Science.gov

Sample records for dynamic i-v measurements

  1. Comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, B.

    1997-01-01

    A comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) is made. The single-cell TFE used in this study is the prototype for the 40kW{sub e} space nuclear power system that is similar to the 6kW{sub e} TOPAZ-II. The steady-state I-V measurements influence the emitter temperature due to electron cooling. Therefore, to eliminate the steady-state I-V measurement influence on the TFE and provide a better understanding of the behavior of the thermionic energy converter and TFE characteristics, dynamic I-V measurements are made. The dynamic I-V measurements are made at various input power levels, cesium pressures, collector temperatures, and steady-state current levels. From these measurements, it is shown that the dynamic I-V{close_quote}s do not change the TFE characteristics at a given operating point. Also, the evaluation of the collector work function from the dynamic I-V measurements shows that the collector optimization is not due to a minimum in the collector work function but due to an emission optimization. Since the dynamic I-V measurements do not influence the TFE characteristics, it is believed that these measurements can be done at a system level to understand the influence of TFE placement in the reactor as a function of the core thermal distribution. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, Bernard

    1997-01-10

    A comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) is made. The single-cell TFE used in this study is the prototype for the 40 kW{sub e} space nuclear power system that is similar to the 6 kW{sub e} TOPAZ-II. The steady-state I-V measurements influence the emitter temperature due to electron cooling. Therefore, to eliminate the steady-state I-V measurement influence on the TFE and provide a better understanding of the behavior of the thermionic energy converter and TFE characteristics, dynamic I-V measurements are made. The dynamic I-V measurements are made at various input power levels, cesium pressures, collector temperatures, and steady-state current levels. From these measurements, it is shown that the dynamic I-V's do not change the TFE characteristics at a given operating point. Also, the evaluation of the collector work function from the dynamic I-V measurements shows that the collector optimization is not due to a minimum in the collector work function but due to an emission optimization. Since the dynamic I-V measurements do not influence the TFE characteristics, it is believed that these measurements can be done at a system level to understand the influence of TFE placement in the reactor as a function of the core thermal distribution.

  3. Research Level I-V and QE Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, Keith

    2013-08-12

    A summary of key points related to research-level measurements of current-voltage (I-V) and quantum efficiency (QE) for various types of photovoltaic cells include the following: (1) Compare measurements with another trusted laboratory often enough to see the random error; (2) Have a calibration lab calibrate your research cell; (3) Document potential metastabilities and sensitivity to premeasurement conditions; (4) Measure the 1-sun spectral responsivity with a bias light level of 0.37 times the expected 1-sun short-current current; and (5) Be aware of bias rate artifacts in I-V and QE.

  4. The I-V Measurement System for Solar Cells Based on MCU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengxiang, Chen; Yu, Ai; Jiafu, Wang; Lisheng, Wang

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, an I-V measurement system for solar cells based on Single-chip Microcomputer (MCU) is presented. According to the test principles of solar cells, this measurement system mainly comprises of two parts—data collecting, data processing and displaying. The MCU mainly used as to acquire data, then the collecting results is sent to the computer by serial port. The I-V measurement results of our test system are shown in the human-computer interaction interface based on our hardware circuit. By comparing the test results of our I-V tester and the results of other commercial I-V tester, we found errors for most parameters are less than 5%, which shows our I-V test result is reliable. Because the MCU can be applied in many fields, this I-V measurement system offers a simple prototype for portable I-V tester for solar cells.

  5. Prediction of field emitter cathode lifetime based on measurement of I- V curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashov, V. S.; Nikolski, K. N.; Baturin, A. S.; Sheshin, E. P.

    2003-06-01

    A technique is presented, which allows the prediction of field emitter cathode lifetime without long-term direct measurements of cathode parameters stability. This technique is based on periodic measurements of cathode I- V characteristics. Moreover, it allows performing a post-experiment optimization for the appropriate choice of the feedback system to provide a stable operation during a long time. The proposed technique was applied to study the emission properties of reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) and thermo-enlarged graphite (TEG). For the given cathodes, the characteristic time of the cathode destruction was estimated.

  6. Photovoltaic performance parameters at the nanoscale from in situ I-V curve measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseem, Sadia; Tennyson, Elizabeth; Leite, Marina

    Monocrystalline photovoltaic (PV) devices exhibit higher efficiencies than polycrystalline devices, but the high manufacturing costs associated with single crystal solar cells pose a hindrance to their wide implementation. Polycrystalline CuInxGa(1 - x)Se2 (CIGS) material with high optical absorbance and low cost/Watt, is a promising alternative. Yet, the efficiency of this low-cost technology is still substantially lower than the theoretical values estimated by the Shockley-Queisser limit. This is likely due to microstructural non-uniformities, which cannot be accessed by macroscopic light I-V measurements. Therefore, we spatially resolve the electrical response of these devices by `local' I-Vs. For that, we utilize a 100x objective as a local excitation source and LabVIEW to map the PV performance with sub-micronscale resolution through extrapolation of key parameters from pixel by pixel I-V curves. Extraction of performance parameters such as short-circuit current, opencircuit voltage fill factor, and maximum power point can provide useful information regarding optimal microstructural characteristics. This information is not only valuable for CIGS-based devices, but also will be an essential tool for maximizing performance across all PV technologies.

  7. Detecting loss mechanisms of c-Si PV modules in-situ I-V measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Siyu; Schneller, Eric; Walters, Joe; Davis, Kristopher O.; Schoenfeld, Winston V.

    2016-09-01

    PV module reliability is alsways an important issue for PV industry. In an outdoor PV system, PV modules suffer from degradation due to different factors. It is then very important to determine the loss mechanisms of a PV module and making improvement based on this. It is found in this work that due to mismatch effect, using fitting method to extract I-V characteristics might not be well applied on a PV module, especially when it has non-uniform degradation problem. This work proposes a method to accurately quantify the power loss of PV modules due to different degradation mechanisms, including series resistance (Rs) loss, non-uniform shunting loss and number of shunted cells, uniform shunting loss, uniform current loss, non-uniform current (mismatch) loss, recombination current (J01 and J02) losses of a PV module. All required input information are the measured current-voltage (I-V) curves and short circuit current- open circuit voltage (Isc-Voc) of PV module initial state and final state. The method is first applied to a simulated PV module with various degradation problems. Power loss due to each loss mechanism for the simulated PV module is then extracted using the proposed method and a pie chart can be generated. Comparing with the actual power loss on each loss mechanism, the method proposed in this work is proved to be very accurate. The method is then further applied to a degradated PV module istalled in an outdoor PV system. The power loss on series resistance, shunting and current mismatch are effectively identified and the number of shunted cells is accurately calculated. In the real application, this method can be used in both indoor and outdoor characterization, which can be very beneficial for PV degradation analysis of PV modules and systems.

  8. Defect Measurements and Performance Testing of CZT Detectors Using I-DLTS, TCT, I-V, C-V and γ-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, Rubi; Li, Zheng; Keeter, Kara; Rodriguez, Rene; James, Ralph

    2008-05-01

    Performance testing and the measurement of the defect levels of CZT detectors from different manufacturers are investigated by means of I-DLTS (Current Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy), TCT (Transient Charge Technique), I-V, C-V and γ-Ray Spectroscopy. Studies include measuring defects parameters such as energy levels in the band gap, carrier capture cross-section and defect density have been determined by using I-DLTS. The space charge density, induced current and collected charge were obtained by using TCT. Detector's electric characteristics and detection performance tests are carried out by using I-V, C-V and γ-Ray Spectroscopy. I-DLTS data is collected in the temperature range of 10-330 K. Different mid-band energy traps, ranging from Ec-0.01 eV to Ec-0.31 eV, mostly native acceptor defects, are identified. The TCT parameters are obtained by measuring laser induced current transients with 50-1100 V bias voltages across the detector. The maximum value of collected electrons and the typical measured space charge density, at 1100V is found of the order of 10^10. Resistivity, performance and depletion of the detectors are determined by I-V and γ-Ray Spectroscopy.

  9. The influence of a voltage ramp on the measurement of I-V characteristics of a solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1980-01-01

    For efficiency and convenience the voltage applied to a Si solar cell is often fairly rapidly driven from zero to the open circuit value typically at a common rate of 1 V per millisecond. During this time the values of current are determined as a function of the instantaneous voltage thus producing an I-V characteristic. The present paper shows that the customary expressions for the current as a function of cell parameters still remain valid provided that the diffusion length in the expression for the dark current is changed from its steady state value L to the effective diffusion length L1 given by L1 = L(1 + qV/kT.tau) to the -1/2, where V is the ramp rate considered constant and tau is the lifetime of minority carriers. This result is true to a very good approximation provided that low level injection prevails.

  10. Defect measurements of CdZnTe detectors using I-DLTS, TCT, I-V, C-V and γ-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, R.; Li, Z.; Rodriguez, R.; Keeter, K.; Bolotnikov, A.; James, R.

    2008-08-01

    In this work we measured the crystal defect levels and tested the performance of CdZnTe detectors by diverse methodologies, viz., Current Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (I-DLTS), Transient Current Technique (TCT), Current and Capacitance versus Voltage measurements (I-V and C-V), and gamma-ray spectroscopy. Two important characteristics of I-DLTS technique for advancing this research are (1) it is applicable for high-resistivity materials (>106 Ω-cm), and, (2) the minimum temperature for measurements can be as low as 10 K. Such low-temperature capability is excellent for obtaining measurements at shallow levels. We acquired CdZnTe crystals grown by different techniques from two different vendors and characterized them for point defects and their response to photons. I-DLTS studies encompassed measuring the parameters of the defects, such as the energy levels in the band gap, the carrier capture cross-sections and their densities. The current induced by the laser-generated carriers and the charge collected (or number of electrons collected) were obtained using TCT that also provides the transport properties, such as the carrier life time and mobility of the detectors under study. The detector's electrical characteristics were explored, and its performance tested using I-V, C-V and gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  11. Changes in haematology measurements with the Sysmex XT-2000iV during storage of feline blood sampled in EDTA or EDTA plus CTAD.

    PubMed

    Granat, Fanny; Geffré, Anne; Bourgès-Abella, Nathalie; Braun, Jean-Pierre; Trumel, Catherine

    2013-06-01

    In veterinary medicine a complete blood cell count (CBC) cannot always be performed within 24 h as usually recommended, particularly for specimens shipped to a reference laboratory. This raises the question of the stability of the variables, especially in ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) feline blood specimens, known to be prone to in vitro platelet aggregation. Citrate, theophylline, adenosine and dipyridamole (CTAD) has been reported to limit platelet aggregation in feline blood specimens. The aim of this study was to measure the stability of the haematological variables and the platelet aggregation score in EDTA and EDTA plus CTAD (EDCT) feline blood specimens during 48 h of storage at room temperature. Forty-six feline EDTA and EDCT blood specimens were analysed with a Sysmex XT-2000iV analyser, and the platelet count and score of platelet aggregation were estimated immediately and after 24 and 48 h of storage. A significant increase in mean corpuscular volume, haematocrit, reticulocyte and eosinophil counts, and a significant decrease in mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration and monocyte count were observed. Haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin, and red blood cell, white blood cell, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts remained stable. Changes in reticulocyte indexes with time (low fluorescence ratio, medium fluorescence ratio, high fluorescence ratio and immature reticulocyte fraction) were not significant. Changes were generally more pronounced in EDTA than in EDCT. Platelet aggregation decreased markedly in initially highly aggregated EDTA specimens, and increased slightly in initially non- or mildly-aggregated EDTA or EDCT specimens. Platelet counts increased and decreased, or remained stable, respectively. CTAD can reduce storage-induced changes of the haematological variables in feline samples, thus improving the reliability of a CBC and limiting clinical misinterpretations.

  12. Equivalent dynamic human brain NK1-receptor occupancy following single-dose i.v. fosaprepitant vs. oral aprepitant as assessed by PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Van Laere, K; De Hoon, J; Bormans, G; Koole, M; Derdelinckx, I; De Lepeleire, I; Declercq, R; Sanabria Bohorquez, S M; Hamill, T; Mozley, P D; Tatosian, D; Xie, W; Liu, Y; Liu, F; Zappacosta, P; Mahon, C; Butterfield, K L; Rosen, L B; Murphy, M G; Hargreaves, R J; Wagner, J A; Shadle, C R

    2012-08-01

    The type 1 neurokinin receptor (NK1R) antagonist aprepitant and its i.v. prodrug fosaprepitant have been approved for prevention of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy. This study evaluated the magnitude and duration of brain NK1R occupancy over a period of 5 days after single-dose i.v. infusion of 150-mg fosaprepitant and single-dose oral administration of 165-mg aprepitant, using serial [(18)F]MK-0999 positron emission tomography (PET) in 16 healthy subjects. Each subject underwent three scans. Brain NK1R occupancy rates after i.v. fosaprepitant at time to peak concentration (T(max); ~30 min), 24, 48, and 120 h after the dose were 100, 100, ≥97, and 41-75%, respectively. After aprepitant, NK1R occupancy rates at these time points (T(max) ~4 h) were ≥99, ≥99, ≥97, and 37-76%, respectively. Aprepitant plasma concentration profiles were comparable for the two dosage forms. The study illustrates the utility of PET imaging in determining central bioequivalence in a limited number of subjects.

  13. I-V characterization of solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veissid, N.; Ranvaud, R.; Fonseca, F. J.

    1981-06-01

    Equivalent circuits were analysed and then I-V characteristics obtained from different solar cells were compared with those from the circuits. The measures were obtained under natural conditions and under artificial conditions (solar simulator made of easily obtained light sources and several filters). The identification of components in the equivalent circuit, together with the theory of photovoltaic conversion, is very important in the optimization of the cell design. A numeric method for determination of the series resistance is proposed.

  14. Phase Diagram Calculation of Gas Mixtures for Refrigeration; Reflection & Transmission Coefficients and the Effective Mass: Superconducting Proximity I-V Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedmann, Gideon

    The efficiency of Joule-Thomson refrigerators greatly improves with the addition of hydrocarbons to nitrogen as coolant, and is highly dependent on the mixture composition. To optimize it, we calculated the mixture phase diagram using the Peng-Robinson equation of state. A program was developed to solve numerically a set of coupled non-linear equations for the equilibrium of the vapor and liquid phases of each mixture component. The program is highly efficient, quite stable, and reliable. Gases can be easily added to the program's database. We found that the cooling efficiency of the mixtures has a sharp ridge in composition space, and explain this. To better understand tunneling spectra of the high T_{rm c} cuprate superconductors, we analyzed the one-dimensional behavior of the wavefunction of a free particle striking a crystal interface. We describe the free particle using a wavepacket of plane waves, and the crystal using the Kronig-Penney model. We find that when the wavepacket is spread over many unit cells, it behaves like a free particle wavepacket striking a small potential step. The reflection and transmission coefficients are derived and one finds that they do not contain the particle's effective mass. We determine that the boundary conditions used in a standard effective mass approach must be modified to make it work. We conclude that one should not use the effective mass approximation in treating high T_{rm c} superconductor interfaces. We measured the dynamic resistance of a superconducting -normal metal-normal metal (SNN') geometry and observed that N', a superconductor at low enough temperatures, displays superconducting properties above its critical temperature. They disappear well below the critical temperature of S. We present a simple model of the proximity effect, which is self-consistent at any temperature and good for arbitrary thicknesses of N. The model shows how the superconducting gap decays with the distance from S. We observe that the

  15. Thermal contact resistance measurement of conduction cooled binary current lead joint block in cryocooler based self field I-V characterization facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Ananya; Das, Subrat Kumar; Agarwal, Anees Bano Pooja; Pradhan, Subrata

    2016-05-01

    In the present study thermal resistance of conduction cooled current lead joint block employing two different interfacial material namely AlN sheet and Kapton Film have been studied in the temperature range 5K-35K. In each case, the performance of different interlayer materials e.g. Indium foil for moderately pressurized contacts (contact pressure <1 MPa), and Apiezon N Grease, GE varnish for low pressurized contact (contact pressure <1 MPa) is studied. The performances of AlN joint with Indium foil and with Apeizon N Grease are studied and it is observed that the contact resistance reduces more with indium foil as compared to greased contact. The contact resistance measurements of Kapton film with Apiezon N grease and with GE varnish were also carried out in the same temperature range. A comparative study of AlN joint with Indium foil and Kapton with GE varnish as filler material is carried out to demonstrate better candidate material among Kapton and AlN for a particular filler material in the same temperature range.

  16. Resistive hysteresis and nonlinear I-V characteristics at the first-order melting of the Abrikosov vortex lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, Daniel; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Bishop, A. R.

    1995-12-01

    We study a three-dimensional network of Josephson junctions in a magnetic field, which undergoes a first-order melting transition of the triangular vortex lattice. We perform a Langevin dynamics calculation of the resistance and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. We find hysteresis in the resistance as a function of temperature as measured in untwinned YBa2Cu3O7. Close to the melting temperature the I-V curves are S shaped with hysteresis and show a melting transition when increasing the current, driven by the blowing out of current nucleated vortex loops.

  17. Teaching solar cell I-V characteristics using SPICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devasia, Archana; Kurinec, Santosh K.

    2011-12-01

    The basic equivalent circuit of a p-n junction solar cell is most commonly represented as consisting of a current source in parallel with two diodes and two parasitic resistances. The output of a solar cell is measured by obtaining the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics for different illumination intensities, and various parameters are extracted from these characteristics. Because the nature of the information derived from these characteristics is not obvious to the beginning students in photovoltaics, a simulation using SPICE was utilized to explain three solar cell I-V characteristics—dark I-V, illuminated I-V, and open circuit voltage versus the short circuit current (illumination intensity). Students can construct a solar cell and study the effect of the diode and parasitic parameters on the three output I-V characteristics. Series and parallel combinations of solar cells for arrays and modules using bypass diodes are demonstrated using SPICE as educational tools for understanding the role of bypass diodes.

  18. Digital smoothing of the Langmuir probe I-V characteristic

    SciTech Connect

    Magnus, F.; Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2008-07-15

    Electrostatic probes or Langmuir probes are the most common diagnostic tools in plasma discharges. The second derivative of the Langmuir probe I-V characteristic is proportional to the electron energy distribution function. Determining the second derivative accurately requires some method of noise suppression. We compare the Savitzky-Golay filter, the Gaussian filter, and polynomial fitting to the Blackman filter for digitally smoothing simulated and measured I-V characteristics. We find that the Blackman filter achieves the most smoothing with minimal distortion for noisy data.

  19. Nonlinear I-V Curve at a Quantum Impurity Quantum Critical Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranger, Harold; Chung, Chung-Hou; Lin, Chao-Yun; Zhang, Gu; Ke, Chung-Ting; Finkelstein, Gleb

    The nonlinear I-V curve at an interacting quantum critical point (QCP) is typically out of reach theoretically. Here, however, we provide a striking example of an analytical calculation of the full nonlinear I-V curve at the QCP. The system that we consider is a quantum dot coupled to resistive leads - a spinless resonant level interacting with an ohmic EM environment in which a QCP similar to the two-channel Kondo QCP occurs. Recent experiments studied this criticality via transport measurements: the transmission approaches unity at low temperature and applied bias when tuned exactly to the QCP (on resonance and symmetric tunnel barriers) and approaches zero in all other cases. To obtain the current at finite temperature and arbitrary bias, we write the problem as a one-dimensional field theory and transform from electrons in the left/right leads to right-going and left-going channels between which there is weak two-body backscattering. Drawing on dynamical Coulomb blockade theory, we thus obtain an analytical expression for the full I-V curve. The agreement with the experimental result is remarkable.

  20. Measuring Family Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunce, Joseph T.; Priesmeyer, Marydeth L.

    1985-01-01

    Investigated dimensions of family dynamics via test construction and cross validation, with a developmental sample (N=93) and a validity generalization sample (N=65). Developed two scales that correlated significantly with perceptions of family stability and quality in the developmental and validity generalization samples. (BH)

  1. Mass properties measurement system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    The MPMS mechanism possess two revolute degrees-of-freedom and allows the user to measure the mass, center of gravity, and the inertia tensor of an unknown mass. The dynamics of the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS) from the Lagrangian approach to illustrate the dependency of the motion on the unknown parameters.

  2. Pulse I-V characterization of a nano-crystalline oxide device with sub-gap density of states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeho; Hur, Ji-Hyun; Jeon, Sanghun

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the charge trapping nature of nano-crystalline oxide semiconductor thin film transistors (TFTs) is one of the most important requirements for their successful application. In our investigation, we employed a fast-pulsed I-V technique for understanding the charge trapping phenomenon and for characterizing the intrinsic device performance of an amorphous/nano-crystalline indium-hafnium-zinc-oxide semiconductor TFT with varying density of states in the bulk. Because of the negligible transient charging effect with a very short pulse, the source-to-drain current obtained with the fast-pulsed I-V measurement was higher than that measured by the direct-current characterization method. This is because the fast-pulsed I-V technique provides a charge-trap free environment, suggesting that it is a representative device characterization methodology of TFTs. In addition, a pulsed source-to-drain current versus time plot was used to quantify the dynamic trapping behavior. We found that the charge trapping phenomenon in amorphous/nano-crystalline indium-hafnium-zinc-oxide TFTs is attributable to the charging/discharging of sub-gap density of states in the bulk and is dictated by multiple trap-to-trap processes.

  3. Leakage of photocurrent: an alternative view on I-V curves of solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taofei, Zhou; Kanglin, Xiong; Min, Zhang; Lei, Liu; Feifei, Tian; Zhiqiang, Zhang; Hong, Gu; Jun, Huang; Jianfeng, Wang; Jianrong, Dong; Ke, Xu

    2015-06-01

    An alternative way is proposed to interpret I-V characteristics of GaInP single-junction solar cells by position-dependent leakage of photocurrent. With this approach, the I-V curves of solar cells under non-uniform illumination are well analyzed. The effective spreading resistance is also extracted to understand the dynamic behavior of between the open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current points. The conditions under which the one-diode model will fail are addressed in detail. These analyses are also applicable for a characterization of the I-V curves with lateral voltage distribution under uniform illumination. Project supported by the Union Innovation Projects of Jiangsu Province (No. BY2011182) and CAS, the National Basic Research Program (No. 2012CB619305), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51272275, 51302305, 61376065).

  4. Dynamic indocyanine green angiography measurements

    PubMed Central

    Invernizzi, Alessandro; Larkin, Sean; Staurenghi, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Dynamic indocyanine green imaging uses a scanning laser ophthalmoscope and a fluorescent dye to produce movies of the dye-filling pattern in the retina and choroid of the eye. It is used for evaluating choroidal neovascularization. Movies are examined to identify the anatomy of the pathology for planning treatment and to evaluate progression or response to treatment. The popularity of this approach is affected by the complexity and difficulty in interpreting the movies. Software algorithms were developed to produce images from the movies that are easy to interpret. A mathematical model is formulated of the flow dynamics, and a fitting algorithm is designed that solves for the flow parameters. The images provide information about flow and perfusion, including regions of change between examinations. Imaged measures include the dye fill-time, temporal dispersion, and magnitude of the dye dilution temporal curves associated with image pixels. Cases show how the software can help to identify clinically relevant anatomy such as feeder vessels, drain vessels, capillary networks, and normal choroidal draining vessels. As a potential tool for research into the character of neovascular conditions and treatments, it reveals the flow dynamics and character of the lesion. Future varieties of this methodology may be used for evaluating the success of engineered tissue transplants, surgical flaps, reconstructive surgery, breast surgery, and many other surgical applications where flow, perfusion, and vascularity of tissue are important. PMID:23192382

  5. Dynamic indocyanine green angiography measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Timothy; Invernizzi, Alessandro; Larkin, Sean; Staurenghi, Giovanni

    2012-11-01

    Dynamic indocyanine green imaging uses a scanning laser ophthalmoscope and a fluorescent dye to produce movies of the dye-filling pattern in the retina and choroid of the eye. It is used for evaluating choroidal neovascularization. Movies are examined to identify the anatomy of the pathology for planning treatment and to evaluate progression or response to treatment. The popularity of this approach is affected by the complexity and difficulty in interpreting the movies. Software algorithms were developed to produce images from the movies that are easy to interpret. A mathematical model is formulated of the flow dynamics, and a fitting algorithm is designed that solves for the flow parameters. The images provide information about flow and perfusion, including regions of change between examinations. Imaged measures include the dye fill-time, temporal dispersion, and magnitude of the dye dilution temporal curves associated with image pixels. Cases show how the software can help to identify clinically relevant anatomy such as feeder vessels, drain vessels, capillary networks, and normal choroidal draining vessels. As a potential tool for research into the character of neovascular conditions and treatments, it reveals the flow dynamics and character of the lesion. Future varieties of this methodology may be used for evaluating the success of engineered tissue transplants, surgical flaps, reconstructive surgery, breast surgery, and many other surgical applications where flow, perfusion, and vascularity of tissue are important.

  6. Sedation in outpatient oral surgery. Comparison of temazepam by mouth and diazepam i.v.

    PubMed

    O'Boyle, C A; Harris, D; Barry, H

    1986-04-01

    In a randomized double-blind, parallel groups study, 39 patients undergoing surgical removal of impacted third molar teeth received either temazepam 40 mg by mouth (as soft gelatin capsules) followed at 35 min by i.v. saline, or oral placebo followed at 35 min by i.v. diazepam 10 mg (Diazemuls). Rapid onset of significant anxiolytic activity and psychomotor depression was seen following temazepam, while the pattern and duration of postoperative sedation measured with standard psychometric tests, were similar for both treatments. Ratings by the surgeon and by the patients indicated that sedation following the two treatments was comparable. No significant cardiovascular complications were found with either treatment. The findings indicate that rapidly acting oral benzodiazepines such as temazepam provide safe, effective alternatives to i.v. diazepam for sedation in outpatients undergoing minor surgical procedures.

  7. Mass calibration and cosmological analysis of the SPT-SZ galaxy cluster sample using velocity dispersion σ <i>v and x-ray Y X measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bocquet, S.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Bazin, G.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Desai, S.; de Haan, T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; Forman, W. R.; Gangkofner, D.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Hennig, C.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Marrone, D. P.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Stubbs, C. W.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-01-30

    Here, we present a velocity-dispersion-based mass calibration of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect survey (SPT-SZ) galaxy cluster sample. Using a homogeneously selected sample of 100 cluster candidates from 720 deg2 of the survey along with 63 velocity dispersion (σv) and 16 X-ray YX measurements of sample clusters, we simultaneously calibrate the mass-observable relation and constrain cosmological parameters. Our method accounts for cluster selection, cosmological sensitivity, and uncertainties in the mass calibrators. The calibrations using σv and YX are consistent at the 0.6σ level, with the σ v calibration preferring ~16% higher masses. We use the full SPTCL data set (SZ clusters+σv+YX) to measure σ8(Ωm/0.27)0.3 = 0.809 ± 0.036 within a flat ΛCDM model. The SPT cluster abundance is lower than preferred by either the WMAP9 or Planck+WMAP9 polarization (WP) data, but assuming that the sum of the neutrino masses is mν = 0.06 eV, we find the data sets to be consistent at the 1.0σ level for WMAP9 and 1.5σ for Planck+WP. Allowing for larger Σmν further reconciles the results. When we combine the SPTCL and Planck+WP data sets with information from baryon acoustic oscillations and Type Ia supernovae, the preferred cluster masses are 1.9σ higher than the YX calibration and 0.8σ higher than the σ v calibration. Given the scale of these shifts (~44% and ~23% in mass, respectively), we execute a goodness-of-fit test; it reveals no tension, indicating that the best-fit model provides an adequate description of the data. Using the multi-probe data set, we measure Ωm = 0.299 ± 0.009 and σ8 = 0.829 ± 0.011. Within a νCDM model we find Σmν = 0.148 ± 0.081 eV. We present a consistency test of the cosmic growth rate using SPT clusters. Allowing both the growth index γ and the

  8. BICEP2 / Keck Arrayi> V: Measurements of B-mode polarization at degree angular scales and 150 GHz by the Keck Array

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Aikin, R. W.; Alexander, K. D.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S. J.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Brevik, J. A.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E.; Buza, V.; Connors, J.; Crill, B. P.; Dowell, C. D.; Dvorkin, C.; Duband, L.; Filippini, J. P.; Fliescher, S.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Harrison, S.; Hasselfield, M.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hilton, G. C.; Hristov, V. V.; Hui, H.; Irwin, K. D.; Karkare, K. S.; Kaufman, J. P.; Keating, B. G.; Kefeli, S.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Mason, P.; Megerian, K. G.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; O’Brient, R.; Ogburn IV, R. W.; Orlando, A.; Pryke, C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Richter, S.; Schwarz, R.; Sheehy, C. D.; Staniszewski, Z. K.; Sudiwala, R. V.; Teply, G. P.; Thompson, K. L.; Tolan, J. E.; Turner, A. D.; Vieregg, A. G.; Weber, A. C.; Willmert, J.; Wong, C. L.; Yoon, K. W.

    2015-09-29

    Here, the Keck Array is a system of cosmic microwave background polarimeters, each similar to the Bicep2 experiment. In this paper we report results from the 2012 to 2013 observing seasons, during which the Keck Array consisted of five receivers all operating in the same (150 GHz) frequency band and observing field as Bicep2. We again find an excess of B-mode power over the lensed-ΛCDM expectation of >5σ in the range 30 < ℓ < 150 and confirm that this is not due to systematics using jackknife tests and simulations based on detailed calibration measurements. In map difference and spectral difference tests these new data are shown to be consistent with Bicep2. Finally, we combine the maps from the two experiments to produce final Q and U maps which have a depth of 57 nK deg (3.4 μK arcmin) over an effective area of 400 deg2 for an equivalent survey weight of 250,000 μK–2. The final BB band powers have noise uncertainty a factor of 2.3 times better than the previous results, and a significance of detection of excess power of >6σ.

  9. I-V Curves from Photovoltaic Modules Deployed in Tucson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Emily; Brooks, Adria; Lonij, Vincent; Cronin, Alex

    2011-10-01

    More than 30 Mega Watts of photo-voltaic (PV) modules are connected to the electric power grid in Tucson, AZ. However, predictions of PV system electrical yields are uncertain, in part because PV modules degrade at various rates (observed typically in the range 0% to 3 %/yr). We present I-V curves (PV output current as a function of PV output voltage) as a means to study PV module efficiency, de-ratings, and degradation. A student-made I-V curve tracer for 100-Watt modules will be described. We present I-V curves for several different PV technologies operated at an outdoor test yard, and we compare new modules to modules that have been operated in the field for 10 years.

  10. Driver for solar cell I-V characteristic plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, G. B. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A bipolar voltage ramp generator which applies a linear voltage through a resistor to a solar cell for plotting its current versus voltage (I-V) characteristic between short circuit and open circuit conditions is disclosed. The generator has automatic stops at the end points. The resistor serves the multiple purpose of providing a current sensing resistor, setting the full-scale current value, and providing a load line with a slope approximately equal to one, such that it will pass through the origin and the approximate center of the I-V curve with about equal distance from that center to each of the end points.

  11. The NO<i>vA simulation chain

    SciTech Connect

    Aurisano, A.; Backhouse, C.; Hatcher, R.; Mayer, N.; Musser, J.; Patterson, R.; Schroeter, R.; Sousa, A.

    2015-12-23

    The NO<i>vA experiment is a two-detector, long-baseline neutrino experiment operating in the recently upgraded NuMI muon neutrino beam. Simulating neutrino interactions and backgrounds requires many steps including: the simulation of the neutrino beam flux using FLUKA and the FLUGG interface, cosmic ray generation using CRY, neutrino interaction modeling using GENIE, and a simulation of the energy deposited in the detector using GEANT4. To shorten generation time, the modeling of detector-specific aspects, such as photon transport, detector and electronics noise, and readout electronics, employs custom, parameterized simulation applications. We will describe the NO<i>vA simulation chain, and present details on the techniques used in modeling photon transport near the ends of cells, and in developing a novel data-driven noise simulation. Due to the high intensity of the NuMI beam, the Near Detector samples a high rate of muons originating in the surrounding rock. In addition, due to its location on the surface at Ash River, MN, the Far Detector collects a large rate ((˜) 140 kHz) of cosmic muons. Furthermore, we will discuss the methods used in NO<i>vA for overlaying rock muons and cosmic ray muons with simulated neutrino interactions and show how realistically the final simulation reproduces the preliminary NO<i>vA data.

  12. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, \\Dynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors". The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  13. Measurements of glottal structure dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.; Burke, Gerry J.; Champagne, Nathan J.; Kallman, Jeffrey S.; Sharpe, Robert M.; Kobler, James B.; Hillman, Robert E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2005-03-01

    Low power, radarlike electromagnetic (EM) wave sensors, operating in a homodyne interferometric mode, are being used to measure tissue motions in the human vocal tract during speech. However, when these and similar sensors are used in front of the laryngeal region during voiced speech, there remains an uncertainty regarding the contributions to the sensor signal from vocal fold movements versus those from pressure induced trachea-wall movements. Several signal-source hypotheses are tested by performing experiments with a subject who had undergone tracheostomy, and who still was able to phonate when her stoma was covered (e.g., with a plastic plate). Laser-doppler motion-measurements of the subject's posterior trachea show small tissue movements, about 15 microns, that do not contribute significantly to signals from presently used EM sensors. However, signals from the anterior wall do contribute. EM sensor and air-pressure measurements, together with 3-D EM wave simulations, show that EM sensors measure movements of the vocal folds very well. The simulations show a surprisingly effective guiding of EM waves across the vocal fold membrane, which, upon glottal opening, are interrupted and reflected. These measurements are important for EM sensor applications to speech signal de-noising, vocoding, speech recognition, and diagnostics. .

  14. Dynamic contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the dynamic advancing and receding contact angles of a series of aqueous solutions were measured on a number of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces using a modified Wilhelmy plate technique. Superhydrophobic surfaces are hydrophobic surfaces with micron or nanometer sized surface roughness. These surfaces have very large static advancing contact angles and little static contact angle hysteresis. In this study, the dynamic advancing and dynamic receding contact angles on superhydrophobic surfaces were measured as a function of plate velocity and capillary number. The dynamic contact angles measured on a smooth hydrophobic Teflon surface were found to obey the scaling with capillary number predicted by the Cox-Voinov-Tanner law, θD3 ∝ Ca. The response of the dynamic contact angle on the superhydrophobic surfaces, however, did not follow the same scaling law. The advancing contact angle was found to remain constant at θA = 160∘, independent of capillary number. The dynamic receding contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces were found to decrease with increasing capillary number; however, the presence of slip on the superhydrophobic surface was found to result in a shift in the onset of dynamic contact angle variation to larger capillary numbers. In addition, a much weaker dependence of the dynamic contact angle on capillary number was observed for some of the superhydrophobic surfaces tested.

  15. Mass properties measurement system: Dynamics and statics measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents and interprets experimental data obtained from the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS). Statics measurements yield the center-of-gravity of an unknown mass and dynamics measurements yield its inertia matrix. Observations of the MPMS performance has lead us to specific design criteria and an understanding of MPMS limitations.

  16. Dynamic Force Measurement with Strain Gauges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bruce E.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of four strain gauges, a Wheatstone bridge, and an oscilloscope to measure forces dynamically. Included is an example of determining the centripetal force of a pendulum in a general physics laboratory. (CC)

  17. A dynamic compressometer for converse electrostriction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yimnirun, Rattikorn; Moses, Paul J.; Newnham, Robert E.; Meyer, Richard J.

    2003-07-01

    A simple dynamic instrument for measuring very small stress dependence of capacitance is presented in this article. We describe the design and development of a dynamic compressometer for converse electrostrictive measurements on low dielectric constant materials. This redesigned system is capable of resolving a change in capacitance of 10-17 F or smaller. The most important feature is the dynamic stressing system incorporated to improve the accuracy and the reproducibility of the measurements. Furthermore, the uniaxiality and uniformity of the applied stress are found to be critical to the measurements. Therefore, a uniaxial stress delivery scheme using ball bearings is employed in the measurements to improve the accuracy of the experimental results. The converse electrostrictive coefficients obtained from this instrument agree reasonably well with those measured directly by a single-beam interferometer.

  18. Solar cell dark I-V characteristics and their applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, M. S.; Brandtzaeg, P.; Miller, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of studies conducted to evaluate the feasibility of and to generate techniques for the use of dark forward current-voltage characteristics in the checkout of the Apollo Telescope Mount Solar Array. Methods for the determination of lumped series resistance and prediction of the illuminated I-V curve using the dark characteristics are also presented. The paper addresses itself primarily to the generation of a valid performance testing and flight readiness checkout technique using the forward characteristics of the solar cell.

  19. High dynamic range charge measurements

    SciTech Connect

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2012-09-04

    A charge amplifier for use in radiation sensing includes an amplifier, at least one switch, and at least one capacitor. The switch selectively couples the input of the switch to one of at least two voltages. The capacitor is electrically coupled in series between the input of the amplifier and the input of the switch. The capacitor is electrically coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. A method of measuring charge in radiation sensing includes selectively diverting charge from an input of an amplifier to an input of at least one capacitor by selectively coupling an output of the at least one capacitor to one of at least two voltages. The input of the at least one capacitor is operatively coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. The method also includes calculating a total charge based on a sum of the amplified charge and the diverted charge.

  20. Robotic system for i.v. antineoplastic drug preparation: description and preliminary evaluation under simulated conditions.

    PubMed

    Cote, D D; Torchia, M G

    1989-11-01

    A robotic system for preparing doses of i.v. antineoplastic drugs is described, and measurements made with the system are compared for accuracy and reproducibility with those made by pharmacists and technicians. System hardware consists of a robotic arm, a 16-bit microcomputer, a bar-code reader, a voice synthesizer, and an electronic balance. The software includes a menu-driven main program, executable files for each robotic activity, and an interface to allow control to pass between the program and the files. The program has routines for matching the software to the hardware; for entering information about the patient, the name of the drug ordered, and the dose; for checking the dose; for selecting the number and size of the vials to be used; for specifying the manipulations of the robotic arm; for printing labels; and for maintaining records. The robot fills an order by getting and placing a vial, inserting a needle into it and withdrawing the drug, weighing the vial, agitating the container to dissolve its contents, reading a bar code, placing a syringe in a syringe manipulator, and getting an i.v. container and injecting the drug into it. Detection of any errors by a series of self-checks arrests execution of an order. No significant differences in accuracy and precision were found between the robotic system and humans performing the same tasks under simulated conditions. The robotic system required less time than humans and eliminated the possibility of direct human contact with the i.v. admixture. Under simulated conditions, a robotic system developed to assist in the preparation of i.v. antineoplastic drugs was as accurate as a manual system and was more time efficient.

  1. Local and global measures of shape dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Meghan K.; Fourkas, John T.; Losert, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    The shape and motion of cells can yield significant insights into the internal operation of a cell. We present a simple, yet versatile, framework that provides multiple metrics of cell shape and cell shape dynamics. Analysis of migrating Dictyostelium discoideum cells shows that global and local metrics highlight distinct cellular processes. For example, a global measure of shape shows rhythmic oscillations suggestive of contractions, whereas a local measure of shape shows wave-like dynamics indicative of protrusions. From a local measure of dynamic shape, or boundary motion, we extract the times and locations of protrusions and retractions. We find that protrusions zigzag, while retractions remain roughly stationary along the boundary. We do not observe any temporal relationship between protrusions and retractions. Our analysis framework also provides metrics of the boundary as whole. For example, as the cell speed increases, we find that the cell shape becomes more elongated. We also observe that while extensions and retractions have similar areas, their shapes differ.

  2. Comparison of calculated with measured dynamic aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, F.

    1994-06-01

    The measured dynamic aperture of the HERA proton ring and the value expected from simulation studies agree within a factor of 2. A better agreement is achieved if a realistic tune modulation is included in the simulation. The approximate threshold of tune-modulation induced diffusion can be calculated analytically. Its value is in remarkable agreement with the dynamic aperture measured. The calculation is based on parameters of resonances through order 11 which are computed using differential-algebra methods and normal-form algorithms. Modulational diffusion in conjunction with drifting machine parameters appears to be the most important transverse diffusion process.

  3. Measuring Dynamic Transfer Functions of Cavitating Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baun, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A water-flow test facility has been built to enable measurement of dynamic transfer functions (DTFs) of cavitating pumps and of inducers in such pumps. Originally, the facility was intended for use in an investigation of the effects of cavitation in a rocket-engine low-pressure oxygen turbopump. The facility can also be used to measure DTFs of cavitating pumps in general

  4. Measuring Group Dynamics: An Exploratory Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phan, Loan T.; Rivera, Edil Torres; Volker, Martin A.; Garrett, Michael T.

    2004-01-01

    This article reports on the development of a scale used to assess and measure group dynamics during group supervision counselling courses (practicum and internship). A 20-item Likert-type scale was administered to 200 counsellors-in-training master's students. Reliability and validity data are described. An exploratory factor analysis yielded…

  5. Conditional measurements as probes of quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Shabnam; Erenso, Daniel; Vyas, Reeta; Singh, Surendra

    2003-06-01

    We discuss conditional measurements as probes of quantum dynamics and show that they provide different ways to characterize quantum fluctuations. We illustrate this by considering the light from a subthreshold degenerate parametric oscillator. Analytic results and curves are presented to illustrate the behavior.

  6. Approximate Single-Diode Photovoltaic Model for Efficient I-V Characteristics Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Ting, T. O.; Zhang, Nan; Guan, Sheng-Uei; Wong, Prudence W. H.

    2013-01-01

    Precise photovoltaic (PV) behavior models are normally described by nonlinear analytical equations. To solve such equations, it is necessary to use iterative procedures. Aiming to make the computation easier, this paper proposes an approximate single-diode PV model that enables high-speed predictions for the electrical characteristics of commercial PV modules. Based on the experimental data, statistical analysis is conducted to validate the approximate model. Simulation results show that the calculated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics fit the measured data with high accuracy. Furthermore, compared with the existing modeling methods, the proposed model reduces the simulation time by approximately 30% in this work. PMID:24298205

  7. On the Dynamic Measurements of Hydraulic Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasmatuchi, Vlad; Bosioc, Alin; Münch-Alligné, Cécile

    2016-11-01

    The present work introduces the implementation and validation of a faster method to measure experimentally the efficiency characteristics of hydraulic turbomachines at a model scale on a test rig. The case study is represented by a laboratory prototype of an in-line axial microturbine for water supply networks. The 2.65 kW one-stage variable speed turbine, composed by one upstream 5-blade runner followed by one counter-rotating downstream 7-blade runner, has been installed on the HES-SO Valais/Wallis universal test rig dedicated to assess performances of small hydraulic machinery following the IEC standard recommendations. In addition to the existing acquisition/control system of the test rig used to measure the 3D hill-chart of a turbine by classical static point-by-point method, a second digitizer has been added to acquire synchronized dynamic signals of the employed sensors. The optimal acceleration/deceleration ramps of the electrical drives have been previously identified in order to cope with the purpose of a reduced measurement time while avoiding errors and hysteresis on the acquired hydraulic characteristics. Finally, the comparison between the turbine efficiency hill-charts obtained by dynamic and static point-by-point methods shows a very good agreement in terms of precision and repeatability. Moreover, the applied dynamic method reduces significantly (by a factor of up to ten) the time necessary to measure the efficiency characteristics on model testing.

  8. Interferometer for measuring dynamic corneal topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micali, Jason Daniel

    The cornea is the anterior most surface of the eye and plays a critical role in vision. A thin fluid layer, the tear film, coats the outer surface of the cornea and serves to protect, nourish, and lubricate the cornea. At the same time, the tear film is responsible for creating a smooth continuous surface where the majority of refraction takes place in the eye. A significant component of vision quality is determined by the shape of the cornea and stability of the tear film. It is desirable to possess an instrument that can measure the corneal shape and tear film surface with the same accuracy and resolution that is currently performed on common optical elements. A dual interferometer system for measuring the dynamic corneal topography is designed, built, and verified. The completed system is validated by testing on human subjects. The system consists of two co-aligned polarization splitting Twyman-Green interferometers designed to measure phase instantaneously. The primary interferometer measures the surface of the tear film while the secondary interferometer simultaneously tracks the absolute position of the cornea. Eye motion, ocular variation, and a dynamic tear film surface will result in a non-null configuration of the surface with respect to the interferometer system. A non-null test results in significant interferometer induced errors that add to the measured phase. New algorithms are developed to recover the absolute surface topography of the tear film and corneal surface from the simultaneous interferometer measurements. The results are high-resolution and high-accuracy surface topography measurements of the in vivo cornea that are captured at standard camera frame rates. This dissertation will cover the development and construction of an interferometer system for measuring the dynamic corneal topography of the human eye. The discussion starts with the completion of an interferometer for measuring the tear film. The tear film interferometer is part of an

  9. Lattice gas dynamics under continuous measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Cheung, Hil F. H.; Madjarov, Ivaylo S.; Chen, Huiyao Y.; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The act of measurement has a profound consequences quantum systems. While this backaction has so far been discussed as being a limitation on the precision of measurements, it is increasingly being appreciated that measurement backaction is a powerful and versatile means of quantum control. We have previously demonstrated that backaction from position measurement can modify the coherent tunneling rate of a lattice gas through the Quantum Zeno effect. Here, we show how spatially designed measurement landscapes can be used to realize entropy segregation in lattice gases. This presents an alternate path to the longstanding challenge of realizing lattice gases with sufficiently low entropy to access regimes of correlated quantum behavior such as Néel ordered states. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  10. Dynamic Electrochemical Measurement of Chloride Ions.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Yawar; de Graaf, Derk B; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2016-02-05

    This protocol describes the dynamic measurement of chloride ions using the transition time of a silver silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) electrode. Silver silver chloride electrode is used extensively for potentiometric measurement of chloride ions concentration in electrolyte. In this measurement, long-term and continuous monitoring is limited due to the inherent drift and the requirement of a stable reference electrode. We utilized the chronopotentiometric approach to minimize drift and avoid the use of a conventional reference electrode. A galvanostatic pulse is applied to an Ag/AgCl electrode which initiates a faradic reaction depleting the Cl- ions near the electrode surface. The transition time, which is the time to completely deplete the ions near the electrode surface, is a function of the ion concentration, given by the Nernst equation. The square root of the transition time is in linear relation to the chloride ion concentration. Drift of the response over two weeks is negligible (59 µM/day) when measuring 1 mM [Cl-]using a current pulse of 10 Am(-2). This is a dynamic measurement where the moment of transition time determines the response and thus is independent of the absolute potential. Any metal wire can be used as a pseudo-reference electrode, making this approach feasible for long-term measurement inside concrete structures.

  11. Accurate extraction of WSe2 FETs parameters by using pulsed I-V method at various temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Tae; Cho, In Tak; Kang, Won Mook; Park, Byung Gook; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2016-11-01

    This work investigates the intrinsic characteristics of multilayer WSe2 field effect transistors (FETs) by analysing Pulsed I- V (PIV) and DC characteristics measured at various temperatures. In DC measurement, unwanted charge trapping due to the gate bias stress results in I- V curves different from the intrinsic characteristic. However, PIV reduces the effect of gate bias stress so that intrinsic characteristic of WSe2 FETs is obtained. The parameters such as hysteresis, field effect mobility (μeff), subthreshold slope ( SS), and threshold voltage ( V th) measured by PIV are significantly different from those obtained by DC measurement. In PIV results, the hysteresis is considerably reduced compared with DC measurement, because the charge trapping effect is significantly reduced. With increasing temperature, the field effect mobility (μeff) and subthreshold swing ( SS) are deteriorated, and threshold voltage ( V th) decreases.

