created to analyze dislocation content using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Large amounts of dislocations were present, indicating that plasticity was achieved through slip and twinning together. Viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) modeling was used to confirm the complex order of operations during deformation. The activation of different mechanisms was highly dependent upon crystal orientation. For [0001] and View the MathML source[101¯1]-oriented crystals, compressive twinning was observed, followed by secondary tensile twinning. Furthermore, dislocations though prevalent in the microstructure, contributed to final texture far less than twinning.

  18. Characterization and modeling of mechanical behavior of single crystal titanium deformed by split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    DOE PAGES

    Morrow, B. M.; Lebensohn, R. A.; Trujillo, C. P.; ...

    2016-03-28

    Single crystal titanium samples were dynamically loaded using split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) and the resulting microstructures were examined. Characterization of the twins and dislocations present in the microstructure was conducted to understand the pathway for observed mechanical behavior. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to measure textures and quantify twinning. Microstructures were profusely twinned after loading, and twin variants and corresponding textures were different as a function of initial orientation. Focused ion beam (FIB) foils were created to analyze dislocation content using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Large amounts of dislocations were present, indicating that plasticity was achieved through slip andmore » twinning together. Viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) modeling was used to confirm the complex order of operations during deformation. The activation of different mechanisms was highly dependent upon crystal orientation. For [0001] and View the MathML source[101¯1]-oriented crystals, compressive twinning was observed, followed by secondary tensile twinning. Furthermore, dislocations though prevalent in the microstructure, contributed to final texture far less than twinning.« less

  19. High-strain rate tensile characterization of graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester based nanocomposites using split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Brahmananda

    The dynamic response of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) reinforced and carboxyl terminated butadiene nitrile (CTBN) toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites are characterized under both dynamic tensile and compressive loading. Dynamic direct tensile tests are performed applying the reverse impact Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique. The specimen geometry for tensile test is parametrically optimized by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using ANSYS Mechanical APDLRTM. Uniform stress distribution within the specimen gage length has been verified using high-speed digital photography. The on-specimen strain gage installation is substituted by a non-contact Laser Occlusion Expansion Gage (LOEG) technique for infinitesimal dynamic tensile strain measurements. Due to very low transmitted pulse signal, an alternative approach based on incident pulse is applied for obtaining the stress-time history. Indirect tensile tests are also performed combining the conventional SHPB technique with Brazilian disk test method for evaluating cylindrical disk specimens. The cylindrical disk specimen is held snugly in between two concave end fixtures attached to the incident and transmission bars. Indirect tensile stress is estimated from the SHPB pulses, and diametrical transverse tensile strain is measured using LOEG. Failure diagnosis using high-speed digital photography validates the viability of utilizing this indirect test method for characterizing the tensile properties of the candidate vinyl ester based nanocomposite system. Also, quasi-static indirect tensile response agrees with previous investigations conducted using the traditional dog-bone specimen in quasi-static direct tensile tests. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Finally, the conventional compressive SHPB tests are performed. It is observed that both

  20. Impact strength of continuous-carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon nitride measured by using the split Hopkinson pressure bar

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kinya; Sugiyama, Fumiko; Pezzotti, G.; Nishida, Toshihiko

    1998-01-01

    Three-point impact bending tests, using the split Hopkinson pressure bar method, were performed to evaluate the fracture resistance of monolithic silicon nitride (SN) and carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon nitride (CFRSN) ceramics. By applying ramped incident-stress waves in the split Hopkinson pressure bar apparatus, relatively smooth stress-time curves could be recorded without using any artificial filtering process. The maximum load in the load-deflection curve of the CFRSN material increased, in comparison to its static value, when impact testing was applied. Such behavior was substantially different from that of the monolithic SN material, for which the maximum load values from impact and static testing were almost the same. The time dependence of strength in the CFRSN ceramic was then investigated by using relaxation tests, and the impact strength behavior could be explained by these results. Also, the shear strength was significantly dependent on the deformation rate, whereas the tensile strength was almost independent of it. The experimental results were compared with the numerical predictions of the stress distribution that were obtained by using finite-element analysis.

  1. Geomechanics of penetration :laboratory analog experiments using a modified split hopkinson pressure bar/impact testing procedure.

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Joseph; Gettemy, Glen L.; Bronowski, David R.

    2005-11-01

    This research continues previous efforts to re-focus the question of penetrability away from the behavior of the penetrator itself and toward understanding the dynamic, possibly strain-rate dependent, behavior of the affected materials. A modified split Hopkinson pressure bar technique is prototyped to determine the value of reproducing the stress states, and mechanical responses, of geomaterials observed in actual penetrator tests within a laboratory setting. Conceptually, this technique simulates the passage of the penetrator surface past any fixed point in the penetrator trajectory by allowing for a controlled stress-time function to be transmitted into a sample, thereby mimicking the 1D radial projection inherent to analyses of the cavity expansion problem. Test results from a suite of weak (unconfined compressive strength, or UCS, of 22 MPa) concrete samples, with incident strain rates of 100-250 s{sup -1}, show that the complex mechanical response includes both plastic and anelastic wave propagation, and is critically dependent on incident particle velocity and saturation state. For instance, examination of the transmitted stress-time data, and post-test volumetric measurements of pulverized material, provide independent estimates of the plasticized zone length (1-2 cm) formed for incident particle velocity of {approx}16.7 m/s. The results also shed light on the elastic or energy propagation property changes that occur in the concrete. For example, the pre- and post-test zero-stress elastic wave propagation velocities show that the Young's modulus drops from {approx}19 GPa to <8 GPa for material within the first centimeter from the plastic transition front, while the Young's modulus of the dynamically confined, axially-stressed (in 6-18 MPa range) plasticized material drops to 0.5-0.6 GPa. The data also suggest that the critical particle velocity for formation of a plastic zone in the weak concrete is 13-15 m/s, with increased saturation tending to increase

  2. Response of Split Hopkinson Bar Apparatus Signal to End-Surface Damage, Numerical and Experimental Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    have a diameter of 14.5 mm, a length of 800 mm and are both made from maraging steel . The sound speed and impedance of the maraging bars were...This constitutive model implies a bilinear stress/strain curve. The bars and striker materials were made from Maraging steel and their mechanical... Steel . Physical Parameters Maraging Steel Density (kg/ m3) 8064 Yield Strength (Pa) 965 106 Elastic Modulus (Pa) 182 109 Poisson’s Ratio 0.3

  3. Numerical Hopkinson Bar Analysis: Uni-Axial Stress and Planar Bar-Specimen Interface Conditions by Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    3- D analysis, uni-axial stress, specimen design, planar bar-specimen interface, transmission tube 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF...direction; subscripts i = C, D , and E represent bar-center, specimen-edge, and bar-edge, respectively; superscripts j = 1 and 2; “1” = IB-S interface...S BD / D = 0.60 , S SH / D 1.00= , SD̂ = 0.60. .........13 Figure 11. Axial stress distribution on the surface of ceramic specimen at a different

  4. On the use of a split Hopkinson pressure bar in structural geology: High strain rate deformation of Seeberger sandstone and Carrara marble under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwiessler, Ruprecht; Kenkmann, Thomas; Poelchau, Michael H.; Nau, Siegfried; Hess, Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    There is increasing evidence that seismogenic fractures can propagate faster than the shear wave velocity of the surrounding rocks. Strain rates within the tip region of such super-shear earthquake ruptures can reach deformation conditions similar to impact processes, resulting in rock pulverization. The physical response of brittle rocks at high strain rates changes dramatically with respect to quasi-static conditions. Rocks become stiffer and their strength increases. A measure for the dynamic behavior of a rock and its strain dependency is the dynamic increase factor (DIF) which is the ratio of the dynamic compressive strength to the quasi-static uniaxial compressive strength. To investigate deformation in the high strain rate regime experimentally, we introduce the split Hopkinson pressure bar technology to the structural geology community, a method that is frequently used by rock and impact engineers. We measure the stress-strain response of homogeneous, fine-grained Seeberger sandstone and Carrara marble in uniaxial compression at strain rates ranging from 10+1 to 10+2 s-1 with respect to tangent modulus and dynamic uniaxial compressive strength. We present full stress-strain response curves of Seeberger sandstone and Carrara marble at high strain rates and an evaluation method to determine representative rates of deformation. Results indicate a rate-dependent elastic behavior of Carrara marble where an average increase of ∼18% could be observed at high strain rates of about 100 s-1. DIF reaches a factor of 2.2-2.4. Seeberger sandstone does not have a rate-dependent linear stress-strain response at high strain rates. Its DIF was found to be about 1.6-1.7 at rates of 100 s-1. The onset of dynamic behavior is accompanied with changes in the fracture pattern from single to multiple fractures to pervasive pulverization for increasing rates of deformation. Seismogenic shear zones and their associated fragment-size spectra should be carefully revisited in the

  5. Dynamic Tensile Testing of Structural Materials Using a Split Hopkinson Bar Apparatus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Stress-Strain Curves, Tungsten Alloy 90W-7Ni-3Fe 38 24 Stress-Strain Curves, Depleted Uranium 39 vi AFWAL-TR-80-4053 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS (CONCLUDED...IN718 (a) (b) 90-7-3W (a); No swaging (b) DU (a) (b) ETP CU (a) Annealed at 1000F, 1 hr; (c) S-65 Be (a) Etch to remove 0.004" per surface; (c) (a

  6. Dynamical Evolution: Spirals and Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, F.

    Non-axisymmetric modes like spirals and bars are the main driver of the evolution of disks, in transferring angular momentum, and allowing mass accretion. This evolution proceeds through self-regulation and feedback mechanisms, such as bar destruction or weakening by a central mass concentration, decoupling of a nuclear bar taking over the gas radial flows and mass accretion, etc.. These internal mechanisms can also be triggered by interaction with the environment. Recent problems are discussed, like the influence of counter-rotation in the m=1 and m=2 patterns development and on mass accretion by a central AGN.

  7. Exploring the binding dynamics of BAR proteins.

    PubMed

    Kabaso, Doron; Gongadze, Ekaterina; Jorgačevski, Jernej; Kreft, Marko; Van Rienen, Ursula; Zorec, Robert; Iglič, Aleš

    2011-09-01

    We used a continuum model based on the Helfrich free energy to investigate the binding dynamics of a lipid bilayer to a BAR domain surface of a crescent-like shape of positive (e.g. I-BAR shape) or negative (e.g. F-BAR shape) intrinsic curvature. According to structural data, it has been suggested that negatively charged membrane lipids are bound to positively charged amino acids at the binding interface of BAR proteins, contributing a negative binding energy to the system free energy. In addition, the cone-like shape of negatively charged lipids on the inner side of a cell membrane might contribute a positive intrinsic curvature, facilitating the initial bending towards the crescent-like shape of the BAR domain. In the present study, we hypothesize that in the limit of a rigid BAR domain shape, the negative binding energy and the coupling between the intrinsic curvature of negatively charged lipids and the membrane curvature drive the bending of the membrane. To estimate the binding energy, the electric potential at the charged surface of a BAR domain was calculated using the Langevin-Bikerman equation. Results of numerical simulations reveal that the binding energy is important for the initial instability (i.e. bending of a membrane), while the coupling between the intrinsic shapes of lipids and membrane curvature could be crucial for the curvature-dependent aggregation of negatively charged lipids near the surface of the BAR domain. In the discussion, we suggest novel experiments using patch clamp techniques to analyze the binding dynamics of BAR proteins, as well as the possible role of BAR proteins in the fusion pore stability of exovesicles.

  8. Development of a new testing equipment that combines the working principles of both the split Hopkinson bar and the drop weight testers.

    PubMed

    Adas, Rateb; Haiba, Majed

    2016-01-01

    In the current work, a new high strain rate tensile testing equipment is proposed. The equipment uses a pendulum device to generate an impact load and a three-bar mechanism to bring that load to act upon a specially designed specimen. As the standard impact testing apparatus uses pendulum device and the well-known SHB high strain rate tester adopts the above-mentioned mechanism, the introduced equipment can be dealt with as an impact apparatus in which the base that supports the V-shape specimen is replaced with the three-bar configuration that the traditional SHB uses. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the new tester, virtual design tools were used to determine the most appropriate configuration for it. Then, a detailed design was created, and a full-scale prototype was produced, calibrated, instrumented and tested. The obtained results demonstrate that the new tester is capable of axially straining steel specimens up to failure at a maximum rate of about 250 s(-1), which is reasonable when compared with a more established high strain rate testers.

  9. Development of new Hopkinson's device dedicated to rib's bone characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayeur, O.; Haugou, G.; Chaâri, F.; Delille, R.; Drazetic, P.; Markiewicz, E.

    2012-08-01

    This study presents an original approach for the design of adapted Hopkinson device dedicated to the characterisation of human ribs' cortical bone. The quasi-static study carried out on flat samples coming from this anatomical part highlighted the importance of the critical effect of sample shape and location on the accuracy of identify mechanical behaviour. The access to higher rates of strains, Hopkinson bars technique are classically required whatever compression or tension loadings. Classical designs of measurement bars are not suitable for this purpose due to the complexity of specimen's geometry (thickness variation). In this context, a new design of SHTB is studied here on the basis on a Finite Element approach of the set measurement bars/biological coupon. Finite Element simulations have been conducted using Abaqus explicit code by varying the design configuration. The comparison on input and output elastic waves suggests a set of small diameter bars in polyamide 66 for a better signal measurement.

  10. FORMING DOUBLE-BARRED GALAXIES FROM DYNAMICALLY COOL INNER DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Min; Shen, Juntai; Debattista, Victor P.

    2015-05-10

    About one-third of early-type barred galaxies host small-scale secondary bars. The formation and evolution of such double-barred (S2B) galaxies remain far from being well understood. In order to understand the formation of such systems, we explore a large parameter space of isolated pure-disk simulations. We show that a dynamically cool inner disk embedded in a hotter outer disk can naturally generate a steady secondary bar while the outer disk forms a large-scale primary bar. The independent bar instabilities of inner and outer disks result in long-lived double-barred structures whose dynamical properties are comparable to those in observations. This formation scenario indicates that the secondary bar might form from the general bar instability, the same as the primary bar. Under some circumstances, the interaction of the bars and the disk leads to the two bars aligning or single, nuclear, bars only. Simulations that are cool enough of the center to experience clump instabilities may also generate steady S2B galaxies. In this case, the secondary bars are “fast,” i.e., the bar length is close to the co-rotation radius. This is the first time that S2B galaxies containing a fast secondary bar are reported. Previous orbit-based studies had suggested that fast secondary bars were not dynamically possible.

  11. Analysis of Hopkinson Bar Pressure Gage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Viscosity ibs/ips Si, 55 0.166 S2, S3, S4 0.333 56, S10 0.416 S7, S8, S9 0.832 This converts to a viscous force of 5.33 lbs per ips of rolative velocity...Information Science, Inc., ATTN: Dr. Dudziak, 123 West Padre Street, Santa Barbara, CA 931C5 Karagozian and Case, ATTN: Mr. Wesevich, Mr. Valoncins, 620

  12. The MTL Torsional Split-Hopkinson Bar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    Antonio, TX 78284 1 Dr. Ulric Lindholm, Southwest Research Institute, P.O. Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78206 1 Prof. F. A. McClintock , Massachusetts...Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cambridge, MA 02139 1 R. M. McMeeking, University of California at Santa Barbara ...Department of Material Science, Santa Barbara , CA 93111 1 Prof. Alan Miller, Stanford University, Department of Material Science Engineering, Stanford, CA

  13. First application of the 3D-MHB on dynamic compressive behavior of UHPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Ezio; Dotta, Matteo; Forni, Daniele; Riganti, Gianmario; Albertini, Carlo

    2015-09-01

    In order to study the dynamic behaviour of material in confined conditions a new machine was conceived and called 3D-Modified Hopkinson Bar (3D-MHB). It is a Modified Hopkinson Bar apparatus designed to apply dynamic loading in materials having a tri-axial stress state. It consists of a pulse generator system (with pre-tensioned bar and brittle joint), 1 input bar, and 5 output bars. The first results obtained on Ultra High Performance Concrete in compression with three different mono-axial compression states are presented. The results show how the pre-stress states minimize the boundary condition and a more uniform response is obtained.

  14. Multidecadal dynamics of alternate bars in the Alpine Rhine River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, Luca; Bertoldi, Walter; Zolezzi, Guido

    2016-11-01

    We report on a multidecadal analysis of alternate bar dynamics in a 41.7 km reach of the Alpine Rhine River, which represents an almost unique example of a regulated river with fixed levees, straight reaches, and regular bends in which alternate gravel bars spontaneously formed and migrated for more than a century. The analysis is based on freely available Landsat imagery, which provided an accurate and frequent survey of the dynamics of the alternate bar configuration since 1984. Bars were characterized in terms of wavelength, migration, and height. Longitudinal and temporal patterns are investigated as a function of flood occurrence and magnitude and in relation to the presence of local planform discontinuities (bends and ramps) that may affect their dynamics. Bars in the upper part of the reach are mostly steady and relatively long (about 13 channel widths); bars in the lower part of the reach are migrating and shorter (about 9 channel widths). Bar height is rather uniform along the reach, ranging between 3 and 4 m. The temporally long hydrological data set allowed the investigation of bar migration during flood events, showing that bars migrate faster for intermediate floods. The observed relationship between bar migration and wavelength was consistent with linear theories for free migrating and steady forced bars in straight channels. The comparison of theories with observations highlights the key role of theories to support interpretation of observations, for a better understanding of the morphodynamic processes controlling bar formation and dynamics.

  15. Bertram Hopkinson's pioneering work and the dislocation mechanics of high rate deformations and mechanically induced detonations.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Ronald W

    2014-05-13

    Bertram Hopkinson was prescient in writing of the importance of better measuring, albeit better understanding, the nature of high rate deformation of materials in general and, in particular, of the importance of heat in initiating detonation of explosives. This report deals with these subjects in terms of post-Hopkinson crystal dislocation mechanics applied to high rate deformations, including impact tests, Hopkinson pressure bar results, Zerilli-Armstrong-type constitutive relations, shock-induced deformations, isentropic compression experiments, mechanical initiation of explosive crystals and shear banding in metals.

  16. Dynamical Calculations of bar K and MULTI-bar K Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazda, D.; Mareš, J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    We report on our recent calculations of bar K and multi-bar K nuclei. Calculations were performed fully self-consistently across the periodic table using the relativistic mean-field approach. We aimed at detailed analysis of dynamical processes and various thresholds that determine the K- absorption width. Further, we studied the behavior of the nuclear medium under the influence of increasing strangeness in order to search for bar K condensation precursor phenomena. Last, we explored possibly self-bound strange hadronic configurations consisting of neutrons and bar K0 mesons and studied their properties.

  17. A miniature Hopkinson experiment device based on multistage reluctance coil electromagnetic launch.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenkai; Huan, Shi; Xiao, Ying

    2017-09-01

    A set of seven-stage reluctance miniaturized Hopkinson bar electromagnetic launcher has been developed in this paper. With the characteristics of high precision, small size, and little noise pollution, the device complies with the requirements of miniaturized Hopkinson bar for high strain rate. The launcher is a seven-stage accelerating device up to 65.5 m/s. A high performance microcontroller is used to control accurately the discharge of capacitor sets, by means of which the outlet velocity of the projectile can be controlled within a certain velocity range.

  18. A miniature Hopkinson experiment device based on multistage reluctance coil electromagnetic launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenkai; Huan, Shi; Xiao, Ying

    2017-09-01

    A set of seven-stage reluctance miniaturized Hopkinson bar electromagnetic launcher has been developed in this paper. With the characteristics of high precision, small size, and little noise pollution, the device complies with the requirements of miniaturized Hopkinson bar for high strain rate. The launcher is a seven-stage accelerating device up to 65.5 m/s. A high performance microcontroller is used to control accurately the discharge of capacitor sets, by means of which the outlet velocity of the projectile can be controlled within a certain velocity range.

  19. THE RELATION BETWEEN DYNAMICS AND STAR FORMATION IN BARRED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Garcia, Eric E.; Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A. E-mail: emartinez@cida.ve

    2011-06-20

    We analyze optical and near-infrared data of a sample of 11 barred spiral galaxies, in order to establish a connection between star formation and bar/spiral dynamics. We find that 22 regions located in the bars and 20 regions in the spiral arms beyond the end of the bar present azimuthal color/age gradients that may be attributed to star formation triggering. Assuming a circular motion dynamic model, we compare the observed age gradient candidates with stellar population synthesis models. A link can then be established with the disk dynamics that allows us to obtain parameters like the pattern speed of the bar or spiral as well as the positions of resonance radii. We subsequently compare the derived pattern speeds with those expected from theoretical and observational results in the literature (e.g., bars ending near corotation). We find a tendency to overestimate bar pattern speeds derived from color gradients in the bar at small radii, away from corotation; this trend can be attributed to non-circular motions of the young stars born in the bar region. In spiral regions, we find that {approx}50% of the color gradient candidates are 'inverse', i.e., with the direction of stellar aging contrary to that of rotation. The other half of the gradients found in spiral arms have stellar ages that increase in the same sense as rotation. Of the nine objects with gradients in both bars and spirals, six (67%) appear to have a bar and a spiral with similar {Omega}{sub p}, while three (33%) do not.

  20. Introducing a New 3D Dynamical Model for Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Christof; Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    2015-11-01

    The regular or chaotic dynamics of an analytical realistic three dimensional model composed of a spherically symmetric central nucleus, a bar and a flat disk is investigated. For describing the properties of the bar, we introduce a new simple dynamical model and we explore the influence on the character of orbits of all the involved parameters of it, such as the mass and the scale length of the bar, the major semi-axis and the angular velocity of the bar, as well as the energy. Regions of phase space with ordered and chaotic motion are identified in dependence on these parameters and for breaking the rotational symmetry. First, we study in detail the dynamics in the invariant plane z = pz = 0 using the Poincaré map as a basic tool and then study the full three-dimensional case using the Smaller Alignment index method as principal tool for distinguishing between order and chaos. We also present strong evidence obtained through the numerical simulations that our new bar model can realistically describe the formation and the evolution of the observed twin spiral structure in barred galaxies.

  1. A comparative study on the restrictions of dynamic test methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzoobi, GH.; Lahmi, S.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic behavior of materials is investigated using different devices. Each of the devices has some restrictions. For instance, the stress-strain curve of the materials can be captured at high strain rates only with Hopkinson bar. However, by using a new approach some of the other techniques could be used to obtain the constants of material models such as Johnson-Cook model too. In this work, the restrictions of some devices such as drop hammer, Taylor test, Flying wedge, Shot impact test, dynamic tensile extrusion and Hopkinson bars which are used to characterize the material properties at high strain rates are described. The level of strain and strain rate and their restrictions are very important in examining the efficiency of each of the devices. For instance, necking or bulging in tensile and compressive Hopkinson bars, fragmentation in dynamic tensile extrusion and petaling in Taylor test are restricting issues in the level of strain rate attainable in the devices.

  2. The Development of a Dual-Warhead Impact System for Dynamic Linearity Measurement of a High-g Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yunbo; Yang, Zhicai; Ma, Zongmin; Cao, Huiliang; Kou, Zhiwei; Zhi, Dan; Chen, Yanxiang; Feng, Hengzhen; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Despite its extreme significance, dynamic linearity measurement for high-g accelerometers has not been discussed experimentally in previous research. In this study, we developed a novel method using a dual-warhead Hopkinson bar to measure the dynamic linearity of a high-g acceleration sensor with a laser interference impact experiment. First, we theoretically determined that dynamic linearity is a performance indicator that can be used to assess the quality merits of high-g accelerometers and is the basis of the frequency response. We also found that the dynamic linearity of the dual-warhead Hopkinson bar without an accelerometer is 2.5% experimentally. Further, we verify that dynamic linearity of the accelerometer is 3.88% after calibrating the Hopkinson bar with the accelerometer. The results confirm the reliability and feasibility of measuring dynamic linearity for high-g accelerometers using this method. PMID:27338383

  3. The Development of a Dual-Warhead Impact System for Dynamic Linearity Measurement of a High-g Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunbo; Yang, Zhicai; Ma, Zongmin; Cao, Huiliang; Kou, Zhiwei; Zhi, Dan; Chen, Yanxiang; Feng, Hengzhen; Liu, Jun

    2016-06-08

    Despite its extreme significance, dynamic linearity measurement for high-g accelerometers has not been discussed experimentally in previous research. In this study, we developed a novel method using a dual-warhead Hopkinson bar to measure the dynamic linearity of a high-g acceleration sensor with a laser interference impact experiment. First, we theoretically determined that dynamic linearity is a performance indicator that can be used to assess the quality merits of high-g accelerometers and is the basis of the frequency response. We also found that the dynamic linearity of the dual-warhead Hopkinson bar without an accelerometer is 2.5% experimentally. Further, we verify that dynamic linearity of the accelerometer is 3.88% after calibrating the Hopkinson bar with the accelerometer. The results confirm the reliability and feasibility of measuring dynamic linearity for high-g accelerometers using this method.

  4. Dynamics of barred galaxies: effects of disc height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Valenzuela, Octavio; Colín, Pedro; Quinn, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    We study dynamics of bars in models of disc galaxies embedded in realistic dark matter haloes. We find that disc thickness plays an important, if not dominant, role in the evolution and structure of the bars. We also make extensive numerical tests of different N-body codes used to study bar dynamics. Models with thick discs typically used in this type of modelling (height-to-length ratio hz/Rd = 0.2) produce slowly rotating, and very long, bars. In contrast, more realistic thin discs with the same parameters as in our Galaxy (hz/Rd ~ 0.1) produce bars with normal length Rbar ~ Rd, which rotate quickly with the ratio of the corotation radius to the bar radius compatible with observations. Bars in these models do not show a tendency to slow down, and may lose as little as 2-3 per cent of their angular momentum due to dynamical friction with the dark matter over cosmological time. We attribute the differences between the models to a combined effect of high phase-space density and smaller Jeans mass in the thin-disc models, which result in the formation of a dense central bulge. Special attention is paid to numerical effects, such as the accuracy of orbital integration, force and mass resolution. Using three N-body codes - GADGET, adaptive refinement tree (ART) and PKDGRAV - we find that numerical effects are very important and, if not carefully treated, may produce incorrect and misleading results. Once the simulations are performed with sufficiently small time-steps and with adequate force and mass resolution, all the codes produce nearly the same results: we do not find any systematic deviations between the results obtained with TREE codes (GADGET and PKDGRAV) and with the adaptive mesh refinement (ART) code.

  5. Dynamical Modelling Of The Inner Galactic Barred Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portail, Matthieu

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the present state of the Milky Way disk is a necessary first step towards learning about the formation history of our Galaxy. While it is clear from infrared photometry that the inner disk hosts a 5 kpc long bar with a central Box/Peanut bulge, the interplay between the bar and the inner disk remains poorly known. To this end we build N-body dynamical models of the inner Galaxy with the Made-to-Measure method, combining deep photometry from the VVV, UKIDSS and 2MASS surveys with kinematics from the BRAVA, OGLE and ARGOS surveys. We explore their stellar to dark matter fraction together with their bar pattern speed and constrain from the modelling the effective Galactic potential (gravitational potential + bar pattern speed) inside the solar radius. Our best model is able to reproduce simultaneously (i) the Box/Peanut shape of the bulge, (ii) the transition between bulge and long bar, (iii) the bulge line-of-sight kinematics and proper motion dispersions, (iv) the ARGOS velocity field in the bar region and (v) the rotation curve of the Galaxy inside 10 kpc. Our effective potential will be an important input to more detailed chemodynamical studies of the stellar populations in the inner Galaxy, as revealed by the ARGOS or APOGEE surveys.

  6. Dynamic high-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald; Bignell, John; Ulrich, George B; George, Easo P

    2015-01-01

    Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified for dynamic high-temperature tensile characterization of thin-sheet alloys. An induction coil heater was used to heat the specimen while a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends of the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. As an example, the high-temperature Kolsky tension bar was used to characterize a DOP-26 iridium alloy in high-strain-rate tension at 860 s(-1)/1030 degrees C.

  7. Medium-term dynamics of a middle Adriatic barred beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postacchini, Matteo; Soldini, Luciano; Lorenzoni, Carlo; Mancinelli, Alessandro

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, attention has been paid to beach protection by means of soft and hard defenses. Along the Italian coast of the Adriatic Sea, sandy beaches are the most common landscape feature and around 70 % of the Marche region's coast (central Adriatic) is protected by defense structures. The longest free-from-obstacle nearshore area in the region includes the beach of Senigallia, frequently monitored in the last decades and characterized by a multiple bar system, which represents a natural beach defense. The bathymetries surveyed in 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 show long-term stability, confirmed by a good adaptation of an analyzed stretch of the beach to the Dean-type equilibrium profile, though a strong short- to medium-term variability of the wave climate has been observed during the monitored periods. The medium-term dynamics of the beach, which deal with the evolution of submerged bars and are of the order of years or seasons, have been related to the wave climate collected, during the analyzed temporal windows, by a wave buoy located about 40 km off Senigallia. An overall interpretation of the hydrodynamics, sediment characteristics and seabed morphology suggests that the wave climate is fundamental for the morphodynamic changes of the beach in the medium term. These medium-term time ranges during which waves mainly come from NNE/ESE are characterized by a larger/smaller steepness and by a larger/smaller relative wave height, and seem to induce seaward/shoreward bar migration as well as bar smoothing/steepening. Moving southeastward, the bar dimension increases, while the equilibrium profile shape suggests the adaptation to a decreasing sediment size in the submerged beach. This is probably due to the presence of both the harbor jetty and river mouth north of the investigated area.

  8. Beam Dynamics Studies of Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, G. Krafft, K. Detrick, S. Silva, J. Delayen, M. Spata ,M. Tiefenback, A. Hofler ,K. Beard

    2011-03-01

    We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for parallel-bar transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type RF separators: normal- and super-conducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to conventional TM$_{110}$ type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a one- or two-cell superconducting structure are enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the Lambertson magnet. Both the normal and super-conducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the vertical kick of the beam.

  9. Properties of Compacted Backfill Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    4 3. SOIL SPECIMEN PREPARATION AND EXPERIMENTAL APPARATUS ....................................................... 19 4. DATA...soil, and how the I specimens were prepared . The data reduction procedure have been addressed in chapter 4. Chapter 5 presents the experimental results...rolling it down a ramp. Their results showed that the response of the clay was influenced • by the preconsolidation pressure at which it was prepared

  10. Dynamic and quasi-static measurements of C-4 and primasheet P1000 explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Thompson, Darla G; De Luca, Racci; Rae, Philip J; Cady, Carl M; Todd, Steven N

    2010-01-01

    We have measured dynamic and quasi-static mechanical properties of C-4 and Primasheet P1000 explosive materials to provide input data for modeling efforts. Primasheet P1000 is a pentaerythritol tetranitrate-based rubberized explosive. C-4 is a RDX-based moldable explosive. Dynamic measurements included acoustic and split-Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Quasi-static testing was done in compression on load frames and on a dynamic mechanical analyzer. Split-Hopkinson and quasi-static tests were done at five temperatures from -50 C to 50 C. Acoustic velocities were measured at, above, and below room temperature.

  11. Dynamic Buckling of Elastic Bar under Axial Impact Based on Finite Difference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hao; Yang, Qiang; Han, Zhi-Jun; Lu, Guo-Yun

    2016-05-01

    Considering first order shear deformation theory, the dynamic buckling governing equations of elastic bar with initial imperfections, transverse inertia and axial inertia are derived by Hamilton principle. The equations are converted into the form of non-dimension. Based on the finite difference method, the equations are solved approximately. The buckling mode of elastic bar under different axial impact velocities has been obtained. The influence of different axial impact velocity on the dynamic buckling of elastic bar is discussed.

  12. Star Formation and Cloud Dynamics in the Galactic Bar Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolls, Volker

    The Inner Galaxy (IG) that is the Galactic Bar Region (GBR) and the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) including the Galactic Center (GC) are, despite being the sites of dramatic processes and unique sources, still only incompletely understood. Detailed new datasets from the Herschel Space Observatory can be systematically combined with older archival material to enable a new and more complete analysis of the region, its large-scale dynamics, its unusual giant molecular clouds, and the likely influences of its bar and its supermassive black hole. Such a study is both timely and important: the region has affected the structure and evolution of the galaxy; its individual sources are opportunities to examine star formation (for example) under extreme conditions; the processes feeding the CMZ and, subsequently, its black hole are important; and not least, it is a nearby template for the inner regions of other galaxies. The Herschel Space Observatory has provided us with exciting new datasets including full FIR photometric maps and highand low-resolution far-infrared/submillimeter spectra of key sources and lines of the locations of dynamical importance. All these datasets are publicly available from the Herschel Science Archive. Our experienced team has already developed preliminary models, and we propose a thorough investigation to combine the Herschel datasets with Spitzer and WISE datasets. We will supplement them with ground-based observations in cases when it will improve the results. We will then analyze the data and use the results to refine the models and improve our understanding of this key region. Our specific goal is to characterize and model the 3 giant high-velocity molecular cloud clumps in the Galaxy Bar Region (GBR) in detail and to combine the conclusions to produce an improved model of the IG. We have seven tasks: (1) identify all smaller scale gas and dust cores using archival Herschel FIR photometric observations and obtain their physical characteristics

  13. BarMap: RNA folding on dynamic energy landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Hofacker, Ivo L.; Flamm, Christoph; Heine, Christian; Wolfinger, Michael T.; Scheuermann, Gerik; Stadler, Peter F.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamical changes of RNA secondary structures play an important role in the function of many regulatory RNAs. Such kinetic effects, especially in time-variable and externally triggered systems, are usually investigated by means of extensive and expensive simulations of large sets of individual folding trajectories. Here we describe the theoretical foundations of a generic approach that not only allows the direct computation of approximate population densities but also reduces the efforts required to analyze the folding energy landscapes to a one-time preprocessing step. The basic idea is to consider the kinetics on individual landscapes and to model external triggers and environmental changes as small but discrete changes in the landscapes. A “barmap” links macrostates of temporally adjacent landscapes and defines the transfer of population densities from one “snapshot” to the next. Implemented in the BarMap software, this approach makes it feasible to study folding processes at the level of basins, saddle points, and barriers for many nonstationary scenarios, including temperature changes, cotranscriptional folding, refolding in consequence to degradation, and mechanically constrained kinetics, as in the case of the translocation of a polymer through a pore. PMID:20504954

  14. Chaotic Dynamics of Falling Disks: from Maxwell to Bar Tricks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Stuart

    1998-03-01

    Understanding the motion of flat objects falling in a viscous medium dates back to at least Newton and Maxwell, and is relevant to problems in meteorology, sedimentology, aerospace and chemical engineering, and bar wagering strategies. Recent theoretical studies have emphasized the role played by deterministic chaos. Here we report(S. B. Field, M. Klaus, M. G. Moore, and F. Nori, Nature 388), 252 (1997) experimental observations and theoretical analysis of the dynamics of disks falling in water/glycerol mixtures. We find four distinct types of motion, and map out a ``phase diagram'' in the appropriate variables. The apparently complex behavior of the disks can be reduced to a series of one-dimensional maps which display a discontinuity at the crossover from periodic and chaotic motion. This discontinuity leads to an unusual intermittency transition between the two behaviors, which has not previously been observed experimentally in any system.

  15. Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330 steel with kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

    2010-08-01

    There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical

  16. Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330-V steel with kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical

  17. Dynamics of membrane nanotubes coated with I-BAR

    PubMed Central

    Barooji, Younes F.; Rørvig-Lund, Andreas; Semsey, Szabolcs; Reihani, S. Nader S.; Bendix, Poul M.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane deformation is a necessary step in a number of cellular processes such as filopodia and invadopodia formation and has been shown to involve membrane shaping proteins containing membrane binding domains from the IRSp53-MIM protein family. In reconstituted membranes the membrane shaping domains can efficiently deform negatively charged membranes into tubules without any other proteins present. Here, we show that the IM domain (also called I-BAR domain) from the protein ABBA, forms semi-flexible nanotubes protruding into Giant Unilamellar lipid Vesicles (GUVs). By simultaneous quantification of tube intensity and tubular shape we find both the diameter and stiffness of the nanotubes. I-BAR decorated tubes were quantified to have a diameter of ~50 nm and exhibit no stiffening relative to protein free tubes of the same diameter. At high protein density the tubes are immobile whereas at lower density the tubes diffuse freely on the surface of the GUV. Bleaching experiments of the fluorescently tagged I-BAR confirmed that the mobility of the tubes correlates with the mobility of the I-BAR on the GUV membrane. Finally, at low density of I-BAR the protein upconcentrates within tubes protruding into the GUVs. This implies that I-BAR exhibits strong preference for negatively curved membranes. PMID:27444356

  18. Dynamics of membrane nanotubes coated with I-BAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barooji, Younes F.; Rørvig-Lund, Andreas; Semsey, Szabolcs; Reihani, S. Nader S.; Bendix, Poul M.

    2016-07-01

    Membrane deformation is a necessary step in a number of cellular processes such as filopodia and invadopodia formation and has been shown to involve membrane shaping proteins containing membrane binding domains from the IRSp53-MIM protein family. In reconstituted membranes the membrane shaping domains can efficiently deform negatively charged membranes into tubules without any other proteins present. Here, we show that the IM domain (also called I-BAR domain) from the protein ABBA, forms semi-flexible nanotubes protruding into Giant Unilamellar lipid Vesicles (GUVs). By simultaneous quantification of tube intensity and tubular shape we find both the diameter and stiffness of the nanotubes. I-BAR decorated tubes were quantified to have a diameter of ~50 nm and exhibit no stiffening relative to protein free tubes of the same diameter. At high protein density the tubes are immobile whereas at lower density the tubes diffuse freely on the surface of the GUV. Bleaching experiments of the fluorescently tagged I-BAR confirmed that the mobility of the tubes correlates with the mobility of the I-BAR on the GUV membrane. Finally, at low density of I-BAR the protein upconcentrates within tubes protruding into the GUVs. This implies that I-BAR exhibits strong preference for negatively curved membranes.

  19. High Velocity Tensile Test for Thin Plate Specimen with One Bar Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itabashi, Masaaki

    In order to design thin-walled impact-resistant structure, for example, an automotive body, dynamic behavior of thin plate is essential. So far, except for laminated composite materials, high velocity tensile test of thin plate specimen did not attract impact researchers' and engineers' attention very much. In this paper, the previous thin plate specimen assembly for the one bar method was improved. The one bar method has been utilized for cylindrical specimens of various solid materials and is known as an effective high velocity tensile testing technique. Unfortunately, the previous assembly introduced a tremendous initial peak on stress-strain curves, even for aluminum alloys. With a new specimen assembly, stress-strain curves for IF (Interstitial-atom Free) steel and 7075-T6 aluminum alloy obtained by the one bar method were almost equivalent to those obtained by the tensile version of the split Hopkinson pressure bar method.

  20. Effects of a groyne field on inner bar dynamics: Anglet, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Santiago, Inaki; Morichon, Denis; Arnould, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Groynes are usually designed to limit beach erosion by mitigating longshore sediment transport. However, little is known about their side effects on inner-bar morphodynamics in double sandbar systems. While most of the studies are focused on natural systems where the outer-bar morphology drives inner-bar dynamics (offshore to nearshore process), this work focuses on the role of groynes on the inner bar dynamics (nearshore to offshore process). The study is based on 3-years field observations carried out at the beach of Anglet in the south-west of France. This engineered beach is 4 km long, limited by a rocky headland in the south and a 1 km long jetty at the entrance of the Adour river in the North. The study area concerns the south part of the beach and includes a series of four groynes, unevenly spaced and extending about 100 m seaward. Morphology changes observations were derived from images collected with a video system (http://sirena.univ-pau.fr/), and bi-annual topo-Bathymetric surveys. A special attention was paid to study the mechanisms controlling the observed morphology changes using the XBeach numerical model. Data analysis reveals that the study site is dominated by a double sandbar system. Both bars can evolve from reasonably alongshore-uniform to crescentic bars. Surprisingly, the beach may show episodes where the inner bar evolves from alonghsore uniform to non-uniform despite an alongshore uniform outer bar. Numerical results corroborate that the formation of inner bar crescentic features can be formed without the presence of an outer non-uniform bar under certain wave conditions for the study site. This study shows that inner bar evolution in the presence of groynes can be controlled by topographic rip channels and not only by morphological coupling as usually observed on natural double sandbar systems.

  1. Transient dynamics of invasive competition: barred owls, spotted owls, habitat, and the demons of competition present.

    PubMed

    Dugger, Katie M; Anthony, Robert G; Andrews, Lawrence S

    2011-10-01

    The recent range expansion of Barred Owls (Strix varia) into the Pacific Northwest, where the species now co-occurs with the endemic Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina), resulted in a unique opportunity to investigate potential competition between two congeneric, previously allopatric species. The primary criticism of early competition research was the use of current species' distribution patterns to infer past processes; however, the recent expansion of the Barred Owl and the ability to model the processes that result in site occupancy (i.e., colonization and extinction) allowed us to address the competitive process directly rather than inferring past processes through current patterns. The purpose of our study was to determine whether Barred Owls had any negative effects on occupancy dynamics of nesting territories by Northern Spotted Owls and how these effects were influenced by habitat characteristics of Spotted Owl territories. We used single-species, multi-season occupancy models and covariates quantifying Barred Owl detections and habitat characteristics to model extinction and colonization rates of Spotted Owl pairs in southern Oregon, USA. We observed a strong, negative association between Barred Owl detections and colonization rates and a strong positive effect of Barred Owl detections on extinction rates of Spotted Owls. We observed increased extinction rates in response to decreased amounts of old forest at the territory core and higher colonization rates when old-forest habitat was less fragmented. Annual site occupancy for pairs reflected the strong effects of Barred Owls on occupancy dynamics with much lower occupancy rates predicted for territories where Barred Owls were detected. The strong Barred Owl and habitat effects on occupancy dynamics of Spotted Owls provided evidence of interference competition between the species. These effects increase the importance of conserving large amounts of contiguous, old-forest habitat to maintain

  2. The Dynamical Relationship between the Bar and Spiral Patterns of NGC 1365

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speights, Jason C.; Rooke, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    Theories that attempt to explain the dynamical relationship between bar and spiral patterns in galactic disks make different predictions about the radial profile of the pattern speed. These are tested for the H-alpha bar and spiral patterns of NGC 1365. The radial profile of the pattern speed is measured by fitting mathematical models that are based on the Tremaine-Weinberg method. The results show convincing evidence for the bar rotating at a faster rate than the spiral pattern, inconsistent with a global wave mode or a manifold. There is evidence for mode coupling of the bar and spiral patterns at the overlap of corotation and inner Lindblad resonances (ILRs), but the evidence is unreliable and inconsistent. The results are the most consistent with the bar and spiral patterns being dynamically distinct features. The pattern speed of the bar begins near an ILR and ends near the corotation resonance (CR). The radial profile of the pattern speed beyond the bar most closely resembles what is expected for coupled spiral modes and tidal interactions.

  3. The Dynamical Relationship Between the Bar and Spiral Patterns of NGC 1365

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speights, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Theories describing the dynamical relationship between bar and spiral patterns in galaxy disks make different predictions about the radial profile of the pattern speed. The purpose of this poster is to test these predictions for the bar and spiral patterns of NGC 1365. The pattern speed is measured by fitting different forms of the Tremaine-Weinberg equations to H-alpha intensity and velocity maps. The results are the most consistent with the currently observed bar and spiral patterns being dynamically distinct features. They show compelling evidence for the bar rotating faster than the spiral pattern, inconsistent with a global wave mode or a manifold. The evidence for mode coupling of the bar and spiral patterns is weak due to inconsistencies in the results for different solution methods. The bar pattern speed is approximately constant between the inner Lindblad and corotation resonances, demonstrating that the solutions can detect large-scale, rigid patterns. Beyond the bar, the results resemble what is expected for coupled spiral modes and tidal interactions.

  4. Dynamic analysis of six-bar mechanical press for deep drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsi, S.; Tsiafis, I.; Bouzakis, K. D.

    2017-02-01

    This paper analyzes the dynamical behavior of a six-bar linkage used in mechanical presses for metal forming such as deep drawing. In the under study mechanism, a four-bar linkage is connected to a slider through an articulated binary link. The motion of the six-bar linkage is studied by kinematic analysis developing an analytical method. Furthermore, using an iterative method and d’ Alembert’s principle, the joint forces and drive moment are evaluated considering joint frictions. The simulation results obtained with a MATLAB program are validated by comparing the theoretical values of the input moment with the ones obtained from the conservation of energy law.

  5. A microstructural investigation of ``machining rings'' and deformation uniformity for dynamic ring compression tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloete, T. J.; Hartley, R. S.; Nurick, G. N.

    2006-08-01

    A series of ring compression tests, conducted both quasi-statically (using a Zwick tensile test machine) and dynamically (using a split Hopkinson bar) are presented. The friction conditions were inferred from the behaviour of the inner diameter of the ring specimen using the analysis of Avitzur. Both quasi-static and dynamic specimens displayed machining rings. Microstructural analysis revealed that under quasi-static conditions the machining rings correlate with fold-over, while under dynamic conditions machining rings can appear without fold over. This indicates that machining rings formed during dynamic tests may be due to lubrication breakdown. The results indicate that the assumption of uniform specimen deformation is reasonable for strains attainable during split Hopkinson bar tests.

  6. Membrane Sculpting by F-BAR Domains Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hang; Schulten, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Interplay between cellular membranes and their peripheral proteins drives many processes in eukaryotic cells. Proteins of the Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain family, in particular, play a role in cellular morphogenesis, for example curving planar membranes into tubular membranes. However, it is still unclear how F-BAR domain proteins act on membranes. Electron microscopy revealed that, in vitro, F-BAR proteins form regular lattices on cylindrically deformed membrane surfaces. Using all-atom and coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulations, we show that such lattices, indeed, induce tubes of observed radii. A 250 ns all-atom simulation reveals that F-BAR domain curves membranes via the so-called scaffolding mechanism. Plasticity of the F-BAR domain permits conformational change in response to membrane interaction, via partial unwinding of the domains 3-helix bundle structure. A CG simulation covering more than 350 µs provides a dynamic picture of membrane tubulation by lattices of F-BAR domains. A series of CG simulations identified the optimal lattice type for membrane sculpting, which matches closely the lattices seen through cryo-electron microscopy. PMID:23382665

  7. Effect of Output Bar Supporting Methods on High Velocity Tensile Behavior for Steel Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itabashi, Masaaki

    In order to obtain precise and correct dynamic stress-strain behavior for steel plate, the split Hopkinson (Kolsky) bar method or the one bar method has been adopted as a testing method. In these two methods, a dynamic load transducer is the thin steel bar (s). On the input and output bars, typically two or four strain gages are adhered at the same distance from the end of the bars to detect elastic strains of the bars as dynamic load signal. The bars are usually mounted on simple supports, allowing a little axial elongation of the bars. Then, ball bearings or polytetrafluoroethylene parts are frequently installed between the bars and supports, because the friction between them will affect the quality of the dynamic load signal. On the other hand, only for the one bar method, it is reported that a relatively tight support, neighboring the loading end of the output bar, is effective to reduce an extraordinarily-high initial stress peak on dynamic stress-strain curve. In this paper, some trials have been carried out to find the optimum supporting condition for the output bar loading end in the one bar method. An assembly for a steel plate specimen is connected to an impact block. The other end of the assembly is an extension of the output bar. Usually, from the end of gage length of the specimen plate, there is no output bar support within approximately 650mm, for the present apparatus. This situation is designated as “no support”. At a location of 60mm from the end of the gage length, a simple output bar support is introduced additionally. This situation is called as “simple support”, because the output bar is left on the V-shaped top of the support. Additional upper supporting parts can be installed to the simple support condition. After the installation, a square hole is formed on the top of the support. The output bar touches four sides of the hole. This situation is called as “surrounding support”. In addition, specimen assembly types are also

  8. Development of a miniature tensile Kolsky bar for dynamic testing of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jastin V.

    Mechanical properties such as yield stress and ultimate strength are most commonly obtained under quasi-static (strain rate of 10--4 s--1) loading conditions Materials such as metals, ceramics, and polymers may exhibit significant changes in mechanical response when subjected to high strain rate (102 --105 per second) conditions. The loading rate or strain rate can affect the material properties such as elastic modulus, yield strength, work hardening, and ductility. To ensure product quality and reliability under impact conditions, the mechanical responses of materials under dynamic loading conditions must be characterized. A Kolsky bar is a tool that can be used to study the uniaxial compressive constitutive behavior of materials under high strain rates. The goal of this thesis is to develop a miniature Tensile Kolsky bar that can be used to test materials with thickness on the order of 200 micrometers (thin foils). The system consists of a cylindrical launch tube with an internal striker, a rectangular incident bar and a transmitted bar. The specimen is held in pockets that were milled directly into the incident and transmitted bar. The rectangular incident and transmitted bars facilitate specimen and strain gage mounting. The rectangular section also provides a reduced cross sectional bar area compared to a bar of circular cross section with diameter equivalent to the width of the rectangular bar, which increases the system sensitivity. This thesis presents the detailed description of the miniature Kolsky bar device, specimen geometry, diagnostic techniques and different calibration and validation techniques used for developing the system. The Kolsky bar setup was used to test 99.9 percent pure magnesium at two different strain rates (5000 and 10000 per second). Specimens were cut from billets processed via the 4Bc equal channel angular extrusion route and were tested in three different directions: extrusion, longitudinal and transverse. The results from the

  9. Advances in experimental assessment of dynamic tensile strength of concrete by the spalling technique. …in tribute to Janusz Roman Klepaczko, Emeritus Professor at the Université Paul Verlaine in Metz, passed away on August 15, 2008.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brara, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    An experimental method to test concrete in dynamic tension by spalling with a Hopkinson bar as loading and measuring tool was developed in 1999. The dynamic strength of concrete specimen and strain rate were indirectly derived from an accurate data processing of the signals measured on the Hopkinson bar surface. This method suggested by late Prof. Klepaczko, allowed for reaching the highest strain rate reported in literature for which an intriguing tensile strength increase was highlighted. This simple and efficient technique has been adopted by many researchers around the world. Some significant improvements in terms of definition and reproducibility of the incident loading pulse travelling along the bar and direct and/or contactless measurements on concrete specimens have been introduced. The very high rate sensitivity of concrete tensile strength was corroborated by the additional experimental data obtained with this experimental technique during the last fifteen years.

  10. Dynamic and quasi-static measurements of PBXN-5 and comp-B explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Ten Cate, James A; Deluca, Racci; Rae, Philip J; Todd, Steven N

    2009-03-12

    We have measured dynamic and quasi-static mechanical properties of PBXN-5 and Comp-B explosive materials to provide input data for modeling efforts. Dynamic measurements included acoustic and split-Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Quasi-static testing was done in compression on a load frame. Hopkinson bar and quasistatic testing was done at five temperatures from -50{sup o}C to 50{sup o}C. Our results were dominated by the low density of the samples and showed up as low acoustic velocities and lower strengths, as compared to other materials of the same or similar formulations. The effects seem to be consistent with the high porosity of the materials. The data do provide useful input to models that include density as a parameter and suggest caution when using measurements of ideal materials to predict behavior of damaged materials.

  11. Dynamic Characterization and Modeling of Potting Materials for Electronics Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vasant; Lee, Gilbert; Santiago, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Prediction of survivability of encapsulated electronic components subject to impact relies on accurate modeling. Both static and dynamic characterization of encapsulation material is needed to generate a robust material model. Current focus is on potting materials to mitigate high rate loading on impact. In this effort, encapsulation scheme consists of layers of polymeric material Sylgard 184 and Triggerbond Epoxy-20-3001. Experiments conducted for characterization of materials include conventional tension and compression tests, Hopkinson bar, dynamic material analyzer (DMA) and a non-conventional accelerometer based resonance tests for obtaining high frequency data. For an ideal material, data can be fitted to Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model. A new temperature-time shift (TTS) macro was written to compare idealized temperature shift factor (WLF model) with experimental incremental shift factors. Deviations can be observed by comparison of experimental data with the model fit to determine the actual material behavior. Similarly, another macro written for obtaining Ogden model parameter from Hopkinson Bar tests indicates deviations from experimental high strain rate data. In this paper, experimental results for different materials used for mitigating impact, and ways to combine data from resonance, DMA and Hopkinson bar together with modeling refinements will be presented.

  12. F-BAR family proteins, emerging regulators for cell membrane dynamic changes-from structure to human diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Suxuan; Xiong, Xinyu; Zhao, Xianxian; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Hong

    2015-05-09

    Eukaryotic cell membrane dynamics change in curvature during physiological and pathological processes. In the past ten years, a novel protein family, Fes/CIP4 homology-Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (F-BAR) domain proteins, has been identified to be the most important coordinators in membrane curvature regulation. The F-BAR domain family is a member of the Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain superfamily that is associated with dynamic changes in cell membrane. However, the molecular basis in membrane structure regulation and the biological functions of F-BAR protein are unclear. The pathophysiological role of F-BAR protein is unknown. This review summarizes the current understanding of structure and function in the BAR domain superfamily, classifies F-BAR family proteins into nine subfamilies based on domain structure, and characterizes F-BAR protein structure, domain interaction, and functional relevance. In general, F-BAR protein binds to cell membrane via F-BAR domain association with membrane phospholipids and initiates membrane curvature and scission via Src homology-3 (SH3) domain interaction with its partner proteins. This process causes membrane dynamic changes and leads to seven important cellular biological functions, which include endocytosis, phagocytosis, filopodium, lamellipodium, cytokinesis, adhesion, and podosome formation, via distinct signaling pathways determined by specific domain-binding partners. These cellular functions play important roles in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. We further summarize F-BAR protein expression and mutation changes observed in various diseases and developmental disorders. Considering the structure feature and functional implication of F-BAR proteins, we anticipate that F-BAR proteins modulate physiological and pathophysiological processes via transferring extracellular materials, regulating cell trafficking and mobility, presenting antigens, mediating extracellular matrix degradation, and transmitting

  13. Dynamics of Nearshore Sand Bars and Infra-gravity Waves: The Optimal Theory Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchette, F.; Mohammadi, B.

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that the dynamics of near-shore sand bars are partly controlled by the features (location of nodes, amplitude, length, period) of the so-called infra-gravity waves. Reciprocally, changes in the location, size and shape of near-shore sand bars can control wave/wave interactions which in their turn alter the infra-gravity content of the near-shore wave energy spectrum. The coupling infra-gravity / near-shore bar is thus definitely two ways. Regarding numerical modelling, several approaches have already been considered to analyze such coupled dynamics. Most of them are based on the following strategy: 1) define an energy spectrum including infra-gravity, 2) tentatively compute the radiation stresses driven by this energy spectrum, 3) compute sediment transport and changes in the seabottom elevation including sand bars, 4) loop on the computation of infra-gravity taking into account the morphological changes. In this work, we consider an alternative approach named Nearshore Optimal Theory, which is a kind of breakdown point of view for the modeling of near-shore hydro-morphodynamics and wave/ wave/ seabottom interactions. Optimal theory applied to near-shore hydro-morphodynamics arose with the design of solid coastal defense structures by shape optimization methods, and is being now extended in order to model dynamics of any near-shore system combining waves and sand. The basics are the following: the near-shore system state is through a functional J representative of the energy of the system in some way. This J is computed from a model embedding the physics to be studied only (here hydrodynamics forced by simple infra-gravity). Then the paradigm is to say that the system will evolve so that the energy J tends to minimize. No really matter the complexity of wave propagation nor wave/bottom interactions. As soon as J embeds the physics to be explored, the method does not require a comprehensive modeling. Near-shore Optimal Theory has already given

  14. Staying away from the bar: the local dynamical signature of slow and fast bars in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monari, Giacomo; Famaey, Benoit; Siebert, Arnaud; Duchateau, Aurore; Lorscheider, Thibault; Bienaymé, Olivier

    2017-02-01

    Both the three-dimensional density of red clump giants and the gas kinematics in the inner Galaxy indicate that the pattern speed of the Galactic bar could be much lower than previously estimated. Here, we show that such slow bar models are unable to reproduce the bimodality observed in local stellar velocity space. We do so by computing the response of stars in the solar neighbourhood to the gravitational potential of slow and fast bars, in terms of their perturbed distribution function in action-angle space up to second order, as well as by identifying resonantly trapped orbits. We also check that the bimodality is unlikely to be produced through perturbations from spiral arms, and conclude that, contrary to gas kinematics, local stellar kinematics still favour a fast bar in the Milky Way, with a pattern speed of the order of almost twice (and no less than 1.8 times) the circular frequency at the Sun's position. This leaves open the question of the nature of the long flat extension of the bar in the Milky Way.

  15. The bar-halo interaction - I. From fundamental dynamics to revised N-body requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Martin D.; Katz, Neal

    2007-02-01

    A galaxy remains near equilibrium for most of its history. Only through resonances can non-axisymmetric features, such as spiral arms and bars, exert torques over large scales and change the overall structure of the galaxy. In this paper, we describe the resonant interaction mechanism in detail, derive explicit criteria for the particle number required to simulate these dynamical processes accurately using N-body simulations, and illustrate them with numerical experiments. To do this, we perform a direct numerical solution of perturbation theory, in short, by solving for each orbit in an ensemble and make detailed comparisons with N-body simulations. The criteria include: sufficient particle coverage in phase space near the resonance and enough particles to minimize gravitational potential fluctuations that will change the dynamics of the resonant encounter. These criteria are general in concept and can be applied to any dynamical interaction. We use the bar-halo interaction as our primary example owing to its technical simplicity and astronomical ubiquity. Some of our more surprising findings are as follows. First, the inner Lindblad like resonance, responsible for coupling the bar to the central halo cusp, requires more than equal-mass particles within the virial radius or inside the bar radius for a Milky Way like bar in a Navarro, Frenk & White profile. Secondly, orbits that linger near the resonance receive more angular momentum than orbits that move through the resonance quickly. Small-scale fluctuations present in state-of-the-art particle-particle simulations can knock orbits out of resonance, preventing them from lingering and, thereby, decrease the torque per orbit. This can be offset by the larger number of orbits affected by the resonance due to the diffusion. However, noise from orbiting substructure remains at least an order of magnitude too small to be of consequence. Applied to N-body simulations, the required particle numbers are sufficiently high

  16. BAR Proteins PSTPIP1/2 Regulate Podosome Dynamics and the Resorption Activity of Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Sztacho, Martin; Segeletz, Sandra; Sanchez-Fernandez, Maria Arantzazu; Czupalla, Cornelia; Niehage, Christian; Hoflack, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Bone resorption in vertebrates relies on the ability of osteoclasts to assemble F-actin-rich podosomes that condense into podosomal belts, forming sealing zones. Sealing zones segregate bone-facing ruffled membranes from other membrane domains, and disassemble when osteoclasts migrate to new areas. How podosome/sealing zone dynamics is regulated remains unknown. We illustrate the essential role of the membrane scaffolding F-BAR-Proline-Serine-Threonine Phosphatase Interacting Proteins (PSTPIP) 1 and 2 in this process. Whereas PSTPIP2 regulates podosome assembly, PSTPIP1 regulates their disassembly. PSTPIP1 recruits, through its F-BAR domain, the protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6) that de-phosphophorylates the phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphatases SHIP1/2 bound to the SH3 domain of PSTPIP1. Depletion of any component of this complex prevents sealing zone disassembly and increases osteoclast activity. Thus, our results illustrate the importance of BAR domain proteins in podosome structure and dynamics, and identify a new PSTPIP1/PTPN6/SHIP1/2-dependent negative feedback mechanism that counterbalances Src and PI(3,4,5)P3 signalling to control osteoclast cell polarity and activity during bone resorption. PMID:27760174

  17. Dynamic High-Temperature Tensile Characterization of an Iridium Alloy with Kolsky Tension Bar Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald; Bignell, John; Ulrich, G. B.; George, Easo P.

    2015-05-29

    In this study, conventional Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified to characterize an iridium alloy in tension at elevated strain rates and temperatures. The specimen was heated to elevated temperatures with an induction coil heater before dynamic loading; whereas, a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends of the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. The dynamic high-temperature tensile stress–strain curves of a DOP-26 iridium alloy were experimentally obtained at two different strain rates (~1000 and 3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750 and 1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress–strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. Finally, the iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress–strain response that strongly depended on strain-rate and temperature.

  18. Dynamic High-Temperature Tensile Characterization of an Iridium Alloy with Kolsky Tension Bar Techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald; ...

    2015-05-29

    In this study, conventional Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified to characterize an iridium alloy in tension at elevated strain rates and temperatures. The specimen was heated to elevated temperatures with an induction coil heater before dynamic loading; whereas, a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends ofmore » the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. The dynamic high-temperature tensile stress–strain curves of a DOP-26 iridium alloy were experimentally obtained at two different strain rates (~1000 and 3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750 and 1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress–strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. Finally, the iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress–strain response that strongly depended on strain-rate and temperature.« less

  19. Spatial dynamics of bar-headed geese migration in the context of H5N1

    PubMed Central

    Bourouiba, L.; Wu, Jianhong; Newman, S.; Takekawa, J.; Natdorj, T.; Batbayar, N.; Bishop, C. M.; Hawkes, L. A.; Butler, P. J.; Wikelski, M.

    2010-01-01

    Virulent outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) since 2005 have raised the question about the roles of migratory and wild birds in the transmission of HPAI. Despite increased monitoring, the role of wild waterfowl as the primary source of the highly pathogenic H5N1 has not been clearly established. The impact of outbreaks of HPAI among species of wild birds which are already endangered can nevertheless have devastating consequences for the local and non-local ecology where migratory species are established. Understanding the entangled dynamics of migration and the disease dynamics will be key to prevention and control measures for humans, migratory birds and poultry. Here, we present a spatial dynamic model of seasonal migration derived from first principles and linking the local dynamics during migratory stopovers to the larger scale migratory routes. We discuss the effect of repeated epizootic at specific migratory stopovers for bar-headed geese (Anser indicus). We find that repeated deadly outbreaks of H5N1 on stopovers during the autumn migration of bar-headed geese could lead to a larger reduction in the size of the equilibrium bird population compared with that obtained after repeated outbreaks during the spring migration. However, the opposite is true during the first few years of transition to such an equilibrium. The age-maturation process of juvenile birds which are more susceptible to H5N1 reinforces this result. PMID:20472636

  20. Spatial dynamics of bar-headed geese migration in the context of H5N1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bourouiba, L.; Wu, Jianhong; Newman, S.; Takekawa, John Y.; Natdorj, T.; Batbayar, N.; Bishop, C.M.; Hawkes, L.A.; Butler, P.J.; Wikelski, M.

    2010-01-01

    Virulent outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) since 2005 have raised the question about the roles of migratory and wild birds in the transmission of HPAI. Despite increased monitoring, the role of wild waterfowl as the primary source of the highly pathogenic H5N1 has not been clearly established. The impact of outbreaks of HPAI among species of wild birds which are already endangered can nevertheless have devastating consequences for the local and non-local ecology where migratory species are established. Understanding the entangled dynamics of migration and the disease dynamics will be key to prevention and control measures for humans, migratory birds and poultry. Here, we present a spatial dynamic model of seasonal migration derived from first principles and linking the local dynamics during migratory stopovers to the larger scale migratory routes. We discuss the effect of repeated epizootic at specific migratory stopovers for bar-headed geese (Anser indicus). We find that repeated deadly outbreaks of H5N1 on stopovers during the autumn migration of bar-headed geese could lead to a larger reduction in the size of the equilibrium bird population compared with that obtained after repeated outbreaks during the spring migration. However, the opposite is true during the first few years of transition to such an equilibrium. The age-maturation process of juvenile birds which are more susceptible to H5N1 reinforces this result.

  1. Dynamic Punch Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilat, Amos; Seidt, Jeremy

    2009-06-01

    A dynamic punch test is introduced. The test is conducted by placing a punching device between the incident and transmitter bars of a compression split Hopkinson bar apparatus. The punch has a rounded end that penetrates into the specimen which is a thin round plate clamped around the circumference. The force of the punch and the relative motion between the punch and the specimen holder are determined from the waves recorded on split Hopkinson bars. Digital image correlation technique is used to verify the displacements determined from the waves. Results are shown from tests on specimens made of 2024-T351 aluminum. The results can be used for the development and validation of continuum failure models for high stain rates applications. Many existing failure models relate stress triaxiality (ratio of the pressure and the von Mises stress) to equivalent failure strain, and some models have been modified to include the Lode parameter. The coefficients in the failure models are determined from experiments in which specimens are subjected to a combined state of stress. Such experiments are relatively easy to conduct in low (quasi-static) strain rate applications, but are very difficult to conduct at high strain rate.

  2. Incremental dynamic analysis of concrete moment resisting frames reinforced with shape memory composite bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Adeel; Andrawes, Bassem

    2012-02-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcing bars have been used in concrete structures as an alternative to conventional steel reinforcement, in order to overcome corrosion problems. However, due to the linear behavior of the commonly used reinforcing fibers, they are not considered in structures which require ductility and damping characteristics. The use of superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) fibers with their nonlinear elastic behavior as reinforcement in the composite could potentially provide a solution for this problem. Small diameter SMA wires are coupled with polymer matrix to produce SMA-FRP composite, which is sought in this research as reinforcing bars. SMA-FRP bars are sought in this study to enhance the seismic performance of reinforced concrete (RC) moment resisting frames (MRFs) in terms of reducing their residual inter-story drifts while still maintaining the elastic characteristics associated with conventional FRP. Three story one bay and six story two bay RC MRF prototype structures are designed with steel, SMA-FRP and glass-FRP reinforcement. The incremental dynamic analysis technique is used to investigate the behaviors of the two frames with the three different reinforcement types under a suite of ground motion records. It is found that the frames with SMA-FRP composite reinforcement exhibit higher performance levels including lower residual inter-story drifts, high energy dissipation and thus lower damage, which are important for structures in highly seismic zones.

  3. Gas Dynamics and Outflow in the Barred Starburst Galaxy NGC 1808 Revealed with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salak, Dragan; Nakai, Naomasa; Hatakeyama, Takuya; Miyamoto, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    NGC 1808 is a nearby barred starburst galaxy with an outflow from the nuclear region. To study the inflow and outflow processes related to star formation and dynamical evolution of the galaxy, we have carried out 12CO (J=1-0) mapping observations of the central r ˜ 4 kpc of NGC 1808 using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Four distinct components of molecular gas are revealed at high spatial resolution of 2″ (˜100 pc): (1) a compact (r < 200 pc) circumnuclear disk (CND), (2) r ˜ 500 pc ring, (3) gas-rich galactic bar, and (4) spiral arms. Basic geometric and kinematic parameters are derived for the central 1 kpc region using tilted-ring modeling. The derived rotation curve reveals multiple mass components that include (1) a stellar bulge, (2) a nuclear bar and molecular CND, and (3) an unresolved massive (˜107 M ⊙) core. Two systemic velocities, 998 km s-1 for the CND and 964 km s-1 for the 500 pc ring, are revealed, indicating a kinematic offset. The pattern speed of the primary bar, derived by using a cloud-orbit model, is 56 ± 11 km s-1 kpc-1. Noncircular motions are detected associated with a nuclear spiral pattern and outflow in the central 1 kpc region. The ratio of the mass outflow rate to the star formation rate is {\\dot{M}}{out}/{SFR}˜ 0.2 in the case of optically thin CO (1-0) emission in the outflow, suggesting low efficiency of star formation quenching.

  4. Dynamical modelling of the galactic bulge and bar: the Milky Way's pattern speed, stellar and dark matter mass distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portail, Matthieu; Gerhard, Ortwin; Wegg, Christopher; Ness, Melissa

    2017-02-01

    We construct a large set of dynamical models of the galactic bulge, bar and inner disc using the made-to-measure method. Our models are constrained to match the red clump giant density from a combination of the VVV, UKIDSS and 2MASS infrared surveys together with stellar kinematics in the bulge from the BRAVA and OGLE surveys, and in the entire bar region from the ARGOS Survey. We are able to recover the bar pattern speed and the stellar and dark matter mass distributions in the bar region, thus recovering the entire galactic effective potential. We find a bar pattern speed of 39.0 ± 3.5 km s- 1 kpc- 1, placing the bar corotation radius at 6.1 ± 0.5 kpc and making the Milky Way bar a typical fast rotator. We evaluate the stellar mass of the long bar and bulge structure to be Mbar/bulge = 1.88 ± 0.12 × 1010 M⊙, larger than the mass of disc in the bar region, Minner disc = 1.29 ± 0.12 × 1010 M⊙. The total dynamical mass in the bulge volume is 1.85 ± 0.05 × 1010 M⊙. Thanks to more extended kinematic data sets and recent measurement of the bulge initial mass function, our models have a low dark matter fraction in the bulge of 17 ± 2 per cent. We find a dark matter density profile which flattens to a shallow cusp or core in the bulge region. Finally, we find dynamical evidence for an extra central mass of ∼ 0.2 × 1010 M⊙, probably in a nuclear disc or discy pseudo-bulge.

  5. A preliminary investigation of the dynamic viscoelastic relaxation of bovine cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loete, T. J. C.; Paul, G.; Ismail, E. B.

    2015-09-01

    A new experimental approach is proposed to characterize the dynamic viscoelastic relaxation behaviour of cortical bone. Theoretical models are presented to show that a linear viscoelastic material, when allowed to relax between two long elastic bars, will produce stress, strain and strain rate histories that contain characteristic features. Furthermore, typical experimental results are presented to show that these characteristic features are observed during split Hopkinson bar tests on bovine cortical bone using a Cone-in-Tube striker. The interpretation of this behaviour in the context of a standard linear viscoelastic model is discussed.

  6. Predicting the Maximum Dynamic Strength in Bench Press: The High Precision of the Bar Velocity Approach.

    PubMed

    Loturco, Irineu; Kobal, Ronaldo; Moraes, José E; Kitamura, Katia; Cal Abad, César C; Pereira, Lucas A; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2017-04-01

    Loturco, I, Kobal, R, Moraes, JE, Kitamura, K, Cal Abad, CC, Pereira, LA, and Nakamura, FY. Predicting the maximum dynamic strength in bench press: the high precision of the bar velocity approach. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1127-1131, 2017-The aim of this study was to determine the force-velocity relationship and test the possibility of determining the 1 repetition maximum (1RM) in "free weight" and Smith machine bench presses. Thirty-six male top-level athletes from 3 different sports were submitted to a standardized 1RM bench press assessment (free weight or Smith machine, in randomized order), following standard procedures encompassing lifts performed at 40-100% of 1RM. The mean propulsive velocity (MPV) was measured in all attempts. A linear regression was performed to establish the relationships between bar velocities and 1RM percentages. The actual and predicted 1RM for each exercise were compared using a paired t-test. Although the Smith machine 1RM was higher (10% difference) than the free weight 1RM, in both cases the actual and predicted values did not differ. In addition, the linear relationship between MPV and percentage of 1RM (coefficient of determination ≥95%) allow determination of training intensity based on the bar velocity. The linear relationships between the MPVs and the relative percentages of 1RM throughout the entire range of loads enable coaches to use the MPV to accurately monitor their athletes on a daily basis and accurately determine their actual 1RM without the need to perform standard maximum dynamic strength assessments.

  7. Spatial Dynamics of Gravel Bedload Transport Between a Pool-Exit Slope and the Head of a Point-Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, K.; Abt, S. R.

    2004-12-01

    Spatial dynamics of gravel transport in mountain streams are not well known. Results compiled from different streams suggest that the path of gravel transport in coarse-bedded streams with a meandering thalweg follows the path described for the coarsest bedload in sand-bedded meandering streams. From the thalweg in the pool exit slope, gravel moves laterally over the downstream riffle to reach the head of the next point bar. Gravel then proceeds across the bar towards the thalweg and into the pool. If proven correct, this finding has important implications for bedload sampling in partially wadable streams. Sampling could be limited to the bar head where equipment requiring wadable flows can be used, while still collecting the majority of gravel transported. To confirm the travel path between the pool exit and the head of the next bar, gravel transport was measured in a Colorado mountain stream in two cross-sections less than 10 m apart: one at a pool exit with the thalweg near the stream center and one at the bar head with the thalweg hugging the left bank. Six bedload traps were installed in each cross-section. The lateral location of maximum gravel transport differed greatly between the two cross-sections. In the pool exit, most of the transport occurred just to the right of the thalweg. In the bar cross-section, transport was absent in the left bank thalweg where flow was deepest and fastest but focused on the bankward side of the bar where flow was much shallower and slower, and with increasing flows the location of maximum gravel transport moved progressively further up the bar. Movement of tracer particles placed at several locations across the pool exit confirmed that most of the particles take a curved path and move onto the bar head and towards the bankward side of the bar. The bedload rating curve on the bar head was found to be better defined and steeper than the curve measured in the pool exit and the curves crossed at about half the measured maximum

  8. PDZ binding to the BAR domain of PICK1 is elucidated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi; Liwo, Adam; Weinstein, Harel; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2010-01-01

    A key regulator of AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid) receptor traffic, PICK1 is also known to interact with over 40 other proteins, including receptors, transporters, and ionic channels, and to be active mostly as a homodimer. The current lack of a complete PICK1 structure determined at atomic resolution hinders the elucidation of its functional mechanisms. Here, we identify interactions between the component PDZ and BAR domains of PICK1 by calculating possible binding sites for the PDZ domain of PICK1, PICK1-PDZ, to the homology-modeled crescent-shaped dimer of the PICK1-BAR domain using multiplexed replica-exchange molecular dynamics (MREMD) and canonical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the coarse-grained UNRES force field. The MREMD results show that the preferred binding site for the single PDZ domain is the concave cavity of the BAR dimer. A second possible binding site is near the N-terminus of the BAR domain that is linked directly to the PDZ domain. Subsequent short MD simulations, used to determine how the PICK1-PDZ domain moves to the preferred binding site on the BAR domain of PICK1, revealed that initial hydrophobic interactions drive the progress of the simulated binding. Thus, the concave face of the BAR dimer accommodates the PDZ domain first by weak hydrophobic interactions, and then the PDZ domain slides to the center of the concave face, where more favorable hydrophobic interactions take over. PMID:21050858

  9. Computer simulations of channel meandering and the formation of point bars: Linking channel dynamics to the preserved stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Covault, J. A.; Pyrcz, M.; Sullivan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Meandering rivers are probably one of the most recognizable geomorphic features on earth. As they meander across alluvial and delta plains, channels migrate laterally and develop point bars, splays, levees and other geomorphic and sedimentary features that compose substantial portions of the fill within many sedimentary basins. These basins can include hydrocarbon producing fields. Therefore, a good understanding of the processes of meandering channels and their associated deposits is critical for exploiting these reservoirs in the subsurface. In the past couple of decades, significant progress has been made in our understanding of the morphodynamics of channel meandering. Basic fluid dynamics and sediment transport (Ikeda and Parker, 1981; Howard, 1992) has shown that many characteristic features of meandering rivers, such as the meandering wavelength, growth rate and downstream migration rate, can be predicted quantitatively. As a result, a number of variations and improvement of the theory have emerged (e.g., Blondeaux and Seminara, 1985; Parker and Andrews, 1985, 1986; and Sun et al., 2001a, b).The main improvements include the recognition of so called "bar-bend" interactions, where the development of bars on the channel bed and their interactions with the channel bend is recognized as a primary cause for meandering channels to develop greater complexity than the classic goose-neck meander bend shapes, such as compound bend. Recently, Sun and others have shown that the spatial patterns of width variations in meandering channels can be explained by an extrinsic periodic flow variations coupled with the intrinsic bend instability dynamics. In contrast to the significant improvement of our understanding of channel meandering, little work has been done to link the geomorphic features of meandering channels to the geometry and heterogeneity of the deposits they form and ultimately preserves. A computer simulation model based on the work of Sun and others (1996, 2001

  10. A localized cathode glow in the presence of a bar magnet and its associated nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Pankaj Kumar; Samanta, Subha; Saha, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Sabuj; Janaki, M. S.; Iyengar, A. N. Sekar

    2017-08-01

    A localized glowing, fireball like structure, appears near the cathode surface of a glow discharge plasma device when it is subjected to a magnetic dipole field produced by a bar magnet placed outside the plasma chamber. It is seen that the plasma density in the localized glow region and the luminous intensity of this structure increases with the increase in the magnetic field strength. The effect of such localized glow region on the plasma floating potential fluctuation dynamics is investigated. Floating potential fluctuations show that the emergence of such localized structure leads the system towards nonlinear dynamical regimes. Increasing the magnetic field strength reveals a transition from order to chaos via period doubling bifurcation. This transition is analyzed by using bifurcation diagram, phase space plots, power spectrum plots, Hilbert Huang transform, and by estimating the largest Lyapunov exponent. The interaction of plasma with a dipole magnetic field produces a non-monotonic potential structure in the vicinity of the cathode surface. Thus, to understand the dynamical origin of such complex oscillations, we have carried out a numerical modelling for ion dynamics by considering trapping of ions inside the potential structure. Numerical results show the existence of period doubling route to chaos.

  11. Nonaxisymmetric Dynamic Instabilities of Rotating Polytropes. II. Torques, Bars, and Mode Saturation with Applications to Protostars and Fizzlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, James N.; Durisen, Richard H.; Pickett, Brian K.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic nonaxisymmetric instabilities in rapidly rotating stars and protostars have a range of potential applications in astrophysics, including implications for binary formation during protostellar cloud collapse and for the possibility of aborted collapse to neutron star densities at late stages of stellar evolution (``fizzlers''). We have recently presented detailed linear analyses for polytropes of the most dynamically unstable global modes, the barlike modes. These produce bar distortions in the regions near the rotation axis but have trailing spiral arms toward the equator. In this paper, we use our linear eigenfunctions to predict the early nonlinear behavior of the dynamic instability and compare these ``quasi-linear'' predictions with several fully nonlinear hydrodynamics simulations. The comparisons demonstrate that the nonlinear saturation of the barlike instability is due to the self-interaction gravitational torques between the growing central bar and the spiral arms, where angular momentum is transferred outward from bar to arms. We also find a previously unsuspected resonance condition that accurately predicts the mass of the bar regions in our own simulations and in those published by other researchers. The quasi-linear theory makes other accurate predictions about consequences of instability, including properties of possible end-state bars and increases in central density, which can be large under some conditions. We discuss in some detail the application of our results to binary formation during protostellar collapse and to the formation of massive rotating black holes.

  12. Investigating the Use of a Dynamic Physical Bar Chart for Data Exploration and Presentation.

    PubMed

    Taher, Faisal; Jansen, Yvonne; Woodruff, Jonathan; Hardy, John; Hornbaek, Kasper; Alexander, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Physical data representations, or data physicalizations, are a promising new medium to represent and communicate data. Previous work mostly studied passive physicalizations which require humans to perform all interactions manually. Dynamic shape-changing displays address this limitation and facilitate data exploration tasks such as sorting, navigating in data sets which exceed the fixed size of a given physical display, or preparing "views" to communicate insights about data. However, it is currently unclear how people approach and interact with such data representations. We ran an exploratory study to investigate how non-experts made use of a dynamic physical bar chart for an open-ended data exploration and presentation task. We asked 16 participants to explore a data set on European values and to prepare a short presentation of their insights using a physical display. We analyze: (1) users' body movements to understand how they approach and react to the physicalization, (2) their hand-gestures to understand how they interact with physical data, (3) system interactions to understand which subsets of the data they explored and which features they used in the process, and (4) strategies used to explore the data and present observations. We discuss the implications of our findings for the use of dynamic data physicalizations and avenues for future work.

  13. BaLROG: The Influence of Bars on the Dynamical Structure in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, M. K.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Martínez-Valpuesta, I.; Díaz-García, S.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Knapen, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    Using the BaLROG (Bars in Low Redshift Optical Galaxies) sample of 16 morphologically distinct barred spirals, we constrain the influence of bars on nearby galaxies observationally. Our sample appears small compared to ongoing IFU surveys, but offers a tenfold sharper spatial resolution (˜100 pc) as each galaxy is a mosaic of several pointings observed with the IFU spectrograph SAURON. We demonstrate a correlation between the bar strength Qb determined from classical torque analysis using 3.6 μm Spitzer (S4G) images, with Qkin, a kinematic torque, calculated via our new method based solely on the kinematics. Using a large number of N-body simulations, we verify this correlation and the measurement of Qb. We also determine bar strengths from ionized gas kinematics and find that they are ˜2.5 larger than those measured from stellar kinematics. Further, inner kinematic features related to bars as predicted by simulations seem to be stronger for stronger bars. We find a stellar angular momentum dip at 0.2±0.1 bar lengths. In these central regions, about half of our sample also exhibits an anti-correlation of h3 - stellar velocity (v/σ). An increased flattening of the stellar σ gradient with increasing bar strength supports the notion of bar-induced orbit mixing. Our results constrain the spatial scales and magnitude of a kinematic influence of bar-driven secular evolution in present day galaxies.

  14. Exploring pre-channelization bar and planform dynamics of a large regulated Alpine River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Simone; Zolezzi, Guido; Scorpio, Vittoria; Mastronunzio, Marco; Bertoldi, Walter; Comiti, Francesco; Daiprà, Elena

    2017-04-01

    As a consequence of heavy channelization mostly carried out in the 1800s, the planform and bars morphodynamics of many large European rivers is hardly detectable even from aerial images dating back several decades, because of the marked reduction of the channel width and of the related morphological complexity. However, when available, historical maps can provide quantitative information on the morphology that characterized these rivers before massive human intervention occurred. In this work we focus on a 100 km reach of the Adige - Etsch River, NE, Italy, with the aim of exploring the short-term (some decades) morphological dynamics that might have characterized the pre-channelized river bed and planform in its single-thread reaches before heavy human intervention. To this aim we integrate the application of a morphodynamic analytical model for meandering rivers with irregularly varying curvature and channel width with the multi-temporal analysis of pre-channelization historical maps. The work focuses on the sinuous and meandering reaches once characterized by spatially varying channel width, and presence of alternate, point and mid-channel bars. Challenges in such kind of integrated analysis are posed by the reconstruction of channel - forming streamflow values and of sediment size that may have characterized the river reaches up to nearly three centuries ago prior to heavy regulation. Formative discharge ranges have been obtained as those generating the best geometrical fit between the modeled river bed morphology and the one observed from the maps. Once calibrated by this procedure, the model was fed through the estimated discharge value to compute the longitudinal variability of the outer-bank shear stress, as a proxy for the locations potentially affected by fluvial bank erosion. The historical maps reveal that during the 17th and 18th century, before the massive channelization, the river morphodynamics was already far from being "natural", especially

  15. The Response of Soil to Impulse Loads Using the Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    d’Alembert, and may be given as (Timoshenko and Goodier , 1970); U - f( x - Cot) + g( x + Cot) , (2.13) where f and g are arbitrary functions, with f...density relationship was determined by the Harvard miniature compaction procedure using three layers with 25, 40 pound tamps per layer. An x - ray ...0 z z** z $ 4 c% - n 0 %. q LO m m (n . 6 " 0 )t $4. 0 *. EO Vj 0) u U x x x oc o-dc o - t 0-601 Oo:~ 0-ol 0.& 0- WdW N I SS381.S 6. DISCUSSION OF

  16. The CRREL (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory) Hopkinson Bar Apparatus.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    of the strain gauge bridge were usd L,, produCe simulated strain. The details of the instrumentation are g Iven i:n AppcndL:-z B. ; 4AVE F 0 M A NA...DUTTA ET AL DEC 97 CRREL-SR-8-24 F/ G 11/7 UEEEEEEEshIhi EOEONEh-E EL’.’ J1. -_0 111112.2 1.1 - 1I8 1=111111L MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART pe S% F...and installing the test facility and for reviewing the report. They thank Darryl Calkins , Dr. Ronald Liston, and Dr. Eugene Marvin for their

  17. Numerical simulations of wave propagation in long bars with application to Kolsky bar testing

    SciTech Connect

    Corona, Edmundo

    2014-11-01

    Material testing using the Kolsky bar, or split Hopkinson bar, technique has proven instrumental to conduct measurements of material behavior at strain rates in the order of 103 s-1. Test design and data reduction, however, remain empirical endeavors based on the experimentalist's experience. Issues such as wave propagation across discontinuities, the effect of the deformation of the bar surfaces in contact with the specimen, the effect of geometric features in tensile specimens (dog-bone shape), wave dispersion in the bars and other particulars are generally treated using simplified models. The work presented here was conducted in Q3 and Q4 of FY14. The objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of numerical simulations of Kolsky bar tests, which was done successfully.

  18. Interactions between bar dynamics and herbaceous vegetation in gravel bed rivers: numerical simulations using BASEMENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siviglia, Annunziato; Tettamanti, Stefano; Bertoldi, Walter; Toffolon, Marco; Vetsch, David; Francalanci, Simona

    2014-05-01

    A new 2D morphodynamic model for gravel bed rivers have been used to investigate the interaction between alternate bar dynamics and herbaceous vegetation. In particular, bed topography evolution has been coupled with the growth of vegetation, included as a function of the access to ground water. Numerical simulations were performed using the code BASEMENT (Vetsch et al., 2013), with the addition of a new submodel, dealing with the numerical description of the vegetation. The vegetation was allowed to grow during the dry season on exposed areas, and the vertical distribution of peak biomass was modeled as a function of the bed elevation, using a simple analytical formulation, following Marani et al. (2013). Flow resistance was divided into a component exerted by the bed and a component exerted by vegetation (Crosato and Saleh, 2010; Li and Millar, 2011); in this way we reproduced both the decrease in bed shear stress, reducing the sediment transport capacity of the flow within the plants, and the increase in hydraulic resistance, reducing flow velocity. The model was applied to a hypothetical case study, with grain size, longitudinal slope, and hydrological regime similar to that of the Magra River (Italy). A straight river reach, 125 m wide and 20 km long was simulated. Starting from an initially flat configuration, the river developed its own bar morphology, under steady formative conditions. After reaching a dynamic equilibrium, we allowed the vegetation to grow and interact with the morphodynamic evolution, reproducing a sequence of floods and growing seasons at low flow. We assumed that vegetation can be uprooted only if the bed shear stress exceeds a fixed threshold. Different scenarios were examined, varying the effect of vegetation in terms of increased resistance and threshold for uprooting (i.e. added sediment cohesion). Preliminary results confirmed that the herbaceous vegetation has a stabilizing effect on river morphology. As the density and strength of

  19. Dynamic crystal rotation resolved by high-speed synchrotron X-ray Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J. W.; E, J. C.; Huang, J. Y.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-03-30

    Dynamic compression experiments are performed on single-crystal Si under split Hopkinson pressure bar loading, together with simultaneous high-speed (250–350 ns resolution) synchrotron X-ray Laue diffraction and phase-contrast imaging. A methodology is presented which determines crystal rotation parameters,i.e.instantaneous rotation axes and angles, from two unindexed Laue diffraction spots. Two-dimensional translation is obtained from dynamic imaging by a single camera. High-speed motion of crystals, including translation and rotation, can be tracked in real timeviasimultaneous imaging and diffraction.

  20. Dynamic crystal rotation resolved by high-speed synchrotron X-ray Laue diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J. W.; E, J. C.; Huang, J. Y.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic compression experiments are performed on single-crystal Si under split Hopkinson pressure bar loading, together with simultaneous high-speed (250–350 ns resolution) synchrotron X-ray Laue diffraction and phase-contrast imaging. A methodology is presented which determines crystal rotation parameters, i.e. instantaneous rotation axes and angles, from two unindexed Laue diffraction spots. Two-dimensional translation is obtained from dynamic imaging by a single camera. High-speed motion of crystals, including translation and rotation, can be tracked in real time via simultaneous imaging and diffraction. PMID:27140150

  1. Dynamical Influence of Bars on the Star Formation in Isolated Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verley, S.; Combes, F.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Bergond, G.; Leon, S.

    2008-10-01

    Star formation depends strongly on both the local environment of galaxies and the internal dynamics of the interstellar medium. To disentangle the two effects, we obtained, in the framework of the AMIGA project (Verdes-Montenegro et al. 2005; Sulentic et al. 2006; Lisenfeld et al. 2007; Verlay et al. 2007a,b,c), Hα and Gunn r photometric data for more than 200 spiral galaxies lying in very low-density regions of the local Universe. We characterize the Hα emission, tracing current star formation, of the 45 largest and least inclined galaxies observed for which we estimate the torques between the gas and the bulk of the optical matter. We subsequently study the Hα morphological aspect of these isolated spiral galaxies. Using Fourier analysis, we focus on the modes of the spiral arms and also on the strength of the bars, computing the torques between the gas and newly formed stars (Hα), and the bulk of the optical matter (Gunn r).

  2. Dynamic characterization and modeling of potting materials for electronics assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vasant S.; Lee, Gilbert F.; Santiago, Jaime R.

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of survivability of encapsulated electronic components subject to impact relies on accurate modeling, which in turn needs both static and dynamic characterization of individual electronic components and encapsulation material to generate reliable material parameters for a robust material model. Current focus is on potting materials to mitigate high rate loading on impact. In this effort, difficulty arises in capturing one of the critical features characteristic of the loading environment in a high velocity impact: multiple loading events coupled with multi-axial stress states. Hence, potting materials need to be characterized well to understand its damping capacity at different frequencies and strain rates. An encapsulation scheme to protect electronic boards consists of multiple layers of filled as well as unfilled polymeric materials like Sylgard 184 and Trigger bond Epoxy # 20-3001. A combination of experiments conducted for characterization of materials used Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB), and dynamic material analyzer (DMA). For material which behaves in an ideal manner, a master curve can be fitted to Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model. To verify the applicability of WLF model, a new temperature-time shift (TTS) macro was written to compare idealized temperature shift factor with experimental incremental shift factor. Deviations can be readily observed by comparison of experimental data with the model fit to determine if model parameters reflect the actual material behavior. Similarly, another macro written for obtaining Ogden model parameter from Hopkinson Bar tests can readily indicate deviations from experimental high strain rate data. Experimental results for different materials used for mitigating impact, and ways to combine data from DMA and Hopkinson bar together with modeling refinements are presented.

  3. The Dynamics of Molecular Clouds in the Galactic Bar Region on the Near-Side of the CMZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolls, Volker; Smith, Howard Alan; HIGGS Team

    2017-01-01

    The inner Galaxy, the area inside the 3-kpc arms, can be divided into two main regions, the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ; Morris and Serabyn 1996) and the Galactic Bar region. Gas and dust moves from the end points of the Galactic Bar on dust lanes towards the CMZ, where it merges with the gas and dust forming a 100-pc molecular ring or stream around the central black hole. The stream of gas and dust on the dust lanes is not continuous, but fragmented into irregularly separated clumps of varying sizes and clustering. On the near side of the CMZ the most prominent cloud clusters are the l=1.6o complex, Clump 2, and the molecular clouds around l=5.5o. We are analyzing Herschel, MOPRA, APEx, and other archival observations in order a) to identify molecular clouds that are part of the gas and dust stream in the Galactic Bar region near the CMZ, b) to determine the dynamics of the Galactic Bar clouds, and c) to derive a gas and dust mass flow rate to the CMZ. This poster will present our initial results.

  4. Spatio-temporal Oxygen Dynamics in Gravel Bars under Varying Hydrological Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, T.; Vieweg, M.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    Morphological features in streams and rivers are increasingly recognized as distinct hotspots for biogeochemical reactivity. Still, we lack a clear picture of the complex spatio-temporal interplay between hydrological and biological controls of these highly reactive zones. Here, the spatio-temporal distribution of oxygen is of particular interest: as indicator for aerobic zonation as well as potential proxy for aerobic respiration. Recent advances in optical sensor development enable automated, high-resolution vertical oxygen profiling in situ which we combined with monitoring of pressure, temperature and the natural electric conductivity (EC) signal. The latter can be used to derive transient travel times in the HZ to characterize hydrologic variability (Vieweg et. al, 2016). We specifically investigated the influence of anthropogenic hydropeaks.Our aim was to (1) characterize spatio-temporal oxygen dynamics, (2) identify discrete zones of biogeochemical reactivity and (3) evaluate the effect of hydrologic variability on reactivity rates. Preliminary results from an ongoing experiment in a 3rd order stream indicate a heterogeneous oxygen distribution in the hyporheic zone of a gravel bar. We observed the formation of a distinct aerobic/anaerobic zonation that exhibited variability and shifts at the hourly and cm scale. The extent of the anaerobic zone increased with rising water levels induced by distinct hydropeaking events. Vieweg M., Kurz M.J., Trauth N., Fleckenstein J.H., Musolff A. & Schmidt C. (2016): Estimating time-variable aerobic respiration rates in the streambed by combining electrical conductivity and dissolved oxygen time-series. Journal of Geophysical Research Biogeosciences. doi:10.1002/2016JG003345

  5. Effect of stationary and dynamic transverse squared bars over the turbulent behavior in a channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez Pastran, Jesus; Duque-Daza, Carlos; Lopez, Omar D.

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent flows over rough surfaces are present in different industrial scenarios. Generally, roughness is used to modify the boundary layer behavior, in order to improve heat transfer rates and mixing processes, which is usually accompanied by an increase of skin-friction drag. In the present work two different techniques for modification of the turbulent boundary layer were explored: first, the use of an arrangement of transverse squared bars (synthetic roughness); second, the use of an oscillating movement of the squared bars. In both cases the goal was to assess the increase or decrease of the skin-friction drag and the changes in the turbulent behavior of the flow. Large Eddy Simulations were carried out in order to study a fully developed turbulent channel flow with a smooth upper wall and a synthetically roughed lower wall with a friction Reynolds number around 180. Channel flow over walls with stationary bars and with one of the bars oscillating in the spanwise direction were also considered. Consistency between skin-friction coefficient modification and evolution of Q-structures was observed. Finally, a comparison of changes on some of the TKE terms between smooth surfaces and synthetically rough surfaces allowed to identify the effect of the squared bars for each case.

  6. Quenching of the Hopkinson maximum under contamination in the system Gd(0001)/W(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, F.H. ); Mirabal-Garcia, M. )

    1990-05-15

    The anomalous Hopkinson maximum is observed in Gd(0001) thin films at 289{plus minus}1 K. This value lies about 3 K below the bulk Curie temperature. The incoherent rotations of the magnetization, which may cause the Hopkinson effect, are quenched by the contamination of the samples. The signal attenuation at 289 K after contaminating a film 80 nm thick is found to be {ital A}{sub {ital V}}{approx}{minus}15.4 dB. In our observations, the sharpness of the maximum seems to be in itself a good monitor of the cleanliness of the Gd films.

  7. Dynamics of stars around spiral arms in an N-body/SPH simulated barred spiral galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, Robert J. J.; Kawata, Daisuke; Cropper, Mark

    2012-10-01

    We run N-body smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of a Milky Way-sized galaxy. The code takes into account hydrodynamics, self-gravity, star formation, supernova and stellar wind feedback, radiative cooling and metal enrichment. The simulated galaxy is a barred spiral galaxy consisting of a stellar and gas disc, enveloped in a static dark matter halo. Similar to what is found in our pure N-body simulation of a non-barred galaxy in Grand et al., we find that the spiral arms are transient features whose pattern speeds decrease with radius, in such a way that the pattern speed is similar to the rotation of star particles. Compared to the non-barred case, we find that the spiral arm pattern speed is slightly faster than the rotation speed of star particles: the bar appears to boost the pattern speed ahead of the rotational velocity. We trace particle motion around the spiral arms at different radii, and demonstrate that there are star particles that are drawn towards and join the arm from behind (in front of) the arm and migrate towards the outer (inner) regions of the disc until the arm disappears as a result of their transient nature. We see this migration over the entire radial range analysed, which is a consequence of the spiral arm rotating at similar speeds to star particles at all radii, which is inconsistent with the prediction of classical density wave theory. The bar does not prevent this systematic radial migration, which is shown to largely preserve circular orbits. We also demonstrate that there is no significant offset of different star-forming tracers across the spiral arm, which is also inconsistent with the prediction of classical density wave theory.

  8. Hydrodynamical simulations of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 1300. Dynamical interpretation of observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindblad, P. A. B.; Kristen, H.

    1996-09-01

    We perform two-dimensional time dependent hydrodynamical simulations of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 1300. The input potential is divided into an axisymmetric part mainly derived from the observed rotation curve, and a perturbing part obtained from near infrared surface photometry of the bar and spiral structure. Self-gravitation of the gas is not taken into account in our modeling. A pure bar perturbed model is unable to reproduce the observations. It was found necessary to add a weak spiral potential to the perturbation, thus suggesting the presence of massive spiral arms in NGC 1300. We find two models, differing mainly in pattern speed, which are able to reproduce the essentials of NGC 1300. The high pattern speed model has {OMEGA}_p_=20km/s/kpc, corresponding to a corotation radius at R_CR_~104"=1.3R_bar_. Furthermore, the adopted rotation curve for this model supports one ILR at R_ILR_~26" and an OLR at R_OLR_~188". The low pattern speed model has {OMEGA}_p_=12km/s/kpc, corresponding to a corotation radius at R_ CR_~190"=2.4R_bar_. The adopted rotation curve for this model, which differs from the fast pattern speed model, supports one ILR at R_ILR_~25" and an OLR at R_OLR_~305". Morphological features, like spiral arms and offset dust lanes, are basically reproduced by both models. They are driven by orbit crowding effects across various resonances, leading to density enhancements. The general velocity structure, as described by HI data and optical long slit measurements, is fairly consistent with the model velocities.

  9. Optimizing purification process of MIM-I-BAR domain by introducing atomic force microscope and dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Lou, Zhichao; Lin, Xubo; Wang, Qiwei; Cao, Meng; Gu, Ning

    2017-09-01

    MIM (missing in metastasis) is a member of I-BAR (inverse BAR) domain protein family, which functions as a putative metastasis suppressor. However, methods of gaining high purity MIM-I-BAR protein are barely reported. Here, by optimizing the purification process including changing the conditions of cell lysate and protein elution, we successfully purified MIM protein. The purity of the obtained protein was up to ∼90%. High-resolution atomic force microscope (AFM) provides more visual images, ensuring that we can observe the microenvironment around the target protein, as well as the conformations of the purification products following each purification process. MIM protein with two different sizes were observed on mica surface with AFM. Combining with molecular dynamics simulations, these molecules were revealed as MIM monomer and dimer. Furthermore, our study attaches importance to the usage of imidazole with suitable concentrations during the affinity chromatography process, as well as the removal of excessive imidazole after the affinity chromatography process. All these results indicate that the method described here was successful in purifying MIM protein and maintaining their natural properties, and is supposed to be used to purify other proteins with low solubility. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. The influence of the rotary inertia on the dynamic behavior of viscoelastic non-cylindrical helicoidal bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermiş, Merve; Eratlı, Nihal; Omurtag, Mehmet H.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the rotary inertia on the dynamic behavior of linear viscoelastic non-cylindrical helicoidal bars due to variation of the active turns. Dynamic analysis is performed in the Laplace space by using the mixed finite element method. The standard model is used for defining the viscoelastic material behavior and by using the correspondence principle, the material constants are replaced with their complex counterparts in the Laplace space. The solution under the rectangular impulsive type loading is carried out in the Laplace space and then the results are transformed back to time domain numerically by the Modified Durbin's transformation algorithm. Some original numerical results for the dynamic behavior of linear viscoelastic non-cylindrical helices with rectangular cross-section are presented.

  11. Experimental and numerical analysis of the dynamic behaviour in tension of an armour steel for applications in defence industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Ezio; Dotta, Matteo; Forni, Daniele; Riganti, Gianmario; Kaufmann, Hanspeter

    2015-09-01

    The dynamic behaviour of armour steel in tension was investigated over a wide range of strain-rates on round specimens. The experiments were carried out by means of a Split Hopkinson Tensile Bar device and by a Hydro Pneumatic Machine. The target strain rate were set at the following six levels: 10-3, 5, 25, 100, 500 and 1000 s-1. Two material models were calibrated and used to replicate the experiments and to simulate blasting event on steel plate. Finally, the two responses are compared.

  12. Dynamical behavior of octahedrite from the Henbury meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Gray, G.T. III; Remo, J.L.

    1993-08-01

    A suite of dynamic property measurements and characterization studies on an iron-nickel single crystal from the Henbury octahedrite containing Widmanstaetten intergrowths of kamacite and taenite (initial density 7.810) has been performed. These measurements include six impact tests (wave profile compression/release) over the stress range 2-20 GPa, metallography, quasi-static and Hopkinson bar mechanical testing, and ultrasonic mapping and sound velocity measurements. A cryogenic impact test was included to evaluate effects of a brittle/ductile transition which has been reported at 200K. Temperature sensitivity of the dynamic behavior was measured at high and low strain rates. The impact test results show loading strength (HEL), Hugoniot and {alpha} {yields} {var_epsilon} transition signatures to be similar to those for Armco iron, and do not show evidence for a ductile-brittle transition at these extremely high strain rates. Metallographic analyses, quasi-static and Hopkinson bar testing suggest that the material is in a work-hardened state and that kamacite properties dominate the bulk octahedrite properties.

  13. Characterisation of dynamic behaviour of alumina ceramics: evaluation of stress uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyong; Li, Peifeng

    2015-10-01

    Accurate characterisation of dynamic behaviour of ceramics requires the reliable split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique and the condition of uniaxial homogeneous specimen deformation. In this study, an experimentally validated 3D finite element model of the full scale SHPB experiment was developed to quantitatively evaluate the wave propagation in the bars and the stress distribution/evolution in the alumina specimen. Wave signals in both the SHPB experiments and the finite element model were analysed to characterise the dynamic behaviour of alumina. It was found that the equilibrium of both stresses within the specimen and forces at the specimen ends can be established in the intermediate stage of deformation. The validity of stress uniformity in the alumina specimen supports the assumption of uniaxial homogeneous specimen deformation in the SHPB and validates the characterisation of dynamic behaviour of alumina ceramics.

  14. Fluvial bar dynamics in large meandering rivers with different sediment supply in the Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monegaglia, Federico; Zolezzi, Guido; Tubino, Marco; Henshaw, Alex

    2017-04-01

    Sediments in the large meandering rivers of the Amazon basin are known to be supplied by sources providing highly different magnitudes of sediment input and storage, ranging from the sediment-rich Andean region to the sediment-poor Central Trough. Recent observations have highlighted how such differences in sediment supply have an important, net effect on the rates of planform activity of meandering rivers in the basin, in terms of meander migration and frequency of cutoffs. In this work we quantify and discuss the effect of sediment supply on the organization of macroscale sediment bedforms on several large meandering rivers in the Amazon basin, and we link our findings with those regarding the rates of planform activity. Our analysis is conducted through the newly developed software PyRIS, which enables us to perform extensive multitemporal analysis of river morphodynamics from multispectral remotely sensed Landsat imagery in a fully automated fashion. We show that large rivers with low sediment supply tend to develop alternate bars that consistently migrate through long reaches, characterized at the same time by limited planform development. On the contrary, high sediment supply is associated with the development of point bars that are well-attached to the evolving meander bends and that follow temporal oscillations around the bend apexes, which in turn show rapid evlution towards complex meander shapes. Finally, rivers with intermediate rates of sediment supply develop rather steady point bars associated with slowly migrating, regular meanders. We finally discuss the results of the image analysis in the light of the properties of river planform metrics (like channel curvature and width) for the examined classes of river reaches with different sediment supply rates.

  15. Dynamics of Braided Channels, Bars, and Associated Deposits Under Experimental Density Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, A. B. S.; Jean-Louis, G.; Paola, C.

    2015-12-01

    Turbidity currents are the principal agents that transfer clastic sediment from continental margins to the deep ocean. The extensive sedimentary deposits that result can record influences from fluvial transport, ocean currents, and seafloor bathymetry; decoding these controls is key to understanding long-term continental denudation and the formation of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Experimental turbidity currents often use pre-formed, single-thread channels, but more recent experiments and seafloor observations suggest that braided channels also develop in submarine environments. Yet controls on the formation of submarine braided channels and relationships between these channels and stratigraphic evolution remain largely untested. We have conducted a series of experiments to determine the conditions conducive to forming braided submarine channels, and to relate channel geometry and kinematics to deposit architecture. Dissolved salt supplies the excess density of the experimental turbidity currents, which transport plastic, sand-sized sediment as bedload across a test section two meters long and one meter wide. Our experiments indicate that braided channels can form as constructional features without prior erosion for a range of input water and sediment fluxes. Channel migration, avulsion, and aggradation construct sedimentary deposits with bars at a variety of scales. Bar geometry and channel kinematics are qualitatively similar under subaerial and subaqueous experiments with other parameters fixed. We will present quantitative analyses of the relationships between channel geometry and mobility and deposit architecture, at scales from individual bars to the entire deposit, and compare these results to control experiments with subaerial braiding. These experimental results suggest parallels between subaerial and subaqueous braiding, and help to constrain forward models for stratigraphic evolution and inverse methods for estimating flow conditions from turbidites.

  16. Multiple bars and secular evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Juntai

    2015-03-01

    Bars are the most important driver of secular evolution. A significant fraction of barred galaxies also harbor small secondary bars. Secondary bars are visible even in near-infrared images, so they are not just dusty and blue, but stellar features (Erwin & Sparke 2002). Since they are quite common, secondary bars are probably long-lived stellar features. The random relative orientation of the two bars indicates that they are dynamically decoupled with different pattern speeds (Buta & Crocker 1993). Corsini et al. (2003) presented conclusive direct kinematic evidence for a decoupled secondary bar in NGC 2950. Dynamically decoupled secondary bars have long been hypothesized to be a mechanism to drive gas past the ILR of primary bars to feed active galactic nuclei (Shlosman et al. 1989). However, the dynamics of secondary bars are still not well understood, and it is still unclear what role secondary bars play in the AGN fueling process. Numerical simulations offer the best approach to understanding double-barred systems. Decoupled secondary bar in the earlier gaseous simulations only last a short time (< 1 Gyr, e.g. Friedli & Martinet 1993). Orbital studies of double-barred systems discovered a family of loop orbits that may be building blocks of long-lived nuclear stellar bars (Maciejewski & Sparke 1997, 2000). To complement orbital studies, which are not fully self-consistent, N-body simulations are preferred to further our understanding of double-barred systems. Debattista & Shen (2007) and Shen & Debattista (2009) managed to form long-lived double-barred systems with purely collisionless simulations, where a pre-existing rotating pseudo-bulge is introduced initially. The shape and size of secondary bars in the models are comparable to observed ones. They found that the rotation of the two bars is not rigid. The amplitude and pattern speed of the secondary bars oscillate as they rotate through their primary counterparts. Although the secondary bar rotates faster

  17. The fate of Salicaceae seedlings related to the dynamics of alluvial bars during floods: differentiating bed erosion, uprooting and burying.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintenberger, C. L.; Rodrigues, S.; Bréhéret, J. G.; Juge, P.; Villar, M.

    2014-12-01

    Riparian vegetation is a key factor of the morphological evolution of river. In Europe, riparian Salicaceae is declining following the loss of potential recruitment areas associated with river management. As an exception for lowland rivers, the Loire River (France) shows, in its middle reaches, an efficient sexual regeneration of Populus nigra and Salix alba on bare sediments deposited during flood events. In the literature, the influence of hydrological patterns as a key factor of the seedlings survival is well documented. Some studies focused on seedlings ability to withstand flood constraints and detailed the effect of duration and intensity of floods but few studies characterized precisely the processes applied on seedlings. As a working hypothesis, we consider that three types of flood stresses can induce mortality of seedlings: (i) uprooting by drag applied on the seedlings without sediment erosion, (ii) erosion of the recruited areas and (iii) burying. The distinction of these three processes allows identifying the importance of survival factors due to a strong sediment dynamics (e.g. erosion height > root height) or to the anchorage and resprouting ability. The main issues are: what are the governing processes (type and intensity) determining survival or death of seedlings and which factor (fluvial dynamics vs. own characteristics of seedlings) controls their survival? In-situ measurements were performed on a forced alluvial bar (20.000 m2) to detail the bar dynamics (bathymetry, topography, scour/fill processes, grain size surveys, flow velocity) and to survey the associated recruitment. On 48 plots (1.410 m2) the density, height and species (P. nigra and S. alba) were surveyed the year of recruitment (after dry period) and the next year after flood period. We highlight the following phases of processes during floods. The erosion of substrate dominates at the beginning of the rising limb. The erosion or uprooting processes depend of the balance between

  18. Finite Element Simulations to Explore Assumptions in Kolsky Bar Experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Justin

    2015-08-05

    The chief purpose of this project has been to develop a set of finite element models that attempt to explore some of the assumptions in the experimental set-up and data reduction of the Kolsky bar experiment. In brief, the Kolsky bar, sometimes referred to as the split Hopkinson pressure bar, is an experimental apparatus used to study the mechanical properties of materials at high strain rates. Kolsky bars can be constructed to conduct experiments in tension or compression, both of which are studied in this paper. The basic operation of the tension Kolsky bar is as follows: compressed air is inserted into the barrel that contains the striker; the striker accelerates towards the left and strikes the left end of the barrel producing a tensile stress wave that propogates first through the barrel and then down the incident bar, into the specimen, and finally the transmission bar. In the compression case, the striker instead travels to the right and impacts the incident bar directly. As the stress wave travels through an interface (e.g., the incident bar to specimen connection), a portion of the pulse is transmitted and the rest reflected. The incident pulse, as well as the transmitted and reflected pulses are picked up by two strain gauges installed on the incident and transmitted bars as shown. By interpreting the data acquired by these strain gauges, the stress/strain behavior of the specimen can be determined.

  19. Andromeda chained to the box - dynamical models for M31: bulge and bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaña Díaz, Matias; Wegg, Christopher; Gerhard, Ortwin; Erwin, Peter; Portail, Matthieu; Opitsch, Michael; Saglia, Roberto; Bender, Ralf

    2017-04-01

    Andromeda is our nearest neighbouring disc galaxy and a prime target for detailed modelling of the evolutionary processes that shape galaxies. We analyse the nature of M31's triaxial bulge with an extensive set of N-body models, which include box/peanut (B/P) bulges as well as initial classical bulges (ICBs). Comparing with Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 3.6 μm data, only one model matches simultaneously all the morphological properties of M31's bulge, and requires an ICB and a B/P bulge with 1/3 and 2/3 of the total bulge mass, respectively. We find that our pure B/P bulge models do not show concentrations high enough to match the Sérsic index (n) and the effective radius of M31's bulge. Instead, the best model requires an ICB component with mass MICB = 1.1 × 1010 M⊙ and 3D half-mass radius rhalfICB = 0.53 kpc (140 arcsec). The B/P bulge component has a mass of MB/P = 2.2 × 1010 M⊙ and a half-mass radius of rhalfB/P = 1.3 kpc (340 arcsec). The model's B/P bulge extends to rB/P = 3.2 kpc (840 arcsec) in the plane of the disc as does M31's bulge. In this composite bulge model, the ICB component explains the velocity dispersion drop observed in the centre within R < 190 pc (50 arcsec), while the B/P bulge component reproduces the observed rapid rotation and the kinematic twist of the observed zero velocity line. This model's pattern speed is Ωp = 38 km s-1 kpc-1, placing corotation at rcor = 5.8 kpc (1500 arcsec). The outer Lindblad resonance (OLR) is then at rOLR = 10.4 kpc, near the 10 kpc ring of M31, suggesting that this structure may be related to the bar's OLR. By comparison with an earlier snapshot, we estimate that M31's thin bar extends to rbarthin ˜ 4.0 kpc (1000 arcsec) in the disc plane, and in projection extends to Rbarthin ˜ 2.3 kpc (600 arcsec).

  20. Towards the prediction of multiple necking during dynamic extension of round bar : linear stability approach versus finite element calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Maï, S.; Mercier, S.; Petit, J.; Molinari, A.

    2014-05-01

    The fragmentation of structures subject to dynamic conditions is a matter of interest for civil industries as well as for Defence institutions. Dynamic expansions of structures, such as cylinders or rings, have been performed to obtain crucial information on fragment distributions. Many authors have proposed to capture by FEA the experimental distribution of fragment size by introducing in the FE model a perturbation. Stability and bifurcation analyses have also been proposed to describe the evolution of the perturbation growth rate. In the proposed contribution, the multiple necking of a round bar in dynamic tensile loading is analysed by the FE method. A perturbation on the initial flow stress is introduced in the numerical model to trigger instabilities. The onset time and the dominant mode of necking have been characterized precisely and showed power law evolutions, with the loading velocities and moderately with the amplitudes and the cell sizes of the perturbations. In the second part of the paper, the development of linear stability analysis and the use of salient criteria in terms of the growth rate of perturbations enabled comparisons with the numerical results. A good correlation in terms of onset time of instabilities and of number of necks is shown.

  1. Orbital and escape dynamics in barred galaxies - II. The 3D system: exploring the role of the normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Christof; Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    2016-12-01

    A three degrees of freedom (3-dof) barred galaxy model composed of a spherically symmetric nucleus, a bar, a flat disc and a spherically symmetric dark matter halo is used for investigating the dynamics of the system. We use colour-coded plots to demonstrate how the value of the semimajor axis of the bar influences the regular or chaotic dynamics of the 3-dof system. For distinguishing between ordered and chaotic motion, we use the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method, a fast yet very accurate tool. Undoubtedly, the most important elements of the dynamics are the normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds (NHIMs) located in the vicinity of the index 1 Lagrange points L2 and L3. These manifolds direct the flow of stars over the saddle points, while they also trigger the formation of rings and spirals. The dynamics in the neighbourhood of the saddle points is visualized by bifurcation diagrams of the Lyapunov orbits as well as by the restriction of the Poincaré map to the NHIMs. In addition, we reveal how the semimajor axis of the bar influences the structure of these manifolds which determine the final stellar structure (rings or spirals). Our numerical simulations suggest that in galaxies with weak bars the formation of R1 rings or R_1^' } pseudo-rings is favoured. In the case of galaxies with intermediate and strong bars, the invariant manifolds seem to give rise to R1R2 rings and twin spiral formations, respectively. We also compare our numerical outcomes with earlier related work and with observational data.