  12. Viscosity measurement techniques in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study two main groups of viscosity measurement techniques are used to measure the viscosity of a simple fluid using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, DPD. In the first method, a microscopic definition of the pressure tensor is used in equilibrium and out of equilibrium to measure the zero-shear viscosity and shear viscosity, respectively. In the second method, a periodic Poiseuille flow and start-up transient shear flow is used and the shear viscosity is obtained from the velocity profiles by a numerical fitting procedure. Using the standard Lees-Edward boundary condition for DPD will result in incorrect velocity profiles at high values of the dissipative parameter. Although this issue was partially addressed in Chatterjee (2007), in this work we present further modifications (Lagrangian approach) to the original LE boundary condition (Eulerian approach) that will fix the deviation from the desired shear rate at high values of the dissipative parameter and decrease the noise to signal ratios in stress measurement while increases the accessible low shear rate window. Also, the thermostat effect of the dissipative and random forces is coupled to the dynamic response of the system and affects the transport properties like the viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We investigated thoroughly the dependency of viscosity measured by both Eulerian and Lagrangian methodologies, as well as numerical fitting procedures and found that all the methods are in quantitative agreement.

  13. Optical dynamic deformation measurements at translucent materials.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Katrin; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Kuschmierz, Robert; Leithold, Christoph; Fischer, Andreas; Czarske, Jürgen

    2015-02-15

    Due to their high stiffness-to-weight ratio, glass fiber-reinforced polymers are an attractive material for rotors, e.g., in the aerospace industry. A fundamental understanding of the material behavior requires non-contact, in-situ dynamic deformation measurements. The high surface speeds and particularly the translucence of the material limit the usability of conventional optical measurement techniques. We demonstrate that the laser Doppler distance sensor provides a powerful and reliable tool for monitoring radial expansion at fast rotating translucent materials. We find that backscattering in material volume does not lead to secondary signals as surface scattering results in degradation of the measurement volume inside the translucent medium. This ensures that the acquired signal contains information of the rotor surface only, as long as the sample surface is rough enough. Dynamic deformation measurements of fast-rotating fiber-reinforced polymer composite rotors with surface speeds of more than 300 m/s underline the potential of the laser Doppler sensor.

  14. Compressing measurements in quantum dynamic parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magesan, Easwar; Cooper, Alexandre; Cappellaro, Paola

    2013-12-01

    We present methods that can provide an exponential savings in the resources required to perform dynamic parameter estimation using quantum systems. The key idea is to merge classical compressive sensing techniques with quantum control methods to significantly reduce the number of signal coefficients that are required for reconstruction of time-varying parameters with high fidelity. We show that incoherent measurement bases and, more generally, suitable random measurement matrices can be created by performing simple control sequences on the quantum system. Random measurement matrices satisfying the restricted isometry property can be used efficiently to reconstruct signals that are sparse in any basis. Because many physical processes are approximately sparse in some basis, these methods can benefit a variety of applications such as quantum sensing and magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers.

  15. Measurement of Gear Tooth Dynamic Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of dynamic friction forces at the gear tooth contact were undertaken using strain gages at the root fillets of two successive teeth. Results are presented from two gear sets over a range of speeds and loads. The results demonstrate that the friction coefficient does not appear to be significantly influenced by the sliding reversal at the pitch point, and that the friction coefficient values found are in accord with those in general use. The friction coefficient was found to increase at low sliding speeds. This agrees with the results of disc machine testing.

  16. Atomic Quadrupole Moment Measurement Using Dynamic Decoupling.

    PubMed

    Shaniv, R; Akerman, N; Ozeri, R

    2016-04-08

    We present a method that uses dynamic decoupling of a multilevel quantum probe to distinguish small frequency shifts that depend on m_{j}^{2}, where m_{j}^{2} is the angular momentum of level |j⟩ along the quantization axis, from large noisy shifts that are linear in m_{j}, such as those due to magnetic field noise. Using this method we measured the electric-quadrupole moment of the 4D_{5/2} level in ^{88}Sr^{+} to be 2.973_{-0.033}^{+0.026}ea_{0}^{2}. Our measurement improves the uncertainty of this value by an order of magnitude and thus helps mitigate an important systematic uncertainty in ^{88}Sr^{+} based optical atomic clocks and verifies complicated many-body quantum calculations.

  17. Measuring mitotic spindle dynamics in budding yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Kemp

    In order to carry out its life cycle and produce viable progeny through cell division, a cell must successfully coordinate and execute a number of complex processes with high fidelity, in an environment dominated by thermal noise. One important example of such a process is the assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle prior to chromosome segregation. The mitotic spindle is a modular structure composed of two spindle pole bodies, separated in space and spanned by filamentous proteins called microtubules, along which the genetic material of the cell is held. The spindle is responsible for alignment and subsequent segregation of chromosomes into two equal parts; proper spindle positioning and timing ensure that genetic material is appropriately divided amongst mother and daughter cells. In this thesis, I describe fluorescence confocal microscopy and automated image analysis algorithms, which I have used to observe and analyze the real space dynamics of the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. The software can locate structures in three spatial dimensions and track their movement in time. By selecting fluorescent proteins which specifically label the spindle poles and cell periphery, mitotic spindle dynamics have been measured in a coordinate system relevant to the cell division. I describe how I have characterised the accuracy and precision of the algorithms by simulating fluorescence data for both spindle poles and the budding yeast cell surface. In this thesis I also describe the construction of a microfluidic apparatus that allows for the measurement of long time-scale dynamics of individual cells and the development of a cell population. The tools developed in this thesis work will facilitate in-depth quantitative analysis of the non-equilibrium processes in living cells.

  18. USTUR WHOLE BODY CASE 0269: DEMONSTRATING EFFECTIVENESS OF I.V. CA-DTPA FOR PU

    SciTech Connect

    James, Anthony C.; Sasser , Lyle B.; Stuit, Dorothy B.; Glover, Samuel E.; Carbaugh, Eugene H.

    2008-01-28

    This whole body donation case (USTUR Registrant) involved a single acute inhalation of an acidic Pu(NO3)4 solution in the form of an aerosol ‘mist.’ Chelation treatment with i.v. Ca-EDTA was initiated on the day of the intake, and continued intermittently over 6 months. After 2½ years with no further treatment, a course of i.v. Ca-DTPA was administered. A total of 400 measurements of 239+240Pu excreted in urine were recorded; starting on the first day (both before and during the initial Ca-EDTA chelation), and continuing for 37 years. This sampling included all intervals of chelation. In addition, 91 measurements of 239+240Pu-in-feces were recorded over this whole period. The Registrant died about 38 years after the intake, at age 79 y, with extensive carcinomatosis secondary to adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. At autopsy, all major soft tissue organs were harvested for radiochemical analyses of their 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am content. Also, all types of bone (comprising about half the skeleton) were harvested for radiochemical analyses, as well as samples of skin, subcutaneous fat and muscle. This comprehensive dataset has been applied to derive ‘chelation-enhanced’ transfer rates in the ICRP Publication 67 plutonium biokinetic model, representing the behaviour of blood-borne and tissue-incorporated plutonium during intervals of therapy. The resulting model of the separate effects of i.v. Ca-EDTA and Ca-DTPA chelation shows that the therapy administered in this case succeeded in reducing substantially the long-term burden of plutonium in all body organs, except for the lungs. The calculated reductions in organ content at the time of death are approximately 40% for the liver, 60% for other soft tissues (muscle, skin, glands, etc.), 50% for the kidneys, and 50% for the skeleton. Essentially all of the substantial reduction in skeletal burden occurred in trabecular bone. This modeling exercise demonstrated that 3-y-delayed Ca-DTPA therapy was as

  19. Ustur whole body case 0269: demonstrating effectiveness of i.v. CA-DTPA for Pu.

    PubMed

    James, A C; Sasser, L B; Stuit, D B; Glover, S E; Carbaugh, E H

    2007-01-01

    This whole body donation case (USTUR Registrant) involved a single acute inhalation of an acidic Pu(NO3)4 solution in the form of an aerosol 'mist'. Chelation treatment with intravenously (i.v.) Ca-EDTA was initiated on the day of the intake, and continued intermittently over 6 months. After 2.5 y with no further treatment, a course of i.v. Ca-DTPA was administered. A total of 400 measurements of 239+240Pu excreted in urine were recorded; starting on the first day (both before and during the initial Ca-EDTA chelation) and continuing for 37 y. This sampling included all intervals of chelation. In addition, 91 measurements of 239+240Pu-in-feces were recorded over this whole period. The Registrant died about 38 y after the intake, at age 79 y, with extensive carcinomatosis secondary to adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. At autopsy, all major soft tissue organs were harvested for radiochemical analyses of their 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am content. Also, all types of bone (comprising about half the skeleton) were harvested for radiochemical analyses, as well as samples of skin, subcutaneous fat and muscle. This comprehensive data set has been applied to derive 'chelation-enhanced' transfer rates in the ICRP Publication 67 plutonium biokinetic model, representing the behaviour of blood-borne and tissue-incorporated plutonium during intervals of therapy. The resulting model of the separate effects of i.v. Ca-EDTA and Ca-DTPA chelation shows that the therapy administered in this case succeeded in reducing substantially the long-term burden of plutonium in all body organs, except for the lungs. The calculated reductions in organ content at the time of death are approximately 40% for the liver, 60% for other soft tissues (muscle, skin, glands, etc.), 50% for the kidneys and 50% for the skeleton. Essentially, all of the substantial reduction in skeletal burden occurred in trabecular bone. This modelling exercise demonstrated that 3-y-delayed Ca-DTPA therapy was as effective

  20. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  1. Dynamic plasmapause model based on THEMIS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Liu, X.

    2015-12-01

    We will present a dynamic plasmapause location model established based on five years of THEMIS measurements from 2009 to 2013. In total, 5878 plasmapause crossing events are identified, sufficiently covering all 24 Magnetic Local Time (MLT) sectors. Based on this plasmapause crossing database, we investigate the correlations between plasmapause locations with solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. Input parameters for the best fits are obtained for different MLT sectors and finally we choose five input parameters to build a plasmapause location model, including five-minute-averaged SYM-H, AL and AU indices as well as hourly-averaged AE and Kp indices. An out-of-sample comparison on the evolution of the plasmapause is shown during April 2001 magnetic storm, demonstrating good agreement between model results and observations. Two major advantages are achieved by this model. First, this model provides plasmapause locations at 24 MLT sectors, still providing good consistency with observations. Second, this model is able to reproduce dynamic variations of plasmapause in the time scale as short as five minutes.

  2. Method and apparatus for I-V data acquisition from solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Steven W. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for logging current-voltage (I-V) characteristic d of a solar cell module (10) in two modes using a portable instrument. One mode controls the load current through a circuit (36) in 256 equal intervals while voltage is measured from open circuit to at least halfway into the knee of the curve and the other mode controls the load voltage through a circuit (34) in 256 equal intervals from the lowest voltage measurement possible (short circuit) to at least halfway into the knee of the curve, under control of a microcomputer (12). All measurements are packed by discarding each measurement that is within 0.5% of the value predicted from two previous measurements, except every ninth (9th) measurement which is retained. The remaining data is further packed into a memory block of a detachable storage medium (14) by recording the data points in sequence following a header containing data common to all points, with each point having the value of the controlled parameter recorded as the number of increments from the previous point recorded followed by the measured value. The detachable storage medium is preferably a solid state device for reliability, and is transferable to a playback terminal which unpacks the data for analysis and display.

  3. Diode-like behavior of I-V curves of CoFe-(Al-O)/Si(100) granular thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan Anh, Nguyen; Van Cuong, Giap; Anh Tuan, Nguyen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the electrical performance of (Co70Fe30)x(Al-O)1-x (where x=0.1 and 0.3) granular thin films sputtered on Si(1 0 0) substrates, which were subsequently annealing at 350 °C for 1 h in vacuum, was investigated. The millimeter-sized samples were installed in an in-plane lateral Ag electrode configuration on the surface. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics were measured in bias voltages of approximately ±7 V. The I-V curves demonstrated the so-called large Coulomb gaps and diode-like asymmetric behavior similar to a Zener diode-type rectification. This remarkable behavior was evaluated using the most suitable transport models. Results suggest that an effective magnetic diode could be fabricated from millimeter-sized magnetic granular thin films.

  4. Comparison of the Sysmex XT-2000iV with microscopic differential counts of canine bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Pernecker, Iris; Bauer, Natali B; Johannes, Sigrid; Ginder, Melanie; Harleman, Johannes H; Moritz, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Canine bone marrow is frequently assessed in the advanced preclinical research environment. Automated analysis provides time savings and objectivity over the gold standard of microscopic (cytologic) evaluation. We compared the analysis of 90 canine bone marrow samples by the Sysmex XT-2000iV hematology analyzer (Sysmex Corp., Kobe, Japan) with cytologic evaluation. Gates for cell populations were created in the system's WBC/BASO channel. Variables "total nucleated red blood cells" (total_NRBC), "poly- and orthochromatic nucleated red blood cells" (poly_orth_NRBC), "total neutrophils" (total_NEUT), "mature neutrophils" (mature_NEUT), and myeloid-to-erythroid (M:E) ratio were compared with cytologic evaluation. Intra-assay repeatability and total error (TE) were calculated for both methods. Intra-assay repeatability was 0.95-2.48% for the XT-2000iV and 8.32-23.23% for cytology. Observed TE for the automated measurement was 5.16-46.8% and for cytology 22.70-76.74%. Spearman rank correlation was excellent for M:E ratio (0.91) and fair for the other populations (0.65-0.71). Absolute bias for M:E ratio was low (-0.114). A negative absolute bias of -7.71% for the XT-2000iV was found for poly_orth_NRBC, whereas the bias was positive for total_NEUT (7.10%) and mature_NEUT (14.67%). M:E ratio of canine bone marrow samples can be precisely determined using the Sysmex XT-2000iV WBC/BASO channel. Total_NRBC, poly_orth_NRBC, total_NEUT, and mature_NEUT can be estimated rapidly. With distinctly lower coefficient of variation and observed TE compared with cytology, automated measurement provides advantages in terms of standardization, and it is suited to the advanced preclinical research environment where large numbers of samples are investigated.

  5. Origin of the Shape of Current-Voltage Curve through Nanopores: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Sumikama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Ion transports through ion channels, biological nanopores, are essential for life: Living cells generate electrical signals by utilizing ion permeation through channels. The measured current-voltage (i-V) relations through most ion channels are sublinear, however, its physical meaning is still elusive. Here we calculated the i-V curves through anion-doped carbon nanotubes, a model of an ion channel, using molecular dynamics simulation. It was found the i-V curve reflects the physical origin of the rate-determining step: the i-V curve is sublinear when the permeation is entropy bottlenecked, while it is superlinear in the case of the energy bottlenecked permeation. Based on this finding, we discuss the relation between the molecular mechanism of ion permeation through the biological K+ channels and the shape of the i-V curves through them. This work also provides a clue for a novel design of nanopores that show current rectification. PMID:27167118

  6. Origin of the Shape of Current-Voltage Curve through Nanopores: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumikama, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    Ion transports through ion channels, biological nanopores, are essential for life: Living cells generate electrical signals by utilizing ion permeation through channels. The measured current-voltage (i-V) relations through most ion channels are sublinear, however, its physical meaning is still elusive. Here we calculated the i-V curves through anion-doped carbon nanotubes, a model of an ion channel, using molecular dynamics simulation. It was found the i-V curve reflects the physical origin of the rate-determining step: the i-V curve is sublinear when the permeation is entropy bottlenecked, while it is superlinear in the case of the energy bottlenecked permeation. Based on this finding, we discuss the relation between the molecular mechanism of ion permeation through the biological K+ channels and the shape of the i-V curves through them. This work also provides a clue for a novel design of nanopores that show current rectification.

  7. I-V Characteristics of a Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat Duen

    1999-01-01

    There are many possible uses for ferroelectric field effect transistors.To understand their application, a fundamental knowledge of their basic characteristics must first be found. In this research, the current and voltage characteristics of a field effect transistor are described. The effective gate capacitance and charge are derived from experimental data on an actual FFET. The general equation for a MOSFET is used to derive the internal characteristics of the transistor: This equation is modified slightly to describe the FFET characteristics. Experimental data derived from a Radiant Technologies FFET is used to calculate the internal transistor characteristics using fundamental MOSFET equations. The drain current was measured under several different gate and drain voltages and with different initial polarizations on the ferroelectric material in the transistor. Two different polarization conditions were used. One with the gate ferroelectric material polarized with a +9.0 volt write pulse and one with a -9.0 volt pulse.

  8. I-V Characteristics of a Static Random Access Memory Cell Utilizing Ferroelectric Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laws, Crystal; Mitchell, Cody; Hunt, Mitchell; Ho, Fat D.; MacLeod, Todd C.

    2012-01-01

    I-V characteristics for FeFET different than that of MOSFET Ferroelectric layer features hysteresis trend whereas MOSFET behaves same for both increasing and decreasing VGS FeFET I-V characteristics doesn't show dependence on VDS A Transistor with different channel length and width as well as various resistance and input voltages give different results As resistance values increased, the magnitude of the drain current decreased.

  9. [AIDS epidemiology and prevention in i.v. drug addicts].

    PubMed

    Uchtenhagen, A

    1988-01-01

    The incidence of AIDS cases in intravenous drug abusers is growing faster than in other risk groups, in Switzerland as well as in Europe in general. By end of May 1988, 27% of all AIDS cases registered nationally were injecting drugs. The prevalence of HIV antibodies is known from selected samples only, on the basis of voluntary testing. In 1986, among all intravenous drug users in residential treatment nation-wide, 90% were tested and thereof 55% seropositive. In a sample of drug abusers in out-patient treatment in Zurich in 1987, seropositivity was documented for 42% of male and 63% of female patients. According to registered AIDS cases, there is no differential risk for both sexes. Duration of intravenous drug abuse is the only relevant risk factor so far. Preventive change in risk taking behaviour is a minimalization of utilizing contaminated syringes/needles and a minimalization of unprotected sex (safer sex by regular use of condoms). An analysis of published data demonstrates that dissemination of information and availability of syringes/condoms are a pre-requisite for behaviour change, but by no means sufficient in order to elicit behaviour change. Drug abusers engaged in out-patient/residential treatment are available in high proportions for voluntary testing and for the intended behavioural changes. It is therefore of primary preventive interest to engage as many intravenous drug abusers as possible in treatment. Apart from drug-free residential treatment, out-patient treatment using Methadone provides positive results, whereas compulsory measures are considered to be of doubtful value.

  10. Rotor/bearing system dynamic stiffness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Sweep perturbation testing as used in Modal Analysis when applied to a rotating machine has to take into consideration the machine dynamic state of equilibrium at its operational rotative speed. This stands in contrasts to a static equilibrium of nonrotating structures. The rotational energy has a significant influence on rotor dynamic characteristics. The best perturbing input for rotating machines is a forward or reverse rotating, circular force applied directly to the shaft. Determination of Dynamic Stiffness Characteristics of the rotor bearing system by nonsynchronous perturbation of a symmetric rotating shaft supported in one relatively rigid and one oil lubricated bearing.

  11. Direct field measurement of the dynamic amplification in a bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Ciarán; OBrien, Eugene J.; Malekjafarian, Abdollah; Lydon, Myra; Taylor, Su

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the level of dynamics, as described by the Assessment Dynamic Ratio (ADR), is measured directly through a field test on a bridge in the United Kingdom. The bridge was instrumented using fiber optic strain sensors and piezo-polymer weigh-in-motion sensors were installed in the pavement on the approach road. Field measurements of static and static-plus-dynamic strains were taken over 45 days. The results show that, while dynamic amplification is large for many loading events, these tend not to be the critical events. ADR, the allowance that should be made for dynamics in an assessment of safety, is small.

  12. High speed high dynamic range high accuracy measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Deibele, Craig E.; Curry, Douglas E.; Dickson, Richard W.; Xie, Zaipeng

    2016-11-29

    A measuring system includes an input that emulates a bandpass filter with no signal reflections. A directional coupler connected to the input passes the filtered input to electrically isolated measuring circuits. Each of the measuring circuits includes an amplifier that amplifies the signal through logarithmic functions. The output of the measuring system is an accurate high dynamic range measurement.

  13. Dynamic Forces in Spur Gears - Measurement, Prediction, and Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Rebbechi, Brian; Lin, Hsiang Hsi

    1996-01-01

    Measured and computed values for dynamic loads in spur gears were compared to validate a new version of the NASA gear dynamics code DANST-PC. Strain gage data from six gear sets with different tooth profiles were processed to determine the dynamic forces acting between the gear teeth. Results demonstrate that the analysis code successfully simulates the dynamic behavior of the gears. Differences between analysis and experiment were less than 10 percent under most conditions.

  14. Measurement fidelity in the presence of coherent dynamics or dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jian-Qiang; Ashhab, S.; Nori, Franco

    2011-03-01

    We analyze the problem of a charge qubit probed by a quantum point contact when the measurement is concurrent with Hamiltonian-induced coherent dynamics or dissipation. This additional dynamics changes the state of the qubit before the measurement is completed. As a result, the measurement fidelity is reduced. We calculate the reduction in measurement fidelity in these cases. References: S. Ashhab, J. Q. You, and F. Nori, New J. Phys. 11, 083017 (2009); Phys. Scr. T137, 014005 (2009).

  15. Body measurements of Chinese males in dynamic postures and application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y J; Mok, P Y; Li, Y; Kwok, Y L

    2011-11-01

    It is generally accepted that there is a relationship between body dimensions, body movement and clothing wearing ease design, and yet previous research in this area has been neither sufficient nor systematic. This paper proposes a method to measure the human body in the static state and in 17 dynamic postures, so as to understand dimensional changes of different body parts during dynamic movements. Experimental work is carried out to collect 30 measurements of 10 male Chinese subjects in both static and dynamic states. Factor analysis is used to analyse body measurement data in a static state, and such key measurements describe the characteristics of different body figures. Moreover, one-way ANOVA is used to analyse how dynamic postures affect these key body measurements. Finally, an application of the research results is suggested: a dynamic block patternmaking method for high-performance clothing design.

  16. Further development of the dynamic gas temperature measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, D. L.; Robinson, W. W.; Watkins, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    A compensated thermocouple measurement method was experimentally verified. Dynamic signal content from an atmospheric pressure laboratory burner was measured by the dynamic temperature sensor and a relatively delicate fine-wire resistance thermometer. Compensated data from the two dynamic temperature sensor thermoelements were compared with the compensated fine-wire data in the frequency domain. Absolute differences between spectral line amplitudes measured with different sensors are small relative to the mean temperature and verify the compenation method. Increases in precision of the measurement method require optimization of several factors, and directions for further work are identified.

  17. Spectroscopic, scanning laser OBIC, and I-V/QE characterizations of browned EVA solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F.J.; Eisgruber, I.L.; Micheels, R.H.

    1996-05-01

    The effects of ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) discoloration due to accelerated field or laboratory exposure on the encapsulated silicon (Si) solar cells or EVA/glass laminates were characterized quantitatively by using non-invasive, non-destructive ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry, spectrocolorimetry, spectrofluorometry, scanning laser OBIC (optical beam induced current) spectroscopy, and current-voltage (I-V) and quantum efficiency (QE) measurements. The results show that the yellowness index (YI) measured directly over the AR-coated solar cells under the glass superstrate increased from the range of -80 to -90 to the range of -20 to 15 as the EVA changed from clear to brown. The ratio of two fluorescence emission peak areas generally increased from 1.45 to 5.69 as browning increased, but dropped to 4.21 on a darker EVA. For a solar cell with brown EVA in the central region, small-area grating QE measurements and scanning laser OBIC analysis between the brown and clear EVA regions showed that the quantum efficiency loss at 633 nm was 42%-48% of the loss at 488 nm, due to a reduced decrease of transmittance in browned EVA at the longer wavelengths. The portion of the solar cell under the browned EVA showed a decrease of {approximately}36% in efficiency, as compared to the cell efficiency under clear EVA. Transmittance loss at 633 nm was 38% of the loss at 488 nm for a light yellow-brown EVA/glass laminate that showed a small increase of 10 in the yellowness index.

  18. Dynamic measurement technology in object separate experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jin Cheng; Liang, Yajun; Guo, Lei; Sun, Zengyu

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a novel experimental method is proposed in order to verify the availability and reliability in separate system. To measure the position-change caused by the fault-mode machine-separate of the electric isolator plug and to know the real switch process of the important component, the ground separate experiment is required to simulate the real object separate process and to obtain the relative position of isolate component under different separate parameter. In the experiment, a position measurement system based on high speed photograph principle is introduced which has hardware, software and gauging method of photograph measure system. A in-situ measurement system is set up by two high speed camera in order to synchronized image collection of separate process. After extracting, matching, coordinate and position calculating to the image, a relative position of the isolator component at the time of separate process can be deduced. The relative separate speed at this time can be calculated by the position parameter. The measurement system can be tested by the three-axis standard revolving stage. The results of the measurement experiment show that camera response frequency is 1000Hz, the relative error of position measurement is less than 5%, the relative error of speed measurement is less than 5% which can meet demands of experiment.

  19. The I-V characteristics of asymmetrically necked samples of high-resistivity silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Asmontas, S.; Kleiza, V.

    2011-03-15

    The results of investigation of the I-V characteristics are presented for asymmetrically necked n-Si samples. It is established that the asymmetry of the I-V characteristic for the samples under investigation at the room and liquid-nitrogen temperatures in high electric fields is caused by the space-charge formation. At T = 78 K in the warm-electron region, the asymmetry of the I-V characteristic is caused by nonlocal relation between the electron mobility and the nonuniform electric-field intensity. It is found that the sample resistance at liquid-nitrogen temperature insignificantly increases after applying high electric-field pulses. The effect under observation is attributed to a decrease in the electron concentration in the necked section of the sample due to the redistribution of hot electrons between bulk and surface.

  20. Nonlinear I- V characteristics in doped ZnO based-ceramic varistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedky, A.; Abu-Abdeen, M.; Almulhem, Abdalaziz A.

    2007-01-01

    Two similar sets of Zn 1-xFe xO ceramic samples with various x values (0.00< x<0.50) are prepared by two different heat treatments. The first set is quenched from sintering temperature down to room temperature, and the second is left in the furnace and slowly cooled to room temperature. These samples are examined by using X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and DC electrical measurements. XRD data indicate that the replacement of Zn 2+ ion by Fe 3+ ion does not influence the Wurtzite structure of ZnO samples, and other well-known peaks are formed. The results of SEM indicate that no secondary phases are formed at grain boundaries, supporting the XRD results. It is also apparent that the average grain size decreases with increasing Fe content up to x=0.10, followed by an increase at x>0.30. With increasing Fe content, a nonlinear region, obtained from I- V characteristics, clearly appears and is shifted to higher fields. Furthermore, the nonlinear coefficients are generally increased by adding Fe up to x=0.30, followed by a decrease at x=0.50. Moreover, the values of the barrier heights are also generally increased with Fe up to x=0.10 and kept unchanged with further Fe content. On the other hand, the electrical conductivities at room temperature are measured and their values are found to be decreasing with increasing Fe content, as compared to those of an undoped ZnO sample. Our results are discussed in terms of both point defects and intrinsic donors, which are produced by Fe doping in the ZnO ceramic system.

  1. Influence of gas heating on high pressure dc microdischarge I V characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belostotskiy, Sergey G.; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.

    2008-11-01

    Experimental I-V characteristics of dc microdischarges in helium at different operating pressures (p = 300-800 Torr) reveal that the classical scaling law of the cathode layer (sheath) does not apply. It is shown that a modified semi-analytical model of the cathode layer that accounts for neutral gas heating is able to reproduce the trends of the experimental I-V characteristics. The model can also be used to quantify the influence of gas heating on microdischarge characteristics and to estimate conditions for stable operation of microdischarges.

  2. Measured Spacecraft Dynamic Effects on Atmospheric Science Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Gell, David A.; Lay, Richard R.

    1997-01-01

    On September 1991, NASA launched the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. In addition to its atmospheric science mission, spacecraft dynamic effects on science measurements were analyzed. The investigation included two in-flight experiments to determine how each on-board instrument, subsystem and environmental disturbance contributed to the spacecraft dynamic response and how these disturbances affected science measurements. Three case studies are presented which show the impact of spacecraft dynamic response on science measurements. In the first case, correlation of independent atmospheric meridional wind measurements taken by two instruments with the spacecraft dynamic response demonstrated that excessive vibration (exceeding instrument pointing requirements) resulted in wind measurement disagreement. In the second case, solar array disturbances produced a spacecraft response signature on radiometer measurements. The signature explicitly demonstrated that if an instrument has sufficient spatial and temporal resolution, spacecraft dynamic response could impact measurements. In the final case, correlation of an instrument's fine sun sensor data and CO2 measurements demonstrated the effect of temporal and spatial sampling resolution and active pointing control on science measurements. The sun sensor had a frequency modulated characteristic due to spacecraft vibration and the periodic scanning of another instrument which was not present on the CO2 measurements.

  3. Measurement of dynamic bite force during mastication.

    PubMed

    Shimada, A; Yamabe, Y; Torisu, T; Baad-Hansen, L; Murata, H; Svensson, P

    2012-05-01

    Efficient mastication of different types and size of food depends on fast integration of sensory information from mechanoreceptors and central control mechanisms of jaw movements and applied bite force. The neural basis underlying mastication has been studied for decades but little progress in understanding the dynamics of bite force has been made mainly due to technical limitations of bite force recorders. The aims of this study were to develop a new intraoral bite force recorder which would allow the study of natural mastication without an increase in the occlusal vertical dimension and subsequently to analyze the relation between electromyographic (EMG) activity of jaw-closing muscles, jaw movements and bite force during mastication of five different types of food. Customized force recorders based on strain gauge sensors were fitted to the upper and lower molar teeth on the preferred chewing side in fourteen healthy and dentate subjects (21-39 years), and recordings were carried out during voluntary mastication of five different kinds of food. Intraoral force recordings were successively obtained from all subjects. anova showed that impulse of bite force as well as integrated EMG was significantly influenced by food (P<0·05), while time-related parameters were significantly affected by chewing cycles (P<0·001). This study demonstrates that intraoral force recordings are feasible and can provide new information on the dynamics of human mastication with direct implications for oral rehabilitation. We also propose that the control of bite force during mastication is achieved by anticipatory adjustment and encoding of bolus characteristics.

  4. Further development of the dynamic gas temperature measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, D. L.; Robinson, W. W.; Watkins, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    Two experiments for verifying the frequency response of a previously-developed dynamic gas temperature measurement system were performed. In both experiments, fine-wire resistance temperature sensors were used as standards. The compensated dynamic temperature sensor data will be compared with the standards to verify the compensation method. The experiments are described in detail.

  5. Conductance measurement circuit with wide dynamic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Bruce E. (Inventor); Von Esch, Myron (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A conductance measurement circuit to measure conductance of a solution under test with an output voltage proportional to conductance over a 5-decade range, i.e., 0.01 uS to 1000 uS or from 0.1 uS to 10,000 uS. An increase in conductance indicates growth, or multiplication, of the bacteria in the test solution. Two circuits are used each for an alternate half-cycle time periods of an alternate squarewave in order to cause alternate and opposite currents to be applied to the test solution. The output of one of the two circuits may be scaled for a different range optimum switching frequency dependent upon the solution conductance and to enable uninterrupted measurement over the complete 5-decade range. This circuitry provides two overlapping ranges of conductance which can be read simultaneously without discontinuity thereby eliminating range switching within the basic circuitry. A VCO is used to automatically change the operating frequency according to the particular value of the conductance being measured, and comparators indicate which range is valid and also facilitate computer-controlled data acquisition. A multiplexer may be used to monitor any number of solutions under test continuously.

  6. Localized measurements of composite dynamic response for health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Sean; Oman, Kyle; Peters, Kara; Stan, Nikola; Chadderdon, Spencer; Selfridge, Richard; Schultz, Stephen

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate the measurement of and applications for full-spectral measurements collected from FBG sensors in dynamic loading environments. The measurement of the dynamic response of a laminated plate to an impact event highlights the information gained during the event as compared to after the event. The measurement of damage induced spectral distortion in a thin plate during vibration loading demonstrates the capability of separating spectral distortion due to multiple effects, including damage and vibration loading. Finally, the measurement of the change in dynamic response of an adhesively bonded joint highlights the capability to measure the progression of fatigue damage. Confirmation that the change in FBG response is due to fatigue damage is performed through independent pulsed phase thermography imaging of the adhesively bonded joint.

  7. HIGH DYNAMIC-RANGE HIGH SPEED LINAC CURRENT MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Deibele, Craig Edmond; Curry, Douglas E; Dickson, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    It is desired to measure the linac current of a charged particle beam with a consistent accuracy over a dynamic range of over 120 dB. Conventional current transformers suffer from droop, can be susceptible to electromagnetic interference (EMI), and can be bandwidth limited. A novel detector and electronics were designed to maximize dynamic range of about 120 dB and measure rise-times on the order of 10 nanoseconds.

  8. Get A.C.T.I.V.E: Engaging Middle School Readers with Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Amy

    2003-01-01

    Explains that a Middle School Literacy Teacher Expert supports and guides teachers with innovative strategies to help students master basic literacy skills to become lifelong learners. Explains the A.C.T.I.V.E. strategy to encourage students to ask, comment, track down, infer, visualize, and Eureka! (synthesize). (PM)

  9. I. V. Zavadskii and the beginnings of behavioral pharmacology: an historical note and translation.

    PubMed Central

    Laties, V G

    1979-01-01

    I. V. Zavadskii, who worked in Pavlov's laboratory between 1907 and 1909, performed a study that has many of the characteristics of modern behavioral pharmacology. He studied the effects of alcohol, morphine, cocaine and caffeine on the conditioned salivary reflex. A translation of his paper and some brief comments on his life are presented. PMID:390079

  10. 21 CFR 880.5420 - Pressure infusor for an I.V. bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pressure infusor for an I.V. bag. 880.5420 Section 880.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal...

  11. 21 CFR 880.5420 - Pressure infusor for an I.V. bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pressure infusor for an I.V. bag. 880.5420 Section 880.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal...

  12. A measure of individual role in collective dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Konstantin; Serrano, M. Ángeles; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Miguel, Maxi San

    2012-02-01

    Identifying key players in collective dynamics remains a challenge in several research fields, from the efficient dissemination of ideas to drug target discovery in biomedical problems. The difficulty lies at several levels: how to single out the role of individual elements in such intermingled systems, or which is the best way to quantify their importance. Centrality measures describe a node's importance by its position in a network. The key issue obviated is that the contribution of a node to the collective behavior is not uniquely determined by the structure of the system but it is a result of the interplay between dynamics and network structure. We show that dynamical influence measures explicitly how strongly a node's dynamical state affects collective behavior. For critical spreading, dynamical influence targets nodes according to their spreading capabilities. For diffusive processes it quantifies how efficiently real systems may be controlled by manipulating a single node.

  13. A measure of individual role in collective dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, Konstantin; Serrano, M. Ángeles; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Miguel, Maxi San

    2012-01-01

    Identifying key players in collective dynamics remains a challenge in several research fields, from the efficient dissemination of ideas to drug target discovery in biomedical problems. The difficulty lies at several levels: how to single out the role of individual elements in such intermingled systems, or which is the best way to quantify their importance. Centrality measures describe a node's importance by its position in a network. The key issue obviated is that the contribution of a node to the collective behavior is not uniquely determined by the structure of the system but it is a result of the interplay between dynamics and network structure. We show that dynamical influence measures explicitly how strongly a node's dynamical state affects collective behavior. For critical spreading, dynamical influence targets nodes according to their spreading capabilities. For diffusive processes it quantifies how efficiently real systems may be controlled by manipulating a single node. PMID:22379597

  14. A novel fault diagnosis method of PV based-on power loss and I-V characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. H.; Liang, R.; Tian, Y.; Wang, F.

    2016-08-01

    The power loss and the changes of internal I-V output characteristics of photovoltaic (PV) module in the typical fault condition were analyzed. We proposed an on-line real time fault diagnosis method for PV module, which takes into account the power loss and the internal I-V characteristics. Taking into account the changes of temperature and irradiation, the running status of the PV module were simulated in real time. Firstly, by comparing the simulated power with the measured power, it could determine whether the abnormal power loss has occurred. Then based on the change of output voltage, it could decide if short-circuit fault has occurred and estimate the number of short circuited cells roughly. Further, the value of fill factor (FF) can be utilized to determine whether aging fault has occurred and to acquire the remaining service life of the module. The results of simulation and experiment show that this method can effectively detect the partial shadow short-circuit fault and aging fault. It proves the feasibility and accuracy of the fault diagnosis method.

  15. Making Scents: Dynamic Olfactometry for Threshold Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Data on human odor thresholds show disparities huge enough to marginalize olfactory psychophysics and delegitimize importation of its data into other areas. Variation of orders of magnitude from study to study, much of it systematic, threatens meaningful comparisons with animal species, comparison between in vivo with in vitro studies, the search for molecular determinants of potency, and use of olfactory information for environmental or public health policy. On the premise that good experimental results will flow from use of good tools, this report describes a vapor delivery system and its peripherals that instantiate good tools. The vapor delivery device 8 (VDD8) provides flexibility in range of delivered concentrations, offers definable stability of delivery, accommodates solvent-free delivery below a part per trillion, gives a realistic interface with subjects, has accessible and replaceable components, and adapts to a variety of psychophysical methodologies. The device serves most often for measurement of absolute sensitivity, where its design encourages collection of thousands of judgments per day from subjects tested simultaneously. The results have shown humans to be more sensitive and less variable than has previous testing. The VDD8 can also serve for measurement of differential sensitivity, discrimination of quality, and perception of mixtures and masking. The exposition seeks to transmit general lessons while it proffers some specifics of design to reproduce features of the device in a new or existing system. The principles can apply to devices for animal testing. PMID:19965900

  16. Dynamic eye phantom for retinal oximetry measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lemaillet, Paul; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of oxygen saturation and flow in the retina can yield information about eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy. Recently, we developed a multiaperture camera that uses the division of the retinal image into several wavelength-sensitive subimages to compute retinal oxygen saturation. The calibration of such instruments is particularly difficult due to the layered structure of the eye and the lack of alternative measurement techniques. For this purpose, we realize an in vitro model of the human eye composed of a lens, the retina vessel, and three layers: the choroid, the retinal pigmented epithelium, and the sclera. The retinal vessel is modeled with a microtube connected to a micropump and a hemoglobin reservoir in a closed circulatory system. Hemoglobin oxygenation in the vessel could be altered using a reversible fuel cell. The sclera is represented by a Spectralon slab. The optical properties of the other layers are mimicked using titanium dioxide as a scatterer, ink as an absorber, and epoxy as a supporting structure. The optical thickness of each layer of the eye phantom is matched to each respective eye layer. PMID:20059246

  17. Dynamic eye phantom for retinal oximetry measurements.

    PubMed

    Lemaillet, Paul; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of oxygen saturation and flow in the retina can yield information about eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy. Recently, we developed a multiaperture camera that uses the division of the retinal image into several wavelength-sensitive subimages to compute retinal oxygen saturation. The calibration of such instruments is particularly difficult due to the layered structure of the eye and the lack of alternative measurement techniques. For this purpose, we realize an in vitro model of the human eye composed of a lens, the retina vessel, and three layers: the choroid, the retinal pigmented epithelium, and the sclera. The retinal vessel is modeled with a microtube connected to a micropump and a hemoglobin reservoir in a closed circulatory system. Hemoglobin oxygenation in the vessel could be altered using a reversible fuel cell. The sclera is represented by a Spectralon slab. The optical properties of the other layers are mimicked using titanium dioxide as a scatterer, ink as an absorber, and epoxy as a supporting structure. The optical thickness of each layer of the eye phantom is matched to each respective eye layer.

  18. Dynamic eye phantom for retinal oximetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaillet, Paul; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2009-11-01

    Measurements of oxygen saturation and flow in the retina can yield information about eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy. Recently, we developed a multiaperture camera that uses the division of the retinal image into several wavelength-sensitive subimages to compute retinal oxygen saturation. The calibration of such instruments is particularly difficult due to the layered structure of the eye and the lack of alternative measurement techniques. For this purpose, we realize an in vitro model of the human eye composed of a lens, the retina vessel, and three layers: the choroid, the retinal pigmented epithelium, and the sclera. The retinal vessel is modeled with a microtube connected to a micropump and a hemoglobin reservoir in a closed circulatory system. Hemoglobin oxygenation in the vessel could be altered using a reversible fuel cell. The sclera is represented by a Spectralon slab. The optical properties of the other layers are mimicked using titanium dioxide as a scatterer, ink as an absorber, and epoxy as a supporting structure. The optical thickness of each layer of the eye phantom is matched to each respective eye layer.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of azithromycin after i.v. and i.m. administration to sheep.

    PubMed

    Cárceles, C M; Font, A; Escudero, E; Espuny, A; Marín, P; Fernández-Varón, E

    2005-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK) of azithromycin after i.v. and i.m. injection at a single dosage of 20 mg/kg bodyweight was studied in sheep. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein until 120 h after dosing for both routes. Plasma concentrations of azithromycin were determined by bioassay. The plasma concentration-time data of azithromycin best fitted a three-compartment model after i.v. administration and a two-compartment model with first-order absorption after i.m. administration. The elimination half-life (t(1/2lambdaz)) was 47.70 +/- 7.49 h after i.v. administration and 61.29 +/- 13.86 h after i.m. administration. Clearance value after i.v. dosing was 0.52 +/- 0.08 L/kg.h. After i.m. administration a peak azithromycin concentration (C(max)) of 1.26 +/- 0.19 mg/L was achieved at 1.24 +/- 0.31 h (t(max)). Area under the curve (AUC) were 38.85 +/- 5.83 mg.h/L and 36.03 +/- 1.52 mg.h/L after i.v. and i.m. administration respectively. Bioavailability obtained after i.m. administration was 94.08 +/- 11.56%. The high tolerability of this i.m. preparation and the favourable PK behaviour such as the long half-life and high bioavailability make azithromycin likely to be effective in sheep.

  20. Pointwise fiber Bragg grating displacement sensor system for dynamic measurements.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Kuo-Chih; Ma, Chien-Ching

    2008-07-10

    A method for setting up a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor which can measure the pointwise, out-of-plane or in-plane dynamic displacement is proposed. The proposed FBG sensor is reusable. A multiplexing demodulation system based on a single long-period fiber grating is used in this study. The experimental results of the steady-state motion for a multilayer piezoelectric actuator and the dynamic response of a cantilever beam subjected to impact loadings are presented. These results indicate that the proposed displacement sensor has the ability to measure the out-of-plane dynamic displacement with high sensitivity. Measurements for a piezoceramic plate excited by high frequency show that the proposed displacement sensor also has the ability to provide the in-plane dynamic displacement up to 20 kHz.

  1. Dynamic gas temperature measurement system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, D. L.; Robinson, W. W.; Watkins, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    A gas temperature measurement system with compensated frequency response of 1 kHz and capability to operate in the exhaust of a gas turbine engine combustor was developed. A review of available technologies which could attain this objective was done. The most promising method was identified as a two wire thermocouple, with a compensation method based on the responses of the two different diameter thermocouples to the fluctuating gas temperature field. In a detailed design of the probe, transient conduction effects were identified as significant. A compensation scheme was derived to include the effects of gas convection and wire conduction. The two wire thermocouple concept was tested in a laboratory burner exhaust to temperatures of about 3000 F and in a gas turbine engine to combustor exhaust temperatures of about 2400 F. Uncompensated and compensated waveforms and compensation spectra are presented.

  2. Measuring Dynamic Patterns in the Structure of Substate Economies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, Richard; And Others

    The objective of this study was to explore a new method of analyzing the performance of substate economies. Conventional analyses of economic diversity and growth are limited by their reliance on static measures of economic structure. Such measures do not capture the patterns of growth dynamics or structural change a region may be experiencing.…

  3. Cumulative Measurement Errors for Dynamic Testing of Space Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winnitoy, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Located at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, the Six-Degree-of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS) is a real-time, six degree-of-freedom, short range motion base simulator originally designed to simulate the relative dynamics of two bodies in space mating together (i.e., docking or berthing). The SDTS has the capability to test full scale docking and berthing systems utilizing a two body dynamic docking simulation for docking operations and a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) simulation for berthing operations. The SDTS can also be used for nonmating applications such as sensors and instruments evaluations requiring proximity or short range motion operations. The motion base is a hydraulic powered Stewart platform, capable of supporting a 3,500 lb payload with a positional accuracy of 0.03 inches. The SDTS is currently being used for the NASA Docking System testing and has been also used by other government agencies. The SDTS is also under consideration for use by commercial companies. Examples of tests include the verification of on-orbit robotic inspection systems, space vehicle assembly procedures and docking/berthing systems. The facility integrates a dynamic simulation of on-orbit spacecraft mating or de-mating using flight-like mechanical interface hardware. A force moment sensor is used for input during the contact phase, thus simulating the contact dynamics. While the verification of flight hardware presents unique challenges, one particular area of interest involves the use of external measurement systems to ensure accurate feedback of dynamic contact. The measurement systems for the test facility have two separate functions. The first is to take static measurements of facility and test hardware to determine both the static and moving frames used in the simulation and control system. The test hardware must be measured after each configuration change to determine both sets of reference frames. The second function is to take dynamic

  4. Furthur development of the dynamic gas temperature measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, D. L.; Robinson, W. W.; Watkins, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    Candidate concepts capable of generating dynamic temperatures were identified and analyzed for use in verifying experimentally the frequency response of the dynamic gas temperature measurement system. A rotating wheel concept and one other concept will be selected for this purpose. Modifications to the data reduction code algorithms developed were identified and evaluated to reduce substantially the data reduction execution time. These modifications will be incorporated in a new data reduction program to be written in FORTRAN IV.

  5. Dual redundant arm system operational quality measures and their applications - Dynamic measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan; Kim, Sungbok

    1990-01-01

    Dual-arm dynamic operation quality measures are presented which quantify the efficiency and capability of generating Cartesian accelerations by two cooperative arms based on the analysis of dual-arm dynamic interactions. Dual-arm dynamic manipulability is defined as the efficiency of generating Cartesian accelerations under the dynamic and kinematic interactions between individual arms and an object under manipulation. The analysis of dual-arm dynamic interactions is based on the so-called Cartesian space agent model of an arm, which represents an individual arm as a force source acting upon a point mass with the effective Cartesian space arm dynamics and an environment or an object under manipulation. The Cartesian space agent model of an arm makes it possible to derive the dynamic and kinematic constraints involved in the transport, assembly and grasping modes of dual-arm cooperation. A task-oriented operational quality measure, (TOQd) is defined by evaluating dual-arm dynamic manipulability in terms of given task requirements. TOQd is used in dual-arm joint configuration optimization. Simulation results are shown. A complete set of forward dynamic equations for a dual-arm system is derived, and dual-arm dynamic operational quality measures for various modes of dual-arm cooperation allowing sliding contacts are established.

  6. Investigation of adaptive signal processing methods for denoised I-V curve of Langmuir probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung Yeol; Han, Moon-Ki; Lee, Ho-Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-09-01

    It is an important issue to obtain a clear second derivative of Langmuir probe I-V curve which involves the electron energy distribution function. Therefore, noise suppressions against random walk of charges are required in the experimental data. Proper numerical methods including fitting, digital smoothing, digital filtering with window function should be used to remove each types of noise to determine electron energy distribution. The calculation of electron energy distributions demands sequential algorithm of several numerical methods to reduce the noise in I-V curve. In this presentation, a new noise suppression method is suggested to achieve advanced Langmuir probe diagnostics. Combined utilization of nonlinear curve fitting and low pass filter with window function shows more precise results than the utilization of smoothing only. Therefore, results including noise analysis algorithm give new guideline of probe diagnostics.