  2. Evolutionary dynamics of complex biomechanical systems: an example using the four-bar mechanism.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Michael E; Bolnick, Daniel I; Wainwright, Peter C

    2004-03-01

    Like many phenotypic traits, biomechanical systems are defined by both an underlying morphology and an emergent functional property. The relationship between these levels may have a profound impact on how selection for functional performance is translated into morphological evolution. In particular, complex mechanical systems are likely to be highly redundant, because many alternative morphologies yield equivalent functions. We suggest that this redundancy weakens the relationship between morphological and functional diversity, and we illustrate this effect using an evolutionary model of the four-bar lever system of labrid fishes. Our results demonstrate that, when traits are complex, the morphological diversity of a clade may only weakly predict its mechanical diversity. Furthermore, parallel or convergent selection on function does not necessarily produce convergence in morphology. Empirical observations suggest that this weak form-function relationship has contributed to the morphological diversity of labrid fishes, as functionally equivalent species may nevertheless possess morphologically distinct jaws. We suggest that partial decoupling of morphology and mechanics due to redundancy is a major factor in morphological diversification.

  3. The dynamic compressive behavior of beryllium bearing bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Bruck, H.A.; Rosakis, A.J.; Johnson, W.L.

    1996-02-01

    In 1993, a new beryllium bearing bulk metallic glass with the nominal composition of Zr{sub 41.25}Ti{sub 13.75}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 22.5} was discovered at Caltech. This metallic glass can be cast as cylindrical rods as large as 16 mm in diameter, which permitted specimens to be fabricated with geometries suitable for dynamic testing. For the first time, the dynamic compressive yield behavior of a metallic glass was characterized at strain rates of 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 4}/s by using the split Hopkinson pressure bar. A high-speed infrared thermal detector was also used to determine if adiabatic heating occurred during dynamic deformation of the metallic glass. From these tests it appears that the yield stress of the metallic glass is insensitive to strain rate and no adiabatic heating occurs before yielding. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  4. The Dynamic Tensile Behavior of Railway Wheel Steel at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Lin; Han, Liangliang; Zhao, Longmao; Zhang, Ying

    2016-11-01

    The dynamic tensile tests on D1 railway wheel steel at high strain rates were conducted using a split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB) apparatus, compared to quasi-static tests. Three different types of specimens, which were machined from three different positions (i.e., the rim, web and hub) of a railway wheel, were prepared and examined. The rim specimens were checked to have a higher yield stress and ultimate tensile strength than those web and hub specimens under both quasi-static and dynamic loadings, and the railway wheel steel was demonstrated to be strain rate dependent in dynamic tension. The dynamic tensile fracture surfaces of all the wheel steel specimens are cup-cone-shaped morphology on a macroscopic scale and with the quasi-ductile fracture features on the microscopic scale.

  5. Dark matter trapping by stellar bars: the shadow bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Michael S.; Weinberg, Martin D.; Katz, Neal

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the complex interactions between the stellar disc and the dark-matter halo during bar formation and evolution using N-body simulations with fine temporal resolution and optimally chosen spatial resolution. We find that the forming stellar bar traps dark matter in the vicinity of the stellar bar into bar-supporting orbits. We call this feature the shadow bar. The shadow bar modifies both the location and magnitude of the angular momentum transfer between the disc and dark matter halo and adds 10 per cent to the mass of the stellar bar over 4 Gyr. The shadow bar is potentially observable by its density and velocity signature in spheroid stars and by direct dark matter detection experiments. Numerical tests demonstrate that the shadow bar can diminish the rate of angular momentum transport from the bar to the dark matter halo by more than a factor of 3 over the rate predicted by dynamical friction with an untrapped dark halo, and thus provides a possible physical explanation for the observed prevalence of fast bars in nature.

  6. Dynamic Strength of Tantalum under impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glam, Benny; Werdiger, Meir; Pistinner, Shlomi

    2013-06-01

    Plane impact experiments of double shock and shock-rarefaction in Tantalum were carried out in a gas gun. VISAR diagnostics has been implemented to measure the particle velocity and the free surface velocity. The VISAR information was utilized to study the dynamic strength of Tantalum under compression and tension. The pressure in the experiments was below 35 GPa. In this pressure range the dominant mechanism is expected to be dislocation motion. A 1-d hydrodynamic code was used in order to match various strength models. As expected, both the Johnson-Cook and the Guinan-Steinberg models do not reproduce the experimental results. Therefore in this paper we compare the Zerilli-Armstrong model which has been recently calibrated at strain rate of 6 x 103 s-1 using the split Kowalsky-Hopkinson bar to our experimental results at strain rate of 106 s-1.

  7. Heterogeneity in deformation of granular ceramics under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J. Y.; Lu, L.; Fan, D.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Xu, S. L.; Zhu, M. H.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic compression experiments are conducted on micron-sized SiC powders of different initial densities with a split Hopkinson pressure bar. Digital image correlation is applied to images from high-speed X-ray phase contrast imaging to map dynamic strain fields. The X-ray imaging and strain field mapping demonstrate the degree of heterogeneity in deformation depends on the initial powder density; mesoscale strain field evolution is consistent with softening or hardening manifested by bulk-scale loading curves. Statistical analysis of the strain probability distributions exhibits exponential decay tail similar to those of contact forces, which are supposed to lead to the grain-scale heterogeneity of granular materials.

  8. Evaluation of the sensing block method for dynamic force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qinghui; Chen, Hao; Li, Wenzhao; Song, Li

    2017-01-01

    Sensing block method was proposed for the dynamic force measurement by Tanimura et al. in 1994. Comparing with the Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique, it can provide a much longer measuring time for the dynamic properties test of materials. However, the signals recorded by sensing block are always accompanied with additional oscillations. Tanimura et al. discussed the effect of force rising edge on the test results, whereas more research is still needed. In this paper, some more dominant factors have been extracted through dimensional analysis. The finite element simulation has been performed to assess these factors. Base on the analysis and simulation, some valuable results are obtained and some criterions proposed in this paper can be applied in design or selection of the sensing block.

  9. Chatter resistance of non-uniform turning bars with attached dynamic absorbers—Analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffury, J.; Altus, E.

    2010-05-01

    Forced harmonic vibration of a non-uniform elastic beam with attached dynamic vibration absorbers (DVA) is studied. Analytical approximation of the solution is obtained by the functional perturbation method (FPM). The problem has application to cutting tools operations where the resistance of the tool holder against regenerative chatter can be enhanced by optimizing the real part of the frequency response function (FRF). A test case of a beam with step-like heterogeneity and single DVA at the tip shows that the FPM solution is very accurate for up to ˜40 percent deviation in both stiffness and mass density. Using the analytical results and Sims approach, optimal DVA tuning is found for each set of beam heterogeneity parameters by solving a set of nonlinear algebraic equations numerically. It is found that the optimum can be further improved by searching for the best step location. The system optimization is then expanded to a general heterogeneous beam with a DVA at its tip. The mass and stiffness distribution is optimized by applying the Lagrange variation method on the FPM solution yielding Fredholm integral equations. The optimized morphology is found to be approximately linear and far from the "intuitive" step-like one (Rivin and Kang, 1992) and yields better chatter-resistance.

  10. Dynamic deformation behavior of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy matrix composites reinforced with 20 vol. % SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, S.I.; Gray, G.T. III ); Lewandowski, J.J. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    The dynamic mechanical response and substructure evolution of underaged and overaged Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys with and without 20 vol.% SiC particles were investigated and compared to those following quasi-static compression. The hardening rates of the overaged composites and control alloys were found to be smaller than those of their underaged counterparts. Overaged composites and the control alloys showed more strain rate sensitive behavior than the underaged composites and alloys. The flow stress of the composites was found to decrease at total strains larger than 0.15 in the high-rate Hopkinson pressure bar test. A more raped decrease in stress in the underaged composites suggests that microstructural damage in the underaged condition is greater than that in the overaged condition tested at high strain rates. Cracks near the SiC/matrix interfaces were observed more frequently in the underaged Hopkinson pressure bar samples. The more frequent interface cracks in the underaged composites are thought to result from much slower relaxation of the stresses and strains built up at the interface due to much more difficult thermally activated deformation.

  11. Numerical Simulations of the Kolsky Compression Bar Test

    SciTech Connect

    Corona, Edmundo

    2015-10-01

    The Kolsky compression bar, or split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB), is an ex- perimental apparatus used to obtain the stress-strain response of material specimens at strain rates in the order of 10 2 to 10 4 1/s. Its operation and associated data re- duction are based on principles of one-dimensional wave propagation in rods. Second order effects such as indentation of the bars by the specimen and wave dispersion in the bars, however, can significantly affect aspects of the measured material response. Finite element models of the experimental apparatus were used here to demonstrate these two effects. A procedure proposed by Safa and Gary (2010) to account for bar indentation was also evaluated and shown to improve the estimation of the strain in the bars significantly. The use of pulse shapers was also shown to alleviate the effects of wave dispersion. Combining the two can lead to more reliable results in Kolsky compression bar testing.

  12. Servohydraulic methods for mechanical testing in the Sub-Hopkinson rate regime up to strain rates of 500 1/s.

    SciTech Connect

    Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2005-10-01

    Tensile and compressive stress-strain experiments on metals at strain rates in the range of 1-1000 1/s are relevant to many applications such as gravity-dropped munitions and airplane accidents. While conventional test methods cover strain rates up to {approx}10 s{sup -1} and split-Hopkinson and other techniques cover strain rates in excess of {approx}1000 s{sup -1}, there are no well defined techniques for the intermediate or ''Sub-Hopkinson'' strain-rate regime. The current work outlines many of the challenges in testing in the Sub-Hopkinson regime, and establishes methods for addressing these challenges. The resulting technique for obtaining intermediate rate stress-strain data is demonstrated in tension on a high-strength, high-toughness steel alloy (Hytuf) that could be a candidate alloy for earth penetrating munitions and in compression on a Au-Cu braze alloy.

  13. Effect of Microstructures on the Dynamic Deformation Behavior of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Young; Shim, In-Ok; Hong, Soon-Hyung

    The effects of microstructures of Ti-6Al-4V alloy on the flow stresses and fracture behaviors at quasi-static and dynamic deformation conditions were investigated. Specimens of different sizes and fractions of α globules in equiaxed and bimodal structures were compressed at the strain rate of 2×10-3/s and 3×103/s using hydraulic testing machine and split Hopkinson pressure bar, respectively. The a globule size in equiaxed structure changed the level of flow stresses, but did not affect the strain hardening characteristics. Meanwhile, the volume fraction of α globule (or lamellar phase) in bimodal structures influenced both the flow stress and strain hardening exponent at quasi-static and dynamic deformation conditions. Bimodal structure of 50% lamellar fraction is considered to be more favorable in dynamic deformation condition at strain rate regime of 3×103/s than equiaxed or bimodal one having higher lamellar fraction.

  14. Size and Geometry Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Carrara Marble Under Dynamic Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chunjiang; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen

    2016-05-01

    The effects of specimen size and geometry on the dynamic mechanical properties of Carrara marble including compressive strength, failure strain and elastic modulus are investigated in this research. Four different groups of specimens of different sizes and cross-sectional geometries are loaded under a wide range of strain rates by the split Hopkinson pressure bar setup. The experimental results indicate that all these mechanical properties are significantly influenced by the specimen size and geometry to different extent, hence highlighting the importance of taking into account of the specimen size and geometry in dynamic tests on rock materials. In addition, the transmission coefficient and the determination of strain rate under dynamic tests are discussed in detail.

  15. Numerical SHPB Tests of Rocks Under Combined Static and Dynamic Loading Conditions with Application to Dynamic Behavior of Rocks Under In Situ Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. B.; Liao, Z. Y.; Tang, C. A.

    2016-10-01

    A modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) numerical testing system is established to study the characteristics of rocks under simultaneous static and dynamic loading conditions following verification of the capability of the SHPB numerical system through comparison with laboratory measurements (Liao et al. in Rock Mech Rock Eng, 2016. doi: 10.1007/s00603-016-0954-8). Three different methods are employed in this numerical testing system to address the contact problem between a rock specimen and bars. The effects of stand-alone static axial pressure, stand-alone lateral confining pressures, and a combination of them are analyzed. It is determined that the rock total strength and the dynamic strength are greatly dependent on the static axial and confining pressures. Moreover, the friction along the interfaces between the rock specimen and bars cannot be ignored, particularly for high axial pressure conditions. Subsequently, the findings are applied to determine the dynamic behavior of rocks with in situ stresses. The effects of the magnitude of horizontal and vertical initial stresses at varied depths and their ratios are investigated. It is observed that the dynamic strength of deep rocks increases with increasing depth or the ratio of horizontal-to-vertical initial stresses ( K). The dynamic behavior of deeper rocks is more sensitive to K, and the rock dynamic strength increases faster with depth in areas with higher K.

  16. Measurement of the $B^+\\rightarrow p \\bar{p} K^{+}$ Branching Fraction and Study of the Decay Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-06

    With a sample of 232 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector, we study the decay B{sup +} {yields} p{bar p}K{sup +} excluding charmonium decays to p{bar p}. We measure a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} p{bar p}K{sup +}) = (6.7 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}. An enhancement at low p{bar p} mass is observed and the Dalitz plot asymmetry suggests dominance of the penguin amplitude in this B decay. We search for a pentaquark candidate {Theta}*{sup ++} decaying into pK{sup +} in the mass range 1.43 to 2.00 GeV/c{sup 2} and set limits on {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {Theta}*{sup ++} {bar p}) x {Beta}({Theta}*{sup ++} {yields} pK{sup +}) at the 10{sup -7} level.

  17. ORBITAL SUPPORT OF FAST AND SLOW INNER BARS IN DOUBLE-BARRED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Maciejewski, Witold; Small, Emma E.

    2010-08-10

    We analyze how the orbital support of the inner bar in a double-barred galaxy (nested bars) depends on the angular velocity (i.e., pattern speed) of this bar. We study orbits in seven models of double bars using the method of invariant loops. The range of pattern speed is covered exhaustively. We find that not all pattern speeds are allowed when the inner bar rotates in the same direction as the outer bar. Below a certain minimum pattern speed orbital support for the inner bar abruptly disappears, while at high values of this speed the orbits indicate an increasingly round bar that looks more like a twist in the nuclear isophotes than a dynamically independent component. For values between these two extremes, orbits supporting the inner bar extend further out as the bar's pattern speed decreases, their corresponding loops become more eccentric, pulsate more, and their rotation becomes increasingly non-uniform, as they speed up and slow down in their motion. Lower pattern speeds also lead to a less coherent bar, as the pulsation and acceleration increasingly varies among the loops supporting the inner bar. The morphologies of fast and slow inner bars expected from the orbital structure studied here have been recently recovered observationally by decomposition of double-barred galaxies. Our findings allow us to link the observed morphology to the dynamics of the inner bar.

  18. Dynamic behaviour and shock-induced martensite transformation in near-beta Ti-5553 alloy under high strain rate loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Yangwei; Xu, Xin; Liu, Chengze

    2015-09-01

    Ti-5553 alloy is a near-beta titanium alloy with high strength and high fracture toughness. In this paper, the dynamic behaviour and shock-induced martensite phase transformation of Ti-5553 alloy with alpha/beta phases were investigated. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar was employed to investigate the dynamic properties. Microstructure evolutions were characterized by Scanning Electronic Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscope. The experimental results have demonstrated that Ti-5553 alloy with alpha/beta phases exhibits various strain rate hardening effects, both failure through adiabatic shear band. Ti-5553 alloy with Widmannstatten microstructure exhibit more obvious strain rate hardening effect, lower critical strain rate for ASB nucleation, compared with the alloy with Bimodal microstructures. Under dynamic compression, shock-induced beta to alpha" martensite transformation occurs.

  19. Experimental analysis of quasi-static and dynamic fracture initiation toughness of gy4 armor steel material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Peng; Guo, Zitao

    Quasi-static and dynamic fracture initiation toughness of gy4 armour steel material are investigated using three point bend specimen. The modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus with digital image correlation (DIC) system is applied to dynamic loading experiments. Full-field deformation measurements are obtained by using DIC to elucidate on the strain fields associated with the mechanical response. A series of experiments are conducted at different strain rate ranging from 10-3 s-1 to 103 s-1, and the loading rate on the fracture initiation toughness is investigated. Specially, the scanning electron microscope imaging technique is used to investigate the fracture failure micromechanism of fracture surfaces. The gy4 armour steel material fracture toughness is found to be sensitive to strain rate and higher for dynamic loading as compared to quasi-static loading. This work is supported by National Nature Science Foundation under Grant 51509115.

  20. Chiral dynamics, S-wave contributions and angular analysis in D→ π π ℓ \\bar{ν }

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu-Ji; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Shuai

    2017-07-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the D^-→ π ^+π ^- ℓ \\bar{ν } and \\bar{D}^0→ π ^+π ^0 ℓ \\bar{ν } decays. We construct a general angular distribution which can include arbitrary partial waves of π π . Retaining the S-wave and P-wave contributions we study the branching ratios, forward-backward asymmetries and a few other observables. The P-wave contribution is dominated by ρ ^0 resonance, and the S-wave contribution is analyzed using the unitarized chiral perturbation theory. The obtained branching fraction for D→ ρ ℓ ν , at the order 10^{-3}, is consistent with the available experimental data. The S-wave contribution has a branching ratio at the order of 10^{-4}, and this prediction can be tested by experiments like BESIII and LHCb. Future measurements can also be used to examine the π -π scattering phase shift.

  1. Dynamic High-Temperature Characterization of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High Strain Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bignell, John L.; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 – 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750°C and 1030°C). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  2. Dynamic compressive properties of bovine knee layered tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Hino, Yuki; Todo, Mitsugu

    2015-09-01

    In Japan, the most common articular disease is knee osteoarthritis. Among many treatment methodologies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have recently received a lot of attention. In this field, cells and scaffolds are important, both ex vivo and in vivo. From the viewpoint of effective treatment, in addition to histological features, the compatibility of mechanical properties is also important. In this study, the dynamic and static compressive properties of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were measured using a universal testing machine and a split Hopkinson pressure bar method. The compressive behaviors of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were examined. The effects of strain rate on the maximum stress and the slope of stress-strain curves of the bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were discussed.

  3. Strain-rate-dependent model for the dynamic compression of elastoplastic spheres.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Hayden A; Daraio, Chiara

    2014-03-01

    We present a force-displacement contact model for the compressive loading of elastoplastic spheres. This model builds from the well known Hertz contact law for elastic, quasistatic compression to incorporate a material's strain-rate-dependent plasticity in order to describe collisions between particles. In the quasistatic regime, finite-element analysis is used to derive an empirical function of the material properties. A Johnson-Cook strain rate dependence is then included into the model to study dynamic effects. We validate the model using split Hopkinson bar experiments and show that the model can accurately simulate the force-displacement response of strain-rate-dependent elastoplastic spheres during dynamic compression and unloading.

  4. Strain-rate-dependent model for the dynamic compression of elastoplastic spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgoyne, Hayden A.; Daraio, Chiara

    2014-03-01

    We present a force-displacement contact model for the compressive loading of elastoplastic spheres. This model builds from the well known Hertz contact law for elastic, quasistatic compression to incorporate a material's strain-rate-dependent plasticity in order to describe collisions between particles. In the quasistatic regime, finite-element analysis is used to derive an empirical function of the material properties. A Johnson-Cook strain rate dependence is then included into the model to study dynamic effects. We validate the model using split Hopkinson bar experiments and show that the model can accurately simulate the force-displacement response of strain-rate-dependent elastoplastic spheres during dynamic compression and unloading.

  5. Modeling and Characterization of Dynamic Failure of Soda-lime Glass Under High Speed Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Chen, Weinong W.; Templeton, Douglas W.

    2012-05-27

    In this paper, the impact-induced dynamic failure of a soda-lime glass block is studied using an integrated experimental/analytical approach. The Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique is used to conduct dynamic failure test of soda-lime glass first. The damage growth patterns and stress histories are reported for various glass specimen designs. Making use of a continuum damage mechanics (CDM)-based constitutive model, the initial failure and subsequent stiffness reduction of glass are simulated and investigated. Explicit finite element analyses are used to simulate the glass specimen impact event. A maximum shear stress-based damage evolution law is used in describing the glass damage process under combined compression/shear loading. The impact test results are used to quantify the critical shear stress for the soda-lime glass under examination.

  6. Modeling and Characterization of Dynamic Failure of Glasses Under High Speed Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin

    2011-08-23

    : In this chapter, the impact-induced dynamic failure of a glass block is studied using an integrated experimental/analytical approach. Both soda-lime and borosilicate glass materials are investigated. The Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique is used to conduct dynamic failure test of soda-lime glass first. The damage growth patterns and stress histories are reported for various glass specimen designs. Making use of a continuum damage mechanics (CDM)-based constitutive model, the initial failure and subsequent stiffness reduction of glass are simulated and investigated. Explicit finite element analyses are used to simulate the glass specimen impact event. A maximum shear stress-based damage evolution law is used in describing the glass damage process under combined compression/shear loading. The impact test results are used to quantify the critical shear stress for the soda-lime glass under examination.

  7. Requirements for F-BAR proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2 in actin dynamics and membrane trafficking during Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte growth and embryonic epidermal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Chiara; Troglio, Flavia; Bai, Zhiyong; Patel, Falshruti B; Zucconi, Adriana; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Disanza, Andrea; Stradal, Theresia B; Cassata, Giuseppe; Confalonieri, Stefano; Hardin, Jeffrey D; Soto, Martha C; Grant, Barth D; Scita, Giorgio

    2009-10-01

    The TOCA family of F-BAR-containing proteins bind to and remodel lipid bilayers via their conserved F-BAR domains, and regulate actin dynamics via their N-Wasp binding SH3 domains. Thus, these proteins are predicted to play a pivotal role in coordinating membrane traffic with actin dynamics during cell migration and tissue morphogenesis. By combining genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular biochemical experiments in mammalian cells, we showed that: i) loss of CeTOCA proteins reduced the efficiency of Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in oocytes. Genetic interference with CeTOCAs interacting proteins WSP-1 and WVE-1, and other components of the WVE-1 complex, produced a similar effect. Oocyte endocytosis defects correlated well with reduced egg production in these mutants. ii) CeTOCA proteins localize to cell-cell junctions and are required for proper embryonic morphogenesis, to position hypodermal cells and to organize junctional actin and the junction-associated protein AJM-1. iii) Double mutant analysis indicated that the toca genes act in the same pathway as the nematode homologue of N-WASP/WASP, wsp-1. Furthermore, mammalian TOCA-1 and C. elegans CeTOCAs physically associated with N-WASP and WSP-1 directly, or WAVE2 indirectly via ABI-1. Thus, we propose that TOCA proteins control tissues morphogenesis by coordinating Clathrin-dependent membrane trafficking with WAVE and N-WASP-dependent actin-dynamics.

  8. Inner shelf morphologic controls on the dynamics of the beach and bar system, Fire Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Schwab, William C.; Gayes, P.; McCoy, Clay; Viso, Richard; Lentz, Erika E.

    2011-01-01

    he mechanism of sediment exchange between offshore sand ridges and the beach at Fire Island, New York is largely unknown. However, recent evidence from repeat nearshore bathymetry surveys, coupled with the complex but consistent bar morphology and patterns of shoreline change demonstrate that there is a feedback occurring between the regional geologic framework and modern processes. Analysis of bathymetric survey data provides direct confirmation that the offshore ridges are connected to the shoreface and are spatially persistent. The fixed nature of the nearshore morphology is further supported by time series camera data that indicate persistent bars with breaks that re-form in the same locations. A long-term time series of shoreline change shows distinct zones of erosion and accretion that are pervasive over time scales greater than a half-century, and their length-scales are similar to the spacing of the offshore ridge-trough system. The first-order geologic framework is responsible for the existence and locations of the ridges and troughs, which then influence the morphodynamics of the beach and bar system.

  9. Simultaneous multiscale measurements on dynamic deformation of a magnesium alloy with synchrotron x-ray imaging and diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, L.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Gong, X. L.; Luo, S.N.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic split Hopkinson pressure bar experiments with in situ synchrotron x-ray imaging and diffraction are conducted on a rolled magnesium alloy at high strain rates of ~5500 s−1. High speed multiscale measurements including stress–strain curves (macroscale), strain fields (mesoscale), and diffraction patterns (microscale) are obtained simultaneously, revealing strong anisotropy in deformation across different length scales. {1012} extension twinning induces homogenized strain fields and gives rise to rapid increase in strain hardening rate, while dislocation motion leads to inhomogeneous deformation and a decrease in strain hardening rate. During the early stage of plastic deformation, twinning is dominant in dynamic compression, while dislocation motion prevails in quasi-static loading, manifesting a strain-rate dependence of deformation.

  10. Effects of laser power density on static and dynamic mechanical properties of dissimilar stainless steel welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yan-Peng; Li, Mao-Hui; Yu, Gang; Wu, Xian-Qian; Huang, Chen-Guang; Duan, Zhu-Ping

    2012-10-01

    The mechanical properties of laser welded joints under impact loadings such as explosion and car crash etc. are critical for the engineering designs. The hardness, static and dynamic mechanical properties of AISI304 and AISI316 L dissimilar stainless steel welded joints by CO2 laser were experimentally studied. The dynamic strain-stress curves at the strain rate around 103 s-1 were obtained by the split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB). The static mechanical properties of the welded joints have little changes with the laser power density and all fracture occurs at 316 L side. However, the strain rate sensitivity has a strong dependence on laser power density. The value of strain rate factor decreases with the increase of laser power density. The welded joint which may be applied for the impact loading can be obtained by reducing the laser power density in the case of welding quality assurance.

  11. Dynamic High-temperature Testing of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High-strain Rates: Dynamic High-temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Song, B.; Nelson, K.; Lipinski, R.; Bignell, J.; Ulrich, G.; George, E. P.

    2014-08-21

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-strain -rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain -rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. In our study, we analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens in compression. We made appropriate modifications using the current high-temperature Kolsky bar technique in order to obtain reliable compressive stress–strain response of an iridium alloy at high-strain rates (300–10 000 s-1) and temperatures (750 and 1030°C). The compressive stress–strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to both strain rate and temperature.

  12. Dynamic High-temperature Testing of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High-strain Rates: Dynamic High-temperature Testing

    DOE PAGES

    Song, B.; Nelson, K.; Lipinski, R.; ...

    2014-08-21

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-strain -rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain -rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. In our study, we analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens in compression. We made appropriate modifications using themore » current high-temperature Kolsky bar technique in order to obtain reliable compressive stress–strain response of an iridium alloy at high-strain rates (300–10 000 s-1) and temperatures (750 and 1030°C). The compressive stress–strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to both strain rate and temperature.« less

  13. An Expanded Chemo-dynamical Sample of Red Giants in the Bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ying-Yi; Mateo, Mario; Walker, Matthew G.; Roederer, Ian U.

    2017-06-01

    We report new spectroscopic observations obtained with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System of 308 red giants (RGs) located in two fields near the photometric center of the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud. This sample consists of 131 stars observed in previous studies (in one field) and 177 newly observed stars (in the second field) selected specifically to more reliably establish the metallicity and age distributions of the bar. For each star, we measure its heliocentric line-of-sight velocity, surface gravity, and metallicity from its high-resolution spectrum (effective temperatures come from photometric colors). The spectroscopic Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams—modulo small offsets in surface gravities—reveal good agreement with model isochrones. The mean metallicity of the 177-RG sample is [Fe/H] = -0.76 ± 0.02 with a metallicity dispersion σ = 0.28 ± 0.03. The corresponding metallicity distribution—corrected for selection effects—is well fitted by two Gaussian components: one metal-rich with a mean -0.66 ± 0.02 and a standard deviation 0.17 ± 0.01, and the other metal-poor with -1.20 ± 0.24 and 0.41 ± 0.06. The metal-rich and metal-poor populations contain approximately 85% and 15% of stars, respectively. We also confirm that the velocity dispersion in the bar center decreases significantly from 31.2 ± 4.3 to 18.7 ± 1.9 km s-1 with increasing metallicity over the range -2.09 to -0.38. Individual stellar masses are estimated using the spectroscopic surface gravities and the known luminosities. We find that lower mass, hence older, RGs have larger metallicity dispersion and lower mean metallicity than the higher-mass, younger RGs. The estimated masses, however, extend to implausibly low values (˜ 0.1 {M}⊙ ), making it impossible to obtain an absolute age-metallicity or age distribution of the bar.

  14. Measurement of intergranular stress and porosity during dynamic compaction of porous beds of cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenaway, M. W.

    2005-05-01

    The dynamic compaction of granular beds of the propellant cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) has been investigated using a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar system. Intergranular stress and bed porosity were simultaneously measured during controlled loading. The importance of grain size was investigated by comparing conventional HMX (mean particle size ˜260μm) to microfine HMX (<5μm). Samples were radially confined and compression was predetermined using special end caps. Initial porosity was varied by hydraulically pressing the beds prior to testing. With large grains, resistance to compaction increased with the solid volume fraction. Microfine HMX behaved like low porosity conventional HMX beds in all cases. Porosity was typically reduced by 5%-10% during compaction and intergranular stresses below the yield stress were ensured. Energy dissipation to plastic flow and fracture were largely eliminated. Optical particle size analysis and electron microscopy support the experimental observations.

  15. Molecular dynamics investigation on the adsorption behaviors of H2O, CO2, CH4 and N2 gases on calcite (1 1 bar 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shimeng; Zhou, Guanggang; Ma, Yue; Gao, Lei; Song, Ranran; Jiang, Guancheng; Lu, Guiwu

    2016-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations (MD) were carried out to investigate the adsorption behaviors of H2O, CO2, CH4 and N2 gases, which are the main and important components in gas wells, on the calcite surface at reservoir conditions. By analyzing the binding energy and Helmholtz free energy, we found that the preferential adsorption order of these four gases is: H2O > CO2 > CH4 > N2. Moreover, we have also calculated the radial distribution function profiles of the system. It shows that the H2O molecules will form two compact adsorbed layers on the surface, which denotes the calcite (1 1 bar 0) surface is hydrophilic. The CO2 molecules can also form a adsorbed layer on the surface, while there are no significant features indicating that the CH4 and N2 molecules were apparently adsorbed on calcite (1 1 bar 0) surface. Our calculations results can not only give a microscopic insight into the wettability of gas reservoirs but also provide theoretical instructions for hydrate risk evaluation of enhanced gas recovery.

  16. Dynamic-tensile-extrusion response of fluoropolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Trujillo, Carl P; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The current work applies the recently developed Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) technique to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE). Similar to the Taylor Impact Rod, Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion is a strongly integrated test, probing a wide range of strain rates and stress states. However, the stress state is primarily tensile enabling investigation of dynamic tensile failure modes. Here we investigate the influence of this propensity to neck or not between PCTFE and PTFE on their response under dynamic tensile extrusion loading. The results of the Dyn-Ten-Ext technique are compared with two classic techniques. Both polymers have been investigated using Tensile Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The quasistatic and dynamic responses of both fluoro-polymers have been extensively characterized. The two polymers exhibit significantly different failure behavior under tensile loading at moderate strain rates. Polytetrafluoroethylene resists formation of a neck and exhibits significant strain hardening. Independent of temperature or strain rate, PTFE sustains true strains to failure of approximately 1.5. Polychlorotrifluoroethylene, on the other hand, consistently necks at true strains of approximately 0.05.

  17. On the morphology of dust lanes in galactic bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Menguiano, L.; Pérez, I.; Zurita, A.; Martínez-Valpuesta, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sánchez, S. F.; Comerón, S.; Díaz-García, S.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of our study is to use dynamical simulations to explore the influence of two important dynamical bar parameters, bar strength and bar pattern speed on the shape of the bar dust lanes. To quantify the shape of the dust lanes we have developed a new systematic method to measure the dust lane curvature. Previous numerical simulations have compared the curvature of bar dust lanes with the bar strength, predicting a relation between both parameters which has been supported by observational studies but with a large spread. We take into account the bar pattern speed to explore, simultaneously, the effect of both parameters on the dust lane shape. To that end, we separate our galactic bars in fast bars (1 < {R} < 1.4 ) and slow bars ({R} > 1.4 ), obtaining, as previous simulations, an inverse relation between the dust lane curvature and the bar strength for fast bars. For the first time, we extend the study to slow bars, finding a constant curvature as a function of the bar strength. As a result, we conclude that weak bars with straight dust lanes are candidates for slow bars. Finally, we have analysed a pilot sample of 10 S4G galaxies, obtaining dust lane curvatures lying within the range covered by the simulations.

  18. An Experimental Study of Dynamic Tensile Failure of Rocks Subjected to Hydrostatic Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bangbiao; Yao, Wei; Xia, Kaiwen

    2016-10-01

    It is critical to understand the dynamic tensile failure of confined rocks in many rock engineering applications, such as underground blasting in mining projects. To simulate the in situ stress state of underground rocks, a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar system is utilized to load Brazilian disc (BD) samples hydrostatically, and then exert dynamic load to the sample by impacting the striker on the incident bar. The pulse shaper technique is used to generate a slowly rising stress wave to facilitate the dynamic force balance in the tests. Five groups of Laurentian granite BD samples (with static BD tensile strength of 12.8 MPa) under the hydrostatic confinement of 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 MPa were tested with different loading rates. The result shows that the dynamic tensile strength increases with the hydrostatic confining pressure. It is also observed that under the same hydrostatic pressure, the dynamic tensile strength increases with the loading rate, revealing the so-called rate dependency for engineering materials. Furthermore, the increment of the tensile strength decreases with the hydrostatic confinement, which resembles the static tensile behavior of rock under confining pressure, as reported in the literature. The recovered samples are examined using X-ray micro-computed tomography method and the observed crack pattern is consistent with the experimental result.

  19. Application of a PVDF-based stress gauge in determining dynamic stress-strain curves of concrete under impact testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yi; Yi, Weijian

    2011-06-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) piezoelectric material has been successfully applied in many engineering fields and scientific research. However, it has rarely been used for direct measurement of concrete stresses under impact loading. In this paper, a new PVDF-based stress gauge was developed to measure concrete stresses under impact loading. Calibrated on a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) with a simple measurement circuit of resistance strain gauges, the PVDF gauge was then used to establish dynamic stress-strain curves of concrete cylinders from a series of axial impact testing on a drop-hammer test facility. Test results show that the stress curves measured by the PVDF-based stress gauges are more stable and cleaner than that of the stress curves calculated with the impact force measured from a load cell.

  20. Requirements for F-BAR Proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2 in Actin Dynamics and Membrane Trafficking during Caenorhabditis elegans Oocyte Growth and Embryonic Epidermal Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Falshruti B.; Zucconi, Adriana; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Disanza, Andrea; Stradal, Theresia B.; Cassata, Giuseppe; Confalonieri, Stefano; Hardin, Jeffrey D.; Soto, Martha C.; Grant, Barth D.; Scita, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    The TOCA family of F-BAR–containing proteins bind to and remodel lipid bilayers via their conserved F-BAR domains, and regulate actin dynamics via their N-Wasp binding SH3 domains. Thus, these proteins are predicted to play a pivotal role in coordinating membrane traffic with actin dynamics during cell migration and tissue morphogenesis. By combining genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular biochemical experiments in mammalian cells, we showed that: i) loss of CeTOCA proteins reduced the efficiency of Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in oocytes. Genetic interference with CeTOCAs interacting proteins WSP-1 and WVE-1, and other components of the WVE-1 complex, produced a similar effect. Oocyte endocytosis defects correlated well with reduced egg production in these mutants. ii) CeTOCA proteins localize to cell–cell junctions and are required for proper embryonic morphogenesis, to position hypodermal cells and to organize junctional actin and the junction-associated protein AJM-1. iii) Double mutant analysis indicated that the toca genes act in the same pathway as the nematode homologue of N-WASP/WASP, wsp-1. Furthermore, mammalian TOCA-1 and C. elegans CeTOCAs physically associated with N-WASP and WSP-1 directly, or WAVE2 indirectly via ABI-1. Thus, we propose that TOCA proteins control tissues morphogenesis by coordinating Clathrin-dependent membrane trafficking with WAVE and N-WASP–dependent actin-dynamics. PMID:19798448

  1. A Method for Selecting Software for Dynamic Event Analysis II: the Taylor Anvil and Dynamic Brazilian Tests

    SciTech Connect

    W. D. Richins; J. M. Lacy; T. K. Larson; S. R. Novascone

    2008-05-01

    New nuclear power reactor designs will require resistance to a variety of possible malevolent attacks as well as traditional dynamic accident scenarios. The design/analysis team may be faced with a broad range of phenomena including air and ground blasts, high-velocity penetrators or shaped charges, and vehicle or aircraft impacts. With a host of software tools available to address these high-energy events, the analysis team must evaluate and select the software most appropriate for their particular set of problems. The accuracy of the selected software should then be validated with respect to the phenomena governing the interaction of the threat and structure. Several software codes are available for the study of blast, impact, and other shock phenomena. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a study is underway to investigate the comparative characteristics of a group of shock and high-strain rate physics codes including ABAQUS, LS-DYNA, CTH, ALEGRA, and ALE-3D. In part I of this report, a series of five benchmark problems to exercise some important capabilities of the subject software was identified. The benchmark problems selected are a Taylor cylinder test, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test, a free air blast, the dynamic splitting tension (Brazilian) test, and projectile penetration of a concrete slab. Part II-- this paper-- reports the results of two of the benchmark problems: the Taylor cylinder and the dynamic Brazilian test. The Taylor cylinder test is a method to determine the dynamic yield properties of materials. The test specimen is a right circular cylinder which is impacted against a theoretically rigid target. The cylinder deforms upon impact, with the final shape depending upon the dynamic yield stress, in turn a function of strain and strain rate. The splitting tension test, or Brazilian test, is a method to measure the tensile strength of concrete using a cylindrical specimen. The specimen is loaded diametrically in compression, producing a

  2. Dynamic fracture behavior of SiC whisker-reinforced aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K.; Lee, S.; Chang, Y. W.; Duffy, J.

    1991-02-01

    This paper presents a study of dynamic fracture initiation behavior of 2124-T6 aluminum matrix composites containing 0, 5.2, and 13.2 vol pct SiC whiskers. In the experiment, an explosive charge is detonated to produce a tensile stress wave to initiate the fracture in a modified Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson bar). This stress wave loading provided a stress intensity rate, KI,, of about 2 × 106 MPa√m/s. The recorded data are then analyzed to calculate the critical dynamic stress intensity factor, K Id, of the composite, and the values obtained are compared with the corresponding quasi-static values. The test temperatures in this experiment ranged from -196 °C to 100°C, within which range the fracture initiation mode was found to be mostly ductile in nature. The micromechanical processes involved in void and microcrack formation were investigated using metallographic techniques. As a general trend, experimental results show a lower toughness as the volume fraction of the SiC whisker reinforcement increases. The results also show a higher toughness under dynamic than under static loading. These results are interpreted using a simple dynamic fracture initiation model based on the basic assumption that crack extension initiates at a certain critical strain developed over some microstructurally significant distance. This model enables us to correlate tensile properties and microstructural parameters, as, for instance, the interspacing of the SiC whiskers with the plane strain fracture toughness.

  3. Determination of E,E-farnesol in Makgeolli (rice wine) using dynamic headspace sampling and stir bar sorptive extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jaeho; Wang, Yiru; Jang, Hyejin; Seog, Homoon; Chen, Xi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analysed the volatile and semi-volatile compounds, including E,E-farnesol in Makgeolli which is a traditional type of Korean fermented rice wines. Forty-one compounds including alcohols, 1-butanol-3-methyl acetate, E,E-farnesol, stearol, and phytane, were separated and quantified by dynamic headspace sampling (DHS) and stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. SBSE has been found to be an effective method for analysing E,E-farnesol levels in Makgeolli. The experimental parameters related to the extraction efficiency of the SBSE method, such as ethanol concentration and filtration, were studied and optimised. The linear dynamic range of the SBSE method for E,E-farnesol ranged from 0.02 to 200ngml(-1) with R(2)=0.9974. The limit of detection and limit of quantification of the SBSE method were 0.02 and 0.05ngml(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation of intra- and inter-day reproducibility was less than 6.2% and 9.9%, respectively.

  4. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Lambert, P K; Hustedt, C J; Vecchio, K S; Huskins, E L; Casem, D T; Gruner, S M; Tate, M W; Philipp, H T; Woll, A R; Purohit, P; Weiss, J T; Kannan, V; Ramesh, K T; Kenesei, P; Okasinski, J S; Almer, J; Zhao, M; Ananiadis, A G; Hufnagel, T C

    2014-09-01

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ~10(3)-10(4) s(-1) in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10-20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (~40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  5. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Vecchio, K. S.; Huskins, E. L.; Casem, D. T.; Gruner, S. M.; Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Woll, A. R.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T.; Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T.; Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼103–104 s−1 in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation. PMID:25273733

  6. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C.; Vecchio, K. S.; Huskins, E. L.; Casem, D. T.; Gruner, S. M.; Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T.; Woll, A. R.; Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T.; Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J.

    2014-09-15

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup −1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  7. Effects of Thermal Treatment on the Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Coal Measures Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Mao, Xianbiao; Cao, Lili; Pu, Hai; Mao, Rongrong; Lu, Aihong

    2016-09-01

    Many projects such as the underground gasification of coal seams and coal-bed methane mining (exploitation) widely involve the dynamic problems of coal measures sandstone achieved via thermal treatment. This study examines the dynamic mechanical properties of coal measures sandstone after thermal treatment by means of an MTS653 high-temperature furnace and Split Hopkinson pressure bar test system. Experimental results indicate that 500 °C is a transition point for the dynamic mechanical parameters of coal measures sandstone. The dynamic elastic modulus and peak strength increase linearly from 25 to 500 °C while the dynamic peak strain decreases linearly over the same temperature range. The dynamic elastic modulus and peak strength drop quickly from 500 to 800 °C, with a significant increase in the dynamic peak strain over the same temperature range. The rock mechanics are closely linked to material composition and mesoscopic structure. Analysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy indicate that the molecules inside the sandstone increase in density due to the thermal expansion of the material particles, which effectively improves the deformation resistance and carrying capacity of the sandstone and reduces the likelihood of axial deformation. With heat treatment that exceeds 500 °C, the dynamic mechanical properties rapidly weaken due to the decomposition of kaolinite; additionally, hot cracking of the mineral particles within the materials arises from coal sandstone internal porosity, and other defects gradually appear.

  8. Some Comments on the Branching Ratios for n-bar p Annihilation into pipi, KK-bar , and pieta Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A. E.

    2000-11-01

    We give some remarks on the $\\bar n p$-partial branching ratios in flight at low momenta of antineutron, measured by OBELIX collaboration. The comparison is made to the known branching ratios from the $p \\bar p$-atomic states. The branching ratio for the reaction $\\bar n p \\to \\pi^+\\pi^0$ is found to be suppressed in comparison to what follows from the $ p \\bar p$-data. It is also shown, that there is no so called dynamic I=0-amplitude suppression for the process $N\\bar N \\to K\\bar K$.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of \\langle \\mathbf{1}\\,\\mathbf{0}\\,\\mathbf{\\bar{1}}\\,\\mathbf{0}\\rangle /\\boldsymbol{\\psi } tilt grain boundaries in ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Prinzio, C. L.; Pereyra, R. G.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) of < 1 0 \\bar{1} 0> /\\psi symmetric tilt ice grain boundaries are presented. The MDS were carried out using the GROMACS v4.5.5 program, and the water molecules were described using the TIP5P-Ew model. The grain boundary energies, {γ\\text{gb}} , relative to those of the surface free energies, {γ\\text{s}} , were obtained as a function of the misorientation angle Ψ, and compared with the {γ\\text{gb}}/{γ\\text{s}} values experimentally obtained. The results show a good correspondence between the experimental and simulated values. The planar density of coincidence sites at the grain boundary planes, Γ, was obtained as a function of ψ. The Γ values were compared with the simulated {γ\\text{gb}}/{γ\\text{s}} values and a relation between the minimum of the simulated {γ\\text{gb}}/{γ\\text{s}} values and the maximum of the Γ values was observed, suggesting that the CSL theory is a good starting point to detect low energy ice GBs.

  10. Laboratory observation of acoustic fluidization in granular fault gouge and implications for dynamic weakening of earthquake faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kaiwen; Huang, Sheng; Marone, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Several lines of evidence, including remote triggering of earthquakes and modulation of seismic tremor by Earth tides, suggest that faults weaken when subject to shaking and dynamic stresses associated with the passage of seismic waves. However, the origin of such dynamic weakening is poorly understood. Here we explore the role of acoustic resonance for dynamic fault weakening using laboratory measurements. Experiments were conducted using a split Hopkinson pressure bar assembly, with dynamic stressing via impact loading. Samples were composed of crushed rock particles from mine tailings with a particle size distribution similar to that found in a natural fault gouge. We used pulse-shaper techniques and carefully evaluated dynamic stresses recorded at the front and rear of the sample to ensure that dynamic force balance was satisfied. Our experiments document acoustic-induced fluidization and dramatic dynamic weakening. Frictional strength and elastic modulus of a simulated fault gouge are reduced by a factor of 5-10 via acoustic fluidization. We find a threshold acoustic pressure for fluidization that varies systematically with gouge zone properties. Our observations could help explain dynamic fault weakening and triggering of earthquake fault slip by dynamic stressing.

  11. Ensemble Canonical Correlation Prediction of Seasonal Precipitation Over the United States: Raising the Bar for Dynamical Model Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Shen, S. P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of an ensemble canonical correlation (ECC) prediction scheme developed at the Climate and Radiation Branch, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center for determining the potential predictability of regional precipitation, and for climate downscaling studies. The scheme is tested on seasonal hindcasts of anomalous precipitation over the continental United States using global sea surface temperature (SST) for 1951-2000. To maximize the forecast skill derived from SST, the world ocean is divided into non-overlapping sectors. The canonical SST modes for each sector are used as the predictor for the ensemble hindcasts. Results show that the ECC yields a substantial (10-25%) increase in prediction skills for all the regions of the US in every season compared to traditional CCA prediction schemes. For the boreal winter, the tropical Pacific contributes the largest potential predictability to precipitation in the southwestern and southeastern regions, while the North Pacific and the North Atlantic are responsible to the enhanced forecast skills in the Pacific Northwest, the northern Great Plains and Ohio Valley. Most importantly, the ECC increases skill for summertime precipitation prediction and substantially reduces the spring predictability barrier over all the regions of the US continent. Besides SST, the ECC is designed with the flexibility to include any number of predictor fields, such as soil moisture, snow cover and additional local observations. The enhanced ECC forecast skill provides a new benchmark for evaluating dynamical model forecasts.

  12. Ensemble Canonical Correlation Prediction of Seasonal Precipitation Over the United States: Raising the Bar for Dynamical Model Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Shen, S. P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of an ensemble canonical correlation (ECC) prediction scheme developed at the Climate and Radiation Branch, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center for determining the potential predictability of regional precipitation, and for climate downscaling studies. The scheme is tested on seasonal hindcasts of anomalous precipitation over the continental United States using global sea surface temperature (SST) for 1951-2000. To maximize the forecast skill derived from SST, the world ocean is divided into non-overlapping sectors. The canonical SST modes for each sector are used as the predictor for the ensemble hindcasts. Results show that the ECC yields a substantial (10-25%) increase in prediction skills for all the regions of the US in every season compared to traditional CCA prediction schemes. For the boreal winter, the tropical Pacific contributes the largest potential predictability to precipitation in the southwestern and southeastern regions, while the North Pacific and the North Atlantic are responsible to the enhanced forecast skills in the Pacific Northwest, the northern Great Plains and Ohio Valley. Most importantly, the ECC increases skill for summertime precipitation prediction and substantially reduces the spring predictability barrier over all the regions of the US continent. Besides SST, the ECC is designed with the flexibility to include any number of predictor fields, such as soil moisture, snow cover and additional local observations. The enhanced ECC forecast skill provides a new benchmark for evaluating dynamical model forecasts.

  13. A hybrid numerical-experimental method for determination of dynamic fracture properties of material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihradi, S.; Putra, I. S.; Dirgantara, T.; Widagdo, D.; Truong, L. X.

    2010-03-01

    A novel hybrid numerical-experimental method to obtain dynamic fracture properties of materials has been developed in the present work. Specimens were tested with one-point bending configuration in the Hopkinson's bar apparatus, from which the impact loading profiles were measured. In this dynamic fracture experiment, the crack tip position was measured by two strips of special strain gage having five gages arranged in one strip. Since the strain gage record only gave strain signal of each gage as a function of time, a novel method is proposed to determine the time at which the crack tip passed each strain gage and the time when the crack finally stopped. From the data of crack tip position as a function of time, the crack speed then can be calculated. These data, i.e. the loading profile and the crack speed, were then used as the input of the Node-Based FEM program developed for dynamic fractures problems. With the proposed method, three dynamic fracture properties of materials i.e dynamic fracture toughness for crack initiation (KIcd), fracture toughness for crack propagation (KID), and crack arrest toughness (KIa) can simultaneously be obtained. The results obtained from the investigation of dynamic fracture properties of Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) material by the present method are well compared with the ones in the literature and from the direct experimental measurement. The good agreement suggests that the hybrid method developed in the present work can be used reliably to determine the dynamic fracture properties of materials.

  14. A hybrid numerical-experimental method for determination of dynamic fracture properties of material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihradi, S.; Putra, I. S.; Dirgantara, T.; Widagdo, D.; Truong, L. X.

    2009-12-01

    A novel hybrid numerical-experimental method to obtain dynamic fracture properties of materials has been developed in the present work. Specimens were tested with one-point bending configuration in the Hopkinson's bar apparatus, from which the impact loading profiles were measured. In this dynamic fracture experiment, the crack tip position was measured by two strips of special strain gage having five gages arranged in one strip. Since the strain gage record only gave strain signal of each gage as a function of time, a novel method is proposed to determine the time at which the crack tip passed each strain gage and the time when the crack finally stopped. From the data of crack tip position as a function of time, the crack speed then can be calculated. These data, i.e. the loading profile and the crack speed, were then used as the input of the Node-Based FEM program developed for dynamic fractures problems. With the proposed method, three dynamic fracture properties of materials i.e dynamic fracture toughness for crack initiation (KIcd), fracture toughness for crack propagation (KID), and crack arrest toughness (KIa) can simultaneously be obtained. The results obtained from the investigation of dynamic fracture properties of Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) material by the present method are well compared with the ones in the literature and from the direct experimental measurement. The good agreement suggests that the hybrid method developed in the present work can be used reliably to determine the dynamic fracture properties of materials.

  15. Static and dynamic moduli of posterior dental resin composites under compressive loading.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Hirayama, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Nishiwaki, Tsuyoshi

    2011-10-01

    Dental resin composites are commonly used as restorative materials for dental treatment. To comprehend the static and dynamic moduli of dental resin composites, we investigated the mechanical behaviors of resin composites under static and dynamic loading conditions. Four commercially available resin composites for posterior restorations were evaluated. The percentages, by weight, of inorganic fillers of resin composites were examined by the ashing technique. The static compressive tests were undertaken with a constant loading speed of 1.0 mm/min using a computer-controlled INSTRON testing machine. The dynamic properties of composites were determined using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique. When inorganic filler content was increased, a remarkable increase in the static modulus and dynamic modulus were observed. Furthermore, there was a strong relationship between the static modulus and dynamic modulus (r(2) = 0.947). The SHPB technique clearly demonstrated the dynamic properties of composites, and was a useful technique for determining the mechanical behavior of composites under dynamic compressive loading. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A study on the dynamic behavior of the Meuse/Haute-Marne argillite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, M.; Kaiser, P. K.; Suorineni, F.; Su, K.

    Excavation of underground tunnels can be conducted by tunnel boring machines (TBM) or drill-and-blast. TBMs cause minimum damage to excavation walls. Blasting effects on excavation walls depend on the care with which the blasting is executed. For blast-induced damage in excavation walls, two issues have to be addressed: rate of loss of confinement (rate of excavation) and dynamic loading from wave propagation that causes both intended and unintended damage. To address these two aspects, laboratory dynamic tests were conducted for the determination of the dynamic properties of the Meuse/Haute-Marne argillite. In the present study, 17 tensile (Brazilian) and 15 compression split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests were conducted. The test revealed that the dynamic strengths of the argillite are strain rate dependent. The average dynamic increase factors (ratio of dynamic strength to static strength) for tensile and compressive strength are about 3.3 and 2.4, respectively. A high-speed video camera was used to visualize the initiation of failure and subsequent deformation of the specimens. The direct compression specimens were found to deform and fail uniformly around the circumference of the specimen, by a spalling process. The SHPB Brazilian tests indicated that failure occurred in tension along the line of load application. Radial fractures were also observed. The test results can be used for the development of a dynamic constitutive model for the argillite for the prediction of damage in underground excavation utilizing the drill-and blast method.

  17. The Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey. V. Statistical Study of Bars and Buckled Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao-Yu; Ho, Luis C.; Barth, Aaron J.

    2017-08-01

    Simulations have shown that bars are subject to a vertical buckling instability that transforms thin bars into boxy or peanut-shaped structures, but the physical conditions necessary for buckling to occur are not fully understood. We use the large sample of local disk galaxies in the Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey to examine the incidence of bars and buckled bars across the Hubble sequence. Depending on the disk inclination angle (i), a buckled bar reveals itself as either a boxy/peanut-shaped bulge (at high i) or as a barlens structure (at low i). We visually identify bars, boxy/peanut-shaped bulges, and barlenses, and examine the dependence of bar and buckled bar fractions on host galaxy properties, including Hubble type, stellar mass, color, and gas mass fraction. We find that the barred and unbarred disks show similar distributions in these physical parameters. The bar fraction is higher (70%-80%) in late-type disks with low stellar mass (M * < 1010.5 M ⊙) and high gas mass ratio. In contrast, the buckled bar fraction increases to 80% toward massive and early-type disks (M * > 1010.5 M ⊙), and decreases with higher gas mass ratio. These results suggest that bars are more difficult to grow in massive disks that are dynamically hotter than low-mass disks. However, once a bar forms, it can easily buckle in the massive disks, where a deeper potential can sustain the vertical resonant orbits. We also find a probable buckling bar candidate (ESO 506-G004) that could provide further clues to understand the timescale of the buckling process.

  18. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y L; Qin, J G; Chen, R; Zhao, P D; Lu, F Y

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m(2)/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  19. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. L.; Qin, J. G.; Chen, R.; Zhao, P. D.; Lu, F. Y.

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m2/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  20. Dynamic Behaviour of Birch and Sequoia at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragov, A. M.; Lomunov, A. K.; Sergeichev, I. V.; Gray, G. T.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents results of the dynamic mechanical response of for two structural woods, i.e. birch and sequoia. Monotonic and cyclic compression testing at room temperature of these materials was performed using a modified Kolsky method; a 20-mm diameter split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). The birch and sequoia specimens were loaded parallel and orthogonal to the grain of the wood, as well as, at other angles relative to the wood grain. The dynamic mechanical behavior of the two woods was measured as a function of loading orientation under a uniaxial stress state as well as under circumferential confinement using a collar surrounding the sample to quantify the effect of lateral confinement on mechanical behavior. The loading and unloading responses of both woods were found to exhibit nonlinear behavior and a strong dependency on the strain rate of loading. The dynamic stress-strain responses of the birch and sequoia showed a strong influence of grain orientation of the flow stress and fracture behavior. Examination of the damage evolution and fracture responses of the birch and sequoia displayed a strong dependence on grain orientation. Cyclic dynamic loading data, obtained using a modification of the original SHPB testing method, is also presented for the two structural woods studied. In addition to the SHPB tests, plane-wave Shockwave loading experiments were conducted and the shock adiabates for birch was obtained.

  1. Lowest-lying even-parity {\\bar{B}}_s mesons: heavy-quark spin-flavor symmetry, chiral dynamics, and constituent quark-model bare masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albaladejo, M.; Fernandez-Soler, P.; Nieves, J.; Ortega, P. G.

    2017-03-01

    The discovery of the D^*_{s0}(2317) and D_{s1}(2460) resonances in the charmed-strange meson spectra revealed that formerly successful constituent quark models lose predictability in the vicinity of two-meson thresholds. The emergence of non-negligible effects due to meson loops requires an explicit evaluation of the interplay between Q{\\bar{q}} and (Q{\\bar{q}})(q{\\bar{q}}) Fock components. In contrast to the c{\\bar{s}} sector, there is no experimental evidence of J^P=0^+,1^+ bottom-strange states yet. Motivated by recent lattice studies, in this work the heavy-quark partners of the D_{s0}^*(2317) and D_{s1}(2460) states are analyzed within a heavy meson chiral unitary scheme. As a novelty, the coupling between the constituent quark-model P-wave {\\bar{B}}_s scalar and axial mesons and the {\\bar{B}}^{(*)}K channels is incorporated employing an effective interaction, consistent with heavy-quark spin symmetry, constrained by the lattice energy levels.

  2. Determination of dynamic fracture-initiation toughness using a novel impact bend test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, T. . Faculty of Engineering Okayama Univ. of Science . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    A novel impact bend test procedure is described for determining the dynamic fracture-initiation toughness, K[sub Id], at a loading rate (stress intensity factor rate), K[sub I], of the order of 10[sup 6] MPa [radical]m/s. A special arrangement of the split Hopkinson pressure bar is adopted to measure accurately dynamic loads applied to a fatigue-precracked bend specimen. The dynamic stress intensity factor history for the bend specimen is evaluated by means of a dynamic finite element technique. The onset of crack initiation is detected using a string gage attached on the side of the specimen near a crack tip. The value of K[sub Id] is determined from the critical dynamic stress intensity factor at crack initiation. A series of dynamic fracture tests is carried out on a 7075-T6 aluminum alloy, a Ti-6246 alloy and an AISI 4340 steel. The K[sub Id] values obtained for the three structural materials are compared with the corresponding values obtained under quasi-static loading conditions.

  3. Gap Formations Along Specimen-Bar Interfaces in Numerical Simulations of SHPB Tests on Elastic Materials Soft in Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftenberg, Martin N.; Scheidler, Mike

    2009-06-01

    Simulations of split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests on elastic materials were performed using LS-DYNA. The specimens were much stiffer in dilatation than in shear. A compressible form of Mooney-Rivlin elasticity was applied with parameters evaluated from ballistic gelatin data. The bars were aluminum. The velocity prescribed on the incident bar increased over a rise time until attaining a steady-state value corresponding to a nominal strain rate of 2500/s. The rise time was varied to observe effects of pulse shaping. All calculations were 2D axisymmetric. A penalty-based contact algorithm was applied at the specimen-bar interfaces. This algorithm introduced a stiffness and a viscosity parameter. In sensitivity studies we varied the radius of the bars, the specimen's mesh, and the two contact parameters. In all calculations with the Mooney-Rivlin model, gaps formed at both specimen-bar interfaces over a wide range of strains. This gap phenomenon appears not to have been previously reported in the SHPB literature. We replaced the Mooney-Rivlin model with linear elasticity in order to explore whether the gaps were associated with material nonlinearity. We fixed Young's modulus at a value much smaller than that of aluminum. For sufficiently large Poisson ratios, we again observed gap formations at both specimen-bar interfaces.

  4. BAR domain proteins regulate Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aspenström, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    BAR proteins comprise a heterogeneous group of multi-domain proteins with diverse biological functions. The common denominator is the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain that not only confers targeting to lipid bilayers, but also provides scaffolding to mold lipid membranes into concave or convex surfaces. This function of BAR proteins is an important determinant in the dynamic reconstruction of membrane vesicles, as well as of the plasma membrane. Several BAR proteins function as linkers between cytoskeletal regulation and membrane dynamics. These links are provided by direct interactions between BAR proteins and actin-nucleation-promoting factors of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family and the Diaphanous-related formins. The Rho GTPases are key factors for orchestration of this intricate interplay. This review describes how BAR proteins regulate the activity of Rho GTPases, as well as how Rho GTPases regulate the function of BAR proteins. This mutual collaboration is a central factor in the regulation of vital cellular processes, such as cell migration, cytokinesis, intracellular transport, endocytosis, and exocytosis. PMID:25483303

  5. A New Fast, Accurate and Non-Oscillatory Numerical Approach for Wave Propagation Problems in Solids Application to High-frequency Pulse Propagation in the Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-16

    and additional qualifiers separated by commas, e.g. Smith, Richard , J, Jr. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES). Self-explanatory. 8...matrix are compared at the same time increments (corresponding to the Courant number τ=0.75) which are close to the stability limit for the reduced

  6. Dynamic behaviour of birch and sequoia at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatoly, Bragov; Andrey, Lomunov; Ivan, Sergeichev; Gray, George, III

    2005-07-01

    The paper presents results of experimental analysis for structural woods, i.e. birch and sequoia at high strain rates. Monotonic and cyclic compression testing at room temperature of these materials was performed by experimental Kolsky method, using the 20-mm diameter split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). The cut out specimens were loaded along and across fibers of woods, as well as, in others angles of cutting out from wooden materials. There were obtained dynamic deformation diagrams in various above conditions for these materials. Directions of specimens' cutting out, as well as, confined conditions effect on mechanical dynamic properties of the woods tested. Loading and unloading branches of stress-strain diagrams obtained are nonlinear and strain rates sensitive. Post-failure behavior of woods' specimens tested results from various forms of their fracture, such cracking and spalling. Experimental stress-strain curves showed significant influence of cutting out angles of specimens on fracture stresses' values. Dynamic deformation diagrams at cyclic loading, obtained by original modification of SPHB, are also presented for tested materials. Alongside with the SHPB tests, plane-wave experiments were conducted and the shock adiabates for the wood samples were obtained.

  7. Static and Dynamic Flexural Strength Anisotropy of Barre Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, F.; Xia, K.; Zuo, J. P.; Zhang, R.; Xu, N. W.

    2013-11-01

    Granite exhibits anisotropy due to pre-existing microcracks under tectonic loadings; and the mechanical property anisotropy such as flexural/tensile strength is vital to many rock engineering applications. In this paper, Barre Granite is studied to understand the flexural strength anisotropy under a wide range of loading rates using newly proposed semi-circular bend tests. Static tests are conducted with a MTS hydraulic servo-control testing machine and dynamic tests with a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. Six samples groups are fabricated with respect to the three principle directions of Barre granite. Pulse shaping technique is used in all dynamic SHPB tests to facilitate dynamic stress equilibrium. Finite element method is utilized to build up equations calculating the flexural tensile strength. For samples in the same orientation group, a loading rate dependence of the flexural tensile strength is observed. The measured flexural tensile strength is higher than the tensile strength measured using Brazilian disc method at given loading rate and this scenario has been rationalized using a non-local failure theory. The flexural tensile strength anisotropy features obvious dependence on the loading rates, the higher the loading rate, the less the anisotropy and this phenomenon may be explained considering the interaction of the preferentially oriented microcracks.

  8. Experiment investigation for dynamic behavior of hybrid fiber effects on reactive powder concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liwen; Pang, Baojun; Yang, Zhenqi; Chi, Runqiang

    2010-03-01

    The influences of different hybrid fibers (steel fibers add polyvinyl-alcohol fibers) mixture rates for reactive power concrete's (RPC) dynamic mechanical behavior after high temperature burnt was investigated by the Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) device. A plumbic pulse shaper technique was applied in the experiment, PVDF stress gauge was used to monitor the stress uniformity state within the specimen. The strain rate was between 75~85s-1, base on the stressstrain curves and dynamic modes of concrete specimen, the hybrid fiber effect on the dynamic properties was determined. The results show, dynamic compression strength of specimens which mixed with steel fibers (1.0%,1.5%,2.0% vol. rate) and 0.1% PVA fibers is higher than normal reactive powder concrete (NRPC), but the toughness improves unconspicuous; while strength of the one which has both steel fiber (1.0%,1.5%,2.0% vol. rate) and 0.2%PVA fiber declines than NRPC but the toughness improves and the plastic behaviors strengthened, stress-strain curve has evident rising and plate portions. It can be deduced that the concrete with mixed two kinds of fibers has improved dynamic mechanical properties after high temperature burnt. By compounding previous literature results, the mechanism of the experimental results can be explained.

  9. Experiment investigation for dynamic behavior of hybrid fiber effects on reactive powder concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liwen; Pang, Baojun; Yang, Zhenqi; Chi, Runqiang

    2009-12-01

    The influences of different hybrid fibers (steel fibers add polyvinyl-alcohol fibers) mixture rates for reactive power concrete's (RPC) dynamic mechanical behavior after high temperature burnt was investigated by the Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) device. A plumbic pulse shaper technique was applied in the experiment, PVDF stress gauge was used to monitor the stress uniformity state within the specimen. The strain rate was between 75~85s-1, base on the stressstrain curves and dynamic modes of concrete specimen, the hybrid fiber effect on the dynamic properties was determined. The results show, dynamic compression strength of specimens which mixed with steel fibers (1.0%,1.5%,2.0% vol. rate) and 0.1% PVA fibers is higher than normal reactive powder concrete (NRPC), but the toughness improves unconspicuous; while strength of the one which has both steel fiber (1.0%,1.5%,2.0% vol. rate) and 0.2%PVA fiber declines than NRPC but the toughness improves and the plastic behaviors strengthened, stress-strain curve has evident rising and plate portions. It can be deduced that the concrete with mixed two kinds of fibers has improved dynamic mechanical properties after high temperature burnt. By compounding previous literature results, the mechanism of the experimental results can be explained.

  10. Bar pattern speeds in CALIFA galaxies. I. Fast bars across the Hubble sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguerri, J. A. L.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Amorin, A.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Cid Fernandes, R.; García-Benito, R.; García-Lorenzo, B.; González Delgado, R. M.; Husemann, B.; Kalinova, V.; Lyubenova, M.; Marino, R. A.; Márquez, I.; Mast, D.; Pérez, E.; Sánchez, S. F.; van de Ven, G.; Walcher, C. J.; Backsmann, N.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; del Olmo, A.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Pérez, I.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The bar pattern speed (Ωb) is defined as the rotational frequency of the bar, and it determines the bar dynamics. Several methods have been proposed for measuring Ωb. The non-parametric method proposed by Tremaine & Weinberg (1984, ApJ, 282, L5; TW) and based on stellar kinematics is the most accurate. This method has been applied so far to 17 galaxies, most of them SB0 and SBa types. Aims: We have applied the TW method to a new sample of 15 strong and bright barred galaxies, spanning a wide range of morphological types from SB0 to SBbc. Combining our analysis with previous studies, we investigate 32 barred galaxies with their pattern speed measured by the TW method. The resulting total sample of barred galaxies allows us to study the dependence of Ωb on galaxy properties, such as the Hubble type. Methods: We measured Ωb using the TW method on the stellar velocity maps provided by the integral-field spectroscopy data from the CALIFA survey. Integral-field data solve the problems that long-slit data present when applying the TW method, resulting in the determination of more accurate Ωb. In addition, we have also derived the ratio ℛ of the corotation radius to the bar length of the galaxies. According to this parameter, bars can be classified as fast (ℛ < 1.4) and slow (ℛ > 1.4). Results: For all the galaxies, ℛ is compatible within the errors with fast bars. We cannot rule out (at 95% level) the fast bar solution for any galaxy. We have not observed any significant trend between ℛ and the galaxy morphological type. Conclusions: Our results indicate that independent of the Hubble type, bars have been formed and then evolve as fast rotators. This observational result will constrain the scenarios of formation and evolution of bars proposed by numerical simulations.

  11. Bar Codes for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahn, Erwin

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the evolution of standards for bar codes (series of printed lines and spaces that represent numbers, symbols, and/or letters of alphabet) and describes the two types most frequently adopted by libraries--Code-A-Bar and CODE 39. Format of the codes is illustrated. Six references and definitions of terminology are appended. (EJS)

  12. How can double-barred galaxies be long-lived?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Hervé

    2015-03-01

    Context. Double-barred galaxies account for almost one third of all barred galaxies, suggesting that secondary stellar bars, which are embedded in large-scale primary bars, are long-lived structures. However, up to now it has been hard to self-consistently simulate a disc galaxy that sustains two nested stellar bars for longer than a few rotation periods. Aims: The dynamical and physical requirements for long-lived triaxiality in the central region of galaxies still need to be clarified. Methods: N-body/hydrodynamical simulations including star formation recipes have been performed. Their properties (bar lengths, pattern speeds, age of stellar population, and gas content) have been compared with the most recent observational data in order to prove that they are representative of double-barred galaxies, even SB0. Overlaps in dynamical resonances and bar modes have been looked for using Fourier spectrograms. Results: Double-barred galaxies have been successfully simulated with lifetimes as long as 7 Gyr. The stellar and gaseous distributions in the central regions are time dependent and display many observed morphological features (circumnuclear rings, pseudo-bulges, triaxial bulges, ovals, etc.) typical of barred galaxies, even early-type. The stellar population of the secondary bar is younger on average than for the primary large-scale bar. An important feature of these simulations is the absence of any resonance overlap for several Gyr. In particular, there is no overlap between the primary bar inner Lindblad resonance and the secondary bar corotation. Therefore, mode coupling cannot sustain the secondary bar mode. Star formation is identified here as possibly being responsible for bringing energy to the nuclear mode. Star formation is also responsible for limiting the amount of gas in the central region which prevents the orbits sustaining the secondary bar from being destroyed. Therefore, the secondary bar can dissolve but reappear after ≈1 Gyr as the

  13. Orthogonal Vertical Velocity Dispersion Distributions Produced by Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Min; Shen, Juntai; Debattista, Victor P.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, Adriana

    2017-02-01

    In barred galaxies, the contours of stellar velocity dispersions (σ) are generally expected to be oval and aligned with the orientation of bars. However, many double-barred (S2B) galaxies exhibit distinct σ peaks on the minor axis of the inner bar, which we termed “σ-humps,” while two local σ minima are present close to the ends of inner bars, i.e., “σ-hollows.” Analysis of numerical simulations shows that {σ }z-humps or hollows should play an important role in generating the observed σ-humps+hollows in low-inclination galaxies. In order to systematically investigate the properties of {σ }z in barred galaxies, we apply the vertical Jeans equation to a group of well-designed three-dimensional bar+disk(+bulge) models. A vertically thin bar can lower {σ }z along the bar and enhance it perpendicular to the bar, thus generating {σ }z-humps+hollows. Such a result suggests that {σ }z-humps+hollows can be generated by the purely dynamical response of stars in the presence of a sufficiently massive, vertically thin bar, even without an outer bar. Using self-consistent N-body simulations, we verify the existence of vertically thin bars in the nuclear-barred and S2B models that generate prominent σ-humps+hollows. Thus, the ubiquitous presence of σ-humps+hollows in S2Bs implies that inner bars are vertically thin. The addition of a bulge makes the {σ }z-humps more ambiguous and thus tends to somewhat hide the {σ }z-humps+hollows. We show that {σ }z may be used as a kinematic diagnostic of stellar components that have different thicknesses, providing a direct perspective on the morphology and thickness of nearly face-on bars and bulges with integral field unit spectroscopy.

  14. Kinematic Clues to Bar Evolution for Galaxies in the Local Universe: Why the Fastest Rotating Bars are Rotating Most Slowly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, J.; Beckman, J. E.; Martínez-Valpuesta, I.; Borlaff, A. S.; James, P. A.; Díaz-García, S.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Camps-Fariña, A.; Gutiérrez, L.; Amram, P.

    2017-02-01

    We have used Spitzer images of a sample of 68 barred spiral galaxies in the local universe to make systematic measurements of bar length and bar strength. We combine these with precise determinations of the corotation radii associated with the bars, taken from our previous study, which used the phase change from radial inflow to radial outflow of gas at corotation, based on high-resolution two-dimensional velocity fields in Hα taken with a Fabry–Pérot spectrometer. After presenting the histograms of the derived bar parameters, we study their dependence on the galaxy morphological type and on the total stellar mass of the host galaxy, and then produce a set of parametric plots. These include the bar pattern speed versus bar length, the pattern speed normalized with the characteristic pattern speed of the outer disk versus the bar strength, and the normalized pattern speed versus { R }, the ratio of corotation radius to bar length. To provide guidelines for our interpretation, we used recently published simulations, including disk and dark matter halo components. Our most striking conclusion is that bars with values of { R } < 1.4, previously considered dynamically fast rotators, can be among the slowest rotators both in absolute terms and when their pattern speeds are normalized. The simulations confirm that this is because as the bars are braked, they can grow longer more quickly than the outward drift of the corotation radius. We conclude that dark matter halos have indeed slowed down the rotation of bars on Gyr timescales.

  15. MEASUREMENT OF THE BRANCHING FRACTIONS FOR THE DECAYS B{sup 0}-->D*{sup -} p{bar p}{pi}{sup +}, B{sup 0}-->D{sup -}p{bar p}{pi}{sup +}, B0-->D*{sup 0} p{bar p} AND B{sup 0}-->D{sup 0} p{bar p}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Aubert

    2004-08-11

    The B{sup 0} meson decay modes B{sup 0} --> D*{sup -}p{bar p}{pi}{sup +}, D{sup -}p{bar p}{sup +}, {bar D}*{sup 0}p{bar p}, and B{sup 0} --> {bar D}{sup 0}p{bar p} are studied in a sample of 124 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. The decay of B{sup 0} --> D{sup -}p{bar p}{pi}{sup +} is observed for the first time, with a measured branching fraction B(B{sup 0} --> D{sup -}p{bar p}{pi}{sup +}) = (3.80 {+-} 0.35 {+-} 0.46) x 10{sup -4}. The following branching fractions are also determined: B(B{sup 0} --> D*{sup -}p{bar p}{pi}{sup +}) = (5.61 {+-} 0.59 {+-} 0.73) x 10{sup -4}, B(B{sup 0} --> {bar D}*{sup 0} p{bar p}) = (0.67 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -4}, and B(B{sup 0} --> {bar D}{sup 0}p{bar p}) = (1.24 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -4}. In each decay mode the invariant mass spectra of the charmed mesons and the baryons are compared with a pure phase-space hypothesis in order to gain insight into the B meson decay dynamics. In particular, the Dalitz plots of {bar D}*{sup 0}p versus {bar D}*{sup 0}{bar p} for B{sup 0} --> {bar D}*{sup 0}p{bar p} and of {bar D}{sup 0}p versus {bar D}{sup 0}{bar p} for B{sup 0} --> {bar D}{sup 0}p{bar p} are presented. All results are preliminary.

  16. Effect of Ductile Agents on the Dynamic Behavior of SiC3D Network Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingbo; Wang, Yangwei; Wang, Fuchi; Fan, Qunbo

    2016-10-01

    Co-continuous SiC ceramic composites using pure aluminum, epoxy, and polyurethane (PU) as ductile agents were developed. The dynamic mechanical behavior and failure mechanisms were investigated experimentally using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) method and computationally by finite element (FE) simulations. The results show that the SiC3D/Al composite has the best overall performance in comparison with SiC3D/epoxy and SiC3D/PU composites. FE simulations are generally consistent with experimental data. These simulations provide valuable help in predicting mechanical strength and in interpreting the experimental results and failure mechanisms. They may be combined with micrographs for fracture characterizations of the composites. We found that interactions between the SiC phase and ductile agents under dynamic compression in the SHPB method are complex, and that interfacial condition is an important parameter that determines the mechanical response of SiC3D composites with a characteristic interlocking structure during dynamic compression. However, the effect of the mechanical properties of ductile agents on dynamic behavior of the composites is a second consideration in the production of the composites.

  17. Fracturing and Failure Behavior of Carrara Marble in Quasistatic and Dynamic Brazilian Disc Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen; Zou, Chunjiang; Cheng, Yi

    2014-07-01

    The tensile strength and fracturing behavior of Carrara marble subjected to the dynamic Brazilian disc test using the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique are determined and compared with those obtained by the conventional quasistatic Brazilian disc test. Detailed observation of the cracking processes is aided by high-speed video footage captured at a frame rate of 100,000 frames per second. The dynamic increase factor is computed, revealing a strong strain rate dependence of the Carrara marble when subjected to strain rates above 1 s-1. Similar to the quasistatic loading tests, conspicuous white zones/patches commonly appear prior to the initiation of visible cracks in the dynamic loading tests. Identification of the white patch initiation and evolution is aided by image comparison software. Comparing the cracking and failure processes under quasistatic and dynamic loading, some distinct differences in the white patch geometry and initiation load are observed. In addition, the extent of the compressive failure zones around the contact points between the loading platens and specimens is found to increase with the strain rate.

  18. Dynamic compressive behavior of Pr-Nd alloy at high strain rates and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huanran; Cai Canyuan; Chen Danian; Ma Dongfang

    2012-07-01

    Based on compressive tests, static on 810 material test system and dynamic on the first compressive loading in split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests for Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens at high strain rates and temperatures, this study determined a J-C type [G. R. Johnson and W. H. Cook, in Proceedings of Seventh International Symposium on Ballistics (The Hague, The Netherlands, 1983), pp. 541-547] compressive constitutive equation of Pr-Nd alloy. It was recorded by a high speed camera that the Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens fractured during the first compressive loading in SHPB tests at high strain rates and temperatures. From high speed camera images, the critical strains of the dynamic shearing instability for Pr-Nd alloy in SHPB tests were determined, which were consistent with that estimated by using Batra and Wei's dynamic shearing instability criterion [R. C. Batra and Z. G. Wei, Int. J. Impact Eng. 34, 448 (2007)] and the determined compressive constitutive equation of Pr-Nd alloy. The transmitted and reflected pulses of SHPB tests for Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens computed with the determined compressive constitutive equation of Pr-Nd alloy and Batra and Wei's dynamic shearing instability criterion could be consistent with the experimental data. The fractured Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens of compressive tests were investigated by using 3D supper depth digital microscope and scanning electron microscope.

  19. The role of the modified taylor impact test in dynamic material research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagusat, Frank; Rohr, Ingmar

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic material research with strain rates of more than 1000 1/s is experimentally very often done with a Split-Hopkinson Bar, Taylor impact tests or planar plate impact test investigations. At the Ernst-Mach-Institut (EMI), a variant of an inverted classical Taylor impact test is used by application of velocity interferometers of the VISAR type ("Modified Taylor Impact Test", MTT). The conduction of the experiments is similar to that of planar plate impact tests. The data reduction and derivation of dynamic material data can also be restricted to an analysis of the VISAR signal. Due to these properties, nearly each highly dynamic material characterization in our institute done by planar plate investigations is usually accompanied by MTT experiments. The extended possibilities and usefulness of a combined usage of these two highly dynamic characterization methods are explained. Recently, further developed MTT experiments with very small specimen sizes are presented. For the first time, Taylor impact and planar impact specimen can be used for which the load directions even in case of thin plate test material are identical and not perpendicular to each other. Consequences for testing construction elements are discussed.

  20. Experimental study on the dynamic mechanical properties of titanium alloy after thermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaoyan; Yu, Yingjie; Ma, Lianhua; Chen, Liangbiao

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the dynamic compressive properties of thermally oxidized TC4 (Ti-6Al-4V) titanium alloys were studied with split Hopkinson pressure bar. The dynamic tests were conducted under multiple strain rates from 400 to 2000 s-1 and different testing temperatures from 25 to 200 °C. Data for the true stress-strain curves of thermally oxidized TC4 titanium alloy are presented. They show that the thermal oxidation increases both the dynamic compressive strength of TC4 titanium and the rate of strain hardening. Higher compressive strengths of the material were obtained by applying higher strain rates. Under a strain rate of 2000 s-1, the stress-strain curves of TC4 titanium alloys exhibit both strain-rate-hardening behavior and thermal softening behavior. The oxidation temperature has little effect on dynamic properties of TC4 titanium alloy, but choosing different holding time for oxidation could greatly affect the initiation of plastic deformation and thus might potentially improve the ductility of the treated material. Furthermore, the data show that the increase in the testing temperature results in much lower yield stresses of the treated material.

  1. Dependence of Dynamic Tensile Strength of Longyou Sandstone on Heat-Treatment Temperature and Loading Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wei; Xu, Ying; Wang, Wei; Kanopolous, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    As a material for famous historical underground rock caverns, Longyou sandstone (LS) may fail under the combination of high loading rate and high temperature. The thermal damage induced by various heat-treatment temperatures (150, 250, 350, 450, 600 and 850 °C) is first characterized by X-ray Micro-computed tomography (CT) method. The damage variable derived from the average CT value for heat-treated LS specimen and reference specimen without heat treatment was used to quantify the thermal damage. The dynamic tensile strengths of these LS samples under different dynamic loading rates (ranging from 24 to 540 GPa/s) were then obtained using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. The dynamic tensile strength of LS increases with the loading rate at a given heat-treatment temperature, and the tensile strength at the same loading rate decreases with the heat-treatment temperature except for 450 °C. Based on the experimental data, an empirical equation was established to relate the dynamic tensile strength of LS to the loading rate and the heat-treatment temperature.

  2. Dynamic compressive behavior of Pr-Nd alloy at high strain rates and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanran; Cai, Canyuan; Chen, Danian; Ma, Dongfang

    2012-07-01

    Based on compressive tests, static on 810 material test system and dynamic on the first compressive loading in split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests for Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens at high strain rates and temperatures, this study determined a J-C type [G. R. Johnson and W. H. Cook, in Proceedings of Seventh International Symposium on Ballistics (The Hague, The Netherlands, 1983), pp. 541-547] compressive constitutive equation of Pr-Nd alloy. It was recorded by a high speed camera that the Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens fractured during the first compressive loading in SHPB tests at high strain rates and temperatures. From high speed camera images, the critical strains of the dynamic shearing instability for Pr-Nd alloy in SHPB tests were determined, which were consistent with that estimated by using Batra and Wei's dynamic shearing instability criterion [R. C. Batra and Z. G. Wei, Int. J. Impact Eng. 34, 448 (2007)] and the determined compressive constitutive equation of Pr-Nd alloy. The transmitted and reflected pulses of SHPB tests for Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens computed with the determined compressive constitutive equation of Pr-Nd alloy and Batra and Wei's dynamic shearing instability criterion could be consistent with the experimental data. The fractured Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens of compressive tests were investigated by using 3D supper depth digital microscope and scanning electron microscope.

  3. Dynamic Fracture Initiation Toughness of a Gamma (Met-PX) Titanium Aluminide at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas; Draper, Susan

    2009-06-01

    Recently, a new generation of titanium aluminide alloy named Gamma-Met PX (GKSS, Geesthacht, Germany) has been developed with better rolling and postrolling characteristics. Previous work on this alloy has shown the material to have higher strengths at room and elevated temperatures when compared with other gamma titanium aluminides. In particular, this new alloy has shown increased ductility at elevated temperatures under both quasistatic and high-strain-rate uniaxial compressive loading. However, its high-strain-rate tensile ductility at room and elevated temperatures is limited to ~1 pct. In the present article, the results of a study investigating the effects of the loading rate and test temperature on the dynamic fracture initiation toughness in Gamma-Met PX are presented. A modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (MSHPB) was used along with high-speed photography, to determine the dynamic fracture initiation toughness. Three-point-bend fracture tests were conducted at impact speeds in the range 1 to 3.6 m/s and at test temperatures up to 1200 °C. Furthermore, the effect of long-time high-temperature air exposure on the fracture toughness was investigated. The results show that the dynamic fracture initiation toughness decreases at test temperatures beyond 600 °C. Moreover, the dynamic fracture initiation toughness was found to decrease with increasing exposure time. The reasons behind this drop are analyzed and discussed.

  4. Two types of coal samples’ dynamic mechanical properties under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongqing; Liu, Zegong; Mu, Chaomin; Zhang, Wenqing

    2017-08-01

    This study presents a kinetic experiment process of briquette and raw coal samples in detail by means of Φ 75mm split Hopkinson pressure bar test system and dynamic stress-strain relations and mechanical properties of this two different coal samples. According to the experimental results, this two coal samples both have strain rate effect. The DIF (dynamic stress increasing factor) and DEIF (dynamic strain increasing factor) of the two coal samples have different trends. There is a turning phenomenon of DIF as the strain rate is around 100s-1, and the DIF of the hard coal increases rapidly over 100s-1, but the DIF increasing rate of soft coal has little change before or after the turning point. The DEIF of the two types of coal all increases with the increase of strain rate, but the turning strain rate of ordinary coal is 120s-1, while a platform of turning strain rate exists for outburst coal with strain rate ranging from 100s-1 to 210s-1. It represents the discrepancy in their strain rate hardening effect and dynamic toughening effect.

  5. Dynamic response of fiber bundle under transverse impact.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo

    2010-03-01

    There has been a very high demand in developing efficient soft body armors to protect the military and law enforcement personnel from ballistic or explosive attack. As a basic component in the soft body armor, fibers or fiber bundles play a key role in the performance against ballistic impact. In order to study the ballistic-resistant mechanism of the soft body armor, it is desirable to understand the dynamic response of the fiber bundle under transverse impact. Transverse wave speed is one important parameter because a faster transverse wave speed can make the impact energy dissipate more quickly. In this study, we employed split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) to generate constant high-speed impact on a Kevlar fiber bundle in the transverse direction. The deformation of the fiber bundle was photographed with high-speed digital cameras. The transverse wave speeds were experimentally measured at various transverse impact velocities. The experimental results can also be used to quantitatively verify the current analytical models or to develop new models to describe the dynamic response of fiber bundle under transverse impact.

  6. Dynamic microbuckling model for compressive strength of polymeric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Jia-Lin

    Dynamic compressive strength of off-axis fiber composites in the form of fiber microbuckling was studied. Both fiber misalignments and material nonlinearity were taken into account in this study. A fiber microbuckling model derived using micromechanics based on the nonlinear behavior of the matrix was extended to include the strain rate effect. The critical microbuckling stress was found to be the same as that in Rosen's bifurcation analysis except that elastic shear modulus was replaced by the tangent shear modulus of composites. The tangent shear modulus was rate dependent and described using an elastic/viscoplastic constitutive model. The viscoplasticity model was verified to provide stress-strain relations at high strain rates. S2/8552 glass/epoxy unidirectional composites with small off-axis angles were tested to failure at various strain rates. For strain rates below 1/sec, the compression tests were conducted on an MTS machine, while higher strain rate tests were carried out using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. Comparison with experimental data indicated that the dynamic microbuckling model was suitable for prediction of compressive strengths at different strain rates. The compressive strength of multi-directional laminates was characterized. Laminate plate theory and finite element analysis with material nonlinearity were employed for laminar stress analysis. The critical failure stress in the 0° ply was estimated using the microbuckling model. Based on that, the compressive strength of composite laminates was predicted. The model predictions were compared with experimental data and good agreements were revealed.

  7. Experimental study on dynamic mechanical behaviors of polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yubo; Ye, Nan; Huang, Wei; Li, Dacheng

    2017-01-01

    Polycarbonate (PC) is a widely used engineering material in aerospace field, since it has excellent mechanical and optical property. In present study, both compressive and tensile tests of PC were conducted at high strain rates by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar. The high-speed camera and 2D Digital Image Correlation method (DIC) were used to analyze the dynamic deformation behavior of PC. Meanwhile, the plate impact experiment was carried out to measure the equation of state of PC in a single-stage gas gun, which consists of asymmetric impact technology, manganin gauges, PVDF, electromagnetic particle velocity gauges. The results indicate that the yield stress of PC increased with the strain rates in both dynamic compression and tension tests. The same phenomenon was similar to elasticity modulus at different strain rate. A constitutive model was used to describe the mechanical behaviors of PC accurately in different strain rates by contrast with the results of 2D-DIC. At last, The D-u Hugoniot curve of polycarbonate in high pressure was fitted by the least square method.

  8. Modelling the parallel bars in men's artistic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Linge, Svein; Hallingstad, Oddvar; Solberg, Flemming

    2006-04-01

    The modelling of the parallel bars-gymnast system is considered. A 2D frontal plane model for the parallel bars apparatus is developed, enabling technique and injury analysis to be undertaken when combined with an interacting gymnast body model. We also demonstrate how such a gymnast body model may be combined with the parallel bars model by use of a simplifying symmetry consideration about the gymnast's sagittal plane. This symmetry consideration implies that just half the gymnast body and one of the two bars, are needed in the total model. We found that midpoint vertical parallel bars dynamics may be modelled by three parameters, using a single damped spring-mass model with linear force-displacement characteristics. Horizontally, as opposed to the vertical direction, bar endpoints accounted for a substantial part (35%) of the midpoint movement, demanding two serially connected springs for this direction. One spring represented the absolute horizontal movement of the bar endpoints, while the other spring represented the superimposed horizontal movement of bar midpoint relative to the endpoints. Both horizontal springs had the same characteristics as the vertical spring, giving a total of nine parameters for the three-spring bar model. Bar parameters were estimated by fitting the modelled bar movements to corresponding measured movements caused by a 140 kg lateral pendulum below the bar midpoint. Validation was then undertaken by comparing model-predicted bar movements to corresponding measurements using lateral pendulums of 100 kg and 60 kg, respectively. Finally, a gymnast handstand position was modelled and used to compare model-predicted and measured bar oscillations following a somersault backwards to a handstand position. The model gave convincing predictions of bar movements both for the 100 kg (1 period, RMS error of 7.0 mm) and 60 kg (1 period, RMS error of 3.7 mm) pendulums, as well as for the somersault landing (2 periods, RMS error of 8.1 mm).

  9. Short Nuss bar procedure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Nuss procedure is now the preferred operation for surgical correction of pectus excavatum (PE). It is a minimally invasive technique, whereby one to three curved metal bars are inserted behind the sternum in order to push it into a normal position. The bars are left in situ for three years and then removed. This procedure significantly improves quality of life and, in most cases, also improves cardiac performance. Previously, the modified Ravitch procedure was used with resection of cartilage and the use of posterior support. This article details the new modified Nuss procedure, which requires the use of shorter bars than specified by the original technique. This technique facilitates the operation as the bar may be guided manually through the chest wall and no additional stabilizing sutures are necessary. PMID:27747185

  10. Mass modeling for bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Thomas G.

    1987-01-01

    Methods of modeling mass for bars are surveyed. A method for extending John Archer's concept of consistent mass beyond just translational inertia effects is included. Recommendations are given for various types of modeling situations.

  11. Effect of a special carbohydrate-protein bar and tomato juice supplementation on oxidative stress markers and vascular endothelial dynamics in ultra-marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Samaras, Antonios; Tsarouhas, Konstantinos; Paschalidis, Eleftherios; Giamouzis, Grigorios; Triposkiadis, Filippos; Tsitsimpikou, Christina; Becker, Aphrodite Tousia; Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Kouretas, Demetrios

    2014-07-01

    It is well established that exercise induces excessive production of reactive species leading to oxidative stress, which has been implicated in oxidative damage of macromolecules, immune dysfunction, muscle damage and fatigue. The present study examined the effect of supplementation of ultra-marathon runners for a two-months-period with a special whey protein bar containing carbohydrates and protein in a specific ratio (1:1) (N=16), prepared using as starting material the by-products of cheese manufacturing, and supplementation with commercially available tomato juice (N=15). Thiobarbituric-acid reactive substances and protein carbonyls were significantly decreased in both supplementation groups, while a pronounced increased in reduced glutathione was observed in the protein bar group. Total anti-oxidant activity remained unchanged in both groups. Flow-mediated dilatation, used as an estimate of endothelial function, was increased in both groups, with a significant rise observed only in the tomato juice administration group. In conclusion, supplementation of ultra marathon runners for a two-months-period with a special protein bar and tomato juice significantly improved the oxidative status of the subjects, while tomato juice also improved vascular endothelial function in these athletes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkins bar configuration. Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1997-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil and rock penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reached the electronics contained in the various mechanical systems. Here, a study to compare two thickness values, 0.125 and 0.250 in. of five materials, GE RTV 630, HS II Silicone, Polysulfide Rubber, Sylgard 184, and Teflon for their shock mitigating characteristics with a split Hopkinson bar configuration has been completed. The five materials have been tested in both unconfined and confined conditions at ambient temperature and with two applied loads of 750 {mu}{epsilon} peak (25 fps peak) with a 100 {micro}s duration, measured at 10% amplitude, and 1500 {mu}{epsilon} peak (50 fps peak) with a 100 {micro}s duration, measured at 10% amplitude. The five materials have been tested at ambient, cold ({minus}65 F), and hot (+165 F) for the unconfined condition with the 750 {mu}{epsilon} peak (25 fps peak) applied load. Time domain and frequency domain analyses of the split Hopkinson bar data have been performed to compare how these materials lengthen the shock pulse

  13. Dynamic mechanical response of magnesium single crystal under compression loading: Experiments, model, and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qizhen

    2011-05-01

    Magnesium single crystal samples are compressed at room temperature under quasistatic (˜0.001 s-1) loading in a universal testing machine and dynamic (430, 1000, and 1200 s-1) loading in a split Hopkinson pressure bar system. Stress-strain curves show that (a) the fracture strain slightly increases with the strain rate; and (b) the maximum strength and strain hardening rate increase significantly when the testing changes from quasistatic to dynamic, although they do not vary much when the strain rate for dynamic testing varies in the range of 430-1200 s-1. The operation of the secondary pyramidal slip system is the dominating deformation mechanism, which leads to a fracture surface with an angle of ˜42° with respect to the loading axial direction. A theoretical material model based on Johnson-Cook law is also derived. The model includes the strain hardening and strain rate hardening terms, and provides the stress-strain relations matching with the experimental results. Finite element simulations for the strain rates used in the experiments predict the mechanical responses of the material that agree well with the experimental data.

  14. Estimation of reliability and dynamic property for polymeric material at high strain rate using SHPB technique and probability theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Hyeok; Lee, Ouk Sub; Kim, Hong Min; Choi, Hye Bin

    2008-11-01

    A modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar technique with aluminum pressure bars and a pulse shaper technique to achieve a closer impedance match between the pressure bars and the specimen materials such as hot temperature degraded POM (Poly Oxy Methylene) and PP (Poly Propylene). The more distinguishable experimental signals were obtained to evaluate the more accurate dynamic deformation behavior of materials under a high strain rate loading condition. A pulse shaping technique is introduced to reduce the non-equilibrium on the dynamic material response by modulation of the incident wave during a short period of test. This increases the rise time of the incident pulse in the SHPB experiment. For the dynamic stress strain curve obtained from SHPB experiment, the Johnson-Cook model is applied as a constitutive equation. The applicability of this constitutive equation is verified by using the probabilistic reliability estimation method. Two reliability methodologies such as the FORM and the SORM have been proposed. The limit state function(LSF) includes the Johnson-Cook model and applied stresses. The LSF in this study allows more statistical flexibility on the yield stress than a paper published before. It is found that the failure probability estimated by using the SORM is more reliable than those of the FORM/ It is also noted that the failure probability increases with increase of the applied stress. Moreover, it is also found that the parameters of Johnson-Cook model such as A and n, and the applied stress are found to affect the failure probability more severely than the other random variables according to the sensitivity analysis.

  15. Dynamic Fracture Initiation Toughness at Elevated Temperatures With Application to the New Generation of Titanium Aluminide Alloys. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas; Draper, Susan; Shukla, Arun (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a new generation of titanium aluminide alloy, named Gamma-Met PX, has been developed with better rolling and post-rolling characteristics. I'revious work on this alloy has shown the material to have higher strengths at room and elevated temperatures when compared with other gamma titanium aluminides. In particular, this new alloy has shown increased ductility at elevated temperatures under both quasi-static and high strain rate uniaxial compressive loading. However, its high strain rate tensile ductility at room and elevated temperatures is limited to approx. 1%. In the present chapter, results of a study to investigate the effects of loading rate and test temperature on the dynamic fracture initiation toughness in Gamma-Met PX are presented. Modified split Hopkinson pressure bar was used along with high-speed photography to determine the crack initiation time. Three-point bend dynamic fracture experiments were conducted at impact speeds of approx. 1 m/s and tests temperatures of up-to 1200 C. The results show that thc dynamic fracture initiation toughness decreases with increasing test temperatures beyond 600 C. Furthermore, thc effect of long time high temperature air exposure on the fracture toughness was investigated. The dynamic fracture initiation toughness was found to decrease with increasing exposure time. The reasons behind this drop are analyzed and discussed.

  16. Studying Barred Galaxies by Means of Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma

    We describe two morphological structures of barred galaxies with the help of numerical simulations. The first one is a feature seen in face-on barred galaxies, the ansae, probably very important dynamically speaking. The second one are the Boxy/Peanut bulges in disc galaxies. They have been associated to stellar bars, and are a result of the secular evolution of barred galaxies. We analyze their properties in a large sample of N-body simulations, using different methods to measure their strength, shape and possible asymmetry, and then inter-compare the results. Some of these methods can be applied to both simulations and observations. In particular, we seek correlations between bar and peanut properties, which, when applied to real galaxies, will give information on bars in edge-on galaxies, and on peanuts in face-on galaxies.

  17. Dynamic compressive failure of a glass ceramic under lateral confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weinong; Ravichandran, G.

    1997-08-01

    An experimental technique has been developed for imposing controlled multi-axial loading on cylindrical ceramic specimens. The multi-axial loading is achieved by superposing passive lateral confinement upon axial compression. Descriptions of the experimental technique, as well as experimental results for a machinable glass ceramic, Macor, are presented. The axial compression was applied using a Kolsky (split Hopkinson) pressure bar modified to apply a single loading pulse. Experiments were also conducted under quasi-static conditions using a servo-hydraulic load frame. The specimens were confined laterally using shrink-fit metal sleeves. The confining pressure ranges from 10 to 230 MPa. Under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions, the experimental results showed that the failure mode changes from fragmentation by axial splitting without confinement to localized faulting under moderate lateral confinement (10-120 MPa). The process of fault initiation was characterized in detail for specimens under moderate confinement. Based on the experimental results, a compressive failure mechanism was proposed for brittle materials under moderate lateral confinement. The Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion was found to fit the experimental strength data. The failure criterion is shown to be consistent with the analytical results from a micromechanical model for brittle failure. Transition from brittle to ductile behavior was observed under high confinement (230 MPa).

  18. Experimental study on dynamic splitting of recycled concrete using SHPB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yubin; Yu, Shuisheng; Cai, Yong

    2015-09-01

    To study the recycled concrete splitting tensile properties and fracture state with various recycled coarse aggregate replacement percentage (i.e. 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%), the dynamic splitting test of recycled concrete was carried out using large diameter (75 mm) split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). The results show that the recycled concrete splitting tensile strength increases with the increase of loading rate, and the loading rate also affects the recycled concrete fracture state, which indicates that the recycled concrete has obvious rate sensitivity. The damage state of the recycled concrete is not only the destruction of the interface between coarse aggregate and cement mortar, but also associates with the fracture damage of aggregates. Under the same water cement ratio, when the replacement percentage of coarse aggregates is around 50%-75%, the gradation of natural and recycled coarse aggregate is optimal, and thus the splitting tensile strength is the largest. This study offers theoretical basis for the engineering applications of recycled concrete.

  19. Experimental study on the dynamic mechanical behaviors of polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yubo; Cai, Xuanming; Ye, Nan; Huang, Wei; Hypervelocity Impact Research Center Team

    2015-06-01

    Polycarbonate (PC) is a widely used engineering material in aerospace field, since it has excellent mechanical and optical property. In present study, both compress and tensile tests of PC were conducted at high strain rates by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar. The high-speed camera and 2D digital speckle correlation method (DIC) were used to analyze the dynamic deformation behavior of PC. Meanwhile, the plate impact experiment was carried out to measure the equation of state of PC in a single-stage gas gun, which consists of asymmetric impact technology, manganin gauges, PVDF, electromagnetic particle velocity gauges. The results indicate that the yield stress of PC increased with the strain rates. The strain softening occurred when the stress over yield point except the tensile tests in the strain rates of 1076s-1 and 1279s-1. The ZWT model can describe the constitutive behaviors of PC accurately in different strain rates by contrast with the results of 2D-DIC. At last, The D-u Hugoniot curve of polycarbonate in high pressure was fitted by the least square method. And the final results showed more closely to Cater and Mash than other previous data.

  20. Breaking through the Bar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Katti

    2011-01-01

    Howard University School of Law had a problem, and school officials knew it. Over a 20-year period, 40 percent of its graduates who took the Maryland bar exam failed it on their first try. During the next 24 months--the time frame required to determine its "eventual pass rate"--almost 90 percent of the students did pass. What they did…

  1. Toll Bar on Sea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Dave

    2008-01-01

    In the summer of 2007 the United Kingdom experienced some of the heaviest rainfall since records began. Toll Bar in South Yorkshire featured prominently in media coverage as the village and the homes surrounding it began to flood. Many people lost everything: their homes, their furniture, their possessions. In an effort to come to terms with what…

  2. Toll Bar on Sea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Dave

    2008-01-01

    In the summer of 2007 the United Kingdom experienced some of the heaviest rainfall since records began. Toll Bar in South Yorkshire featured prominently in media coverage as the village and the homes surrounding it began to flood. Many people lost everything: their homes, their furniture, their possessions. In an effort to come to terms with what…

  3. Breaking through the Bar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Katti

    2011-01-01

    Howard University School of Law had a problem, and school officials knew it. Over a 20-year period, 40 percent of its graduates who took the Maryland bar exam failed it on their first try. During the next 24 months--the time frame required to determine its "eventual pass rate"--almost 90 percent of the students did pass. What they did…

  4. Dynamic Fracture Properties of Rocks Subjected to Static Pre-load Using Notched Semi-circular Bend Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rong; Li, Kang; Xia, Kaiwen; Lin, Yuliang; Yao, Wei; Lu, Fangyun

    2016-10-01

    A dynamic load superposed on a static pre-load is a key problem in deep underground rock engineering projects. Based on a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar test system, the notched semi-circular bend (NSCB) method is selected to investigate the fracture initiation toughness of rocks subjected to pre-load. In this study, a two-dimensional ANSYS finite element simulation model is developed to calculate the dimensionless stress intensity factor. Three groups of NSCB specimen are tested under a pre-load of 0, 37 and 74 % of the maximum static load and with the loading rate ranging from 0 to 60 GPa m1/2 s-1. The results show that under a given pre-load, the fracture initiation toughness of rock increases with the loading rate, resembling the typical rate dependence of materials. Furthermore, the dynamic rock fracture toughness decreases with the static pre-load at a given loading rate. The total fracture toughness, defined as the sum of the dynamic fracture toughness and initial stress intensity factor calculated from the pre-load, increases with the pre-load at a given loading rate. An empirical equation is used to represent the effect of loading rate and pre-load force, and the results show that this equation can depict the trend of the experimental data.

  5. Dynamic tensile deformation and fracture of a highly particle-filled composite using SHPB and high-speed DIC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z.; Chen, P.; Guo, B.; Huang, F.

    2012-08-01

    In this work, various tensile tests, including Brazilian disc test (BDT), flattened Brazilian disc (FBD) test and semi-circular bending (SCB) test, were carried out on a highly particle-filled composite by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). With the consideration of low strength and low wave impedance of the materials, a quartz crystal transducer was embedded in SHPB to measure the loading forces. A high-speed camera was used to capture the deformation and fracture process of materials. Digital image correlation (DIC) method was used to process these digital images to obtain the dynamic deformation information. Based on the measured strain fields, the crack growth path was determined and the failure mechanism of samples was analyzed. Combining SHPB and DIC method, the indirect tensile stress strain plots of disc samples were obtained, and the dynamic fracture toughness of materials was measured using both FBD and SCB tests. The results show that the tensile failure strength and fracture toughness increases with the increase of strain rates, exhibiting strain rate dependence. The high-speed DIC method combined with SHPB is effective to study the dynamic tensile behaviour of brittle materials with low strengths.

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Laser Solid Formed Ti-6Al-4V Alloy Under Dynamic Shear Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Guo, Wei-Guo; Su, Yu; Wang, Jianjun; Lin, Xin; Huang, Weidong

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the mechanical properties of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy fabricated by laser solid forming technology, both static and dynamic shear tests were conducted on hat-shaped specimens by a servohydraulic testing machine and an enhanced split Hopkinson pressure bar system, over a temperature range of 173-573 K. The microstructure of both the original and deformed specimens was characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that: (1) the anisotropy of shear properties is not significant regardless of the visible stratification and the prior- β grains that grow epitaxially along the depositing direction; (2) the ultimate shear strength of this material is lower than that of those Ti-6Al-4V alloys fabricated by forging and extrusion; (3) the adiabatic shear bands of approximately 25.6-36.4 μm in width can develop at all selected temperatures during the dynamic shear deformation; and (4) the observed microstructure and measured microhardness indicate that the grains become refined in adiabatic shear band. Estimation of the temperature rise shows that the temperature in shear band exceeds the recrystallization temperature. The process of rotational dynamic recrystallization is considered to be the cause of the grain refinement in shear band.

  7. Dynamic tensile stress-strain characteristics of carbon/epoxy laminated composites in through-thickness direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Kenji; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    The effect of strain rate up to approximately ɛ˙ = 102/s on the tensile stress-strain properties of unidirectional and cross-ply carbon/epoxy laminated composites in the through-thickness direction is investigated. Waisted cylindrical specimens machined out of the laminated composites in the through-thickness direction are used in both static and dynamic tests. The dynamic tensile stress-strain curves up to fracture are determined using the split Hopkinson bar (SHB). The low and intermediate strain-rate tensile stress-strain relations up to fracture are measured on an Instron 5500R testing machine. It is demonstrated that the ultimate tensile strength and absorbed energy up to fracture increase significantly, while the fracture strain decreases slightly with increasing strain rate. Macro- and micro-scopic examinations reveal a marked difference in the fracture surfaces between the static and dynamic tension specimens.

  8. Dynamic tensile deformation behavior of Zr-based amorphous alloy matrix composites reinforced with tungsten or tantalum fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyungsoo; Kim, Gyeong Su; Jeon, Changwoo; Sohn, Seok Su; Lee, Sang-Bok; Lee, Sang-Kwan; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-07-01

    Zr-based amorphous alloy matrix composites reinforced with tungsten (W) or tantalum (Ta) continuous fibers were fabricated by liquid pressing process. Their dynamic tensile properties were investigated in relation with microstructures and deformation mechanisms by using a split Hopkinson tension bar. The dynamic tensile test results indicated that the maximum strength of the W-fiber-reinforced composite (757 MPa) was much lower than the quasi-statically measured strength, whereas the Ta-fiber-reinforced composite showed very high maximum strength (2129 MPa). In the W-fiber-reinforced composite, the fracture abruptly occurred in perpendicular to the tensile direction because W fibers did not play a role in blocking cracks propagated from the amorphous matrix, thereby resulting in abrupt fracture within elastic range and consequent low tensile strength. The very high dynamic tensile strength of the Ta-fiber-reinforced composite could be explained by the presence of ductile Ta fibers in terms of mechanisms such as (1) interrupted propagation of cracks initiated in the amorphous matrix, (2) formation of lots of cracks in the amorphous matrix, and (3) sharing of loads and severe deformation (necking) of Ta fibers in cracked regions.

  9. Effects of Dynamic Multi-directional Loading on the Microstructural Evolution and Thermal Stability of Pure Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Yadong

    2016-09-01

    Microstructural evolution and thermal stability of 1050 commercial pure aluminum processed by means of split Hopkinson pressure bar and Instron-3369 mechanical testing machine to an accumulated strain of 3.6 were investigated. The nominal strain rates reached up to 3.0 × 103 and 1 × 10-3/s, respectively. Samples in the deformed state and annealed in the temperature interval 423-523 K for 1 h were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM observations reveal that the initial coarse grains are refined significantly, and the deformed structures mainly consist of equiaxed subgrains and dislocation cells with a high density of interior dislocation. In addition, the average subgrain/cell sizes of these two kinds of deformed samples are nearly the same. As to recovery behavior, recovered subgrains are observed at 473 (dynamic) versus 523 K (quasi-static), that is to say, recovery is fairly slow in the quasi-static deformed samples. It is therefore to be expected that thermal stability of this dynamic deformed aluminum is weaker than that of the quasi-static compressed one, which is due to the higher density of dislocation and nonequilibrium dislocation configurations produced during dynamic loading.

  10. Full Field Measurement of The Dynamic Response of AA6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy under High Strain Rate Compression and Torsion Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odoh, Daniel Oghenekewhe Oluwatobi

    The dynamic response of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy under high strain rate loading in compression and torsion loading conditions was studied using the split Hopkinson pressure bar, the Kolsky torsion bar, and the high speed digital image correlation system. AA6061-T6 alloy, the most widely used in the AA6000 series, is a multi-purpose Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy containing about 0.4 % wt. of Cu and other alloying additives. The properties of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy including medium to high strength, good fracture toughness, and high corrosion resistance make it to find application in high performance structures such as the automotive parts, panels, and armored carriers. In this work, the effect of strain rate during dynamic test on formation of adiabatic shear bands in AA6061-T6 alloy was investigated. A post deformation analysis of the tested specimen was performed in order to determine the damage evolution and strain localization along the narrow adiabatic shear bands within the specimen. The formation of an adiabatic shear band in the aluminum alloy tested was found to depend on the strain rate at which the test was conducted. Stress, strain, and strain rate data obtained from the elastic waves in the compression and torsion bar tests were also compared with those obtained using the high speed digital cameras. Results show good agreement between both measurement techniques with the 3D digital image correlation technique giving a slightly lower result. Scanning and electron microscopy results show that both deformed and transformed bands can be formed in AA6061-T6 alloy during dynamic loading. The type of adiabatic shear band formed depends on the strain rate at which test was performed.

  11. Dynamic fracture resilience of elk antler: Biomimetic inspiration for improved crashworthiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulin, Robb M.; Chen, Po-Yu; Jiang, Fengchun; McKittrick, Joanna; Vecchio, Kenneth S.

    2010-01-01

    The antler of the North American elk has been shown to have impressive fracture resistance under quasi-static loads, but given its viscoelastic behavior and impact nature of loading, questions remain as to its mechanical, and in particular, fracture behavior under dynamic loading. Samples were tested using a unique split-pressure Hopkin-son bar (SPHB) for four-point bending experiments in order to measure the fracture toughness of this material Interestingly, the hierarchical structure of antler had a strong influence on crack propagation characteristics, and cracks tended to propagate along the osteonal growth direction, whether loaded parallel or perpendicular to the osteonal growth direction. This occurred to such a degree so as to stop all crack propagation through the sample on transverse specimens, thus inhibiting the ability to measure a valid crack initiation toughness and demonstrating the extreme resilience of antler to resist dynamic fracture. The high resilience of antler to impact loading may serve as biomimetic inspiration to future material development for crashworthiness and defense applications.

  12. Dynamic Mechanical Response of Biomedical 316L Stainless Steel as Function of Strain Rate and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woei-Shyan; Chen, Tao-Hsing; Lin, Chi-Feng; Luo, Wen-Zhen

    2011-01-01

    A split Hopkinson pressure bar is used to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of biomedical 316L stainless steel under strain rates ranging from 1 × 103 s−1 to 5 × 103 s−1 and temperatures between 25°C and 800°C. The results indicate that the flow stress, work-hardening rate, strain rate sensitivity, and thermal activation energy are all significantly dependent on the strain, strain rate, and temperature. For a constant temperature, the flow stress, work-hardening rate, and strain rate sensitivity increase with increasing strain rate, while the thermal activation energy decreases. Catastrophic failure occurs only for the specimens deformed at a strain rate of 5 × 103 s−1 and temperatures of 25°C or 200°C. Scanning electron microscopy observations show that the specimens fracture in a ductile shear mode. Optical microscopy analyses reveal that the number of slip bands within the grains increases with an increasing strain rate. Moreover, a dynamic recrystallisation of the deformed microstructure is observed in the specimens tested at the highest temperature of 800°C. PMID:22216015

  13. An investigation on dynamic tensile properties of TiAl intermetallic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Lin, T.L.; Zhou, Y.; Xia, Y.; Law, C.C.

    1999-07-01

    Room-temperature tensile properties of polycrystalline Ti-47Al-2Mn-2Nb alloy with nearly lamellar (NL) microstructures were investigated at the strain rate between 10{sup {minus}5} and 1,000 s{sup {minus}1} using a self-designed Split-Hopkinson tensile bar setup with a rotating disk and conventional testing machine. It was found that tensile ductility varies within a narrow range with the strain rate while dynamic strengths ({sigma}{sup d}) of the alloy are obviously higher than static strengths ({sigma}{sup s}). There exists a linear relationship between {sigma}{sup s} and the logarithm of the strain rate (ln{dot {epsilon}}), and between {sigma}{sup d} and the strain rate itself ({dot {epsilon}}). Fractography analysis indicated that the alloy fractured in a mixed mode of predominant transgranular cleavage and minor intergranular cracking under static and dynamic strain rates. Environmental effect was excluded from the main cause for the room-temperature brittleness of the investigated alloy.

  14. Investigation of Dynamic Crack Coalescence Using a Gypsum-Like 3D Printing Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao; Zhao, Gao-Feng; Zhu, Jianbo; Zhao, Yi-Xin; Shen, Luming

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic crack coalescence attracts great attention in rock mechanics. However, specimen preparation in experimental study is a time-consuming and difficult procedure. In this work, a gypsum-like material by powder bed and inkjet 3D printing technique was applied to produce specimens with preset cracks for split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) test. From micro X-ray CT test, it was found that the 3D printing technique could successfully prepare specimens that contain preset cracks with width of 0.2 mm. Basic mechanical properties of the 3D printing material, i.e., the elastic modulus, the Poisson's ratio, the density, the compressive strength, the indirect tensile strength, and the fracture toughness, were obtained and reported. Unlike 3D printed specimens using polylactic acid, these gypsum-like specimens can produce failure patterns much closer to those observed in classical rock mechanical tests. Finally, the dynamic crack coalescence of the 3D printed specimens with preset cracks were captured using a high-speed camera during SHPB tests. Failure patterns of these 3D printed specimens are similar to the specimens made by Portland cement concrete. Our results indicate that sample preparation by 3D printing is highly competitive due to its quickness in prototyping, precision and flexibility on the geometry, and high material homogeneity.

  15. Dynamic Mechanical Response of Biomedical 316L Stainless Steel as Function of Strain Rate and Temperature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woei-Shyan; Chen, Tao-Hsing; Lin, Chi-Feng; Luo, Wen-Zhen

    2011-01-01

    A split Hopkinson pressure bar is used to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of biomedical 316L stainless steel under strain rates ranging from 1 × 10(3) s(-1) to 5 × 10(3) s(-1) and temperatures between 25°C and 800°C. The results indicate that the flow stress, work-hardening rate, strain rate sensitivity, and thermal activation energy are all significantly dependent on the strain, strain rate, and temperature. For a constant temperature, the flow stress, work-hardening rate, and strain rate sensitivity increase with increasing strain rate, while the thermal activation energy decreases. Catastrophic failure occurs only for the specimens deformed at a strain rate of 5 × 10(3) s(-1) and temperatures of 25°C or 200°C. Scanning electron microscopy observations show that the specimens fracture in a ductile shear mode. Optical microscopy analyses reveal that the number of slip bands within the grains increases with an increasing strain rate. Moreover, a dynamic recrystallisation of the deformed microstructure is observed in the specimens tested at the highest temperature of 800°C.