  7. Quality criteria for i.v.-immunoglobulins: importance of tests and product properties.

    PubMed

    Gronski, P; Kanzy, E J; Ronneberger, H J; Geursen, R; Seiler, F R

    1986-06-01

    Quality criteria for i.v.-immunoglobulins (i.v.- Igs) are critically discussed laying emphasis on spontaneous anticomplementary activity (aca) and size-dependent composition. Considering the percentage of fractions obtained by gel filtration (Ultrogel AcA 34), however, the monomeric IgG containing fraction contributed the major part of aca under the experimental conditions chosen. Subclass IgG3 seems to contribute considerably to aca. No correlation was found between aca and the percentage of fractions containing components larger in size than IgG dimers in various commercially available Igs. Moreover, the subclass distribution in different batches of individual products showed considerable variations. The amount of IgG4 is correlated with that of IgA in chemically unmodified products relatively poor in IgA (approx. less than or or equal to 10 mg/5 g Ig), indicating that attempts to reduce IgA consequently result in removal of IgG4.

  8. A I-V analysis of irradiated Gallium Arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heulenberg, A.; Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    A computer program was used to analyze the illuminated I-V characteristics of four sets of gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells irradiated with 1-MeV electrons and 10-MeV protons. It was concluded that junction regions (J sub r) dominate nearly all GaAs cells tested, except for irradiated Mitsubishi cells, which appear to have a different doping profile. Irradiation maintains or increases the dominance by J sub r. Proton irradiation increases J sub r more than does electron irradiation. The U.S. cells were optimized for beginning of life (BOL) and the Japanese for end of life (EOL). I-V analysis indicates ways of improving both the BOL and EOL performance of GaAs solar cells.

  9. A I-V analysis of irradiated Gallium Arsenide solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heulenberg, A.; Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.

    1991-08-01

    A computer program was used to analyze the illuminated I-V characteristics of four sets of gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells irradiated with 1-MeV electrons and 10-MeV protons. It was concluded that junction regions (J sub r) dominate nearly all GaAs cells tested, except for irradiated Mitsubishi cells, which appear to have a different doping profile. Irradiation maintains or increases the dominance by J sub r. Proton irradiation increases J sub r more than does electron irradiation. The U.S. cells were optimized for beginning of life (BOL) and the Japanese for end of life (EOL). I-V analysis indicates ways of improving both the BOL and EOL performance of GaAs solar cells.

  10. Observation of step structures in the I-V characteristics of YBCO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, J.; Verdyan, A.; Lapsker, I.

    1997-08-01

    Many electrical properties of the high Tc superconductors are widely probed utilizing current-voltage characteristics because of its sensitivity to the phase transition. In this work we report on detailed study of YBCO I-V characteristics shape above the critical current in the phase transition vicinity. For a given temperature controlled to a better than 10mK stability over the whole I-V cycle, the applied current has been gradually increased to exceed the critical current. The system has thus been driven to cross over to the mixed state. Using dI/dV versus V plots, it is shown that all the curves are characterized by a fine step structures at current densities higher than the critical ones.

  11. Sysmex XT-2000iV scattergram analysis in a cat with basophilia.

    PubMed

    Stranieri, Angelica; Ferrari, Roberta; Zanzani, Sergio; Rossi, Gabriele

    2016-06-01

    A 13-year-old female Domestic Shorthair cat was presented to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the University of Milan for an interscapular mass suspected to be a mesenchymal malignant tumor. A preoperative CBC performed with Sysmex XT-2000iV showed leukocytosis with neutrophilia and eosinophilia. The Sysmex WBC/DIFF scattergram showed an additional, well-separated cluster of events between the neutrophil, eosinophil, and lymphocyte clusters. Blood smear evaluation revealed the presence of a significant number of basophils; thus, it was hypothesized that the additional cluster could represent the basophilic population. A second CBC, 24 days later, showed the same pattern on the WBC/DIFF scattergram in the absence of leukocytosis and neutrophilia. After surgical excision of the mass, a definitive diagnosis of feline injection site sarcoma was made. To the author's knowledge, there are no previous reports about the identification of feline basophils in the WBC/DIFF scattergram of Sysmex XT-2000iV.

  12. Dynamic tire pressure sensor for measuring ground vibration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; McDaniel, James Gregory; Wang, Ming L

    2012-11-07

    This work presents a convenient and non-contact acoustic sensing approach for measuring ground vibration. This approach, which uses an instantaneous dynamic tire pressure sensor (DTPS), possesses the capability to replace the accelerometer or directional microphone currently being used for inspecting pavement conditions. By measuring dynamic pressure changes inside the tire, ground vibration can be amplified and isolated from environmental noise. In this work, verifications of the DTPS concept of sensing inside the tire have been carried out. In addition, comparisons between a DTPS, ground-mounted accelerometer, and directional microphone are made. A data analysis algorithm has been developed and optimized to reconstruct ground acceleration from DTPS data. Numerical and experimental studies of this DTPS reveal a strong potential for measuring ground vibration caused by a moving vehicle. A calibration of transfer function between dynamic tire pressure change and ground acceleration may be needed for different tire system or for more accurate application.

  13. Dynamic Tire Pressure Sensor for Measuring Ground Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; McDaniel, James Gregory; Wang, Ming L.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a convenient and non-contact acoustic sensing approach for measuring ground vibration. This approach, which uses an instantaneous dynamic tire pressure sensor (DTPS), possesses the capability to replace the accelerometer or directional microphone currently being used for inspecting pavement conditions. By measuring dynamic pressure changes inside the tire, ground vibration can be amplified and isolated from environmental noise. In this work, verifications of the DTPS concept of sensing inside the tire have been carried out. In addition, comparisons between a DTPS, ground-mounted accelerometer, and directional microphone are made. A data analysis algorithm has been developed and optimized to reconstruct ground acceleration from DTPS data. Numerical and experimental studies of this DTPS reveal a strong potential for measuring ground vibration caused by a moving vehicle. A calibration of transfer function between dynamic tire pressure change and ground acceleration may be needed for different tire system or for more accurate application. PMID:23202206

  14. The effect of used deformation, metal sheath and heat treatment on the I-V curve of ex situ MgB 2 composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, P.; Hušek, I.; Melišek, T.

    2004-01-01

    Current-voltage characteristics of MgB 2 composite wires made of ex situ process using Cu, Fe and stainless steel (SS) sheaths have been measured at 4.2 K in the self-field and external magnetic field between 2 and 4 T. It was found that the used mode of deformation (drawing, rotary swaging and two-axial rolling) influences the slope of I-V curve due to affected grain connectivity. Final heat treatment at 950 °C/0.5 h improves grain connectivity apparently, which results in I-V characteristic with very high n-exponents. The n-exponents of multi-core wires measured in external field are apparently lower due to a current sharing among the non-uniform filaments surrounded by high resistance matrix.

  15. Rapid Drinking Devices Constructed from I.V. Bags and Plastic Squeeze Bottles,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    i D-153 652 RAPID DRINKING DEVICES CONSTRUCTED FROM IY BAS AND 1/1 I PLASTIC SQUEEZE BOTTLES (U) A MY RESEARCH INST OF I ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE...TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVEREDLf Rapid Drinking Devices Constructed Fram I.V. ( Bags and Plastic Squeeze Bottles 6...running. The primary problem with using a plastic water bottle during a race is that it ~ must be held upright and squeezed tightly while the runner

  16. I-V relationship for the Cu2S/CdS solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarev, G. L.

    1980-08-01

    The diode equation, which describes the behavior of the Cu2S/CdS solar cell, was derived from first principles. The key results are the independence of the open-circuit voltage from the field in CdS and an explanation of the intersection of the dark and illuminated portions of the I-V curves. The limiting factors and correlation with experimental results are discussed.

  17. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Measurement of Velocity and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, J.

    2001-01-01

    A new technique for measuring dynamic gas velocity and temperature is described. The technique is based on molecular Rayleigh scattering of laser light, so no seeding of the flow is necessary. The Rayleigh scattered light is filtered with a fixed cavity, planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer. A minimum number of photodetectors were used in order to allow the high data acquisition rate needed for dynamic measurements. One photomultiplier tube (PMT) was used to measure the total Rayleigh scattering, which is proportional to the gas density. Two additional PMTs were used to detect light that passes through two apertures in a mask located in the interferometer fringe plane. An uncertainty analysis was used to select the optimum aperture parameters and to predict the measurement uncertainty due to photon shot-noise. Results of an experiment to measure the velocity of a subsonic free jet are presented.

  18. Distribution of nobiletin chitosan-based microemulsions in brain following i.v. injection in mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Zhou, Jian Ping; Ping, Qi Neng; Lu, Yun; Chen, Liang

    2008-03-20

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the in vitro properties of a number of chitosan-based microemulsions containing nobiletin and determine its distribution in mice brain following i.v. administration. The phase behavior and properties of chitosan-based microemulsions were investigated in a pseudo-ternary system composed of polyoxyethylene 35 castor oil/benzyl alcohol/medium-chain triglyceride/tea oil/water with the chitosan. The droplet sizes were found to be smaller than 25 nm by photo correlation spectrometer. The nobiletin-loaded hyaluronic acid chitosan-based microemulsion (HAC-ME) carried negative charge and nobiletin-loaded hydrochlorate chitosan-based microemulsion (HCC-ME) carried positive charge. The concentrations of nobiletin in tissues were determined by HPLC after i.v. administration of HAC-ME, nobiletin-loaded microemulsion (ME), HCC-ME and nobiletin solution. Based on AUC(0-t), MRT and C(max), HAC-ME delivered more nobiletin to the brain compared to nobiletin solution, ME and HCC-ME. The long-circulation effect might contribute to the higher AUC(0-t) for HAC-ME in brain. On the other hand, the AUC(0-t) in plasma and brain after i.v. administration of HCC-ME were not significantly increased relative to ME. These results indicate that HAC-ME may be presented as potential candidates for delivering more drugs into the brain.

  19. Laser velocimetry measurements of oscillating airfoil dynamic stall flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Ahmed, S.

    1991-01-01

    Ensemble-averaged two-component velocity measurements over an airfoil experiencing oscillatory dynamic stall under compressibility conditions were obtained. The measurements show the formation of a separation bubble over the airfoil that persists till angles of attack close to when the dynamic stall vortex forms and convects. The fluid attains mean velocities as large as 1.6 times the free stream velocity with instantaneous values of 1.8 times the free stream velocity. The airfoil motion induces these large velocities in regions that are far removed from the surface.

  20. A mathematical model describing the glycemic response of diabetic patients to meal and i.v. infusion of insulin.

    PubMed

    Fabietti, P G; Calabrese, G; Iorio, M; Bistoni, S; Brunetti, P; Sarti, E; Benedetti, M M

    2001-10-01

    Nine type 1 diabetic patients were studied for 24 hours. During this period they were given three calibrated meals. The glycemia was feedback-controlled by means of an artificial pancreas. The blood concentration of glucose and the infusion speed of the insulin were measured every minute. The experimental data referring to each of the three meals were used to estimate the parameters of a mathematical model suitable for describing the glycemic response of diabetic patients at meals and at the i.v. infusion of exogenous insulin. From the estimate a marked dispersion of the parameters was found, both interindividual and intraindividual. Nevertheless the models thus obtained seem to be usable for the synthesis of a feedback controller, especially in view of creating a portable artificial pancreas that now seems possible owing to the realization (so far experimental) of sufficiently reliable glucose concentration sensors.

  1. Quantum dynamics of simultaneously measured non-commuting observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacohen-Gourgy, Shay; Martin, Leigh S.; Flurin, Emmanuel; Ramasesh, Vinay V.; Whaley, K. Birgitta; Siddiqi, Irfan

    2016-10-01

    In quantum mechanics, measurements cause wavefunction collapse that yields precise outcomes, whereas for non-commuting observables such as position and momentum Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle limits the intrinsic precision of a state. Although theoretical work has demonstrated that it should be possible to perform simultaneous non-commuting measurements and has revealed the limits on measurement outcomes, only recently has the dynamics of the quantum state been discussed. To realize this unexplored regime, we simultaneously apply two continuous quantum non-demolition probes of non-commuting observables to a superconducting qubit. We implement multiple readout channels by coupling the qubit to multiple modes of a cavity. To control the measurement observables, we implement a ‘single quadrature’ measurement by driving the qubit and applying cavity sidebands with a relative phase that sets the observable. Here, we use this approach to show that the uncertainty principle governs the dynamics of the wavefunction by enforcing a lower bound on the measurement-induced disturbance. Consequently, as we transition from measuring identical to measuring non-commuting observables, the dynamics make a smooth transition from standard wavefunction collapse to localized persistent diffusion and then to isotropic persistent diffusion. Although the evolution of the state differs markedly from that of a conventional measurement, information about both non-commuting observables is extracted by keeping track of the time ordering of the measurement record, enabling quantum state tomography without alternating measurements. Our work creates novel capabilities for quantum control, including rapid state purification, adaptive measurement, measurement-based state steering and continuous quantum error correction. As physical systems often interact continuously with their environment via non-commuting degrees of freedom, our work offers a way to study how notions of contemporary

  2. A theory of neural dimensionality, dynamics, and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Surya

    In many experiments, neuroscientists tightly control behavior, record many trials, and obtain trial-averaged firing rates from hundreds of neurons in circuits containing millions of behaviorally relevant neurons. Dimensionality reduction has often shown that such datasets are strikingly simple; they can be described using a much smaller number of dimensions than the number of recorded neurons, and the resulting projections onto these dimensions yield a remarkably insightful dynamical portrait of circuit computation. This ubiquitous simplicity raises several profound and timely conceptual questions. What is the origin of this simplicity and its implications for the complexity of brain dynamics? Would neuronal datasets become more complex if we recorded more neurons? How and when can we trust dynamical portraits obtained from only hundreds of neurons in circuits containing millions of neurons? We present a theory that answers these questions, and test it using neural data recorded from reaching monkeys. Overall, this theory yields a picture of the neural measurement process as a random projection of neural dynamics, conceptual insights into how we can reliably recover dynamical portraits in such under-sampled measurement regimes, and quantitative guidelines for the design of future experiments. Moreover, it reveals the existence of phase transition boundaries in our ability to successfully decode cognition and behavior as a function of the number of recorded neurons, the complexity of the task, and the smoothness of neural dynamics. membership pending.

  3. Scale-Independent Measures and Pathologic Cardiac Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Luís A.; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    1998-09-01

    We study several scale-independent measures of cardiac interbeat interval dynamics defined through the application of the wavelet transform. We test their performance in detecting heart disease using a database consisting of records of interbeat intervals for a group of healthy individuals and subjects with congestive heart failure. We find that scale-independent measures effectively distinguish healthy from pathologic behavior and propose a new two-variable scale-independent measure that could be clinically useful. We compare the performance of a recently proposed scale-dependent measure and find that the results depend on the database analyzed and on the analyzing wavelet.

  4. Objective and automated measurement of dynamic vision functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, M. C.; Adams, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    A phoria stimulus array and electro-oculographic (EOG) arrangements for measuring motor and sensory responses of subjects subjected to stress or drug conditions are described, along with experimental procedures. Heterophoria (as oculomotor function) and glare recovery time (time required for photochemical and neural recovery after exposure to a flash stimulus) are measured, in research aimed at developing automated objective measurement of dynamic vision functions. Onset of involuntary optokinetic nystagmus in subjects attempting to track moving stripes (while viewing through head-mounted binocular eyepieces) after exposure to glare serves as an objective measure of glare recovery time.

  5. A method of measuring dynamic strain under electromagnetic forming conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinling; Xi, Xuekui; Wang, Sijun; Lu, Jun; Guo, Chenglong; Wang, Wenquan; Liu, Enke; Wang, Wenhong; Liu, Lin; Wu, Guangheng

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic strain measurement is rather important for the characterization of mechanical behaviors in electromagnetic forming process, but it has been hindered by high strain rate and serious electromagnetic interference for years. In this work, a simple and effective strain measuring technique for physical and mechanical behavior studies in the electromagnetic forming process has been developed. High resolution (∼5 ppm) of strain curves of a budging aluminum tube in pulsed electromagnetic field has been successfully measured using this technique. The measured strain rate is about 10(5) s(-1), which depends on the discharging conditions, nearly one order of magnitude of higher than that under conventional split Hopkins pressure bar loading conditions (∼10(4) s(-1)). It has been found that the dynamic fracture toughness of an aluminum alloy is significantly enhanced during the electromagnetic forming, which explains why the formability is much larger under electromagnetic forging conditions in comparison with conventional forging processes.

  6. Subpicosecond measurements of polar solvation dynamics: Coumarin 153 revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Horng, M.L.; Gardecki, J.A.; Papazyan, A.; Maroncelli, M.

    1995-11-30

    Time-resolved emission measurements of the solute coumarin 153 (C153) are used to probe the time dependence of solvation in 24 common solvents at room temperature. Significant improvements in experimental time resolution ({approx}100 fs instrument response) as well as corresponding improvements in analysis methods provide confidence that all of the spectral evolution (including both the inertial and the diffusive parts of the response) are observed in these measurements. Extensive data concerning the steady-state solvatochromism of C153, coupled to an examination of the effects of vibrational relaxation, further demonstrate that the spectral dynamics being observed accurately monitor the dynamics of nonspecific solvation. Comparisons to theoretical predictions show that models based on the dielectric response of the pure solvent provide a semiquantitative understanding of the dynamics observed. 156 refs., 26 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. The differential emission measure of dynamic coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of time dependent phenomena, such as flare energization and decay, on the temperature and density structure of the transition region and, in particular, on the form of the differential emission measure are studied. It is found that unlike the case of the static models, the form of the differential emission measure can be used to determine the important physical mechanisms in the dynamic models.

  8. Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    Radiometric Measurements Dick K.P. Yue Center for Ocean Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology Room 5-321 77 Massachusetts Ave...comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 30 SEP 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES ...COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurements 5a

  9. Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    Radiometric Measurement Lian Shen Department of Mechanical Engineering & St. Anthony Falls Laboratory University of Minnesota Minneapolis, MN...information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 30 SEP 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00...2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurement 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  10. Dynamic measurements of gear tooth friction and load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a program to study fundamental mechanisms of gear noise, static and dynamic gear tooth strain measurements were made on the NASA gear-noise rig. Tooth-fillet strains from low-contact ratio-spur gears were recorded for 28 operating conditions. A method is introduced whereby strain gage measurements taken from both the tension and compression sides of a gear tooth can be transformed into the normal and frictional loads on the tooth. This technique was applied to both the static and dynamic strain data. The static case results showed close agreement with expected results. For the dynamic case, the normal-force computation produced very good results, but the friction results, although promising, were not as accurate. Tooth sliding friction strongly affected the signal from the strain gage on the tensionside of the tooth. The compression gage was affected by friction to a much lesser degree. The potential of the method to measure friction force was demonstrated, but further refinement will be required before this technique can be used to measure friction forces dynamically with an acceptable degree of accuracy.

  11. Localized dynamic light scattering: a new approach to dynamic measurements in optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Meller, A; Bar-Ziv, R; Tlusty, T; Moses, E; Stavans, J; Safran, S A

    1998-03-01

    We present a new approach to probing single-particle dynamics that uses dynamic light scattering from a localized region. By scattering a focused laser beam from a micron-size particle, we measure its spatial fluctuations via the temporal autocorrelation of the scattered intensity. We demonstrate the applicability of this approach by measuring the three-dimensional force constants of a single bead and a pair of beads trapped by laser tweezers. The scattering equations that relate the scattered intensity autocorrelation to the particle position correlation function are derived. This technique has potential applications for measurement of biomolecular force constants and probing viscoelastic properties of complex media.

  12. Ammonia quantitative analysis model based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rongfei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, ammonia quantitative analysis based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model was proposed. Al plate anodic gas-ionization sensor was used to obtain the current-voltage (I-V) data. Measurement data was processed by non-linear bistable dynamics model. Results showed that the proposed method quantitatively determined ammonia concentrations. PMID:25975362

  13. Dynamic Calibration and Verification Device of Measurement System for Dynamic Characteristic Coefficients of Sliding Bearing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Runlin; Wei, Yangyang; Shi, Zhaoyang; Yuan, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    The identification accuracy of dynamic characteristics coefficients is difficult to guarantee because of the errors of the measurement system itself. A novel dynamic calibration method of measurement system for dynamic characteristics coefficients is proposed in this paper to eliminate the errors of the measurement system itself. Compared with the calibration method of suspension quality, this novel calibration method is different because the verification device is a spring-mass system, which can simulate the dynamic characteristics of sliding bearing. The verification device is built, and the calibration experiment is implemented in a wide frequency range, in which the bearing stiffness is simulated by the disc springs. The experimental results show that the amplitude errors of this measurement system are small in the frequency range of 10 Hz–100 Hz, and the phase errors increase along with the increasing of frequency. It is preliminarily verified by the simulated experiment of dynamic characteristics coefficients identification in the frequency range of 10 Hz–30 Hz that the calibration data in this frequency range can support the dynamic characteristics test of sliding bearing in this frequency range well. The bearing experiments in greater frequency ranges need higher manufacturing and installation precision of calibration device. Besides, the processes of calibration experiments should be improved. PMID:27483283

  14. Dynamic Calibration and Verification Device of Measurement System for Dynamic Characteristic Coefficients of Sliding Bearing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Runlin; Wei, Yangyang; Shi, Zhaoyang; Yuan, Xiaoyang

    2016-07-30

    The identification accuracy of dynamic characteristics coefficients is difficult to guarantee because of the errors of the measurement system itself. A novel dynamic calibration method of measurement system for dynamic characteristics coefficients is proposed in this paper to eliminate the errors of the measurement system itself. Compared with the calibration method of suspension quality, this novel calibration method is different because the verification device is a spring-mass system, which can simulate the dynamic characteristics of sliding bearing. The verification device is built, and the calibration experiment is implemented in a wide frequency range, in which the bearing stiffness is simulated by the disc springs. The experimental results show that the amplitude errors of this measurement system are small in the frequency range of 10 Hz-100 Hz, and the phase errors increase along with the increasing of frequency. It is preliminarily verified by the simulated experiment of dynamic characteristics coefficients identification in the frequency range of 10 Hz-30 Hz that the calibration data in this frequency range can support the dynamic characteristics test of sliding bearing in this frequency range well. The bearing experiments in greater frequency ranges need higher manufacturing and installation precision of calibration device. Besides, the processes of calibration experiments should be improved.

  15. Electrical characterization of polymer matrix — TiO2 filler composites through isothermal polarization / depolarization currents and I-V tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrakas, Ilias; Triantis, Dimos; Hloupis, George; Moutzouris, Konstantinos

    2014-04-01

    Specimens of polymer matrix — ceramic TiO2 filler composites were prepared. The contribution of the filler content on the electrical conductivity and energy storage properties of the samples was examined. I-V and Isothermal Polarization/Depolarization Current (IPC/IDC) measurements were conducted. Dc conductivity values directly calculated from the I-V curves exhibited excellent agreement with corresponding values derived from the IPC/IDC recordings. Standard models were employed for fitting the IPC/IDC data. In specific, the short and the very long depolarization times were fitted by use of power laws of different slopes, while the intermediate depolarization times were fitted as a sum of three exponential decays. The present study reveals a strong dependence of the depolarization and polarization processes, as well as of the dc conductivity, on the filler concentration.

  16. In-flight measurement of upwind dynamic soaring in albatrosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2016-03-01

    In-flight measurement results on upwind flight of albatrosses using dynamic soaring are presented. It is shown how the birds manage to make progress against the wind on the basis of small-scale dynamic soaring maneuvers. For this purpose, trajectory features, motion quantities and mechanical energy relationships as well as force characteristics are analyzed. The movement on a large-scale basis consists of a tacking type flight technique which is composed of dynamic soaring cycle sequences with alternating orientation to the left and right. It is shown how this is performed by the birds so that they can achieve a net upwind flight without a transversal large-scale movement and how this compares with downwind or across wind flight. Results on upwind dynamic soaring are presented for low and high wind speed cases. It is quantified how much the tacking trajectory length is increased when compared with the beeline distance. The presented results which are based on in-flight measurements of free flying albatrosses were achieved with an in-house developed GPS-signal tracking method yielding the required high precision for the small-scale dynamic soaring flight maneuvers.

  17. Dynamic measurement of temperature using neutron resonance spectroscopy (NRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, D. J.; Asay, B. W.; Bennett, B. I.; Bowman, J. D.; Boat, R. M.; Dickson, P. M.; Henson, B. F.; Hull, L. M.; Idar, D. J.; Laabs, G. W.; London, R. K.; Mace, J. L.; Morgan, G. L.; Murk, D. M.; Rabie, R. L.; Ragan, C. E.; Stacy, H. L.; Yuan, V. W.

    1998-07-01

    Accurate temperature measurements in dynamic systems have been pursued for decades and have usually relied on optical techniques. These approaches are generally hampered by insufficient information regarding the emissivity of the system under study. We are developing NRS techniques to measure temperature in dynamic systems and overcome these limitations. Many neutron resonances have narrow intrinsic Breit-Wigner widths such that the resonance is substantially broadened by the atomic motion even at room temperature. Thus, accurate measurement of the Doppler contribution allows one to infer the material temperature, and for the conditions achieved using standard high explosives, the probe itself is not perturbed by the high temperature and pressure. Experiments are conducted using a pulsed spallation source at LANSCE with time-of-flight measurement of the neutron spectra. In initial experiments, we have demonstrated that measurements with ten percent accuracy are possible. We have fielded dynamic tests, most of which were neutron-flux limited. An overview of the approach and the status of our experimental campaign are discussed.

  18. Dynamic Measurement of Temperature using Neutron Resonance Spectroscopy (NRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, David J.; Asay, B. W.; Bennett, B. I.; Bowman, J. D.; Boat, R. M.; Henson, B. F.; Hixson, R. S.; Hull, L. M.; Laabs, G. W.; London, R. K.; Mace, J. L.; Morgan, G. L.; Murk, D. M.; Rabie, R. L.; Ragan, C. E.; Stacy, H. L.; Yuan, V. W.

    1997-07-01

    Accurate temperature measurements in dynamic systems have been pursued for decades and have usually relied on optical techniques. These approaches are generally hampered by insufficient information regarding the emissivity of the system under study. We are developing NRS techniques to measure temperature in dynamic systems and overcome these limitations. Many neutron resonances have narrow intrinsic Breit-Wigner widths such that the resonance is substantially broadened by the atomic motion even at room temperature. Thus, accurate measurement of the Doppler contribution allows one to infer the material temperature, and for the conditions achieved using standard high explosives, the probe itself is not perturbed by the high temperature and pressure. Experiments are conducted using a pulsed spallation source at LANSCE with time-of-flight measurement of the neutron spectra. In initial experiments, we have demonstrated that measurements with ten percent accuracy are possible. We have fielded dynamic tests, most of which were neutron-flux limited. An overview of the approach and the status of our experimental campaign will be discussed.

  19. Dynamically Reconfigurable Piezoelectric Sensors for Ultrasonic Nonlinearity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirikera, G. R.; Regez, B. A.; Balugun, O.; Zinck, A.; Krishnaswamy, S.

    2009-03-01

    Ultrasonic interaction with fatigue damage in a material can lead to nonlinear ultrasonic harmonic generation. Unfortunately, nonlinear generation is often very weak and measurement sensors need to have a large dynamic range to pick weak second harmonic signals. Furthermore, couplant dependence of the ultrasonic measurements can mask any variations in second harmonic generation due to fatigue damage. To overcome this, a couplant-independent method for ultrasonic nonlinearity measurements was recently proposed by us. This method requires two sets of transducers that can each generate/detect both the fundamental and second harmonic signals. In this paper, we describe a dynamically reconfigurable interdigitated Surface Acoustic Wave transducer mat can effectively be used to generate/receive bom the fundamental and the second harmonic signals. This is achieved using simple external electronic reconfiguration of the signals from a pair of interdigitated transducer arrays.

  20. Unitarity, feedback, interactions—dynamics emergent from repeated measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamirano, Natacha; Corona-Ugalde, Paulina; Mann, Robert B.; Zych, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by the recent efforts to describe the gravitational interaction as a classical channel arising from continuous quantum measurements, we study what types of dynamics can emerge from a collisional model of repeated interactions between a system and a set of ancillae. We show that contingent on the model parameters the resulting dynamics ranges from exact unitarity to arbitrarily fast decoherence (quantum Zeno effect). For a series of measurements the effective dynamics includes feedback-control, which for a composite system yields effective interactions between the subsystems. We quantify the amount of decoherence accompanying such induced interactions, generalizing the lower bound found for the gravitational example. However, by allowing multipartite measurements, we show that interactions can be induced with arbitrarily low decoherence. These results have implications for gravity-inspired decoherence models. Moreover, we show how the framework can include terms beyond the usual second-order approxiation, which can spark new quantum control or simulation protocols. Finally, within our simple approach we re-derive the quantum filtering equations for the different regimes of effective dynamics, which can facilitate new connections between different formulations of open systems.

  1. Pulse train fluorescence technique for measuring triplet state dynamics.

    PubMed

    De Boni, Leonardo; Franzen, Paulo L; Gonçalves, Pablo J; Borissevitch, Iouri E; Misoguti, Lino; Mendonça, Cleber R; Zilio, Sergio C

    2011-05-23

    We report on a method to study the dynamics of triplet formation based on the fluorescence signal produced by a pulse train. Basically, the pulse train acts as sequential pump-probe pulses that precisely map the excited-state dynamics in the long time scale. This allows characterizing those processes that affect the population evolution of the first excited singlet state, whose decay gives rise to the fluorescence. The technique was proven to be valuable to measure parameters of triplet formation in organic molecules. Additionally, this single beam technique has the advantages of simplicity, low noise and background-free signal detection.

  2. Measurements of nuclear spin dynamics by spin-noise spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S.; Kavokin, K. V.; Glazov, M. M.; Vladimirova, M.; Scalbert, D.; Cronenberger, S.; Lemaître, A.; Bloch, J.

    2015-06-15

    We exploit the potential of the spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) for studies of nuclear spin dynamics in n-GaAs. The SNS experiments were performed on bulk n-type GaAs layers embedded into a high-finesse microcavity at negative detuning. In our experiments, nuclear spin polarisation initially prepared by optical pumping is monitored in real time via a shift of the peak position in the electron spin noise spectrum. We demonstrate that this shift is a direct measure of the Overhauser field acting on the electron spin. The dynamics of nuclear spin is shown to be strongly dependent on the electron concentration.

  3. Multiple Point Dynamic Gas Density Measurements Using Molecular Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard; Panda, Jayanta

    1999-01-01

    A nonintrusive technique for measuring dynamic gas density properties is described. Molecular Rayleigh scattering is used to measure the time-history of gas density simultaneously at eight spatial locations at a 50 kHz sampling rate. The data are analyzed using the Welch method of modified periodograms to reduce measurement uncertainty. Cross-correlations, power spectral density functions, cross-spectral density functions, and coherence functions may be obtained from the data. The technique is demonstrated using low speed co-flowing jets with a heated inner jet.

  4. Optical measurements pertaining to Space Station solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holly, S.; Springer, T.; Jefferies, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Station solar dynamic power system is a hybrid of solar photovoltaic and solar dynamic systems, the latter of which uses a parabolic reflector to collect solar energy. This paper describes analytical results of an off-axis solar illumination on the intensity distribution in arbitrary target planes perpendicular to the axis of a parabolic reflector. Such computational capability would make it possible to predict optical intensity distributions resulting from off-axis angles of incident radiation on such target planes. To validate the computer code, experimental optical measurements were performed on the multifaceted paraboloidal collecor at the Solar Dynamic Test Facility at Rockedyne's Santa Susana Field Laboratory. The experimental data compared reasonably well with the calculated values.

  5. Dynamic Measures of RSA Predict Distress and Regulation in Toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Brooker, Rebecca J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined a new method for quantifying individual variability using dynamic measures of Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA). This method incorporated temporal variation into the measurement of RSA and provided information beyond that offered by more traditional quantifications such as difference scores. Dynamic and static measures of change in RSA were tested in relation to displays of emotion and affective behaviors during a fear eliciting episode in a sample of 88 typically-developing and high-fear toddlers during a laboratory visit at age 24 months. Dynamic measures of RSA contributed information that was unique from traditionally-employed, static change scores in predicting high-fear toddlers’ displays of shyness during a fear-eliciting episode. In contrast, RSA change scores offered information related to boldness in non-high-fear children. In addition, several associations included estimates of nonlinear change in RSA. Implications for the study of individual differences in RSA and relations with emotion and emotion regulation are discussed. PMID:20373328

  6. Dynamic analysis of sea wave data measured by LED lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yasukuni; Shimada, Shohei; Shiina, Tatsuo; Baji, Hiroyuki; Takemoto, Sae

    2016-10-01

    Form of sea wave is greatly affected by not just flow and depth of sea water, but also wind blowing on the sea surface. Therefore, measurement and analysis of sea wave motion is of assistance for control and operational safety of boats and ships. Generally, oceanic information is gauged by acoustic and electric wave. But these methods have not provided enough spatial and temporal resolution, and are completely out of touch with the on-site needs. Thus, the LED liar for sea wave measurement has been developed. The dynamic analysis of sea wave image measured by the LED lidar was conducted and the relationship with wind speed was evaluated. In this report, we first present the specifications and measurement methodologies of the LED lidar. Then we describe the actual measurements of sea wave with shallow angle by using this lidar and the results of their analysis.

  7. Large-Scale Hybrid Dynamic Simulation Employing Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Guttromson, Ross T.; Hauer, John F.

    2004-06-30

    Simulation and measurements are two primary ways for power engineers to gain understanding of system behaviors and thus accomplish tasks in system planning and operation. Many well-developed simulation tools are available in today's market. On the other hand, large amount of measured data can be obtained from traditional SCADA systems and currently fast growing phasor networks. However, simulation and measurement are still two separate worlds. There is a need to combine the advantages of simulation and measurements. In view of this, this paper proposes the concept of hybrid dynamic simulation which opens up traditional simulation by providing entries for measurements. A method is presented to implement hybrid simulation with PSLF/PSDS. Test studies show the validity of the proposed hybrid simulation method. Applications of such hybrid simulation include system event playback, model validation, and software validation.

  8. A Dynamic Attitude Measurement System Based on LINS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanzhou; Pan, Quan; Wang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Juanni; Li, Jiang; Jiang, Xiangjun

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic attitude measurement system (DAMS) is developed based on a laser inertial navigation system (LINS). Three factors of the dynamic attitude measurement error using LINS are analyzed: dynamic error, time synchronization and phase lag. An optimal coning errors compensation algorithm is used to reduce coning errors, and two-axis wobbling verification experiments are presented in the paper. The tests indicate that the attitude accuracy is improved 2-fold by the algorithm. In order to decrease coning errors further, the attitude updating frequency is improved from 200 Hz to 2000 Hz. At the same time, a novel finite impulse response (FIR) filter with three notches is designed to filter the dither frequency of the ring laser gyro (RLG). The comparison tests suggest that the new filter is five times more effective than the old one. The paper indicates that phase-frequency characteristics of FIR filter and first-order holder of navigation computer constitute the main sources of phase lag in LINS. A formula to calculate the LINS attitude phase lag is introduced in the paper. The expressions of dynamic attitude errors induced by phase lag are derived. The paper proposes a novel synchronization mechanism that is able to simultaneously solve the problems of dynamic test synchronization and phase compensation. A single-axis turntable and a laser interferometer are applied to verify the synchronization mechanism. The experiments results show that the theoretically calculated values of phase lag and attitude error induced by phase lag can both match perfectly with testing data. The block diagram of DAMS and physical photos are presented in the paper. The final experiments demonstrate that the real-time attitude measurement accuracy of DAMS can reach up to 20″ (1σ) and the synchronization error is less than 0.2 ms on the condition of three axes wobbling for 10 min. PMID:25177802

  9. Influence of Source/Drain Residual Implant Lattice Damage Traps on Silicon Carbide Metal Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor Drain I-V Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjaye, J.; Mazzola, M. S.

    4H-SiC n-channel power metal semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs) with nitrogen n+-implanted source/drain ohmic contact regions, with and without p-buffer layer fabricated on semi-insulating substrates exhibited hysteresis in the drain I-V characteristics of both types of devices at 300 K and 480 K due to traps. However, thermal spectroscopic measurements could detect the traps only in the devices without p-buffer. Device simulation and optical admittance spectroscopy (OAS) are used to resolve the discrepancy in the initial experimental characterization results. Device simulations and OAS suggest that, in addition to the semi-insulating (SI) substrate traps, acceptor traps due to source/drain residual implant lattice damage contribute to the hysteresis observed in the drain I-V characteristics of the devices. Simulations suggest these traps are contained in the lateral straggle of the implanted source and drain regions since the drain current largely flows between the un-gated edges of the source and drain through the volume of lateral straggle traps. Since hysteresis in I-V curves is a manifestation of the presence of defects in devices and since defects degrade carrier mobility and hence device performance, efforts should be made to minimize the source/drain lateral straggle implant damage.

  10. Dynamic viscosity measurement in non-Newtonian graphite nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fei; Wong, Ting Foong; Crivoi, Alexandru

    2012-07-02

    : The effective dynamic viscosity was measured in the graphite water-based nanofluids. The shear thinning non-Newtonian behavior is observed in the measurement. On the basis of the best fitting of the experimental data, the viscosity at zero shear rate or at infinite shear rate is determined for each of the fluids. It is found that increases of the particle volume concentration and the holding time period of the nanofluids result in an enhancement of the effective dynamic viscosity. The maximum enhancement of the effective dynamic viscosity at infinite rate of shear is more than 24 times in the nanofluids held for 3 days with the volume concentration of 4% in comparison with the base fluid. A transmission electron microscope is applied to reveal the morphology of aggregated nanoparticles qualitatively. The large and irregular aggregation of the particles is found in the 3-day fluids in the drying samples. The Raman spectra are extended to characterize the D and G peaks of the graphite structure in the nanofluids. The increasing intensity of the D peak indicates the nanoparticle aggregation growing with the higher concentration and the longer holding time of the nanofluids. The experimental results suggest that the increase on effective dynamic viscosity of nanofluids is related to the graphite nanoparticle aggregation in the fluids.

  11. Investigating dynamical complexity of geomagnetic jerks using various entropy measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios; Potirakis, Stelios; Mandea, Mioara

    2016-06-01

    Recently, many novel concepts originated in dynamical systems or information theory have been developed, partly motivated by specific research questions linked to geosciences, and found a variety of different applications. This continuously extending toolbox of nonlinear time series analysis highlights the importance of the dynamical complexity to understand the behavior of the complex Earth's system and its components. Here, we propose to apply such new approaches, mainly a series of entropy methods to the time series of the geomagnetic field. Two datasets provided by Chambon la Foret (France) and Niemegk (Germany) observatories are considered for analysis to detect dynamical complexity changes associated with geomagnetic jerks, the abrupt changes in the second temporal derivative of the Earth's magnetic field. The results clearly demonstrate the ability of Shannon and Tsallis entropies as well as Fisher information to detect events in a regional manner having identified complexities lower than the background in time intervals when geomagnetic jerks have already been reported in the literature. Additionally, these information measures are directly applicable to the original data without having to derive the secular variation or acceleration from the observatory monthly means. The strength of the proposed analysis to reveal dynamical complexity features associated with geomagnetic jerks can be utilized for analyzing not only ground measurements, but also satellite data, as those provided by the current magnetic field mission of Swarm.

  12. Evaluation of the sensing block method for dynamic force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qinghui; Chen, Hao; Li, Wenzhao; Song, Li

    2017-01-01

    Sensing block method was proposed for the dynamic force measurement by Tanimura et al. in 1994. Comparing with the Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique, it can provide a much longer measuring time for the dynamic properties test of materials. However, the signals recorded by sensing block are always accompanied with additional oscillations. Tanimura et al. discussed the effect of force rising edge on the test results, whereas more research is still needed. In this paper, some more dominant factors have been extracted through dimensional analysis. The finite element simulation has been performed to assess these factors. Base on the analysis and simulation, some valuable results are obtained and some criterions proposed in this paper can be applied in design or selection of the sensing block.

  13. Measuring Predictability of Autonomous Network Transitions into Bursting Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mofakham, Sima; Zochowski, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spontaneous transitions between dynamical modes in a network is of significant importance. These transitions may separate pathological and normal functions of the brain. In this paper, we develop a set of measures that, based on spatio-temporal features of network activity, predict autonomous network transitions from asynchronous to synchronous dynamics under various conditions. These metrics quantify spike-timing distributions within a narrow time window as a function of the relative location of the active neurons. We applied these metrics to investigate the properties of these transitions in excitatory-only and excitatory-and-inhibitory networks and elucidate how network topology, noise level, and cellular heterogeneity affect both the reliability and the timeliness of the predictions. The developed measures can be calculated in real time and therefore potentially applied in clinical situations. PMID:25855975

  14. Measuring predictability of autonomous network transitions into bursting dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mofakham, Sima; Zochowski, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spontaneous transitions between dynamical modes in a network is of significant importance. These transitions may separate pathological and normal functions of the brain. In this paper, we develop a set of measures that, based on spatio-temporal features of network activity, predict autonomous network transitions from asynchronous to synchronous dynamics under various conditions. These metrics quantify spike-timing distributions within a narrow time window as a function of the relative location of the active neurons. We applied these metrics to investigate the properties of these transitions in excitatory-only and excitatory-and-inhibitory networks and elucidate how network topology, noise level, and cellular heterogeneity affect both the reliability and the timeliness of the predictions. The developed measures can be calculated in real time and therefore potentially applied in clinical situations.

  15. Octadentate hydroxypyridinonate (HOPO) ligands for plutonium (i.v.): pharmacokinetics and oral efficacy.

    PubMed

    Durbin, P W; Kullgren, B; Xu, J; Raymond, K N; Hengé-Napoli, M H; Bailly, T; Burgada, R

    2003-01-01

    Linear octadentate spermine based 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) and the mixed ligand, 3,4,3-LI(1,2-Me-3,2-HOPO), are the most effective agents for decorporation of Pu prepared so far; they are effective at low dosage, orally active, and of low toxicity at effective injected dosage. Their pharmacological properties are favourable for in vivo Pu chelation--penetration of extracellular water, useful residence in the circulation, substantial hepato-biliary excretion, low but useful GI absorption, and transitory residence in the kidneys. Reductions of body Pu were significant, compared with controls, when oral administration to normally fed mice (30 or 100 micromol kg(-1)) was delayed as long as 24 h after i.v. Pu injection. The HOPO ligands (10-100 micromol kg(-1)) or CaNa3-DTPA (100 or 300 micromol kg(-1)) were given orally to normally fed mice starting at 4 h after an i.v. Pu injection and continued 5 d per week for 3 weeks. 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) (100 micromol kg(-1)) reduced Pu in skeleton, liver, and body, to 44 +/- 9, 18 +/- 8, and 38 +/- 7% of controls, respectively, reductions significantly greater than with the mixed HOPO ligand or with three times more CaNa3-DTPA.

  16. Inverse I-V Injection Characteristics of ZnO Nanoparticle-Based Diodes.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Paul; Vogel, Stefan; Bonrad, Klaus; von Seggern, Heinz

    2016-08-10

    Simple Al/ZnO(NP)/Au diodes produced by spin coating of ZnO nanoparticle dispersions (ZnO(NP)) on Al/Al2O3 and Au substrates and subsequent Au deposition have been investigated to understand electron injection properties of more complex devices, incorporating ZnO(NP) as injection layer. Inverse I-V characteristics have been observed compared to conventional Al/ZnO(SP)/Au diodes produced by reactive ion sputtering of ZnO. SEM micrographs reveal that the void-containing contact of ZnO(NP) with the bottom Al electrode and the rough morphology of the top Au electrode are likely to be responsible for the observed injection and ejection probabilities of electrons. A simple tunneling model, incorporating the voids, explains the strongly reduced injection currents from Al whereas the top electrode fabricated by vapor deposition of Au onto the nanoparticle topology adopts the inverse ZnO(NP) morphology leading to enlarged injection areas combined with Au-tip landscapes. These tips in contrast to the smooth sputtered ZnO(SP) lead to electric field enhancement and strongly increased injection of electrons in reverse direction. The injected charge piles up at the barrier generated by voids between ZnO(NP) and the bottom electrode forcing a change in the barrier shape and therefore allowing for higher ejection rates. Both effects in combination explain the inverse I-V characteristic of nanoparticle based diodes.

  17. The Extrapolation of High Altitude Solar Cell I(V) Characteristics to AM0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, David B.; Scheiman, David A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Reinke, William; Blankenship, Kurt; Demers, James

    2007-01-01

    The high altitude aircraft method has been used at NASA GRC since the early 1960's to calibrate solar cell short circuit current, ISC, to Air Mass Zero (AMO). This method extrapolates ISC to AM0 via the Langley plot method, a logarithmic extrapolation to 0 air mass, and includes corrections for the varying Earth-Sun distance to 1.0 AU and compensating for the non-uniform ozone distribution in the atmosphere. However, other characteristics of the solar cell I(V) curve do not extrapolate in the same way. Another approach is needed to extrapolate VOC and the maximum power point (PMAX) to AM0 illumination. As part of the high altitude aircraft method, VOC and PMAX can be obtained as ISC changes during the flight. These values can then the extrapolated, sometimes interpolated, to the ISC(AM0) value. This approach should be valid as long as the shape of the solar spectra in the stratosphere does not change too much from AMO. As a feasibility check, the results are compared to AMO I(V) curves obtained using the NASA GRC X25 based multi-source simulator. This paper investigates the approach on both multi-junction solar cells and sub-cells.

  18. Revisiting the Calculation of I/V Profiles in Molecular Junctions Using the Uncertainty Principle.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Berdullas, Nicolás; Mandado, Marcos

    2014-04-17

    Ortiz and Seminario (J. Chem. Phys. 2007, 127, 111106/1-3) proposed some years ago a simple and direct approach to obtain I/V profiles from the combination of ab initio equilibrium electronic structure calculations and the uncertainty principle as an alternative or complementary tool to more sophisticated nonequilibrium Green's functions methods. In this work, we revisit the fundamentals of this approach and reformulate accordingly the expression of the electric current. By analogy to the spontaneous electron decay process in electron transitions, in our revision, the current is calculated upon the relaxing process from the "polarized" state induced by the external electric field to the electronic ground state. The electric current is obtained from the total charge transferred through the molecule and the corresponding electronic energy relaxation. The electric current expression proposed is more general compared with the previous expression employed by Ortiz and Seminario, where the charge variation must be tested among different slabs of atoms at the contact. This new approach has been tested on benzene-1,4-dithiolate attached to different gold clusters that represent the contact with the electrodes. Analysis of the total electron deformation density induced by the external electric voltage and properties associated with the electron deformation orbitals supports the conclusions obtained from the I/V profiles.

  19. I.v. access options for AIDS patients with cytomegalovirus disease.

    PubMed

    Sargent, J; Nixon, E

    In view of changes over the past 2 years in the intravenous (i.v.) management of patients with AIDS and cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease, a small study was carried out at the Kobler Clinic, an HIV treatment centre in London, to examine optimal i.v. access for CMV induction treatment. Thirty lines were analysed over a period of 4 months: 18 were peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and 12 were midline catheters. Each line was monitored and evaluated for reason for choice of line, insertion data, line survival, patient self-administration, patient comfort scores, infection rate, and other difficulties encountered during treatment induction. The study results indicated noticeable differences between PICC and midline catheter performances, although a change in treatment protocol during the study influenced the choice of line used. There were also marked differences from other studies, carried out predominantly in non-HIV patients, when infection rate, dwell time of lines and thrombus formation were compared. Significant changes in practice have been implemented and further clinical studies/research identified.

  20. A universal steady state I-V relationship for membrane current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernyak, Y. B.; Cohen, R. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A purely electrical mechanism for the gating of membrane ionic channel gives rise to a simple I-V relationship for membrane current. Our approach is based on the known presence of gating charge, which is an established property of the membrane channel gating. The gating charge is systematically treated as a polarization of the channel protein which varies with the external electric field and modifies the effective potential through which the ions migrate in the channel. Two polarization effects have been considered: 1) the up or down shift of the whole potential function, and 2) the change in the effective electric field inside the channel which is due to familiar effect of the effective reduction of the electric field inside a dielectric body because of the presence of surface charges on its surface. Both effects are linear in the channel polarization. The ionic current is described by a steady state solution of the Nernst-Planck equation with the potential directly controlled by the gating charge system. The solution describes reasonably well the steady state and peak-current I-V relationships for different channels, and when applied adiabatically, explains the time lag between the gating charge current and the rise of the ionic current. The approach developed can be useful as an effective way to model the ionic currents in axons, cardiac cells and other excitable tissues.

  1. Laser Velocimetry Measurements of Oscillating Airfoil Dynamic Stall Flow Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Velocimetry Measurements of Oscillating Airfoil Dynamic Stall Flow Field By M.S.Chandrasekharal Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics and Fluid Mechanics ...tunnel of the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory(FML) angle information. The other could be used for the at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). It is one of...were on throat is always kept choked so that no disturbances a different traverse mechanism , but this was driven as can propagate upstream into the

  2. Measuring contemporary crustal motions; NASA’s Crustal Dynamics Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frey, H. V.; Bosworth, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    In this article we describe briefly the two space geodetic techniques and how they are used by the Crustal Dynamics Project, show some of the very exciting results that have emerged at the halfway point in the project's life, describe the availability and utilization of the data being collected, and consider what the future may hold when measurement accuracies eventually exceed even those now available and when other international groups become more heavily involved.   

  3. Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-31

    2. REPORT DATE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...WORK UNIT NUMBER 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 31-03-2015...Final March 2013 -- February 2015 Quantifying the Dynamic Ocean Surface Using Underwater Radiometric Measurements N00014-13-1-0352 Yue, Dick K.P

  4. Dynamic CT perfusion measurement in a cardiac phantom.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-10-01

    Widespread clinical implementation of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion has been hampered by its limited accuracy and high radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of a dynamic CT myocardial perfusion technique based on first pass analysis (FPA). To test the FPA technique, a pulsatile pump was used to generate known perfusion rates in a range of 0.96-2.49 mL/min/g. All the known perfusion rates were determined using an ultrasonic flow probe and the known mass of the perfusion volume. FPA and maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion rates were measured using volume scans acquired from a 320-slice CT scanner, and then compared to the known perfusion rates. The measured perfusion using FPA (P(FPA)), with two volume scans, and the maximum slope model (P(MSM)) were related to known perfusion (P(K)) by P(FPA) = 0.91P(K) + 0.06 (r = 0.98) and P(MSM) = 0.25P(K) - 0.02 (r = 0.96), respectively. The standard error of estimate for the FPA technique, using two volume scans, and the MSM was 0.14 and 0.30 mL/min/g, respectively. The estimated radiation dose required for the FPA technique with two volume scans and the MSM was 2.6 and 11.7-17.5 mSv, respectively. Therefore, the FPA technique can yield accurate perfusion measurements using as few as two volume scans, corresponding to approximately a factor of four reductions in radiation dose as compared with the currently available MSM. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that the FPA technique can make accurate dynamic CT perfusion measurements over a range of clinically relevant perfusion rates, while substantially reducing radiation dose, as compared to currently available dynamic CT perfusion techniques.

  5. Effects of thermal annealing on the deep-level defects and I-V characteristics of 200 keV proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. S.; Schoenfeld, D. W.; Chiu, T. T.; Loo, R. Y.

    1980-01-01

    Detailed characterization of deep-level defects and analysis of dark I-V data in 200 keV proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells have been carried out for several proton fluences (5 x 10 to the 11th, 10 to the 12th, and 10 to the 13th P/sq cm), using DLTS, C-V, and I-V measurement techniques. To study the effect of low temperature thermal annealing on the deep-level defect properties, these irradiated samples were annealed in vacuum at 300 C for one hour. Comparison was then made on the measured defect parameters (i.e., defect energy levels and densities) and the dark I-V characteristics for both the annealed and unannealed samples.

  6. Generalized Dynamic Factor Models for Mixed-Measurement Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Kai; Dunson, David B.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we propose generalized Bayesian dynamic factor models for jointly modeling mixed-measurement time series. The framework allows mixed-scale measurements associated with each time series, with different measurements having different distributions in the exponential family conditionally on time-varying latent factor(s). Efficient Bayesian computational algorithms are developed for posterior inference on both the latent factors and model parameters, based on a Metropolis Hastings algorithm with adaptive proposals. The algorithm relies on a Greedy Density Kernel Approximation (GDKA) and parameter expansion with latent factor normalization. We tested the framework and algorithms in simulated studies and applied them to the analysis of intertwined credit and recovery risk for Moody’s rated firms from 1982–2008, illustrating the importance of jointly modeling mixed-measurement time series. The article has supplemental materials available online. PMID:24791133

  7. Generalized Dynamic Factor Models for Mixed-Measurement Time Series.

    PubMed

    Cui, Kai; Dunson, David B

    2014-02-12

    In this article, we propose generalized Bayesian dynamic factor models for jointly modeling mixed-measurement time series. The framework allows mixed-scale measurements associated with each time series, with different measurements having different distributions in the exponential family conditionally on time-varying latent factor(s). Efficient Bayesian computational algorithms are developed for posterior inference on both the latent factors and model parameters, based on a Metropolis Hastings algorithm with adaptive proposals. The algorithm relies on a Greedy Density Kernel Approximation (GDKA) and parameter expansion with latent factor normalization. We tested the framework and algorithms in simulated studies and applied them to the analysis of intertwined credit and recovery risk for Moody's rated firms from 1982-2008, illustrating the importance of jointly modeling mixed-measurement time series. The article has supplemental materials available online.

  8. Investigating dynamical complexity in the magnetosphere using various entropy measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Kalimeri, Maria; Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Eftaxias, Konstantinos

    2009-09-01

    The complex system of the Earth's magnetosphere corresponds to an open spatially extended nonequilibrium (input-output) dynamical system. The nonextensive Tsallis entropy has been recently introduced as an appropriate information measure to investigate dynamical complexity in the magnetosphere. The method has been employed for analyzing Dst time series and gave promising results, detecting the complexity dissimilarity among different physiological and pathological magnetospheric states (i.e., prestorm activity and intense magnetic storms, respectively). This paper explores the applicability and effectiveness of a variety of computable entropy measures (e.g., block entropy, Kolmogorov entropy, T complexity, and approximate entropy) to the investigation of dynamical complexity in the magnetosphere. We show that as the magnetic storm approaches there is clear evidence of significant lower complexity in the magnetosphere. The observed higher degree of organization of the system agrees with that inferred previously, from an independent linear fractal spectral analysis based on wavelet transforms. This convergence between nonlinear and linear analyses provides a more reliable detection of the transition from the quiet time to the storm time magnetosphere, thus showing evidence that the occurrence of an intense magnetic storm is imminent. More precisely, we claim that our results suggest an important principle: significant complexity decrease and accession of persistency in Dst time series can be confirmed as the magnetic storm approaches, which can be used as diagnostic tools for the magnetospheric injury (global instability). Overall, approximate entropy and Tsallis entropy yield superior results for detecting dynamical complexity changes in the magnetosphere in comparison to the other entropy measures presented herein. Ultimately, the analysis tools developed in the course of this study for the treatment of Dst index can provide convenience for space weather

  9. Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Dynamics over High Mountainous Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshev, Zahary Y.; Deleva, Atanaska D.; Dreischuh, Tanja N.; Stoyanov, Dimitar V.

    2010-01-01

    Results of lidar observations on the dynamics of atmospheric layers over the ridge and northeast slope of Vitosha Mountain situated close to Sofia, Bulgaria, are reported and compared with results for layers over surrounding plain and urban zones. Measurements are carried out at 1064 nm wavelength with a lidar range resolution of 15 m, by using one of the aerosol channels of a combined Raman-aerosol lidar based on a powerful Nd:YAG laser. Two cases of distinctly different weather conditions are studied. The mountainous area, situated from 6 km to 12 km away from the lidar station, is scanned reiteratively within 7°-9° slope-angle range. Multiple series of lidar profiles are registered with average time of 2-5 s. Lidar signals are then range corrected and processed statistically. Normalized standard deviation is used as a characteristic of the atmospheric dynamics. The spatial-temporal evolution of atmospheric density fluctuations is shown on colormap plots. Intensive air dynamics over the mountain is revealed, exceeding considerably the one over the plain zone. Peculiarities of the dynamics in the investigated atmospheric domains are discussed. Results obtained show that Vitosha Mountain strongly affects variations of the atmospheric density and stability over large areas.

  10. Scanning transient current study of the I-V stabilization phenomena in silicon detectors irradiated by fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Li, Z.; Sidorov, A.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstrom, G.

    1996-03-01

    Investigation of the I-V stabilization phenomena in neutron irradiated silicon detectors has been carried out using scanning transient current technique (STCT) on non-irradiated PP{sup +}-p-n{sup +} detectors. The PP{sup +}-p-n{sup +} detectors were used to simulate the PP{sup +}-n-n{sup +} detectors irradiated beyond the space charge sign inversion (SCSI). Two mechanisms partially responsible for the I- V stabilization have been identified.

  11. I-V characteristics of the Langmuir probe in flowing afterglow plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shun'ko, E. V.

    2003-04-01

    The specific features of the probe I-V characteristics in flowing-afterglow plasmas are studied experimentally and in theory. As it was found at a probe potential equal to the plasma one, V=0, an electron concentration in a probe vicinity (and a probe current) is decreased due to a predominant outflow of the electrons into an electrical circuit of the probe from the probe vicinity. The expression allowing one to reconstruct the undisturbed-by-probe electron concentration from only experimental data is derived. The reconstructed values of the electron concentration enable one to find from the experiments the semiempiric expressions allowing to describe quantitatively the behavior of the probe I-V characteristics at the electron-attracting as well as at the ion-attracting potential, respectively. The expressions found (both for electron-attracting and ion-attracting potential) include the "separating length," which merely is the Langmuir length with a factor equal to the square root of the electron mass over the ion mass ratio for two-component plasma. The intermediate part of the probe I-V characteristics is discovered for probes operating with afterglow plasmas. This intermediate part is described in terms of the experimental parameter L0 having a dimension of the length (presumably electron-orbital length). The value of the parameter L0 does not depend on plasma parameters to within the ranges of plasma parameter variations for experimentally investigated plasmas as it was found. The experiments were performed with two cylindrical probes of 10 and 25 μm diam and ˜3 mm lengths in the experimentally investigated ranges of the afterglow plasma parameters: 105 cm-3

  12. Hydro-resistive measurement of dynamic lifting strength.

    PubMed

    Pinder, A D; Grieve, D W

    1997-04-01

    A device is described for measuring strength and power outputs of dynamic vertical lifts between heights of 0.4 and 2.2 m. The device is safe, robust, and easily transportable. It consists of a water-filled tube 2 m high and 200 mm internal diameter. The subject pulls vertically on a handle which is connected with flexible wire rope via a series of pulleys to a piston suspended inside the tube. The piston has holes which can be closed with bungs. The drag force is proportional to the square of the velocity. The constant of proportionality can be chosen over a more than 100-fold range and is independent of temperature. Manual force is measured using a strain gauged cantilever over which the rope passes. Rope movement is monitored with a shaft encoder. These devices are sampled synchronously by an interfaced computer. Velocity and power are derived from the measurements of displacement, time and force. The device is highly accurate. Power measurements are not significantly different on two separate days although repetitions on one day show a warming-up effect. This device allows the study of dynamic lifts ranging from slow, high force, quasi-isokinetic lifts to lifts where high velocities and accelerations occur.

  13. Measurements of radiated elastic wave energy from dynamic tensile cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boler, Frances M.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fracture-velocity, microstructure, and fracture-energy barriers in elastic wave radiation during a dynamic fracture was investigated in experiments in which dynamic tensile cracks of two fracture cofigurations of double cantilever beam geometry were propagating in glass samples. The first, referred to as primary fracture, consisted of fractures of intact glass specimens; the second configuration, referred to as secondary fracture, consisted of a refracture of primary fracture specimens which were rebonded with an intermittent pattern of adhesive to produce variations in fracture surface energy along the crack path. For primary fracture cases, measurable elastic waves were generated in 31 percent of the 16 fracture events observed; the condition for radiation of measurable waves appears to be a local abrupt change in the fracture path direction, such as occurs when the fracture intersects a surface flaw. For secondary fractures, 100 percent of events showed measurable elastic waves; in these fractures, the ratio of radiated elastic wave energy in the measured component to fracture surface energy was 10 times greater than for primary fracture.

  14. Measuring methods for evaluation of dynamic tyre properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmoch, Klaus

    1992-01-01

    Extensive measuring methods for macroscopic assessment of tire properties, based on classical mechanics and dynamics, are presented. Theoretical results and measurements were included in an expert system, where the pneumatic tire is represented as a wheel with particular elastic properties. For geometry measurement of the tire surface, a laser scanner test bed was used. The tire was excited with a shaker in order to obtain acceleration signals and for estimating global parameters such as stiffness, damping, and nonlinearity influence, which is found to increase with excitation force. Tire dynamic behavior was examined by low velocities with microscopy and infrared thermography, in order to quantify temperature augmentation and tangential and normal forces in the contact area; the slip stick oscillations were recorded on microphones. A drum test bed was used for studying tire behavior at high velocities and the tire vehicle interaction was established with acceleration measurements; nonuniformity influence on rolling stability was ascertained. The results were compared with data from theoretical models, which are pinpoint mass systems or multiple bodies problems.

  15. Novel dynamic measures of emetic behavior in musk shrews

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Charles C.; Wang, Hong; Estival, Laureline; Meyers, Kelly; Magnusson, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    The emetic reflex occurs as a pattern of motor responses produced by a network of neurons in the hindbrain. Despite an understanding of the sequence of motor outputs that form an emetic episode (EE), the variability in the dynamics of multiple EEs across time remains a mystery. Nearly all clinical studies rely on once a day patient recall of total amount of vomiting, and preclinical studies frequently report only the total number of EE per unit time. The aim of the current study was to develop novel temporal measures of emetic activation in a preclinical model. Male and female musk shrews were tested with prototypical emetic stimuli: motion exposure (1 Hz), nicotine (5 mg/kg, sc), and copper sulfate (120 mg/kg, ig). New emetic measures included duration (time from first to last episode), rate, standard deviation of the inter-episode interval (SD-I), and a survival analysis of emetic latency (analyzed with Cox regression). Behavioral patterns associated with emesis were also assessed using statistical temporal pattern (T-pattern) analysis to measure nausea-like behaviors (e.g., immobility). The emetic stimuli produced different levels of total EE number, duration, rate, and SD-I. A typical antiemetic, the neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist CP-99,994, suppressed the number of EEs but was less effective for reducing the duration or prolonging the emetic latency. Overall, the current study shows the use of novel dynamic behavioral measures to more comprehensively assess emesis and the impact of therapies. PMID:23953843

  16. Measurement of dynamic task related functional networks using MEG.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, George C; Tewarie, Prejaas K; Colclough, Giles L; Gascoyne, Lauren E; Hunt, Benjamin A E; Morris, Peter G; Woolrich, Mark W; Brookes, Matthew J

    2017-02-01

    The characterisation of dynamic electrophysiological brain networks, which form and dissolve in order to support ongoing cognitive function, is one of the most important goals in neuroscience. Here, we introduce a method for measuring such networks in the human brain using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Previous network analyses look for brain regions that share a common temporal profile of activity. Here distinctly, we exploit the high spatio-temporal resolution of MEG to measure the temporal evolution of connectivity between pairs of parcellated brain regions. We then use an ICA based procedure to identify networks of connections whose temporal dynamics covary. We validate our method using MEG data recorded during a finger movement task, identifying a transient network of connections linking somatosensory and primary motor regions, which modulates during the task. Next, we use our method to image the networks which support cognition during a Sternberg working memory task. We generate a novel neuroscientific picture of cognitive processing, showing the formation and dissolution of multiple networks which relate to semantic processing, pattern recognition and language as well as vision and movement. Our method tracks the dynamics of functional connectivity in the brain on a timescale commensurate to the task they are undertaking.

  17. Measurements of granular flow dynamics with high speed digital images

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.

    1994-12-31

    The flow of granular materials is common to many industrial processes. This dissertation suggests and validates image processing algorithms applied to high speed digital images to measure the dynamics (velocity, temperature and volume fraction) of dry granular solids flowing down an inclined chute under the action of gravity. Glass and acrylic particles have been used as granular solids in the experiment. One technique utilizes block matching for spatially averaged velocity measurements of the glass particles. This technique is compared with the velocity measurement using an optic probe which is a conventional granular flow velocity measurement device. The other technique for measuring the velocities of individual acrylic particles is developed with correspondence using a Hopfield network. This technique first locates the positions of particles with pattern recognition techniques, followed by a clustering technique, which produces point patterns. Also, several techniques are compared for particle recognition: synthetic discriminant function (SDF), minimum average correlation energy (MACE) filter, modified minimum average correlation energy (MMACE) filter and variance normalized correlation. The author proposes an MMACE filter which improves generalization of the MACE filter by adjusting the amount of averaged spectrum of training images in the spectrum whitening stages of the MACE filter. Variance normalized correlation is applied to measure the velocity and temperature of flowing glass particles down the inclined chute. The measurements are taken for the steady and wavy flow and qualitatively compared with a theoretical model of granular flow.

  18. High spatial resolution measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkey, J. B.; Burnham, E. A.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    High spatial resolution experimental tube wall pressure measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena are presented. The projectile resembles the centerbody of a ramjet and travels supersonically through a tube filled with a combustible gaseous mixture, with the tube acting as the outer cowling. Pressure data are recorded as the projectile passes by sensors mounted in the tube wall at various locations along the tube. Data obtained by using a special highly instrumented section of tube has allowed the recording of gas dynamic phenomena with a spatial resolution on the order of one tenth the projectile length. High spatial resolution tube wall pressure data from the three regimes of propulsion studied to date (subdetonative, transdetonative, and superdetonative) are presented and reveal the 3D character of the flowfield induced by projectile fins and the canting of the projectile body relative to the tube wall. Also presented for comparison to the experimental data are calculations made with an inviscid, 3D CFD code.

  19. The effect of gradually constricted channel on the I-V characteristics of graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanella, Fernando; Nobrega, K. Z.; Dartora, C. A.

    2016-10-01

    Ideal graphene is a gapless semiconductor consisting of a single layer of carbon atoms regularly arranged in a honeycomb lattice having infinite spatial extent in the (x,y)-plane, in which electrons behave as Dirac massless fermions. Even neglecting interactions with the anchoring substrate, a graphene sheet in real world has finite extent, leading to distinctive features in the conductivity of a given sample. In this letter we study the effect of a gradual channel constriction in graphene nanoribbons on their I-V characteristics, using non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. The constriction width and the border cutting angle are the main parameters to be varied. We found that transmission through the channel is considerably affected by these parameters, presenting sharp peaks at specific energies, which can be attributed to a resonance due to the tuning of energy eigenvalues.

  20. Immunolocalisation pattern of complex I-V in ageing human retina: Correlation with mitochondrial ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Nag, Tapas Chandra; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2016-11-01

    Earlier studies reported accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations in ageing and age-related macular degeneration. To know about the mitochondrial status with age, we examined immunoreactivity (IR) to markers of mitochondria (anti-mitochondrial antibody and voltage-dependent anion channel-1) and complex I-V (that mediate oxidative phosphorylation, OXPHOS) in donor human retinas (age: 19-94years; N=26; right eyes). In all samples, at all ages, IR to anti-mitochondrial antibody and voltage-dependent anion channel-1 was prominent in photoreceptor cells. Between second and seventh decade of life, strong IR to complex I-V was present in photoreceptors over macular to peripheral retina. With progressive ageing, the photoreceptors showed a decrease in complex I-IR (subunit NDUFB4) at eighth decade, and a weak or absence of IR in 10 retinas between ninth and tenth decade. Patchy IR to complex III and complex IV was detected at different ages. IR to ND1 (complex I) and complex II and V remained unaltered with ageing. Nitrosative stress (evaluated by IR to a nitro-tyrosine antibody) was found in photoreceptors. Superoxide dismutase-2 was found upregulated in photoreceptors with ageing. Mitochondrial ultrastructure was examined in two young retinas with intact complex IR and six aged retinas whose counterparts showed weak to absence of IR. Observations revealed irregular, photoreceptor inner segment mitochondria in aged maculae and mid-peripheral retina between eighth and ninth decade; many cones possessed autophagosomes with damaged mitochondria, indicating age-related alterations. A trend in age-dependent reduction of complex I-IR was evident in aged photoreceptors, whereas patchy complex IV-IR (subunits I and II) was age-independent, suggesting that the former is prone to damage with ageing perhaps due to oxidative stress. These changes in OXPHOS system may influence the energy budget of human photoreceptors, affecting their viability.

  1. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation measured with coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy (CHS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Tgavalekos, Kristen T.; Fantini, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    Coherent Hemodynamics Spectroscopy (CHS) is a novel technique for non-invasive measurements of local microcirculation quantities such as the capillary blood transit times and dynamic autoregulation. The basis of CHS is to measure, for instance with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), peripheral coherent hemodynamic changes that are induced by controlled perturbations in the systemic mean arterial pressure (MAP). In this study, the MAP perturbation was induced by the fast release of two pneumatic cuffs placed around the subject's thighs after they were kept inflated (at 200 mmHg) for two minutes. The resulting transient changes in cerebral oxy- (O) and deoxy- (D) hemoglobin concentrations measured with NIRS on the prefrontal cortex are then described by a novel hemodynamic model, from which quantifiable parameters such as the capillary blood transit time and a cutoff frequency for cerebral autoregulation are obtained. We present results on eleven healthy volunteers in a protocol involving measurements during normal breathing and during hyperventilation, which is known to cause a hypocapnia-induced increase in cerebral autoregulation. The measured capillary transit time was unaffected by hyperventilation (normal breathing: 1.1±0.1 s; hyperventilation: 1.1±0.1 s), whereas the cutoff frequency of autoregulation, which increases for higher autoregulation efficiency, was indeed found to be significantly greater during hyperventilation (normal breathing: 0.017±0.002 Hz; hyperventilation: 0.034±0.005 Hz). These results provide a validation of local cerebral autoregulation measurements with the new technique of CHS.

  2. Measurements and analysis of end-to-end Internet dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Paxson, Vern

    1997-04-01

    Accurately characterizing end-to-end Internet dynamics - the performance that a user actually obtains from the lengthy series of network links that comprise a path through the Internet - is exceptionally difficult, due to the network`s immense heterogeneity. At the heart of this work is a `measurement framework` in which a number of sites around the Internet host a specialized measurement service. By coordinating `probes` between pairs of these sites one can measure end-to-end behavior along O(N2) paths for a framework consisting of N sites. Consequently, one obtains a superlinear scaling that allows measuring a rich cross-section of Internet behavior without requiring huge numbers of observation points. 37 sites participated in this study, allowing the author to measure more than 1,000 distinct Internet paths. The first part of this work looks at the behavior of end-to-end routing: the series of routers over which a connection`s packets travel. Based on 40,000 measurements made using this framework, the author analyzes: routing `pathologies` such as loops, outages, and flutter; the stability of routes over time; and the symmetry of routing along the two directions of an end-to-end path. The author finds that pathologies increased significantly over the course of 1995 and that Internet paths are heavily dominated by a single route. The second part of this work studies end-to-end Internet packet dynamics. The author analyzes 20,000 TCP transfers of 100 Kbyte each to investigate the performance of both the TCP endpoints and the Internet paths. The measurements used for this part of the study are much richer than those for the first part, but require a great degree of attention to issues of calibration, which are addressed by applying self-consistency checks to the measurements whenever possible. The author finds that packet filters are capable of a wide range of measurement errors, some of which, if undetected, can significantly taint subsequent analysis.

  3. Statistical prediction of dynamic distortion of inlet flow using minimum dynamic measurement. An application to the Melick statistical method and inlet flow dynamic distortion prediction without RMS measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweikhard, W. G.; Chen, Y. S.

    1986-01-01

    The Melick method of inlet flow dynamic distortion prediction by statistical means is outlined. A hypothetic vortex model is used as the basis for the mathematical formulations. The main variables are identified by matching the theoretical total pressure rms ratio with the measured total pressure rms ratio. Data comparisons, using the HiMAT inlet test data set, indicate satisfactory prediction of the dynamic peak distortion for cases with boundary layer control device vortex generators. A method for the dynamic probe selection was developed. Validity of the probe selection criteria is demonstrated by comparing the reduced-probe predictions with the 40-probe predictions. It is indicated that the the number of dynamic probes can be reduced to as few as two and still retain good accuracy.

  4. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of the Wind Velocity from Minisodar Measurement Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakhin, V. A.; Cherepanov, O. S.; Shamanaeva, L. G.

    2016-04-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of the three wind velocity components in the atmospheric boundary layer is analyzed on the basis of Doppler minisodar measurements. The data were processed and analyzed with the help of robust nonparametric methods based on the weighted maximum likelihood method and classical methods. Distribution laws were obtained for each wind velocity component. There are outliers in the distribution functions; both right and left asymmetry of the distributions are observed. For the x- and ycomponents, the width of the distribution increases as the observation altitude is increased, but the maximum of the distribution function decreases, which is in agreement with the data available in the literature. For the zcomponents the width of the distribution remains practically constant, but the value of the maximum also decreases with altitude. Analysis of the hourly semidiurnal dynamics showed that all three components have maxima in the morning and evening hours. For the y- and z-components the maxima in the evening hours are more strongly expressed than in the morning hours. For the x- and y-components the horizontal wind shear is closely tracked in the evening hours. It is shown that adaptive estimates on the efficiency significantly exceed the classical parametric estimates and allow one to analyze the spatiotemporal dynamics of the wind velocity, and reveal jets and detect wind shears.

  5. Quantitative Fluorescent Speckle Microscopy (QFSM) to Measure Actin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Michelle C.; Besson, Sebastien; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative Fluorescent Speckle Microscopy (QFSM) is a live cell imaging method to analyze the dynamics of macromolecular assemblies with high spatial and temporal resolution. Its greatest successes were in the analysis of actin filament and adhesion dynamics in the context of cell migration and microtubule dynamics in interphase and the meotic/mitotic spindle. Here, we focus on the former application to illustrate the procedures of FSM imaging and the computational image processing that extracts quantitative information from these experiments. QFSM is advantageous over other methods because it measures the movement and turnover kinetics of the actin filament (F-actin) network in living cells across the entire field of view. Experiments begin with microinjection of fluorophore-labeled actin into cells, which generate a low ratio of fluorescently-labeled:endogenous unlabeled actin monomers. Spinning disk confocal or wide-field imaging then visualizes fluorophore clusters (2–8 actin monomers) within the assembled F-actin network as speckles. QFSM software identifies and computationally tracks and utilizes the location, appearance, and disappearance of speckles to derive network flows and maps of the rate of filament assembly and disassembly. PMID:23042526

  6. Modulation measuring profilometry with cross grating projection and single shot for dynamic 3D shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mingteng; Su, Xianyu; Cao, Yiping; You, Zhisheng; Zhong, Min

    2016-12-01

    In order to determine Dynamic 3-D shape with vertical measurement mode, a fast modulation measuring profilometry (MMP) with a cross grating projection and single shot is proposed. Unlike the previous methods, in our current projection system, one cross grating is projected by a special projection lens consisting of a common projection lens and a cylindrical lens. Due to the characteristics of cylindrical lens, the image of the vertical component and the horizontal component of the cross grating is separated in the image space, and the measuring range is just the space between the two image planes. Through a beam splitter, the CCD camera can coaxially capture the fringe pattern of the cross grating modulated by the testing object's shape. In one fringe pattern, by applying Fourier transform, filtering and inverse Fourier transform, the modulation corresponding to the vertical and horizontal components of the cross grating can be obtained respectively. Then the 3-D shape of the object can be reconstructed according to the mapping relationship between modulation and height, which was established by calibration process in advance. So the 3-D shape information can be recorded at the same speed of the frame rate of the CCD camera. This paper gives the principle of the proposed method and the set-up for measuring experiment and system calibration. The 3-D shape of a still object and a dynamic process of liquid vortex were measured and reconstructed in the experiments, and the results proved the method's feasibility. The advantage of the proposed method is that only one fringe pattern is needed to extract the modulation distribution and to reconstruct the 3-D shape of the object. Therefore, the proposed method can achieve high speed measurement and vertical measurement without shadow and occlusion. It can be used in the dynamic 3-D shape measurement and vibration analysis.

  7. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y L; Qin, J G; Chen, R; Zhao, P D; Lu, F Y

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m(2)/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  8. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. L.; Qin, J. G.; Chen, R.; Zhao, P. D.; Lu, F. Y.

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m2/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  9. Dynamic measurements of actuators driven by AlN layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacperski, Jacek; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Leon, Sergio Camacho; Nieradko, Lukasz; Jozwik, Michal; Gorecki, Christophe

    2005-09-01

    Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems are nowadays frequently used in many fields of industry. The number of their applications increase and their functions became more complex and demanding. Therefore precise knowledge about their static (shape, deformations, stresses) and dynamic (resonance frequencies, amplitude and phase of vibration) properties is necessary. Two beam laser interferometry is one of the most popular testing methods of micromechanical elements as a non-contact, high-accurate method allowing full-field measurement. First part of the paper present microbeam actuators designed for MEMS/MOEMS applications. The proposed structures are the straight silicon microbeams formed by KOH etching of Si wafer. Aluminium nitride (AlN) thin films are promising materials for many acoustic and optic applications in MEMS field. In the proposed architecture the actuation layer is sandwiched between two metal electrodes on the top of beam. In the second part we describe the methodology of the actuator characterization. These methods applied are: stroboscopic interferometry and active interferometry (LCOS SLM is used as a reference surface in Twyman-Green interferometer). Moreover some results of FEM analysis of the sample are shown and compared with experimental results. Dynamic measurements validate the design and simulations, and provide information for optimization of the actuator manufacturing process.

  10. Optimization of dynamic measurement of receptor kinetics by wavelet denoising.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Nathaniel M; Reilhac, Anthonin; Chio, Tat C; Selesnick, Ivan

    2006-04-01

    The most important technical limitation affecting dynamic measurements with PET is low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Several reports have suggested that wavelet processing of receptor kinetic data in the human brain can improve the SNR of parametric images of binding potential (BP). However, it is difficult to fully assess these reports because objective standards have not been developed to measure the tradeoff between accuracy (e.g. degradation of resolution) and precision. This paper employs a realistic simulation method that includes all major elements affecting image formation. The simulation was used to derive an ensemble of dynamic PET ligand (11C-raclopride) experiments that was subjected to wavelet processing. A method for optimizing wavelet denoising is presented and used to analyze the simulated experiments. Using optimized wavelet denoising, SNR of the four-dimensional PET data increased by about a factor of two and SNR of three-dimensional BP maps increased by about a factor of 1.5. Analysis of the difference between the processed and unprocessed means for the 4D concentration data showed that more than 80% of voxels in the ensemble mean of the wavelet processed data deviated by less than 3%. These results show that a 1.5x increase in SNR can be achieved with little degradation of resolution. This corresponds to injecting about twice the radioactivity, a maneuver that is not possible in human studies without saturating the PET camera and/or exposing the subject to more than permitted radioactivity.

  11. Hysteresis effects on I-V relations in a single crystal of the Cu-In-Te system with two mobile ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, R.; Arranz, A.

    2013-02-01

    Three slices of the same In-rich chalcopyrite single crystal ingot of the Cu-In-Te system with different compositions and stoichiometric deviations are studied by means of electrical measurements. The slices are mixed electronic and ionic conductors, and under a constant applied voltage and under dark conditions, variations of the current intensity with time are observed due to ionic motion. The measuring time was 25, or 300 s, in measurements carried out subsequently two months later. Symmetric electrodes formed by graphite paint are used on both sides of the samples. The electrode/semiconductor/electrode solid-state device does not block the electrons, while it blocks the ions at the semiconductor/electrode interface. Nonlinear I-V relations and different hysteresis effects are obtained, relating the different ionic mobilities to the measuring time. To understand the different I-V relations and hysteresis cycles, a two-mobile-ion framework is applied. The effect of ion motion in the electronic current and the voltage drop at the semiconductor/electrode interface, due to ionic accumulation, are studied. The different results in each sample can only be explained by taking into account the motion of two different ions, and the different compositions and stoichiometric deviations of the slices. The understanding and, above all, the control of the ionic motion in In-rich chalcopyrites could be the key to improve the reproducibility of solar cell efficiency.

  12. Levels of heroin and its metabolites in blood and brain extracellular fluid after i.v. heroin administration to freely moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Gottås, A; Øiestad, E L; Boix, F; Vindenes, V; Ripel, Å; Thaulow, C H; Mørland, J

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Heroin, with low affinity for μ-opioid receptors, has been considered to act as a prodrug. In order to study the pharmacokinetics of heroin and its active metabolites after i.v. administration, we gave a bolus injection of heroin to rats and measured the concentration of heroin and its metabolites in blood and brain extracellular fluid (ECF). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH After an i.v. bolus injection of heroin to freely moving Sprague–Dawley rats, the concentrations of heroin and metabolites in blood samples from the vena jugularis and in microdialysis samples from striatal brain ECF were measured by ultraperformance LC-MS/MS. KEY RESULTS Heroin levels decreased very fast, both in blood and brain ECF, and could not be detected after 18 and 10 min respectively. 6-Monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) increased very rapidly, reaching its maximal concentrations after 2.0 and 4.3 min, respectively, and falling thereafter. Morphine increased very slowly, reaching its maximal levels, which were six times lower than the highest 6-MAM concentrations, after 12.6 and 21.3 min, with a very slow decline during the rest of the experiment and only surpassing 6-MAM levels at least 30 min after injection. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS After an i.v. heroin injection, 6-MAM was the predominant opioid present shortly after injection and during the first 30 min, not only in the blood but also in rat brain ECF. 6-MAM might therefore mediate most of the effects observed shortly after heroin intake, and this finding questions the general assumption that morphine is the main and most important metabolite of heroin. PMID:23865556

  13. Accurately measuring dynamic coefficient of friction in ultraform finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Dennis; Echaves, Samantha; Pidgeon, Brendan; Travis, Nathan; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    UltraForm Finishing (UFF) is a deterministic sub-aperture computer numerically controlled grinding and polishing platform designed by OptiPro Systems. UFF is used to grind and polish a variety of optics from simple spherical to fully freeform, and numerous materials from glasses to optical ceramics. The UFF system consists of an abrasive belt around a compliant wheel that rotates and contacts the part to remove material. This work aims to accurately measure the dynamic coefficient of friction (μ), how it changes as a function of belt wear, and how this ultimately affects material removal rates. The coefficient of friction has been examined in terms of contact mechanics and Preston's equation to determine accurate material removal rates. By accurately predicting changes in μ, polishing iterations can be more accurately predicted, reducing the total number of iterations required to meet specifications. We have established an experimental apparatus that can accurately measure μ by measuring triaxial forces during translating loading conditions or while manufacturing the removal spots used to calculate material removal rates. Using this system, we will demonstrate μ measurements for UFF belts during different states of their lifecycle and assess the material removal function from spot diagrams as a function of wear. Ultimately, we will use this system for qualifying belt-wheel-material combinations to develop a spot-morphing model to better predict instantaneous material removal functions.

  14. Dynamic wall shear stress measurements in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amili, Omid; Soria, Julio

    2010-11-01

    To quantify and understand the dynamics of near wall momentum transfer, high spatial resolution, time-resolved measurements of wall shear stress distribution are essential. In this study, a film-based shear stress sensor has been used to measure the time-resolved local wall shear stress distribution in a turbulent channel flow. Measurements have been undertaken in a turbulent channel flow at Reynolds numbers up to 130,000 based on the bulk velocity and channel height. The measured fluctuating wall shear stress distribution provides spatio-temporal information of the characteristics of near wall structures by detecting their footprints. The span-wise extent of the positive two-point correlation of the stream-wise shear stress fluctuations provides the average width in the order of 100 wall units for the near-wall coherent structures. An investigation of the topological features of the velocity gradient and rate of strain tensors enables us to show an intrinsic characteristic of the near wall flow, which follows a two-dimensional flow pattern.

  15. Reinforcement learning for partially observable dynamic processes: adaptive dynamic programming using measured output data.

    PubMed

    Lewis, F L; Vamvoudakis, Kyriakos G

    2011-02-01

    Approximate dynamic programming (ADP) is a class of reinforcement learning methods that have shown their importance in a variety of applications, including feedback control of dynamical systems. ADP generally requires full information about the system internal states, which is usually not available in practical situations. In this paper, we show how to implement ADP methods using only measured input/output data from the system. Linear dynamical systems with deterministic behavior are considered herein, which are systems of great interest in the control system community. In control system theory, these types of methods are referred to as output feedback (OPFB). The stochastic equivalent of the systems dealt with in this paper is a class of partially observable Markov decision processes. We develop both policy iteration and value iteration algorithms that converge to an optimal controller that requires only OPFB. It is shown that, similar to Q -learning, the new methods have the important advantage that knowledge of the system dynamics is not needed for the implementation of these learning algorithms or for the OPFB control. Only the order of the system, as well as an upper bound on its "observability index," must be known. The learned OPFB controller is in the form of a polynomial autoregressive moving-average controller that has equivalent performance with the optimal state variable feedback gain.

  16. Diagnosing feline infectious peritonitis using the Sysmex XT-2000iV based on frozen supernatants from cavitary effusions.

    PubMed

    Stranieri, Angelica; Paltrinieri, Saverio; Giordano, Alessia

    2017-02-01

    The delta total nucleated cells (ΔTNC) measurement with the Sysmex XT-2000iV (Sysmex Europe, Norderstedt, Germany) has high diagnostic accuracy on effusions in feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) cases, but the test can be performed only on fresh samples. We evaluated whether supernatants from effusions retain the ability to induce cell clumping and assessed the diagnostic accuracy of this modified ΔTNC method. Effusions were collected from FIP cats ( n = 19) and from cats with other diseases ( n = 15). ΔTNC was measured on fresh samples and on frozen-thawed supernatants after the addition of feline blood at 1:10 dilution. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed at the cutoffs of suggestive of FIP (ΔTNC = 1.7) and consistent with FIP (ΔTNC = 3.4). The influence of the protein content, number of added cells, and magnitude of dilution were also investigated. Specificity and positive predictive value were 100% for both the methods. Sensitivity and negative predictive value were higher for the modified ΔTNC (84.2% and 83.3%, respectively, at the cutoff of 1.7; 78.9% and 78.9%, respectively, at the cutoff of 3.4) than for the ΔTNC on fresh samples (78.6% and 81.3%, respectively, at the cutoff of 1.7; 57.1% and 68.4%, respectively, at the cutoff of 3.4). Protein content, total cell count of the added blood, and magnitude of dilutions did not influence the results. Supernatants of frozen effusions from FIP cats retain the ability to induce cell clumping, thus the modified ΔTNC measurement is a reliable tool to diagnose FIP on samples that cannot be analyzed immediately.

  17. MEASURING THE MASS OF 4UO900-40 DYNAMICALLY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, J. F.; Etzel, Paul B.; Boyd, Patricia T.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate measurements of neutron star masses are needed to constrain the equation of state of neutron star matter - of importance to both particle physics and the astrophysics of neutron stars - and to identify the evolutionary track of the progenitor stars that form neutron stars. The best measured values of the mass of 4UO900-40 (= Vela XR-l), 1.86 +/- 0.16 Msun (Barziv et al. 2001) and 1.93 +/- 0.20 Msun (Abubekerov et al. 2004), make it a leading candidate for the most massive neutron star known. The direct relationship between the maximum mass of neutron stars and the equation of state of ultra-dense matter makes 4UO900-40 an important neutron star mass to determine accurately. The confidence interval on previous mass estimates, obtained from observations that include parameters determined by non-dynamical methods, are not small enough to significantly restrict possible equations of state. We describe here a purely dynamical method for determining the mass of 4UO900-40, an X-ray pulsar, using the reprocessed UV pulses emitted by its BO.5Ib companion. One can derive the instantaneous radial velocity of each component by simultaneous X-ray and UV observations at the two quadratures of the system. The Doppler shift caused by the primary's rotational velocity and the illumination pattern of the X-rays on the primary, two of the three principal contributors to the uncertainty on the derived mass of the neutron star, almost exactly cancel by symmetry in this method. A heuristic measurement of the mass of 4UO900-40 using observations obtained previously with the High Speed Photometer on HST is given in Appendix A.

  18. Dynamic light-scattering measurement comparability of nanomaterial suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, Carmen; Angelstorf, Judith; Bienert, Ralf; Burkart, Corinna; Gabsch, Stephan; Giebner, Sabrina; Haase, Andrea; Hellack, Bryan; Hollert, Henner; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin; Jungmann, Dirk; Kaminski, Heinz; Luch, Andreas; Maes, Hanna M.; Nogowski, André; Oetken, Matthias; Schaeffer, Andreas; Schiwy, Andreas; Schlich, Karsten; Stintz, Michael; von der Kammer, Frank; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A. J.

    2014-02-01

    Increased use of nanomaterials in everyday products leads to their environmental release and therefore, the information need on their fate and behaviour. Nanomaterials have to be suspended with high repeatability and comparability for studies on environmental effects. They also have to be well characterised with a focus on the state of agglomeration and particle size distribution. Dynamic light-scattering (DLS) is a common technique used for these measurements. If suspensions are prepared in different laboratories, then concern has risen about the comparability of the measured results, especially when different DLS instruments are used. Therefore, for quality assurance, a round-robin test was conducted to assess the comparability of different DLS instruments and a dispersion protocol in ten independent laboratories. Polystyrene and TiO2 were chosen as test (nano)materials. For the comparability of the DLS instruments, the average sizes of the PSL and a stabilised TiO2 suspension were measured. The measured average hydrodynamic diameter shows an overall good inter-laboratory comparability. For the PSL suspension, an average hydrodynamic diameter of 201 ± 13 nm and for the TiO2 suspension an average diameter of 224 ± 24 nm were detected. For the TiO2 suspension that was prepared at each laboratory following an established suspension preparation protocol, an average hydrodynamic diameter of 211 ± 11 nm was detected. The measured average particle size (mode) increased up to 284 nm with a high standard deviation of 119 nm if the preparation protocol could not established and different procedures or different equipment were employed. This study shows that no significant differences between the employed DLS instrument types were determined. It was also shown that comparable measurements and suspension preparation could be achieved if well-defined suspension preparation protocols and comparable equipment can be used.

  19. On the I-V characteristics of contacts made of Al/Ti:W films on amorphized (100)Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, S.; Komem, Y.

    1989-12-01

    The effect of Ar ion implantation energy to amorphize the (100)Si substrate and heat treatments on the I-V characteristics was studied. It was found that the electrical resistance of the contacts increased as a result of increasing the ion implantation energy, the heat treatment temperature, and time. The I-V characteristics of the contacts are analyzed with a model of electrical conductivity in amorphous solids. Based on this model and the experimental results, the distance between two adjacent ionized defects that are active in the electrical conductivity, was calculated. The effect of ion implantation energy and the heat treatments on the I-V characteristics are correlated to the microstructural and compositional alterations in the amorphous Si region of the contacts.

  20. Light regulated I-V hysteresis loop of Ag/BiFeO3/FTO thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lujun; Sun, Bai; Zhao, Wenxi; Li, Hongwei; Chen, Peng

    2017-01-01

    A hysteresis loop of current-voltage characteristics based multiferroic BiFeO3 nanoribbons memory device is observed. Moreover, the white-light can greatly regulate both the current-voltage hysteresis loop and the ferroelectric hysteresis loop. The stored space charges within the electrodes/BiFeO3 interface can lead to hysteresis-type I-V characteristics of Ag/BiFeO3/FTO devices. The white-light controlled I-V loop and ferroelectric loop result from photon-generated carries. Since the I-V hysteresis loop and ferroelectric hysteresis loop have a potential application prospect to the memory devices, these two white-light controlled the hysteresis loops curves are likely to provide promising opportunity for developing the multi-functional memory devices.

  1. Measurement of dynamic surface tension by mechanically vibrated sessile droplets.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Shuichi; Yamauchi, Satoko; Yoshitake, Yumiko; Nagumo, Ryo; Mori, Hideki; Kajiya, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of liquids using mechanically vibrated sessile droplets. Under continuous mechanical vibration, the shape of the deformed droplet was fitted by numerical analysis, taking into account the force balance at the drop surface and the momentum equation. The surface tension was determined by optimizing four parameters: the surface tension, the droplet's height, the radius of the droplet-substrate contact area, and the horizontal symmetrical position of the droplet. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were confirmed using drops of distilled water as well as viscous aqueous glycerol solutions. The vibration frequency had no influence on surface tension in the case of pure liquids. However, for water-soluble surfactant solutions, the dynamic surface tension gradually increased with vibration frequency, which was particularly notable for low surfactant concentrations slightly below the critical micelle concentration. This frequency dependence resulted from the competition of two mechanisms at the drop surface: local surface deformation and surfactant transport towards the newly generated surface.

  2. Measurement of dynamic surface tension by mechanically vibrated sessile droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Shuichi; Yamauchi, Satoko; Yoshitake, Yumiko; Nagumo, Ryo; Mori, Hideki; Kajiya, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of liquids using mechanically vibrated sessile droplets. Under continuous mechanical vibration, the shape of the deformed droplet was fitted by numerical analysis, taking into account the force balance at the drop surface and the momentum equation. The surface tension was determined by optimizing four parameters: the surface tension, the droplet's height, the radius of the droplet-substrate contact area, and the horizontal symmetrical position of the droplet. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were confirmed using drops of distilled water as well as viscous aqueous glycerol solutions. The vibration frequency had no influence on surface tension in the case of pure liquids. However, for water-soluble surfactant solutions, the dynamic surface tension gradually increased with vibration frequency, which was particularly notable for low surfactant concentrations slightly below the critical micelle concentration. This frequency dependence resulted from the competition of two mechanisms at the drop surface: local surface deformation and surfactant transport towards the newly generated surface.

  3. Methodological aspects of EEG and body dynamics measurements during motion

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Pedro M. R.; Hebenstreit, Felix; Gabsteiger, Florian; von Tscharner, Vinzenz; Lochmann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    EEG involves the recording, analysis, and interpretation of voltages recorded on the human scalp which originate from brain gray matter. EEG is one of the most popular methods of studying and understanding the processes that underlie behavior. This is so, because EEG is relatively cheap, easy to wear, light weight and has high temporal resolution. In terms of behavior, this encompasses actions, such as movements that are performed in response to the environment. However, there are methodological difficulties which can occur when recording EEG during movement such as movement artifacts. Thus, most studies about the human brain have examined activations during static conditions. This article attempts to compile and describe relevant methodological solutions that emerged in order to measure body and brain dynamics during motion. These descriptions cover suggestions on how to avoid and reduce motion artifacts, hardware, software and techniques for synchronously recording EEG, EMG, kinematics, kinetics, and eye movements during motion. Additionally, we present various recording systems, EEG electrodes, caps and methods for determinating real/custom electrode positions. In the end we will conclude that it is possible to record and analyze synchronized brain and body dynamics related to movement or exercise tasks. PMID:24715858

  4. Microsensor measurements of hydrogen gas dynamics in cyanobacterial microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Michael; Revsbech, Niels P; Kühl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We used a novel amperometric microsensor for measuring hydrogen gas production and consumption at high spatio-temporal resolution in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats dominated by non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes and Oscillatoria sp.). The new microsensor is based on the use of an organic electrolyte and a stable internal reference system and can be equipped with a chemical sulfide trap in the measuring tip; it exhibits very stable and sulfide-insensitive measuring signals and a high sensitivity (1.5-5 pA per μmol L(-1) H2). Hydrogen gas measurements were done in combination with microsensor measurements of scalar irradiance, O2, pH, and H2S and showed a pronounced H2 accumulation (of up to 8-10% H2 saturation) within the upper mm of cyanobacterial mats after onset of darkness and O2 depletion. The peak concentration of H2 increased with the irradiance level prior to darkening. After an initial build-up over the first 1-2 h in darkness, H2 was depleted over several hours due to efflux to the overlaying water, and due to biogeochemical processes in the uppermost oxic layers and the anoxic layers of the mats. Depletion could be prevented by addition of molybdate pointing to sulfate reduction as a major sink for H2. Immediately after onset of illumination, a short burst of presumably photo-produced H2 due to direct biophotolysis was observed in the illuminated but anoxic mat layers. As soon as O2 from photosynthesis started to accumulate, the H2 was consumed rapidly and production ceased. Our data give detailed insights into the microscale distribution and dynamics of H2 in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats, and further support that cyanobacterial H2 production can play a significant role in fueling anaerobic processes like e.g., sulfate reduction or anoxygenic photosynthesis in microbial mats.