  16. Effects of Temperature on Dynamic Properties of a Biodegradable Polymer Made from Corn Starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Ito, Noriomi; Kawase, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Koichi

    The effect of strain rate on compressive properties of starch-based biodegradable plastics (Nihon Cornstarch Co., CPR-M2) was examined. Dynamic stress-strain curves of starch-based biodegradable plastics were measured over a wide range of strain rates from 10-5 s-1 to 104 s-1, using a quasi-static compression testing machine and a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. The strain rate slightly affected Young's modulus and considerably increased 7% flow stress. Empirical equation for 7% flow stress was derived for the strain rates from 10-5 s-1 to 104 s-1. In addition, the effect of temperature on Young's modulus and flow stress was also examined in a range from 4°C to 63°C. A master curve of 7% flow stress, reduced to 24°C, was made. The values of activation energies related to the α and β relaxation processes were respectively estimated from the master curve of 7% flow stress and from the best fit of equations based on Ree-Eyring theory and Bauwens' treatment. Temperature measurement of specimens was also made using thermocouples during dynamic compression.

  17. Combined experimental and numerical approach for identification of dynamic material model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirs, J.; Verleysen, P.; van Paepegem, W.; Degrieck, J.

    2010-06-01

    Extraction of the material stress-strain curve from a dynamic tensile or shear experiment is not straightforward. Indeed, stress and strain are not homogeneously distributed in the specimen, and consequently no one-one relation exists between the measured elongation and strain on one hand, and the measured force and stress on the other hand. This work aims at improving the accuracy of the stress-strain curves calculated from high strain rate experiments and the modelling of the material behaviour. Therefore numerical simulations are used to determine the relationship between the average stress-strain and local effective stress-strain. The material model parameters used in these simulations are improved during an iterative procedure which combines the experimental results and the simulated stress and strain distribution. Stress triaxiality, local temperature and strain rate are taken into account. The method is applied to dynamic tensile and shear experiments on a Ti6Al4V alloy carried out on a split Hopkinson bar set up. The Johnson-Cook model is used to describe the strain rate and temperature dependent material behaviour. The two types of tests are used separately or simultaneously to extract and model the material behaviour. It is found that using tensile and shear experiments simultaneously has clear advantages. The same approach is used to identify parameters for the Johnson-Cook damage initiation criteria.

  18. The dynamic Virtual Fields Method on rubbers at medium and high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung-Ho; Siviour, Clive R.

    2015-09-01

    Elastomeric materials are widely used for energy absorption applications, often experiencing high strain rate deformations. The mechanical characterization of rubbers at high strain rates presents several experimental difficulties, especially associated with achieving adequate signal to noise ratio and static stress equilibrium, when using a conventional technique such as the split Hopkinson pressure bar. In the present study, these problems are avoided by using the dynamic Virtual Fields Method (VFM) in which acceleration fields, clearly generated by the non-equilibrium state, are utilized as a force measurement with in the frame work of the principle of virtual work equation. In this paper, two dynamic VFM based techniques are used to characterise an EPDM rubber. These are denoted as the linear and nonlinear VFM and are developed for (respectively) medium (drop-weight) and high (gas-gun) strain-rate experiments. The use of the two VFMs combined with high-speed imaging analysed by digital imaging correlation allows the identification of the parameters of a given rubber mechanical model; in this case the Ogden model is used.

  19. Warp evidence in precessing galactic bar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Martín, P.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Masdemont, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    Most galaxies have a warped shape when they are seen edge-on. The reason for this curious form is not completely known so far, so in this work we apply dynamical system tools to contribute to its explanation. Starting from a simple, but realistic model formed by a bar and a disc, we study the effect of a small misalignment between the angular momentum of the system and its angular velocity. To this end, a precession model was developed and considered, assuming that the bar behaves like a rigid body. After checking that the periodic orbits inside the bar continue to be the skeleton of the inner system even after inflicting a precession to the potential, we computed the invariant manifolds of the unstable periodic orbits departing from the equilibrium points at the ends of the bar to find evidence of their warped shapes. As is well known, the invariant manifolds associated with these periodic orbits drive the arms and rings of barred galaxies and constitute the skeleton of these building blocks. Looking at them from a side-on viewpoint, we find that these manifolds present warped shapes like those recognised in observations. Lastly, test particle simulations have been performed to determine how the stars are affected by the applied precession, this way confirming the theoretical results.

  20. Predictions for the $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow \\bar{K}^{\\ast 0}$ X(YZ) and $\\bar{B}^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow\\phi$ X(YZ) with X(4160), Y(3940), Z(3930)

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Wei -Hong; Molina, R.; Xie, Ju -Jun; Doring, M.; Oset, E.

    2015-05-22

    We investigate the decay of $\\bar B^0 \\to \\bar K^{*0} R$ and $\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi R$ with $R$ being the $X(4160)$, $Y(3940)$, $Z(3930)$ resonances. Under the assumption that these states are dynamically generated from the vector-vector interaction, as has been concluded from several theoretical studies, we use a reaction mechanism of quark production at the elementary level, followed by hadronization of one final $q \\bar q$ pair into two vectors and posterior final state interaction of this pair of vector mesons to produce the resonances. With this procedure we are able to predict five ratios for these decays, which are closely linked to the dynamical nature of these states, and also predict the order of magnitude of the branching ratios which we find of the order of $10^{-4}$, well within the present measurable range. In order to further test the dynamical nature of these resonances we study the $\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi D^* \\bar D^*$ and $\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi D_s^* \\bar D_s^*$ decays close to the $D^* \\bar D^*$ and $D_s^* \\bar D_s^*$ thresholds and make predictions for the ratio of the mass distributions in these decays and the $\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi R$ decay widths. In conclusion, the measurement of these decays rates can help unravel the nature of these resonances.

  1. Predictions for the $$\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow \\bar{K}^{\\ast 0}$$ X(YZ) and $$\\bar{B}^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow\\phi$$ X(YZ) with X(4160), Y(3940), Z(3930)

    DOE PAGES

    Liang, Wei -Hong; Molina, R.; Xie, Ju -Jun; ...

    2015-05-22

    We investigate the decay ofmore » $$\\bar B^0 \\to \\bar K^{*0} R$$ and $$\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi R$$ with $R$ being the $X(4160)$, $Y(3940)$, $Z(3930)$ resonances. Under the assumption that these states are dynamically generated from the vector-vector interaction, as has been concluded from several theoretical studies, we use a reaction mechanism of quark production at the elementary level, followed by hadronization of one final $$q \\bar q$$ pair into two vectors and posterior final state interaction of this pair of vector mesons to produce the resonances. With this procedure we are able to predict five ratios for these decays, which are closely linked to the dynamical nature of these states, and also predict the order of magnitude of the branching ratios which we find of the order of $$10^{-4}$$, well within the present measurable range. In order to further test the dynamical nature of these resonances we study the $$\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi D^* \\bar D^*$$ and $$\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi D_s^* \\bar D_s^*$$ decays close to the $$D^* \\bar D^*$$ and $$D_s^* \\bar D_s^*$$ thresholds and make predictions for the ratio of the mass distributions in these decays and the $$\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi R$$ decay widths. In conclusion, the measurement of these decays rates can help unravel the nature of these resonances.« less

  2. THE MASS PROFILE AND SHAPE OF BARS IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G): SEARCH FOR AN AGE INDICATOR FOR BARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taehyun; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Sheth, Kartik; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Zaritsky, Dennis; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Holwerda, Benne; Ho, Luis C.; Comerón, Sébastien; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Knapen, Johan H.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Hinz, Joannah L.; Buta, Ronald J.; Kim, Minjin; Madore, Barry F.; and others

    2015-01-20

    We have measured the radial light profiles and global shapes of bars using two-dimensional 3.6 μm image decompositions for 144 face-on barred galaxies from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. The bar surface brightness profile is correlated with the stellar mass and bulge-to-total (B/T) ratio of their host galaxies. Bars in massive and bulge-dominated galaxies (B/T > 0.2) show a flat profile, while bars in less massive, disk-dominated galaxies (B/T ∼ 0) show an exponential, disk-like profile with a wider spread in the radial profile than in the bulge-dominated galaxies. The global two-dimensional shapes of bars, however, are rectangular/boxy, independent of the bulge or disk properties. We speculate that because bars are formed out of disks, bars initially have an exponential (disk-like) profile that evolves over time, trapping more disk stars to boxy bar orbits. This leads bars to become stronger and have flatter profiles. The narrow spread of bar radial profiles in more massive disks suggests that these bars formed earlier (z > 1), while the disk-like profiles and a larger spread in the radial profile in less massive systems imply a later and more gradual evolution, consistent with the cosmological evolution of bars inferred from observational studies. Therefore, we expect that the flatness of the bar profile can be used as a dynamical age indicator of the bar to measure the time elapsed since the bar formation. We argue that cosmic gas accretion is required to explain our results on bar profile and the presence of gas within the bar region.

  3. Environmental regulation of cloud and star formation in galactic bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, F.; Bournaud, F.; Emsellem, E.; Agertz, O.; Athanassoula, E.; Combes, F.; Elmegreen, B.; Kraljic, K.; Motte, F.; Teyssier, R.

    2015-12-01

    The strong time-dependence of the dynamics of galactic bars yields a complex and rapidly evolving distribution of dense gas and star forming regions. Although bars mainly host regions void of any star formation activity, their extremities can gather the physical conditions for the formation of molecular complexes and mini-starbursts. Using a sub-parsec resolution hydrodynamical simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy, we probe these conditions to explore how and where bar (hydro-)dynamics favours the formation or destruction of molecular clouds and stars. The interplay between the kpc-scale dynamics (gas flows, shear) and the parsec-scale (turbulence) is key to this problem. We find a strong dichotomy between the leading and trailing sides of the bar, in term of cloud fragmentation and in the age distribution of the young stars. After orbiting along the bar edge, these young structures slow down at the extremities of the bar, where orbital crowding increases the probability of cloud-cloud collision. We find that such events increase the Mach number of the cloud, leading to an enhanced star formation efficiency and finally the formation of massive stellar associations, in a fashion similar to galaxy-galaxy interactions. We highlight the role of bar dynamics in decoupling young stars from the clouds in which they form, and discuss the implications on the injection of feedback into the interstellar medium (ISM), in particular in the context of galaxy formation.

  4. Measurements of vertical bar Vcb vertical bar and vertical bar Vub vertical bar at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Rotondo, M.

    2005-10-12

    We report results from the BABAR Collaboration on the semileptonic B decays, highlighting the measurements of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements Vub and Vcb. We describe the techniques used to obtain the matrix element |Vcb| using the measurement of the inclusive B {yields} Xclv process and a large sample of exclusive B {yields} D*lv decays. The vertical bar Vub vertical bar matrix elements has been measured studying different kinematic variables of the B {yields} Xulv process, and also with the exclusive reconstruction of B {yields} {pi}({rho})lv decays.

  5. On the bar formation mechanism in galaxies with cuspy bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyachenko, E. V.; Berczik, P.; Just, A.

    2016-11-01

    We show by numerical simulations that a purely stellar dynamical model composed of an exponential disc, a cuspy bulge, and a Navarro-Frenk-White halo with parameters relevant to the Milky Way is subject to bar formation. Taking into account the finite disc thickness, the bar formation can be explained by the usual bar instability, in spite of the presence of an inner Lindblad resonance, that is believed to damp any global modes. The effect of replacing the live halo and bulge by a fixed external axisymmetric potential (rigid models) is studied. It is shown that while the e-folding time of bar instability increases significantly (from 250 to 500 Myr), the bar pattern speed remains almost the same. For the latter, our average value of 55 km s-1 kpc-1 agrees with the assumption that the Hercules stream in the solar neighbourhood is an imprint of the bar-disc interaction at the outer Lindblad resonance of the bar. Vertical averaging of the radial force in the central disc region comparable to the characteristic scale length allows us to reproduce the bar pattern speed and the growth rate of the rigid models, using normal mode analysis of linear perturbation theory in a razor-thin disc. The strong increase of the e-folding time with decreasing disc mass predicted by the mode analysis suggests that bars in galaxies similar to the Milky Way have formed only recently.

  6. Membrane biology: fission behind BARs.

    PubMed

    Haucke, Volker

    2012-06-05

    Membrane bending is accomplished in part by amphipathic helix insertion into the bilayer and the assembly of BAR domain scaffolds preparing the membrane for fission. Two recent studies highlight the roles of amphipathic helices and BAR scaffolds in membrane fission and establish the structural basis of membrane bending by the N-BAR protein endophilin.

  7. bar{D}Σ c* and bar{D}nolimits*Σ c Interactions and LHCb Pentaquarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun

    Recently, LHCb collaboration reported the observation of two hidden-charmed resonances Pc(4380) and Pc(4450) consistent with hidden-charmed pentaquarks. We perform a dynamical investigation about the bar{D}Σ c*(2520) and bar{D}nolimits*Σ c(2455) interactions which are described by the meson exchanges in a quasipotential Bethe-Salpeter equation approach. Two poles around 4450 and 4390 MeV are produced from the bar{D}nolimits*Σ c(2455) interaction with spin parities 3/2- and 5/2+, respectively. The peak for 5/2+ state has a comparable hight as that of 3/2- state in the J/ψ p invariant mass spectrum. Another bound state with spin-parity JP = 3/2- is produced from the bar{D}Σ c*(2520) interaction. Such results suggest that the narrower LHCb pentaquark Pc(4450) can be well interpreted as a 5/2+ bar{D}nolimits*Σ c(2455) molecular state while the Pc(4380) is a 3/2- bar{D}nolimits*Σ c(2455) molecular state mixed with other secondary origins.

  8. Living with others inside the self: decolonising transplantation, selfhood and the body politic in Nalo Hopkinson's Brown Girl in the Ring.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Donna

    2016-12-01

    This article examines anxieties concerning organ transplantation in Nalo Hopkinson's prize-winning novel Brown Girl in the Ring (1998). The main focus is how this novel re-imagines subjectivity and selfhood as an embodied metaphor for the reconfiguring of broader sociopolitical relations. In other words, this article analyses the relationship between the transplanted body and the body politic, arguing that a post-transplant identity, where there is little separation between donor and recipient, is the foundation for a politics based on responsibility for others. Such a responsibility poses a challenge to the race and class segregation that is integral to the post-apocalyptic world of Hopkinson's novel. Transplantation is not a utopian vision of an egalitarian society coming together in one body; rather, this biotechnological intervention offers a potentially different mode of thinking what it means to work across race, class and embodied division, while always recalling the violence that might facilitate so-called medical progress. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Strained graphene Hall bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanović, S. P.; Peeters, F. M.

    2017-02-01

    The effects of strain, induced by a Gaussian bump, on the magnetic field dependent transport properties of a graphene Hall bar are investigated. The numerical simulations are performed using both classical and quantum mechanical transport theory and we found that both approaches exhibit similar characteristic features. The effects of the Gaussian bump are manifested by a decrease of the bend resistance, R B, around zero-magnetic field and the occurrence of side-peaks in R B. These features are explained as a consequence of bump-assisted scattering of electrons towards different terminals of the Hall bar. Using these features we are able to give an estimate of the size of the bump. Additional oscillations in R B are found in the quantum description that are due to the population/depopulation of Landau levels. The bump has a minor influence on the Hall resistance even for very high values of the pseudo-magnetic field. When the bump is placed outside the center of the Hall bar valley polarized electrons can be collected in the leads.

  10. Bar coded retroreflective target

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  11. Dynamic Characterization of Shape Memory Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, V. S.; Imam, M. A.

    2004-07-01

    Evaluation of high strain rate behavior of materials at pre-fracture strains is very important where the materials are considered for ballistic applications. High compression strain rate response of shape memory titanium alloy including a typical titanium alloy are determined using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). The conventional SHPB technique has been routinely used for measuring high strain rate properties of high strength materials. A split Hopkinson bar consisting of 10-mm diameter Maraging 350 alloy incident, transmitter, and striker bars was used to determine the compressive response of these alloys. Attempts are underway to use this technique to extract useful information required to design a material for improving its impact resistance. Initial test results performed on these different titanium alloys show an interesting trend with change of composition. Attempts were made to compare the stress-strain data of these alloys with the published data for titanium alloys. Stress-strain data and changes resulting in the microstructure from strain rates in the regime 1800-4000/s are presented.

  12. Dynamic Tensile Test Results for Several Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    8217• AFWAL-TR-82-4026 SDYNAMIC TENSILE TEST RESULTS FOR SEVERAL METALS SUNIVERSITY OF DAYTON RESEA CH INSTITUTE ’ 300 COLLEGE PARK DR. DAYTON, OHIO... Tensile Test Results for March - September 1981 Several Metals 6. PERFORMING oDG. REPORT NUMBER UDR-TR-82-05 7. AUTHOR(s) S. CONTRACT OfR GRANT NUMBER(&) S...tensile stresses above 10 s The split Hopkinson bar tensile test (see next section) can extend this range another decade. Resolution of rapidly

  13. Three-Dimensional Dynamic Loading of Sand

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    selecting the right constitutive relations; in this wor k several were investigated, however onl y one is presented here: a tabular EOS ( sesame table) with...Hopkinson bar. A su ite of sesame tables for vary ing soil moisture content has been included in the stan dard release of CTH since version 8.0. For the...simulations presented here the eos7860 tabular sesame was used, which was formulated for 4% moisture and bulk SiO2 sand, where the grain densit y is

  14. Effect of microstructure on static and dynamic mechanical properties of high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jinbo

    The high speed deformation behavior of a commercially available dual phase (DP) steel was studied by means of split Hopkinson bar apparatus in shear punch (25m/s) and tension (1000s-1) modes with an emphasis on the influence of microstructure. The cold rolled sheet material was subjected to a variety of heat treatment conditions to produce several different microstructures, namely ferrite plus pearlite, ferrite plus bainite and/or acicular ferrite, ferrite plus bainite and martensite, and ferrite plus different fractions of martensite. Static properties (0.01mm/s for shear punch and 0.001s -1 for tension) of all the microstructures were also measured by an MTS hydraulic machine and compared to the dynamic properties. The effects of low temperature tempering and bake hardening were investigated for some ferrite plus martensite microstructures. In addition, two other materials, composition designed as high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel, were heat treated and tested to study the effect of alloy chemistry on the microstructure and property relationship. A strong effect of microstructure on both static and dynamic properties and on the relationship between static and dynamic properties was observed. According to the variation of dynamic factor with static strength, three groups of microstructures with three distinct behaviors were identified, i.e. classic dual phase (ferrite plus less than 50% martensite), martensite-matrix dual phase (ferrite plus more than 50% martensite), and non-dual phase (ferrite plus non-martensite). Under the same static strength level, the dual phase microstructure was found to absorb more dynamic energy than other microstructures. It was also observed that the general dependence of microstructure on static and dynamic property relationship was not strongly influenced by chemical composition, except the ferrite plus martensite microstructures generated by the TRIP chemistry, which exhibited

  15. Dynamic failure behavior of ceramics under multiaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weinong

    An experimental technique has been developed that is capable of (1) dynamically loading the specimen in multiaxial compression; (2) controlling the stress state in the specimen in the range from uniaxial stress to uniaxial strain; and (3) allowing the recovery of the sample after loaded by a single, well defined pulse for the characterization of the failure mode. In this technique, cylindrical ceramic specimens were loaded in the axial direction using a split Hopkinson pressure bar modified to apply a single loading pulse, and were confined laterally either by shrink fit sleeves, or by eletro-magnetic force.Quasi-static and dynamic multiaxial compression experiments have been performed on a machinable glass ceramic, Macor, and a monolithic engineering ceramic, sintered aluminum nitride (A1N). The cylindrical ceramic specimens were confned laterally by shrink fit sleeves: the amount of confining pressure (0-230 MPa) was varied by using different sleeve materials. The quasi-static axial load was applied by a hydraulic driven Material Test System (MTS), whereas the dynamic axial load was provided by a modified split Hopkinson (Kolsky) pressure bar (SHPB). Under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions, the experimental results for both materials showed that the failure mode changed from fragmentation by axial splitting under conditions of uniaxial stress (without lateral confinement) to localized deformation on faults under moderate lateral confinement. The fault initiation process was studied experimentally in detail. Based on the experimental results, a compressive brittle failure process was summarized. A transition from brittle to ductile behavior was observed in Macor under high confinement pressure which was achieved using a second sleeve around the inner sleeve. The compressive failure strengths of both materials increased with increasing confinement pressure under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. The highest dynamic compressive

  16. Dynamic behaviors of various volume rate steel-fiber reinforced reactive powder concrete after high temperature burnt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Baojun; Wang, Liwen; Yang, Zhenqi; Chi, Runqiang

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic strain-stress curves of reactive powder concrete under high strain rate (10/s-100/s) were determined by improved split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. A plumbum pulse shaper was used to ensure the symmetrical stress in the specimens before fracture and avoid the fluctuation of test data due to input shaky stress pulse. A time modified method was induced for data processing in order to get accurate SHPB results. The results of experiment showed after high temperature burnt, different volume rate (0.0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%) steel-fiber reinforced reactive power concrete had the same changing tendency of residual mechanics behaviors, e.g. after 400 centigrade burnt, the residual compression strength was about 70% of material strength without burnt under 100/s. After 800 centigrade burnt, the compression strength is about 30% under 100/s while the deformation ability increased. At meanwhile, steel fiber had improved the mechanism of reinforcing effect and toughening effect of concrete material after burnt. With increasing of steel fiber volume rate, dynamic residual behavior of samples was improved. Microcosmic characteristics and energy absorption were induced for explaining the experiment results.

  17. Energy absorption behavior of polyurea coatings under laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajam, Kailash; Lee, Jaejun; Sottos, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    Energy absorbing, lightweight, thin transparent layers/coatings are desirable in many civilian and military applications such as hurricane resistant windows, personnel face-shields, helmet liners, aircraft canopies, laser shields, blast-tolerant sandwich structures, sound and vibration damping materials to name a few. Polyurea, a class of segmented block copolymer, has attracted recent attention for its energy absorbing properties. However, most of the dynamic property characterization of polyurea is limited to tensile and split-Hopkinson-pressure-bar compression loading experiments with strain rates on the order of 102 and 104 s-1, respectively. In the present work, we report the energy absorption behavior of polyurea thin films (1 to 2 μm) subjected to laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading. The laser-generated high amplitude stress wave propagates through the film in short time frames (15 to 20 ns) leading to very high strain rates (107 to 108 s-1) . The substrate stress, surface velocity and fluence histories are inferred from the displacement fringe data. On comparing input and output fluences, test results indicate significant energy absorption by the polyurea films under both tensile and mixed-mode loading conditions. Microscopic examination reveals distinct changes in failure mechanisms under mixed-mode loading from that observed under pure tensile loading. Office of Naval Research MURI.

  18. Grain size dependence of dynamic mechanical behavior of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet under compressive shock loading

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, H.; Odeshi, A.G.; Szpunar, J.A.; Zeng, L.J.; Olsson, E.

    2015-08-15

    The effects of grain size on the dynamic deformation behavior of rolled AZ31B alloy at high strain rates were investigated. Rolled AZ31B alloy samples with grain sizes of 6, 18 and 37 μm, were subjected to shock loading tests using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar at room temperature and at a strain rate of 1100 s{sup −} {sup 1}. It was found that a double-peak basal texture formed in the shock loaded samples. The strength and ductility of the alloy under the high strain-rate compressive loading increased with decreasing grain size. However, twinning fraction and strain hardening rate were found to decrease with decreasing grain size. In addition, orientation imaging microscopy showed a higher contribution of double and contraction twins in the deformation process of the coarse-grained samples. Using transmission electron microscopy, pyramidal dislocations were detected in the shock loaded sample, proving the activation of pyramidal slip system under dynamic impact loading. - Highlights: • A double-peak basal texture developed in all shock loaded samples. • Both strength and ductility increased with decreasing grain size. • Twinning fraction and strain hardening rate decreased with decreasing grain size. • ‘g.b’ analysis confirmed the presence of dislocations in shock loaded alloy.

  19. Large strain dynamic compression for soft materials using a direct impact experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenken, T.; Hiermaier, S.

    2006-08-01

    Measurement of strain rate dependent material data of low density low strength materials like polymeric foams and rubbers still poses challenges of a different kind to the experimental set up. For instance, in conventional Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar tests the impedance mismatch between the bars and the specimen makes strain measurement almost impossible. Application of viscoelastic bars poses new problems with wave dispersion. Also, maximum achievable strains and strain rates depend directly on the bar lengths, resulting in large experimental set ups in order to measure relevant data for automobile crash applications. In this paper a modified SHPB will be presented for testing low impedance materials. High strains can be achieved with nearly constant strain rate. A thin film stress measurement has been applied to the specimen/bar interfaces to investigate the initial sample ring up process. The process of stress homogeneity within the sample was investigated on EPDM and PU rubber.

  20. Dynamic Properties of Polyurea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, George H.

    The aim of this thesis was to understand the dynamic behavior of polyurea at rates of loading that is outside the reach of plate impact and split-Hopkinson bar experiments. This was motivated by the desire to design polyurea-based armors against hypervelocity impacts such as those arising from shaped charges and explosively formed projectiles with speeds in the range of 9,000 to 30,000 ft/s. By employing the laser-induced stress waves, the tensile strength and fracture energy of polyurea were measured at peak strain rate of 10 7s-1. Tensile strength of 93.1 ±5 MPa and fracture energy values of 6.75 (± 0.5) J/m2 were measured. It was also shown that the Time Temperature Superposition Principle holds for polyurea even at strain rates as high as 105s-1. This strain rate is two orders of magnitude higher than those reported recently by the Caltech group (Zhao, et al.). This important finding suggests that blast simulations of large-scale structures and those of armors involving polyurea can be based on constitutive data gathered under quasi-static conditions. This is quite powerful. With a view towards future reach, preliminary experiments were performed to inquire how polyurca behaves in the presence of other armor materials when subjected to impacts in the nanoseconds timeframe. That is, does it synergistically add its intrinsic impact-mitigating properties to other known defeat mechanisms? To this end, sections in which I to 2 mm thick polyurea layers were sandwiched between glass, acrylic, polyurethane, Al, Steel, and PMMA plates were subjected to laser-generated stress waves. The sections were evaluated based on the amplitude and time profile of the stress wave that exited the sections. Both metal plates resulted in a significant reduction in the transmitted stress wave amplitude. This was due to the large impedance mismatch between the polyurea and the metal which essentially resulted in trapping of the stress wave within the incident substrate. An unexpected

  1. Barred Spiral Galaxy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Barred Spiral Galaxy NGC 1300 Credit: NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Acknowledgment: P. Knezek (WIYN) The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center manages the telescope. The Space Telescope Science Institute conducts Hubble science operations. Goddard is responsible for HST project management, including mission and science operations, servicing missions, and all associated development activities. To learn more about the Hubble Space Telescope go here: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/main/index.html

  2. Microstructures Induced in Porous Limestone by Dynamic Loading, and Fracture Healing: An Experimental Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Julie; Doan, Mai-Linh; Gratier, Jean-Pierre; Renard, François

    2015-05-01

    Fracturing and healing are crucial processes inducing changes in the permeability and mechanical behavior of fault zones. Fracturing increases the permeability of fault rocks, creating flow-channels for fluid circulation and enhancing the kinetics of such fluid-rock processes as pressure solution or metamorphism. Conversely, healing processes reduce permeability by closing the fractures and lead to rock strengthening. Consequently, the timescales of these two processes are important in determining the strength of fault zones and their ability to rupture during earthquakes. This article reports observations of the microstructure of porous limestone samples subjected to rapid dynamic loading, and long-term healing as a result of fluid percolation. Dynamic loading was performed by impacting the samples with steel bars inside a split Hopkinson pressure bar apparatus. Healing was performed by leaving the samples for three months within a triaxial machine with percolation of supersaturated fluids for five weeks. Two kinds of fracture network were observed in samples damaged at high strain rate: a series of radial and circular macrofractures and an incipient pulverization zone at the center of the sample loaded at the highest strain rate. Fracture density determined microscopically from X-ray images correlates with dissipated energy computed from macro-mechanical data. X-ray images enable good quantification of the damaged state of the samples. Percolation experiments under stress with high-solubility fluid at room temperature show that the main healing processes promoting closure of the fractures in the sample are a combination of mechanical and chemical compaction. Microfracturing networks were found to heal faster than the largest fractures, leading to heterogeneous strengthening of the rock. This feature affects the processes of earthquake nucleation and rupture propagation.

  3. Quasi-static and dynamic responses of advanced high strength steels: Experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Akhtar; Baig, Muneer; Choi, Shi Hoon; Yang, Hoe Seok; Sun, Xin

    2012-03-01

    Measured responses of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and their tailor welded blanks (TWBs), over a wide range of strain-rates (10*4 to 103 s*1) are presented. The steels investigated include transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), dual phase (DP), and drawing quality (DQ) steels. The TWBs include DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds. A tensile split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) was used for the dynamic experiments. AHSS and their TWB's were found to exhibit positive strain-rate sensitivity. The Khan-Huang-Liang (KHL) constitutive model is shown to correlate and predict the observed responses reasonably well. Micro-texture characterization of DQ steels, DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds were performed to investigate the effect of strain-rate on texture evolution of these materials. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique was used to analyze the micro-texture evolution and kernel average misorientation (KAM) map. Measurement of micro-hardness profile across the cross section of tensile samples was conducted to understand the effect of initial microstructure on ductility of laser weld samples.

  4. Study on Dynamic Failure Model of Lead-Free Solders Using Shpb Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Guozheng; Li, Zhigang; Shu, Xuefeng

    The dynamic compressive properties of 96.3Sn3Ag0.7Cu and 99.3Sn0.7Cu solders were studied by means of a split Hopkinson pressure bar at strain rates ranging from 500 to 2000 s-1. Tests were conducted at room temperature and under uniaxial compressive conditions. Eutectic SnPb solders were used as the reference. From the data of tests, it was found that yield strength and flow stress increased remarkably with the increase of strain rate. On logarithmic scales, the yield strength increased linearly with strain rate. These lead-free solders revealed certain visco-plastic behavior and strain rate sensitivity, which predicted using Johnson-Cook material model. Related parameters in the model were determined from the experiment. Compared with the typical Pb-containing solder Sn63Pb37, these lead-free solders showed some fine properties and could substitute some Pb-containing solder alloys in microelectronic components packaging and interconnects.

  5. Study of the dynamic Bauschinger effect in Ti6Al4V by torsion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirs, J.; Verleysen, P.; Degrieck, J.

    2012-08-01

    The materials kinematic hardening behaviour and Bauschinger effect is indispensible to describe complex deformation processes involving strain path changes. Moreover, the Bauschinger effect provides valuable information about underlying microstructural plasticity mechanisms. Until now, the Bauschinger effect at high strain rates remains a largely unexplored topic. However, different studies demonstrated the strain rate dependent character of the Bauschinger effect. The aim of this work is to study the dynamic Bauschinger effect by means of a novel experimental technique. A modified torsional split Hopkinson bar setup is used to conduct Bauschinger experiments on Ti6Al4V. Forward and reverse loading of the specimen take place successively in only one experiment. This has the advantage of having the same thermal conditions during the two loading cycles. Besides high strain rate tests, quasi-static torsional Bauschinger experiments are conducted. The Bauschinger effect at the different strain rates is quantified with a dimensionless Bauschinger stress parameter. It is found that the Bauschinger effect is present at all tested strain rates. However, it is more pronounced at high strain rates. This implies that the kinematic hardening of Ti6Al4V is strain rate sensitive.

  6. Dynamic response of shear thickening fluid reinforced with SiC nanowires under high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhuhua; Ge, Jianhao; Zhang, Hang; Zhai, Pengcheng; Li, Weihua

    2017-07-01

    In this letter, SiC nanowires were adopted to reinforce the nanoparticle-based shear thickening fluid (STF) to improve its rheological properties. The reinforced STF showed a significant increase in viscosity. A Split-Hopkinson pressure bar was implemented to evaluate the dynamic response of STF at strain rates in the range of 3 × 103-1.2 × 104/s. For the pure STF, the flow stress reaches a saturation value with increasing strain rates and shows almost no strain rate sensitivity, whereas the flow stress of the reinforced STF increases with strain rates, and the strain rate sensitivity to flow stress is obvious owing to the resistance of nanowires. The essence of this study is to reveal that there is a limiting value of the flow stress of traditional nanoparticle-based STF at high strain rates due to the lubrication force among particles. SiC nanowires can be used to break this limitation of the nanoparticle-based STF.

  7. The Role of 2D Circulation in Sand Bar Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splinter, K. D.; Holman, R. A.; Plant, N. G.; Holland, K. T.

    2006-12-01

    Models of bar dynamics typically involve moments of the cross-shore flow, with offshore movement associated with the strong offshore directed undertow and onshore migration related to wave asymmetry and skewness [Gallagher, et al., 1998]. Based on these hypotheses, models and laboratory studies have used the alongshore-mean bar position and alongshore-uniform wave conditions (a 1DH approach) to study bar response to varying wave conditions. Commonly, cases of offshore migration were reproduced with reasonable accuracy, but predictions of onshore migration were less successful. However, examination of time-exposure images of waves show that during periods of offshore migration, bars tend to be alongshore uniform and move rapidly offshore, but during onshore migration, sand bars are rarely straight, instead becoming very sinuous, violating the 1DH approach. We hypothesize that under milder wave conditions, the 2DH circulation associated with this alongshore-variable morphology is, in fact, largely responsible for increased onshore net sand transport and the resulting onshore bar movement. We extend the work of Plant et al. [in review] that relates bar position, sinuosity, and wave forcing within a dynamical feedback model. The model consists of coupled differential equations that govern the rates of change of cross-shore position and horizontal sinuosity as a function of the current cross-shore position and sinuosity and a proxy for wave forcing. Using a short data set from Duck, NC, they solve for the unknown coupling coefficients by doing a least-squares fit. They find that the coefficients for the self-interaction terms have a negative sign, indicating the overall system is stable. The coefficients of the cross-interaction terms (the effect of sinuosity on rate of change of bar position and visa versa), however, are non-zero and have opposite signs indicating the systems are coupled and stability is not affected by these terms. We expand this study, relating bar

  8. Physeal bar equivalent.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Hamlet A; Shaughnessy, William J; Stans, Anthony A

    2016-09-29

    Premature partial physeal arrest without the formation of an osseous bar - physeal bar equivalent (PBE) - is uncommon. Four children with a PBE had an infection near the distal femoral physis before the age of 11 months. Some growth was achieved after resection of the PBE in each case. Of two cases diagnosed and treated early, one required only contralateral physeal arrests to achieve limb-length equality at maturity. The other, currently 8 years and 4 months old, has a 1.1-cm limb-length discrepancy 6 years after PBE resection and will require observation until maturity. Of two cases diagnosed and treated late, one required ipsilateral femoral lengthening and contralateral femoral shortening and physeal arrests to treat the limb-length discrepancy and angular deformity. The other, currently 7 years and 1 month old, has a 4.8-cm discrepancy and will need future surgical limb-length equalization. Early recognition and treatment of PBE is required to avoid severe limb-length inequality and angular deformity.

  9. Bar-Code-Scribing Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badinger, Michael A.; Drouant, George J.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed hand-held tool applies indelible bar code to small parts. Possible to identify parts for management of inventory without tags or labels. Microprocessor supplies bar-code data to impact-printer-like device. Device drives replaceable scribe, which cuts bar code on surface of part. Used to mark serially controlled parts for military and aerospace equipment. Also adapts for discrete marking of bulk items used in food and pharmaceutical processing.

  10. Dynamic crushing behaviour of aluminium tubes filled with cork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gameiro, C. P.; Cirne, J.; Gary, G.

    2006-08-01

    Cork is a natural cellular material with unique remarkable properties such as low density, great elasticity, chemical stability and resilience, no permeability to liquid and gases and resistance to wear and fire. Besides, it is ecological, hygienic, easy to maintain and a very durable material. Unfortunately, there are still application fields that have not been explored yet for the use of cork, possibly due to the fact that it is a complex cellular material, characterized by very variable mechanical properties which clearly depend on its microstructure. The fundamental aspects of the static and dynamic mechanical behaviour of natural and agglomerate cork, used alone and as filler inside a tube with small dimensions, under axial compressive loading, have already been studied by the authors. Aluminium cork-filled tubes and their empty counterparts were tested experimentally and numerically at quasi-static and dynamic strain rates from 10 - 3s - 1 to 600 s - 1. Data from the Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar and “deconvolution” techniques were used to generate stress-strain curves for the structures composed of natural and agglomerate cork. The numerical simulations of the dynamic compression of the specimens were carried out using the finite element method software LS-DYNA^TM and showed quite good agreement with the experimental results. Hence, in this work, in order to extend the study started previously and investigate the possible advantages of cork-filling in longer tubes with a different section, the authors simulate, using the same software, the influence of the introduction of agglomerate cork in square and circular aluminium tubes with a diameter/width of 80 mm, a length of 300mm and a variable thickness. The mechanical properties of the structures composed of cork may constitute a potential for this material to be used in innovative applications related to diverse fields such as automotive, transport, ships and military applications.

  11. Simulations of the quart (101-bar1)/water interface: A comparison of classical force fields, ab initi molecular dynamics, and x-ray reflectivity experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, Adam; Fenter, Paul; Kubicki, James D.; Wesolowski, David J; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the (1011) surface of quartz interacting with bulk liquid water are performed using three different classical force fields, Lopes et al., ClayFF, and CHARMM water contact angle (CWCA), and compared to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and X-ray reflectivity (XR) results. The axial densities of the water and surface atoms normal to the surface are calculated and compared to previous XR experiments. Favorable agreement is shown for all the force fields with respect to the position of the water atoms. Analyses such as the radial distribution functions between water and hydroxyl atoms and the average cosine of the angle between the water dipole vector and the normal of the surface are also calculated for each force field. Significant differences are found between the different force fields from such analyses, indicating differing descriptions of the structured water in the near vicinity of the surface. AIMD simulations are also performed to obtain the water and hydroxyl structure for comparison among the predictions of the three classical force fields to better understand which force field is most accurate. It is shown that ClayFF exhibits the best agreement with the AIMD simulations for water hydroxyl radial distribution functions, suggesting that ClayFF treats the hydrogen bonding more accurately.

  12. Barred Ring Galaxy NGC 1291

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-05

    This ultraviolet image left and visual image right from NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer is of the barred ring galaxy NGC 1291. The VIS image is dominated by the inner disk and bar. The UV image is dominated by the low surface brightness outer arms.

  13. BARS: Battlefield Augmented Reality System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP010892 TITLE: BARS: Battlefield Augmented Reality System DISTRIBUTION...component part numbers comprise the compilation report: ADP010865 thru. ADP010894 UNCLASSIFIED 27-1 BARS: Battlefield Augmented Reality System Simon Julier... future military operations are expected to occur overload, we have developed an intelligent filter which in urban environments. These complex, 3D

  14. GASEOUS STRUCTURES IN BARRED GALAXIES: EFFECTS OF THE BAR STRENGTH

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woong-Tae; Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Yonghwi

    2012-10-10

    Using hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the physical properties of gaseous substructures in barred galaxies and their relationships with the bar strength. The gaseous medium is assumed to be isothermal and unmagnetized. The bar potential is modeled as a Ferrers prolate with index n. To explore situations with differing bar strength, we vary the bar mass f{sub bar} relative to the spheroidal component as well as its aspect ratio R. We derive expressions as functions of f{sub bar} and R for the bar strength Q{sub b} and the radius r(Q{sub b} ) where the maximum bar torque occurs. When applied to observations, these expressions suggest that bars in real galaxies are most likely to have f{sub bar} {approx} 0.25-0.50 and n {approx}< 1. Dust lanes approximately follow one of the x{sub 1}-orbits and tend to be straighter under a stronger and more elongated bar, but are insensitive to the presence of self-gravity. A nuclear ring of a conventional x{sub 2} type forms only when the bar is not so massive or elongated. The radius of an x{sub 2}-type ring is generally smaller than the inner Lindblad resonance, decreases systematically with increasing Q{sub b} , and is slightly larger when self-gravity is included. This is evidence that the ring position is not determined by the resonance, but instead by the amount of angular momentum loss at dust-lane shocks. Nuclear spirals exist only when the ring is of the x{sub 2} type and is sufficiently large in size. Unlike the other features, nuclear spirals are transient in that they start out being tightly wound and weak, and then, due to the nonlinear effect, unwind and become stronger until they turn into shocks, with an unwinding rate that is higher for larger Q{sub b} . The mass inflow rate to the galaxy center is found to be less than 0.01 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for models with Q{sub b} {approx}< 0.2, while becoming larger than 0.1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} when Q{sub b} {approx}> 0.2 and self-gravity is included.

  15. Carbohydrate composition of candy bars.

    PubMed

    Hurst, W J; Martin, R A; Zoumas, B L

    1983-07-01

    The data in Table 1 show a wide variation among products and when added to other available data provide a more complete picture of the carbohydrate composition of candy bars. Interestingly, the sucrose content of the bars in Table 1 ranges from a low of 19.12% to a high of 56.06%. Extensive use of corn syrup is clearly evident in ingrediated bar types (categories e and f). Although the higher saccharides of corn syrup were not quantitated, we think that this article adds to the knowledge of the carbohydrate composition of the best-selling candy bars, since previously only a carbohydrate by difference value was available. This report provides the health professional with an update on carbohydrate composition of a large number of candy bars.

  16. Process-based modelling of tidally-influenced estuarine morphodynamics and bar architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Lageweg, Wietse; Feldman, Howard

    2017-04-01

    Estuaries represent one of the most dynamic environments on Earth with continuously changing channels and shoals of sand and mud that are driven by ebb and flood currents that interact with chemical and biological processes. These transition zones between terrestrial and marine environments generally have complex bar depositional patterns due to the dominance of river processes in proximal areas transitioning to the dominance of oceanic processes in distal areas. Although modern estuaries have been studied for many years, it is largely unknown in which manner basin geometry and tidal range impact bar formation, and how this would affect the subsurface architecture. This study applies the morphodynamic model Delft3D to test models of estuarine bar morphology and stratigraphy along the fluvial-tidal transition. Observations from the modern Columbia River estuary and idealized estuaries are combined to systematically evaluate estuarine hydrodynamics, bar formation and bar preservation. A unique aspect of the methodology is that morphological as well as subsurface data are collected, thus enabling the estuarine bar morphodynamics to be related explicitly to the associated depositional product. Model results highlight the complex and dynamic flow patterns in the Columbia River estuary, which are consistent with observations from local tide gauges. By systematically varying tidal range and basin width, it is shown that estuarine bar dimensions are primarily affected by estuary width, and that tidal range has a secondary effect. An increase in estuary width results in a higher bar braiding index, a larger number of bars as well as longer bars, wider bars and thicker bar deposits. Synthetic architectures that can be compared directly to the sedimentary record show a high degree of fragmentation within estuarine bars. Statistical distributions summarising the internal structure of estuarine bars provide much-needed quantification of the preservation of estuarine bars and

  17. The Effects of Specimen Geometry and Size on the Dynamic Failure of Aluminum Alloy 2219-T8 Under Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolling, Denzell Tamarcus

    A significant amount of research has been devoted to the characterization of new engineering materials. Searching for new alloys which may improve weight, ultimate strength, or fatigue life are just a few of the reasons why researchers study different materials. In support of that mission this study focuses on the effects of specimen geometry and size on the dynamic failure of AA2219 aluminum alloy subjected to impact loading. Using the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) system different geometric samples including cubic, rectangular, cylindrical, and frustum samples are loaded at different strain rates ranging from 1000s-1 to 6000s-1. The deformation properties, including the potential for the formation of adiabatic shear bands, of the different geometries are compared. Overall the cubic geometry achieves the highest critical strain and the maximum stress values at low strain rates and the rectangular geometry has the highest critical strain and the maximum stress at high strain rates. The frustum geometry type consistently achieves the lowest the maximum stress value compared to the other geometries under equal strain rates. All sample types clearly indicated susceptibility to strain localization at different locations within the sample geometry. Micrograph analysis indicated that adiabatic shear band geometry was influenced by sample geometry, and that specimens with a circular cross section are more susceptible to shear band formation than specimens with a rectangular cross section.

  18. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of texture evolution in 904L stainless steel under dynamic shock compression

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Nanan; Wang, Y. D.; Peng, R. Lin; Sun, Xin; Ren, Yang; Wang, L.; Cai, H. N.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of strain rate on development of deformation texture under a dynamic shock compression of a 904L stainless steel was quantitatively investigated using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and crystallographic orientation distribution function (ODF) analysis. Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar technique was used to generate a high strain rate of > 103 s-1 for preparing the deformed samples. Starting with an almost random texture in a solution treatment condition, the deformed material developed several typical texture components, such as ‘Goss’ texture and ‘Brass’ texture. Compared to the texture components displayed in the state of quasi-static compression deformation, it was found that the high-speed deformation generated much weaker texture components. In combination with the change in microstructures observed by EBSD and TEM technique, the high-energy X-ray diffraction provides a powerful tool for characterizing the strain-rate dependence of grain rotation at each stage of deformation. The deformation heterogeneity evident in our experiment can be explained by a transition of deformation mechanism from the dislocation/twin-dominated mode to shear-band-dominated one with increasing strain rate.

  19. Vision system for gauging and automatic straightening of steel bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidla, Oliver; Wilding, Ernst; Niel, Albert; Barg, Herbert

    2001-02-01

    A machine vision application for the fully automatic straightening of steel bars is presented. The bars with lengths of up to 6000 mm are quite bent on exit of the rolling mill and need to be straightened prior to delivery to a customer. The shape of the steel bar is extracted and measured by two video resolution cameras which are calibrated in position and viewing angle relative to a coordinate system located in the center of the roller table. Its contour is tracked and located with a dynamic programming method utilizing several constraints to make the algorithm as robust as possible. 3D camera calibration allows the transformation of image coordinates to real-world coordinates. After smoothing and spline fitting the curvature of the bar is computed. A deformation model of the effect of force applied to the steel allows the system to generate press commands which state where and with what specific pressure the bar has to be processed. The model can be used to predict the straightening of the bar over some consecutive pressing events helping to optimize the operation. The process of measurement and pressing is repeated until the straightness of the bar reaches a predefined limit.

  20. A numerical study of interactions and stellar bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; González-García, A. César; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Stringer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    For several decades, it has been known that stellar bars in disc galaxies can be triggered by interactions, or by internal processes such as dynamical instabilities. In this work, we explore the differences between these two mechanisms using numerical simulations. We perform two groups of simulations based on isolated galaxies, one group in which a bar develops naturally, and another group in which the bar could not develop in isolation. The rest of the simulations recreate 1:1 coplanar fly-by interactions computed with the impulse approximation. The orbits we use for the interactions represent the fly-bys in groups or clusters of different masses accordingly to the velocity of the encounter. In the analysis, we focus on bars' amplitude, size, pattern speed and their rotation parameter, R=R_{CR}/R_{bar}. The latter is used to define fast (R<1.4) and slow rotation (R>1.4). Compared with equivalent isolated galaxies, we find that bars affected or triggered by interactions: (i) remain in the slow regime for longer, (ii) are more boxy in face-on views and (iii) they host kinematically hotter discs. Within this set of simulations, we do not see strong differences between retrograde or prograde fly-bys. We also show that slow interactions can trigger bar formation.

  1. Alluvial Bars of the Obed Wild and Scenic River, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, W.J.; Fitch, K.C.; Ladd, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Park Service (NPS) initiated a reconnaissance study of alluvial bars along the Obed Wild and Scenic River (Obed WSR), in Cumberland and Morgan Counties, Tennessee. The study was partly driven by concern that trapping of sand by upstream impoundments might threaten rare, threatened, or endangered plant habitat by reducing the supply of sediment to the alluvial bars. The objectives of the study were to: (1) develop a preliminary understanding of the distribution, morphology, composition, stability, and vegetation structure of alluvial bars along the Obed WSR, and (2) determine whether evidence of human alteration of sediment dynamics in the Obed WSR warrants further, more detailed examination. This report presents the results of the reconnaissance study of alluvial bars along the Obed River, Clear Creek, and Daddys Creek in the Obed WSR. The report is based on: (1) field-reconnaissance visits by boat to 56 alluvial bars along selected reaches of the Obed River and Clear Creek; (2) analysis of aerial photographs, topographic and geologic maps, and other geographic data to assess the distribution of alluvial bars in the Obed WSR; (3) surveys of topography, surface particle size, vegetation structure, and ground cover on three selected alluvial bars; and (4) analysis of hydrologic records.

  2. Bar Effects on Central Star Formation and Active Galactic Nucleus Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seulhee; Oh, Kyuseok; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2012-01-01

    Galactic bars are often suspected to be channels of gas inflow to the galactic center and to trigger central star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. However, the current status on this issue based on empirical studies is unsettling, especially regarding AGNs. We investigate this question based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. From the nearby (0.01 < z < 0.05) bright (M r < -19) database, we have constructed a sample of 6658 relatively face-on late-type galaxies through visual inspection. We found 36% of them to have a bar. Bars are found to be more common in galaxies with earlier morphology. This makes sample selection critical. Parameter-based selections would miss a large fraction of barred galaxies of early morphology. Bar effects on star formation or AGNs are difficult to understand properly because multiple factors (bar frequency, stellar mass, black hole mass, gas contents, etc.) seem to contribute to them in intricate manners. In the hope of breaking these degeneracies, we inspect bar effects for fixed galaxy properties. Bar effects on central star formation seem higher in redder galaxies. Bar effects on AGNs on the other hand are higher in bluer and less massive galaxies. These effects seem more pronounced with increasing bar length. We discuss possible implications in terms of gas contents, bar strength, bar evolution, fueling timescale, and the dynamical role of supermassive black hole.

  3. 'Light bar' attitude indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enevoldson, E. K.; Horton, V. W.

    1982-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a light bar attitude indicator to help maintain proper aircraft attitude during high altitude night flying is described. A standard four-inch ADI was modified to project an artificial horizon across the instrument panel for pitch and roll information. A light bulb was put in the center of the ADI and a thin slit cut on the horizon, resulting in a thin horizontal sheet of light projecting from the instrument. The intensity of the projected beam is such that it can only be seen in a darkened room or at night. The beam on the instrument panel of the T-37 jet trainer is shown, depicting various attitudes. The favorable comments of about 50 pilots who evaluated the instrument are summarized, including recommendations for improving the instrument. Possible uses for the instrument to ease the pilot task are listed. Two potential problems in using the device are the development of pilot complacency and an upright-inverted ambiguity in the instrument.

  4. CULTURAL FACTORS RELATED TO SMOKING IN SAN FRANCISCO’S IRISH BARS

    PubMed Central

    Satterlund, Travis D.; Antin, Tamar M.J.; Lee, Juliet P.; Moore, Roland S.

    2009-01-01

    California’s Smoke-Free Workplace Act was extended to include bars in 1998. While the majority of bars in the state have become smoke free, in many bars patrons and staff continue to smoke despite the law. The authors present findings from a study which assessed cultural factors related to continued smoking in bars in the city of San Francisco. In bars serving primarily Irish migrants, tight-knit relations within the local Irish bar community together with a reluctance to be the first Irish bar to ban smoking were found to contribute to continued indoor smoking. The findings illustrate challenges to implementing tobacco control policies within ethnic subpopulations and particularly highlight the importance of considering how cultural dynamics within subpopulations may help or hinder such policies. PMID:19999704

  5. Bar shapes and orbital stochasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Athanassoula, E. )

    1990-06-01

    Several independent lines of evidence suggest that the isophotes or isodensities of bars in barred galaxies are not really elliptical in shape but more rectangular. The effect this might have on the orbits in two different types of bar potentials is studied, and it is found that in both cases the percentage of stochastic orbits is much larger when the shapes are more rectangularlike or, equivalently, when the m = 4 components are more important. This can be understood with the help of the Chirikov criterion, which can predict the limit for the onset of global stochasticity. 9 refs.

  6. Star Formation Activity of Barred Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eunbin; Hwang, Ho Seong; Chung, Haeun; Lee, Gwang-Ho; Park, Changbom; Cervantes Sodi, Bernardo; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2017-08-01

    We study the star formation activity of nearby galaxies with bars using a sample of late-type galaxies at 0.02≤slant z≤slant 0.05489 and {M}r< -19.5 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We compare the physical properties of strongly and weakly barred galaxies with those of non-barred galaxies that have stellar mass and redshift distributions similar to barred galaxies. We find that the star formation activity of strongly barred galaxies probed by starburstiness, g-r, {NUV}-r, and mid-infrared [3.4]-[12] colors is, on average, lower than that of non-barred galaxies. However, weakly barred galaxies do not show such a difference between barred and non-barred galaxies. The amounts of atomic and molecular gas in strongly barred galaxies are smaller than those in non-barred galaxies, and the gas metallicity is higher in strongly barred galaxies than in non-barred galaxies. The gas properties of weakly barred galaxies again show no difference from those of non-barred galaxies. We stack the optical spectra of barred and non-barred galaxies in several mass bins and fit to the stacked spectra with a spectral fitting code, STARLIGHT. We find no significant difference in stellar populations between barred and non-barred galaxies for both strongly and weakly barred galaxies. Our results are consistent with the idea that the star formation activity of barred galaxies was enhanced in the past along with significant gas consumption, and is currently lower than or similar to that of non-barred galaxies. The past star formation enhancement depends on the strength of bars.

  7. Processing, Dynamic Deformation and Fragmentation of Heterogeneous Materials (Aluminum-Tungsten Composites and Aluminum-Nickel Laminates)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Po-Hsun

    Two types of heterogeneous reactive materials, Aluminum-Tungsten composites and Aluminum-Nickel laminates were investigated. The current interest in these materials is their ability to combine the high strength and energy output under critical condition of the mechanical deformation which may include their fragmentation. Mesoscale properties of reactive materials are very important for the generation of local hot spots to ignite reactions and generate critical size of debris suitable for fast oxidation kinetics. Samples with different mesostructures (e.g., coarse vs. fine W particles, bonded vs. non-bonded Al particles, W particles vs. W wires and concentric vs. corrugated Al-Ni laminates) were prepared by Cold Isostatic Pressing, Hot Isostatic Pressing and Swaging. Several dynamic tests were utilized including Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar, Drop Weight Test, Explosively Driven Fragmentation Test, and Thick-Walled Cylinder Method. A high speed camera was used to record images of the in situ behavior of materials under dynamic loading. Pre- and post-experiment analyses and characterization were done using Optical Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Powder Diffraction, and Laser Diffraction. The numerical simulations were conducted to monitor the in situ dynamic behavior of materials and elucidate the mesoscale mechanisms of the plastic strain accommodation under high-strain, high-strain-rate conditions in investigated heterogeneous m aterials. Several interesting results should be specifically mentioned. They include observation that the fracture and dynamic properties of the Al-W composites are sensitive to porosity of samples, particles sizes of rigid inclusions (W particles or wires), and bonding strength between Al particles in the matrix. Soft Al particles were heavily deformed between the rigid W particles/wires during dynamic tests. Three plastic strain accommodation mechanisms are observed in Al-Ni laminates. They depend on the initial

  8. Property Control through Bar Coding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingma, Gerben J.

    1984-01-01

    A public utility company uses laser wands to read bar-coded labels on furniture and equipment. The system allows an 80 percent savings of the time required to create reports for inventory control. (MLF)

  9. Russian BAR/EXPERT experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-28

    ISS020-E-035017 (27 Aug. 2009) --- Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka, Expedition 20 commander, uses the Russian BAR/EXPERT science payload to take various environmental measurements in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  10. Russian BAR/EXPERT experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-28

    ISS020-E-035016 (27 Aug. 2009) --- Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka, Expedition 20 commander, uses the Russian BAR/EXPERT science payload to take various environmental measurements in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  11. Russian BAR/EXPERT experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-28

    ISS020-E-035022 (27 Aug. 2009) --- Russian cosmonaut Roman Romanenko, Expedition 20 flight engineer, uses the Russian BAR/EXPERT science payload to take various environmental measurements in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  12. Property Control through Bar Coding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingma, Gerben J.

    1984-01-01

    A public utility company uses laser wands to read bar-coded labels on furniture and equipment. The system allows an 80 percent savings of the time required to create reports for inventory control. (MLF)

  13. Triple bar, high efficiency mechanical sealer

    DOEpatents

    Pak, Donald J.; Hawkins, Samantha A.; Young, John E.

    2013-03-19

    A clamp with a bottom clamp bar that has a planar upper surface is provided. The clamp may also include a top clamp bar connected to the bottom clamp bar, and a pressure distribution bar between the top clamp bar and the bottom clamp bar. The pressure distribution bar may have a planar lower surface in facing relation to the upper surface of the bottom clamp bar. An object is capable of being disposed in a clamping region between the upper surface and the lower surface. The width of the planar lower surface may be less than the width of the upper surface within the clamping region. Also, the pressure distribution bar may be capable of being urged away from the top clamp bar and towards the bottom clamp bar.