  5. Microsensor measurements of hydrogen gas dynamics in cyanobacterial microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Michael; Revsbech, Niels P.; Kühl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We used a novel amperometric microsensor for measuring hydrogen gas production and consumption at high spatio-temporal resolution in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats dominated by non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes and Oscillatoria sp.). The new microsensor is based on the use of an organic electrolyte and a stable internal reference system and can be equipped with a chemical sulfide trap in the measuring tip; it exhibits very stable and sulfide-insensitive measuring signals and a high sensitivity (1.5–5 pA per μmol L-1 H2). Hydrogen gas measurements were done in combination with microsensor measurements of scalar irradiance, O2, pH, and H2S and showed a pronounced H2 accumulation (of up to 8–10% H2 saturation) within the upper mm of cyanobacterial mats after onset of darkness and O2 depletion. The peak concentration of H2 increased with the irradiance level prior to darkening. After an initial build-up over the first 1–2 h in darkness, H2 was depleted over several hours due to efflux to the overlaying water, and due to biogeochemical processes in the uppermost oxic layers and the anoxic layers of the mats. Depletion could be prevented by addition of molybdate pointing to sulfate reduction as a major sink for H2. Immediately after onset of illumination, a short burst of presumably photo-produced H2 due to direct biophotolysis was observed in the illuminated but anoxic mat layers. As soon as O2 from photosynthesis started to accumulate, the H2 was consumed rapidly and production ceased. Our data give detailed insights into the microscale distribution and dynamics of H2 in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats, and further support that cyanobacterial H2 production can play a significant role in fueling anaerobic processes like e.g., sulfate reduction or anoxygenic photosynthesis in microbial mats. PMID:26257714

  6. Characterizing Suspension Plasma Spray Coating Formation Dynamics through Curvature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidambaram Seshadri, Ramachandran; Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) enables the production of variety of microstructures with unique mechanical and thermal properties. In SPS, a liquid carrier (ethanol/water) is used to transport the sub-micrometric feedstock into the plasma jet. Considering complex deposition dynamics of SPS technique, there is a need to better understand the relationships among spray conditions, ensuing particle behavior, deposition stress evolution and resultant properties. In this study, submicron yttria-stabilized zirconia particles suspended in ethanol were sprayed using a cascaded arc plasma torch. The stresses generated during the deposition of the layers (termed evolving stress) were monitored via the change in curvature of the substrate measured using an in situ measurement apparatus. Depending on the deposition conditions, coating microstructures ranged from feathery porous to dense/cracked deposits. The evolving stresses and modulus were correlated with the observed microstructures and visualized via process maps. Post-deposition bi-layer curvature measurement via low temperature thermal cycling was carried out to quantify the thermo-elastic response of different coatings. Lastly, preliminary data on furnace cycle durability of different coating microstructures were evaluated. This integrated study involving in situ diagnostics and ex situ characterization along with process maps provides a framework to describe coating formation mechanisms, process parametrics and microstructure description.

  7. The effect of the dynamic wet troposphere on VLBI measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Lanyi, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Calculations using a statistical model of water vapor fluctuations yield the effect of the dynamic wet troposphere on Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) measurements. The statistical model arises from two primary assumptions: (1) the spatial structure of refractivity fluctuations can be closely approximated by elementary (Kolmogorov) turbulence theory, and (2) temporal fluctuations are caused by spatial patterns which are moved over a site by the wind. The consequences of these assumptions are outlined for the VLBI delay and delay rate observables. For example, wet troposphere induced rms delays for Deep Space Network (DSN) VLBI at 20-deg elevation are about 3 cm of delay per observation, which is smaller, on the average, than other known error sources in the current DSN VLBI data set. At 20-deg elevation for 200-s time intervals, water vapor induces approximately 1.5 x 10 to the minus 13th power s/s in the Allan standard deviation of interferometric delay, which is a measure of the delay rate observable error. In contrast to the delay error, the delay rate measurement error is dominated by water vapor fluctuations. Water vapor induced VLBI parameter errors and correlations are calculated. For the DSN, baseline length parameter errors due to water vapor fluctuations are in the range of 3 to 5 cm. The above physical assumptions also lead to a method for including the water vapor fluctuations in the parameter estimation procedure, which is used to extract baseline and source information from the VLBI observables.

  8. Dual interferometer for dynamic measurement of corneal topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micali, Jason D.; Greivenkamp, John E.

    2016-08-01

    The cornea is the anterior most surface of the eye and plays a critical role in vision. A thin fluid layer, the tear film, coats the outer surface of the cornea and serves to protect, nourish, and lubricate the cornea. At the same time, the tear film is responsible for creating a smooth continuous surface, where the majority of refraction takes place in the eye. A significant component of vision quality is determined by the shape of the cornea and stability of the tear film. A dual interferometer system for measuring the dynamic corneal topography is designed, built, verified, and qualified by testing on human subjects. The system consists of two coaligned simultaneous phase-shifting polarization-splitting Twyman-Green interferometers. The primary interferometer measures the surface of the tear film while the secondary interferometer tracks the absolute position of the cornea, which provides enough information to reconstruct the absolute shape of the cornea. The results are high-resolution and high-accuracy surface topography measurements of the in vivo tear film and cornea that are captured at standard camera frame rates.

  9. Thermographic measurement of thermal bridges in buildings under dynamic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarini, G.; Bison, P.; Bortolin, A.; Cadelano, G.; De Carli, M.

    2016-05-01

    The accurate knowledge of the thermal performance could reduce significantly the impact of buildings on global energy consumption. Infrared thermography is widely recognized as one of the key technologies for building surveys, thanks to its ability to acquire at a glance thermal images of the building envelope. However, a spot measurement could be misleading when the building is under dynamic thermal conditions. In this case data should be acquired for hours or days, depending on the thermal properties of the walls. Long term thermographic monitoring are possible but imply strong challenges from a practical standpoint. This work investigates the possibilities and limitations of spot thermographic surveys coupled with contact probes, that are able to acquire continuously the thermal signal for days, to investigate the thermal bridges of a building. The goal is the estimation of the reliability and accuracy of the measurement under realistic environmental conditions. Firstly, numerical simulations are performed to determine the reference value of an experimental case. Then a long term thermographic survey is performed and integrated with the contact probe measurement, assessing the feasibility of the method.

  10. Optical measurement methods to study dynamic behavior in MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembe, Christian; Kant, Rishi; Muller, Richard S.

    2001-10-01

    The maturing designs of moving microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) make it more-and-more important to have precise measurements and visual means to characterize dynamic microstructures. The Berkeley Sensor&Actuator Center (BSAC) has a forefront project aimed at developing these capabilities and at providing high-speed Internet (Supernet) access for remote use of its facilities. Already in operation are three optical-characterization tools: a stroboscopic-interferometer system, a computer-microvision system, and a laser-Doppler vibrometer. This paper describes precision and limitations of these systems and discusses their further development. In addition, we describe the results of experimental studies on the different MEMS devices, and give an overview about high-speed visualization of rapidly moving MEMS structures.

  11. Ultrasonic Measurement of Dynamic Muscle Behavior for Poststroke Hemiparetic Gait

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Shi, Wenxiu; Wang, Jun; Xiang, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of the hemiparesis status for a poststroke patient is still challenging. This study aims to measure and investigate the dynamic muscle behavior in poststroke hemiparetic gait using ultrasonography. Twelve hemiparetic patients walked on a treadmill, and EMG, joint angle, and ultrasonography were simultaneously recorded for the gastrocnemius medialis muscle. Pennation angle was automatically extracted from ultrasonography using a tracking algorithm reported previously. The characteristics of EMG, joint angle, and pennation angle in gait cycle were calculated for both (affected and unaffected) sides of lower limbs. The results suggest that pennation angle could work as an important morphological index to continuous muscle contraction. The change pattern of pennation angle between the affected and unaffected sides is different from that of EMG. These findings indicate that morphological parameter extracted from ultrasonography can provide different information from that provided by EMG for hemiparetic gait. PMID:28232945

  12. Evaluation of the impact of non-inpatient i.v. antibiotic treatment for acute infections on the hospital, primary care services and the patient.

    PubMed

    Parker, S E; Nathwani, D; O'Reilly, D; Parkinson, S; Davey, P G

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of providing i.v. antibiotic therapy outside hospital. The main outcome measures were the direct costs of providing i.v. antibiotic therapy in the community compared with standard hospital treatment and the perceptions of patients and General Practitioners (GPs). A total of 29 patients entered the study, of whom 15 received teicoplanin and 14 ceftriaxone. The costs of drugs exceeded the cost of the estimated alternative treatments (median Pound Sterling 208 and Pound Sterling 126 respectively) and this was only partially compensated for by a small reduction in costs of consumables. The staff time required to train patients was compensated for by savings in drug preparation and administration. Sensitivity analysis showed that these conclusions were sensitive to drug and patient selection, and that treatment of skin and soft tissue infections outside hospital with ceftriaxone was likely to have similar variable costs to treatment in hospital with drugs such as flucloxacillin. Non-inpatient i.v. (NIPIV) therapy was estimated to save a total of 532 bed days in the year of the study. Patients strongly preferred non-inpatient treatment to hospital treatment. GPs identified a number of potential disadvantages, mainly concerning safety and lack of support for patients at home. Following the study a strategy for development of NIPIV services in Tayside has been developed with local GPs and a plan has been agreed for funding a community liaison nurse based on the impact of NIPIV therapy on future bed requirements in Dundee Teaching Hospitals Trust.

  13. Hole-transport limited S-shaped I-V curves in planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Minlu; Wang, Hui; Tang, C. W.

    2011-11-01

    Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells based on N',N'-Di-[(1-naphthyl)-N',N'-diphenyl]-1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (NPB) and C60 are investigated. Through variation of the layer thickness and composition, specifically chemical doping NPB with MoOx, we show that the hole-transport limitation in the NPB layer is the determining factor in shaping the I-V characteristics of NPB/C60 cells.

  14. Dynamic measurements and uncertainty estimation of clinical thermometers using Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorevc, Jaka; Bojkovski, Jovan; Pušnik, Igor; Drnovšek, Janko

    2016-09-01

    Clinical thermometers in intensive care units are used for the continuous measurement of body temperature. This study describes a procedure for dynamic measurement uncertainty evaluation in order to examine the requirements for clinical thermometer dynamic properties in standards and recommendations. In this study thermistors were used as temperature sensors, transient temperature measurements were performed in water and air and the measurement data were processed for the investigation of thermometer dynamic properties. The thermometers were mathematically modelled. A Monte Carlo method was implemented for dynamic measurement uncertainty evaluation. The measurement uncertainty was analysed for static and dynamic conditions. Results showed that dynamic uncertainty is much larger than steady-state uncertainty. The results of dynamic uncertainty analysis were applied on an example of clinical measurements and were compared to current requirements in ISO standard for clinical thermometers. It can be concluded that there was no need for dynamic evaluation of clinical thermometers for continuous measurement, while dynamic measurement uncertainty was within the demands of target uncertainty. Whereas in the case of intermittent predictive thermometers, the thermometer dynamic properties had a significant impact on the measurement result. Estimation of dynamic uncertainty is crucial for the assurance of traceable and comparable measurements.

  15. Dynamic-structure-factor measurements on a model Lorentz gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egelstaff, P. A.; Eder, O. J.; Glaser, W.; Polo, J.; Renker, B.; Soper, A. K.

    1990-02-01

    A model system for the Lorentz gas can be made [Eder, Chen, and Egelstaff, Proc. Phys. Soc. London 89, 833 (1966); McPherson and Egelstaff, Can. J. Phys. 58, 289 (1980)] by mixing small quantities of hydrogen with an argon host. For neutron-scattering experiments the large H-to-Ar cross section ratio (~200) makes the argon relatively invisible. Dynamic-structure-factor [S(Q,ω) for H2] measurements at room temperature have been made on this system using the IN4 spectrometer at the Institute Laue Langevin, Grenoble, France. Argon densities between 1.9 and 10.5 atoms/nm3 were used for 0.4measurements were made with a He gas host at densities of 4 and 10.5 atoms/nm3; helium is relatively invisible also compared to hydrogen. These experiments are described, and some examples of the results are presented to show the qualitative effects observed. The principle observation is a pronounced narrowing of S(Q,ω) as a function of ω as the argon density is increased. This effect is large at low Q and decreases with increasing Q, and also decreases substantially when helium is used in place of argon. In addition, the shape of S(Q,ω) is more complex than can be accommodated within a simple model, but slightly less complicated than a computer simulation so showing the significance of multiple-collision processes.

  16. Ultrafast Magnetism Dynamics Measure Using Tabletop Ultrafast EUV Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Thomas J.; Murnane, Margaret

    2013-08-21

    In our work to date, we made two significant advances. First we demonstrated element-selective demagnetization dynamics for the first time, with a record time resolution for x-ray probing of 55 fs. Second, in new work, we were able to probe the timescale of the exchange interaction in magnetic materials, also for the first time. Our measurements were made using the transverse magneto-optic Kerr effect (T-MOKE) geometry, since the reflectivity of a magnetic material changes with the direction of the magnetization vector of a surface. In our experiment, we periodically reversed the magnetization direction of a grating structure made of Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) using an external magnetic field. To achieve maximum contrast, we used HHG light spanning the M-shell (3p) absorption edges of Fe and Ni. Our characterization of the static magnetization of a Permalloy sample shows high magnetic asymmetry at photon energies just above and below the absorption edges at 55 eV and 65 eV, respectively. This result is in excellent agreement with measurements done on the same using a synchrotron source.

  17. Measuring dynamic kidney function in an undergraduate physiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Medler, Scott; Harrington, Frederick

    2013-12-01

    Most undergraduate physiology laboratories are very limited in how they treat renal physiology. It is common to find teaching laboratories equipped with the capability for high-resolution digital recordings of physiological functions (muscle twitches, ECG, action potentials, respiratory responses, etc.), but most urinary laboratories still rely on a "dipstick" approach of urinalysis. Although this technique can provide some basic insights into the functioning of the kidneys, it overlooks the dynamic processes of filtration, reabsorption, and secretion. In the present article, we provide a straightforward approach of using renal clearance measurements to estimate glomerular filtration rate, fractional water reabsorption, glucose clearance, and other physiologically relevant parameters. The estimated values from our measurements in laboratory are in close agreement with those anticipated based on textbook parameters. For example, we found glomerular filtration rate to average 124 ± 45 ml/min, serum creatinine to be 1.23 ± 0.4 mg/dl, and fractional water reabsorption to be ∼96.8%. Furthermore, analyses for the class data revealed significant correlations between parameters like fractional water reabsorption and urine concentration, providing opportunities to discuss urine concentrating mechanisms and other physiological processes. The procedures outlined here are general enough that most undergraduate physiology laboratory courses should be able to implement them without difficulty.

  18. Measurement realities of current collection in dynamic space plasma environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuszczewicz, Edward P.

    1990-01-01

    Theories which describe currents collected by conducting and non-conducting bodies immersed in plasmas have many of their concepts based upon the fundamentals of sheath-potential distributions and charged-particle behavior in superimposed electric and magnetic fields. Those current-collecting bodies (or electrodes) may be Langmuir probes, electric field detectors, aperture plates on ion mass spectrometers and retarding potential analyzers, or spacecraft and their rigid and tethered appendages. Often the models are incomplete in representing the conditions under which the current-voltage characteristics of the electrode and its system are to be measured. In such cases, the experimenter must carefully take into account magnetic field effects and particle anisotropies, perturbations caused by the current collection process itself and contamination on electrode surfaces, the complexities of non-Maxwellian plasma distributions, and the temporal variability of the local plasma density, temperature, composition and fields. This set of variables is by no means all-inclusive, but it represents a collection of circumstances guaranteed to accompany experiments involving energetic particle beams, plasma discharges, chemical releases, wave injection and various events of controlled and uncontrolled spacecraft charging. Here, an attempt is made to synopsize these diagnostic challenges and frame them within a perspective that focuses on the physics under investigation and the requirements on the parameters to be measured. Examples include laboratory and spaceborne applications, with specific interest in dynamic and unstable plasma environments.

  19. Measuring static and dynamic contact angles using a liquid needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanedrin, Raymond; Jin, Ming; Frese, Daniel; Scheithauer, Carsten; Willers, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    The optical determination of static and advancing contact angle is made on drops applied or extended, respectively, onto a substrate through the use of thin solid needles. Although this method has been used extensively, this method of dosing can be time consuming, cumbersome and if not meticulously performed can lead to erroneous contact angle results. Herein, we present an alternative way of applying drops onto substrates using a small liquid jet, which is produced by a liquid pressure dosing system acting as a "liquid needle." A comparative static contact angle study on 14 different surfaces with two different liquids were performed utilizing two different ways of dosing: the conventional solid and a novel liquid needle based technique. We found, for all but one sample, that the obtained results were highly comparable. Observed differences can be explained by the characteristics of either way of dosing. In addition, we used the liquid pressure based dosing system for optical advancing contact angle measurement on two different samples. The liquid needle based method facilitates the expansion of a drop from 0.1 to 22 μL within less than 1.2 seconds, which provided constant contact angle versus drop base diameter curves. The obtained results were highly comparable with dynamic Wilhelmy contact angle measurements.

  20. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntampaka, Michelle; Trac, Hy; Sutherland, Dougal; Fromenteau, Sebastien; Poczos, Barnabas; Schneider, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are a rich source of information for examining fundamental astrophysical processes and cosmological parameters, however, employing clusters as cosmological probes requires accurate mass measurements derived from cluster observables. We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers, and show that a modern machine learning (ML) algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create a mock catalog from Multidark's publicly-available N-body MDPL1 simulation where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line of sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. The presence of interlopers in the catalog produces a wide, flat fractional mass error distribution, with width = 2.13. We employ the Support Distribution Machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement (width = 0.67). Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even a scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  1. PK and tissue distribution of docetaxel in rabbits after i.v. administration of liposomal and injectable formulations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Wei, Yu-Meng; Zhong, Xiao-Dong; Liang, Yan; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Li, Wei; Li, Bi-Bo; Wang, Ya; Yu, Yu

    2009-05-01

    A simple and sensitive HPLC method was established and validated for the determination of docetaxel (DTX) in rabbit plasma and tissue samples. Biosamples were spiked with paclitaxel as an internal standard and pre-treated by solid phase extraction (SPE). Sample separation was performed on a reverse-phase HPLC column at 30 degrees C by using a mobile phase of acetonitrile-methanol-0.02 M ammonium acetate buffer (pH 5.0) (20:47.5:32.5, v/v/v) at flow rate of 1.0 mL/min The UV absorbance of the samples was measured at the wavelength of 230 nm. The standard curves were linear over the ranges of 0.02525-2.525 microg/mL for plasma, 1.010-202.00 microg/g for lung, 0.202-20.20 microg/g for spleen, liver and kidney, 0.202-10.10 microg/g for heart and stomach, 0.0505-2.02 microg/g for brain, respectively. The limits of quantification (LOQ) were 10.0 ng/mL in the plasma samples and 20.0 ng/g in the tissue samples, respectively. The analysis method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution studies of DTX liposomes and DTX injection after i.v. administration to the rabbits. The results showed that the liposome carrier led to a significant difference in pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution profile compared to the conventional DTX injection.

  2. Noninvasive, quantitative respirator fit testing through dynamic pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, D R; Willeke, K

    1988-10-01

    A new method has been invented for the noninvasive and quantitative determination of fit for a respirator. The test takes a few seconds and requires less expensive instrumentation than presently used for invasive testing. In this test, the breath is held at a negative pressure for a few seconds, and the leak-induced pressure decay inside the respirator cavity is monitored. A dynamic pressure sensor is attached to a modified cartridge of an air-purifying respirator or built into the respirator body or into the air supply line of an air-supplied respirator. The method is noninvasive in that the modified cartridge can be mounted onto any air-purifying respirator. The pressure decay during testing quantifies the airflow entered through the leak site. An equation has been determined which gives the air leakage as a function of pressure decay slope, respirator volume and the pressure differential during actual wear--all of which are determined by the dynamic pressure sensor. Thus, the ratio of air inhaled through the filters or via the air supply line to the leak rate is a measure of respirator fit, independent of aerosol deposition in the lung and aerosol distribution in the respirator cavity as found for quantitative fit testing with aerosols. The new method is shown to be independent of leak and sensor locations. The concentration and distribution of aerosols entered through the leak site is dependent only on the physical dimensions of the leak site and the air velocity in it, which can be determined independently.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Dynamic range measurement and calibration of SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Lauscher, M.; Middendorf, L.; Niggemann, T.; Schumacher, J.; Stephan, M.; Bueno, A.; Navas, S.; Ruiz, A. G.

    2016-03-01

    Photosensors have played and will continue to play an important role in high-energy and Astroparticle cutting-edge experiments. As of today, the most common photon detection device in use is the photomultiplier tube (PMT). However, we are witnessing rapid progress in the field and new devices now show very competitive features when compared to PMTs. Among those state-of-the-art photo detectors, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are a relatively new kind of semiconductor whose potential is presently studied by many laboratories. Their characteristics make them a very attractive candidate for future Astroparticle physics experiments recording fluorescence and Cherenkov light, both in the atmosphere and on the ground. Such applications may require the measurement of the light flux on the sensor for the purpose of energy reconstruction. This is a complex task due to the limited dynamic range of SiPMs and the presence of thermal and correlated noise. In this work we study the response of three SiPM types in terms of delivered charge when exposed to light pulses in a broad range of intensities: from single photon to saturation. The influence of the pulse time duration and the SiPM over-voltage on the response are also quantified. Based on the observed behaviour, a method is presented to reconstruct the real number of photons impinging on the SiPM surface directly from the measured SiPM charge. A special emphasis is placed on the description of the methodology and experimental design used to perform the measurements.

  4. Information on the Impact Parameter Dependence of the BAI Yields BaI(V=8)+H Reaction,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-15

    the velocity dependence of the reaction channel studied. If the reaction probability is the same for all relative collision velocities, then the BaI(v...barrier in the entrance channel causes a cutoff in the relative collision velocity distribution, and this type of velocity dependence would significantly affect the shape of the specific opacity function.

  5. Measurement of human pilot dynamic characteristics in flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, James T.

    1987-01-01

    Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Least Square Error (LSE) estimation techniques were applied to the problem of identifying pilot-vehicle dynamic characteristics in flight simulation. A brief investigation of the effects of noise, input bandwidth and system delay upon the FFT and LSE techniques was undertaken using synthetic data. Data from a piloted simulation conducted at NASA Ames Research Center was then analyzed. The simulation was performed in the NASA Ames Research Center Variable Stability CH-47B helicopter operating in fixed-basis simulator mode. The piloting task consisted of maintaining the simulated vehicle over a moving hover pad whose motion was described by a random-appearing sum of sinusoids. The two test subjects used a head-down, color cathode ray tube (CRT) display for guidance and control information. Test configurations differed in the number of axes being controlled by the pilot (longitudinal only versus longitudinal and lateral), and in the presence or absence of an important display indicator called an 'acceleration ball'. A number of different pilot-vehicle transfer functions were measured, and where appropriate, qualitatively compared with theoretical pilot- vehicle models. Some indirect evidence suggesting pursuit behavior on the part of the test subjects is discussed.

  6. Force measurement enabling precise analysis by dynamic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Taninaka, Atsushi; Hirano, Yuuichi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) makes it possible to investigate specific interactions between two molecules such as ligand-receptor pairs at the single-molecule level. In the DFS method based on the Bell-Evans model, the unbinding force applied to a molecular bond is increased at a constant rate, and the force required to rupture the molecular bond is measured. By analyzing the relationship between the modal rupture force and the logarithm of the loading rate, microscopic potential barrier landscapes and the lifetimes of bonds can be obtained. However, the results obtained, for example, in the case of streptavidin/biotin complexes, have differed among previous studies and some results have been inconsistent with theoretical predictions. In this study, using an atomic force microscopy technique that enables the precise analysis of molecular interactions on the basis of DFS, we investigated the effect of the sampling rate on DFS analysis. The shape of rupture force histograms, for example, was significantly deformed at a sampling rate of 1 kHz in comparison with that of histograms obtained at 100 kHz, indicating the fundamental importance of ensuring suitable experimental conditions for further advances in the DFS method.

  7. Testing and Validation of the Dynamic Inertia Measurement Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Alexander W.; Herrera, Claudia Y.; Spivey, Natalie D.; Fladung, William A.; Cloutier, David

    2015-01-01

    The Dynamic Inertia Measurement (DIM) method uses a ground vibration test setup to determine the mass properties of an object using information from frequency response functions. Most conventional mass properties testing involves using spin tables or pendulum-based swing tests, which for large aerospace vehicles becomes increasingly difficult and time-consuming, and therefore expensive, to perform. The DIM method has been validated on small test articles but has not been successfully proven on large aerospace vehicles. In response, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) conducted mass properties testing on an "iron bird" test article that is comparable in mass and scale to a fighter-type aircraft. The simple two-I-beam design of the "iron bird" was selected to ensure accurate analytical mass properties. Traditional swing testing was also performed to compare the level of effort, amount of resources, and quality of data with the DIM method. The DIM test showed favorable results for the center of gravity and moments of inertia; however, the products of inertia showed disagreement with analytical predictions.

  8. High Temperature Dynamic Pressure Measurements Using Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chang, Clarence T.; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Un-cooled, MEMS-based silicon carbide (SiC) static pressure sensors were used for the first time to measure pressure perturbations at temperatures as high as 600 C during laboratory characterization, and subsequently evaluated in a combustor rig operated under various engine conditions to extract the frequencies that are associated with thermoacoustic instabilities. One SiC sensor was placed directly in the flow stream of the combustor rig while a benchmark commercial water-cooled piezoceramic dynamic pressure transducer was co-located axially but kept some distance away from the hot flow stream. In the combustor rig test, the SiC sensor detected thermoacoustic instabilities across a range of engine operating conditions, amplitude magnitude as low as 0.5 psi at 585 C, in good agreement with the benchmark piezoceramic sensor. The SiC sensor experienced low signal to noise ratio at higher temperature, primarily due to the fact that it was a static sensor with low sensitivity.

  9. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntampaka, M.; Trac, H.; Sutherland, D. J.; Fromenteau, S.; Póczos, B.; Schneider, J.

    2016-11-01

    We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers and show that a modern machine learning algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create two mock catalogs from Multidark’s publicly available N-body MDPL1 simulation, one with perfect galaxy cluster membership information and the other where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power-law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. Assuming perfect membership knowledge, this unrealistic case produces a wide fractional mass error distribution, with a width of {{Δ }}ε ≈ 0.87. Interlopers introduce additional scatter, significantly widening the error distribution further ({{Δ }}ε ≈ 2.13). We employ the support distribution machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement ({{Δ }}ε ≈ 0.67) for the contaminated case. Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even the scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  10. Measurements of turbulent premixed flame dynamics using cinema stereoscopic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Adam M.; Driscoll, James F.; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2008-06-01

    A new experimental method is described that provides high-speed movies of turbulent premixed flame wrinkling dynamics and the associated vorticity fields. This method employs cinema stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and has been applied to a turbulent slot Bunsen flame. Three-component velocity fields were measured with high temporal and spatial resolutions of 0.9 ms and 140 μm, respectively. The flame-front location was determined using a new multi-step method based on particle image gradients, which is described. Comparisons are made between flame fronts found with this method and simultaneous CH-PLIF images. These show that the flame contour determined corresponds well to the true location of maximum gas density gradient. Time histories of typical eddy-flame interactions are reported and several important phenomena identified. Outwardly rotating eddy pairs wrinkle the flame and are attenuated at they pass through the flamelet. Significant flame-generated vorticity is produced downstream of the wrinkled tip. Similar wrinkles are caused by larger groups of outwardly rotating eddies. Inwardly rotating pairs cause significant convex wrinkles that grow as the flame propagates. These wrinkles encounter other eddies that alter their behavior. The effects of the hydrodynamic and diffusive instabilities are observed and found to be significant contributors to the formation and propagation of wrinkles.

  11. Circadian dynamics in measures of cortical excitation and inhibition balance

    PubMed Central

    Chellappa, Sarah L.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Ly, Julien Q. M.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Borsu, Chloé; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Luxen, André; Middleton, Benita; Archer, Simon N.; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Massimini, Marcello; Maquet, Pierre; Phillips, Christophe; Moran, Rosalyn J.; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Several neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders have recently been characterized as dysfunctions arising from a ‘final common pathway’ of imbalanced excitation to inhibition within cortical networks. How the regulation of a cortical E/I ratio is affected by sleep and the circadian rhythm however, remains to be established. Here we addressed this issue through the analyses of TMS-evoked responses recorded over a 29 h sleep deprivation protocol conducted in young and healthy volunteers. Spectral analyses of TMS-evoked responses in frontal cortex revealed non-linear changes in gamma band evoked oscillations, compatible with an influence of circadian timing on inhibitory interneuron activity. In silico inferences of cell-to-cell excitatory and inhibitory connectivity and GABA/Glutamate receptor time constant based on neural mass modeling within the Dynamic causal modeling framework, further suggested excitation/inhibition balance was under a strong circadian influence. These results indicate that circadian changes in EEG spectral properties, in measure of excitatory/inhibitory connectivity and in GABA/glutamate receptor function could support the maintenance of cognitive performance during a normal waking day, but also during overnight wakefulness. More generally, these findings demonstrate a slow daily regulation of cortical excitation/inhibition balance, which depends on circadian-timing and prior sleep-wake history. PMID:27651114

  12. Implosion dynamics measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Olson, R. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Döppner, T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Di Nicola, P.; Dixit, S. N.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eggert, J. E.; Farley, D. R.; Frenje, J. A.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A. V.; Heeter, R. F.; Holder, J. P.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D. H.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J. M.; Moody, J. D.; Moran, M. J.; Nathan, B. R.; Nikroo, A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prasad, R. R.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rygg, J. R.; Salmonson, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Simanovskaia, N.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Widmann, K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Hsing, W. W.; MacGowan, B. J.; Atherton, L. J.; Edwards, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements have been made of the in-flight dynamics of imploding capsules indirectly driven by laser energies of 1-1.7 MJ at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)]. These experiments were part of the National Ignition Campaign [Landen et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051002 (2011)] to iteratively optimize the inputs required to achieve thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory. Using gated or streaked hard x-ray radiography, a suite of ablator performance parameters, including the time-resolved radius, velocity, mass, and thickness, have been determined throughout the acceleration history of surrogate gas-filled implosions. These measurements have been used to establish a dynamically consistent model of the ablative drive history and shell compressibility throughout the implosion trajectory. First results showed that the peak velocity of the original 1.3-MJ Ge-doped polymer (CH) point design using Au hohlraums reached only 75% of the required ignition velocity. Several capsule, hohlraum, and laser pulse changes were then implemented to improve this and other aspects of implosion performance and a dedicated effort was undertaken to test the sensitivity of the ablative drive to the rise time and length of the main laser pulse. Changing to Si rather than Ge-doped inner ablator layers and increasing the pulse length together raised peak velocity to 93% ± 5% of the ignition goal using a 1.5 MJ, 420 TW pulse. Further lengthening the pulse so that the laser remained on until the capsule reached 30% (rather than 60%-70%) of its initial radius, reduced the shell thickness and improved the final fuel ρR on companion shots with a cryogenic hydrogen fuel layer. Improved drive efficiency was observed using U rather than Au hohlraums, which was expected, and by slowing the rise time of laser pulse, which was not. The effect of changing the Si-dopant concentration and distribution, as well as the effect of using a larger initial shell thickness

  13. Measured Two-Dimensional Ice-Wedge Polygon Thermal Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Busey, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Ice-wedge polygons are perhaps the most dominant permafrost related features in the arctic landscape. The microtopography of these features, that includes rims, troughs, and high and low polygon centers, alters the local hydrology, as water tends to collect in the low areas. During winter, wind redistribution of snow leads to an increased snowpack depth in the low areas, while the slightly higher areas often have very thin snow cover, leading to differences across the landscape in vegetation communities and soil moisture between higher and lower areas. These differences in local surface conditions lead to spatial variability of the ground thermal regime in the different microtopographic areas and between different types of ice-wedge polygons. To study these features in depth, we established temperature transects across four different types of ice-wedge polygons near Barrow, Alaska. The transects were composed of five vertical array thermistor probes (VATP) beginning in the center of each polygon and extending through the trough to the rim of the adjacent polygon. Each VATP had 16 thermistors from the surface to a depth of 1.5 m. In addition to these 80 subsurface temperature measurement points per polygon, soil moisture, thermal conductivity, heat flux, and snow depth were all measured in multiple locations for each polygon. Above ground, a full suite of micrometeorological instrumentation was present at each polygon. Data from these sites has been collected continuously for the last three years. We found snow cover, timing and depth, and active layer soil moisture to be major controlling factors in the observed thermal regimes. In troughs and in the centers of low-center polygons, the combined effect of typically saturated soils and increased snow accumulation resulted in the highest mean annual ground temperatures (MAGT). Additionally, these areas were the last part of the polygon to refreeze during the winter. However, increased active layer thickness was not

  14. CSF clearance in Alzheimer Disease measured with dynamic PET.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Mony J; Li, Yi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Tsui, Wai H; Saint Louis, Les A; Glodzik, Lidia; Osorio, Ricardo S; Fortea, Juan; Butler, Tracy; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Fossati, Silvia; Kim, Hee-Jin; Carare, Roxana O; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Rusinek, Henry

    2017-03-16

    Evidence supporting the hypothesis that reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) comes from primarily from rodent models. However, unlike rodents where predominant extra-cranial CSF egress is via olfactory nerves traversing the cribriform plate, human CSF clearance pathways are not well characterized. Using dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with (18)F-THK5117 a tracer for tau pathology, the ventricular CSF time activity was used as a biomarker for CSF clearance. We tested three hypotheses: 1. Extra-cranial CSF is detected at the superior turbinates; 2. CSF clearance is reduced in AD; and 3. CSF clearance is inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Methods: 15 subjects, 8 with AD and 7 normal control volunteers were examined with (18)F-THK5117. 10 subjects additionally received (11)C-PiB PET scans and 8 were PiB positive. Ventricular time activity curves (TAC) of (18)F-THK5117 were used to identify highly correlated TAC from extra-cranial voxels. Results: For all subjects, the greatest density of CSF positive extra-cranial voxels was in the nasal turbinates. Tracer concentration analyses validated the superior nasal turbinate CSF signal intensity. AD patients showed ventricular tracer clearance reduced by 23% and 66% fewer superior turbinate CSF egress sites. Ventricular CSF clearance was inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Conclusion: The human nasal turbinate is part of the CSF clearance system. Lateral ventricle and superior nasal turbinates CSF clearance abnormalities are found in AD. Ventricular CSF clearance reductions are associated with increased brain amyloid depositions. These data suggest that PET measured CSF clearance is a biomarker of potential interest in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Invariant Measures for Dissipative Dynamical Systems: Abstract Results and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekroun, Mickaël D.; Glatt-Holtz, Nathan E.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we study certain invariant measures that can be associated to the time averaged observation of a broad class of dissipative semigroups via the notion of a generalized Banach limit. Consider an arbitrary complete separable metric space X which is acted on by any continuous semigroup { S( t)} t ≥ 0. Suppose that { S( t)} t ≥ 0 possesses a global attractor {{A}}. We show that, for any generalized Banach limit LIM T → ∞ and any probability distribution of initial conditions {{m}_0}, that there exists an invariant probability measure {{m}}, whose support is contained in {{A}}, such that intX \\varphi(x) d{m}(x) = \\underset{t rightarrow infty}LIM1/T int_0^T int_X \\varphi(S(t) x) d{m}_0(x) dt, for all observables φ living in a suitable function space of continuous mappings on X. This work is based on the framework of Foias et al. (Encyclopedia of mathematics and its applications, vol 83. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2001); it generalizes and simplifies the proofs of more recent works (Wang in Disc Cont Dyn Syst 23(1-2):521-540, 2009; Lukaszewicz et al. in J Dyn Diff Eq 23(2):225-250, 2011). In particular our results rely on the novel use of a general but elementary topological observation, valid in any metric space, which concerns the growth of continuous functions in the neighborhood of compact sets. In the case when { S( t)} t ≥ 0 does not possess a compact absorbing set, this lemma allows us to sidestep the use of weak compactness arguments which require the imposition of cumbersome weak continuity conditions and thus restricts the phase space X to the case of a reflexive Banach space. Two examples of concrete dynamical systems where the semigroup is known to be non-compact are examined in detail. We first consider the Navier-Stokes equations with memory in the diffusion terms. This is the so called Jeffery's model which describes certain classes of viscoelastic fluids. We then consider a family of neutral delay differential

  16. Movement Characteristics Analysis and Dynamic Simulation of Collaborative Measuring Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    guoqing, MA; li, LIU; zhenglin, YU; guohua, CAO; yanbin, ZHENG

    2017-03-01

    Human-machine collaboration is becoming increasingly more necessary, and so collaborative robot applications are also in high demand. We selected a UR10 robot as our research subject for this study. First, we applied D-H coordinate transformation of the robot to establish a link system, and we then used inverse transformation to solve the robot’s inverse kinematics and find all the joints. Use Lagrange method to analysis UR robot dynamics; use ADAMS multibody dynamics simulation software to dynamic simulation; verifying the correctness of the derived kinetic models.

  17. Real-Time Series Resistance Monitoring in PV Systems Without the Need for I-V Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Deceglie, Michael G.; Silverman, Timothy J.; Marion, Bill; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-10-01

    We apply the physical principles of a familiar method, suns-Voc, to a new application: the real-time detection of series resistance changes in modules and systems operating outside. The real-time series resistance (RTSR) method that we describe avoids the need for collecting I-V curves or constructing full series resistance-free I-V curves. RTSR is most readily deployable at the module level on microinverters or module-integrated electronics, but it can also be extended to full strings. We found that automated detection of series resistance increases can provide early warnings of some of the most common reliability issues, which also pose fire risks, including broken ribbons, broken solder bonds, and contact problems in the junction or combiner box. We also describe the method in detail and describe a sample application to data collected from modules operating in the field.

  18. Nanoprobe I-V characterization of CdTe/CdS micro and nano-patterned solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Heber

    This thesis presents a novel way to characterize micro and nano patterned cadmium telluride thin film solar cells via a nano-probe system. A historical review of CdTe-based solar cells is presented first followed by review of the technology developed to produce the patterned CdTe cells. A detailed presentation is then provided on the use of a Zyvex nanoprobing system to characterize the patterned solar cells. The I-V response of micro- and nano-patterned solar cells stimulated under different e-beam conditions is presented and analyzed. Suggestions of how to improve the technique are provided. This work documents, for the first time, the I-V testing of isolated CdTe grains of different feature size.

  19. A non-iterative technique for determination of solar cell parameters from the light generated I-V characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Gaurav; Panchal, Ashish K.

    2013-08-01

    Accurate information about electrical parameters of a photovoltaic (PV) cell is many times essential for evaluating the performance of the cell when delivering power at its full capacity. This paper presents a technique for determining the cell parameters from the light generated current-voltage (I-V) characteristic with a valid assumption for any kind of cells. The technique neither involves any initial approximations nor iteration processes. The technique is employed for various PV cell technologies such as silicon, copper indium gallium selenide, organic, dye sensitized solar cell, and organic tandem cells, previously available in the literatures. Obtained I-V characteristics for the cells using the present technique are in well agreement with those of reported in the literature. The technique is further extended for the analysis of a silicon cell and a silicon module tested in the laboratory and the results obtained are very close to those of the experimental data.

  20. Polar distortion in ultrathin BaTiO3 films studied by in situ LEED I-V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Junsoo; Nascimento, V. B.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Plummer, E. W.; Kalinin, S. V.; Baddorf, A. P.

    2008-06-01

    Phase stability in nanoscale ferroelectrics is governed by the interplay of electrostatic depolarization energy, domain formation, adsorption, and surface band bending. Using in situ low-energy electron-diffraction intensity versus voltage (LEED I-V ), we have characterized 4 and 10 ML BaTiO3 films, grown using pulsed laser deposition with fully compressive strain on a SrRuO3/SrTiO3 substrate. LEED I-V reveals a single surface dead layer and a monodomain vertically polarized state below. The single orientation is attributed to the intrinsic imprint asymmetry and the stability of a polarized phase to compensation of depolarizing charges by dipoles induced by surface stress.

  1. I-V and noise performance in MWIR to VLWIR large area Hg1-xCdxTe photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, A. I.; Stapelbroek, M. G.; Dolan, P. N.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Boehmer, E.; Smith, D. S.; Ehlert, J. C.; Andrews, J. E.

    2005-05-01

    , diffusion current limited photodiodes having values of αdark in the mid 10-6 range. All of the 850 μm diameter, λc ~ 15.5 μm photodiodes measured have excess low frequency noise, with the best performers having in(f = 100 Hz, Vd =-60 mV , Δf = 1 Hz) ~ 2 x 10-11 A/Hz1/2 and the best photodiode αdark = 3.92 x 10-6. I-V measurements, noise, and visual inspections are performed at several steps in the photodiodes manufacturing process. It was observed, following FPM fabrication, photodiode dark current and noise had increased from the initial pre-mounting leadless chip carrier (LCC) measurements for some of the nine photodiodes. The performance degradation observed led to an investigation into the cause (baking at elevated temperatures, mechanical handling, electrical stress etc.) of photodiode degradation that occurred between LCC and FPM testing. Correlations between I-V, noise and surface visual defects have been performed on some λc ~ 15.5 mm photodiodes. This paper outlines the results of the study, correlating the electrical performance observed to visual defects on the surface and to defects seen following cross sectioning of degraded photodiodes. In addition, other lessons learned and the corrective actions implemented that led to the successful manufacture of SWIR, MWIR and LWIR large photodiodes from the material growth to insertion into and successful demonstration of flight FPMs for the CrIS program are described.

  2. Chemical input and I-V output: stepwise chemical information processing in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Norifusa; Han, Liyuan

    2012-12-14

    As a complex system, a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) exhibits emergent photovoltaics not obvious from the properties of the individual components. The chemical input of 4-tert-butylpyridine (TBP) into DSC improves the open circuit voltage (V(oc)) and reduces the short circuit current (I(sc)) in I-V output through multiple interactions with the components, yet it has been difficult to distinguish the multiple interactions and correlate the interactions with the influences on I-V output due to the complexity of the system. To deal with the multiple interactions, we have adapted a conceptual framework and methodology from coordination chemistry. First, we titrated the photovoltaic interface and electrolyte with TBP to identify the stepwise chemical interaction processes. An isopotential point observed in I-V output indicates that most of the inputted chemicals interact with the electrolyte. Cyclic voltammetric titration of the electrolyte demonstrates asymmetric redox peaks and two different isopotential points, indicating that the two-step coordination-decoordination process inhibits the reduction current of the electrolyte. Second, we set an interaction model bridging the hierarchical gaps between the multiple interactions and the I-V output to address the influences on outputs from the amount of the inputs. From the viewpoint of the interaction model and interactions observed, we are able to comprehend the processes of the complex system and suggest a direction to improve V(oc) without sacrificing I(sc) in DSCs. We conclude that the conceptual framework and methodology adapted from coordination chemistry is beneficial to enhance the emergent outputs of complex systems.

  3. Dynamic Measures of Elastic Nonlinear (Anelastic) Behavior: Dynamic Acousto-Elasticity Testing (DAET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, G.; Le Bas, P.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Ulrich, T. J.; Carey, J. W.; Han, J.; Darling, T. W.; Johnson, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Unraveling the physics of the earthquake source, reliable sequestration of CO2, predicting wellbore breakout in oil and gas reservoirs, monitoring thermal damage to rock in nuclear waste storage, and probing cement integrity require new approaches to material characterization and imaging. The elastic nonlinear material response is extremely promising in this regard. A persistent problem has been the direct relation between elastic nonlinearity and mechanical damage, because a reliable physics-based theory does not yet exist; however, recent work in medical nonlinear acoustics has led to an experimental breakthrough in measuring material nonlinear response. The breakthrough, termed Dynamic Acousto-Elasticity Testing (e.g., Renaud et al, 2008), has significant implication to development of a physics based theory, and thus ultimately to our ability to directly relate nonlinear material behavior to damage. The method provides the means to dynamically study the velocity-pressure and attenuation-pressure behaviors through the full wave cycle in contrast to most methods that measure average response (e.g., Nonlinear Resonance Ultrasound Spectroscopy [e.g., Guyer and Johnson, 2009]). The method relies on exciting a sample with a low frequency vibration in order to cycle it through stress-strain multiple times. Simultaneously, a high frequency ultrasonic source applies pulses and the change in wavespeed as a function of the low frequency stress is measured. In crystalline rock, we expect that the elastic nonlinearity arises from the microcracks and dislocations contained within individual crystals. In contrast, sandstones, limestones and other sedimentary rocks may have other origin(s) of elastic nonlinearity that are currently under debate. Thus we can use a crystalline sample as a point of reference from which to extrapolate to other sources of nonlinear mechanisms. We report results from our preliminary studies applying a number of room-dry rock samples of differing rock

  4. The influence of top electrode of InGaAsN/GaAs solar cell on their electrical parameters extracted from illuminated I-V characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawidowski, Wojciech; Ściana, Beata; Zborowska-Lindert, Iwona; Mikolášek, Miroslav; Bielak, Katarzyna; Badura, Mikołaj; Pucicki, Damian; Radziewicz, Damian; Kováč, Jaroslav; Tłaczała, Marek

    2016-06-01

    In the presented work the growth and fabrication process of dilute nitride based solar cells were reported. We fabricated three different solar cells to investigate the influence of top contact on their electrical parameters. Test devices were characterized by the means of current-voltage measurements carried out under the sunlight simulator. The obtained I-V results were scrutinized using a single diode equivalent circuit of a solar cell. We employed the Lambert W approach to find the solvable solution of the modified Shockley equation, in order to determine the basic solar cell electrical parameters such as: ideality factor n, series and shunt resistances (Rs and Rsh), saturation current I0 and photocurrent Iph generated in the solar cell structure. It was found that electrical parameters obtained from the fitting procedure depend on solar cell design. The type of top electrode influences the values of parasitic resistances, open circuit voltage and short circuit current.

  5. Dynamic Temperature and Pressure Measurements in the Core of a Propulsion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Bill; Gordon, Grant; Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic temperature and pressure measurements were made in the core of a TECH977 propulsion engine as part of a NASA funded investigation into indirect combustion noise. Dynamic temperature measurements were made in the combustor, the inter-turbine duct, and the mixer using ten two-wire thermocouple probes. Internal dynamic pressure measurements were made at the same locations using piezoresistive transducers installed in semi-infinite coils. Measurements were acquired at four steady state operating conditions covering the range of aircraft approach power settings. Fluctuating gas temperature spectra were computed from the thermocouple probe voltage measurements using a compensation procedure that was developed under previous NASA test programs. A database of simultaneously acquired dynamic temperature and dynamic pressure measurements was produced. Spectral and cross-spectral analyses were conducted to explore the characteristics of the temperature and pressure fluctuations inside the engine, with a particular focus on attempting to identify the presence of indirect combustion noise.

  6. Fast ion dynamics measured by collective Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindslev, Henrik

    2001-10-01

    In magnetically confined fusion plasmas, fast ions, from fusion reactions and auxiliary heating, typically carry a third of the total plasma kinetic energy, and even more of the free energy. This free energy must be channelled into heating the bulk plasma, but is also available for driving waves in the plasma, affecting confinement of bulk and fast ions. We know that fast ions can drive Alfvén waves, affect sawteeth and fishbones. In turn all three can redistribute or ejects the fast ions. Wave particle interaction, also the basis of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH), depends crucially on the phase space distribution of the fast ions. Conversely the effect waves and instabilities have of fast ions will manifest itself in the detail of the fast ion phase space distribution. To explore the dynamics of fast ions and their interaction with the plasma thus begs for measurements of the fast ion distribution resolved in space, time and velocity. This has long been the promise of Collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) [1]. First demonstrated at JET [2]and subsequently at TEXTOR [3], CTS is living up to its promise and is now contributing to the understanding of fast ion dynamics. With the TEXTOR CTS, temporal behaviours of fast ion velocity distributions have been uncovered. The fast ion populations are produced by ICRH and Neutral Beam Injection (NBI). At sawteeth, we see clear variations in the fast ion population, which depend on ion energy, pitch angle and spatial location. Investigating the region just inside the inversion radius, we find that ions with small parallel energy, and with perpendicular energies up to a soft threshold well above thermal, are lost from the high field side near the inversion radius, while more energetic ions in the same pitch angle range remain insensitive to the sawteeth. The sensitive population could include the potato and stagnation orbit particles identified theoretically as being sensitive the sawteeth [4]. Under the same conditions

  7. Temperature dependent I-V characteristics of an Au/n-GaAs Schottky diode analyzed using Tung’s model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korucu, Demet; Turut, Abdulmecit; Efeoglu, Hasan

    2013-04-01

    The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of Au/n-GaAs contacts prepared with photolithography technique have been measured in the temperature range of 80-320 K. The ideality factor and barrier height (BH) values have remained almost unchanged between 1.04 and 1.10 and at a value of about 0.79 eV at temperatures above 200 K, respectively. Therefore, the ideality factor values near unity say that the experimental I-V data are almost independent of the sample temperature, that is, contacts have shown excellent Schottky diode behavior above 200 K. An abnormal decrease in the experimental BH Φb and an increase in the ideality factor with a decrease in temperature have been observed below 200 K. This behavior has been attributed to the barrier inhomogeneity by assuming a Gaussian distribution of nanometer-sized patches with low BH at the metal-semiconductor interface. The barrier inhomogeneity assumption is also confirmed by the linear relationship between the BH and the ideality factor. According to Tung’s barrier inhomogeneity model, it has been seen that the value of σT=7.41×10-5 cm2/3 V1/3from ideality factor versus (kT)-1 curve is in close agreement with σT=7.95×10-5 cm2/3 V1/3 value from the Φeff versus (2kT)-1 curve in the range of 80-200 K. The modified Richardson ln(J0/T2)-(qσT)2(Vb/η)2/3/[2(kT)2] versus (kT)-1 plot, from Tung’s Model, has given a Richardson constant value of 8.47 A cm-2 K-2which is in very close agreement with the known value of 8.16 A cm-2 K-2 for n-type GaAs; considering the effective patch area which is significantly lower than the entire geometric area of the Schottky contact, in temperature range of 80-200 K. Thus, it has been concluded that the use of Tung’s lateral inhomogeneity model is more appropriate to interpret the temperature-dependent I-V characteristics in the Schottky contacts.

  8. Neutron Reflectivity Measurement for Polymer Dynamics near Graphene Oxide Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Jaseung

    We investigated the diffusion dynamics of polymer chains confined between graphene oxide layers using neutron reflectivity (NR). The bilayers of polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA)/ deuterated PMMA (d-PMMA) films and polystyrene (PS)/d-PS films with various film thickness sandwiched between Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers of graphene oxide (GO) were prepared. From the NR results, we found that PMMA diffusion dynamics was reduced near the GO surface while the PS diffusion was not significantly changed. This is due to the different strength of GO-polymer interaction. In this talk, these diffusion results will be compared with dewetting dynamics of polymer thin films on the GO monolayers. This has given us the basis for development of graphene-based nanoelectronics with high efficiency, such as heterojunction devices for polymer photovoltaic (OPV) applications.

  9. Quantum Dynamics Simulations for Modeling Experimental Pump-Probe Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Brett; Nayyar, Sahil; Liss, Kyle; Weinacht, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved studies of quantum dynamics have benefited greatly from developments in ultrafast table-top and free electron lasers. Advances in computer software and hardware have lowered the barrier for performing calculations such that relatively simple simulations allow for direct comparison with experimental results. We describe here a set of quantum dynamics calculations in low-dimensional molecular systems. The calculations incorporate coupled electronic-nuclear dynamics, including two interactions with an applied field and nuclear wave packet propagation. The simulations were written and carried out by undergraduates as part of a senior research project, with the specific goal of allowing for detailed interpretation of experimental pump-probe data (in additional to the pedagogical value).

  10. Probing dynamic protein ensembles with atomic proximity measures.

    PubMed

    Gáspári, Zoltán; Angyán, Annamária F; Dhir, Somdutta; Franklin, Dino; Perczel, András; Pintar, Alessandro; Pongor, Sándor

    2010-11-01

    The emerging role of internal dynamics in protein fold and function requires new avenues of structure analysis. We analyzed the dynamically restrained conformational ensemble of ubiquitin generated from residual dipolar coupling data, in terms of protruding and buried atoms as well as interatomic distances, using four proximity-based algorithms, CX, DPX, PRIDE and PRIDE-NMR (http://hydra.icgeb.trieste.it/protein/). We found that Ubiquitin, this relatively rigid molecule has a highly diverse dynamic ensemble. The environment of protruding atoms is highly variable across conformers, on the other hand, only a part of buried atoms tends to fluctuate. The variability of the ensemble cautions against the use of single conformers when explaining functional phenomena. We also give a detailed evaluation of PRIDE-NMR on a wide dataset and discuss its usage in the light of the features of available NMR distance restraint sets in public databases.

  11. Development of Ultrasound to Measure In-vivo Dynamic Cervical Spine Intervertebral Disc Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    images of IVDs and dynamic vertebral motion in-vivo during simulated tasks relevant to acute and chronic cervical spine injury and disease. A semi...of cervical vertebrae. Dynamic IVD displacements of vertebrae C4-5 measured by US were consistent with direct measurements. For motion frequencies...We developed a diagnostic system that applies dynamic cyclic loads to cervical spine over a range of programmable frequencies and amplitudes that

  12. Quantitative respirator fit testing: dynamic pressure versus aerosol measurement.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, D R; Willeke, K

    1988-10-01

    A noninvasive, fast, inexpensive new fit testing method has been invented which relates the slope of the pressure decay inside a respirator during breath-holding to the fit of the respirator on the wearer's face. The dynamic pressure test has been compared with the conventional aerosol test at different leakage levels. The results of this comparison show that the sensitivity of the dynamic pressure test is similar to that of the aerosol test. The pressure test, however, is independent of leak site and probe location and can be performed on respirators before and after their use.

  13. An ultrasonic flowmeter for measuring dynamic liquid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpini, T. D.; Monteith, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    A novel oscillating pipe system was developed to provide dynamic calibration wherein small sinusoidal signals with amplitudes of 0.5 to 10% of the steady-state flow were added to the steady-state flow by oscillating the flowmeter relative to the fixed pipes in the flow system. Excellent agreement was obtained between the dynamic velocities derived from an accelerometer mounted on the oscillating pipe system and those sensed by the flowmeter at frequencies of 7, 19, and 30 Hz. Also described were the signal processing techniques used to retrieve the small sinusoidal signals which were obscured by the fluid turbulence.

  14. Dynamic-pressure measurements using an electronically scanned pressure module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    Frequency response was measured for different lengths and diameters of tubing between a sinusoidal pressure source and a pressure sensing module from an electronically scanned pressure measuring system. Measurements were made for straight runs of both steel and vinyl tubing. For steel tubing, measured results are compared with results calculated by using equations developed by Tijdeman and Bergh. Measurements were also made with a bend in the vinyl tubing at the module. In addition, measurements were made with two coils placed in the tubing near the middle of the run.

  15. Measuring Teachers' Attunement to Children's Friendships, Victimization, and Popularity Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madill, Rebecca; Zadzora, Kathleen; Gest, Scott D.

    2016-01-01

    Educational researchers have long recognized that teachers have an "invisible hand" with which they can subtly shape students' relationships. Through seating arrangements, instructional groups, and general classroom management strategies, teachers have many opportunities to shape friendships and status dynamics in the classroom. The…

  16. Log amplifier instrument measures physiological biopotentials over wide dynamic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kado, R. T.

    1970-01-01

    To record biopotentials with extreme dynamic ranges, biopotential inputs are capacitatively coupled to a miniature, low power, solid-state signal conditioner consisting of a two-stage differential preamplifier that has a low noise figure. The ouput of the preamplifier uses diodes to provide an overall gain which is nearly logarithmic.

  17. Dynamic pressure as a measure of gas turbine engine (GTE) performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, G.; Stiharu, I.; Packirisamy, M.; Nerguizian, V.; Landry, R., Jr.; Raskin, J.-P.

    2010-04-01

    Utilizing in situ dynamic pressure measurement is a promising novel approach with applications for both control and condition monitoring of gas turbine-based propulsion systems. The dynamic pressure created by rotating components within the engine presents a unique opportunity for controlling the operation of the engine and for evaluating the condition of a specific component through interpretation of the dynamic pressure signal. Preliminary bench-top experiments are conducted with dc axial fans for measuring fan RPM, blade condition, surge and dynamic temperature variation. Also, a method, based on standing wave physics, is presented for measuring the dynamic temperature simultaneously with the dynamic pressure. These tests are implemented in order to demonstrate the versatility of dynamic pressure-based diagnostics for monitoring several different parameters, and two physical quantities, dynamic pressure and dynamic temperature, with a single sensor. In this work, the development of a dynamic pressure sensor based on micro-electro-mechanical system technology for in situ gas turbine engine condition monitoring is presented. The dynamic pressure sensor performance is evaluated on two different gas turbine engines, one having a fan and the other without.

  18. Autonomous dynamic displacement estimation from data fusion of acceleration and intermittent displacement measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junhee; Kim, Kiyoung; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Addressing the importance of displacement measurement of structural responses in the field of structural health monitoring, this paper presents an autonomous algorithm for dynamic displacement estimation from acceleration integration fused with displacement data intermittently measured. The presented acceleration integration algorithm of multi-rate Kalman filtering distinguishes itself from the past study in the literature by explicitly considering acceleration measurement bias. Furthermore, the algorithm is formulated by unique state definition of integration errors and error dynamics system modeling. To showcase performance of the algorithm, a series of laboratory dynamic experiments for measuring structural responses of acceleration and displacement are conducted. Improved results are demonstrated through comparison between the proposed and past study.

  19. High Dynamic Range Complex Impedance Measurement System for Petrophysical Usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; He, X.; Yao, H.; Tan, S.; Shi, H.; Shen, R.; Yan, C.; Zeng, P.; He, L.; Qiao, N.; Xi, F.; Zhang, H.; Xie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral induced polarization method (SIP) or complex resistivity method is increasing its application in metalliferous ore exploration, hydrocarbon exploration, underground water exploration, monitoring of environment pollution, and the evaluation of environment remediation. And the measurement of complex resistivity or complex impedance of rock/ore sample and polluted water plays a fundamental role in improving the application effect of SIP and the application scope of SIP. However, current instruments can't guaranty the accuracy of measurement when the resistance of sample is less than 10Ω or great than 100kΩ. A lot of samples, such as liquid, polluted sea water, igneous rock, limestone, and sandstone, can't be measured with reliable complex resistivity result. Therefore, this problem projects a shadow in the basic research and application research of SIP. We design a high precision measurement system from the study of measurement principle, sample holder, and measurement instrument. We design input buffers in a single board. We adopt operation amplifier AD549 in this system because of its ultra-high input impedance and ultra-low current noise. This buffer is good in acquiring potential signal across high impedance sample. By analyzing the sources of measurement error and errors generated by the measurement system, we propose a correction method to remove the error in order to achieve high quality complex impedance measurement for rock and ore samples. This measurement system can improve the measurement range of the complex impedance to 0.1 Ω ~ 10 GΩ with amplitude error less than 0.1% and phase error less than 0.1mrad when frequency ranges as 0.01 Hz ~ 1 kHz. We tested our system on resistors with resistance as 0.1Ω ~ 10 GΩ in frequency range as 1 Hz ~ 1000 Hz, and the measurement error is less than 0.1 mrad. We also compared the result with LCR bridge and SCIP, we can find that the bridge's measuring range only reaches 100 MΩ, SCIP's measuring range

  20. Can dynamic contact angle be measured using molecular modeling?

    PubMed

    Malani, Ateeque; Raghavanpillai, Anilkumar; Wysong, Ernest B; Rutledge, Gregory C

    2012-11-02

    A method is presented for determining the dynamic contact angle at the three-phase contact between a solid, a liquid, and a vapor under an applied force, using molecular simulation. The method is demonstrated using a Lennard-Jones fluid in contact with a cylindrical shell of the fcc Lennard-Jones solid. Advancing and receding contact angles and the contact angle hysteresis are reported for the first time by this approach. The increase in force required to wet fully an array of solid cylinders (robustness) with decreasing separation distance between cylinders is evaluated. The dynamic contact angle is characterized by partial slipping of the three phase contact line when a force is applied.

  1. Measurement of cardiac output from dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Seonghwan; Scalzetti, Ernest M.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce a method of estimating cardiac output from the dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT that is primarily used to determine the optimal time window of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Methods: Dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT series, acquired for eight patients, were retrospectively analyzed. The dynamic CT series was acquired, prior to the main CTPA, in cine mode (1 frame/s) for a single slice at the level of the main pulmonary artery covering the cross sections of ascending aorta (AA) and descending aorta (DA) during the infusion of iodinated contrast. The time series of contrast changes obtained for DA, which is the downstream of AA, was assumed to be related to the time series for AA by the convolution with a delay function. The delay time constant in the delay function, representing the average time interval between the cross sections of AA and DA, was determined by least square error fitting between the convoluted AA time series and the DA time series. The cardiac output was then calculated by dividing the volume of the aortic arch between the cross sections of AA and DA (estimated from the single slice CT image) by the average time interval, and multiplying the result by a correction factor. Results: The mean cardiac output value for the six patients was 5.11 (l/min) (with a standard deviation of 1.57 l/min), which is in good agreement with the literature value; the data for the other two patients were too noisy for processing. Conclusions: The dynamic single-slice pulmonary circulation time CT series also can be used to estimate cardiac output.

  2. The number comb for a soil physical properties dynamic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olechko, K.; Patiño, P.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    We propose the prime numbers distribution extracted from the soil digital multiscale images and some physical properties time series as the precise indicator of the spatial and temporal dynamics under soil management changes. With this new indicator the soil dynamics can be studied as a critical phenomenon where each phase transition is estimated and modeled by the graph partitioning induced phase transition. The critical point of prime numbers distribution was correlated with the beginning of Andosols, Vertisols and saline soils physical degradation under the unsustainable soil management in Michoacan, Guanajuato and Veracruz States of Mexico. The data banks corresponding to the long time periods (between 10 and 28 years) were statistically compared by RISK 5.0 software and our own algorithms. Our approach makes us able to distill free-form natural laws of soils physical properties dynamics directly from the experimental data. The Richter (1987) and Schmidt and Lipson (2009) original approaches were very useful to design the algorithms to identify Hamiltonians, Lagrangians and other laws of geometric and momentum conservation especially for erosion case.

  3. Enzyme dynamics during catalysis measured by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kern, Dorothee; Eisenmesser, Elan Z; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2005-01-01

    Many biological processes, in particular enzyme catalysis, occur in the microsecond to millisecond time regime. While the chemical events and static structural features of enzyme catalysis have been extensively studied, very little is known about dynamic processes of the enzyme during the catalytic cycle. Dynamic NMR methods such as ZZ-exchange, line-shape analysis, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG), and rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation (R(1rho)) experiments are powerful in detecting conformational rearrangements with interconversion rates between 0.1 and 10(5) s(-1). In this chapter, the first application of these methods to enzymes during catalysis is described, in addition to studies on several other enzymes in their free states and in complex with ligands. From the experimental results of all systems, a picture arises in which flexibility in the microsecond to millisecond time regime is intrinsic and likely to be an essential property of the enzyme. Quantitative analysis of dynamics at multiple sites of the enzyme reveal large-scale collective motions. For several enzymes, the frequency of motion is comparable to the overall turnover rate, raising the possibility that conformational rearrangements may be rate limiting for catalysis in these enzymes.

  4. Digital system for dynamic turbine engine blade displacement measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiraly, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a technique for measuring blade tip displacements which employs optical probes and an array of microcomputers. A system directly digitizing a minimum of a 2048-point time-deflection history for each of the three measurement locations on each blade is described.

  5. Measures of trajectory ensemble disparity in nonequilibrium statistical dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin; Sivak, David

    2011-06-03

    Many interesting divergence measures between conjugate ensembles of nonequilibrium trajectories can be experimentally determined from the work distribution of the process. Herein, we review the statistical and physical significance of several of these measures, in particular the relative entropy (dissipation), Jeffreys divergence (hysteresis), Jensen-Shannon divergence (time-asymmetry), Chernoff divergence (work cumulant generating function), and Renyi divergence.

  6. Testing and Validation of the Dynamic Interia Measurement Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Alexander; Herrera, Claudia; Spivey, Natalie; Fladung, William; Cloutier, David

    2015-01-01

    This presentation describes the DIM method and how it measures the inertia properties of an object by analyzing the frequency response functions measured during a ground vibration test (GVT). The DIM method has been in development at the University of Cincinnati and has shown success on a variety of small scale test articles. The NASA AFRC version was modified for larger applications.

  7. Vestibular ontogeny: Measuring the influence of the dynamic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Timothy A.; Devries, Sherri M.; Dubois, Linda M.; Nelson, Rick C.

    1993-01-01

    In comparison to other special senses, we are only meagerly informed about the development of vestibular function and the mechanisms that may operate to control or influence the course of vestibular ontogeny. Perhaps one contributing factor to this disparity is the difficulty of evaluating vestibular sense organs directly and noninvasively. The present report describes a recently developed direct noninvasive vestibular function test that can be used to address many basic questions about the developing vestibular system. More particularly, the test can be used to examine the effects of the dynamic environment (e.g. gravitational field and vibration) on vestibular ontogeny.

  8. Digital system for dynamic turbine engine blade displacement measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiraly, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    An instrumentation concept for measuring blade tip displacements which employs optical probes and an array of micro-computers is presented. The system represents a hitherto unknown instrumentation capability for the acquisition and direct digitization of deflection data concurrently from all of the blade tips of an operational engine rotor undergoing flutter or forced vibration. System measurements are made using optical transducers which are fixed to the case. Measurements made in this way are the equivalent of those obtained by placing three surface-normal displacement transducers at three positions on each blade of an operational rotor.

  9. Dynamic and quasi-static measurements of C-4 and primasheet P1000 explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Thompson, Darla G; De Luca, Racci; Rae, Philip J; Cady, Carl M; Todd, Steven N

    2010-01-01

    We have measured dynamic and quasi-static mechanical properties of C-4 and Primasheet P1000 explosive materials to provide input data for modeling efforts. Primasheet P1000 is a pentaerythritol tetranitrate-based rubberized explosive. C-4 is a RDX-based moldable explosive. Dynamic measurements included acoustic and split-Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Quasi-static testing was done in compression on load frames and on a dynamic mechanical analyzer. Split-Hopkinson and quasi-static tests were done at five temperatures from -50 C to 50 C. Acoustic velocities were measured at, above, and below room temperature.

  10. Comparative analysis of high-frequency dynamic measurement experiment for vibration sensor and GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Keliang; Song, Zichao; Zhou, Mingduan; Liu, Miao

    2015-12-01

    Sensor technology applied in dynamic measurement in recent years become the mainly focus subject of attention. In this paper, the high-frequency data collected by two kinds of sensors from vibration sensor and GPS receiver are comparatively analyzed. The integrated scheme of dynamic measurement is proposed based on the high-frequency data for vibration sensor and GPS receiver. The result of experiment is shown that the above sensors with the some same characteristics based on the advantages of the sensors applied in the scheme. Finally, the feasibility and effectiveness of the integrated scheme for the vibration sensor and GPS receiver is verified in the dynamic measurement experiment.

  11. Analysis of strawberry ripening by dynamic speckle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulone, C.; Budini, N.; Vincitorio, F. M.; Freyre, C.; López Díaz, A. J.; Ramil Rego, A.

    2013-11-01

    This work seeks to determine the age of a fruit from observation of its dynamic speckle pattern. A mobile speckle pattern originates on the fruit's surface due to the interference of the wavefronts reflected from moving scatterers. For this work we analyzed two series of photographs of a strawberry speckle pattern, at different stages of ripening, acquired with a CMOS camera. The first day, we took ten photographs at an interval of one second. The same procedure was repeated the next day. From each series of images we extracted several statistical descriptors of pixel-to-pixel gray level variation during the observation time. By comparing these values from the first to the second day we noticed a diminution of the speckle activity. This decay demonstrated that after only one day the ripening process of the strawberry can be detected by dynamic speckle pattern analysis. For this study we employed a simple new algorithm to process the data obtained from the photographs. This algorithm allows defining a global mobility index that indicates the evolution of the fruit's ripening.

  12. Multidimensional characterization of stochastic dynamical systems based on multiple perturbations and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kryvohuz, Maksym Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-06-07

    Generalized nonlinear response theory is presented for stochastic dynamical systems. Experiments in which multiple measurements of dynamical quantities are used along with multiple perturbations of parameters of dynamical systems are described by generalized response functions (GRFs). These constitute a new type of multidimensional measures of stochastic dynamics either in the time or the frequency domains. Closed expressions for GRFs in stochastic dynamical systems are derived and compared with numerical non-equilibrium simulations. Several types of perturbations are considered: impulsive and periodic perturbations of temperature and impulsive perturbations of coordinates. The present approach can be used to study various types of stochastic processes ranging from single-molecule conformational dynamics to chemical kinetics of finite-size reactors such as biocells.

  13. Highly stretchable miniature strain sensor for large dynamic strain measurement

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Bo; Yao, Shurong; Nie, Xu; ...

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new type of highly stretchable strain sensor was developed to measure large strains. The sensor was based on the piezo-resistive response of carbon nanotube (CNT)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite thin films. The piezo-resistive response of CNT composite gives accurate strain measurement with high frequency response, while the ultra-soft PDMS matrix provides high flexibility and ductility for large strain measurement. Experimental results show that the CNT/PDMS sensor measures large strains (up to 8 %) with an excellent linearity and a fast frequency response. The new miniature strain sensor also exhibits much higher sensitivities than the conventional foil strain gages,more » as its gauge factor is 500 times of that of the conventional foil strain gages.« less

  14. Highly stretchable miniature strain sensor for large dynamic strain measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Yao, Shurong; Nie, Xu; Yu, Xun; Blecke, Jill

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new type of highly stretchable strain sensor was developed to measure large strains. The sensor was based on the piezo-resistive response of carbon nanotube (CNT)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite thin films. The piezo-resistive response of CNT composite gives accurate strain measurement with high frequency response, while the ultra-soft PDMS matrix provides high flexibility and ductility for large strain measurement. Experimental results show that the CNT/PDMS sensor measures large strains (up to 8 %) with an excellent linearity and a fast frequency response. The new miniature strain sensor also exhibits much higher sensitivities than the conventional foil strain gages, as its gauge factor is 500 times of that of the conventional foil strain gages.

  15. Abel Inversion of Deflectometric Measurements in Dynamic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Albers, Burt W.; Griffin, DeVon W.

    1999-01-01

    We present an Abel-inversion algorithm to reconstruct mean and rms refractive-index profiles from spatially resolved statistical measurements of the beam-deflection angle in time-dependent, axisymmetric flows. An oscillating gas-jet diffusion flame was investigated as a test case for applying the algorithm. Experimental data were obtained across the whole field by a rainbow schlieren apparatus. Results show that simultaneous multipoint measurements are necessary to reconstruct the rms refractive index accurately.

  16. Dynamic displacement measurement based on triangle phase modulation without preliminary measurement of half-wave voltage for phase modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yosuke; Kimura, Ryosuke; Ito, Takamasa; Kurokawa, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents an improved method for our recently proposed dynamic displacement measurement based on triangle phase modulation. The use of deep phase modulation eliminates the need for preliminary measurement of half-wave voltage V π for the phase modulator. We demonstrate displacement measurement with tens-of-nanometer scale taking place within a few micro seconds, where the temporal resolution is 33 ns. A long-term stability is also realized by employing a simple feedback control for the interferometer. The measurement precision is proved to be as high as that in the previously developed system that required careful preliminary measurement of V π .

  17. Further development of the dynamic gas temperature measurement system. Volume 1: Technical efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, D. L.; Robinson, W. W.; Watkins, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    A compensated dynamic gas temperature thermocouple measurement method was experimentally verified. Dynamic gas temperature signals from a flow passing through a chopped-wheel signal generator and an atmospheric pressure laboratory burner were measured by the dynamic temperature sensor and other fast-response sensors. Compensated data from dynamic temperature sensor thermoelements were compared with fast-response sensors. Results from the two experiments are presented as time-dependent waveforms and spectral plots. Comparisons between compensated dynamic temperature sensor spectra and a commercially available optical fiber thermometer compensated spectra were made for the atmospheric burner experiment. Increases in precision of the measurement method require optimization of several factors, and directions for further work are identified.

  18. The Interpretation of Dynamic Contact Angles Measured by the Wilhelmy Plate Method

    PubMed

    Ramé

    1997-01-01

    We present an analysis for properly interpreting apparent dynamic contact angles measured using the Wilhelmy plate method at low capillary numbers, Ca. This analysis removes the ambiguity in current dynamic measurements which interpret data with the same formula as static measurements. We properly account for all forces, including viscous forces, acting on the plate as it moves into or out of a liquid bath. Our main result, valid at O(1) as Ca --> 0, relates the apparent dynamic contact angle to material-dependent, geometry-independent parameters necessary for describing dynamic wetting of a system. The special case of the apparent contact angle = pi/2 was solved to O(Ca). This O(Ca) solution can guide numerical work necessary for higher Ca's and arbitrary values of the apparent contact angle. These results make the Wilhelmy plate a viable method for determining material parameters for dynamic spreading.

  19. MR measurement of critical phase transition dynamics and supercritical fluid dynamics in capillary and porous media flow.

    PubMed

    Rassi, Erik M; Codd, Sarah L; Seymour, Joseph D

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical fluids (SCF) are useful solvents in green chemistry and oil recovery and are of great current interest in the context of carbon sequestration. Magnetic resonance techniques were applied to study near critical and supercritical dynamics for pump driven flow through a capillary and a packed bed porous media. Velocity maps and displacement propagators measure the dynamics of C(2)F(6) at pressures below, at, and above the critical pressure and at temperatures below and above the critical temperature. Displacement propagators were measured at various displacement observation times to quantify the time evolution of dynamics. In capillary flow, the critical phase transition fluid C(2)F(6) showed increased compressibility compared to the near critical gas and supercritical fluid. These flows exhibit large variations in buoyancy arising from large changes in density due to very small changes in temperature.

  20. Direct, Dynamic Measurement of Interfacial Area within Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.; Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to exhibit several shortcomings that might be partially overcome with a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles (Hassanizadeh and Gray, 1990). This alternative two-phase flow model contains a set of new and non-standard parameters, including specific interfacial area. By incorporating interfacial area production, destruction, and propagation into functional relationships that describe the capillary pressure and saturation, a more physical model has been developed. Niessner and Hassanizadeh (2008) have examined this model numerically and have shown that the model captures saturation hysteresis with drainage/imbibition cycles. Several static experimental studies have been performed to examine the validity of this new thermodynamically based approach; these allow the determination of static parameters of the model. To date, no experimental studies have obtained information about the dynamic parameters required for the model. A new experimental porous flow cell has been constructed using stereolithography to study two-phase flow phenomena (Crandall et al. 2008). A novel image analysis tool was developed for an examination of the evolution of flow patterns during displacement experiments (Crandall et al. 2009). This analysis tool enables the direct quantification of interfacial area between fluids by matching known geometrical properties of the constructed flow cell with locations identified as interfaces from images of flowing fluids. Numerous images were obtained from two-phase experiments within the flow cell. The dynamic evolution of the fluid distribution and the fluid-fluid interface locations were determined by analyzing these images. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the thermodynamically based two-phase flow model, review the properties of the stereolithography flow cell, and show how the image analysis procedure has been used to obtain dynamic parameters for the

  1. Room temperature current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of Ag/InGaN/n-Si Schottky barrier diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdoğan, Erman; Kundakçı, Mutlu

    2017-02-01

    Metal-semiconductors (MSs) or Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) have a significant potential in the integrated device technology. In the present paper, electrical characterization of Ag/InGaN/n-Si Schottky diode have been systematically carried out by simple Thermionic method (TE) and Norde function based on the I-V characteristics. Ag ohmic and schottky contacts are deposited on InGaN/n-Si film by thermal evaporation technique under a vacuum pressure of 1×10-5 mbar. Ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance values of this diode are determined from I-V curve. These parameters are calculated by TE and Norde methods and findings are given in a comparetive manner. The results show the consistency for both method and also good agreement with other results obtained in the literature. The value of ideality factor and barrier height have been determined to be 2.84 and 0.78 eV at room temperature using simple TE method. The value of barrier height obtained with Norde method is calculated as 0.79 eV.

  2. Electron transfer processes occurring on platinum neural stimulating electrodes: a tutorial on the i(V e) profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumsa, Doe W.; Bhadra, Narendra; Hudak, Eric M.; Kelley, Shawn C.; Untereker, Darrel F.; Mortimer, J. Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this tutorial is to encourage members of the neuroprosthesis community to incorporate electron transfer processes into their thinking and provide them with the tools to do so when they design and work with neurostimulating devices. The focus of this article is on platinum because it is the most used electrode metal for devices in commercial use. The i(V e) profile or cyclic voltammogram contains information about electron transfer processes that can occur when the electrode-electrolyte interface, V e, is at a specific potential, and assumed to be near steady-state conditions. For the engineer/designer this means that if the potential is not in the range of a specific electron transfer process, that process cannot occur. An i(V e) profile, recorded at sweep rates greater than 0.1 mVs-1, approximates steady-state conditions. Rapid transient potential excursions, like that seen with neural stimulation pulses, may be too fast for the reaction to occur, however, this means that if the potential is in the range of a specific electron transfer process it may occur and should be considered. The approach described here can be used to describe the thermodynamic electron transfer processes on other candidate electrode metals, e.g. stainless steel, iridium, carbon-based, etc.

  3. [Prospective evaluation of clinical parameters of AAT patients with i. v. prolastin therapy in a homecare setting].

    PubMed

    Wilke, A; Grohé, C

    2013-10-01

    Prognostic parameters and indicators of deterioration of prolastin substituted alpha 1 antitrypsin deficient COPD (AAT) are poorly defined. In particular, there is a lack of information how patients with AAT report exacerbations or how intravenous therapy with prolastin is tolerated and leads to a stabilization of the clinical course of the disease. In a prospective study seven patients were followed over 36 months who received i. v. prolastin at home. Both clinical parameters such as exacerbations and spirometric lung function tests were used to monitor the clinical course of the disease. During the time period given 2.1 exacerbations/year were documented, the average lung function loss over the period of 36 month was mean FEV1 1.02 ± 0.61 l/s to 0.94 ± 0.63 l/s and mean vital capacity 2.95 ± 0.82 l to 2.87 ± 0.81 l. Complications related to home based infusion therapy did not occur. No non elective hospitalisations were reported. Taken together, this prospective feasibility trial could show that home based i. v. therapy in patients with AAT is safe and leads to less exacerbations and loss of lung function as compared to the historical cohort.

  4. Dynamic mechanical measurement of the viscoelasticity of single adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Elise A.; Adeniba, Olaoluwa O.; Ewoldt, Randy H.; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-02-01

    Many recent studies on the viscoelasticity of individual cells link mechanics with cellular function and health. Here, we introduce a measurement of the viscoelastic properties of individual human colon cancer cells (HT-29) using silicon pedestal microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonant sensors. We demonstrate that the viscoelastic properties of single adherent cells can be extracted by measuring a difference in vibrational amplitude of our resonant sensor platform. The magnitude of vibration of the pedestal sensor is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). A change in amplitude of the sensor, compared with the driving amplitude (amplitude ratio), is influenced by the mechanical properties of the adhered cells. The amplitude ratio of the fixed cells was greater than the live cells, with a p-value <0.0001. By combining the amplitude shift with the resonant frequency shift measure, we determined the elastic modulus and viscosity values of 100 Pa and 0.0031 Pa s, respectively. Our method using the change in amplitude of resonant MEMS devices can enable the determination of a refined solution space and could improve measuring the stiffness of cells.

  5. New measurement technology for 'Critical Dynamics in Microgravity'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Robert

    2000-03-01

    When driven away from equilibrium by a heat flux Q, the superfluid transition in ^4He evolves from a simple critical point into a fascinating and complex nonlinear region, where the onset of macroscopic quantum order is masked by Earth's gravity. Prior measurements of heat transport within this nonlinear region on Earth (and scheduled measurements on the International Space Station) require temperature resolution to 0.1 nK at 2.2 K in an exceptionally stable thermometer, with all heat flow stable to 3 fW/s. These measurements of the liquid helium temperature must be localized along the side of the experimental cell with a spatial resolution of 5 microns, and systematic offsets of the measured temperature from the true helium temperature must be controlled to within 0.3 nK. Such measurement technology has recently been developed, out-performing these demanding requirements by a comfortable margin. A new class of fundamental physics experiments may be facilitated by these recent advances in metrology. This work has been supported by the Microgravity Science Division of NASA, conducted in cooperation with JPL, and in collaboration with Mary Jayne Adriaans, Alex Babkin, S.T.P. Boyd, Peter Day, David Elliott, Beverly Klemme, T.D. McCarson, Ray Nelson, and Dmitri Sergatskov.

  6. Sensor Web Dynamic Measurement Techniques and Adaptive Observing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talabac, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Sensor Web observing systems may have the potential to significantly improve our ability to monitor, understand, and predict the evolution of rapidly evolving, transient, or variable environmental features and events. This improvement will come about by integrating novel data collection techniques, new or improved instruments, emerging communications technologies and protocols, sensor mark-up languages, and interoperable planning and scheduling systems. In contrast to today's observing systems, "event-driven" sensor webs will synthesize real- or near-real time measurements and information from other platforms and then react by reconfiguring the platforms and instruments to invoke new measurement modes and adaptive observation strategies. Similarly, "model-driven" sensor webs will utilize environmental prediction models to initiate targeted sensor measurements or to use a new observing strategy. The sensor web concept contrasts with today's data collection techniques and observing system operations concepts where independent measurements are made by remote sensing and in situ platforms that do not share, and therefore cannot act upon, potentially useful complementary sensor measurement data and platform state information. This presentation describes NASA's view of event-driven and model-driven Sensor Webs and highlights several research and development activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center.

  7. Nonlinear measures and dynamics in psychophysiology of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Bob, Petr

    2014-01-01

    According to recent findings nonlinear dynamic processes related to neural chaos and complexity likely play a crucial role in neural synchronization of distributed neural activities that enable information integration and conscious experience. Disturbances in these interactions produce patterns of temporal and spatial disorganization with decreased or increased functional connectivity and complexity that underlie specific changes of perceptual and cognitive states. These perceptual and cognitive changes may be characterized by neural chaos with significantly increased brain sensitivity that may underlie sensitization and kindling, and cognitive hypersensitivity in some mental disorders. Together these findings suggest that processes related to more irregular neural states with higher complexity that may lead to neural chaos, negatively affect information integration and processing in the brain, and may influence disintegrated conscious experience.

  8. Measuring actin dynamics during phagocytosis using photo-switchable fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovari, Daniel T.; Curtis, Jennifer E.

    2013-03-01

    Phagocytosis has traditionally been investigated in terms of the relevant biochemical signaling pathways. However, a growing number of studies investigating the physical aspects of phagocytosis have demonstrated that several distinct forces are exerted throughout particle ingestion. We use variations on FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching) in combination with photo-switchable fluorescent protein to investigate actin dynamics as a phagocyte attempts to engulf its prey. The goal of our actin studies are to determine the recruitment and polymerization rate of actin in the forming phagosome and whether an organized contractile actin ring is present and responsible for phagosome closure, as proposed in the literature. These experiments are ongoing and contribute to our long term effort of developing a physics based model of phagocytosis.

  9. Dynamical measurements of the interior structure of exoplanets

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Juliette C.; Batygin, Konstantin

    2013-12-01

    Giant gaseous planets often reside on orbits in sufficient proximity to their host stars for the planetary quadrupole gravitational field to become non-negligible. In presence of an additional planetary companion, a precise characterization of the system's orbital state can yield meaningful constraints on the transiting planet's interior structure. However, such methods can require a very specific type of system. This paper explores the dynamic range of applicability of these methods and shows that interior structure calculations are possible for a wide array of orbital architectures. The HAT-P-13 system is used as a case study, and the implications of perturbations arising from a third distant companion on the feasibility of an interior calculation are discussed. We find that the method discussed here is likely to be useful in studying other planetary systems, allowing the possibility of an expanded survey of the interiors of exoplanets.

  10. Optical Scattering Measurement of Microbubble Cloud Dynamics in Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashi Miwa,; Yoshiki Yamakoshi,; Tomoharu Mashiyama,

    2010-07-01

    The manipulation of microbubbles by ultrasonic waves has the potential to be a useful technique in therapeutic ultrasound, such as for drug delivery systems and gene delivery systems. The Bjerknes force, which is an acoustic radiation force produced by microbubbles, acts as a driving force on the microbubbles; however, the two types of Bjerknes force make the resultant bubble movement very complex. In this paper, the evaluation of microbubble dynamics under ultrasonic wave radiation based on a laser diffraction method is proposed. The relationship between the microbubble spatial distribution and the diffracted light intensity is discussed on the basis of both theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. Experiments are carried out using ultrasonic wave contrast agent as microbubbles.

  11. Complexity multiscale asynchrony measure and behavior for interacting financial dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ge; Wang, Jun; Niu, Hongli

    2016-08-01

    A stochastic financial price process is proposed and investigated by the finite-range multitype contact dynamical system, in an attempt to study the nonlinear behaviors of real asset markets. The viruses spreading process in a finite-range multitype system is used to imitate the interacting behaviors of diverse investment attitudes in a financial market, and the empirical research on descriptive statistics and autocorrelation behaviors of return time series is performed for different values of propagation rates. Then the multiscale entropy analysis is adopted to study several different shuffled return series, including the original return series, the corresponding reversal series, the random shuffled series, the volatility shuffled series and the Zipf-type shuffled series. Furthermore, we propose and compare the multiscale cross-sample entropy and its modification algorithm called composite multiscale cross-sample entropy. We apply them to study the asynchrony of pairs of time series under different time scales.

  12. Measurement of interstage fluid-annulus dynamical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Makay, E.; Diaz-Tous, I. A.

    1982-01-01

    The work described in this paper is part of an Electric Power Research Institute sponsored effort to improve rotor vibrational performance on power plant feed water pumps. A major objective of this effort is to reduce vibration levels by devising inter-stage sealing configurations with optimized damping capacity, realizing that the typical multi-stage centrifugal pump has several ore inter-stage fluid annuli than it has journal bearings. Also, the fluid annuli are distributed between the journal bearings where vibration levels are highest and can therefore be 'exercised' more as dampers than can the bearings. Described in this paper is a test apparatus which has been built to experimentally determine fluid-annulus dynamical coefficients for various configurations of inter-stage sealing geometry.

  13. Measurements of impulsive reconnection driven by nonlinear Hall dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tharp, T. D.; Almagri, A. F.; Miller, M. C.; Mirnov, V. V.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.; Kim, C. C.

    2010-12-15

    The magnetic fields associated with reconnection in the edge of the reversed field pinch configuration have been measured in the Madison Symmetric Torus. The measured magnetic field structure is compared with theoretical predictions computed in both toroidal and cylindrical geometries. The summation of multiple modes has been accomplished to reveal a complex but still coherent edge structure. Key terms of relevant Ohm's law are accessible from magnetic field measurement and reveal the ordering [(1/ne)JxB>>E>{eta}J], which implies that two fluid effects are important in the physics governing this reconnection. Further, it is seen that the nonlinear three-wave coupling of the Hall term acts as a driving mechanism for this linearly stable mode.

  14. Measuring Group Work Dynamics and Its Relation with L2 Learners' Task Motivation and Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poupore, Glen

    2016-01-01

    While learners of a second language (L2) are increasingly interacting in small groups as part of a communicative methodological paradigm, very few studies have investigated the social dynamics that occur in such groups. The aim of this study is to introduce a group work dynamic measuring instrument and to investigate the relationship between group…

  15. Carrier Lifetimes in a I I I -V -N Intermediate-Band Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyman, J. N.; Schwartzberg, A. M.; Yu, K. M.; Luce, A. V.; Dubon, O. D.; Kuang, Y. J.; Tu, C. W.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2017-01-01

    We use transient absorption spectroscopy to measure carrier lifetimes in the multiband semiconductor GaPyAs1 -x -yNx . These measurements probe the electron populations in the conduction band, intermediate band, and valence band as a function of time after an excitation pulse. Following photoexcitation of GaP0.32As0.67N0.01 , we find that the electron population in the conduction band decays exponentially with a time constant τCB=23 ps . The electron population in the intermediate band exhibits bimolecular recombination with recombination constant r =2 ×10-8 cm3/s . In our experiment, an optical pump pulse excites electrons from the valence band to the intermediate and conduction bands, and the change in interband absorption due to absorption saturation and induced absorption is probed with a delayed white-light pulse. We model the optical properties of our samples using the band anticrossing model to extract carrier densities as a function of time. These results not only identify the short minority-carrier lifetime as a key factor affecting the performance of GaPyAs1 -x -yNx -based intermediate-band solar cells but also provide guidance on ways to address this issue.

  16. Performance predictions for solar-chemical converters based on photoelectrochemical I-V curves

    SciTech Connect

    Luttmer, J.D.; Trachtenberg, I.

    1985-06-01

    Texas Instruments' solar energy system contains a solar-chemical converter (SCC) which converts solar energy into chemical energy via the electrolysis of hydrobromic acid (HBr) into hydrogen (H/sub 2/) and bromine (Br/sub 2/). Previous predictions of SCC performance have employed electrical dry-probe data and a computer simulation model to predict the H/sub 2/ generation rates. The method of prediction described here makes use of the photoelectrochemical Icurves to determine the ''wet'' probe parameters of V /SUB oc/ J /SUB sc/ FF, and efficiency for anodes and cathodes. The advantages of this technique over the dry-probe/computer simulation method are discussed. A comparison of predicted and measured H/sub 2/ generation rates is presented. Solar to chemical efficiencies of 8.6% have been both predicted and measured for the electrolysis of 48% HBr to hydrogen and bromine by a full anode/cathode array. Individual cathode solar to hydrogen efficiencies of 9.5% have been obtained.

  17. The Focus Factor: A Dynamic Measure of Journal Specialisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Frandsen, Tove Faber

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We present a new bibliometric indicator to measure journal specialisation over time, named the focus factor. This new indicator is based on bibliographic coupling and counts the percentage of re-citations given in subsequent years. Method: The applicability of the new indicator is demonstrated on a selection of general science…

  18. X-RAY MEASURED DYNAMICS OF TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuda, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Hwang, Una; Hughes, John P.; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Hayato, Asami; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi E-mail: Robert.Petre-1@nasa.go E-mail: jackph@physics.rutgers.ed E-mail: hayato@crab.riken.j E-mail: tsunemi@ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.j

    2010-02-01

    We present X-ray proper-motion measurements of the forward shock and reverse-shocked ejecta in Tycho's supernova remnant, based on three sets of archival Chandra data taken in 2000, 2003, and 2007. We find that the proper motion of the edge of the remnant (i.e., the forward shock and protruding ejecta knots) varies from 0.''20 yr{sup -1} (expansion index m = 0.33, where R = t{sup m} ) to 0.''40 yr{sup -1} (m = 0.65) with azimuthal angle in 2000-2007 measurements, and 0.''14 yr{sup -1} (m = 0.26) to 0.''40 yr{sup -1} (m = 0.65) in 2003-2007 measurements. The azimuthal variation of the proper motion and the average expansion index of approx0.5 are consistent with those derived from radio observations. We also find proper motion and expansion index of the reverse-shocked ejecta to be 0.''21-0.''31 yr{sup -1} and 0.43-0.64, respectively. From a comparison of the measured m-value with Type Ia supernova evolutionary models, we find a pre-shock ambient density around the remnant of approx<0.2 cm{sup -3}.

  19. High Dynamic Range Nonlinear Measurement using Analog Cancellation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    shield around sensitive areas. The target may also be sensitive to radiated coupling from the system and will benefit from a shield box or Faraday ... cage , if it is not already enclosed. On the shared measurement path and through the target, cross-channel coupling cannot be prevented, so low-PIM

  20. Static and dynamic wetting measurements of single carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Barber, Asa H; Cohen, Sidney R; Wagner, H Daniel

    2004-05-07

    Individual carbon nanotubes were immersed and removed from various organic liquids using atomic force microscopy. The carbon nanotube-liquid interactions could be monitored in situ, and accurate measurements of the contact angle between liquids and the nanotube surface were made. These wetting data were used to produce Owens and Wendt plots giving the dispersive and polar components of the nanotube surface.

  1. Exploring Quantum Dynamics of Continuous Measurement with a Superconducting Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadbabaie, Arian; Forouzani, Neda; Tan, Dian; Murch, Kater

    Weak measurements obtain partial information about a quantum state with minimal backaction. This enables state tracking without immediate collapse to eigenstates, of interest to both experimental and theoretical physics. State tomography and continuous weak measurements may be used to reconstruct the evolution of a single system, known as a quantum trajectory. We examine experimental trajectories of a two-level system at varied measurement strengths with constant unitary drive. Our analysis is applied to a transmon qubit dispersively coupled to a 3D microwave cavity in the circuit QED architecture. The weakly coupled cavity acts as pointer system for QND measurements in the qubit's energy basis. Our results indicate a marked difference in state purity between two approaches for trajectory reconstruction: the Bayesian and Stochastic Master Equation (SME) formalisms. Further, we observe the transition from diffusive to jump-like trajectories, state purity evolution, and a novel, tilted form of the Quantum Zeno effect. This work provides new insight into quantum behavior and prompts further comparison of SME and Bayesian formalisms to understand the nature of quantum systems. Our results are applicable to a variety of fields, from stochastic thermodynamics to quantum control.