  14. Experimental serpentinization of dunite cores at 150-200ºC and 150 bar: Importance of open system dynamics for hydrogen generation and stabilization of ferric-rich serpentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Tutolo, B. M.; Bagley, B. C.; Mildner, D. F. R.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic processes often exhume mantle peridotite to environments near the Earth's surface, where serpentinization occurs and involves the hydration of peridotite at relatively low temperatures. This process oxidizes ferrous iron in olivine, which produces hydrogen (H2), creating environments that are conducive to abiotic synthesis of organic compounds and H2-based microbial communities. To understand better chemical and physical processes associated with serpentinization, two flow-through experiments (>30 days) were conducted at 150 and 200°C and 150 bar on intact dunite cores. Permeability decreased by a factor of 31 during the 200°C experiment, more than an order of magnitude larger than that at 150°C. Furthermore, H2 and methane concentrations exceeded 600 µmol/kg and 300 µmol/kg during the 200°C experiment, and were one and two orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than the 150°C experiment. H2 was primarily generated during the conversion of olivine to ferric serpentine at 200°C, since vibrating sample magnetometer analysis indicated little to no magnetite production. Secondary mineralization was identified on the core from this experiment, but X-ray computed tomography scans indicated little change. Furthermore, (ultra) small-angle neutron scattering datasets indicated that any change in nano-porosity and surface area was smaller than the natural variability of the dunite. Even though there was little evidence of alteration, the initial stage of serpentinization at 200°C was sufficient to produce a dramatic effect on flow fields in the core. Furthermore, this experiment generated significant dissolved H2 concentrations, while simulating open system dynamics. Thus, the experimental data provide insight on mass transfer processes in open geochemical systems, which effectively prevent highly elevated H2 concentrations due to continual loss. We speculate that this process is responsible for stabilizing unusually ferric-rich serpentine in nature.

  15. Dynamic tensile deformation and damage of B4C-reinforced Al composites: Time-resolved imaging with synchrotron x-rays

    DOE PAGES

    Bie, B. X.; Huang, J. Y.; Su, B.; ...

    2016-03-30

    Dynamic tensile experiments are conducted on 15% and 30% in weight percentage B4C/Al composites with a split Hopkinson tension bar, along with high-speed synchrotron x-ray digital image correlation (XDIC) to map strain fields at μ m and μ s scales. As manifested by bulk-scale stress – strain curves, a higher particle content leads to a higher yield strength but lower ductility. Strain field mapping by XDIC demonstrates that tension deformation and tensile fracture, as opposed to shear and shear failure, dominate deformation and failure of the composites. The fractographs of recovered samples show consistent features. The particle-matrix interfaces are nucleationmore » sites for strain localizations, and their propagation and coalescence are diffused by the Al matrix. The reduced spacing between strain localization sites with increasing particle content, facilitates their coalescence and leads to decreased ductility. Furthermore, designing a particle-reinforced, metallic-matrix composite with balanced strength and ductility should consider optimizing the inter-particle distance as a key par« less

  16. Dynamic tensile deformation and damage of B4C-reinforced Al composites: Time-resolved imaging with synchrotron x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bie, B. X.; Huang, J. Y.; Su, B.; Lu, L.; Fan, D.; E, J. C.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Qi, M. L.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-03-30

    Dynamic tensile experiments are conducted on 15% and 30% in weight percentage B4C/Al composites with a split Hopkinson tension bar, along with high-speed synchrotron x-ray digital image correlation (XDIC) to map strain fields at μ m and μ s scales. As manifested by bulk-scale stress – strain curves, a higher particle content leads to a higher yield strength but lower ductility. Strain field mapping by XDIC demonstrates that tension deformation and tensile fracture, as opposed to shear and shear failure, dominate deformation and failure of the composites. The fractographs of recovered samples show consistent features. The particle-matrix interfaces are nucleation sites for strain localizations, and their propagation and coalescence are diffused by the Al matrix. The reduced spacing between strain localization sites with increasing particle content, facilitates their coalescence and leads to decreased ductility. Furthermore, designing a particle-reinforced, metallic-matrix composite with balanced strength and ductility should consider optimizing the inter-particle distance as a key par

  17. Would a Galactic bar destroy the globular cluster system?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Kevin; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Aguilar, Luis

    1992-01-01

    Five different dynamical Galaxy models are presented for the Galactic potential which satisfy the observed rotation curve but contain a central bar so that the 3-kpc nonintersecting streamlines have a radial velocity of 50 km/s when viewed at 45 deg to the bar axis. The effect of the central bars on the destruction rates of globular clusters in the Galaxy is investigated. The method of Aguilar et al. (1988) is applied to these barred Galaxy models. The unknown tangential velocity components of each observed cluster are drawn randomly from an assumed distribution function. The cluster's orbit is integrated, and the bulge shocking rate is calculated. The median destruction rate of the cluster is computed by sampling a large number of such orbits. The addition of the rotating bar does not strongly affect the destruction rates of globular clusters. There is a small increase in the destruction rate for those clusters within about 2.5 kpc. Thus it is not possible to rule out the existence of a rotating bar on these grounds.

  18. Hercules and Wolf 630 stellar streams and galactic bar kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, V. V.; Bajkova, A. T.

    2016-04-01

    We have identified the four most significant features in the UV velocity distribution of solarneighborhood stars: H1, H2 in the Hercules stream and W1, W2 in the Wolf 630 stream. We have formulated the problemof determining several characteristics of the centralGalactic bar independently from each of the identified features by assuming that the Hercules and Wolf 630 streams are of a bar-induced dynamical nature. The problem has been solved by constructing 2: 1 resonant orbits in the rotating bar frame for each star in these streams. Analysis of the resonant orbits found has shown that the bar pattern speed is 45-55 km s-1 kpc-1, while the bar angle lies within the range 40°-60°. The results obtained are consistent with the view that the Hercules andWolf 630 streams could be formed by a long-term influence of the Galactic bar leading to a characteristic bimodal splitting of the UV velocity plane.

  19. Would a Galactic bar destroy the globular cluster system?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Kevin; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Aguilar, Luis

    1992-01-01

    Five different dynamical Galaxy models are presented for the Galactic potential which satisfy the observed rotation curve but contain a central bar so that the 3-kpc nonintersecting streamlines have a radial velocity of 50 km/s when viewed at 45 deg to the bar axis. The effect of the central bars on the destruction rates of globular clusters in the Galaxy is investigated. The method of Aguilar et al. (1988) is applied to these barred Galaxy models. The unknown tangential velocity components of each observed cluster are drawn randomly from an assumed distribution function. The cluster's orbit is integrated, and the bulge shocking rate is calculated. The median destruction rate of the cluster is computed by sampling a large number of such orbits. The addition of the rotating bar does not strongly affect the destruction rates of globular clusters. There is a small increase in the destruction rate for those clusters within about 2.5 kpc. Thus it is not possible to rule out the existence of a rotating bar on these grounds.

  20. Riverbank erosion induced by gravel bar accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klösch, Mario; Habersack, Helmut

    2010-05-01

    Riverbank erosion is known to be strongly fluvially controlled and determination of shear stresses at the bank surface and at the bank toe is a crucial point in bank erosion modeling. In many modeling attempts hydraulics are simulated separately in a hydrodynamic-numerical model and the simulated shear stresses are further applied onto the bank surface in a bank erosion model. Hydrodynamics are usually simulated at a constant geometry. However, in some cases bed geometry may vary strongly during the event, changing the conditions for hydrodynamics along the bank. This research seeks to investigate the effect of gravel bar accretion during high discharges on final bank retreat. At a restored section of the Drava River bed widenings have been implemented to counter bed degradation. There, in an initiated side-arm, self-dynamic widening strongly affects bed development and long-term connectivity to the main channel. Understanding the riverbank erosion processes there would help to improve planning of future restoration measures. At one riverbank section in the side-arm large bank retreat was measured repeatedly after several flow events. This section is situated between two groins with a distance of 60 m, which act as lateral boundaries to the self-widening channel. In front of this bank section a gravel bar developed. During low flow condition most discharge of the side-arm flows beside the gravel bar along the bank, but shear stresses are too low for triggering bank erosion. For higher discharges results from a two-dimensional hydrodynamic-numerical model suggested shear stresses there to be generally low during the entire events. At some discharges the modeled flow velocities even showed to be recirculating along the bank. These results didn't explain the observed bank retreat. Based on the modeled shear stresses, bank erosion models would have greatly underestimated the bank retreat induced by the investigated events. Repeated surveys after events applying

  1. Electrical response of carbon nanotube reinforced nanocomposites under static and dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeder, Nicholas J.

    The electrical response of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced epoxy nanocomposites under quasi-static and dynamic compressive loading is experimentally investigated. The objective of this project was to study the electrical response of CNT-reinforced nanocomposites under mechanical loading where the carbon nanotubes are used to create an internal sensory network within, capable of detecting important information such as strain and damage. Experimental techniques were developed to effectively obtain the bulk resistance change of the nanocomposite material while subjected to quasi-static and dynamic loading. A combination of shear mixing and ultrasonication was used to fabricate the low resistance nanocomposite material. The fabrication process parameters and the optimum weight fraction of MWCNTs for generating a well-dispersed percolation network were first determined. A screw-driven testing machine, a drop weight tower, and a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus were utilized to load the specimens. Absolute resistance values were measured with a high-resolution four-point probe method for both quasi-static and dynamic loading. In addition to measuring the percentage change in electrical resistance, real-time damage was captured using high-speed photography. The real-time damage was correlated to both load and percentage change in resistance profiles to better understand the electrical behavior of CNT reinforced nanocomposites under mechanical loading. The experimental findings indicate that the bulk electrical resistance of the nanocomposites, under both quasi-static and drop weight loading conditions, initially decreased between 40%--60% during compression and then increased as damage initiated and propagated. Similarly, a 65%--85% decrease in resistance was observed when the nanocomposites were subjected to SHPB loading. Damage initiation and propagation was also captured by the resistance measurements owing to the ability of the CNTs to be

  2. Microscopic Observation of Tremor-Like Excitations during Dynamic Loading of Trapped Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Julien, R. C.; Ghaffari, H.; Borjas, C. N.; Griffith, W. A.

    2016-12-01

    Volcano seismicity has become a common tool for monitoring active volcanoes, with recent research successfully linking some of the characteristic signals observed in the field and laboratory experiments to the likely source processes. In particular, movement of pressurized fluids and interaction with fractures have been directly linked to the generation of detected seismic signals. In volcanically active areas, the wealth of seismic signals includes volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes, low-frequency (LF) or long-period (LP) events, and very-low-frequency (VLF) or very long period (VLP) type events. Volcano seismic events also include hybrid events, a mixture of the initial impulsive VT earthquake and the resonant coda of the LF signal, and also quasi continuous volcanic "tremor" signals, also known as a Tornillio (screw) events, that may last for several minutes. Here we describe a set of laboratory experiments in which we employ multi-array ultrasound sensors in combination with the dynamic loading of trapped liquids in PMMA casing using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar, leading to clear observation of tremor-like excitations in the recorded waveforms. These excitations are linked to the movement of the pressurized water leading to dynamically-inducing hydraulic fracturing of the sample casing. By controlling the stress-pulse shape, we illustrate the process of hydraulic fracturing under an impulsive loading regime, such as dynamic triggering of volcanic plumbing systems by large magnitude earthquakes. In addition, we demonstrate the effects of liquid viscosity by analyzing signals in the frequency-time domain as well as their counterpart features in functional acoustic networks.

  3. The statistics and kinematics of transverse sand bars on an open coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konicki, K.M.; Holman, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Ten years (1987-1996) of time exposure video images of the nearshore region at Duck, NC were used to study transverse sand bars, bathymetric features of intermediate length scales (10-200 m) oriented oblique or perpendicular to the shoreline. These transverse sand bars extend seaward from both the shoreline (trough transverse bars) and the shore-parallel sand bar (offshore transverse bars). Transverse bars had not previously been observed in an energetic Coastal environment such as that at Duck, and their dynamics and role in nearshore processes is unknown. Frequency of occurrence statistics and length scales of the transverse bars were calculated using the video images. Trough and offshore transverse bars appeared a mean of 39 and 73 days per year, respectively. The offshore bars were found to be much larger features than the trough bars, with mean wavelengths (alongshore spacing between consecutive crests) of 79 and 172 m for trough and offshore bars, respectively. Both the trough and offshore bars were found to persist for periods of days to months. The alongshore movement of the bars was measured and compared to estimates of surf zone longshore currents which were calculated from wave height and wave angle data. Both sets of bars were observed to move at rates up to 40 m/day. At times, both trough and offshore bars were observed shifting in the same direction as the current was flowing, and at other times, both sets of bars remained stationary, even under relatively strong longshore currents. Trough bars were also observed moving against the current. An hypothesis, proposed by Barcilon and Lau (1973) [J. Geophys. Res. 78(15): 2656-2664], that the transverse bars were created as a sea bed instability under longshore currents, was tested by comparing the magnitude of estimated surf zone longshore currents with times of formation or presence of transverse bars. There was no evidence to suggest that the bars were formed by this simple longshore current instability

  4. Kinetic Energy associated with Dynamic Fragmentation in Brittle Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. A.; Ghaffari, H.; Barber, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    The formation of fragments during dynamic processes associated with impulsive loads has been the subject of numerous studies ranging from shaped-charge jet break up and rock blasting to bolide impacts, and, more recently, earthquake rupture. In the latter case pulverized rocks found millimeters to tens of meters from the principal slip zone have been associated with fast, and even supershear, rupture. It has been conjectured that the transition from intact or discretely fractured host rock to pulverization is controlled by initial micro-defects and the driven impulse signal characteristics. Here we report a series of experiments where we characterize the 3D terminal velocity vectors of particles in a range of fragmented to pulverized Novaculite and Westerly Granite rock samples using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar Apparatus. We accomplish this by controlling the rate of the stress ramp (a characteristic of the source time function) applied to the rock specimen and recording the impact pattern of rock fragments using a steel ring lined with a pressure-calibrated thin film surrounding the specimen. Using elastic Hertzian contact theory in conjunction with the resulting pressure distributions, we calculate the velocity of ejected particles for each experiment, allowing us to calculate approximate the normal components of kinematic energy of flying fragments. In combination with the laser particle size analysis (PSD), we show a relationship between the rate of the stress ramp and average particle size, and we refine the estimation of fracture energy during the experiments. Coupled with recently obtained data constraining the mechanical energy invested in creating new fracture surfaces, this work brings us closer to defining a complete energy budget for the brittle fragmentation process during earthquake rupture.

  5. Low energy {bar p} physics at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, S.Y.

    1992-12-01

    The charmonium formation experiment is the only low energy {bar p} experiment at FNAL. This paper describes the performance of the Fermilab {bar p} Accumulator during fixed target run for the experiment and the planned upgrades. We also discuss the proposal for the direct CP violation search in {bar p} + p {yields} {bar {Lambda}} + {Lambda} {yields} {bar p}{pi}{sup +} + p{pi}{sup {minus}}.

  6. Applying Schwarzschild's orbit superposition method to barred or non-barred disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Eugene; Athanassoula, E.

    2015-07-01

    We present an implementation of the Schwarzschild orbit superposition method, which can be used for constructing self-consistent equilibrium models of barred or non-barred disc galaxies, or of elliptical galaxies with figure rotation. This is a further development of the publicly available code SMILE; its main improvements include a new efficient representation of an arbitrary gravitational potential using two-dimensional spline interpolation of Fourier coefficients in the meridional plane, as well as the ability to deal with rotation of the density profile and with multicomponent mass models. We compare several published methods for constructing composite axisymmetric disc-bulge-halo models and demonstrate that our code produces the models that are closest to equilibrium. We also apply it to create models of triaxial elliptical galaxies with cuspy density profiles and figure rotation, and find that such models can be found and are stable over many dynamical times in a wide range of pattern speeds and angular momenta, covering both slow- and fast-rotator classes. We then attempt to create models of strongly barred disc galaxies, using an analytic three-component potential, and find that it is not possible to make a stable dynamically self-consistent model for this density profile. Finally, we take snapshots of two N-body simulations of barred disc galaxies embedded in nearly-spherical haloes, and construct equilibrium models using only information on the density profile of the snapshots. We demonstrate that such reconstructed models are in near-stationary state, in contrast with the original N-body simulations, one of which displayed significant secular evolution.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.-T.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic fields are pervasive in barred galaxies, especially in gaseous substructures such as dust lanes and nuclear rings. To explore the effects of magnetic fields on the formation of the substructures as well as on the mass inflow rates to the galaxy center, we run two-dimensional, ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We use a modified version of the Athena code whose numerical magnetic diffusivity is shown to be of third order in space. In the bar regions, magnetic fields are compressed and abruptly bent around the dust-lane shocks. The associated magnetic stress not only reduces the peak density of the dust-lane shocks but also removes angular momentum further from the gas that is moving radially in. Nuclear rings that form at the location of centrifugal barrier rather than resonance with the bar are smaller and more radially distributed, and the mass flow rate to the galaxy center is correspondingly larger in models with stronger magnetic fields. Outside the bar regions, the bar potential and strong shear conspire to amplify the field strength near the corotation resonance. The amplified fields transport angular momentum outward, producing trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The base of the magnetic arms are found to be unstable to a tearing-mode instability of magnetic reconnection. This produces numerous magnetic islands that eventually make the outer regions highly chaotic.

  8. Novel experimental methods for investigating high speed friction of titanium-aluminum-vanadium/tool steel interface and dynamic failure of extrinsically toughened DRA composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Mohammad Abdulaziz

    effects the sliding resistance of the interface. The experimental results deduced from the response of the sliding interface to step changes in normal pressure and the applied shear stress reinforce the importance of including frictional memory in the development of rate dependent state variable friction models. The second part of the thesis presents an investigation into the dynamic deformation and failure of extrinsically toughened DRA composites. Experiments were conducted using the split Hopkinson pressure bar to investigate the deformation and flow behavior under dynamic compression loading. A modified Hopkinson bar apparatus was used to explore the dynamic fracture behavior of three different extrinsically toughened DRA composites. The study was paralleled by systematic exploration of the failure modes in each composite. For all the composites evaluated the dynamic crack propagation characteristics of the composites are observed to be strongly dependent on the volume fraction of the ductile phase reinforcement in the composite, the yield stress of the ductile phase reinforcement, the micro-structural arrangement of the ductile phase reinforcements with respect to the notch, and the impact velocity employed in the particular experiment.

  9. Universal precision sine bar attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Franklin D. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to an attachment for a sine bar which can be used to perform measurements during lathe operations or other types of machining operations. The attachment can be used for setting precision angles on vises, dividing heads, rotary tables and angle plates. It can also be used in the inspection of machined parts, when close tolerances are required, and in the layout of precision hardware. The novelty of the invention is believed to reside in a specific versatile sine bar attachment for measuring a variety of angles on a number of different types of equipment.

  10. Photometric Surveys of the Galactic Bulge and Long Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, O.; Wegg, C.; Portail, M.

    The Galactic bar and box/peanut bulge can be studied in an unrivaled manner, star-by-star, with detailed chemical information and full 3D kinematics. Because of intervening dust this is greatly facilitated by the availability of wide field deep NIR photometric surveys. Here we summarize recent results on the three-dimensional structure of the bulge and the long bar region, based on 2MASS, UKIDSS, and particularly the ongoing VVV survey. We also summarize results from dynamical models for the Galactic bulge constructed with the Made-to-Measure method.

  11. Bar-spheroid interaction in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Weinberg, Martin D.

    1992-01-01

    N-body simulation and linear analysis is employed to investigate the secular evolution of barred galaxies, with emphasis on the interaction between bars and spheroidal components of galaxies. This interaction is argued to drive secular transfer of angular momentum from bars to spheroids, primarily through resonant coupling. A moderately strong bar, having mass within corotation about 0.3 times the enclosed spheroid mass, is predicted to shed all its angular momentum typically in less than about 10 exp 9 yr. Even shorter depletion time scales are found for relatively more massive bars. It is suggested either that spheroids around barred galaxies are structured so as to inhibit strong coupling with bars, or that bars can form by unknown processes long after disks are established. The present models reinforce the notion that bars can drive secular evolution in galaxies.

  12. Dynamic testing of old and young baboon cortical bone with numerical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chocron, S.; Nicolella, D.; Nicholls, A. E.; Bredbenner, T.; Havill, L.

    2012-08-01

    Cortical bone tensile mechanical properties at quasistatic and high rates (˜300s-1) were determined ex vivo using the right femurs of 12 female baboons, (Papio hamadryas spp.) from the Texas Biomedical Research Institute/Southwest National Primate Research Center in San Antonio, Texas. The animals were divided into two age groups: a young age group (6.63 ± 0.6 years) and an old age group (26.96 ± 1.3 years). Seven specimens per group were monotonically loaded to failure to determine their mechanical properties. The quasistatic strength of the bone for the old group was just a little (but not significantly) lower than the young group. High strain rate tests performed with the Hopkinson bar indicate that baboon bone from the older group was significantly weaker under impact loads than that from the younger group. This observation is particularly important due to the similarities between baboon and human bone tissue. Typical strain rates for these tests ranged from 130s-1 to 250s-1. A full-size 3-D simulation of the Hopkinson bar test was performed to confirm that the bone specimen was under stress equilibrium and to evaluate the consistency of the modulus and strength inferred from the tests. Simulations were performed in which the modulus, strength and failure strain were varied to see the sensitivity of the results. Additionally, simplified simulations were performed to estimate the strain rate environment of a femur during a fall at an impact velocity of 5 m/s, similar to a free fall velocity from a height of 1.3 meters. The simulations confirm that strain rates obtained in the Hopkinson bar are relevant because they are similar to those expected inr such a fall.

  13. Dynamic response of polyurea subjected to nanosecond rise-time stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, George; Gupta, Vijay

    2012-08-01

    Shaped charges and explosively formed projectiles used in modern warfare can attain speeds as high as 30,000 ft/s. Impacts from these threats are expected to load the armor materials in the 10 to 100 ns timeframe. During this time, the material strains are quite limited but the strain rates are extremely high. To develop armors against such threats it is imperative to understand the dynamic constitutive behavior of materials in the tens of nanoseconds timeframe. Material behavior in this parameter space cannot be obtained by even the most sophisticated plate-impact and split-Hopkinson bar setups that exist within the high energy materials field today. This paper introduces an apparatus and a test method that are based on laser-generated stress waves to obtain such material behaviors. Although applicable to any material system, the test procedures are demonstrated on polyurea which shows unusual dynamic properties. Thin polyurea layers were deformed using laser-generated stress waves with 1-2 ns rise times and 16 ns total duration. The total strain in the samples was less than 3%. Because of the transient nature of the stress wave, the strain rate varied throughout the deformation history of the sample. A peak value of 1.1×105 s-1 was calculated. It was found that the stress-strain characteristics, determined from experimentally recorded incident and transmitted wave profiles, matched satisfactorily with those computed from a 2D wave mechanics simulation in which the polyurea was modeled as a linearly viscoelastic solid with constants derived from the quasi-static experiments. Thus, the test data conformed to the Time-Temperature Superposition (TTS) principle even at extremely high strain rates of our test. This then extends the previous observations of Zhao et al. (Mech. Time-Depend. Mater. 11:289-308, 2007) who showed the applicability of the TTS principle for polyurea in the linearly viscoelastic regime up to peak strain rates of 1200 s-1.

  14. Dynamical properties measurements for asteroid, comet and meteorite material applicable to impact modeling and mitigation calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Boslough, M.B.; Gray, G.T. III; Remo, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    We describe methods for measuring dynamical properties for two material categories of interest in understanding large-scale extraterrestrial impacts: iron-nickel and underdense materials (e.g. snow). Particular material properties measured by the present methods include Hugoniot release paths and constitutive properties (stress vs. strain). The iron-nickel materials lend themselves well to conventional shock and quasi-static experiments. As examples, a suite of experiments is described including six impact tests (wave profile compression/release) over the stress range 2--20 GPa, metallography, quasi-static and split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) mechanical testing, and ultrasonic mapping and sound velocity measurements. Temperature sensitivity of the dynamic behavior was measured at high and low strain rates. Among the iron-nickel materials tested, an octahedrite was found to have behavior close to that of Armco iron under shock and quasi-static conditions, while an ataxite exhibited a significantly larger quasi-static yield strength than did the octahedrite or a hexahedrite. The underdense materials pose three primary experimental difficulties. First, the samples are friable; they can melt or sublimate during storage, preparation and testing. Second, they are brittle and crushable; they cannot withstand such treatment as traditional machining or launch in a gun system. Third, with increasing porosity the calculated Hugoniot density becomes rapidly more sensitive to errors in wave time-of-arrival measurements. Carefully chosen simulants eliminate preservation (friability) difficulties, but the other difficulties remain. A family of 36 impact tests was conducted on snow and snow simulants at Sandia, yielding reliable Hugoniot and reshock states, but limited release property information. Other methods for characterizing these materials are discussed.

  15. Demographic response of northern spotted owls to barred owl removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diller, V. Lowell; Hamm, Keith A; Early, Desiree A; Lamphear, David W; Katie Dugger,; Yackulic, Charles B.; Schwarz, Carl J.; Carlson, Peter C.; McDonald, Trent L.

    2016-01-01

    Federally listed as threatened in 1990 primarily because of habitat loss, the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) has continued to decline despite conservation efforts resulting in forested habitat being reserved throughout its range. Recently, there is growing evidence the congeneric invasive barred owl (Strix varia) may be responsible for the continued decline primarily by excluding spotted owls from their preferred habitat. We used a long-term demographic study for spotted owls in coastal northern California as the basis for a pilot barred owl removal experiment. Our demography study used capture–recapture, reproductive output, and territory occupancy data collected from 1990 to 2013 to evaluate trends in vital rates and populations. We used a classic before-after-control-impact (BACI) experimental design to investigate the demographic response of northern spotted owls to the lethal removal of barred owls. According to the best 2-species dynamic occupancy model, there was no evidence of differences in barred or northern spotted owl occupancy prior to the initiation of the treatment (barred owl removal). After treatment, barred owl occupancy was lower in the treated relative to the untreated areas and spotted owl occupancy was higher relative to the untreated areas. Barred owl removal decreased spotted owl territory extinction rates but did not affect territory colonization rates. As a result, spotted owl occupancy increased in the treated area and continued to decline in the untreated areas. Prior to and after barred owl removal, there was no evidence that average fecundity differed on the 2 study areas. However, the greater number of occupied spotted owl sites on the treated areas resulted in greater productivity in the treated areas based on empirical counts of fledged young. Prior to removal, survival was declining at a rate of approximately 0.2% per year for treated and untreated areas. Following treatment, estimated survival was 0.859 for

  16. Potential trophic cascades triggered by the barred owl range expansion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holm, Samantha R.; Noon, Barry R.; Wiens, David; Ripple, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the barred owl (Strix varia) has expanded its range into the Pacific Northwest of the United States resulting in pronounced effects on the demography and behavior of the northern spotted owl (S. occidentalis caurina). The range expansion has brought together historically allopatric species, creating the potential for significant changes in the avian predator community with possible cascading effects on food-web dynamics. The adverse effects of the barred owl on the behavior and demography of the northern spotted owl are well-documented, but little is known about the immediate and long-term effects changes in the predator community may have on native species composition and ecosystem processes. Based on northern spotted owl and barred owl selection for diet and habitat resources, there is a potential for trophic cascades within the region's predator and prey communities, differing responses by their shared and unique prey species, and possible direct and indirect effects on ecosystem processes. We explored the possible ecological consequences of the barred owl range expansion to wildlife communities of the Pacific Northwest based on the theoretical underpinnings of predator–prey relationships, interspecific competition, intraguild predation, and potential cascading trophic interactions. Negative effects on fitness of northern spotted owls because of interspecific competition with barred owls are strong selection forces that may contribute to the regional extinction of the northern spotted owl. In addition, we posit that shared prey species and those uniquely consumed by barred owls, along with other competing native predators, may experience changes in behavior, abundance, and distribution as a result of increased rates of predation by rapidly expanding populations of barred owls.

  17. On loading velocity oscillations during dynamic tensile testing with flying wheel systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erice, Borja; Roth, Christian; Gary, Gerard; Mohr, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Flying Wheels (FW) provide a space-saving alternative to Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB) systems for generating the loading pulse for intermediate and high strain rate material testing. This is particularly attractive in view of performing ductile fracture experiments at intermediate strain rates that require a several milliseconds long loading pulse. More than 50 m long Hopkinson bars are required in that case, whereas the same kinetic energy (for a given loading velocity) can be stored in rather compact flying wheels (e.g. diameter of less than 1.5 m). To gain more insight into the loading capabilities of FW tensile testing systems, a simple analytical model is presented to analyze the loading history applied by a FW system. It is found that due to the presence of a puller bar that transmits the tensile load from the rotating wheel to the specimen, the loading velocity applied onto the specimen oscillates between about zero and twice the tangential loading speed applied by the FW. The theoretical and numerical evaluation for a specific 1.1 m diameter FW system revealed that these oscillations occur at a frequency in the kHz range, thereby questioning the approximate engineering assumption of a constant strain rate in FW tensile experiments at strain rates of the order of 100/s.

  18. Morphodynamics of Bar Formation in Meandering Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooke, J.

    2009-12-01

    Bar formation is an integral part of the morphodynamics of meandering rivers. Various theories predict bar formation and experimental and numerical simulations have produced bar forms. Various types of free and forced bars occur, associated with various stages of meander development and with meander morphology, as well as sediment supply. In some cases bars have been shown to move through channel systems, usually as parts of sediment waves. Data are still sparse on timescales and lifecycles of bar formation and integration into floodplains and on variability of bar formation over time. The extent to which bar behaviour conforms with theory and its contribution to meander morphodynamics are examined and quantified using data derived from photogrammetric mapping of courses at four dates and annual ground mapping along the course of an active meandering river over a period of nearly 30 years. The distribution, occurrence and types of bars are examined in relation to the position in the planform, the channel curvature and channel width and in relation to channel changes and bank erosion. Using GIS, the sizes and position of bars are tracked over time. Point bars (forced) emerge, as expected, as major components, but their degree of development varies in different types of bend. Temporal variation in activity and calibre of sediment varies with discharge events but also stage of development of bars. Mid-channel bars arise at certain points, largely associated with excessive erosion and widening of the channel. They exhibit a lifecycle of formation lasting a few years on the study river. Concave bank bars are also an important component of sedimentation and occur in zones of rapid migration. Formation is slower and comprises finer sediment than other bars. Free bars show little sign of moving through the bend forms and remain stable in position. They significantly affect bend morphology but interaction is complex through feedbacks. Free bars may not always persist and

  19. Stratigraphic Feedbacks on Alternate Bar Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R.; Nelson, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    As rivers aggrade, they can develop subsurface stratigraphy consisting of heterogeneous grain-size distributions in the downstream, cross-stream, and vertical directions. During subsequent periods of degradation, this stratigraphy may be exhumed and potentially feed back on the processes that drive morphodynamic evolution, but these surface-stratigraphy feedbacks are poorly understood and difficult to predict. Here we investigate these feedbacks by implementing the ability to store, track, and access bed stratigraphy in the 2-dimensional morphodynamic model FaSTMECH. We use a modified active layer approach, in which the active layer is allowed to exchange sediment with bedload as well as the highest stratigraphy layer. In cases of aggradation, a fraction of the active layer and bedload is released to the highest stratigraphy layer. During degradation, the active layer takes on the sediment properties stored in the stratigraphy. We validate this new model against flume experiments of migrating, alternate bars in which detailed topography and stratigraphy measurements were collected. We then investigate the effects of stratigraphic feedbacks on the coevolution of fixed patches and alternate bar morphology. Initial model results suggest that including dynamic stratigraphy in morphodynamic models enables prediction of fine grain-size surface patches observed in experiments, but not predicted in simulations without stratigraphy. Our findings suggest that surface-subsurface interactions can play an important role in river morphodynamics.

  20. Mass Distribution and Bar Formation in Growing Disk Galaxy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrier, Joel C.; Sellwood, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    We report idealized simulations that mimic the growth of galaxy disks embedded in responsive halos and bulges. The disks manifested an almost overwhelming tendency to form strong bars that we found very difficult to prevent. We found that fresh bars formed in growing disks after we had destroyed the original, indicating that bar formation also afflicts continued galaxy evolution, and not just the early stages of disk formation. This behavior raises still more insistently the previously unsolved question of how some galaxies avoid bars. Since our simulations included only collisionless star and halo particles, our findings may apply to gas-poor galaxies only; however, the conundrum persists for the substantial unbarred fraction of those galaxies. Our original objective was to study how internal dynamics rearranged the distribution of mass in the disk as a generalization of our earlier study with rigid spherical components. With difficulty, we were able to construct some models that were not strongly influenced by bars, and found that halo compression and angular momentum exchange with the disk did not alter our earlier conclusion that spiral activity is largely responsible for creating smooth density profiles and rotation curves.

  1. Intertidal finger bars at El Puntal, Bay of Santander, Spain: observation and forcing analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellón, E.; Garnier, R.; Medina, R.

    2013-11-01

    A system of 15 small-scale finger bars has been observed, by using video imagery, between 23 June 2008 and 2 June 2010. The bar system is located in the intertidal zone of the swell-protected beaches of El Puntal Spit, in the Bay of Santander (Northern coast of Spain). It appears on a planar beach (slope = 1.5%) with fine uniform sand (D50 = 0 .27 mm) and extends 600 m alongshore. The cross-shore span of the bars is determined by the tidal horizontal excursion (between 70 and 130 m). They have an oblique orientation with respect to the low-tide shoreline being up-current oriented with respect to the ebb-flow (mean angle of 26° from the shore normal). Their mean wavelength is 26 m and their amplitude varies between 10 and 20 cm. The full system slowly migrates to the east (opposite to the ebb-flow) with a mean speed of 0.06 m day-1, a maximum speed in winter (up to 0.15 m day-1) and a minimum speed in summer. An episode of merging has been identified as bars with larger wavelength seem to migrate slower than shorter bars. Several forcings can act on the bar dynamics being the wind, blowing predominantly from the west, the main candidate to explain the eastward migration of the system. In particular, the wind can generate waves of up to 20 cm (root-mean-squared wave height) over a fetch that can reach 4.5 km at high tide. The astronomical tide seems to be important in the bar dynamics, as the tidal range conditions the mean (daily) fetch and also the time of exposure of the bars to the marine dynamics. Furthermore, the river discharges could act as input of suspended sediment in the bar system and play a role in the bar dynamics.

  2. 49 CFR 236.705 - Bar, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.705 Bar, locking. A bar in an interlocking machine to which the locking dogs are attached. ...

  3. 49 CFR 236.705 - Bar, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.705 Bar, locking. A bar in an interlocking machine to which the locking dogs are attached. ...

  4. 49 CFR 236.705 - Bar, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.705 Bar, locking. A bar in an interlocking machine to which the locking dogs are attached. ...

  5. 49 CFR 236.705 - Bar, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.705 Bar, locking. A bar in an interlocking machine to which the locking dogs are attached. ...

  6. 49 CFR 236.705 - Bar, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.705 Bar, locking. A bar in an interlocking machine to which the locking dogs are attached. ...

  7. Positioning bars for large wire harnesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glessner, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    By tying positioning bars to harness, its configuration can be preserved during transport, thus facilitating installation. Harness can also be showed temporarily by placing hanging hooks on end of bar.

  8. The K K bar π decay of the f1 (1285) and its nature as a K* K bar - cc molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceti, F.; Xie, Ju-Jun; Oset, E.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the decay of f1 (1285) → πK K bar with the assumption that the f1 (1285) is dynamically generated from the K* K bar - cc interaction. In addition to the tree level diagrams that proceed via f1 (1285) →K* K bar - cc → πK K bar , we take into account also the final state interactions of K K bar → K K bar and πK → πK. The partial decay width and mass distributions of f1 (1285) → πK K bar are evaluated. We get a value for the partial decay width which, within errors, is in fair agreement with the experimental result. The contribution from the tree level diagrams is dominant, but the final state interactions have effects in the mass distributions. The predicted mass distributions are significantly different from phase space and tied to the K* K bar - cc nature of the f1 (1285) state.

  9. Effect of bars on the galaxy properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, Matias; Alonso, Sol; Coldwell, Georgina

    2016-10-01

    Aims: With the aim of assessing the effects of bars on disk galaxy properties, we present an analysis of different characteristics of spiral galaxies with strong bars, weak bars and without bars. Methods: We identified barred galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). By visual inspection of SDSS images we classified the face-on spiral galaxies brighter than g< 16.5 mag into strong-bar, weak-bar, and unbarred galaxies. With the goal of providing an appropriate quantification of the influence of bars on galaxy properties, we also constructed a suitable control sample of unbarred galaxies with similar redshifts, magnitudes, morphology, bulge sizes, and local density environment distributions to those of barred galaxies. Results: We found 522 strong-barred and 770 weak-barred galaxies; this represents a bar fraction of 25.82% with respect to the full sample of spiral galaxies, in good agreement with several previous studies. We also found that strong-barred galaxies show lower efficiency in star formation activity and older stellar populations (as derived with the Dn(4000) spectral index) with respect to weak-barred and unbarred spirals from the control sample. In addition, there is a significant excess of strong-barred galaxies with red colors. The color-color and color-magnitude diagrams show that unbarred and weak-barred galaxies are more extended towards the blue zone, while strong-barred disk objects are mostly grouped in the red region. Strong-barred galaxies present an important excess of high metallicity values compared to unbarred and weak-barred disk objects, which show similar distributions. Regarding the mass-metallicity relation, we found that weak-barred and unbarred galaxies are fitted by similar curves, while strong-barred ones show a curve that falls abruptly with more significance in the range of low stellar masses (log (M∗/M⊙) < 10.0). These results would indicate that prominent bars produced an accelerating effect on the gas processing

  10. Intertidal finger bars at El Puntal, Bay of Santander, Spain: observation and forcing analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellón, E.; Garnier, R.; Medina, R.

    2014-06-01

    A system of 15 small-scale finger bars has been observed, by using video imagery, between 23 June 2008 and 2 June 2010. The bar system is located in the intertidal zone of the swell-protected beaches of El Puntal Spit, in the Bay of Santander (northern coast of Spain). The bars appear on a planar beach (slope = 0.015) with fine, uniform sand (D50 = 0.27 mm) and extend 600 m alongshore. The cross-shore span of the bars is determined by the tidal horizontal excursion (between 70 and 130 m). They have an oblique orientation with respect to the low-tide shoreline; specifically, they are down-current-oriented with respect to the dominant sand transport computed (mean angle of 26° from the shore normal). Their mean wavelength is 26 m and their amplitude varies between 10 and 20 cm. The full system slowly migrates to the east (sand transport direction) with a mean speed of 0.06 m day-1, a maximum speed in winter (up to 0.15 m day-1) and a minimum speed in summer. An episode of merging has been identified as bars with larger wavelength seem to migrate more slowly than shorter bars. The wind blows predominantly from the west, generating waves that transport sediment across the bars during high-tide periods. This is the main candidate to explain the eastward migration of the system. In particular, the wind can generate waves of up to 20 cm (root-mean-squared wave height) over a fetch that can reach 4.5 km at high tide. The astronomical tide seems to be important in the bar dynamics, as the tidal level changes the fetch and also determines the time of exposure of the bars to the surf-zone waves and currents. Furthermore, the river discharge could act as input of suspended sediment in the bar system and play a role in the bar dynamics.

  11. Hierarchical tapered bar elements undergoing axial deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesan, N.; Thampi, S. K.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described to model the dynamics of tapered axial bars of various cross sections based on the well-known Craig/Bampton component mode synthesis technique. This element is formed in terms of the static constraint modes and interface restrained normal modes. This is in contrast with the finite elements as implemented in NASTRAN where the interface restrained normal modes are neglected. These normal modes are in terms of Bessel functions. Restoration of a few of these modes leads to higher accuracy with fewer generalized coordinates. The proposed models are hierarchical so that all lower order element matrices are embedded in higher order element matrices. The advantages of this formulation compared to standard NASTRAN truss element formulation are demonstrated through simple numerical examples.

  12. Bar formation as driver of gas inflows in isolated disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanali, R.; Dotti, M.; Fiacconi, D.; Haardt, F.

    2015-12-01

    Stellar bars are a common feature in massive disc galaxies. On a theoretical ground, the response of gas to a bar is generally thought to cause nuclear starbursts and, possibly, AGN activity once the perturbed gas reaches the central supermassive black hole. By means of high-resolution numerical simulations, we detail the purely dynamical effects that a forming bar exerts on the gas of an isolated disc galaxy. The galaxy is initially unstable to the formation of non-axisymmetric structures, and within ˜1 Gyr it develops spiral arms that eventually evolve into a central stellar bar on kpc scale. A first major episode of gas inflow occurs during the formation of the spiral arms while at later times, when the stellar bar is establishing, a low-density region is carved between the bar corotational and inner Lindblad resonance radii. The development of such `dead zone' inhibits further massive gas inflows. Indeed, the gas inflow reaches its maximum during the relatively fast bar-formation phase and not, as often assumed, when the bar is fully formed. We conclude that the low efficiency of long-lived, evolved bars in driving gas towards galactic nuclei is the reason why observational studies have failed to establish an indisputable link between bars and AGNs. On the other hand, the high efficiency in driving strong gas inflows of the intrinsically transient process of bar formation suggests that the importance of bars as drivers of AGN activity in disc galaxies has been overlooked so far. We finally prove that our conclusions are robust against different numerical implementations of the hydrodynamics routinely used in galaxy evolution studies.

  13. Enabling Narrow(est) IWA Coronagraphy with STIS BAR5 and BAR10 Occulters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Glenn; Gaspar, Andras; Debes, John; Gull, Theodore; Hines, Dean; Apai, Daniel; Rieke, George

    2017-09-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph's (STIS) BAR5 coronagraphic occulter was designed to provide high-contrast, visible-light, imaging in close (> 0.15") angular proximity to bright point-sources. We explored and verified the functionality and utility of the BAR5 occulter. We also investigated, and herein report on, the use of the BAR10 rounded corners as narrow-angle occulters and compare IWA vs. contrast performance for the BAR5, BAR10, and Wedge occulters. With that, we provide recommendations for the most efficacious BAR5 and BAR10 use on-orbit in support of GO science.

  14. Bar-holding prosthetic limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees is disclosed. The device has a removable effector, which is attached to the end of an arm cuff. The effector is comprised of a pair of C-shaped members that are oriented so as to face each other. Working in concert, the C-shaped members are able to hold a bar such as a chainsaw handle. A flat spring is fitted around the C-shaped members to hold them together.

  15. Jackson Bar Training Structure Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    used a kicker and transverse dikes. DISCLAIMER: The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising, publication, or promotional purposes... transverse dikes. ............. 91 Tables Table 1. Sieve stack sizes for all bed samples taken in the vicinity of Jackson Bar, AL, on 11 November 2012...defined as transverse rock structure in the navigation channel of a bend and are angled 30° upstream (Parchure 2005). Primary features include a crest

  16. Galaxy Zoo: Observing secular evolution through bars

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Edmond; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Melvin, Thomas; Bell, Eric F.; Lintott, Chris; Schawinski, Kevin; Skibba, Ramin A.; Willett, Kyle W.

    2013-12-20

    In this paper, we use the Galaxy Zoo 2 data set to study the behavior of bars in disk galaxies as a function of specific star formation rate (SSFR) and bulge prominence. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall (strong) bar fraction of 23.6% ± 0.4%, of which 1154 barred galaxies also have bar length (BL) measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in galaxy evolution. We find that the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar is anticorrelated with SSFR, regardless of stellar mass or bulge prominence. We find that the trends of bar likelihood and BL with bulge prominence are bimodal with SSFR. We interpret these observations using state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution that include live halos and the effects of gas and star formation. We suggest our observed trends of bar likelihood with SSFR are driven by the gas fraction of the disks, a factor demonstrated to significantly retard both bar formation and evolution in models. We interpret the bimodal relationship between bulge prominence and bar properties as being due to the complicated effects of classical bulges and central mass concentrations on bar evolution and also to the growth of disky pseudobulges by bar evolution. These results represent empirical evidence for secular evolution driven by bars in disk galaxies. This work suggests that bars are not stagnant structures within disk galaxies but are a critical evolutionary driver of their host galaxies in the local universe (z < 1).

  17. Analysis of the QQ\\bar{Q}\\bar{Q} tetraquark states with QCD sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Gang

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we study the J^{PC}=0^{++} and 2^{++} QQ\\bar{Q}\\bar{Q} tetraquark states with the QCD sum rules, and we obtain the predictions M_{X(cc\\bar{c}\\bar{c},0^{++})} =5.99± 0.08 GeV, M_{X(cc\\bar{c}\\bar{c},2^{++})} =6.09± 0.08 GeV, M_{X(bb\\bar{b}\\bar{b},0^{++})} =18.84± 0.09 GeV and M_{X(bb\\bar{b}\\bar{b},2^{++})} =18.85± 0.09 GeV, which can be confronted to the experimental data in the future. Furthermore, we illustrate that the diquark-antidiquark type tetraquark state can be taken as a special superposition of a series of meson-meson pairs and that it embodies the net effects.

  18. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilat, A.; Seidt, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    Three new testing configurations that have been developed since the last DYMAT conference in 2009 are presented. The first is high strain rate testing of Kevlar cloth and Kevlar yarn in a tensile Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB) apparatus. The Kevlar cloth/yarn is attached to the bars by specially designed adaptors that keep the impedance constant. In addition to determining the specimen's stress and strain from the recorded waves in the bars the deformations are also measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The second testing configuration is a high strain rate shear test for sheet metal. The experiment is done by using a flat notched specimen in a tensile SHB apparatus. The shear strain is measured using DIC within the notch and on the boundary. The third development is a compression apparatus for testing at intermediate strain rates ranging from 20 s-1 to 200 s-1. The apparatus is a combination of a hydraulic actuator and a compression SHB. The stress in the specimen is determined from the stress wave in a very long transmitter bar and the strain and strain rate is determined by using DIC. The results show clean stress strain curves (no ringing).

  19. Dynamic Loading of Carrara Marble in a Heated State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen; Li, Zhihuan; Kang, Hyeong Min; Teh, Cee Ing

    2017-06-01

    Useable land is a finite space, and with a growing global population, countries have been exploring the use of underground space as a strategic resource to sustain the growth of their society and economy. However, the effects of impact loading on rocks that have been heated, and hence the integrity of the underground structure, are still not fully understood and has not been included in current design standards. Such scenarios include traffic accidents and explosions during an underground fire. This study aims to provide a better understanding of the dynamic load capacity of Carrara marble at elevated temperatures. Dynamic uniaxial compression tests are performed on Carrara marble held at various temperatures using a split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) setup with varying input force. A customized oven is included in the SHPB setup to allow for testing of the marble specimens in a heated state. After the loading test, a three-wave analysis is performed to obtain the dynamic stress-strain curve of the specimen under loading. The fragments of the failed specimens were also collected and dry-sieved to obtain the particle size distribution. The results reveal that the peak stress of specimens that have been heated is negatively correlated with the heating temperature. However, the energy absorbed by the specimens at peak stress at all temperatures is similar, indicating that a significant amount of energy is dissipated via plastic deformation. Generally, fragment size is also found to show a negative correlation with heating temperature and loading pressure. However, in some cases this relationship does not hold true, probably due to the occurrence of stress shadowing. Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics has been found to be generally applicable to specimens tested at low temperatures; but at higher temperatures, Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics will give a more accurate prediction. Another contribution of this study is to show that other than the peak stress of the

  20. Experimental and numerical findings on the long-term evolution of migrating alternate bars in alluvial channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosato, Alessandra; Desta, Frehiwot Beidmariam; Cornelisse, John; Schuurman, Filip; Uijttewaal, Wim S. J.

    2012-06-01

    Migrating alternate bars form in alluvial channels as a result of morphodynamic instability. Extensive literature can be found on their origin and short-term development, but their long-term evolution has been poorly studied so far. In particular, it is not clear whether migrating bars eventually reach a (dynamic) equilibrium, as in previous studies bars were observed to elongate with time. We studied the long-term evolution of alternate bars by performing two independent long-duration laboratory experiments and some numerical tests with a physics-based depth-averaged model. In a straight flume with constant water flow and sediment recirculation, migrating bars followed a cyclic variation. They became gradually longer and higher for a while, then quickly much shorter and lower. In one case, all migrating bars simultaneously vanished almost completely only to reform soon after. At the same time, steady bars, two to three times as long, progressively developed from upstream, gradually suppressing the migrating bars. We also observed simultaneous vanishing of migrating bars in an annular flume experiment, this time at intervals of 6-8 d. Numerical simulations of long alluvial channels with constant flow rate and fixed banks show periodic vanishing of a few migrating bars at a time, occurring at regular spacing. Under constant flow rates, migrating bars appear as a transition phenomenon of alluvial channels having a cyclic character. These observations, however, might hold only for certain morphodynamics conditions, which should be further investigated.

  1. Turning the tide: estuarine bars and mutually evasive ebb- and flood-dominated channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinhans, M. G.; Leuven, J.; van der Vegt, M.; Baar, A. W.; Braat, L.; Bergsma, L.; Weisscher, S.

    2015-12-01

    Estuaries have perpetually changing and interacting channels and shoals formed by ebb and flood currents, but we lack a descriptive taxonomy and forecasting model. We explore the hypotheses that the great variation of bar and shoal morphologies are explained by similar factors as river bars, namely channel aspect ratio, sediment mobility and limits on bar erosion and chute cutoff caused by cohesive sediment. Here we use remote sensing data and a novel tidal flume setup, the Metronome, to create estuaries or short estuarine reaches from idealized initial conditions, with and without mud supply at the fluvial boundary. Bar width-depth ratios in estuaries are similar to those in braided rivers. In unconfined (cohesionless) experimental estuaries, bar- and channel dynamics increase with increasing river discharge. Ebb- and flood-dominated channels are ubiquitous even in entirely straight sections. The apparent stability of ebb- and flood channels is partly explained by the inherent instability of symmetrical channel bifurcations as in rivers.

  2. The F-BAR domains from srGAP1, srGAP2 and srGAP3 regulate membrane deformation differently

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho-Budd, Jaeda; Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Zylka, Mark J.; Polleux, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Summary Coordination of membrane deformation and cytoskeletal dynamics lies at the heart of many biological processes critical for cell polarity, motility and morphogenesis. We have recently shown that Slit-Robo GTPase-activating protein 2 (srGAP2) regulates neuronal morphogenesis through the ability of its F-BAR domain to regulate membrane deformation and induce filopodia formation. Here, we demonstrate that the F-BAR domains of two closely related family members, srGAP1 and srGAP3 [designated F-BAR(1) and F-BAR(3), respectively] display significantly different membrane deformation properties in non-neuronal COS7 cells and in cortical neurons. F-BAR(3) induces filopodia in both cell types, though less potently than F-BAR(2), whereas F-BAR(1) prevents filopodia formation in cortical neurons and reduces plasma membrane dynamics. These three F-BAR domains can heterodimerize, and they act synergistically towards filopodia induction in COS7 cells. As measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, F-BAR(2) displays faster molecular dynamics than F-BAR(3) and F-BAR(1) at the plasma membrane, which correlates well with its increased potency to induce filopodia. We also show that the molecular dynamic properties of F-BAR(2) at the membrane are partially dependent on F-Actin. Interestingly, acute phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] depletion in cells does not interfere with plasma membrane localization of F-BAR(2), which is compatible with our result showing that F-BAR(2) binds to a broad range of negatively-charged phospholipids present at the plasma membrane, including phosphatidylserine (PtdSer). Overall, our results provide novel insights into the functional diversity of the membrane deformation properties of this subclass of F-BAR-domains required for cell morphogenesis. PMID:22467852

  3. [Nutritional characteristics of cereal and peanut bars].

    PubMed

    Escobar, B; Estévez, A M; Tepper, A; Aguayo, M

    1998-06-01

    Snack with good nutritional value could play an important role in the physical and mental development of children and teenagers since they show a great preference for them. The tendency is increasing their nutritional value by supplying proteins, carbohydrates, fiber, vitamins and minerals in a balanced form. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the chemical, sensorial and nutritional quality of cereal and peanut bars. Three types of bars using different ratios of oat, wheat germ, peanut, toasted and expanded amaranthus and wheat extrudate were prepared. Bars proximate composition was determined according the AOAC methods, and their acceptability according Hedonic Scale. In the biological assays, rats fed with 10% protein diets, were used to obtain the Protein Efficiency Ratio (PER) Net Protein Ratio (NPR) and Apparent Digestibility (AD). Corrected PER, relative PER, relative AD, PER and NPR values did not showed difference between bars CM1 and CM2 (PER: 2.59-2.57; NPR: 3.99-3.95 respectively); CM3 bar showed a lower quality. There were not differences among bars in relation to AD. CM1 and CM2 bars had a better biological quality of the protein being CM3 bar of lower quality. From a chemical and sensorial point of view CM1 bar shows the highest protein content (14.23%) and acceptability (6.8) and CM2 bar shows a high raw fiber content (2.27%).

  4. Different Properties of the \\varvec{bar{K}NN} and \\varvec{bar{K}bar{K}N} Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, N. V.

    2017-03-01

    A series of exact or accurate three-body calculations of different properties of the bar{K}NN and bar{K}bar{K}N systems is described. In particular, binding energies and widths of the quasi-bound states in the systems were calculated. Near-threshold elastic K^- d amplitudes were also found together with the 1 s level shift and width of kaonic deuterium. Different dependences of the three-body results on two-body inputs are discussed.

  5. Influence of optimization constraints in uneven parallel bar dismount swing simulations.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Alison L; Hubbard, Mont

    2009-08-07

    Forward dynamics simulations of a dismount preparation swing on the uneven parallel bars were optimized to investigate the sensitivity of dismount revolution potential to the maximum bar force before slipping, and to low-bar avoidance. All optimization constraints were classified as 1-anatomical/physiological; limiting maximum hand force on the high bar before slipping, joint ranges of motion and maximum torques, muscle activation/deactivation timing and 2-geometric; avoiding low-bar contact, and requiring minimum landing distance. The gymnast model included torso/head, arm and two leg segments connected by a planar rotating, compliant shoulder and frictionless ball-and-socket hip joints. Maximum shoulder and hip torques were measured as functions of joint angle and angular velocity. Motions were driven by scaling maximum torques by a joint torque activation function of time which approximated the average activation of all muscles crossing the joint causing extension/flexion, or adduction/abduction. Ten joint torque activation values, and bar release times were optimized to maximize dismount revolutions using the downhill simplex method. Low-bar avoidance and maximum bar-force constraints are necessary because they reduce dismount revolution potential. Compared with the no low-bar performance, optimally avoiding the low bar by piking and straddling (abducting) the hips reduces dismount revolutions by 1.8%. Using previously reported experimentally measured peak uneven bar-force values of 3.6 and 4.0 body weight (BW) as optimization constraints, 1.40 and 1.55 revolutions with the body extended and arms overhead were possible, respectively. The bar-force constraint is not active if larger than 6.9 BW, and instead performances are limited only by maximum shoulder and hip torques. Bar forces accelerate the mass center (CM) when performing muscular work to flex/extend the joints, and increase gymnast mechanical energy. Therefore, the bar-force constraint inherently

  6. Simulating a slow bar in the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chequers, Matthew H.; Spekkens, Kristine; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Gilhuly, Colleen

    2016-12-01

    We present a disc-halo N-body model of the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628, one of the few systems that harbours a `slow' bar with a ratio of corotation radius to bar length of R ≡ R_c/a_b ˜ 2. We select our initial conditions using SDSS DR10 photometry, a physically motivated radially variable mass-to-light ratio profile, and rotation curve data from the literature. A global bar instability grows in our submaximal disc model, and the disc morphology and dynamics agree broadly with the photometry and kinematics of UGC 628 at times between peak bar strength and the onset of buckling. Prior to bar formation, the disc and halo contribute roughly equally to the potential in the galaxy's inner region, giving the disc enough self-gravity for bar modes to grow. After bar formation, there is significant mass redistribution, creating a baryon-dominated inner and dark matter-dominated outer disc. This implies that, unlike most other low surface brightness galaxies, UGC 628 is not dark matter dominated everywhere. Our model nonetheless implies that UGC 628 falls on the same relationship between dark matter fraction and rotation velocity found for high surface brightness galaxies, and lends credence to the argument that the disc mass fraction measured at the location where its contribution to the potential peaks is not a reliable indicator of its dynamical importance at all radii.

  7. Optimization of the dynamic behavior of strongly nonlinear heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbold, Eric B.