  2. System Engineering on the Use for Ares I,V - the Simpler, the Better

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, William; Greene, William D.; Greasley, Paul; Ackerman, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    The Ares I and Ares V Vehicles will utilize the J-2X rocket engine developed for NASA by the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne Company. The J-2X is an improved higher power version of the original J-2 engine used during the Apollo program. With higher power and updated requirements for safety and performance, the J-2X becomes a new engine using state-of-the-art design methodology, materials and manufacturing processes. The implementation of Systems Engineering (SE) principles enables the rapid J-2X development program to remain aligned with the ARES I and V vehicle programs, Meeting the aggressive development schedule is a challenge. Coordinating the best expertise thai NASA and PWR have to offer requires effectively utilizing resources at multiple sites. This presents formidable communication challenges. SE allows honest and open discussions of issues and problems. This simple idea is often overlooked in large and complex SE programs. Regular and effective meetings linking SE objectives to component designs are used to voice differences of opinions with customer and contractor in attendance so that the best mutual decisions can be made on the shortest possible schedule. Regular technical interchange meetings on secure program wide computer networks and CM processes are effective,in the "Controlled Change" process that exemplifies good SE. Good communication is a key effective SE implementation. The System of Systems approach is the vision of the Orion program which facilitates the establishment of dynamic SE processes at all levels including the engine. SE enables requirements evolution by facilitating organizational and process agility. Flow down and distribution of requirements is controlled by Allocation Reports which breakdown numerical design objectives (weight, reliability, etc.) into quanta goals for each component area. Linked databases of design and verification requirements helps eliminate redundancy and potential mistakes inherent m separated systems. Another

  3. Design Considerations for Remote High-Speed Pressure Measurements of Dynamic Combustion Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, D.L.; Ferguson, D.H.; Rohrssen, Robert; Perez, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    As gas turbine combustion systems evolve to achieve ultra-low emission targets, monitoring and controlling dynamic combustion processes becomes increasingly important. These dynamic processes may include flame extinction, combustion-driven instabilities, or other dynamic combustion phenomena. Pressure sensors can be incorporated into the combustor liner design, but this approach is complicated by the harsh operating environment. One practical solution involves locating the sensor in a more remote location, such as outside the pressure casing. The sensor can be connected to the measurement point by small diameter tubing. Although this is a practical approach, the dynamics of the tubing can introduce significant errors into the pressure measurement. This paper addresses measurement errors associated with semi-infinite coil remote sensing setups and proposes an approach to improve the accuracy of these types of measurements.

  4. Manganite-based memristive heterojunction with tunable non-linear I-V characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong-Sub; Park, Hyung-Ho; Rozenberg, M J

    2015-04-21

    A resistive random access memory (ReRAM) based on the memristive effect allows high-density integration through a cross-point array (CPA) structure. However, a significant common drawback of the CPA configuration is the crosstalk between cells. Here, we introduce a solution based on a novel heterojunction stack solely made of members of the perovskite manganite family Pr(1-x)Ca(x)MnO3 (PCMO) and CaMnO(3-δ) (CMO) which show electroforming-free bipolar resistive switching. The heterojunction consists of rectifying interfaces and shows a symmetrical and tunable non-linear current-voltage curve. The spectromicroscopic measurements support the scenario of specialized roles, with the memristive effect taking place at the active Al-PCMO interface via a redox mechanism, while non-linearity was achieved by adopting a rectifying double interface PCMO-CMO-PCMO.

  5. Poly-benzyl domains grown on porous silicon and their I- V rectification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Jie; Han, Huan-Mei; Xia, Bing; Ba, Long; Liu, Hong-Bo; Xiao, Shou-Jun

    2007-09-01

    Microwave-irradiated polymerization of benzyl chloride and triphenyl chloromethane on hydride-terminated porous silicon (PS) was achieved through the use of Zn powder as a catalyst. Transmission infrared Fourier-transform spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses confirmed the poly-benzyl membranes grafted on PS. Topographical images by AFM revealed crystal-like domains rather than homogenous monolayers on the surface. The current-voltage measurements in nano-scale by current sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) showed the rectification behavior of this polymer membrane. Finally, mechanism of a radical initiation on the surface and a following Friedel-Crafts alkylation was proposed for the covalent assembly of poly-benzyl domains.

  6. Dynamic Deformation Measurements of an Aeroelastic Semispan Model. [conducted in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Sharon S.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Edwards, John W.; Schuster, David M.

    2001-01-01

    The techniques used to acquire, reduce, and analyze dynamic deformation measurements of an aeroelastic semispan wind tunnel model are presented. Single-camera, single-view video photogrammetry (also referred to as videogrammetric model deformation, or VMD) was used to determine dynamic aeroelastic deformation of the semispan 'Models for Aeroelastic Validation Research Involving Computation' (MAVRIC) model in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. Dynamic deformation was determined from optical retroreflective tape targets at five semispan locations located on the wing from the root to the tip. Digitized video images from a charge coupled device (CCD) camera were recorded and processed to automatically determine target image plane locations that were then corrected for sensor, lens, and frame grabber spatial errors. Videogrammetric dynamic data were acquired at a 60-Hz rate for time records of up to 6 seconds during portions of this flutter/Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO) test at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.96. Spectral analysis of the deformation data is used to identify dominant frequencies in the wing motion. The dynamic data will be used to separate aerodynamic and structural effects and to provide time history deflection data for Computational Aeroelasticity code evaluation and validation.

  7. Flight and attitude dynamics measurements of an instrumented Frisbee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2005-03-01

    In-flight measurements are made of the translational accelerations and attitude motion of a hand-thrown flying disc using miniaturized accelerometers and other sensors and a microcontroller data acquisition system. The experiments explore the capabilities and limitations of sensors on a rapidly rotating platform moving in air, and illustrate several of the complex gyrodynamic aspects of Frisbee flight. The data give insight into the biomechanics of Frisbee launch, and indicate lift, drag and pitch moment coefficients consistent with previous wind-tunnel measurements. The experiments constitute an instructive exercise in aerospace vehicle systems integration and in attitude reconstruction, and open the way to guided disc wings using control surfaces actuated during specific spin phases determined by onboard sensors.

  8. Instrumentation for measuring the dynamic pressure on rotating compressor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, H. P.; Lanati, G. A.

    1978-01-01

    To establish the capability for measurement of oscillatory pressure on rotating blades, miniature fast response semiconductor strain gage pressure transducers (2mm x 0.33mm) were mounted in several configurations on thin titanium and steel compressor blades and subjected to pressure cycles from 1 to 310 kPa during static tests and spin tests. Static test conditions included 20 C to 150 C, 0 to 3000 tensile microstrain, -1000 to +1000 bending microstrain and + or - 650G vibration. The spin test conditions included 20 C to 82 C at 0 to 90,000G. Durability was excellent. Pressure transducer sensitivity changed by only a few percent over this range of environmental conditions. Noise signal due to oscillatory acceleration normal to the diaphragm was acceptable (0.33Pa/G). Noise signal due to oscillatory strain was acceptable (0.5 Pa/microstrain) when the transducer was mounted on a 0.05mm rubber pad, with a total buildup of 0.38mm on the measure surface. Back mounting or partial recessing to eliminate buildup, increased the strain effect to 1.2 Pa/microstrain. Flush mounting within the blade to eliminate buildup reduced the strain effect, but required development of a special transducer shape. This transducer was not available in time for spin tests. Unpredictable zero drift + or - 14 kPa ruled out the use of these mounting arrangements for accurate steady-state (D.C.) measurements on rotating blades. The two best configurations fully developed and spin tested were then successfully applied in the NAS3-20606 rotating fan flutter program for quantitative measurement of oscillatory pressure amplitudes.

  9. Dynamic temperature and velocity measurements using neutron resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, V.W.; Asay, B.W.; Boat, R.

    1997-08-01

    The use of Doppler broadening in neutron resonances as a quantitative way to measure temperatures has been proposed and investigated for cases of static or quasi-static temperature measurements. Neutrons are temperature probes that can penetrate a sample to view its interior. At the same time products that may shield a sample optically are not opaque to neutrons so that temperature measurements can be made in their presence. When neutrons are attenuated by a sample material, the time-of-flight (TOF) spectrum of the transmitted neutrons exhibits a series of characteristic dips or resonances. These resonances appear when neutrons are captured from the beam in the formation of excited states in the A + 1 nucleus (n + A {ge} (A + 1){sup *}). Subsequent de-excitation of these states, by gamma emission or particle emission into 4{pi} steradians, effectively eliminates the captured neutrons from the transmitted beam. The resonance locations and lineshapes which appear in the TOF spectrum are unique to each isotopic element, and temperature determinations can be localized through the positioning of resonant tags.

  10. Effects of Thermal Treatment on the Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Coal Measures Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Mao, Xianbiao; Cao, Lili; Pu, Hai; Mao, Rongrong; Lu, Aihong

    2016-09-01

    Many projects such as the underground gasification of coal seams and coal-bed methane mining (exploitation) widely involve the dynamic problems of coal measures sandstone achieved via thermal treatment. This study examines the dynamic mechanical properties of coal measures sandstone after thermal treatment by means of an MTS653 high-temperature furnace and Split Hopkinson pressure bar test system. Experimental results indicate that 500 °C is a transition point for the dynamic mechanical parameters of coal measures sandstone. The dynamic elastic modulus and peak strength increase linearly from 25 to 500 °C while the dynamic peak strain decreases linearly over the same temperature range. The dynamic elastic modulus and peak strength drop quickly from 500 to 800 °C, with a significant increase in the dynamic peak strain over the same temperature range. The rock mechanics are closely linked to material composition and mesoscopic structure. Analysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy indicate that the molecules inside the sandstone increase in density due to the thermal expansion of the material particles, which effectively improves the deformation resistance and carrying capacity of the sandstone and reduces the likelihood of axial deformation. With heat treatment that exceeds 500 °C, the dynamic mechanical properties rapidly weaken due to the decomposition of kaolinite; additionally, hot cracking of the mineral particles within the materials arises from coal sandstone internal porosity, and other defects gradually appear.

  11. Semicircular bend testing with split Hopkinson pressure bar for measuring dynamic tensile strength of brittle solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, F.; Xia, K.; Luo, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    We propose and validate an indirect tensile testing method to measure the dynamic tensile strength of rocks and other brittle solids: semicircular bend (SCB) testing with a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. A strain gauge is mounted near the failure spot on the specimen to determine the rupture time. The momentum trap technique is utilized to ensure single pulse loading for postmortem examination. Tests without and with pulse shaping are conducted on rock specimens. The evolution of tensile stress at the failure spot is determined via dynamic and quasistatic finite element analyses with the dynamic loads measured from SHPB as inputs. Given properly shaped incident pulse, far-field dynamic force balance is achieved and the peak of the loading matches in time with the rupture onset of the specimen. In addition, the dynamic tensile stress history at the failure spot obtained from the full dynamic finite element analysis agrees with the quasistatic analysis. The opposite occurs for the test without pulse shaping. These results demonstrate that when the far-field dynamic force balance is satisfied, the inertial effects associated with stress wave loading are minimized and thus one can apply the simple quasistatic analysis to obtain the tensile strength in the SCB-SHPB testing. This method provides a useful and cost effective way to measure indirectly the dynamic tensile strength of rocks and other brittle materials.

  12. Measurement of the time-temperature dependent dynamic mechanical properties of boron/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.; Maisel, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    A flexural vibration test and associated equipment were developed to accurately measure the low strain dynamic modulus and damping of composite materials from -200 C to over 500 C. The basic test method involves the forced vibration of composite bars at their resonant free-free flexural modes in a high vacuum cryostat furnace. The accuracy of these expressions and the flexural test was verified by dynamic moduli and damping capacity measurements on 50 fiber volume percent boron/aluminum (B/Al) composites vibrating near 2000 Hz. The phase results were summarized to permit predictions of the B/Al dynamic behavior as a function of frequency, temperature, and fiber volume fraction.

  13. Dynamic properties of bacterial pili measured by optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallman, Erik G.; Andersson, Magnus J.; Schedin, Staffan S.; Jass, Jana; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Axner, Ove

    2004-10-01

    The ability of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to cause urinary tract infections is dependent on their ability to colonize the uroepithelium. Infecting bacteria ascend the urethra to the bladder and then kidneys by attaching to the uroepithelial cells via the differential expression of adhesins. P pili are associated with pyelonephritis, the more severe infection of the kidneys. In order to find means to treat pyelonephritis, it is therefore of interest to investigate the properties P pili. The mechanical behavior of individual P pili of uropathogenic Escherichia coli has recently been investigated using optical tweezers. P pili, whose main part constitutes the PapA rod, composed of ~1000 PapA subunits in a helical arrangement, are distributed over the bacterial surface and mediate adhesion to host cells. We have earlier studied P pili regarding its stretching/elongation properties where we have found and characterized three different elongation regions, of which one constitute an unfolding of the quaternary (helical) structure of the PapA rod. It was shown that this unfolding takes place at an elongation independent force of 27 +/- 2 pN. We have also recently performed studies on its folding properties and shown that the unfolding/folding of the PapA rod is completely reversible. Here we present a study of the dynamical properties of the PapA rod. We show, among other things, that the unfolding force increases and that the folding force decreases with the speed of unfolding and folding respectively. Moreover, the PapA rod can be folded-unfolded a significant number of times without loosing its characteristics, a phenomenon that is believed to be important for the bacterium to keep close contact to the host tissue and consequently helps the bacterium to colonize the host tissue.

  14. Production Measurement of Fuze Components under Dynamic Stress.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-09

    grams including user s programs for measurement , control , data processing, and data reporting, and RTE-11 based pro- gr4rns (editor , compilers...assembler. etc.) for concurrent pro- - • • gram development. Multiprogramming gives the user the abil-• ~‘~~~~~~ • ‘, _ - It y to match the frequency...0.0026’~ ts °C Long-Term Drill: ±0.06% Is . maxi mum , in 30 days. Throughput Rate to Buffer To 45 kHz ’ via Dual -(’hanne l Port (‘ontro ller (D( P

  15. Dynamic holographic interferometry by photorefractive crystals for quantitative deformation measurements.

    PubMed

    Pouet, B; Krishnaswamy, S

    1996-02-10

    A holographic interferometer that uses two-wave mixing in a photorefractive (Bi12SiO20) crystal under an applied ac field is described. The interferometer uses a repetitive sequence of separate record and readout times to obtain quasi real-time holographic interferograms of vibrating objects. It is shown that a good signal-to-noise ratio of the interferometer is obtained by turning off the object illumination and the applied ac field during readout of the hologram. The good signal-to-noise ratio of the resulting holographic interferograms enables phase measurement, which allows for quantitative deformation analysis.

  16. Use of measurement theory for operationalization and quantification of psychological constructs in systems dynamics modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitkov-Norris, Elena; Yeghiazarian, Ara

    2016-11-01

    The analytical tools available to social scientists have traditionally been adapted from tools originally designed for analysis of natural science phenomena. This article discusses the applicability of systems dynamics - a qualitative based modelling approach, as a possible analysis and simulation tool that bridges the gap between social and natural sciences. After a brief overview of the systems dynamics modelling methodology, the advantages as well as limiting factors of systems dynamics to the potential applications in the field of social sciences and human interactions are discussed. The issues arise with regards to operationalization and quantification of latent constructs at the simulation building stage of the systems dynamics methodology and measurement theory is proposed as a ready and waiting solution to the problem of dynamic model calibration, with a view of improving simulation model reliability and validity and encouraging the development of standardised, modular system dynamics models that can be used in social science research.

  17. Perspectives for clinical measures of dynamic foot function-reference data and methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Rathleff, M S; Nielsen, R G; Simonsen, O; Olesen, C G; Kersting, U G

    2010-02-01

    Several studies have investigated if static posture assessments qualify to predict dynamic function of the foot showing diverse outcomes. However, it was suggested that dynamic measures may be better suited to predict foot-related overuse problems. The purpose of this study was to establish the reliability for dynamic measures of longitudinal arch angle (LAA) and navicular height (NH) and to examine to what extent static and dynamic measures thereof are related. Intra-rater reliability of LAA and NH measures was tested on a sample of 17 control subjects. Subsequently, 79 subjects were tested while walking on a treadmill. The ranges and minimum values for LAA and NH during ground contact were identified over 20 consecutive steps. A geometric error model was used to simulate effects of marker placement uncertainty and skin movement artifacts. Results demonstrated the highest reliability for the minimum NH (MinNH), followed by the minimum LAA (MinLAA), the dynamic range of navicular height (DeltaNH) and the range of LAA (DeltaLAA) while all measures were highly reliable. Marker location uncertainty and skin movement artifacts had the smallest effects on measures of NH. The use of an alignment device for marker placement was shown to reduce error ranges for NH measures. Therefore, DeltaNH and MinNH were recommended for functional dynamic foot characterization in the sagittal plane. There is potential for such measures to be a suitable predictor for overuse injuries while being obtainable in clinical settings. Future research needs to include such dynamic but simple foot assessments in large-scale clinical studies.

  18. Dynamic and static measurements on epitaxial Fe/Si/Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuanr, Bijoy K.; Buchmeier, M.; Buergler, D. E.; Gruenberg, P.; Camley, R.; Celinski, Z.

    2003-07-01

    Strong antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling across an insulating spacer is in increasing demand for high-density magnetic recording. We report here on the interlayer exchange coupling of epitaxial Fe(8 nm)/Si(t)/Fe(10 nm) trilayers as a function of Si thickness studied by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), Brillouin light scattering, and magneto optic Kerr effect (MOKE) measurement techniques. A very strong antiferromagnetic (AFM) interlayer exchange coupling (>6 erg/cm2) was observed at a spacer Si thickness of 0.7 nm. The bilinear J1 and biquadratic J2 coupling constants were determined from (i) the fitting of the angular variation of the resonance field (Hres) in FMR experiments, (ii) the field variation of the frequencies of the Damon-Eshbach surface modes (both optic and acoustic) in BLS measurements, and (iii) the fitting of longitudinal MOKE hysteresis loops. We obtain a higher Hres along the easy axis than along the hard axis and the magnetizations of the two Fe films are canted. The eightfold-like symmetry of Hres as a function of the angle observed at room temperature is due to the competition between the Fe fourfold anisotropy and AFM interfacial coupling energy. This behavior vanishes at low temperatures due to a strong increase of AFM coupling (especially J2) in comparison to fourfold in-plane anisotropy. From the fitting of the temperature dependent FMR data, we obtain the temperature variation of the bilinear and biquadratic exchange coupling constants. We distinguish the existence of canted magnetization states at resonance by fitting the experimental Hres versus θH data to the model calculation.

  19. [Validation of the Tekscan system for statistic and dynamic pressure measurements of the human femorotibial joint].

    PubMed

    Wirz, D; Becker, R; Li, S Feng; Friederich, N F; Müller, W

    2002-01-01

    In vitro dynamic pressure measurements in the healthy and pathologically altered knee joint help to improve our understanding of the loading pattern on femorotibial surfaces. The aim of the study was to evaluate a piezoresistive pressure measuring system. A human cadaveric knee was mounted in a material-testing machine (Bionix 858) using a specially designed knee-holding device. Axial loading of the knee, flexed at 20o, at 500 N, 1000N and 1500 N was then carried out. For the static investigations, the piezoresistive measuring system (Tekscan), was compared with the FUJI measuring system. In addition, dynamic measurements were also performed with the Tekscan System. With the exception of the lateral compartment at a load of 1500 N, no differences in maximum pressures were observed between the two systems. Nor were there any differences with regard to contact surfaces, either in the medial or lateral compartment (p > 0.05). However, the reproducibility of the data was significantly higher with the Tekscan System (p < 0.01). Dynamic pressure measurements obtained with the knee flexed 20 to 90o showed that the lateral contact area shifted from anterior to posterior, while the medial contact area remained virtually unchanged. The Tekscan System proved to be more reliable than the FUJI System, and permits simultaneous measurements in both compartments. The Tekscan System is suitable for dynamic measurement of the femorotibial joint, and permits measurements to be made under more physiological conditions.

  20. I-V characteristics of atomically thin superconducting La2 - xSrxCuO4 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Scott; Byrnes, Sean; Vitkalov, Sergey; Sergeev, Andrey

    2014-03-01

    I-V characteristics of La2 - x Srx CuO4 thin films grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy are studied in a wide range of temperatures in zero magnetic field. Strongly nonlinear response to applied electric current was observed near the superconducting state. At temperatures T >TBKT the observed characteristics have three distinct features: (1) at small currents voltage V is proportional to the current I; (2) at higher currents a cubic dependence (I ~I3) is observed; (3) and even higher currents V ~Iα with coefficient α (T) < 3, which decreases with the temperature increase. At T =TBKT the coefficient α = 3 . Observed nonlinear response is in-line with Berezinsky-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) theory. Work was supported by National Science Foundation (ECCS-1128459).

  1. Surface atomic structure of epitaxial LaNiO3 thin films studied by in situ LEED-I (V )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruf, J. P.; King, P. D. C.; Nascimento, V. B.; Schlom, D. G.; Shen, K. M.

    2017-03-01

    We report in situ low-energy electron diffraction intensity versus voltage [LEED-I (V )] studies of the surface atomic structure of epitaxially grown (001) pc-oriented (pc=pseudocubic ) thin films of the correlated 3 d transition-metal oxide LaNiO3. Our analysis indicates the presence of large out-of-plane bucklings of the topmost LaO layers but only minor bucklings of the topmost NiO2 layers, in close agreement with earlier surface x-ray diffraction data. In view of materials design approaches that have suggested using atomic-scale polar structural distortions to produce designer electronic structures in artificial nickelate heterostructures, we propose that the broken inversion symmetry inherent to the surface of rare-earth nickelate thin films offers a similar opportunity to study the coupling between atomic structure and electronic properties in this family of materials.

  2. I- V characteristics of ZnO/Cu 2O thin film n-i-p heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Peiwei; Zheng, Weifeng; Lin, Limei; Peng, Fuchuan; Huang, Zhigao; Lai, Fachun

    2011-03-01

    ZnO/Cu 2O thin film n-i-p heterojunctions were fabricated by magnetron sputtering. The microstructure, optical, and electrical properties of n-type (n -) ZnO, insulating (i -) ZnO, and p-type (p -) Cu 2O films deposited on glass substrates were characterized by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), spectrophotometer, and the van der Pauw method, respectively. XRD results show that the mean grain size of i-ZnO film is much larger than that of n-ZnO film. The optical band gap energies of n-ZnO, i-ZnO, and p-Cu 2O film are 3.27, 3.47, and 2.00 eV, respectively. The carrier concentration of n-ZnO film is two orders of magnitude larger than that of p-Cu 2O film. The current-voltage ( I- V) characteristics of ZnO/Cu 2O thin film n-i-p heterojunctions with different i-ZnO film thicknesses were investigated. Results show that ZnO/Cu 2O n-i-p heterojunctions have well-defined rectifying behavior. All ideality factors of these n-i-p heterojunctions are larger than 2.0. The forward bias threshold voltage and ideality factor increase when i-ZnO layer thickness increases from 100 to 200 nm. An energy band diagram was proposed to analyze the I- V characteristics of these n-i-p heterojunctions.

  3. Dynamic measurement of stress optical behavior of three amorphous polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Inki; Yoon, Kyunghwan

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, rheo-optical and mechanical properties of three amorphous polymers, i.e., PS (polystyrene), PC(polycarbonate) and COC(cyclo olefin copolymer), widely used for optical products have been investigated. Accurate measurement of stress optical coefficients and elastic modulus data across the glass transition region are essential for predicting optical anisotropy in many injection molded optical products like pickup lenses and waveguide in LCD module since the final products have both flow and thermal history from the melt to glass. To obtain stress optical behavior in wide range of frequency and temperature including rubbery, glassy and glass transition regime, frequency sweep tests with extensional bar and shear sandwich tools were undertaken. As a result, glassy and melt extreme values of stress optical coefficient of PS and PC were evaluated as well as master plots in wide frequency region. The sign change of stress optical coefficient was shown clearly for PS as the frequency increased. On the other hand, the sign of stress optical coefficient over the whole frequency region is always positive for PC. For COC's of different composition, even though the glass transition temperature can vary, the stress optical coefficient of COC's with different composition stays almost constant at two extremes.

  4. Measuring Static and Dynamic Properties of Frozen Silty Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.

    1998-09-30

    A mechanical characterization of frozen silty soils has been conducted to support computer modeling of penetrators. The soils were obtained from the Eilson AFB (Alaska) vicinity. Quasi-static testing with a multiaxial system in a cold room and intermediate strain rate testing with a split Hopkinson pressure bar were conducted. Maximum stresses achieved were slightly above 1 GPa, apparently limiting the observed behavior primarily to elastic compression and pore crushing phenomena. Lower temperatures seem to increase the strength of the material markedly, although not by a simple factor. Lower temperatures and higher strain rates increase the apparent Young's and bulk moduli as well (an increase of {approximately} a factor of two is observed for strain rate increasing from 0.001 s{sup {minus}1} to 800 s{sup {minus}1}). The strength also depends strongly on strain rate. Increasing the strain rate from 0.001 {sup {minus}1} to 0.07 {sup {minus}1} increases the strength by a factor of five to ten (to values of order 1 GPa). However,only a small increase in strength is seen as strain rate is increased to {approximately} 10{sup 2}--10{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1}. The reliability of the strength measurements at strain rates< 1 s{sup {minus}1} is decreased due to details of the experimental geometry, although general trends are observable. A recipe is provided for a simulant soil based on bentonite, sand, clay-rich soil and water to fit the {approximately} 6% air-filled porosity, density and water content of the Alaska soils, based on benchtop mixing and jacketed compression testing of candidate mixes.

  5. Direct measurements of ion dynamics in collisional magnetic presheaths

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, M. Umair; Jackson, Cory D.; Kim, Justin F.; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2014-10-15

    Ion velocities and temperatures are measured in the presheath of a grounded plate downstream from an argon helicon plasma source using laser-induced fluorescence (P{sub rf}≈450→750 W, T{sub e}=2.5→5 eV, T{sub i}=0.1→0.6 eV, n{sub 0}≈1×10{sup 12}cm{sup −3}, p{sub n}=1→6.5 mTorr, λ=0.3→2 cm, ρ{sub i}≈ 0.5 cm). The plate is held 16°→60° relative to the 1 kG background axial magnetic field. The velocity profiles are compared to a 1D fluid model similar to those presented by Riemann [Phys. Plasmas 1, 552 (1994)] and Ahedo [Phys. Plasmas 4, 4419 (1997)] for the 1 mTorr dataset and are shown to agree well. The model is sensitive to parameters such as collision and ionization frequencies and simplified models, such one presented by Chodura [Phys. Fluids 25, 1628 (1982)], are shown to be inaccurate. E{sup →}×B{sup →} flows as large as 40% of c{sub s} at the sheath edge are inferred. Definitions for the term “magnetic presheath” and implications for ion flow to tokamak divertors and Hall thruster walls are discussed.

  6. The Development of a New Method of Idiographic Measurement for Dynamic Assessment Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Emma; Murphy, Raegan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method of idiographic measurement for dynamic assessment (DA) intervention. There are two main methods of measurement for DA intervention; split-half tests and integrated scoring systems. Split-half tests of ability have proved useful from a research perspective. Integrated scoring systems coupled with case studies are…

  7. Dynamic Tests And Application Of The Electron-Optical Measuring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiruma, T.; Ilida, H.; Inuzuka, E.; Kamiya, K.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Platonov, V. N.; Postovalov, V. E.; Serdyuchenko, Yu. N.; Schelev, M. Y.

    1983-03-01

    The basic and dynamic performances of the new Electron-Optical measuring system type EWE in conjunction with various laser applications are presented. The system consists of Electron-Optical streak camera which is sensitive in the spectral recion from 380 nm to 1100 nm, TV read-out device and microprocessor controlled frame memory. Main features of the developed system will be described. The limiting temporal resolution has been measured to be 1.4 ps at FWEM. The dynamic range Of 70 at the measured duration of 5 ps has been obtained.

  8. Continuous Weak Measurement and Nonlinear Dynamics in a Cold Spin Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Greg A.; Chaudhury, Souma; Silberfarb, Andrew; Deutsch, Ivan H.; Jessen, Poul S.

    2004-10-01

    A weak continuous quantum measurement of an atomic spin ensemble can be implemented via Faraday rotation of an off-resonance probe beam, and may be used to create and probe nonclassical spin states and dynamics. We show that the probe light shift leads to nonlinearity in the spin dynamics and limits the useful Faraday measurement window. Removing the nonlinearity allows a nonperturbing measurement on the much longer time scale set by decoherence. The nonlinear spin Hamiltonian is of interest for studies of quantum chaos and real-time quantum state estimation.

  9. Dynamic Modeling Accuracy Dependence on Errors in Sensor Measurements, Mass Properties, and Aircraft Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    A nonlinear simulation of the NASA Generic Transport Model was used to investigate the effects of errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry on the accuracy of dynamic models identified from flight data. Measurements from a typical system identification maneuver were systematically and progressively deteriorated and then used to estimate stability and control derivatives within a Monte Carlo analysis. Based on the results, recommendations were provided for maximum allowable errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry to achieve desired levels of dynamic modeling accuracy. Results using other flight conditions, parameter estimation methods, and a full-scale F-16 nonlinear aircraft simulation were compared with these recommendations.

  10. Frequency-scanning interferometry for dynamic absolute distance measurement using Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Tao, Long; Liu, Zhigang; Zhang, Weibo; Zhou, Yangli

    2014-12-15

    We propose a frequency-scanning interferometry using the Kalman filtering technique for dynamic absolute distance measurement. Frequency-scanning interferometry only uses a single tunable laser driven by a triangle waveform signal for forward and backward optical frequency scanning. The absolute distance and moving speed of a target can be estimated by the present input measurement of frequency-scanning interferometry and the previously calculated state based on the Kalman filter algorithm. This method not only compensates for movement errors in conventional frequency-scanning interferometry, but also achieves high-precision and low-complexity dynamic measurements. Experimental results of dynamic measurements under static state, vibration and one-dimensional movement are presented.

  11. Dynamic response tests of inertial and optical wind-tunnel model attitude measurement devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, R. D.; Young, C. P., Jr.; Burner, A. W.; Tripp, J. S.; Tcheng, P.; Finley, T. D.; Popernack, T. G., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study of the response of inertial and optical wind-tunnel model attitude measurement systems in a wind-off simulated dynamic environment. This study is part of an ongoing activity at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop high accuracy, advanced model attitude measurement systems that can be used in a dynamic wind-tunnel environment. This activity was prompted by the inertial model attitude sensor response observed during high levels of model vibration which results in a model attitude measurement bias error. Significant bias errors in model attitude measurement were found for the measurement using the inertial device during wind-off dynamic testing of a model system. The amount of bias present during wind-tunnel tests will depend on the amplitudes of the model dynamic response and the modal characteristics of the model system. Correction models are presented that predict the vibration-induced bias errors to a high degree of accuracy for the vibration modes characterized in the simulated dynamic environment. The optical system results were uncorrupted by model vibration in the laboratory setup.

  12. I-V and DLTS study of generation and annihilation of deep-level defects in an oxygen-ion irradiated bipolar junction transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, K. V.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Ravindra, M.; Damle, R.

    A commercial bipolar junction transistor (2N 2219A, npn) irradiated with 84 MeV O6+-ions with fluence of the order of 1013 ions cm-2 is studied for radiation-induced gain degradation and deep-level defects or recombination centers. I-V measurements are made to study the gain degradation as a function of ion fluence. Properties such as activation energy, trap concentration and capture cross section of deep levels are studied by deep-level transient spectroscopy. Minority carrier trap energy levels with energies ranging from EC -0.17 eV to EC -0.55 eV are observed in the base-collector junction of the transistor. Majority carrier defect levels are also observed with energies ranging from EV +0.26 eV to EV +0.44 eV. The irradiated device is subjected to isothermal and isochronal annealing. The defects are seen to anneal above 250 °C. The defects generated in the base region of the transistor by displacement damage appear to be responsible for an increase in base current through Shockley-Read-Hall or multi-phonon recombination and consequent transistor gain degradation.

  13. A data base and analysis program for shuttle main engine dynamic pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffin, T.

    1986-01-01

    A dynamic pressure data base management system is described for measurements obtained from space shuttle main engine (SSME) hot firing tests. The data were provided in terms of engine power level and rms pressure time histories, and power spectra of the dynamic pressure measurements at selected times during each test. Test measurements and engine locations are defined along with a discussion of data acquisition and reduction procedures. A description of the data base management analysis system is provided and subroutines developed for obtaining selected measurement means, variances, ranges and other statistics of interest are discussed. A summary of pressure spectra obtained at SSME rated power level is provided for reference. Application of the singular value decomposition technique to spectrum interpolation is discussed and isoplots of interpolated spectra are presented to indicate measurement trends with engine power level. Program listings of the data base management and spectrum interpolation software are given. Appendices are included to document all data base measurements.

  14. [Measurement of multi-wavelength pulse oxygen saturation based on dynamic spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Wen-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The present paper puts forward multi-wavelength pulse oxygen saturation measurement based on dynamic spectroscopy to do the non-invasive determination of oxygen saturation. Compared to conventional ways, the new method makes full use of more wavelengths light and improves the measurement accuracy. During the experiment, the in-vivo measurements were carried out on 60 patients and their spectroscopic data were collected by the high sensitivity type fiber optic spectrometer. Singletrial estimation method was used to extract the dynamic spectroscopy at the wavelengths of 606. 44 approximately 987. 55 nm. Oxygen saturation obtained from arterial blood gas analysis is regarded as the true value. Synergy interval partial least square (siPLS) was used to establish the calibration model of subjects' oxygen saturation values against dynamic spectroscopy data. The relative error of prediction is +/-0. 017 6, but the relative error of the subjects in the same set measured by the patient monitor which was two-wavelength measure system is +/-0. 116 4. Measurement results show that the use of the high sensitivity type fiber optic spectrometer to collect multi-wavelength spectroscopic data and dynamic spectroscopy method to process data can do better in improving the accuracy of the oxygen saturation measurement.

  15. Quasistatic vs. Dynamic Modulus Measurements Of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Morscher, G. N.; Choi, S. R.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been demonstrated to exhibit nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior by quasistatic cyclic compression and cylindrical punch indentation measurements. In particular, the instantaneous (tangential) elastic modulus increases with applied stress and exhibits significant hysteresis during cycling. Sound velocity (dynamic) measurements also show an increase in TBC modulus with applied compressive stress, but in contrast show no significant hysteresis for the modulus during cycling. The nonlinear elastic behavior of the TBCs evidenced by these tests is attributed to coating compaction and internal sliding. The differences between the quasistatic and dynamic measurements are explained by the relative absence of the effect of internal sliding in the dynamic modulus measurements. By incorporating short load reversals into the larger loading cycle and measuring the instantaneous modulus at the start of each load reversal, the effects of internal sliding can be substantially reduced in the quasistatic measurements, and the resulting modulus values show good agreement with the modulus values determined by dynamic sound velocity measurements.

  16. Modal Correction Method For Dynamically Induced Errors In Wind-Tunnel Model Attitude Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, R. D.; Young, C. P., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a method for correcting the dynamically induced bias errors in wind tunnel model attitude measurements using measured modal properties of the model system. At NASA Langley Research Center, the predominant instrumentation used to measure model attitude is a servo-accelerometer device that senses the model attitude with respect to the local vertical. Under smooth wind tunnel operating conditions, this inertial device can measure the model attitude with an accuracy of 0.01 degree. During wind tunnel tests when the model is responding at high dynamic amplitudes, the inertial device also senses the centrifugal acceleration associated with model vibration. This centrifugal acceleration results in a bias error in the model attitude measurement. A study of the response of a cantilevered model system to a simulated dynamic environment shows significant bias error in the model attitude measurement can occur and is vibration mode and amplitude dependent. For each vibration mode contributing to the bias error, the error is estimated from the measured modal properties and tangential accelerations at the model attitude device. Linear superposition is used to combine the bias estimates for individual modes to determine the overall bias error as a function of time. The modal correction model predicts the bias error to a high degree of accuracy for the vibration modes characterized in the simulated dynamic environment.

  17. Dynamics and Density Measurements in a Small Plasma Focus of Tens Joules

    SciTech Connect

    Tarifeno, Ariel; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, Jose; Soto, Leopoldo

    2009-01-21

    As a part of the systematic research conducted to study the scaling of Plasma Focus experiments to small devices, radial dynamic and density measurements using Hydrogen and Deuterium as filling gas in the PF-50 J device are presented. Results confirm that the expected dynamics observed in large experiments and densities of the order 10{sup 25} m{sup -3} at the pinch time are present in our experiments operated at only 67 J.

  18. Implementation of the dynamic laser goniometer for noncontact measurement of angular movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohkman, Eugene; Burnashev, Mikhail; Filatov, Yuri; Pavlov, Petr

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic laser goniometer (LG) implementation for noncontact measurements of an object's angular position is presented. One of the possible implementations involves determining the time dependence of the scanning mirror's angular position. Another application is aimed at determining the oscillatory movement parameters on the test table. The results obtained in the course of the research show that the dynamic LG makes it possible to calibrate various kinds of test beds making angular oscillations or angular movement of arbitrary law.

  19. Generator Dynamic Model Validation and Parameter Calibration Using Phasor Measurements at the Point of Connection

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Du, Pengwei; Kosterev, Dmitry; Yang, Steve

    2013-05-01

    Disturbance data recorded by phasor measurement units (PMU) offers opportunities to improve the integrity of dynamic models. However, manually tuning parameters through play-back events demands significant efforts and engineering experiences. In this paper, a calibration method using the extended Kalman filter (EKF) technique is proposed. The formulation of EKF with parameter calibration is discussed. Case studies are presented to demonstrate its validity. The proposed calibration method is cost-effective, complementary to traditional equipment testing for improving dynamic model quality.

  20. Direct measurement of the surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol by optical scanning a film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Guo-Feng; Dong, Shuang-Li; Sun, Jian-Hu; Chen, Rui-Yun; Xiao, Lian-Tuan; Jia, Suo-Tang

    2009-09-01

    The surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol is studied by scanning the thickness of the glycerol film with single photon detection. Measurements are performed at room temperature well above the glycerol's glass transition temperature. It is shown that the surface dynamics of the glycerol film is very sensitive to the temperature. The linear relationship between the thickness of the film and the viscosity predicted by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTH) law is also presented experimentally.

  1. Correlations between measures of dynamic balance in individuals with post-stroke hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Vistamehr, Arian; Kautz, Steven A; Bowden, Mark G; Neptune, Richard R

    2016-02-08

    Mediolateral balance control during walking is a challenging task in post-stroke hemiparetic individuals. To detect and treat dynamic balance disorders, it is important to assess balance using reliable methods. The Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), margin-of-stability (MoS), and peak-to-peak range of angular-momentum (H) are some of the most commonly used measures to assess dynamic balance and fall risk in clinical and laboratory settings. However, it is not clear if these measures lead to similar conclusions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess dynamic balance in post-stroke hemiparetic individuals using BBS, DGI, MoS and the range of H and determine if these measure are correlated. BBS and DGI were collected from 19 individuals post-stroke. Additionally, kinematic and kinetic data were collected while the same individuals walked at their self-selected speed. MoS and the range of H were calculated in the mediolateral direction for each participant. Correlation analyses revealed moderate associations between all measures. Overall, a higher range of angular-momentum was associated with a higher MoS, wider step width and lower BBS and DGI scores, indicating poor balance control. Further, only the MoS from the paretic foot placement, but not the nonparetic foot, correlated with the other balance measures. Although moderate correlations existed between all the balance measures, these findings do not necessarily advocate the use of a single measure as each test may assess different constructs of dynamic balance. These findings have important implications for the use and interpretation of dynamic balance assessments.

  2. Correlations between Measures of Dynamic Balance in Individuals with Post-stroke Hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Vistamehr, Arian; Kautz, Steven A.; Bowden, Mark G.; Neptune, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Mediolateral balance control during walking is a challenging task in post-stroke hemiparetic individuals. To detect and treat dynamic balance disorders, it is important to assess balance using reliable methods. The Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), margin-of-stability (MoS), and peak-to-peak range of angular-momentum (H) are some of the most commonly used measures to assess dynamic balance and fall risk in clinical and laboratory settings. However, it is not clear if these measures lead to similar conclusions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess dynamic balance in post-stroke hemiparetic individuals using BBS, DGI, MoS and the range of H and determine if these measure are correlated. BBS and DGI were collected from 19 individuals post-stroke. Additionally, kinematic and kinetic data were collected while the same individuals walked at their self-selected speed. MoS and the range of H were calculated in the mediolateral direction for each participant. Correlation analyses revealed moderate associations between all measures. Overall, a higher range of angular-momentum was associated with a higher MoS, wider step width and lower BBS and DGI scores, indicating poor balance control. Further, only the MoS from the paretic foot placement, but not the nonparetic foot, correlated with the other balance measures. Although moderate correlations existed between all the balance measures, these findings do not necessarily advocate the use of a single measure as each test may assess different constructs of dynamic balance. These findings have important implications for the use and interpretation of dynamic balance assessments. PMID:26795124

  3. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation: An approach based on quantum measurement picture

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Wei; Xu, Luting; Li, Xin-Qi; Fang, Weihai; Yan, YiJing

    2014-07-15

    Mixed-quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulation implies an effective quantum measurement on the electronic states by the classical motion of atoms. Based on this insight, we propose a quantum trajectory mean-field approach for nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations. The new protocol provides a natural interface between the separate quantum and classical treatments, without invoking artificial surface hopping algorithm. Moreover, it also bridges two widely adopted nonadiabatic dynamics methods, the Ehrenfest mean-field theory and the trajectory surface-hopping method. Excellent agreement with the exact results is illustrated with representative model systems, including the challenging ones for traditional methods.

  4. Dynamic gas temperature measurement system. Volume 2: Operation and program manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purpura, P. T.

    1983-01-01

    The hot section technology (HOST) dynamic gas temperature measurement system computer program acquires data from two type B thermocouples of different diameters. The analysis method determines the in situ value of an aerodynamic parameter T, containing the heat transfer coefficient from the transfer function of the two thermocouples. This aerodynamic parameter is used to compute a fequency response spectrum and compensate the dynamic portion of the signal of the smaller thermocouple. The calculations for the aerodynamic parameter and the data compensation technique are discussed. Compensated data are presented in either the time or frequency domain, time domain data as dynamic temperature vs time, or frequency domain data.

  5. Dependence of Dynamic Modeling Accuracy on Sensor Measurements, Mass Properties, and Aircraft Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) nonlinear simulation was used to investigate the effects of errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry on the accuracy of identified parameters in mathematical models describing the flight dynamics and determined from flight data. Measurements from a typical flight condition and system identification maneuver were systematically and progressively deteriorated by introducing noise, resolution errors, and bias errors. The data were then used to estimate nondimensional stability and control derivatives within a Monte Carlo simulation. Based on these results, recommendations are provided for maximum allowable errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry to achieve desired levels of dynamic modeling accuracy. Results using additional flight conditions and parameter estimation methods, as well as a nonlinear flight simulation of the General Dynamics F-16 aircraft, were compared with these recommendations

  6. Static and Dynamic Measurement of Ocular Surface Temperature in Dry Eyes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li Li; Sanjay, Srinivasan; Morgan, Philip B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To study ocular surface temperature (OST) in dry eyes by static and dynamic measures. Methods. OST was recorded on 62 dry eyes and 63 age- and sex-matched controls. Static measures were study of absolute OST at t = 0, 5, and 10 s after eye opening. Dynamic measures were study of mean change and net change in OST over 10 s of sustained eye opening. Ten OST indices studied were temperatures of the geometric center of the cornea (GCC), extreme temporal (T1) and nasal conjunctiva (T4), midtemporal (CT) and nasal conjunctiva (CN), temporal (LT) and nasal (LN) limbus, and mean (MOST), maximum (Max T), and minimum (Min T) temperatures of the region of interest. Results. For static measures, dry eyes recorded significantly lower GCC, MOST, Min T, Max T, T4, CT, LT, LN, and CN. For dynamic measures, dry eyes had significantly steeper regression line of mean change (corresponding to greater net change) for Max T 5 s onward and T4 at 3 s onward. Conclusions. Both static and dynamic measures of the OST were valuable and can be used as clinical tool to assess dry eye.

  7. Static and Dynamic Measurement of Ocular Surface Temperature in Dry Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Sanjay, Srinivasan; Morgan, Philip B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To study ocular surface temperature (OST) in dry eyes by static and dynamic measures. Methods. OST was recorded on 62 dry eyes and 63 age- and sex-matched controls. Static measures were study of absolute OST at t = 0, 5, and 10 s after eye opening. Dynamic measures were study of mean change and net change in OST over 10 s of sustained eye opening. Ten OST indices studied were temperatures of the geometric center of the cornea (GCC), extreme temporal (T1) and nasal conjunctiva (T4), midtemporal (CT) and nasal conjunctiva (CN), temporal (LT) and nasal (LN) limbus, and mean (MOST), maximum (Max T), and minimum (Min T) temperatures of the region of interest. Results. For static measures, dry eyes recorded significantly lower GCC, MOST, Min T, Max T, T4, CT, LT, LN, and CN. For dynamic measures, dry eyes had significantly steeper regression line of mean change (corresponding to greater net change) for Max T 5 s onward and T4 at 3 s onward. Conclusions. Both static and dynamic measures of the OST were valuable and can be used as clinical tool to assess dry eye. PMID:27433352

  8. A study on the reliability of measuring dynamic balance ability using a smartphone

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seulki; Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Evaluation of the reliability of smartphones as measuring equipment for dynamic balance ability was the goal of this study. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 30 healthy young students in their 20s. The first and second rounds of measurements were taken at a one-day interval to confirm test-retest reliability. The subjects stood on the footboard of the Biodex Balance System. Balance was measured using a smart phone. [Results] Acceleration rates corresponding to subjects with open eyes were 2.7 ± 2.2 (first measurement) and 3.3 ± 1.5 (second measurement), and the interclass correlation coefficient ICC (1,1) was 0.8. Acceleration rates corresponding to subjects with closed eyes were 4.1 ± 2.4 (first measurement) and 4.5 ± 1.8 (second measurement), and the ICC (1,1) was 0.9. Gyroscope rates corresponding to subjects with open eyes were 1.7 ± 1.2 (first measurement) and 2.3 ± 1.5 (second measurement), and the ICC (1,1) was 0.7. Gyroscope rates corresponding to subjects with closed eyes were 6.7 ± 2.4 (first measurement) and 6.6 ± 2.3 (second measurement), and the ICC (1,1) was 0.6. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that smartphones have sufficient potential as measuring equipment for dynamic balance ability. PMID:27799682

  9. Correction for dynamic bias error in transmission measurements of void fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, P.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Svärd, S. Jacobsson; Sjöstrand, H.

    2012-12-01

    Dynamic bias errors occur in transmission measurements, such as X-ray, gamma, or neutron radiography or tomography. This is observed when the properties of the object are not stationary in time and its average properties are assessed. The nonlinear measurement response to changes in transmission within the time scale of the measurement implies a bias, which can be difficult to correct for. A typical example is the tomographic or radiographic mapping of void content in dynamic two-phase flow systems. In this work, the dynamic bias error is described and a method to make a first-order correction is derived. A prerequisite for this method is variance estimates of the system dynamics, which can be obtained using high-speed, time-resolved data acquisition. However, in the absence of such acquisition, a priori knowledge might be used to substitute the time resolved data. Using synthetic data, a void fraction measurement case study has been simulated to demonstrate the performance of the suggested method. The transmission length of the radiation in the object under study and the type of fluctuation of the void fraction have been varied. Significant decreases in the dynamic bias error were achieved to the expense of marginal decreases in precision.

  10. Dynamic Phase Shifts in Nanoscale Distance Measurements by Double Electron Electron Resonance (DEER)†

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Michael K.; Maryasov, Alexander G.

    2007-04-01

    The off-resonant pump pulse used in double electron electron resonance (DEER) measurements produces dynamic phase shifts that are explained here by simple analytic and vector descriptions of the full range of signal behaviors observed during DEER measurements, including: large phase shifts in the signal; changes in the position and shape of the detected echo; and changes in the signal intensity. The dynamic phase shifts depend on the width, amplitude and offset frequency of the pump pulse. Isolated radicals as well as pairs or clusters of dipolar-coupled radicals have the same dynamic phase shift that is independent of pump pulse delay in a typical measurement. A method of calibrating both the pump pulse offset frequency and the pump pulse field strength is outlined. A vector model is presented that explains the dynamic phase shifts in terms of precessing magnetization that is either spin locked or precessing about the effective pump field during the pump pulse. Implications of the dynamic phase shifts are discussed as they relate to setting up, calibrating and interpreting the results of DEER measurements.