    New aspects of strongly nonlinear wave and structural phenomena in granular media are developed numerically, theoretically and experimentally. One-dimensional chains of particles and compressed powder composites are the two main types of materials considered here. Typical granular assemblies consist of linearly elastic spheres or layers of masses and effective nonlinear springs in one-dimensional columns for dynamic testing. These materials are highly sensitive to initial and boundary conditions, making them useful for acoustic and shock-mitigating applications. One-dimensional assemblies of spherical particles are examples of strongly nonlinear systems with unique properties. For example, if initially uncompressed, these materials have a sound speed equal to zero (sonic vacuum), supporting strongly nonlinear compression solitary waves with a finite width. Different types of assembled metamaterials will be presented with a discussion of the material's response to static compression. The acoustic diode effect will be presented, which may be useful in shock mitigation applications. Systems with controlled dissipation will also be discussed from an experimental and theoretical standpoint emphasizing the critical viscosity that defines the transition from an oscillatory to monotonous shock profile. The dynamic compression of compressed powder composites may lead to self-organizing mesoscale structures in two and three dimensions. A reactive granular material composed of a compressed mixture of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), tungsten (W) and aluminum (Al) fine-grain powders exhibit this behavior. Quasistatic, Hopkinson bar, and drop-weight experiments show that composite materials with a high porosity and fine metallic particles exhibit a higher strength than less porous mixtures with larger particles, given the same mass fraction of constituents. A two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode is implemented to investigate the mechanical deformation and failure of the compressed

  8. Boric Acid Reclamation System (BARS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kniazewycz, B.G.; Markind, J.

    1986-03-01

    KLM Technologies' personnel have identified a Boric Acid Reclamation System (BARS) utilizing reverse osmosis and ultrafiltration to produce a recyclable grade of otherwise waste boric acid at PWRs, thus reducing a major source of low-level radwaste. The design of a prototype BARS as a compact volume reduction system was the result of KLM's Phase 1 Program, and based upon a preliminary feasibility program, which assessed the applicability of membrane technology to refurbish and recycle waste boric acid from floor and equipment drain streams. The analysis of the overall program indicated a substantial savings regarding off-site disposal costs. Today's economic scenario indicates that optimization of volume reduction operation procedures could significantly reduce waste management costs, especially where burial penalties have become more severe. As a reaction to the economic burden imposed by final disposal, many nuclear plants are currently modifying their design and operating philosophies concerning liquid radwaste processing systems to meet stricter environmental regulations, and to derive potential economic benefits by reducing the ever-increasing volumes of wastes that are produced. To effect these changes, innovative practices in waste management and more efficient processing technologies are being successfully implemented.

  9. Properties of Bars in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Preethi

    2009-12-01

    Early work on bar fractions suffered from poor sample sizes which limited the study of correlations between bar fraction and physical properties. Recent large surveys like SDSS and COSMOS have helped rectify this deficiency. Sheth et al. (2008) using a sample of 2000 galaxies from COSMOS, have shown that bar fractions decrease with redshift as claimed by Abraham et al. (1999) and van den Bergh et al. (2000) . In addition, they find the bar fraction of spiral galaxies is a strong function of stellar mass, color and bulge prominence such that more massive, redder, concentrated galaxies have a larger bar fraction than less massive, bluer, diskier galaxies. Barazza et al. (2008) using 2000 galaxies from SDSS find results counter to Sheth et al. (2008) i.e., bar fractions increase with decreasing mass and bluer colors (corresponding to late type galaxies). Using a larger sample of 15000 visually classified SDSS galaxies (which includes bar classifications) I further investigate the properties of barred galaxies in the local universe. In addition, I will describe the variation of total fine fraction (bars + rings +lenses) with physical properties and the effects of AGN on the observed fine fraction.

  10. Basic physics of xylophone and marimba bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suits, B. H.

    2001-07-01

    The frequency-dependent wave velocity and nonsinusoidal spatial dependence found for transverse waves in finite vibrating bars stands in stark contrast to the solutions to the one-dimensional wave equation, for example for the idealized vibrating string. The difference is particularly important when the resulting vibrations are used to produce music. Here, the appropriate approximate equations for transverse vibrations on a uniform bar are developed and compared to measurements using wooden bars. The results are extended using a simple finite element model to provide a means to predict normal mode behavior in nonuniform wooden bars such as those used for xylophones, marimbas, and related musical instruments.

  11. New design of high performance ionizing bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ronggang; Sun, Yurong

    2013-03-01

    This paper introduces a new design of DC-pulse ionizing bar to solve the problem of imbalance offset voltage for the AC ionizing bar, which is easily affected by the environment, as well as indicate the final tests. The new design mainly includes five parts: power supply circuit, main control unit, logic circuit, high frequency transformer unit, and feedback unit. The ionizing bar can automatically adjust the discharge voltage, pulse frequency and pulse width to balance the positive and negative ions. The final test results indicate that the DC ionizing bar owns good effect in electrostatic elimination.

  12. DO BARS DRIVE SPIRAL DENSITY WAVES?

    SciTech Connect

    Buta, Ronald J.; Knapen, Johan H.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Salo, Heikki; Laurikainen, Eija; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Puerari, Ivanio; Block, David L. E-mail: jhk@iac.es E-mail: hsalo@sun3.oulu.fi E-mail: elmegreen@vassar.edu E-mail: David.Block@wits.ac.za

    2009-05-15

    We present deep near-infrared K{sub s} -band Anglo-Australian Telescope Infrared Imager and Spectrograph observations of a selected sample of nearby barred spiral galaxies, including some with the strongest known bars. The sample covers a range of Hubble types from SB0{sup -} to SBc. The goal is to determine if the torque strengths of the spirals correlate with those of the bars, which might be expected if the bars actually drive the spirals as has been predicted by theoretical studies. This issue has implications for interpreting bar and spiral fractions at high redshift. Analysis of previous samples suggested that such a correlation exists in the near-infrared, where effects of extinction and star formation are less important. However, the earlier samples had only a few excessively strong bars. Our new sample largely confirms our previous studies, but still any correlation is relatively weak. We find two galaxies, NGC 7513 and UGC 10862, where there is only a weak spiral in the presence of a very strong bar. We suggest that some spirals probably are driven by their bars at the same pattern speed, but that this may be only when the bar is growing or if there is abundant gas and dissipation.

  13. Piezoelectric generation of extensional waves in a viscoelastic bar by use of a linear power amplifier: Theoretical basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, A.; Lundberg, B.

    2007-09-01

    A system consisting of a linear power amplifier driving a piezoelectric actuator pair attached to a long viscoelastic bar is analysed. Coupled piezoelectric theory is used, and allowance is made for the dynamics of the amplifier and of the actuators. Formulae are derived for the relation between the input voltage to the amplifier and the normal force associated with extensional waves generated in the bar and for the load impedance constituted by the actuator-bar assembly. It is established that the mechanical work performed on the external parts of the bar at the actuator/bar interfaces is at most equal to the electrical energy supplied by the amplifier. The results are applied to a three-parameter viscoelastic bar and to an elastic bar, and the effects of the cut-off frequency, without load, and the output impedance of the amplifier are examined. For the elastic bar, sharp response minima occur at frequencies that are integral multiples of the inverse transit time through the actuator region. For the viscoelastic bar, the corresponding minima are less sharp and deep. The input voltage to the amplifier required to produce a desired output wave at the actuator/bar interfaces can be determined provided that the spectrum of this wave is not too broad.

  14. PREDICTIONS FOR $B \\to \\tau \\bar{\\mu} + \\mu \\bar{\\tau}$

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubaa, Dris; Datta, Alakabha; Duraisamy, Murugeswaran; Khalil, Shaaban

    2013-12-01

    The observation of B -> τ \\bar {μ } + μ \\bar {τ } at present experiments would be a clear sign of new physics. In this paper, we calculate this process in an extended Higgs sector framework where the decay is mediated by the exchange of spin zero particle with flavor changing neutral current couplings. If we identify the scalar with the newly discovered state at LHC with a mass 125 GeV then we find that, after imposing all experimental constraints, the BR(Bs -> τ \\bar {μ } + μ \\bar {τ }) can be as high as 10-6 and BR (Bd -> τ \\bar {μ } + μ \\bar {τ }) can be as high as 10-7. We also calculate this process in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and find the BR(Bs ->τ \\bar {μ } + μ \\bar {τ }) is typically of the order 10-8.

  15. Experimental constraints on the energy budget of dynamic gouge formation: effects of rock strength, material heterogeneity, and initial flaw characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Ashley; Barber, Troy; Borjas, Christopher; Ghaffari, Hamed

    2016-04-01

    Fault core materials are characterized by substantial grain size reduction relative to host and damage zone rocks. The properties of these materials control fault strength and frictional behavior, and they record valuable information about rupture and slip processes. At high strain rates and large stress amplitudes characteristic of earthquake rupture tips, rock failure passes through a fragmentation transition from discrete fracture to pulverization; therefore much of the observed grain size reduction at the leading edge of propagating earthquake ruptures. Past examinations of particle size distributions in gouge formed in the cores of natural faults have led to contrasting conclusions that during a single event, the energy associated with creation of new surface area during this grain size reduction can be as large as 50%, or as little as <1% of the earthquake energy budget; however these estimates are difficult to confirm due to (A) challenges associated with accurate particle size measurement and (B) uncertainty regarding the variety of (not-necessarily coseismic) physico-chemical processes that may contribute to the observed grain size reduction. Here we study the micromechanics and energy budget of dynamic rock fragmentation under impulsive compressive loads using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. We present new experimental results on Arkansas Novaculite and Westerly Granite coupled with microstructural observations and BET surface area measurements of post-mortem specimens. We show that the energy partitioned into creation of new surface areas approaches a significant portion of the total dissipated energy during our experiments, but this partitioning can be buffered by the presence of flaws and/or significant material heterogeneity. The results of this work have important implications for lithologic controls on gouge formation and energy partitioning during earthquakes.

  16. Remote Sensing Global Surface Air Pressure Using Differential Absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Harrah, Steven; Lawrence, Wes; Hu, Yongxiang; Min, Qilong

    2016-01-01

    Tropical storms and severe weathers are listed as one of core events that need improved observations and predictions in World Meteorological Organization and NASA Decadal Survey (DS) documents and have major impacts on public safety and national security. This effort tries to observe surface air pressure, especially over open seas, from space using a Differential-absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR) operating at the 50-55 gigahertz O2 absorption band. Air pressure is among the most important variables that affect atmospheric dynamics, and currently can only be measured by limited in-situ observations over oceans. Analyses show that with the proposed space radar the errors in instantaneous (averaged) pressure estimates can be as low as approximately 4 millibars (approximately 1 millibar under all weather conditions). With these sea level pressure measurements, the forecasts of severe weathers such as hurricanes will be significantly improved. Since the development of the DiBAR concept about a decade ago, NASA Langley DiBAR research team has made substantial progress in advancing the concept. The feasibility assessment clearly shows the potential of sea surface barometry using existing radar technologies. The team has developed a DiBAR system design, fabricated a Prototype-DiBAR (P-DiBAR) for proof-of-concept, conducted lab, ground and airborne P-DiBAR tests. The flight test results are consistent with the instrumentation goals. Observational system simulation experiments for space DiBAR performance based on the existing DiBAR technology and capability show substantial improvements in tropical storm predictions, not only for the hurricane track and position but also for the hurricane intensity. DiBAR measurements will lead us to an unprecedented level of the prediction and knowledge on global extreme weather and climate conditions.

  17. The mass dependence of star formation histories in barred spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carles, Christian; Martel, Hugo; Ellison, Sara L.; Kawata, Daisuke

    2016-11-01

    We performed a series of 29 gas dynamical simulations of disc galaxies, barred and unbarred, with various stellar masses, to study the impact of the bar on star formation history. Unbarred galaxies evolve very smoothly, with a star formation rate (SFR) that varies by at most a factor of 3 over a period of 2 Gyr. The evolution of barred galaxies is much more irregular, especially at high stellar masses. In these galaxies, the bar drives a substantial amount of gas towards the centre, resulting in a high SFR, and producing a starburst in the most massive galaxies. Most of the gas is converted into stars, and gas exhaustion leads to a rapid drop of star formation after the starburst. In massive barred galaxies (stellar mass M_{*}>2× 10^{10} M_{⊙}) the large amount of gas funnelled towards the centre is completely consumed by the starburst, while in lower mass barred galaxies it is only partially consumed. Gas concentration is thus higher in lower mass barred galaxies than it is in higher mass ones. Even though unbarred galaxies funnelled less gas towards their centre, the lower SFR allows this gas to accumulate. At late times, the star formation efficiency is higher in barred galaxies than unbarred ones, enabling these galaxies to maintain a higher SFR with a smaller gas supply. Several properties, such as the global SFR, central SFR, or central gas concentration, vary monotonically with time for unbarred galaxies, but not for barred galaxies. Therefore one must be careful when comparing barred and unbarred galaxies that share one observational property, since these galaxies might be at very different stages of their respective evolution.

  18. Black Hole Growth in Disk Galaxies Mediated by the Secular Evolution of Short Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Min; Debattista, Victor P.; Shen, Juntai; Ho, Luis C.; Erwin, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The growth of black holes (BHs) in disk galaxies lacking classical bulges, which implies an absence of significant mergers, appears to be driven by secular processes. Short bars of sub-kiloparsec radius have been hypothesized to be an important mechanism for driving gas inflows to small scale, feeding central BHs. In order to quantify the maximum BH mass allowed by this mechanism, we examine the robustness of short bars to the dynamical influence of BHs. Large-scale bars are expected to be robust, long-lived structures; extremely massive BHs, which are rare, are needed to completely destroy such bars. However, we find that short bars, which are generally embedded in large-scale outer bars, can be destroyed quickly when BHs of mass {M}{bh}∼ 0.05 % {--}0.2 % of the total stellar mass ({M}\\star ) are present. In agreement with this prediction, all galaxies observed to host short bars have BHs with a mass fraction less than 0.2 % {M}\\star . Thus, the dissolution of short inner bars is possible, perhaps even frequent, in the universe. An important implication of this result is that inner-bar-driven gas inflows may be terminated when BHs grow to ∼ 0.1 % {M}\\star . We predict that 0.2 % {M}\\star is the maximum mass of BHs allowed if they are fed predominately via inner bars. This value matches well the maximum ratio of BH-to-host-galaxy stellar mass observed in galaxies with pseudo-bulges and most nearby active galactic nucleus host galaxies. This hypothesis provides a novel explanation for the lower {M}{bh}/{M}\\star in galaxies that have avoided significant mergers compared with galaxies with classical bulges.

  19. Kinematic Properties of Double-barred Galaxies: Simulations versus Integral-field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Min; Debattista, Victor P.; Shen, Juntai; Cappellari, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we recently reported that a dynamically cool inner disk embedded in a hotter outer disk can naturally generate a steady double-barred (S2B) structure. Here we study the kinematics of these S2B simulations, and compare them to integral-field observations from ATLAS 3D and SAURON. We show that S2B galaxies exhibit several distinct kinematic features, namely: (1) significantly distorted isovelocity contours at the transition region between the two bars, (2) peaks in σ LOS along the minor axis of inner bars, which we term “σ-humps,” that are often accompanied by ring/spiral-like features of increased σ LOS, (3) {h}3{--}\\bar{v} anti-correlations in the region of the inner bar for certain orientations, and (4) rings of positive h 4 when viewed at low inclinations. The most impressive of these features are the σ-humps these evolve with the inner bar, oscillating in strength just as the inner bar does as it rotates relative to the outer bar. We show that, in cylindrical coordinates, the inner bar has similar streaming motions and velocity dispersion properties as normal large-scale bars, except for σ z , which exhibits peaks on the minor axis, i.e., humps. These σ z humps are responsible for producing the σ-humps. For three well-resolved early-type S2Bs (NGC 2859, NGC 2950, and NGC 3941) and a potential S2B candidate (NGC 3384), the S2B model qualitatively matches the integral-field data well, including the “σ-hollows” previously identified. We also discuss the kinematic effect of a nuclear disk in S2Bs.

  20. ON THE BAR PATTERN SPEED DETERMINATION OF NGC 3367

    SciTech Connect

    Gabbasov, R. F.; Repetto, P.; Rosado, M.

    2009-09-01

    An important dynamic parameter of barred galaxies is the bar pattern speed, {omega} {sub P}. Among several methods that are used for the determination of {omega} {sub P}, the Tremaine-Weinberg method has the advantage of model independence and accuracy. In this work, we apply the method to a simulated bar including gas dynamics and study the effect of two-dimensional spectroscopy data quality on robustness of the method. We added white noise and a Gaussian random field to the data and measured the corresponding errors in {omega} {sub P}. We found that a signal to noise ratio in surface density {approx}5 introduces errors of {approx}20% for the Gaussian noise, while for the white noise the corresponding errors reach {approx}50%. At the same time, the velocity field is less sensitive to contamination. On the basis of the performed study, we applied the method to the NGC 3367 spiral galaxy using H{alpha} Fabry-Perot interferometry data. We found {omega} {sub P} = 43 {+-} 6 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1} for this galaxy.

  1. Too Much Bar and Not Enough Mitzvah? A Proposed Research Agenda on Bar/Bat Mitzvah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Jewish educators are understandably interested in research on how bar/bat mitzvah affect Jewish education or research on what Jewish schools have done to avoid the distortions of a focus on bar/bat mitzvah. Research might also focus on the somewhat different and more ambitious topic of the role that bar/bat mitzvah play in contemporary Jewish…

  2. Too Much Bar and Not Enough Mitzvah? A Proposed Research Agenda on Bar/Bat Mitzvah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Jewish educators are understandably interested in research on how bar/bat mitzvah affect Jewish education or research on what Jewish schools have done to avoid the distortions of a focus on bar/bat mitzvah. Research might also focus on the somewhat different and more ambitious topic of the role that bar/bat mitzvah play in contemporary Jewish…

  3. Taylor impact of glass bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Natalie; Bourne, Neil; Field, John

    1997-07-01

    Brar and Bless pioneeered the use of plate impact upon bars as a technique for investigating the 1D stress loading of glass. We wish to extend this technique by applying VISAR and embedded stress gauge measurements to a symmetrical version of the test. In this configuration two rods impact one upon the other in a symmetrical version of the Taylor test geometry in which the impact is perfectly rigid in the centre of mass frame. Previous work in the laboratory has characterised the three glass types (float, borosilicate and a high density lead glass). These experiments will identify the 1D stress failure mechanisms from high-speed photography and the stress and particle velocity histories will be interpreted in the light of these results. The differences in response of the three glasses will be highlighted.

  4. Bar Study Stories. Issues in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This issue of "Issues in Prevention" focuses on the impact of the availability of drinks in licensed establishments, such as bars and taverns on student drinking. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Cheap Drinks at College Bars Can Escalate Student Drinking (John D. Clapp); (2) High Alcohol Outlet Density: A Problem for Campuses and…

  5. Needle bar for warp knitting machines

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, Adolf; Thumling, Manfred

    1979-01-01

    Needle bar for warp knitting machines with a number of needles individually set into slits of the bar and having shafts cranked to such an extent that the head section of each needle is in alignment with the shaft section accommodated by the slit. Slackening of the needles will thus not influence the needle spacing.

  6. Flexible scaffolding made of rigid BARs.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Vadim A; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2008-03-07

    Crescent-shaped BAR domains are generic actors in the creation of membrane curvature. In this issue, Frost et al. (2008) reveal how collective twisting of rigid F-BAR domains on a soft membrane surface may lead to different membrane curvatures.

  7. Bars as seen by Herschel and Sloan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolandi, Guido; Dotti, Massimo; Boselli, Alessandro; Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Gargiulo, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    We present an observational study of the effect of bars on the gas component and on the star formation properties of their host galaxies in a statistically significant sample of resolved objects, the Herschel Reference Sample. The analysis of optical and far-infrared images allows us to identify a clear spatial correlation between stellar bars and the cold-gas distribution mapped by the warm dust emission. We find that the infrared counterparts of optically identified bars are either bar-like structures or dead central regions in which star formation is strongly suppressed. Similar morphologies are found in the distribution of star formation directly traced by Hα maps. The sizes of such optical and infrared structures correlate remarkably well, hinting at a causal connection. In the light of previous observations and of theoretical investigations in the literature, we interpret our findings as further evidence of the scenario in which bars drive strong inflows toward their host nuclei: young bars are still in the process of perturbing the gas and star formation clearly delineates the shape of the bars; old bars on the contrary already removed any gas within their extents, carving a dead region of negligible star formation.

  8. The Bar Tack Machine. Module 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This module on the bar tack machine, one in a series dealing with industrial sewing machines, their attachments, and operation, covers one topic: performing special operations on the bar tack machine. These components are provided: an introduction, directions, an objective, learning activities, student information, a student self-check, and a…

  9. Conservative Groups Threaten to Sue Bar Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    A proposed revision in the American Bar Association's accrediting standards for law schools is coming under fire from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, which says the proposal seems to require the schools to use racial preferences in hiring and admissions despite federal and state laws limiting such policies. Although a bar-association official…

  10. Charm Physics at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chunhui; /Maryland U.

    2005-06-29

    Large production of the c{bar c} pairs and high integrated luminosity make the PEPII B Factory an excellent place for studying the charm hadrons. In this paper, we present a few most recent results from BaBar collaboration in charm sector.

  11. Instructional Uses of Bar Code Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanBiervliet, Alan

    The paper examines applications and research on the use of bar code technology to aid mentally retarded, physically handicapped, visually impaired, and other handicapped persons in independently gaining information from a variety of sources. Bar code reader technology is compared to alternative information systems such as Braille, pictorial…

  12. Impact behavior of extrinsically toughened discontinuously reinforced aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Irfan, M.A.; Liou, N.; Prakash, V.

    1996-12-31

    Discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) composites with enhanced fracture toughness have recently been developed at Alcoa. The approach consists of producing a composite microstructure in which discrete ductile phases have been incorporated into the DRA through traditional powder processing routes. In the present paper, the high strain rate behavior of these toughened composites is investigated by obtaining (1) the dynamic flow characteristics at various levels of elevated strain rates using a split Hopkinson compression bar, and (2) energy absorption during dynamic crack initiation and crack propagation using three-point bend specimens loaded on a modified Hopkinson bar configuration.

  13. Dynamic fiber debonding and push-out in model composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Xiaopeng

    2003-10-01

    When a crack propagates in a fiber-reinforced composite material, a substantial part of energy is dissipated in the debonding and sliding of the bridging fibers located behind the advancing crack front. Because of the important effect they have on the fracture toughness of a composite, these processes have been the subject of extensive experimental, analytical and numerical work. However, the vast majority of existing work on this topic has been limited to quasi-static loading situations. The few investigations performed on various composite systems involving higher loading rates seem to indicate that the fiber sliding process presents some unusual and sometimes contradictory rate-dependent characteristics. To enhance the current understanding of dynamic fiber debonding and push-out in model fiber-reinforced composites, a combined experimental and numerical investigation was carried out. A modified split Hopkinson pressure bar was used to perform high-rate fiber push-out experiments on an aluminum/epoxy model composite system. An axisymmetric cohesive/volumetric finite element scheme was developed to simulate the push-out process. Effects of several important parameters such as interfacial strength, interfacial fracture toughness and fiber/matrix friction coefficient were investigated. Interface cohesive properties were extracted by comparison between experimental and numerical results. The comparison between numerics and experiments was made as close as possible by (a) simulating the entire experimental apparatus; (b) using loading directly measured in the experiments as input to the finite element analysis (FEA) code; (c) using measured material properties in the FEA simulations; and (d) accounting for effects such as large deformations, residual stresses (through a quasi-static pre-loading scheme), spontaneous crack formation (through a cohesive failure formulation) and dynamic frictional sliding. Details of the physical process were discussed by numerically

  14. Studying plastic shear localization in aluminum alloys under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilalov, D. A.; Sokovikov, M. A.; Chudinov, V. V.; Oborin, V. A.; Bayandin, Yu. V.; Terekhina, A. I.; Naimark, O. B.

    2016-12-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of plastic shear localization mechanisms observed under dynamic deformation using the shear-compression scheme on a Hopkinson-Kolsky bar has been carried out using specimens of AMg6 alloy. The mechanisms of plastic shear instability are associated with collective effects in the microshear ensemble in spatially localized areas. The lateral surface of the specimens was photographed in the real-time mode using a CEDIP Silver 450M high-speed infrared camera. The temperature distribution obtained at different times allowed us to trace the evolution of the localization of the plastic strain. Based on the equations that describe the effect of nonequilibrium transitions on the mechanisms of structural relaxation and plastic flow, numerical simulation of plastic shear localization has been performed. A numerical experiment relevant to the specimen-loading scheme was carried out using a system of constitutive equations that reflect the part of the structural relaxation mechanisms caused by the collective behavior of microshears with the autowave modes of the evolution of the localized plastic flow. Upon completion of the experiment, the specimens were subjected to microstructure analysis using a New View-5010 optical microscope-interferometer. After the dynamic deformation, the constancy of the Hurst exponent, which reflects the relationship between the behavior of defects and roughness induced by the defects on the surfaces of the specimens is observed in a wider range of spatial scales. These investigations revealed the distinctive features in the localization of the deformation followed by destruction to the script of the adiabatic shear. These features may be caused by the collective multiscale behavior of defects, which leads to a sharp decrease in the stress-relaxation time and, consequently, a localized plastic flow and generation of fracture nuclei in the form of adiabatic shear. Infrared scanning of the localization zone of the

  15. [Development of cereal bar with pineapple skin].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Renata Siqueira; Del Santo, Victor Rogério; Souza, Gilberto Batista de; Pereira, Cíntia Alessandra Matiucci

    2011-06-01

    The cereal bars are multi-component products consisting of cereals, dried fruit and syrup binder and may be added to the consumable parts of fruits and vegetables which usually are not exploited and have high nutritional value, thereby reducing food waste. It was developed a jam with pineapple skin, which it was utilized in 13.5% in the cereal bar formulation. The cereal bar was sensorial evaluated and had its centesimal and mineral composition determined. The new product achieved average of 8.3 for global impression using 9 points hedonic scale, 91% of acceptance rate and 67% of purchase intent. In this first use of pineapple skin jam as food ingredient it can be concluded that its aggregation in the cereal bar formula is feasible, making an accepted product with fibers, proteins and minerals, as an alternative to traditional cereal bars.

  16. Design and Evaluation of a Prosthetic Knee Joint Using the Geared Five-Bar Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanxi; Ge, Wenjie; Zheng, Jia; Dong, Dianbiao

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the mechanical design, dynamics analysis and ankle trajectory analysis of a prosthetic knee joint using the geared five-bar mechanism. Compared with traditional four-bar or six-bar mechanisms, the geared five-bar mechanism is better at performing diverse movements and is easy to control. This prosthetic knee joint with the geared five-bar mechanism is capable of fine-tuning its relative instantaneous center of rotation and ankle trajectory. The centrode of this prosthetic knee joint, which is mechanically optimized according to the centrode of human knee joint, is better in the bionic performance than that of a prosthetic knee joint using the four-bar mechanism. Additionally, the stability control of this prosthetic knee joint during the swing and stance phase is achieved by a motor. By adjusting the gear ratio of this prosthetic knee joint, the ankle trajectories of both unilateral and bilateral amputees show less deviations from expected than that of the four-bar knee joint.

  17. Is a shorter bar an effective solution to avoid bar dislocation in a Nuss procedure?

    PubMed

    Ghionzoli, Marco; Ciuti, Gastone; Ricotti, Leonardo; Tocchioni, Francesca; Lo Piccolo, Roberto; Menciassi, Arianna; Messineo, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    A variety of expedients to minimize bar dislocation in the Nuss procedure has been reported. The aims of this study were to create a mathematical model to define mechanical stresses acting on bars of different lengths in the Nuss procedure, and to apply this model to clinical scenarios. Finite element model analyses were used to outline the mechanical stresses and to mathematically define different cases. Data from a group of patients with procedures carried out using standard Nuss criteria (NC group; bars half an inch shorter than the distance between the mid-axillary lines) were compared with data from a second group treated by applying model-based suggestions (MS group; bars approximately 3 inches shorter than the distance between the mid-axillary lines). Mean patient age in the NC group (48 cases) was 16.4 years old (84% males). The mean operating time was 57 minutes, and the mean bar length was 14.19 inches. There were 5 cases (10.4%) of bar dislocation. Mean patient age in the MS group (88 cases) was 16.2 years old (87% males). The mean operating time was 43 minutes and the mean bar length was 11.67 inches. There was only 1 bar dislocation, a reduction from 10.4% (NC) to 1.1% (MS) odds ratio 0.0989 (confidence interval 0.0112 to 0.8727), p = 0.0373. A shorter Nuss bar reduces tension on the sutures applied at bar extremities. This leads to enhanced bar stability and a reduced risk that the bar will flip. The use of a shorter Nuss bar may reduce the incidence of bar dislocation. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling and simulation framework for dynamic strain localization in elasto-viscoplastic metallic materials subject to large deformations

    DOE PAGES

    Mourad, Hashem Mourad; Bronkhorst, Curt Allan; Livescu, Veronica; ...

    2016-09-23

    geometry and the Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar dynamic test system. Axi-symmetric finite element simulation results are compared to cross-sectional micrographs of recovered samples and experimental load–displacement results, in order to examine the performance of the proposed framework and demonstrate its effectiveness in treating the initiation and growth of adiabatic shear banding in dynamically loaded metallic materials. These comparisons demonstrate that thermal softening alone is insufficient to induce shear localization behaviors observed in some materials, such as stainless steel, and support the hypothesis that dynamic recrystallization and/or other softening mechanisms play an essential role in this process.« less

  19. Modeling and simulation framework for dynamic strain localization in elasto-viscoplastic metallic materials subject to large deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, Hashem Mourad; Bronkhorst, Curt Allan; Livescu, Veronica; Plohr, JeeYeon Nam; Cerreta, Ellen Kathleen

    2016-09-23

    top-hat sample geometry and the Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar dynamic test system. Axi-symmetric finite element simulation results are compared to cross-sectional micrographs of recovered samples and experimental load–displacement results, in order to examine the performance of the proposed framework and demonstrate its effectiveness in treating the initiation and growth of adiabatic shear banding in dynamically loaded metallic materials. These comparisons demonstrate that thermal softening alone is insufficient to induce shear localization behaviors observed in some materials, such as stainless steel, and support the hypothesis that dynamic recrystallization and/or other softening mechanisms play an essential role in this process.

  20. Modeling and simulation framework for dynamic strain localization in elasto-viscoplastic metallic materials subject to large deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, Hashem Mourad; Bronkhorst, Curt Allan; Livescu, Veronica; Plohr, JeeYeon Nam; Cerreta, Ellen Kathleen

    2016-09-23

    top-hat sample geometry and the Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar dynamic test system. Axi-symmetric finite element simulation results are compared to cross-sectional micrographs of recovered samples and experimental load–displacement results, in order to examine the performance of the proposed framework and demonstrate its effectiveness in treating the initiation and growth of adiabatic shear banding in dynamically loaded metallic materials. These comparisons demonstrate that thermal softening alone is insufficient to induce shear localization behaviors observed in some materials, such as stainless steel, and support the hypothesis that dynamic recrystallization and/or other softening mechanisms play an essential role in this process.

  1. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  2. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  3. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  4. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  5. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  6. 15. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST INSIDE OF THE 22' BAR MILL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST INSIDE OF THE 22' BAR MILL SHIPPING BUILDING No. 1 AT THE 10' SUTTON BAR STRAIGHTENER. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, 22-Inch Bar Mill, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  7. Modified sine bar device measures small angles with high accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thekaekara, M.

    1968-01-01

    Modified sine bar device measures small angles with enough accuracy to calibrate precision optical autocollimators. The sine bar is a massive bar of steel supported by two cylindrical rods at one end and one at the other.

  8. Galaxy Zoo 2: A Study of Bar Fraction Versus Stellar Mass and Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortson, Lucy; Bamford, S.; Lintott, C.; Schawinski, K.; Smith, A.; Whyte, L.; Galaxy Zoo Team

    2010-01-01

    Galaxy Zoo has involved ¼ million of the public through the Internet in providing morphological classifications of nearly a million galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Galaxy Zoo 2 is a follow on project and has already recorded more than 40 million detailed morphological classifications on the brightest 250,000 galaxies in the SDSS. Among the most interesting products is a catalog of 10,000 barred spirals - an order of magnitude increase on the sample sizes used in most current population studies of barred spirals. In this poster we present a first look at the properties of this catalog focusing in particular on the fraction of spirals with bars as a function of environment, stellar mass and star formation history. Barred spirals are a sensitive indicator of the dynamical state of a galaxy and we discuss the implications for the evolution of the spiral population.

  9. Distributary-mouth bar development and role of submarine landslides in delta growth, South Pass, Mississippi delta

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, J.F.; Coleman, J.M.; Prior, D.B.

    1984-11-01

    Submarine landslides play a major role in the development of distributary-mouth bars and are of major importance in transporting sediment from the bar front to deeper water along the Mississippi delta front. Historic maps of the South Pass of the Mississippi delta show that the bar advanced seaward more than 1 mi (1.6 km) between 1867 and 1953. Details of the growth of the bar have been elucidated using an elaborate computer modeling program to analyze these historic maps. The analysis has shown that the geometry of the bar was controlled by the dynamics of the freshwater plume of river water as it mixed with saline Gulf water. Approximately half the sediment deposited on the bar was moved into deeper water by submarine landslides. The underlying causes of bar failure were established during major floods with the deposition of thick blankets of unstable, watersaturated sediments on the bar front. Failure occurred one to four years later in response to a variety of triggering mechanisms, which either changed the shear strength of the sediment or modified local bottom slope. The triggering mechanisms include: major storms and hurricanes, mudlump activity, and possibly, increased pore pressures resulting from generation of biogenic gas. Bar growth and basinward movement of sediment thus represent a multilvariate problem that can be approached by means of a computer analysis of bathymetric data.

  10. Molecular cloud shredding in the Galactic Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liszt, H. S.

    2006-02-01

    Seen just outside the innermost regions of the galactic center, the kinematics of molecular gas are dominated by a handful of compact but unusually broad-lined features of enigmatic origin. We show, using previous data, that there is a family of such features whose members are distinguished morphologically by their extreme vertical extension, perpendicular to the inclined plane of the overall gas tilt. Having isolated the features spatially, we mapped them with varying degrees of completeness at high resolution (1´) in lines of 12CO, 13CO and CS. Although very broad profiles exist in some individual beams, more generally we resolved the kinematics into spatial gradients which earlier were smeared in broader beams to form wider lines. The largest apparent velocity gradients are typically with respect to galactic latitude but motions are confined to the range of velocities inside the galactic terminal velocity, indicating that it is the galactic gravitational potential which is being tapped to create the observed kinematics. We interpret the broad-lined features qualitatively in terms of recent hydrodynamical models of gas flow in strongly barred galaxies: standing shocks which occur where gas enters the Galactic dust lane can account for the presence of broad lines over small spatial volumes wherever molecular gas is actually engaged in this process. To interpret the dynamical sequencing of the complex behaviour seen within the broad-line features we discuss how the Sun must be oriented with respect to the bar. In doing so, we identify the nuclear star-forming rings seen in other galaxies with the complex of giant H II regions Sgr A, B, C etc. and show that the kinematics are as expected for a ring of radius 175 pc (for a Sun-center distance of 8.5 kpc) rotating at about 210 km s-1. Gas having clear and strong outward-directed non-circular motion around l=0° (the famous "expanding molecular ring") is then associated with the "spray" of incoming gas at the inner

  11. Cam-controlled boring bar

    DOEpatents

    Glatthorn, Raymond H.

    1986-01-01

    A cam-controlled boring bar system (100) includes a first housing (152) which is rotatable about its longitudinal axis (154), and a second housing in the form of a cam-controlled slide (158) which is also rotatable about the axis (154) as well as being translatable therealong. A tool-holder (180) is mounted within the slide (158) for holding a single point cutting tool. Slide (158) has a rectangular configuration and is disposed within a rectangularly configured portion of the first housing (152). Arcuate cam slots (192) are defined within a side plate (172) of the housing (152), while cam followers (194) are mounted upon the cam slide (158) for cooperative engagement with the cam slots (192). In this manner, as the housing (152) and slide (158) rotate, and as the slide (158) also translates, a through-bore (14) having an hourglass configuration will be formed within a workpiece (16) which may be, for example, a nuclear reactor steam generator tube support plate.

  12. Highly reliable qcw laser bars and stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deichsel, E.; Schröder, D.; Meusel, J.; Hülsewede, R.; Sebastian, J.; Ludwig, S.; Hennig, P.

    2008-02-01

    Based on a well established technology for continuous-wave (cw) diode lasers, further development and optimization lead to high performance laser bars for quasi-continuous-wave (qcw) operation suitable for pumping applications. Mounted on standard heat sinks, these 808nm laser bars exhibit more than 300W (400W) qcw output power with 50% (75%) filling factors. Reliability tests of these bars are running at >200W. Several GShots at 2, 4 and 10% duty cycle (d.c.) were already achieved. With this high performance qcw laser bars, passively cooled laser stacks were developed and tested using a new design compatible to high power operation. Thermal expansion matched materials and hard solder techniques allow reliable operation, even under rough environmental conditions. Output powers of 2.5kW (>300W per bar) were demonstrated from a stack with 8 bars. After environmental tests (vibration and thermal cycles), an ongoing life test exhibits more than 2.5GShots with 1.6kW (~200W per bar) at 4% duty cycle.

  13. Numerical Investigation of the Dynamic Compressive Behaviour of Rock Materials at High Strain Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y.; Hao, H.

    2013-03-01

    The dynamic compressive strength of rock materials increases with the strain rate. They are usually obtained by conducting laboratory tests such as split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) test or drop-weight test. It is commonly agreed now that the dynamic increase factor (DIF) obtained from impact test is affected by lateral inertia confinement, friction confinement between the specimen and impact materials and the specimen sizes and geometries. Therefore, those derived directly from testing data do not necessarily reflect the true dynamic material properties. The influences of these parameters, however, are not straightforward to be quantified in laboratory tests. Therefore, the empirical DIF relations of rock materials obtained directly from impact tests consist of contributions from lateral inertia and end friction confinements, which need be eliminated to reflect the true dynamic material properties. Moreover, different rocks, such as granite, limestone and tuff have different material parameters, e.g., equation of state (EOS) and strength, which may also affect the DIF of materials but are not explicitly studied in the open literature. In the present study, numerical models of granite, limestone and tuff materials with different EOS and strength under impact loads are developed to simulate SHPB tests and to study the influences of EOS and strength, lateral inertia confinement and end friction confinement effects on their respective DIFs in the strain rate range between 1 and 1,000 s-1. The commercial software AUTODYN with user-provided subroutines is used to perform the numerical simulations of SHPB tests. Numerical simulation results indicate that the lateral inertia confinement, friction confinement and specimen aspect ( L/ D) ratio significantly influence DIF obtained from impact tests and the inertia confinement effect is different for different rocks. Based on the numerical results, quantifications on the relative contributions from the lateral inertia

  14. On the offset of barred galaxies from the black hole M {sub BH}-σ relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jonathan S.; Valluri, Monica; Shen, Juntai; Debattista, Victor P. E-mail: mvalluri@umich.edu

    2013-12-01

    We use collisionless N-body simulations to determine how the growth of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) influences the nuclear kinematics in both barred and unbarred galaxies. In the presence of a bar, the increase in the velocity dispersion σ (within the effective radius) due to the growth of an SMBH is on average ≲ 10%, whereas the increase is only ≲ 4% in an unbarred galaxy. In a barred galaxy, the increase results from a combination of three separate factors: (1) orientation and inclination effects; (2) angular momentum transport by the bar that results in an increase in the central mass density; and (3) an increase in the vertical and radial velocity anisotropy of stars in the vicinity of the SMBH. In contrast, the growth of the SMBH in an unbarred galaxy causes the velocity distribution in the inner part of the nucleus to become less radially anisotropic. The increase in σ following the growth of the SMBH is insensitive to a variation of a factor of 10 in the final mass of the SMBH, showing that it is the growth process rather than the actual SMBH mass that alters bar evolution in a way that increases σ. We argue that using an axisymmetric stellar dynamical modeling code to measure SMBH masses in barred galaxies could result in a slight overestimate of the derived M {sub BH}, especially if a constant M/L ratio is assumed. We conclude that the growth of a black hole in the presence of a bar could result in an increase in σ that is roughly 4%-8% larger than the increase that occurs in an axisymmetric system. While the increase in σ due to SMBH growth in a barred galaxy might partially account for the claimed offset of barred galaxies and pseudo bulges from the M {sub BH}-σ relation obtained for elliptical galaxies and classical bulges in unbarred galaxies, it is inadequate to account for all of the offset.

  15. Nearshore shore-oblique bars, gravel outcrops, and their correlation to shoreline change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schupp, C.A.; McNinch, J.E.; List, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    This study demonstrates the physical concurrence of shore-oblique bars and gravel outcrops in the surf zone along the northern Outer Banks of North Carolina. These subaqueous features are spatially correlated with shoreline change at a range of temporal and spatial scales. Previous studies have noted the existence of beach-surf zone interactions, but in general, relationships between nearshore geological features and coastal change are poorly understood. These new findings should be considered when exploring coastal zone dynamics and developing predictive engineering models. The surf zone and nearshore region of the Outer Banks is predominantly planar and sandy, but there are several discrete regions with shore-oblique bars and interspersed gravel outcrops. These bar fields have relief up to 3??m, are several kilometers wide, and were relatively stationary over a 1.5??year survey period; however, the shoreward component of the bar field does exhibit change during this time frame. All gravel outcrops observed in the study region, a 40??km longshore length, were located adjacent to a shore-oblique bar, in a trough that had width and length similar to that of the associated bar. Seismic surveys show that the outcrops are part of a gravel stratum underlying the active surface sand layer. Cross-correlation analyses demonstrate high correlation of monthly and multi-decadal shoreline change rates with the adjacent surf-zone bathymetry and sediment distribution. Regionally, areas with shore-oblique bars and gravel outcrops are correlated with on-shore areas of high short-term shoreline variability and high long-term shoreline change rates. The major peaks in long-term shoreline erosion are onshore of shore-oblique bars, but not all areas with high rates of long-term shoreline change are associated with shore-oblique bars and troughs. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tidally Induced Bars of Galaxies in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łokas, Ewa L.; Ebrová, Ivana; del Pino, Andrés; Sybilska, Agnieszka; Athanassoula, E.; Semczuk, Marcin; Gajda, Grzegorz; Fouquet, Sylvain

    2016-08-01

    Using N-body simulations, we study the formation and evolution of tidally induced bars in disky galaxies in clusters. Our progenitor is a massive, late-type galaxy similar to the Milky Way, composed of an exponential disk and a Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter halo. We place the galaxy on four different orbits in a Virgo-like cluster and evolve it for 10 Gyr. As a reference case, we also evolve the same model in isolation. Tidally induced bars form on all orbits soon after the first pericenter passage and survive until the end of the evolution. They appear earlier, are stronger and longer, and have lower pattern speeds for tighter orbits. Only for the tightest orbit are the properties of the bar controlled by the orientation of the tidal torque from the cluster at pericenter. The mechanism behind the formation of the bars is the angular momentum transfer from the galaxy stellar component to its halo. All of the bars undergo extended periods of buckling instability that occur earlier and lead to more pronounced boxy/peanut shapes when the tidal forces are stronger. Using all simulation outputs of galaxies at different evolutionary stages, we construct a toy model of the galaxy population in the cluster and measure the average bar strength and bar fraction as a function of clustercentric radius. Both are found to be mildly decreasing functions of radius. We conclude that tidal forces can trigger bar formation in cluster cores, but not in the outskirts, and thus can cause larger concentrations of barred galaxies toward the cluster center.

  17. Quantifying the mixing due to bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia

    2015-03-01

    We will present star formation histories and the stellar and gaseous metallicity gradients in the disk of a sample of 50 face-on spiral galaxies with and without bars observed with the integral field unit spectrograph PMAS. The final aim is to quantify the redistribution of mass and angular momentum in the galactic disks due to bars by comparing both the gas-phase and star-phase metallicity gradients on the disk of barred and non-barred galaxies. Numerical simulations have shown that strong gravitational torque by non-axisymmetric components induce evolutionary processes such as redistribution of mass and angular momentum in the galactic disks (Sellwood & Binney 2002) and consequent change of chemical abundance profiles. If we hope to understand chemical evolution gradients and their evolution we must understand the secular processes and re-arrangement of material by non-axisymmetric components and vice-versa. Furthermore, the re-arrangement of stellar disk material influences the interpretation of various critical observed metrics of Galaxy evolution, including the age-metallicity relation in the solar neighborhood and the local G-dwarf metallicity distribution. Perhaps the most obvious of these aforementioned non-axisymmetric components are bars - at least 2/3 of spiral galaxies host a bar, and possibly all disk galaxies have hosted a bar at some point in their evolution. While observationally it has been found that barred galaxies have shallower gas-phase metallicity gradients than non-barred galaxies, a complementary analysis of the stellar abundance profiles has not yet been undertaken. This is unfortunate because the study of both gas and stars is important in providing a complete picture, as the two components undergo (and suffer from) very different evolutionary processes.

  18. The BaLROG project - II. Quantifying the influence of bars on the stellar populations of nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, M. K.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Martínez-Valpuesta, I.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Pérez, I.; Peletier, R.; Vazdekis, A.

    2016-08-01

    We continue the exploration of the BaLROG (Bars in Low Redshift Optical Galaxies) sample: 16 large mosaics of barred galaxies observed with the integral field unit Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae. We quantify the influence of bars on the composition of the stellar component. We derive line-strength indices of H β, Fe5015 and Mgb. Based on single stellar population (SSP) models, we calculate ages, metallicities and [Mg/Fe] abundances and their gradients along the bar major and minor axes. The high spatial resolution of our data allows us to identify breaks among index and SSP profiles, commonly at 0.13 ± 0.06 bar length, consistent with kinematic features. Inner gradients are about 10 times steeper than outer gradients and become larger when there is a central rotating component, implying that the gradients are not independent of dynamics and orbits. Central ages appear to be younger for stronger bars. Yet, the bar regions are usually old. We find a flattening of the iron (Fe5015) and magnesium (Mgb) outer gradients along the bar major axis, translating into a flattening of the metallicity gradient. This gradient is found to be 0.03 ± 0.07 dex kpc-1 along the bar major axis while the mean value of the bar minor axis compares well with that of an unbarred control sample and is significantly steeper, namely -0.20 ± 0.04 dex kpc-1. These results confirm recent simulations and discern the important localized influence of bars. The elevated [Mg/Fe] abundances of bars and bulges compared to the lower values of discs suggest an early formation, in particular for early-type galaxies.

  19. First Measurement of σ(gg → t$\\bar{t}$)/σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$)

    SciTech Connect

    Alamdari, Shabnaz Pashapour

    2008-01-01

    The work presented here is the first measurement of the fraction of top quark pair production through gluon-gluon fusion. We use an integrated luminosity of 0.96 ± 0.06 fb-1 of p{bar p} collisions at √s of 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector. We select t$\\bar{t}$ candidates by identifying a high-pT lepton candidate, a large missing ET as evidence for a neutrino candidate and at least four high ET jets, one of which has to be identified as originating from a b quark. The challenge is to discriminate between the two production processes with the identical final state, gg → t$\\bar{t}$ and q$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$. We take advantage of the fact that compared to a quark, a gluon is more likely to radiate a low momentum gluon and therefore, one expects a larger number of charged particles with low pT in a process involving more gluons. Given the large uncertainties associated with the modeling of the low pT charged particle multiplicity, a data-driven technique was employed. Using calibration data samples, we show there exists a clear correlation between the observed average number of low pT charged particles and the average number of gluons involved in the production process predicted by Monte Carlo calculations. Given the correlation, one can identify low pT charged particle multiplicity distributions associated with specific average number of gluons. The W + 0 jet sample and dijets sample with leading jet ET in the range of 80-100 GeV are used to find no-gluon and gluon-rich low p{sub T} charged particle multiplicity distributions, respectively. Using these no-gluon and gluon-rich distributions in a likelihood fit, we find the fraction of gluon-rich events in t{bar t} candidates. This fraction has contributions from the signal and background events. Taking into account these contributions and the gg → t$\\bar{t}$ and q$\\bar{q}$ → t$\\bar

  20. Infragravity waves over a natural barred profile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H.; Holman, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of cross-shore flow were made across the surf zone during a storm as a nearshore bar became better developed and migrated offshore. Measured infragravity band spectra were compared to synthetic spectra calculated numerically over the natural barred profile assuming a white run-up spectrum of leaky mode or high-mode edge waves. The dominant wave observed early in the storm was consistent with Symond and Bowen's (1984) theoretical prediction of resonant amplification of discrete frequencies over a barred profile. -from Authors

  1. Orbital classification in an N-body bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yougang; Athanassoula, E.; Mao, Shude

    2016-12-01

    The dynamics and evolution of any galactic structure are strongly influenced by the properties of the orbits that constitute it. In this paper, we compare two orbit classification schemes, one by Laskar [numerical analysis of fundamental frequencies (NAFF)], and the other by Carpintero and Aguilar (CA), by applying both of them to orbits obtained by following individual particles in a numerical simulation of a barred galaxy. We find that, at least for our case and some provisos, the main frequencies calculated by the two methods are in good agreement: for 80 per cent of the orbits the difference between the results of the two methods is less than 5 per cent for all three main frequencies. However, it is difficult to evaluate the amount of regular or chaotic bar orbits in a given system. The fraction of regular orbits obtained by the NAFF method strongly depends on the critical frequency drift parameter, while in the CA method the number of fundamental frequencies strongly depends on the frequency difference parameter Lr and the maximum integer used for searching the linear independence of the fundamental frequencies. We also find that, for a given particle, in general the projection of its motion along the bar minor axis is more regular than the other two projections, while the projection along the intermediate axis is the least regular.

  2. MOEM scan engine for bar code reading and factory automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamedi, M. Edward; Park, Sangtae; Melendes, Robert; Wang, A.; Andrews, Angus P.; Garcia-Nunez, Dawn S.; Jinar, Dan; Richardson, Patti D.; Studer, J.; Chen, J. K.; DeNatale, Jeffrey F.; Moranski, Jeffrey A.

    1998-03-01

    Rockwell is in the state of technology transfer to manufacturing of a micro-opto-electro-mechanical scan engine with superior scanning performance for bar code reading and factory automation. The scan engine consists of three main components: actuator, mirrors, and control electronics. The first two components are fabricated on a silicon cantilever beam while the control electronics are presently hybrid. The actuator comprises of a bimorph layer covered with two metal layers. The mirror has a large area (several mm2) and it is micromachined with a surface flatness better than (lambda) /2. Actuator scan-angles greater than 22 degree(s) with high repeatability in performance are achieved. The scan engine was integrated with an existing Rockwell commercial bar code reader/decoder and successfully proven to read a two-character code 39 bar code. The system was capable of decoding the 13-mil label at 360 scans per second with a 100% successful read performance. Environmental testing of the device indicates that the scanner can operate at elevated temperatures up to 70 degree(s)C with minor fluctuations in frequency and scan angle. The scanner has also gone through a lifetime cycle test and it has survived more than 8 billion cycles during a period of 18 months. To increase the yield and the performance level of the device, theoretical study as well as dynamic simulation by finite elements modeling have been investigated and will be reported separately.

  3. Impact resistance of bar glasses.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, J P; Huggett, R H; Kidner, G

    1993-12-01

    Bar glasses are often used as weapons in interpersonal violence. Violence often erupts spontaneously and assailants use objects close to hand as weapons. After an initial national Accident and Emergency Department study to identify glass designs most often implicated in interpersonal violence, the impact resistance of 1-pint beer glasses was tested in a materials laboratory with a Zwick 5102 pendulum impact tester. Both straight-sided (nonik) glasses (annealed and tempered) and handled tankards (annealed) were tested to destruction. The impact resistance of new glasses was compared with that of glasses subjected to wear. The mean impact resistance of new annealed noniks did not differ significantly although new glasses were significantly more resistant than worn glasses (p < 0.01). It was not possible to break any of the tempered glasses with the pendulum used (maximum impact energy, 4 J). When noniks had been scratched at the rim to mimic wear, tempered glasses also had the highest impact resistance (p < 0.01) whereas the mean resistance of the annealed noniks was not significantly different. When tempered glasses failed during testing, they all disintegrated into relatively harmless cubes of glass, particularly the thicker bases of glasses. In contrast, annealed designs fractured leaving sharp shards although the thicker bases remained intact. The mean impact resistance of new annealed noniks was 0.5 J, of worn annealed noniks 0.08 J, of tempered new noniks > 4 J, of worn tempered noniks 0.18 J, and of tankards, 1.7 J.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. The BaBar electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, A.

    1997-07-01

    The progress on the design and construction of the BaBar electromagnetic calorimeter including its mechanical structure, the readout system, the mechanical and optical properties of the crystals, and the schedule for the final assembly and testing is summarized.

  5. Barring intervention? Lesbian and gay bars as an underutilized venue for tobacco interventions.

    PubMed

    Leibel, Katherine; Lee, Joseph G L; Goldstein, Adam O; Ranney, Leah M

    2011-07-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) communities are at high risk for tobacco use. While LGBT communities have historically considered bars to be safe places to socialize and congregate, these spaces are often tobacco-friendly environments and may have potential as sites for much needed intervention. Only a few public health interventions have attempted to work through bars and clubs to decrease tobacco use in the LGBT populations. Evidence from HIV prevention suggests some potential interventions in bars, and the tobacco industry has worked extensively (and successfully) to utilize bars in marketing efforts. Lesbian and gay bars are underutilized in tobacco control, suggesting missed avenues for chronic disease prevention programs. Researchers and communities should continue to recognize the importance of clean indoor air laws covering bars and develop additional strategies for reaching LGBT populations with disparities.

  6. BAR Domains as Sensors of Membrane Curvature: The Amphiphysin BAR Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Brian J.; Kent, Helen M.; Mills, Ian G.; Vallis, Yvonne; Butler, P. Jonathan G.; Evans, Philip R.; McMahon, Harvey T.

    2004-01-01

    The BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain is the most conserved feature in amphiphysins from yeast to human and is also found in endophilins and nadrins. We solved the structure of the Drosophila amphiphysin BAR domain. It is a crescent-shaped dimer that binds preferentially to highly curved negatively charged membranes. With its N-terminal amphipathic helix and BAR domain (N-BAR), amphiphysin can drive membrane curvature in vitro and in vivo. The structure is similar to that of arfaptin2, which we find also binds and tubulates membranes. From this, we predict that BAR domains are in many protein families, including sorting nexins, centaurins, and oligophrenins. The universal and minimal BAR domain is a dimerization, membrane-binding, and curvature-sensing module.

  7. ${{\\bar{d}} - {\\bar{u}}}$ Flavor Asymmetry in the Proton in Chiral Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Salamu, Y.; Ji, Cheung-Ryong; Melnitchouk, Wally; Wang, P.

    2015-09-01

    The ${\\bar d - \\bar u}$ flavor asymmetry in the proton arising from pion loops is computed using chiral effective field theory. The calculation includes both nucleon and Δ intermediate states, and uses both the fully relativistic and heavy baryon frameworks. The x dependence of ${\\bar d - \\bar u}$ extracted from the Fermilab E866 Drell–Yan data can be well reproduced in terms of a single transverse momentum cutoff parameter regulating the ultraviolet behavior of the loop integrals. In addition to the distribution at x > 0, corrections to the integrated asymmetry from zero momentum contributions are computed, which arise from pion rainbow and bubble diagrams at x = 0. These have not been accounted for in previous analyses, and can make important contributions to the lowest moment of ${\\bar d-\\bar u}$ .

  8. Phenomenological study of a cellular material behaviour under dynamic loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouix, R.; Viot, Ph.; Lataillade, J.-L.

    2006-08-01

    Polypropylene foams are cellular materials, which are often use to fill structures subjected to crash or violent impacts. Therefore, it is necessary to know and to characterise in experiments their mechanical behaviour in compression at high strain rates. So, several apparatus have been used in order to highlight the influence of strain rate, material density and also temperature. A split Hopkinson Pressure Bar has been used for impact tests, a fly wheel to test theses materials at medium strain rate and an electro-mechanical testing machine associated to a climatic chamber for temperature tests. Then, a rheological model has been used in order to describe the material behaviour. The mechanical response to compression of these foams presents three typical domains: a linear elastic step, a wide collapse plateau stress, which leads to a densification, which are related to a standard rheological model.

  9. Intelligent Bar Chart Plagiarism Detection in Documents

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dabbagh, Mohammed Mumtaz; Salim, Naomie; Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Saba, Tanzila; Al-Rodhaan, Mznah; Al-Dhelaan, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel features mining approach from documents that could not be mined via optical character recognition (OCR). By identifying the intimate relationship between the text and graphical components, the proposed technique pulls out the Start, End, and Exact values for each bar. Furthermore, the word 2-gram and Euclidean distance methods are used to accurately detect and determine plagiarism in bar charts. PMID:25309952

  10. Frequency-narrowed diode array bar.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Earl; Chann, Bien; Nelson, Ian A; Walker, Thad G

    2005-05-20

    We describe a method to frequency narrow multielement high-power diode bars. Using a commercial 60-W, 49-element, 1-cm-long diode array bar at 795 nm running at 45 W, we narrow the linewidth from 1000 to 64 GHz with only a loss of 33% in output power. The resulting laser light is well suited for spin-exchange optical pumping of noble gas nuclei.

  11. Intelligent bar chart plagiarism detection in documents.

    PubMed

    Al-Dabbagh, Mohammed Mumtaz; Salim, Naomie; Rehman, Amjad; Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Saba, Tanzila; Al-Rodhaan, Mznah; Al-Dhelaan, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel features mining approach from documents that could not be mined via optical character recognition (OCR). By identifying the intimate relationship between the text and graphical components, the proposed technique pulls out the Start, End, and Exact values for each bar. Furthermore, the word 2-gram and Euclidean distance methods are used to accurately detect and determine plagiarism in bar charts.

  12. Delamination stresses in semicircular laminated composite bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1988-01-01

    Using anisotropic elasticity theory, delamination stresses in a semicircular laminated composite curved bar subjected to end forces and end moments were calculated, and their radial locations determined. A family of design curves was presented, showing variation of the intensity of delamination stresses and their radial locations with different geometry and different degrees of anisotropy of the curved bar. The effect of anisotropy on the location of peak delamination stress was found to be small.

  13. Preparation of a Breadfruit Flour Bar.

    PubMed

    Nochera, Carmen L; Ragone, Diane

    2016-05-20

    Breadfruit is a nutritious, high energy food with a low quantity of protein but excellent protein quality. It has the potential to be developed into desired products which will help increase its utilization and add value to the crop. The overall purposes of this investigation were to develop a portable, nutritious, ready-to-eat breadfruit product (bar), test the sensory qualities of the product, and evaluate the nutritional properties of the product. Flour made from the Micronesian variety, Meinpadahk (Artocarpus altilis × Artocarpus mariannensis), was utilized for the development of the breadfruit bar. Breadfruit is a rich source of fiber, vitamins such as vitamin C, minerals such as potassium, and phytochemicals such as flavonoids. Nutritional labeling indicates that the breadfruit bar is high in carbohydrates and low in fat, and sensory evaluation indicates that 81% of the panelists found the bar acceptable while 19% disliked the bar. The breadfruit bar can provide an appealing and inexpensive gluten-free food source based on locally available breadfruit.

  14. Preparation of a Breadfruit Flour Bar

    PubMed Central

    Nochera, Carmen L.; Ragone, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Breadfruit is a nutritious, high energy food with a low quantity of protein but excellent protein quality. It has the potential to be developed into desired products which will help increase its utilization and add value to the crop. The overall purposes of this investigation were to develop a portable, nutritious, ready-to-eat breadfruit product (bar), test the sensory qualities of the product, and evaluate the nutritional properties of the product. Flour made from the Micronesian variety, Meinpadahk (Artocarpus altilis × Artocarpus mariannensis), was utilized for the development of the breadfruit bar. Breadfruit is a rich source of fiber, vitamins such as vitamin C, minerals such as potassium, and phytochemicals such as flavonoids. Nutritional labeling indicates that the breadfruit bar is high in carbohydrates and low in fat, and sensory evaluation indicates that 81% of the panelists found the bar acceptable while 19% disliked the bar. The breadfruit bar can provide an appealing and inexpensive gluten-free food source based on locally available breadfruit. PMID:28231132

  15. Bar Evolution and Bar Properties from Disc Galaxies in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson-Smith, Tenley; Simmons, Brooke

    2017-01-01

    Bars in disc galaxies indicate a large collection of stars in a specific configuration of orbits that give the galaxy center a rectangular looking feature. Astronomers have discovered that these bars affect the distribution of matter in galaxies, and are also related to galaxy stellar mass and star formation history. Little is known about the specifics of how bars evolve and drive the evolution of their host galaxies because only a handful of bars have been studied in detail so far. I have examined a sample of 8,221 barred galaxies from the early universe to identify and examine correlations with galaxy properties. The data comes from Galaxy Zoo, an online citizen science project that allows anyone to classify and measure detailed properties of galaxies. I present results including the fraction of galaxies in the sample that have bars, and the variation of galaxy properties with bar length, including galaxy color and stellar mass. I also compare these results to barred galaxies in the local universe. I will discuss the implications of these results in the context of galaxy evolution overall, including the effect of dark matter on bars and galaxy evolution.

  16. The smile effect reduction of diode laser bar by bare bar curve control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guannan; Yao, Shun; Luo, Xiaoying; Cheng, Jian; Wang, Zhiyong

    2017-02-01

    To reduce the diode laser bar's smile effect induced by packaging, a method based on a chip mounter is presented. When the bare bar is picked up by the pick-up tool (PUT) of the chip mounter, the curve direction and volume of the bar can be measured by scanning the P side surface of the bar with a laser rangefinder, and they can be controlled through adjusting the setting up of the PUT. By controlling the curve direction and volume at an appropriate state to compensate the packaging induced strain, the obtaining smile effect is restricted within 0.5μm steadily.

  17. Coffee straw can replace Hader bar for bar retained overdentures--a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Guttal, S S; Shetty, U S

    2012-12-01

    Bar attachment system provides retention and support for the overdenture. Retention of a mandibular denture can be achieved by an implant-retained or natural tooth-retained bar and stud attachment in the anterior segment of the mandible. A simple and cost effective treatment for more complex implant overdenture is the concept of conventional tooth-retained overdentures. The authors present a clinical report of a patient treated with a mandibular tooth-borne overdenture with a bar. The bar was fabricated using a coffee straw.

  18. $\\bar d - \\bar u$ asymmetry in the proton in chiral effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Salamu, Yusupujiang; Ji, Chueng -Ryong; Melnitchouk, W.; Wang, P.

    2015-03-25

    We compute the $\\bar d - \\bar u$ asymmetry in the proton in chiral effective theory, including both nucleon and Δ degrees of freedom, within both relativistic and heavy baryon frameworks. In addition to the distribution at $x>0$, we estimate the correction to the integrated asymmetry arising from zero momentum contributions from pion rainbow and bubble diagrams at $x=0$, which have not been accounted for in previous analyses. In conclusion, we find that the empirical $x$ dependence of $\\bar d - \\bar u$ as well as the integrated asymmetry can be well reproduced in terms of a transverse momentum cutoff parameter.

  19. Role of Erosion in Shaping Point Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J.; Meade, R.

    2012-04-01

    A powerful metaphor in fluvial geomorphology has been that depositional features such as point bars (and other floodplain features) constitute the river's historical memory in the form of uniformly thick sedimentary deposits waiting for the geomorphologist to dissect and interpret the past. For the past three decades, along the channel of Powder River (Montana USA) we have documented (with annual cross-sectional surveys and pit trenches) the evolution of the shape of three point bars that were created when an extreme flood in 1978 cut new channels across the necks of two former meander bends and radically shifted the location of a third bend. Subsequent erosion has substantially reshaped, at different time scales, the relic sediment deposits of varying age. At the weekly to monthly time scale (i.e., floods from snowmelt or floods from convective or cyclonic storms), the maximum scour depth was computed (by using a numerical model) at locations spaced 1 m apart across the entire point bar for a couple of the largest floods. The maximum predicted scour is about 0.22 m. At the annual time scale, repeated cross-section topographic surveys (25 during 32 years) indicate that net annual erosion at a single location can be as great as 0.5 m, and that the net erosion is greater than net deposition during 8, 16, and 32% of the years for the three point bars. On average, the median annual net erosion was 21, 36, and 51% of the net deposition. At the decadal time scale, an index of point bar preservation often referred to as completeness was defined for each cross section as the percentage of the initial deposit (older than 10 years) that was still remaining in 2011; computations indicate that 19, 41, and 36% of the initial deposits of sediment were eroded. Initial deposits were not uniform in thickness and often represented thicker pods of sediment connected by thin layers of sediment or even isolated pods at different elevations across the point bar in response to multiple

  20. Cultural Factors Related to Smoking in San Francisco's Irish Bars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlund, Travis D.; Antin, Tamar M. J.; Lee, Juliet P.; Moore, Roland S.

    2009-01-01

    California's Smoke-Free Workplace Act was extended to include bars in 1998. While the majority of bars in the state have become smoke free, in many bars patrons and staff continue to smoke despite the law. The authors present findings from a study which assessed cultural factors related to continued smoking in bars in the city of San Francisco. In…

  1. Cultural Factors Related to Smoking in San Francisco's Irish Bars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlund, Travis D.; Antin, Tamar M. J.; Lee, Juliet P.; Moore, Roland S.

    2009-01-01

    California's Smoke-Free Workplace Act was extended to include bars in 1998. While the majority of bars in the state have become smoke free, in many bars patrons and staff continue to smoke despite the law. The authors present findings from a study which assessed cultural factors related to continued smoking in bars in the city of San Francisco. In…

  2. 21 CFR 886.1650 - Ophthalmic bar prism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar prism. 886.1650 Section 886.1650...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1650 Ophthalmic bar prism. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar prism is a device that is a bar composed of fused prisms of gradually increasing...

  3. 21 CFR 886.1650 - Ophthalmic bar prism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar prism. 886.1650 Section 886.1650...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1650 Ophthalmic bar prism. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar prism is a device that is a bar composed of fused prisms of gradually increasing...

  4. 21 CFR 886.1650 - Ophthalmic bar prism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar prism. 886.1650 Section 886.1650...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1650 Ophthalmic bar prism. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar prism is a device that is a bar composed of fused prisms of gradually increasing...

  5. Automated bar detection in local disk galaxies from the SDSS. The colors of bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolandi, G.

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes an automatic isophotal fitting procedure that succeeds, without the support of any visual inspection of either the images or the ellipticity/position-angle radial profiles, to extract a fairly pure sample of barred late-type galaxies (LTGs) among thousands of optical images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The procedure relies on previous methods to robustly extract the photometrical properties of a large sample of local SDSS galaxies and is tailored to extract bars on the basis of their well-known peculiarities in their position angle and ellipticity profiles. This procedure was run on a sample of 5853 galaxies in the Coma and Local superclusters. The procedure extracted a color, an ellipticity and a position angle radial profile of the ellipses fitted to the isophotes for each galaxy. Examining the profiles of 922 face-on LTGs (B/A > 0.7) automatically, the procedure found that 36% are barred. The local bar fraction strongly increases with stellar mass. The sample of barred galaxies is used to construct a set of template radial color profiles to test the impact of the barred galaxy population on the average color profiles as previously shown in the literature and to test the bar-quenching scenario. The radial color profile of barred galaxy shows that bars are on average redder than their surrounding disk producing an outside-in gradient toward red in correspondence with their corotation radius. The distribution of the extension of the deprojected length of the bar suggests that bars have strong impact on the gradients of averaged color profiles. The dependence of the profiles on the mass is consistent with the bar-quenching scenario, i.e. more massive barred galaxies have redder colors (hence older stellar population and suppressed star formation) inside their corotation radius with respect to their lower mass counterparts. Tables of the barred and non-barred galaxies are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  6. Chemodynamical modelling of the galactic bulge and bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portail, Matthieu; Wegg, Christopher; Gerhard, Ortwin; Ness, Melissa

    2017-09-01

    We present the first self-consistent chemodynamical model fitted to reproduce data for the galactic bulge, bar and inner disc. We extend the Made-to-Measure method to an augmented phase-space including the metallicity of stars, and show its first application to the bar region of the Milky Way. Using data from the ARGOS and APOGEE (DR12) surveys, we adapt the recent dynamical model from Portail et al. to reproduce the observed spatial and kinematic variations as a function of metallicity, thus allowing the detailed study of the 3D density distributions, kinematics and orbital structure of stars in different metallicity bins. We find that metal-rich stars with [Fe/H] ≥ -0.5 are strongly barred and have dynamical properties that are consistent with a common disc origin. Metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] ≤ -0.5 show strong kinematic variations with metallicity, indicating varying contributions from the underlying stellar populations. Outside the central kpc, metal-poor stars are found to have the density and kinematics of a thick disc while in the inner kpc, evidence for an extra concentration of metal-poor stars is found. Finally, the combined orbit distributions of all metallicities in the model naturally reproduce the observed vertex deviations in the bulge. This paper demonstrates the power of Made-to-Measure chemodynamical models, that when extended to other chemical dimensions will be very powerful tools to maximize the information obtained from large spectroscopic surveys such as APOGEE, GALAH and MOONS.

  7. Monitoring Changes of Tropical Extreme Rainfall Events Using Differential Absorption Barometric Radar (DiBAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Harrah, Steven; Lawrence, R. Wes; Hu, Yongxiang; Min, Qilong

    2015-01-01

    This work studies the potential of monitoring changes in tropical extreme rainfall events such as tropical storms from space using a Differential-absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR) operating at 50-55 gigahertz O2 absorption band to remotely measure sea surface air pressure. Air pressure is among the most important variables that affect atmospheric dynamics, and currently can only be measured by limited in-situ observations over oceans. Analyses show that with the proposed radar the errors in instantaneous (averaged) pressure estimates can be as low as approximately 5 millibars (approximately 1 millibar) under all weather conditions. With these sea level pressure measurements, the forecasts, analyses and understanding of these extreme events in both short and long time scales can be improved. Severe weathers, especially hurricanes, are listed as one of core areas that need improved observations and predictions in WCRP (World Climate Research Program) and NASA Decadal Survey (DS) and have major impacts on public safety and national security through disaster mitigation. Since the development of the DiBAR concept about a decade ago, our team has made substantial progress in advancing the concept. Our feasibility assessment clearly shows the potential of sea surface barometry using existing radar technologies. We have developed a DiBAR system design, fabricated a Prototype-DiBAR (P-DiBAR) for proof-of-concept, conducted lab, ground and airborne P-DiBAR tests. The flight test results are consistent with our instrumentation goals. Observational system simulation experiments for space DiBAR performance show substantial improvements in tropical storm predictions, not only for the hurricane track and position but also for the hurricane intensity. DiBAR measurements will lead us to an unprecedented level of the prediction and knowledge on tropical extreme rainfall weather and climate conditions.

  8. The Economic Impact of Smoke-Free Laws on Restaurants and Bars in 9 States

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Paul R.; van Hasselt, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Smoke-free air laws in restaurants and bars protect patrons and workers from involuntary exposure to secondhand smoke, but owners often express concern that such laws will harm their businesses. The primary objective of this study was to estimate the association between local smoke-free air laws and economic outcomes in restaurants and bars in 8 states without statewide smoke-free air laws: Alabama, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, South Carolina, Texas, and West Virginia. A secondary objective was to examine the economic impact of a 2010 statewide smoke-free restaurant and bar law in North Carolina. Methods Using quarterly data from 2000 through 2010, we estimated dynamic panel data models for employment and sales in restaurants and bars. The models controlled for smoke-free laws, general economic activity, cigarette sales, and seasonality. We included data from 216 smoke-free cities and counties in the analysis. During the study period, only North Carolina had a statewide law banning smoking in restaurants or bars. Separate models were estimated for each state. Results In West Virginia, smoke-free laws were associated with a significant increase of approximately 1% in restaurant employment. In the remaining 8 states, we found no significant association between smoke-free laws and employment or sales in restaurants and bars. Conclusion Results suggest that smoke-free laws did not have an adverse economic impact on restaurants or bars in any of the states studied; they provided a small economic benefit in 1 state. On the basis of these findings, we would not expect a statewide smoke-free law in Alabama, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas, or West Virginia to have an adverse economic impact on restaurants or bars in those states. PMID:23906328

  9. THE IMPACT OF BARS ON DISK BREAKS AS PROBED BY S{sup 4}G IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Sheth, Kartik; Kim, Taehyun; Meidt, Sharon; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Comeron, Sebastien; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Hinz, Joannah L.; Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F.; Holwerda, Benne; Jarrett, Thomas H.; and others

    2013-07-01

    We have analyzed the radial distribution of old stars in a sample of 218 nearby face-on disks, using deep 3.6 {mu}m images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. In particular, we have studied the structural properties of those disks with a broken or down-bending profile. We find that, on average, disks with a genuine single-exponential profile have a scale length and a central surface brightness which are intermediate to those of the inner and outer components of a down-bending disk with the same total stellar mass. In the particular case of barred galaxies, the ratio between the break and the bar radii (R{sub br}/R{sub bar}) depends strongly on the total stellar mass of the galaxy. For galaxies more massive than 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, the distribution is bimodal, peaking at R{sub br}/R{sub bar} {approx} 2 and {approx}3.5. The first peak, which is the most populated one, is linked to the outer Lindblad resonance of the bar, whereas the second one is consistent with a dynamical coupling between the bar and the spiral pattern. For galaxies below 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, breaks are found up to {approx}10 R{sub bar}, but we show that they could still be caused by resonances given the rising nature of rotation curves in these low-mass disks. While not ruling out star formation thresholds, our results imply that radial stellar migration induced by non-axisymmetric features can be responsible not only for those breaks at {approx}2 R{sub bar}, but also for many of those found at larger radii.

  10. DECREASED FREQUENCY OF STRONG BARS IN S0 GALAXIES: EVIDENCE FOR SECULAR EVOLUTION?

    SciTech Connect

    Buta, R.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.

    2010-09-20

    Using data from the Near-Infrared S0 Survey of nearby, early-type galaxies, we examine the distribution of bar strengths in S0 galaxies as compared to S0/a and Sa galaxies, and as compared to previously published bar strength data for Ohio State University Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey spiral galaxies. Bar strengths based on the gravitational torque method are derived from 2.2 {mu}m K{sub s} -band images for a statistical sample of 138 (98 S0, 40 S0/a,Sa) galaxies having a mean total blue magnitude (B{sub T}) {<=} 12.5 and generally inclined less than 65{sup 0}. We find that S0 galaxies have weaker bars on average than spiral galaxies in general, even compared to their closest spiral counterparts, S0/a and Sa galaxies. The differences are significant and cannot be entirely due to uncertainties in the assumed vertical scale heights or in the assumption of constant mass-to-light ratios. Part of the difference is likely simply due to the dilution of the bar torques by the higher mass bulges seen in S0s. If spiral galaxies accrete external gas, as advocated by Bournaud and Combes, then the fewer strong bars found among S0s imply a lack of gas accretion according to this theory. If S0s are stripped former spirals, or else are evolved from former spirals due to internal secular dynamical processes which deplete the gas as well as grow the bulges, then the weaker bars and the prevalence of lenses in S0 galaxies could further indicate that bar evolution continues to proceed during and even after gas depletion.

  11. Origin, structure, and evolution of a reattachment bar, Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, David M.; Schmidt, John C.; Moore, Johnnie N.

    1990-01-01

    In a channel expansion, flow can separate from the bank, creating a zone of relatively weak recirculating current. Bars that accumulate in this weak flow near the point where flow reattaches to the bank are called reattachment bars. As a reattachment bar evolves, the recirculation zone may fill with sediment and restrict flow from the main channel. The increasingly restricted flow over the bar causes ripples to replace dunes and causes the sediment size to fine; the resulting vertical sequence resembles that of point bars. Seasonal and daily flow fluctuations in the Grand Canyon complicate this idealized sequence. Changes in discharge alter the geometry of recirculation zones, flow within the recirculation zones, the location of depositional and erosional sites, the kind of bedform and migration direction of bedforms on the bar, and the transported sediment size. Dunes and ripples within a recirculation zone migrate in a rotary pattern in response to the recirculating flow. Ripples near the reattachment point often resemble oscillation ripples in morphology and dynamics. The reversing flow that creates these ripples is caused by fluctuations in location of the reattachment point. These fluctuations cause flow near the reattachment point to reverse in an upstream-downstream direction, thereby producing symmetrical, reversing ripples with crests that trend normal to the bank. Low rates of ripple migration in the reversing flow, accompanied by rapid deposition, cause these ripples to climb at a high angle. At increasing distances from the reattachment point, the reversing flow is less balanced, and the ripples climb at lower angles as they migrate upstream and downstream. Although these observations were made in a bedrock canyon, the same processes operate in alluvial and tidal channels and are important in adjusting the shape of channels on point bars and concave benches and behind bedforms that become emergent at low stage. Reattachment bars can be recognized by the

  12. Social Organization in Bars: Implications for Tobacco Control Policy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juliet P.; Antin, Tamar M.J.; Moore, Roland S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers social roles and relationships of the patrons, staff and owners of bars as critical factors determining adherence to public health policies, and specifically California’s smokefree workplace law. Specific elements of social organization in bars affecting health policy include the community within which the bar is set, the unique identity the bar creates, the bar staff and patrons who enact this identity, and their bar society. These elements were found to contribute to the development of power relations within the bar and solidarity against the outside world, resulting in either resistance to or compliance with smokefree workplace policy. PMID:22522904

  13. pp-bar->LAMBDA{sub c}LAMBDA-bar{sub c} within a Handbag Picture - Section and Spin Observables

    SciTech Connect

    Goritschnig, A. T.; Schweiger, W.; Kroll, P.

    2009-08-04

    We study the process pp-bar->LAMBDA{sub c}LAMBDA-bar{sub c} within the generalized parton picture. Our starting point is the double handbag diagram which factorizes into soft generalized parton distributions and a hard subprocess amplitude for uu-bar->cc-bar. Our cross-section predictions may become interesting in view of forthcoming experiments at FAIR in Darmstadt.

  14. SNX–BAR proteins in phosphoinositide-mediated, tubular-based endosomal sorting

    PubMed Central

    van Weering, Jan R.T.; Verkade, Paul; Cullen, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The endocytic network is morphologically characterized by a wide variety of membrane bound compartments that are able to undergo dynamic re-modeling through tubular and vesicular structures. The precise molecular mechanisms governing such re-modeling, and the events that co-ordinated this with the major role of the endocytic network, cargo sorting, remain unclear. That said, recent work on a protein family of sorting nexins (SNX) – especially a subfamily of SNX that contain a BAR domain (SNX–BARs) – has begun to shed some much needed light on these issues and in particular the process of tubular–based endosomal sorting. SNX–BARs are evolutionary conserved in endosomal protein complexes such as retromer, where they co–ordinate membrane deformation with cargo selection. Furthermore a central theme emerges of SNX–BARs linking the forming membrane carrier to cytoskeletal elements for transport through motor proteins such as dynein. By studying these SNX–BARs, we are gaining an increasingly detailed appreciation of the mechanistic basis of endosomal sorting and how this highly dynamic process functions in health and disease. PMID:19914387

  15. SNX-BAR proteins in phosphoinositide-mediated, tubular-based endosomal sorting.

    PubMed

    van Weering, Jan R T; Verkade, Paul; Cullen, Peter J

    2010-06-01

    The endocytic network is morphologically characterized by a wide variety of membrane bound compartments that are able to undergo dynamic re-modeling through tubular and vesicular structures. The precise molecular mechanisms governing such re-modeling, and the events that co-ordinated this with the major role of endosomes, cargo sorting, remain unclear. That said, recent work on a protein family of sorting nexins (SNX) - especially a subfamily of SNX that contain a BAR domain (SNX-BARs) - has begun to shed some much needed light on these issues and in particular the process of tubular-based endosomal sorting. SNX-BARs are evolutionary conserved in endosomal protein complexes such as retromer, where they co-ordinate membrane deformation with cargo selection. Furthermore a central theme emerges of SNX-BARs linking the forming membrane carrier to cytoskeletal elements for transport through motor proteins such as dynein. By studying these SNX-BARs, we are gaining an increasingly detailed appreciation of the mechanistic basis of endosomal sorting and how this highly dynamic process functions in health and disease.

  16. Improved Coating System for High Strength Torsion Bars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-23

    SwW IMPROVED COATING SYSTEM FOR HIGH S- TYPE Of REPORT & PEROo CovERED STRENGTH TORSION BAR Final Report Plastisol Coating System Provides a Cost...8217 mumber) Torsion Bar Plastisol Coating Inorganic Coating Protective Coating Polyvinyl Chloride Coating Polyurethane Coating Corrosion Protection Tape...Bars E. Endurance Test Results for One-third Length Torsion E-1 Bar F. Specification for Application of Plastisol to High F-1 Strength Torsion Bar

  17. bar H and bar H+ production cross sections for the GBAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comini, P.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2013-06-01

    The production and cooling of the bar H+ ion is the key point of the GBAR experiment (Gravitational Behaviour of Antihydrogen at Rest), which aims at performing the free fall of antihydrogen atoms to measure bar g, the acceleration of antimatter on Earth. bar H+ ions will be obtained from collisions between a positronium cloud and antiprotons delivered by the AD/ELENA facility at CERN, with intermediate formation of antihydrogen atoms. In order to optimise the experimental production of bar H+ ions, we computed the total cross sections of the two corresponding reactions, within the same theoretical framework of the Continuum Distorted Wave - Final State (CDW-FS) model. The different contributions of the bar H excited states have been systematically investigated for different states of Ps. The results exhibit an increase of the bar H production toward low kinetic energies, in agreement with experimental data and previous calculations, whereas the largest bar H+ production is obtained with low energy ground-state antihydrogen atoms. These theoretical predictions suggest that the overall production of bar H+ could be optimal for 2 keV antiproton impact energy, using positronium atoms prepared in the 2p state.

  18. Measurement of B0bar -> D(*)0 K(*)0bar BranchingFractions

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-04-10

    The authors present a study of the decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)0}{bar K}{sup (*)0} using a sample of 226 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. They report evidence for the decay of B{sup 0} and {bar B}{sup 0} mesons to the D*{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} final state with an average branching fraction {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0}) {triple_bond} {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0}) + {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}K{sup 0})/2 = (3.6 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -5}.

  19. Bars, Lines, & Pies: A Graphing Skills Program. Expect the Unexpected with Math[R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Actuarial Foundation, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Bars, Lines, & Pies" is a dynamic math program designed to build graphing skills in students, while also showing them the relevance of math in their lives. Developed by The Actuarial Foundation along with Scholastic, the graphing lessons and activities involve engaging, real-world examples about the environment and recycling. In these lessons,…

  20. Effect of dowel bar looseness on measured load transfer efficiency using FWD load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoukry, Samir N.; William, Gergis W.; Riad, Mourad Y.

    2001-07-01

    The effect of dowel bar looseness on the joint load transfer efficiency using Falling Weight Deflectometer is the subject of this paper. The mechanism of dynamic load transfer at transverse joints of Jointed Plain Concrete Pavement is examined using nonlinear 3D finite element analysis.

  1. Partial entrainment of gravel bars during floods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, C.P.; Booth, D.B.; Burges, S.J.; Montgomery, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Spatial patterns of bed material entrainment by floods were documented at seven gravel bars using arrays of metal washers (bed tags) placed in the streambed. The observed patterns were used to test a general stochastic model that bed material entrainment is a spatially independent, random process where the probability of entrainment is uniform over a gravel bar and a function of the peak dimensionless shear stress ??*0 of the flood. The fraction of tags missing from a gravel bar during a flood, or partial entrainment, had an approximately normal distribution with respect to ??*0 with a mean value (50% of the tags entrained) of 0.085 and standard deviation of 0.022 (root-mean-square error of 0.09). Variation in partial entrainment for a given ??*0 demonstrated the effects of flow conditioning on bed strength, with lower values of partial entrainment after intermediate magnitude floods (0.065 < ??*0 < 0.08) than after higher magnitude floods. Although the probability of bed material entrainment was approximately uniform over a gravel bar during individual floods and independent from flood to flood, regions of preferential stability and instability emerged at some bars over the course of a wet season. Deviations from spatially uniform and independent bed material entrainment were most pronounced for reaches with varied flow and in consecutive floods with small to intermediate magnitudes.

  2. Arthroscopically assisted central physeal bar resection.

    PubMed

    Marsh, James S; Polzhofer, Gert K

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-seven central physeal bars were removed with an arthroscopically assisted technique. Thirty children (32 cases) have been followed to maturity or physeal closure. There were 19 boys and 11 girls, aged 4-14 years (mean, 9.5 years). Site of arrest was distal femur (15), proximal tibia (9), distal tibia (6), and distal radius (2). Mean follow-up was 6.5 years (range, 2-12 years). Adequate longitudinal growth was realized in 21 patients (70%) just after bar resection. Five patients (17%) required osteotomy, lengthening, or epiphysiodesis in addition to bar resection. In 4 patients (13%), bar resection failed. Failures occurred in those patients whose source of growth arrest was infection (3) or degree of physeal trauma approached 50% (1 case). This is the first series that studies and documents the efficacy of the arthroscope in central physeal bar resection. It provides the best visualization with minimal morbidity. The technique is described, including a discussion of technical tips and pitfalls.

  3. On the Galactic Spin of Barred Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Sodi, Bernardo; Li, Cheng; Park, Changbom; Wang, Lixin

    2013-09-01

    We present a study of the connection between the galactic spin parameter (λ d ) and the bar fraction in a volume-limited sample of 10,674 disk galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. The galaxies in our sample are visually classified into one of three groups: non-barred galaxies and galaxies hosting long or short bars, respectively. We find that the spin distributions of these three classes are statistically different, with galaxies hosting long bars having the lowest λ d values, followed by non-barred galaxies, while galaxies with short bars present typically high spin parameters. The bar fraction presents its maximum at low to intermediate λ d values for the case of long bars, while the maximum for short bars is at high λ d . This bimodality is in good agreement with previous studies finding longer bars hosted by luminous, massive, red galaxies with a low content of cold gas, while short bars were found in low luminosity, low mass, blue galaxies that were typically gas rich. In addition, the rise and fall of the bar fraction as a function of λ d , within the long-bar sample shown in our results, can be explained as a result of two competing factors: the self-gravity of the disk that enhances bar instabilities and the support by random motions, instead of ordered rotational motion, that prevents the formation/growth of bars.

  4. Interaction of real and virtual p p bar pairs in J / ψ → p p bar γ (ρ , ω) decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milstein, A. I.; Salnikov, S. G.

    2017-10-01

    The p p bar invariant mass spectra of the processes J / ψ → p p bar ω, J / ψ → p p bar ρ, and J / ψ → p p bar γ close to the p p bar threshold are calculated by means of the N N bar optical potential. The potential model for N N bar interaction in the S10 state is proposed. The parameters of the model are obtained by fitting the cross section of N N bar scattering together with the p p bar invariant mass spectra of the J / ψ decays. Good agreement with the available experimental data is achieved. Using our potential and the Green's function approach we also describe the peak in the η‧π+π- invariant mass spectrum in the decay J / ψ → γη‧π+π- in the energy region near the N N bar threshold.

  5. Measuring the Fraction of Bars and Offset Bars Using the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Alexa

    2012-01-01

    Using the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies at 3.6 and 4.5μm, I have measured a preliminary bar fraction and offset bar fraction in the local universe by visually identifying bar structure within a sample of 2,140 local galaxies. A sample this large has not been used since 1963, when Gerard de Vaucouleurs found the bar fraction to be roughly fbar ˜ 0.6 in the Third Reference Catalog of Bright Galaxies. Since then, there has been much debate over the true value of the bar fraction. The purpose of finding a bar fraction using S4G is to provide a final say in this debate. I have found that the bar fraction in the local universe is fbar = 0.69 when including both definite bars (SB) and candidate bars (SAB). I have also measured a preliminary value for the fraction of offset bars using the same sample. Offset bars are a very rare phenomenon. Of the sample used, 91 galaxies are found to be definite offset bars while an additional 39 are found to be candidate offset bars. When including both definite offset bars and candidate offset bars, the offset bar fraction in the local universe becomes fob = 0.12. I also measure the fraction of offset bars as a function of Hubble type and stellar mass. We find that 54% of offset bars are found in disks having a stellar mass of M ≤ 108 M⊙. Late-type disks possess significantly more offset bars than early-type with 60% of offset bars being found in disks having a Hubble type t ≥ 6.

  6. Evidence for B+ -> K*0bar K*+

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-06-19

    We present measurements of the branching fraction and fraction of longitudinal polarization for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K*{sup +} with a sample of 467 {+-} 5 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We obtain the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K*{sup +}) = (1.2 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup ?6} with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. We measure the fraction of longitudinal polarization f{sub L} = 0.75{sub -0.26}{sup +0.16} {+-} 0.03. The first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic.

  7. Subsurface Flow in Gravel River Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, E. N.; Dunne, T.

    2014-12-01

    The geomorphic and hydraulic characteristics of gravel bars control the direction, magnitude and spatial patterns of infiltration and exfiltration between rivers and their immediate subsurface environments. Bed undulation, water-surface gradient, alluvial depth, and the spatial variation of hydraulic conductivity (both deterministic trends and stochastic variability) affect the hydrologically-driven groundwater-surface water exchange. In this paper, we use a set of field measurements of morphological and hydrological characteristics along two reaches of the San Joaquin River, California to motivate a systematic analysis of the factors that affect paths and residence times of flow through gravel bars under an observed range of streamflow values. In the field investigation, it is shown that asymmetry of bar morphology is a first-order control on the extent and magnitude of infiltration, which is often represented to produce approximately equal areas of infiltration and seepage under the assumption of sinusoidal bedforms. Infiltration over the length of a bar is shown to be greater at low flow than at high flow because of the effect of water-surface gradient. Hydraulic conductivity (ksat) varies by orders of magnitude and systematic downstream coarsening arises related to the process of bar evolution. The lowest values of ksat were observed where the difference between the topographic gradient and the water-surface gradient is at a maximum and thus where the infiltration would be greatest into a uniform bar of homogeneous gravel. Morphology and fine sediment accumulation in recharge zones exert an important control over the mechanisms driving subsurface fluid exchange. Simulations from a numerical groundwater flow model that isolate the signatures of morphology and streambed sediment patterns on subsurface flow corroborate our interpretation that the infiltration patterns and rates are primarily controlled by bed morphology, with ksat playing a secondary role.

  8. Imaging of physeal bars in children.

    PubMed

    Wang, David C; Deeney, Vincent; Roach, James W; Shah, Amisha J

    2015-08-01

    The growth plate, also known as the physis or epiphyseal plate, is essential for longitudinal growth of bones in the immature skeleton. A variety of insults to the growth plate from trauma to infection to idiopathic causes can lead to physeal bar formation, an interruption in normal growth plate cartilage, where a bony or fibrous bridge develops between the metaphysis and epiphysis. This bridge restricts subsequent bone growth, leading to limb shortening and/or angular deformities. Early recognition of the presence of a physeal bar can help direct appropriate surgical management to restore linear growth of the bone.

  9. BaBar Forward Endcap Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Anulli, F.

    2004-06-17

    The muon and neutral hadron detector (Instrumented Flux Return or IFR) in the forward endcap of the BaBar detector at SLAC was upgraded by the installation of a new generation of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) and by increasing the absorber. The chamber replacement was made necessary by the rapid aging and efficiency loss of the original BaBar RPCs. Based on our experience with those original RPCs and 24 RPCs with thinner linseed oil treatments, improvements in the design, construction, and testing of the new generation RPCs were implemented and are described in detail.

  10. B Counting at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Grant Duncan

    2008-12-16

    In this thesis we examine the method of counting B{bar B} events produced in the BABAR experiment. The original method was proposed in 2000, but improvements to track reconstruction and our understanding of the detector since that date make it appropriate to revisit the B Counting method. We propose a new set of cuts designed to minimize the sensitivity to time-varying backgrounds. We find the new method counts B{bar B} events with an associated systematic uncertainty of {+-} 0.6%.

  11. Newtorites in bar detectors of gravitational wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronga, F.; ROG Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The detection of particles with only gravitational interactions (Newtorites) in gravitational bar detectors was studied in 1984 by Bernard, De Rujula and Lautrup. The negative results of dark matter searches suggest to look to exotic possibilities like Newtorites. The limits obtained with the Nautilus bar detector will be presented and the possible improvements will be discussed. Since the gravitational coupling is very weak, the possible limits are very far from what is needed for dark matter, but for large masses are the best limits obtained on the Earth. An update of limits for MACRO particles will be given.

  12. Sine-Bar Attachment For Machine Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    Sine-bar attachment for collets, spindles, and chucks helps machinists set up quickly for precise angular cuts that require greater precision than provided by graduations of machine tools. Machinist uses attachment to index head, carriage of milling machine or lathe relative to table or turning axis of tool. Attachment accurate to 1 minute or arc depending on length of sine bar and precision of gauge blocks in setup. Attachment installs quickly and easily on almost any type of lathe or mill. Requires no special clamps or fixtures, and eliminates many trial-and-error measurements. More stable than improvised setups and not jarred out of position readily.

  13. BaBar forward endcap upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anulli, F.; Baldini, R.; Calcaterra, A.; Daniello, L.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Piccolo, M.; Santoni, M.; Zallo, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Boyce, R.; Krebs, J.; Messner, R.; Putallaz, G.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Buzzo, A.; Crosetti, G.; LoVetere, M.; Minutoli, S.; Passaggio, S.; Pollovio, P.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Trovato, A.; Cartaro, C.; Fabozzi, F.; Lista, L.; Piccolo, D.; Paolucci, P.; Avanzini, C.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzi, D.; Bellini, F.; Buccheri, A.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gargiulo, C.; Gaspero, M.; Lunadei, R.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pelosi, A.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Voena, C.; Sinev, N.; Strom, D.; Foulkes, S.; Wang, K.; Band, H. R.; Hollar, J.; Tan, P.

    2005-02-01

    The muon and neutral hadron detector (instrumented flux return or IFR) in the forward endcap of the BaBar detector at SLAC was upgraded by the installation of a new generation of resistive plate chambers (RPCs) and by increasing the absorber. The chamber replacement was made necessary by the rapid aging and efficiency loss of the original BaBar RPCs. Based on our experience with those original RPCs and 24 RPCs with thinner linseed oil treatments, improvements in the design, construction, and testing of the new generation RPCs were implemented and are described in detail.

  14. Sine-Bar Attachment For Machine Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    Sine-bar attachment for collets, spindles, and chucks helps machinists set up quickly for precise angular cuts that require greater precision than provided by graduations of machine tools. Machinist uses attachment to index head, carriage of milling machine or lathe relative to table or turning axis of tool. Attachment accurate to 1 minute or arc depending on length of sine bar and precision of gauge blocks in setup. Attachment installs quickly and easily on almost any type of lathe or mill. Requires no special clamps or fixtures, and eliminates many trial-and-error measurements. More stable than improvised setups and not jarred out of position readily.

  15. Multipole Field Effects for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika; Delayen, Jean Roger

    2012-09-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity is currently being considered as one of the design options in rf separation for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for the crabbing cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade. Knowledge of multipole field effects is important for accurate beam dynamics study of rf structures. The multipole components can be accurately determined numerically using the electromagnetic surface field data in the rf structure. This paper discusses the detailed analysis of those components for the fundamental deflecting/crabbing mode and higher order modes in the parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity.

  16. Four Experiments on the Perception of Bar Charts.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Justin; Setlur, Vidya; Anand, Anushka

    2014-12-01

    Bar charts are one of the most common visualization types. In a classic graphical perception paper, Cleveland & McGill studied how different bar chart designs impact the accuracy with which viewers can complete simple perceptual tasks. They found that people perform substantially worse on stacked bar charts than on aligned bar charts, and that comparisons between adjacent bars are more accurate than between widely separated bars. However, the study did not explore why these differences occur. In this paper, we describe a series of follow-up experiments to further explore and explain their results. While our results generally confirm Cleveland & McGill's ranking of various bar chart configurations, we provide additional insight into the bar chart reading task and the sources of participants' errors. We use our results to propose new hypotheses on the perception of bar charts.

  17. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of $\\Lambda$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}$ production in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2016-02-09

    Here, we study $\\Lambda$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}$ production asymmetries in $p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$, $p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$, and $p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\mu^\\pm \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$ events recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV. We find an excess of $\\Lambda$'s ($\\bar{\\Lambda}$'s) produced in the proton (antiproton) direction. This forward-backward asymmetry is measured as a function of rapidity. We confirm that the $\\bar{\\Lambda}/\\Lambda$ production ratio, measured by several experiments with various targets and a wide range of energies, is a universal function of "rapidity loss", i.e., the rapidity difference of the beam proton and the lambda.

  18. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of $$\\Lambda$$ and $$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$ production in $$p \\bar{p}$$ collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2016-02-09

    Here, we studymore » $$\\Lambda$$ and $$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$ production asymmetries in $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$, $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$, and $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\mu^\\pm \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$ events recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$$ TeV. We find an excess of $$\\Lambda$$'s ($$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$'s) produced in the proton (antiproton) direction. This forward-backward asymmetry is measured as a function of rapidity. We confirm that the $$\\bar{\\Lambda}/\\Lambda$$ production ratio, measured by several experiments with various targets and a wide range of energies, is a universal function of "rapidity loss", i.e., the rapidity difference of the beam proton and the lambda.« less

  19. 50 CFR Figures 14a and 14b to Part... - Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Bent Bars... 223—Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and...

  20. Unitarity Triangles at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Vidal, Fernando; /Valencia U., IFIC

    2011-11-23

    The BaBar experiment has used a variety of methods to determine the angles {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Unitarity Triangle, which give insight into the Standard Model description of CP violation in the quark sector of the electroweak interactions. Here we review the main experimental techniques and analyses, with emphasis in the most recent results.

  1. Characterization of matched piezoelectric transducer bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugnet, Boris; Assaad, Jamal; Hladky-Hennion, Anne-Christine

    2004-06-01

    To aid the design of linear arrays, it is quite important to have a detailed understanding of the elementary transducer behavior. These transducer bars must be backed and matched. The aim of this work is to characterize and to optimize layers that are used to match such transducer bars. In order to show the influence of these layers, the acoustical (acoustical power, far-field directivity pattern), electrical (electrical impedance) and mechanical (displacement field) parameters of the transducer are computed using the finite element method. Numerical studies of several transducers with different ideal matching layers which satisfy the one-dimensional criterion are presented and carefully analyzed. These studies show the existence of parasitic modes in the desired operating band of the transducer, due to shear wave propagation in the matching layer. A simple choice criterion of the matching material suggesting no parasitic mode in the desired operating band of the transducer bar has been defined. This criterion is given by W<λS/2, where W is the width of the transducer and λS is the shear wavelength of the matching layer at the working frequency. Finally, experimental results of a matched transducer bar are successfully compared with numerical ones.

  2. Martian Meanders and Scroll-Bars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-01

    This is a portion of an inverted fluvial channel in the region of Aeolis/Zephyria Plana, at the Martian equator. Channels become inverted when the sediments filling them become more resistant to erosion than the surrounding material. Here, the most likely process leading to hardening of the channel material is chemical cementation by precipitation of minerals. Once the surrounding material erodes, the channel is left standing as a ridge. The series of curvilinear lineations are ancient scroll-bars, which are features typical of river meanders (bends) in terrestrial fluvial channels. Scroll-bars are series of ridges that result from the continuous lateral migration of a meander. On Earth, they are more common in mature rivers. The presence of scroll bars suggests that the water flow in this channel may have been sustained for a relatively long time. Measuring characteristics of these scroll-bars and meanders may help to estimate the amount of water that once flowed in this channel, aiding our understanding of the history of water on Mars. The map is projected here at a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 29.3 centimeters (11.5 inches) per pixel (with 1 x 1 binning); objects on the order of 88 centimeters (29.6 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21551

  3. My Bar Graph Tells a Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillen, Sue; McMillen, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Connecting stories to qualitative coordinate graphs has been suggested as an effective instructional strategy. Even students who are able to "create" bar graphs may struggle to correctly "interpret" them. Giving children opportunities to work with qualitative graphs can help them develop the skills to interpret, describe, and compare information…

  4. Spinners, Scroll Bars and Simpson's Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staples, Ed

    2005-01-01

    One of the most remarkable devices embedded in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is known as the spinner. Its staggering simplicity is undoubtedly its strength. As an incrementing device that allows graphs to dance across the screen, it gives the concept of variability a whole new meaning. Spinners and their close cousins scroll bars can be grabbed…

  5. Hiding Solar-Array Bus Bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hufnagel, W. F.

    1983-01-01

    End terminals mounted under cells, maximizing usable illuminated area. Reconfigured solar panel bus bars placed under cells, reducing portion of module area not occupied by active silicon. Underside of last cell in string of cells serves as contact for positive bus. Negative tab of last cell in string is wrapped around from top of cell. Tabs are connected to output boards mounted under cells.

  6. Semileptonic B decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, D.; /Montreal U.

    2007-05-23

    This paper summarizes the content of a talk given by the author at the Lake Louise Winter Institute, on February 21st 2007. It presents recent measurements of the rates for semileptonic B decays using data collected by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  7. Divorce and Bar Mitzvah: A First Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geffen, Michael; Kaplan, Earl

    After an introductory discussion and review of literature on divorce among Jewish families, this document presents and analyzes two case studies which show the adverse effect of divorce and child-custody battles on the children of Jewish families who subsequently plan a B'nai Mitzvah (Bar or Bat Mitzvah) ceremony--a joyous ritual of initiation…

  8. Star formation properties in barred galaxies. III. Statistical study of bar-driven secular evolution using a sample of nearby barred spirals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhi-Min; Wu, Hong; Cao, Chen E-mail: hwu@bao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    Stellar bars are important internal drivers of secular evolution in disk galaxies. Using a sample of nearby spiral galaxies with weak and strong bars, we explore the relationships between the star formation feature and stellar bars in galaxies. We find that galaxies with weak bars tend coincide with low concentrical star formation activity, while those with strong bars show a large scatter in the distribution of star formation activity. We find enhanced star formation activity in bulges toward stronger bars, although not predominantly, consistent with previous studies. Our results suggest that different stages of the secular process and many other factors may contribute to the complexity of the secular evolution. In addition, barred galaxies with intense star formation in bars tend to have active star formation in their bulges and disks, and bulges have higher star formation densities than bars and disks, indicating the evolutionary effects of bars. We then derived a possible criterion to quantify the different stages of the bar-driven physical process, while future work is needed because of the uncertainties.

  9. Internal meson dominance for pp-bar annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Brix, G.; Genz, H.; Tatur, S.

    1989-04-01

    The previously considered /sup 3/S/sub 1/ internal fusion model of pp-bar..-->..YY-bar, YY-bar /sup */, and Y/sup */Y-bar/sup */ (Y denotes hyperon) at low energies is modified and thereby extended to also include pp-bar..-->..nn-bar and ..delta../sup ++/Delta-bar/sup - -/. It is assumed that the same nonperturbative mechanism that mixes the different qq-bar pairs within the neutral, nonstrange mesons is also responsible for the scattering, annihilation, and creation of qq-bar pairs within the baryon-antibaryon system. More specifically, we assume that processes qq-bar..-->..QQ-bar within the baryon-antibaryon system with q = d or u and Q = d, u, or s quarks is mediated by fusion of the qq-bar to a pseudoscalar or vector meson that also within the system decays into QQ-bar. The /sup 1/S/sub 0/ pseudoscalar-meson model disagrees with experiment whereas the /sup 3/S/sub 1/ vector-meson fusion model is in reasonable agreement with it. As compared to the previously considered /sup 3/S/sub 1/ internal fusion model the main change is an extension of the approximate agreement to the nonstrange final-state baryons. This is achieved since strange baryons in the model are only produced via the small ..omega..-phi mixing.

  10. Common evolutionary trends underlie the four-bar linkage systems of sunfish and mantis shrimp.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yinan; Nelson-Maney, Nathan; Anderson, Philip S L

    2017-05-01

    Comparative biomechanics offers an opportunity to explore the evolution of disparate biological systems that share common underlying mechanics. Four-bar linkage modeling has been applied to various biological systems such as fish jaws and crustacean appendages to explore the relationship between biomechanics and evolutionary diversification. Mechanical sensitivity states that the functional output of a mechanical system will show differential sensitivity to changes in specific morphological components. We document similar patterns of mechanical sensitivity in two disparate four-bar systems from different phyla: the opercular four-bar system in centrarchid fishes and the raptorial appendage of stomatopods. We built dynamic linkage models of 19 centrarchid and 36 stomatopod species and used phylogenetic generalized least squares regression (PGLS) to compare evolutionary shifts in linkage morphology and mechanical outputs derived from the models. In both systems, the kinematics of the four-bar mechanism show significant evolutionary correlation with the output link, while travel distance of the output arm is correlated with the coupler link. This common evolutionary pattern seen in both fish and crustacean taxa is a potential consequence of the mechanical principles underlying four-bar systems. Our results illustrate the potential influence of physical principles on morphological evolution across biological systems with different structures, behaviors, and ecologies. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. Musculoskeletal work preceding the outward and inward Tkachev on uneven bars in artistic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, David G; Irwin, Gareth

    2010-03-01

    Outward facing Tkachevs on uneven bars have been the traditional technique employed by artistic gymnasts. Changes in bar spacing and judging have increased the popularity of the inward version of the skill, in which the gymnast faces towards the low bar as she straddles over the high bar. The purpose of this study was to compare these two variants of the women's Tkachev to examine the influence of the positioning of the low bar on the musculoskeletal demands placed on the gymnast. 3-D DLT reconstructed data sets from digitised video images of straddle Tkachevs performed at the 2000 Sydney Olympics were analysed. Five performances of each variant were compared using kinematics and inverse dynamics. Mean hip and shoulder kinematics were similar for both variants of the Tkachev, but for the inward, gymnasts released later, travelled higher and re-grasped earlier than for the outward. Hip joint moments were similar for both variants while shoulder moments were different. Total musculoskeletal demands were similar for both variants, although the distribution was markedly different with the shoulders contributing positively for the outward and negatively for the inward. Implications for training specificity, along with potential future developments for the inward variant, have been highlighted.

  12. Physical and ecological connectivity among restored oyster bars in the Severn River (Maryland, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steppe, C. N.; Fredriksson, D. W.; Wallendorf, L.; Barlow, A.

    2008-12-01

    In an effort to improve water quality and enhance the Crassostrea virginica fishery, many oyster restoration bars have been placed in Chesapeake Bay tributaries. Nevertheless, bars are often placed in sub-estuaries with poorly described circulation dynamics. Therefore the potential for the restored bars to either re-seed themselves or serve as larval sources for other beds remains unclear. To address this problem we assessed connectivity among 3 restored oyster bars in the Severn River Estuary, (Maryland, USA) via a combination of weekly plankton tows at each bar (College Creek, Weems Creek, and Lake Ogleton; May-October 2007); predictions from a hydrodynamic model (ADCIRC) adapted for the study area; and satellite-tracked drifter deployments from the College Creek and Weems Creek sites (2007-2008). Planktonic assemblages were similar among sites, and shifted on a time scale of weeks. Preliminary model runs showed that connectivity between the Weems Creek site and the main-stem of the Severn River may be higher than between the College Creek site and the Severn. Finally, drifter trajectories indicated two distinct transport regimes; retention within the Severn River system, on a time scale pertinent to C. virginica larval development (about 3 weeks), and export to the main-stem of Chesapeake Bay, indicating loss of larvae from the local system, either by mortality or recruitment to another sub-estuary.

  13. Calculations of bar K-nuclear quasi-bound states using chiral bar KN amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareš, J.; Barnea, N.; Cieplý, A.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Gazda, D.

    2014-03-01

    We review our recent calculations of K- quasi-bound states in nuclear systems using subthreshold energy dependent chiral bar KN amplitudes. Strong energy dependence of the scattering amplitudes requires self-consistent evaluation of the involved bar KN interactions. In view of sizable widths predicted by our calculations, an unambiguous identification of K--nuclear quasi-bound states in ongoing experimental searches would be difficult.

  14. 14. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST INSIDE OF THE 22' BAR STOCKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST INSIDE OF THE 22' BAR STOCKING AND FINISHING BUILDING AT THE PICKLING VATS. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, 22-Inch Bar Mill, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  15. Bond tests of fiberglass-reinforced plastic bars in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Larralde, J.; Silva-Rodriquez, R.; Burdette, J.; Harris, B. . Civil and Architectural Engineering Dept.)

    1994-07-01

    Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic (FRP) bars for concrete reinforcement have been commercially available for several years. The main advantage of such bar relative to the conventional steel reinforcing bars is their resistance to corrosion. The reinforced plastic bars are slightly different from the conventional steel bars both geometrically and mechanically. Thus, research is needed to understand their behavior and to be able to use them in concrete reinforcement with adequate reliability. Bond strength of reinforced plastic bars in concrete is one of the mechanical and behavioral differences with the steel bars. This paper presents the results of pullout and beam tests conducted to determine the bond stress-slip behavior of FRP bars in concrete.

  16. Laboratory and workplace assessments of rivet bucking bar vibration emissions.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Thomas W; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S; Welcome, Daniel E; Dong, Ren G

    2015-04-01

    Sheet metal workers operating rivet bucking bars are at risk of developing hand and wrist musculoskeletal disorders associated with exposures to hand-transmitted vibrations and forceful exertions required to operate these hand tools. New bucking bar technologies have been introduced in efforts to reduce workplace vibration exposures to these workers. However, the efficacy of these new bucking bar designs has not been well documented. While there are standardized laboratory-based methodologies for assessing the vibration emissions of many types of powered hand tools, no such standard exists for rivet bucking bars. Therefore, this study included the development of a laboratory-based method for assessing bucking bar vibrations which utilizes a simulated riveting task. With this method, this study evaluated three traditional steel bucking bars, three similarly shaped tungsten alloy bars, and three bars featuring spring-dampeners. For comparison the bucking bar vibrations were also assessed during three typical riveting tasks at a large aircraft maintenance facility. The bucking bars were rank-ordered in terms of unweighted and frequency-weighted acceleration measured at the hand-tool interface. The results suggest that the developed laboratory method is a reasonable technique for ranking bucking bar vibration emissions; the lab-based riveting simulations produced similar rankings to the workplace rankings. However, the laboratory-based acceleration averages were considerably lower than the workplace measurements. These observations suggest that the laboratory test results are acceptable for comparing and screening bucking bars, but the laboratory measurements should not be directly used for assessing the risk of workplace bucking bar vibration exposures. The newer bucking bar technologies exhibited significantly reduced vibrations compared to the traditional steel bars. The results of this study, together with other information such as rivet quality, productivity, tool

  17. Laboratory and Workplace Assessments of Rivet Bucking Bar Vibration Emissions

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Thomas W.; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S.; Welcome, Daniel E.; Dong, Ren G.

    2016-01-01

    Sheet metal workers operating rivet bucking bars are at risk of developing hand and wrist musculoskeletal disorders associated with exposures to hand-transmitted vibrations and forceful exertions required to operate these hand tools. New bucking bar technologies have been introduced in efforts to reduce workplace vibration exposures to these workers. However, the efficacy of these new bucking bar designs has not been well documented. While there are standardized laboratory-based methodologies for assessing the vibration emissions of many types of powered hand tools, no such standard exists for rivet bucking bars. Therefore, this study included the development of a laboratory-based method for assessing bucking bar vibrations which utilizes a simulated riveting task. With this method, this study evaluated three traditional steel bucking bars, three similarly shaped tungsten alloy bars, and three bars featuring spring-dampeners. For comparison the bucking bar vibrations were also assessed during three typical riveting tasks at a large aircraft maintenance facility. The bucking bars were rank-ordered in terms of unweighted and frequency-weighted acceleration measured at the hand-tool interface. The results suggest that the developed laboratory method is a reasonable technique for ranking bucking bar vibration emissions; the lab-based riveting simulations produced similar rankings to the workplace rankings. However, the laboratory-based acceleration averages were considerably lower than the workplace measurements. These observations suggest that the laboratory test results are acceptable for comparing and screening bucking bars, but the laboratory measurements should not be directly used for assessing the risk of workplace bucking bar vibration exposures. The newer bucking bar technologies exhibited significantly reduced vibrations compared to the traditional steel bars. The results of this study, together with other information such as rivet quality, productivity, tool

  18. Patient misidentifications caused by errors in standard bar code technology.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Marion L; Carter, Alexis; Jenkins, Karen; Fantz, Corinne R

    2010-10-01

    Bar code technology has decreased transcription errors in many healthcare applications. However, we have found that linear bar code identification methods are not failsafe. In this study, we sought to identify the sources of bar code decoding errors that generated incorrect patient identifiers when bar codes were scanned for point-of-care glucose testing and to develop solutions to prevent their occurrence. We identified misread wristband bar codes, removed them from service, and rescanned them by using 5 different scanner models. Bar codes were reprinted in pristine condition for use as controls. We determined error rates for each bar code-scanner pair and manually calculated internal bar code data integrity checks. As many as 3 incorrect patient identifiers were generated from a single bar code. Minor bar code imperfections, failure to control for bar code scanner resolution requirements, and less than optimal printed bar code orientation were confirmed as sources of these errors. Of the scanner models tested, the Roche ACCU-CHEK® glucometer had the highest error rate. The internal data integrity check system did not detect these errors. Bar code-related patient misidentifications can occur. In the worst case, misidentified patient results could have been transmitted to the incorrect patient medical record. This report has profound implications not only for point-of-care testing but also for bar coded medication administration, transfusion recipient certification systems, and other areas where patient misidentifications can be life-threatening. Careful control of bar code scanning and printing equipment specifications will minimize this threat to patient safety. Ultimately, healthcare device manufacturers should adopt more robust and higher fidelity alternatives to linear bar code symbologies.

  19. Program for drawing bar graphs on IBM Personal computers.

    PubMed

    Anandhkumar, N; Namasivayam, A

    1990-04-01

    A simple program for drawing Bar graphs on IBM Personal computers is described here. This program is written in BASIC language and is user friendly. The program allows the operator to plot the bars with standard error, adjust the spacing between the bars and save the 'bar in a floppy disk. Legend can also be added at appropriate places in the graph. In the graphic mode, a hard copy can be obtained from a dot matrix printer using print screen command.

  20. EAST ELEVATION, LTV STEEL (FORMERLY REPUBLIC STEEL), 8" BAR MILL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION, LTV STEEL (FORMERLY REPUBLIC STEEL), 8" BAR MILL, BUFFALO PLANT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM ROLL SHOP. 8" BAR MILL DESIGNED AND BUILT BY DONNER STEEL CO. (PREDECESSOR OF REPUBLIC), 1919-1920. FOR DESCRIPTION OF ORIGINAL MILL SEE "IRON AGE", 116\\4 (23 JULY 1925): 201-204. - LTV Steel, 8-inch Bar Mill, Buffalo Plant, Buffalo, Erie County, NY