  11. Dynamic phase shifts in nanoscale distance measurements by double electron electron resonance (DEER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Michael K.; Maryasov, Alexander G.

    2007-04-01

    The off-resonant pump pulse used in double electron electron resonance (DEER) measurements produces dynamic phase shifts that are explained here by simple analytic and vector descriptions of the full range of signal behaviors observed during DEER measurements, including: large phase shifts in the signal; changes in the position and shape of the detected echo; and changes in the signal intensity. The dynamic phase shifts depend on the width, amplitude and offset frequency of the pump pulse. Isolated radicals as well as pairs or clusters of dipolar-coupled radicals have the same dynamic phase shift that is independent of pump pulse delay in a typical measurement. A method of calibrating both the pump pulse offset frequency and the pump pulse field strength is outlined. A vector model is presented that explains the dynamic phase shifts in terms of precessing magnetization that is either spin locked or precessing about the effective pump field during the pump pulse. Implications of the dynamic phase shifts are discussed as they relate to setting up, calibrating and interpreting the results of DEER measurements.

  12. The relationship between the transition voltage of the I- V curve of the ferroelectrics and the coercive field of the P- V hysteretic curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xingjiao, Li; Junbo, Bao; Ningzhang, Wang; Jingping, Xu; Tao, Chen; Xuecheng, Zou; Hanhua, Feng; Shaoping, Li

    2002-07-01

    The relationship between the transition voltage of the I- V curve of the ferroelectrics and the coercive field of the P- V hysteretic curve is calculated. The first mathematical analysis to explain the relation between the transition voltage Vt and the coercive voltage Vc is obtained. The origin of the interrelation between the transition voltage of the I- V curve and the coercive field is that the height of the boundary barrier is inversely proportional to the effective dielectric constant of the near-boundary region, which is dependent on a derivative of polarization on the electric field, ∂P/ ∂E. The term ξ( eVt) plus the term ( enb2δ/ dNdPs)( eVc) equals a constant. Vt is the function of Eg, Ps, Vc, and E. There is a linear relation between Vc and Vt. This relationship will induce the matchable relations between the I- V curve and the E- P loop. As long as the Vc of the V- P loop exists, the correspondent Vt of I- V curve will certainly exist. It will be the foundation of a new ferroelectric memory, which operates by the I- V characteristics. These relations are the conditions that can enable nonvolatile memory and nondestructive readout.

  13. Measurement of dynamic gas disengagement profile by using an analog output level gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkilineni, S.; Koelle, M.; Xu, H.

    The dynamic gas disengagement profile was measured in a 0.14 m diameter and 3.66 m high plexiglas column by using an analog output gauge, which was connected to a data acquisition system. This analog output gauge is a high accuracy continuous measurement level gauge. It is made up of a wave guide, a float, a motion or stress sensing device and a probe housing. The fluid level at any gas velocity is obtained by using the data acquisition system. The dynamic gas disengagement profile produced one slope in the bubble flow and two slopes in the churn turbulent flow representing unimodal and bimodal distributions of bubbles.

  14. In Situ Measurements of the Dynamics of A Full Scale Bottom Moored Mine Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    A4P/?o 7935 WHOI-93-21 In Situ Measurements of the Dynamics - of A Full Scale Bottom Moored Mine Model by H.O. Berteaux, A. Bocconcelli, C. Eck and S...BOTTOM MOORED MINE MODEL by H.O. BERTEAUX, A. BOCCONCELLI, C. ECK, S. KERY Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543 -"iSi...of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution devised (1991) and conducted (1992) an experiment to measure the dynamic response of a full scale model

  15. Dynamic phase measurements based on a polarization Michelson interferometer employing a pixelated polarization camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano-Garcia, David I.; Otani, Yukitoshi

    2017-02-01

    We implemented an interferometric configuration capable of following a phase variation in time. By using a pixelated polarization camera, the system is able to retrieve the phase information instantaneously avoiding the usage of moving components and the necessity of an extra replication method attached at the output of the interferometer. Taking into account the temporal stability obtained from the system, a spatial-temporal phase demodulation algorithm can be implemented on frequency domain for the dynamic phase measurement. Spatial resolution is analyzed experimentally using a USAF pattern, and dynamic phase measurements were done on air and water medium variations due to a jet flame and a living fish as a biological sample, respectively.

  16. Mercury dynamics in a San Francisco estuary tidal wetland: assessing dynamics using in situ measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Fleck, Jacob A.; Downing, Bryan D.; Boss, Emmanuel; Pellerin, Brian A.; Ganju, Neil K.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Byington, Amy A.; Heim, Wesley A.; Stephenson, Mark; Fujii, Roger

    2012-01-01

    We used high-resolution in situ measurements of turbidity and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) to quantitatively estimate the tidally driven exchange of mercury (Hg) between the waters of the San Francisco estuary and Browns Island, a tidal wetland. Turbidity and FDOM—representative of particle-associated and filter-passing Hg, respectively—together predicted 94 % of the observed variability in measured total mercury concentration in unfiltered water samples (UTHg) collected during a single tidal cycle in spring, fall, and winter, 2005–2006. Continuous in situ turbidity and FDOM data spanning at least a full spring-neap period were used to generate UTHg concentration time series using this relationship, and then combined with water discharge measurements to calculate Hg fluxes in each season. Wetlands are generally considered to be sinks for sediment and associated mercury. However, during the three periods of monitoring, Browns Island wetland did not appreciably accumulate Hg. Instead, gradual tidally driven export of UTHg from the wetland offset the large episodic on-island fluxes associated with high wind events. Exports were highest during large spring tides, when ebbing waters relatively enriched in FDOM, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and filter-passing mercury drained from the marsh into the open waters of the estuary. On-island flux of UTHg, which was largely particle-associated, was highest during strong winds coincident with flood tides. Our results demonstrate that processes driving UTHg fluxes in tidal wetlands encompass both the dissolved and particulate phases and multiple timescales, necessitating longer term monitoring to adequately quantify fluxes.

  17. An improved dynamic method to measure kL a in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Andrew L; Kim, Min Hea; Wang, Jin

    2014-10-01

    An accurate measurement or estimation of the volumetric mass transfer coefficient kL a is crucial for the design, operation, and scale up of bioreactors. Among different physical and chemical methods, the classical dynamic method is the most widely applied method to simultaneously estimate both kL a and cell's oxygen utilization rate. Despite several important follow-up articles to improve the original dynamic method, some limitations exist that make the classical dynamic method less effective under certain conditions. For example, for the case of high cell density with moderate agitation, the dissolved oxygen concentration barely increases during the re-gassing step of the classical dynamic method, which makes kL a estimation impossible. To address these limitations, in this work we present an improved dynamic method that consists of both an improved model and an improved procedure. The improved model takes into account the mass transfer between the headspace and the broth; in addition, nitrogen is bubbled through the broth when air is shut off. The improved method not only enables a faster and more accurate estimation of kL a, but also allows the measurement of kL a for high cell density with medium/low agitation that is impossible with the classical dynamic method. Scheffersomyces stipitis was used as the model system to demonstrate the effectiveness of the improved method; in addition, experiments were conducted to examine the effect of cell density and agitation speed on kL a.

  18. Study on dynamic response measurement of the submarine pipeline by full-term FBG sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinghai; Sun, Li; Li, Hongnan

    2014-01-01

    The field of structural health monitoring is concerned with accurately and reliably assessing the integrity of a given structure to reduce ownership costs, increase operational lifetime, and improve safety. In structural health monitoring systems, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is a promising measurement technology for its superior ability of explosion proof, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and high accuracy. This paper is a study on the dynamic characteristics of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors applied to a submarine pipeline, as well as an experimental investigation on a laboratory model of the pipeline. The dynamic response of a submarine pipeline under seismic excitation is a coupled vibration of liquid and solid interaction. FBG sensors and strain gauges are used to monitor the dynamic response of a submarine pipeline model under a variety of dynamic loading conditions and the maximum working frequency of an FBG strain sensor is calculated according to its dynamic strain responses. Based on the theoretical and experimental results, it can be concluded that FBG sensor is superior to strain gauge and satisfies the demand of dynamic strain measurement.

  19. Study on Dynamic Response Measurement of the Submarine Pipeline by Full-Term FBG Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jinghai; Sun, Li; Li, Hongnan

    2014-01-01

    The field of structural health monitoring is concerned with accurately and reliably assessing the integrity of a given structure to reduce ownership costs, increase operational lifetime, and improve safety. In structural health monitoring systems, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is a promising measurement technology for its superior ability of explosion proof, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and high accuracy. This paper is a study on the dynamic characteristics of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors applied to a submarine pipeline, as well as an experimental investigation on a laboratory model of the pipeline. The dynamic response of a submarine pipeline under seismic excitation is a coupled vibration of liquid and solid interaction. FBG sensors and strain gauges are used to monitor the dynamic response of a submarine pipeline model under a variety of dynamic loading conditions and the maximum working frequency of an FBG strain sensor is calculated according to its dynamic strain responses. Based on the theoretical and experimental results, it can be concluded that FBG sensor is superior to strain gauge and satisfies the demand of dynamic strain measurement. PMID:24971391

  20. Dynamic spectrum in frequency domain on nonnvasive in vivo measurement of blood spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoxia; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling; Liu, Yuliang; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yunfeng

    2005-01-01

    Near-IR spectroscopy holds great promise for non-invasive concentration measurements of blood on the basis of its potential for reagent-less, nondestructive, and noninvasive measurements. The main difficulty for determining absolute or even exact relative concentrations is the scattering behavior of the tissue. This leads to significant differences in the ideal Lambert Beer's law. In this paper, the approach of the Dynamic Spectrum in the frequency domain was proposed by Professor LI Gang etc. is shown, it is based on Photo-plethysmography (PPG) with fast Fourier transforms. The magnitude of fundamental wave of the pulse wave at each wavelength divided by the peak value of the pulse wave, get the natural logarithm of quotient at each wavelength and then the Dynamic Spectrum in the frequency domain is got. Evaluating only the pulsatile part of the entire optical signal, this approach is rather independent of individual or time changes in scattering or absorption characteristics of the tissue. Because of the noise and the resolution of the spectrometer, the Dynamic Spectrum is very difficult to get. In this paper, a series of measures is taken, and high-precision Dynamic Spectrum in the frequency domain is got with the experiment. The approach is verified. The advantage of getting Dynamic Spectrum in the frequency domain is analyzed, and compared with the Dynamic Spectrum in the time domain. The paper shows that the technique enables high precision measurement of changes in tissue absorbance caused by blood pulsation. It is very important in the non-invasive in vivo concentration measurement of blood.

  1. Static and dynamic stress analyses of the prototype high head Francis runner based on site measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Oram, C.; Sick, M.

    2014-03-01

    More efforts are put on hydro-power to balance voltage and frequency within seconds for primary control in modern smart grids. This requires hydraulic turbines to run at off-design conditions. especially at low load or speed-no load. Besides. the tendency of increasing power output and decreasing weight of the turbine runners has also led to the high level vibration problem of the runners. especially high head Francis runners. Therefore. it is important to carry out the static and dynamic stress analyses of prototype high head Francis runners. This paper investigates the static and dynamic stresses on the prototype high head Francis runner based on site measurements and numerical simulations. The site measurements are performed with pressure transducers and strain gauges. Based on the measured results. computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the flow channel from stay vane to draft tube cone are performed. Static pressure distributions and dynamic pressure pulsations caused by rotor-stator interaction (RSI) are obtained under various operating conditions. With the CFD results. static and dynamic stresses on the runner at different operating points are calculated by means of the finite element method (FEM). The agreement between simulation and measurement is analysed with linear regression method. which indicates that the numerical result agrees well with that of measurement. Furthermore. the maximum static and dynamic stresses on the runner blade are obtained at various operating points. The relations of the maximum stresses and the power output are discussed in detail. The influences of the boundary conditions on the structural behaviour of the runner are also discussed.

  2. Selection of first-line i.v. antibiotics for acute pyelonephritis in patients requiring emergency hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Yasufuku, Tomihiko; Shigemura, Katsumi; Yamashita, Masuo; Arakawa, Soichi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2011-04-01

    Febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs) often require the intravenous infusion of antibiotics and/or hospitalization. Acute pyelonephritis (AP) is one of the most severe forms of UTI, and the antibiotics we should use as the first line and the risk factors for treatment failure remain controversial. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of i.v. antibiotics selected for the treatment of febrile AP and to examine the risk factors for antibiotic resistance. We set risk factors for antibiotic treatment failure such as age, sex, and the presence of underlying urinary tract disease. We classified all cases into 49 cases of complicated AP and 24 cases of uncomplicated AP according to the presence of underlying urinary tract diseases, and examined the characteristics of the patients and the efficacy of the antibiotics used in this study. We investigated risk factors which relate to initial treatment failure and the duration of antibiotic treatment. Initial antibiotic treatment failure was significantly correlated to C-reactive protein in complicated AP and to positive blood culture in uncomplicated AP. We revealed a significant correlation between the duration of the given antibiotics and diabetes mellitus or positive blood culture in uncomplicated AP, and tazobactam/piperacillin was significantly related to prolongation of antibiotic treatment in complicated AP. In conclusion, in this study, a positive blood culture was the representative risk factor that related to both initial treatment failure and longer duration of the given antibiotics in uncomplicated AP.

  3. I-V characteristics of in-plane and out-of-plane strained edge-hydrogenated armchair graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Cartamil-Bueno, S. J. E-mail: rbolivar@ugr.es; Rodríguez-Bolívar, S. E-mail: rbolivar@ugr.es

    2015-06-28

    The effects of tensile strain on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of hydrogenated-edge armchair graphene nanoribbons are investigated by using DFT theory. The strain is introduced in two different ways related to the two types of systems studied in this work: in-plane strained systems (A) and out-of-plane strained systems due to bending (B). These two kinds of strain lead to make a distinction among three cases: in-plane strained systems with strained electrodes (A1) and with unstrained electrodes (A2), and out-of-plane homogeneously strained systems with unstrained, fixed electrodes (B). The systematic simulations to calculate the electronic transmission between two electrodes were focused on systems of 8 and 11 dimers in width. The results show that the differences between cases A2 and B are negligible, even though the strain mechanisms are different: in the plane case, the strain is uniaxial along its length; while in the bent case, the strain is caused by the arc deformation. Based on the study, a new type of nanoelectromechanical system solid state switching device is proposed.

  4. Safe on-orbit experiment for measurement of large structures dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) on-orbit experiment for measurement of large structures dynamics consists of a dynamic sensing system designed to record and analyze the dynamic characteristics of the SAFE. The early availability of the SAFE and its basic large space structure characteristics make it a logical candidate for verification of the sensing system and the evaluation technique. The characteristics of the solar array which place it well within the generic class of large space structures are: (1) large size, (2) low natural frequencies, (3) mechanical complexity of its extendable/retractable mast, and (4) the inability to dynamically test in the Earth's atmosphere and in one g. The fourth characteristic is due to its size, air damping dominance of the blanket, and structural instability in one g. The specific characteristics of the solar array are shown and the applicability to large space structures is illustrated.

  5. Engineering many-body dynamics with quantum light potentials and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, T. J.; Mekhov, I. B.

    2016-07-01

    Interactions between many-body atomic systems in optical lattices and light in cavities induce long-range and correlated atomic dynamics beyond the standard Bose-Hubbard model, due to the global nature of the light modes. We characterize these processes, and show that uniting such phenomena with dynamical constraints enforced by the backaction resultant from strong light measurement leads to a synergy that enables the atomic dynamics to be tailored, based on the particular optical geometry, exploiting the additional structure imparted by the quantum light field. This leads to a range of tunable effects such as long-range density-density interactions, perfectly correlated atomic tunneling, superexchange, and effective pair processes. We further show that this provides a framework for enhancing quantum simulations to include such long-range and correlated processes, including reservoir models and dynamical global gauge fields.

  6. Quantitative measurement of intracellular protein dynamics using photobleaching or photoactivation of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Tomoki; Nagai, Takeharu

    2014-12-01

    Unlike in vitro protein dynamics, intracellular protein dynamics are intricately regulated by protein-protein interactions or interactions between proteins and other cellular components, including nucleic acids, the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. Alteration of these dynamics plays a crucial role in physiological phenomena such as gene expression and cell division. Live-cell imaging via microscopy with the inherent properties of fluorescent proteins, i.e. photobleaching and photoconversion, or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, provides insight into the movement of proteins and their interactions with cellular components. This article reviews techniques based on photo-induced changes in the physicochemical properties of fluorescent proteins to measure protein dynamics inside living cells, and it also discusses the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques.

  7. Static and dynamic thermal infrared signatures measured during the FESTER experiment: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunter, W. H.; February, F.; Seiffer, D. P.; Eisele, C.

    2016-10-01

    The First European South African Experiment (FESTER) was conducted over about a 10 month period at the Institute of Maritime Technology (IMT) in False Bay, South Africa. One of the principal goals was recording of static and dynamic thermal infrared signatures under different environmental conditions for both validations of existing thermal equilibrium signature prediction codes, but also to aid development of dynamic thermal signature models. A small scientific work boat (called Sea Lab) was used as the principal target and sensor platform. Painted metal plates of different thicknesses were also used as infrared targets on-board Sea Lab to study static/dynamic thermal signatures and were also fitted with pyrgeometers, pyrometers and iButton temperature sensors/loggers. First results focused on the variable of thermal signatures as function of environmental conditions and the accuracy of calculated source temperatures (from measured radiometric temperatures) compared to the physical temperature measurements of the plates.

  8. X-ray scattering measurements of dissociation-induced metallization of dynamically compressed deuterium

    PubMed Central

    Davis, P.; Döppner, T.; Rygg, J. R.; Fortmann, C.; Divol, L.; Pak, A.; Fletcher, L.; Becker, A.; Holst, B.; Sperling, P.; Redmer, R.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Celliers, P.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Falcone, R. W.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen, the simplest element in the universe, has a surprisingly complex phase diagram. Because of applications to planetary science, inertial confinement fusion and fundamental physics, its high-pressure properties have been the subject of intense study over the past two decades. While sophisticated static experiments have probed hydrogen's structure at ever higher pressures, studies examining the higher-temperature regime using dynamic compression have mostly been limited to optical measurement techniques. Here we present spectrally resolved x-ray scattering measurements from plasmons in dynamically compressed deuterium. Combined with Compton scattering, and velocity interferometry to determine shock pressure and mass density, this allows us to extract ionization state as a function of compression. The onset of ionization occurs close in pressure to where density functional theory-molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations show molecular dissociation, suggesting hydrogen transitions from a molecular and insulating fluid to a conducting state without passing through an intermediate atomic phase. PMID:27079420

  9. X-ray scattering measurements of dissociation-induced metallization of dynamically compressed deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, P.; Döppner, T.; Rygg, J. R.; Fortmann, C.; Divol, L.; Pak, A.; Fletcher, L.; Becker, A.; Holst, B.; Sperling, P.; Redmer, R.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Celliers, P.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Falcone, R. W.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-04-18

    Hydrogen, the simplest element in the universe, has a surprisingly complex phase diagram. Because of applications to planetary science, inertial confinement fusion and fundamental physics, its high-pressure properties have been the subject of intense study over the past two decades. While sophisticated static experiments have probed hydrogen’s structure at ever higher pressures, studies examining the higher-temperature regime using dynamic compression have mostly been limited to optical measurement techniques. Here we present spectrally resolved x-ray scattering measurements from plasmons in dynamically compressed deuterium. Combined with Compton scattering, and velocity interferometry to determine shock pressure and mass density, this allows us to extract ionization state as a function of compression. Finally, the onset of ionization occurs close in pressure to where density functional theory-molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations show molecular dissociation, suggesting hydrogen transitions from a molecular and insulating fluid to a conducting state without passing through an intermediate atomic phase.

  10. Analyzing Repeated Measures Data on Individuals Nested within Groups: Accounting for Dynamic Group Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Daniel J.; Gottfredson, Nisha C.; Dean, Danielle; Zucker, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers commonly collect repeated measures on individuals nested within groups such as students within schools, patients within treatment groups, or siblings within families. Often, it is most appropriate to conceptualize such groups as dynamic entities, potentially undergoing stochastic structural and/or functional changes over time. For…

  11. Beyond the NAS Parallel Benchmarks: Measuring Dynamic Program Performance and Grid Computing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Biswas, Rupak; Frumkin, Michael; Feng, Huiyu; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The contents include: 1) A brief history of NPB; 2) What is (not) being measured by NPB; 3) Irregular dynamic applications (UA Benchmark); and 4) Wide area distributed computing (NAS Grid Benchmarks-NGB). This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  12. Another Approach to Measuring Human Development: The Composite Dynamic Human Development Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilbao-Ubillos, Javier

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks mainly to contribute to the debate on how the relative degree of development of a country should be measured by proposing an indicator to build on the valuable starting point provided by the Human Development Index (HDI). The indicator proposed is called the "Composite, Dynamic Human Development Index". It incorporates in a simple…

  13. A new measurement method for the dynamic resistance signal during the resistance spot welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijing; Hou, Yanyan; Zhang, Hongjie; Zhao, Jian; Xi, Tao; Qi, Xiangyang; Li, Yafeng

    2016-09-01

    To measure the dynamic resistance signal during the resistance spot welding process, some original work was carried out and a new measurement method was developed. Compared with the traditional method, using the instantaneous electrode voltage and welding current at peak current point in each half cycle, the resistance curve from the newly proposed method can provide more details of the dynamic resistance changes over time. To test the specific performance of the proposed method, a series of welding experiments were carried out and the tensile shear strengths of the weld samples were measured. Then, the measurement error of the proposed method was evaluated. Several features were extracted from the dynamic resistance curves. The correlations between the extracted features and weld strength were analyzed and the results show that these features are closely related to the weld strength and they can be used for welding quality monitoring. Moreover, the dynamic resistance curve from the newly proposed method can also be used to monitor some abnormal welding conditions.

  14. Measurement of Size-dependent Dynamic Shape Factors of Quartz Particles in Two Flow Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Jennifer M.; Bell, David M.; Imre, D.; Kleiber, Paul; Grassian, Vicki H.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2016-08-02

    Understanding and modeling the behavior of quartz dust particles, commonly found in the atmosphere, requires knowledge of many relevant particles properties, including particle shape. This study uses a single particle mass spectrometer, a differential mobility analyzer, and an aerosol particle mass analyzer to measure quartz aerosol particles mobility, aerodynamic, and volume equivalent diameters, mass, composition, effective density, and dynamic shape factor as a function of particle size, in both the free molecular and transition flow regimes. The results clearly demonstrate that dynamic shape factors can vary significantly as a function of particle size. For the quartz samples studied here, the dynamic shape factors increase with size, indicating that larger particles are significantly more aspherical than smaller particles. In addition, dynamic shape factors measured in the free-molecular (χv) and transition (χt) flow regimes can be significantly different, and these differences vary with the size of the quartz particles. For quartz, χv of small (d < 200 nm) particles is 1.25, while χv of larger particles (d ~ 440 nm) is 1.6, with a continuously increasing trend with particle size. In contrast χt, of small particles starts at 1.1 increasing slowly to 1.34 for 550 nm diameter particles. The multidimensional particle characterization approach used here goes beyond determination of average properties for each size, to provide additional information about how the particle dynamic shape factor may vary even for particles with the same mass and volume equivalent diameter.

  15. Describing and compensating gas transport dynamics for accurate instantaneous emission measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilenmann, Martin; Soltic, Patrik; Ajtay, Delia

    Instantaneous emission measurements on chassis dynamometers and engine test benches are becoming increasingly usual for car-makers and for environmental emission factor measurement and calculation, since much more information about the formation conditions can be extracted than from the regulated bag measurements (integral values). The common exhaust gas analysers for the "regulated pollutants" (carbon monoxide, total hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxide, carbon dioxide) allow measurement at a rate of one to ten samples per second. This gives the impression of having after-the-catalyst emission information with that chronological precision. It has been shown in recent years, however, that beside the reaction time of the analysers, the dynamics of gas transport in both the exhaust system of the car and the measurement system last significantly longer than 1 s. This paper focuses on the compensation of all these dynamics convoluting the emission signals. Most analysers show linear and time-invariant reaction dynamics. Transport dynamics can basically be split into two phenomena: a pure time delay accounting for the transport of the gas downstream and a dynamic signal deformation since the gas is mixed by turbulence along the way. This causes emission peaks to occur which are smaller in height and longer in time at the sensors than they are after the catalyst. These dynamics can be modelled using differential equations. Both mixing dynamics and time delay are constant for modelling a raw gas analyser system, since the flow in that system is constant. In the exhaust system of the car, however, the parameters depend on the exhaust volume flow. For gasoline cars, the variation in overall transport time may be more than 6 s. It is shown in this paper how all these processes can be described by invertible mathematical models with the focus on the more complex case of the car's exhaust system. Inversion means that the sharp emission signal at the catalyst out location can be

  16. The impact of dynamic balance measures on walking performance in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Nora E.; Marasigan, Rhul Evans R.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Newsome, Scott D.; Zackowski, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Static posture imbalance and gait dysfunction are common in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). Although the impact of strength and static balance on walking has been examined, little is known about the impact of dynamic standing balance on walking in MS. Objective To determine the impact of dynamic balance, static balance, sensation, and strength measures to walking in individuals with MS. Methods 52 individuals with MS (27 females; 26 relapsing-remitting; mean age 45.6±10.3 years; median EDSS 3.5 (range 0-7) participated in testing for dynamic and static posturography (Kistler 9281 force plate), hip flexion, hip extension, and ankle dorsiflexion strength (Microfet2 hand-held dynamometer), sensation (Vibratron II) and walk velocity (Optotrak Motion Analysis System). Mann-Whitney tests, Spearman correlation coefficients, and forward stepwise multiple regression were used to assess statistical significance. Results All measures were significantly abnormal in MS subjects when compared to age and sex-matched norms (p<0.05 for all). Static balance (eyes open, feet together [EOFT]), anterior- posterior (AP) dynamic sway, and hip extension strength were strongly correlated with fast walking velocity (AP sway r=0.68; hip extension strength r=0.73; EOFT r=-0.40). Together, AP dynamic sway (ρr=0.71, p<0.001), hip extension strength (ρr=0.54, p<0.001), and EOFT static balance (ρr=-0.41, p=0.01) explained more than 70% of the variance in fast walking velocity (p<0.001). Conclusions These data suggest that AP dynamic sway impacts walking performance in MS. A combined evaluation of dynamic balance, static balance and strength may lead to a better understanding of walking mechanisms as well as the development of strategies to improve walking. PMID:24795162

  17. Survey of Primary Flow Measurement Parameters at the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piatak, David J.

    2003-01-01

    An assessment of the methods and locations used to measure the primary flow conditions in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel was conducted during calibration activities following the facility conversion from a Freon-12 heavy-gas test medium to R-134a. A survey of stagnation pressure, plenum static pressure, and stagnation temperature was undertaken at many pertinent locations in the settling chamber, plenum, and contraction section of the wind tunnel and these measurements were compared to those of the existing primary flow measurement systems. Local flow velocities were measured in the settling chamber using a pitot probe. Results illustrate that small discrepancies exist between measured primary tunnel flow conditions and the survey measurements. These discrepancies in tunnel stagnation pressure, plenum pressure, and stagnation temperature were found to be approximately +/- 1-3 psf and 2-3 degrees Fahrenheit. The propagation of known instrument errors in measured primary flow conditions and its impact on tunnel Mach number, dynamic pressure, flow velocity, and Reynolds number have been investigated analytically and shown to require careful attention when considering the uncertainty in measured test section conditions.

  18. Dynamic displacement distribution measurement of deforming structure using sampling moiré camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Takuya; Fujigaki, Motoharu; Murata, Yorinobu

    A Sampling moire method is one of the convenient phase analysis methods. The accuracy of phase difference analysis is from 1/100 to 1/1000 of the grating pitches. This method is useful to a real-time deformation measurement because the two-dimensional phase analysis can be performed from a single shot two-dimensional grating image. We developed a sampling moire camera which can analyze the two-dimensional displacement images in real-time by using the sampling moire method. The camera is composed of a C-MOS sensor, an FPGA, memory modules and a USB interface. A two-dimensional grating image on the object is taken by the CMOS sensor in synchronization with a camera trigger. The algorithm mentioned previous was written into the FPGA. The two-dimensional grating images analyzed from one-shot image by the FPGA and outputted in real-time. It is confirmed that the camera can measure static displacement in high accuracy. However, it is not confirmed that the camera can measure dynamic displacement in high accuracy. In this paper, the accuracy of dynamic displacement measurement by using sampling moire camera is confirmed. And the sampling moire camera was applied to measure dynamic displacement of train bridges while a train is passing.

  19. Dynamic displacement measurements with a stabilized fiber Michelson interferometer based on quadratrue-phase-tracking technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhimin; Xie, Fang; Li, Min; Feng, Qibo

    2010-01-01

    A highly stabilized dynamic displacement measurement system, which employs fiber Bragg gratings to interleave two fiber Michelson interferometers that share the common interferometric optical path, is presented. The phase change in the interferometric signals of the two fiber Michelson interferometers is tracked respectively by maintaining the phase difference in quadrature with two electronic feedback loops. One of the fiber interferometers is used to stabilize the system by the use of an electronic feedback loop to eliminate the influences that result from the environmental disturbances, while the other fiber interferometer is used for the measurement by employing another electronic feedback loop to track the phase change in the interferometric signal. The system is able to measure dynamic displacement and provide a sense of direction of the displacement at the same time. The dynamic displacement with frequencies ranging from 0.1 Hz to 200 Hz and with a maximum amplitude of 60 μm can be measured, and the measurement resolution can reach 10 nm.

  20. Statistical complexity measures as telltale of relevant scales in emergent dynamics of spatial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbona, A.; Bona, C.; Miñano, B.; Plastino, A.

    2014-09-01

    The definition of complexity through Statistical Complexity Measures (SCM) has recently seen major improvements. Mostly, the effort is concentrated in measures on time series. We propose a SCM definition for spatial dynamical systems. Our definition is in line with the trend to combine entropy with measures of structure (such as disequilibrium). We study the behaviour of our definition against the vectorial noise model of Collective Motion. From a global perspective, we show how our SCM is minimal at both the microscale and macroscale, while it reaches a maximum at the ranges that define the mesoscale in this model. From a local perspective, the SCM is minimum both in highly ordered and disordered areas, while it reaches a maximum at the edges between such areas. These characteristics suggest this is a good candidate for detecting the mesoscale of arbitrary dynamical systems as well as regions where the complexity is maximal in such systems.

  1. Strain and dynamic measurements using fiber optic sensors embedded into graphite/epoxy tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehart, D. W.; Doederlein, T.; Koury, J.; Rogowski, R. S.; Heyman, J. S.; Holben, M. S., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy tubes were fabricated with embedded optical fibers to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring strains with a fiber optic technique. Resistance strain gauges were attached to the tubes to measure strain at four locations along the tube for comparison with the fiber optic sensors. Both static and dynamic strain measurements were made with excellent agreement between the embedded fiber optic strain sensor and the strain gauges. Strain measurements of 10(exp -7) can be detected with the optical phase locked loop (OPLL) system using optical fiber. Because of their light weight, compatibility with composites, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and based on the static and dynamic results obtained, fiber optic sensors embedded in composites may be useful as the sensing component of smart structures.

  2. Adiabatic elimination of Gaussian subsystems from quantum dynamics under continuous measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černotík, Ondřej; Vasilyev, Denis V.; Hammerer, Klemens

    2015-07-01

    An ever broader range of physical platforms provides the possibility to study and engineer quantum dynamics under continuous measurements. In many experimental arrangements the system of interest is monitored by means of an ancillary device, whose sole purpose is to transduce the signal from the system to the measurement apparatus. Here we present a method of adiabatic elimination when the transducer consists of an arbitrary number of bosonic modes with Gaussian dynamics while the measured object can be any quantum system. Crucially, our approach can cope with the highly relevant case of finite temperature of the transducer, which is not easily achieved with other methods. We show that this approach provides a significant improvement in the readout of superconducting qubits in circuit QED already for a few thermal excitations and makes it possible to adiabatically eliminate optomechanical transducers relevant for frequency conversion between microwave and optical fields.

  3. A portable instrument for 3-D dynamic robot measurements using triangulation and laser tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J.R.R. . Mechanical Engineering Dept.); Parker, G.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    The paper describes the development and validation of a 3-D measurement instrument capable of determining the static and dynamic performance of industrial robots to ISO standards. Using two laser beams to track an optical target attached to the robot end-effector, the target position coordinates may be estimated, relative to the instrument coordinate frame, to a high accuracy using triangulation principles. The effect of variations in the instrument geometry from the nominal model is evaluated through a kinematic model of the tracking head. Significant improvements of the measurement accuracy are then obtained by a simple adjustment of the main parameters. Extensive experimental test results are included to demonstrate the instrument performance. Finally typical static and dynamic measurement results for an industrial robot are presented to illustrate the effectiveness and usefulness of the instrument.

  4. A Hot Dynamic Seal Rig for Measuring Hypersonic Engine Seal Durability and Flow Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jeffrey H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Sirocky, Paul J.; Kren, Lawrence A.

    1993-01-01

    A test fixture for measuring the dynamic performance of candidate high-temperature engine seal concepts was installed at NASA Lewis Research Center. The test fixture was designed to evaluate seal concepts under development for advanced hypersonic engines, such as those being considered for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). The fixture can measure dynamic seal leakage performance from room temperature up to 840 C (1550 F) and air pressure differentials up to 690 kPa (100 psi). Performance of the seals can be measured while sealing against flat or distorted walls. In the fixture two seals are preloaded against the sides of a 30 cm (1 ft) long saber that slides transverse to the axis of the seals, simulating the scrubbing motion anticipated in these engines. The capabilities of this test fixture along with preliminary data showing the dependence of seal leakage performance on high temperature cycling are addressed.

  5. Dynamic and quasi-static measurements of PBXN-5 and comp-B explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Ten Cate, James A; Deluca, Racci; Rae, Philip J; Todd, Steven N

    2009-03-12

    We have measured dynamic and quasi-static mechanical properties of PBXN-5 and Comp-B explosive materials to provide input data for modeling efforts. Dynamic measurements included acoustic and split-Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Quasi-static testing was done in compression on a load frame. Hopkinson bar and quasistatic testing was done at five temperatures from -50{sup o}C to 50{sup o}C. Our results were dominated by the low density of the samples and showed up as low acoustic velocities and lower strengths, as compared to other materials of the same or similar formulations. The effects seem to be consistent with the high porosity of the materials. The data do provide useful input to models that include density as a parameter and suggest caution when using measurements of ideal materials to predict behavior of damaged materials.

  6. A hot dynamic seal rig for measuring hypersonic engine seal durability and flow performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jeffrey H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Sirocky, Paul J.; Kren, Lawrence A.

    1993-01-01

    A test fixture for measuring the dynamic performance of candidate high-temperature engine seal concepts has been installed at NASA Lewis Research Center. The test fixture has been designed to evaluate seal concepts under development for advanced hypersonic engines, such as those being considered for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). The fixture can measure dynamic seal leakage performance from room temperature up to 840 C (1550 F) and air pressure differentials up to 690 kPa (100 psi). Performance of the seals can be measured while sealing against flat or distorted walls. In the fixture two seals are preloaded against the sides of a 30 cm (1 ft) long saber that slides transverse to the axis of the seals, simulating the scrubbing motion anticipated in these engines. This report covers the capabilities of this test fixture along with preliminary data showing the dependence of seal leakage performance on high temperature cycling.

  7. Hot dynamic test rig for measuring hypersonic engine seal flow and durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jeffrey H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Sirocky, Paul J.; Kren, Lawrence A.

    1994-01-01

    A test fixture for measuring the dynamic performance of candidate high-temperature engine seal concepts was developed. The test fixture was developed to evaluate seal concepts under development for advanced hypersonic engines, such as those being considered for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). The fixture can measure dynamic seal leakage performance from room temperature up to 840 C and air pressure differentials of to 0.7 MPa. Performance of the seals can be measured while sealing against flat or engine-simulated distorted walls. In the fixture, two seals are preloaded against the sides of a 0.3 m long saber that slides transverse to the axis of the seals, simulating the scrubbing motion anticipated in these engines. The capabilities of this text fixture along with preliminary data showing the dependence of seal leakage performance on high temperature cycling are covered.

  8. Evaluation of the dynamic behavior of a Pelton runner based on strain gauge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Reiner; Probst, Christian

    2016-11-01

    A reliable mechanical design of Pelton runners is very important in the layout of new installations and modernizations. Especially in horizontal machines, where the housing is not embedded into concrete, a rupture of a runner bucket can have severe consequences. Even if a crack in the runner is detected on time, the outage time that follows the malfunction of the runner is shortening the return of investment. It is a fact that stresses caused by the runner rotation and the jet forces are superposed by high frequent dynamic stresses. In case of resonance it even can be the dominating effect that is limiting the lifetime of a runner. Therefore a clear understanding of the dynamic mechanisms is essential for a safe runner design. This paper describes the evaluation of the dynamic behavior of a Pelton runner installed in a model turbine based on strain gauge measurements. Equipped with strain gauges at the root area of the buckets, the time responses of the strains under the influence of various operational parameters were measured. As a result basic theories for the jet bucket excitation were verified and the influence of the water mass was detected by evaluating the frequency shift in case of resonance. Furthermore, the influence of the individual bucket masses onto the dynamic behaviour for different mode shapes got measured.

  9. Measuring nonadiabaticity of molecular quantum dynamics with quantum fidelity and with its efficient semiclassical approximation.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Tomáš; Vaníček, Jiří

    2012-03-07

    We propose to measure nonadiabaticity of molecular quantum dynamics rigorously with the quantum fidelity between the Born-Oppenheimer and fully nonadiabatic dynamics. It is shown that this measure of nonadiabaticity applies in situations where other criteria, such as the energy gap criterion or the extent of population transfer, fail. We further propose to estimate this quantum fidelity efficiently with a generalization of the dephasing representation to multiple surfaces. Two variants of the multiple-surface dephasing representation (MSDR) are introduced, in which the nuclei are propagated either with the fewest-switches surface hopping or with the locally mean field dynamics (LMFD). The LMFD can be interpreted as the Ehrenfest dynamics of an ensemble of nuclear trajectories, and has been used previously in the nonadiabatic semiclassical initial value representation. In addition to propagating an ensemble of classical trajectories, the MSDR requires evaluating nonadiabatic couplings and solving the Schrödinger (or more generally, the quantum Liouville-von Neumann) equation for a single discrete degree of freedom. The MSDR can be also used in the diabatic basis to measure the importance of the diabatic couplings. The method is tested on three model problems introduced by Tully and on a two-surface model of dissociation of NaI.

  10. An evaluation of dynamic mutuality measurements and methods in cyclic time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiaohua; Huang, Guitian; Duan, Na

    2010-12-01

    Several measurements and techniques have been developed to detect dynamic mutuality and synchronicity of time series in econometrics. This study aims to compare the performances of five methods, i.e., linear regression, dynamic correlation, Markov switching models, concordance index and recurrence quantification analysis, through numerical simulations. We evaluate the abilities of these methods to capture structure changing and cyclicity in time series and the findings of this paper would offer guidance to both academic and empirical researchers. Illustration examples are also provided to demonstrate the subtle differences of these techniques.

  11. Measurement of dynamic characteristics of latex foams by the antiresonance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarevskii, W.; Apinis, R.; Jirgens, L.

    2000-03-01

    Measuring and calculation methods for the dynamic characteristics of tubular specimens of low-modulus latex foams and composites based on them, under longitudinal vibrations in a low-frequency region (up to 200 Hz), are developed. The method is based on the effect of antiresonance. Data on the influence of the basic formulation-processing factors on the dynamic characteristics (gelatination time and content of the plasticizer and chopped fibers) are presented. The results obtained can be used to choose the composition of latex foams for lining acoustic channels, injectors, ejectors, and phase inverters, as well as to control products quality. This method can be applied directly to full-size articles.

  12. Unsteady-Pressure and Dynamic-Deflection Measurements on an Aeroelastic Supercritical Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, David A.; Sandford, Maynard C.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1991-01-01

    Transonic steady and unsteady pressure tests were conducted on a large elastic wing. The wing has a supercritical airfoil, a full span aspect ratio of 10.3, a leading edge sweepback angle of 28.8 degrees, and two inboard and one outboard trailing edge control surfaces. Only the outboard control surface was deflected statically and dynamically to generate steady and unsteady flow over the wing. The unsteady surface pressure and dynamic deflection measurements of this elastic wing are presented to permit correlations of the experimental data with theoretical predictions.

  13. Dynamic deformation measurement and analysis of active stressed lap using optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qican; Su, Xianyu; Liu, Yuankun; Xiang, Liqun

    2007-12-01

    The active stressed lap is the heart of polishing process. A novel non-contact optical method of dynamic deformation measurement and analysis of an active stressed lap is put forward. This method, based on structured illumination, is able to record full-field information of the bending and rotating stressed lap dynamically and continuously, while its profile is changed under computer control, and restore the whole process of lap deformation varied with time at different position and rotating angle. It has been verified by experiments that this proposed method will be helpful to the opticians to ensure the stressed lap as expected.

  14. Beam dynamics simulations and measurements at the Project X Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Scarpine, V.E.; Webber, R.C.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project X, under study at Fermilab, is a multitask high-power superconducting RF proton beam facility, aiming to provide high intensity protons for rare processes experiments and nuclear physics at low energy, and simultaneously for the production of neutrinos, as well as muon beams in the long term. A beam test facility - former known as High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) - is under commissioning for testing critical components of the project, e.g. dynamics and diagnostics at low beam energies, broadband beam chopping, RF power generation and distribution. In this paper we describe the layout of the test facility and present beam dynamics simulations and measurements.

  15. Measurement of the dynamic response of compressed hydrogen by inelastic X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, K.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Fäustlin, R. R.; Fortmann, C.; Y Khattak, F.; Kleppe, A. K.; Riley, D.; Toleikis, S.; Wark, J.; Wilhelm, H.; Gregori, G.

    2010-08-01

    Measurement of the dynamic properties of hydrogen and helium under extreme pressures is a key to understanding the physics of planetary interiors. The inelastic scattering signal from statically compressed hydrogen inside diamond anvil cells at 2.8 GPa and 6.4 GPa was measured at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron facility in the UK. The first direct measurement of the local field correction to the Coulomb interactions in degenerate plasmas was obtained from spectral shifts in the scattering data and compared to predictions by the Utsumi-Ichimaru theory for degenerate electron liquids.

  16. Protein adsorption on surfaces: dynamic contact-angle (DCA) and quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements.

    PubMed

    Stadler, H; Mondon, M; Ziegler, C

    2003-01-01

    Adsorption of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) on gold has been tested at various concentrations in aqueous solution by dynamic contact-angle analysis (DCA) and quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. With the Wilhelmy plate technique advancing and receding contact angles and the corresponding hysteresis were measured and correlated with the hydrophilicity and the homogeneity of the surface. With electrical admittance measurements of a gold-coated piezoelectrical quartz crystal, layer mass and viscoelastic contributions to the resonator's frequency shift during adsorption could be separated. A correlation was found between the adsorbed mass and the homogeneity and hydrophilicity of the adsorbed film.

  17. Dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurements with high resolution.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jidong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Tao, Tianjiong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2014-11-01

    A unique dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurement has been developed recently. This paper presents the working principle of the new interferometric system, which uses a photonic crystal fiber to transmit the wide-spectrum light beams and a high-speed streak camera or frame camera to record the interference stripes. Preliminary measurements of harmonic vibrations of a speaker, driven by a radio, and the changes in the tip clearance of a rotating gear wheel show that this new type of interferometer has the ability to perform absolute distance measurements both with high time- and distance-resolution.

  18. Dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurements with high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Jidong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Tao, Tianjiong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2014-11-15

    A unique dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurement has been developed recently. This paper presents the working principle of the new interferometric system, which uses a photonic crystal fiber to transmit the wide-spectrum light beams and a high-speed streak camera or frame camera to record the interference stripes. Preliminary measurements of harmonic vibrations of a speaker, driven by a radio, and the changes in the tip clearance of a rotating gear wheel show that this new type of interferometer has the ability to perform absolute distance measurements both with high time- and distance-resolution.

  19. Direct Measurement of Core-Level Relaxation Dynamics on a Surface-Adsorbate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miaja-Avila, L.; Saathoff, G.; Mathias, S.; Yin, J.; La-O-Vorakiat, C.; Bauer, M.; Aeschlimann, M.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.

    2008-07-01

    The coupling between electronic states in a surface-adsorbate system is fundamental to the understanding of many surface interactions. In this Letter, we present the first direct time-resolved observations of the lifetime of core-excited states of an atom adsorbed onto a surface. By comparing laser-assisted photoemission from a substrate with a delayed Auger decay process from an adsorbate, we measure the lifetime of the 4d-1 core level of xenon on Pt(111) to be 7.1±1.1fs. This result opens up time-domain measurements of surface dynamics where energy-resolved measurements may provide incomplete information.

  20. Laser velocimeter measurements of dynamic stall. [conducted in the Ames two foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, F. K.

    1984-01-01

    Laser velocimeter measurements were made during the study of a two-dimensional NACA 0012 airfoil undergoing conditions of dynamic stall. The measurements, which were obtained in the Ames 2 foot wind tunnel at reduced frequencies of 0.12 and 1.2, show significant flow field hysteresis around the static stall angle. Comparisons were also made with dual-plate interferograms and good agreement was found for the attached flow cases. For separated flow, characteristic vortex shedding caused poor agreement and significantly increased the measured Reynolds shear stresses.

  1. A New Sensor for Measurement of Dynamic Contact Stress in the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Rudert, M. J.; Ellis, B. J.; Henak, C. R.; Stroud, N. J.; Pederson, D. R.; Weiss, J. A.; Brown, T. D.

    2014-01-01

    Various techniques exist for quantifying articular contact stress distributions, an important class of measurements in the field of orthopaedic biomechanics. In situations where the need for dynamic recording has been paramount, the approach of preference has involved thin-sheet multiplexed grid-array transducers. To date, these sensors have been used to study contact stresses in the knee, shoulder, ankle, wrist, and spinal facet joints. Until now, however, no such sensor had been available for the human hip joint due to difficulties posed by the deep, bi-curvilinear geometry of the acetabulum. We report here the design and development of a novel sensor capable of measuring dynamic contact stress in human cadaveric hip joints (maximum contact stress of 20 MPa and maximum sampling rate 100 readings/s). Particular emphasis is placed on issues concerning calibration, and on the effect of joint curvature on the sensor's performance. The active pressure-sensing regions of the sensors have the shape of a segment of an annulus with a 150-deg circumferential span, and employ a polar/circumferential “ring-and-spoke” sensel grid layout. There are two sensor sizes, having outside radii of 44 and 48 mm, respectively. The new design was evaluated in human cadaver hip joints using two methods. The stress magnitudes and spatial distribution measured by the sensor were compared to contact stresses measured by pressure sensitive film during static loading conditions that simulated heel strike during walking and stair climbing. Additionally, the forces obtained by spatial integration of the sensor contact stresses were compared to the forces measured by load cells during the static simulations and for loading applied by a dynamic hip simulator. Stress magnitudes and spatial distribution patterns obtained from the sensor versus from pressure sensitive film exhibited good agreement. The joint forces obtained during both static and dynamic loading were within ±10% and ±26

  2. Local Difference Measures between Complex Networks for Dynamical System Model Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Stefan; Donges, Jonathan F.; Volkholz, Jan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    A faithful modeling of real-world dynamical systems necessitates model evaluation. A recent promising methodological approach to this problem has been based on complex networks, which in turn have proven useful for the characterization of dynamical systems. In this context, we introduce three local network difference measures and demonstrate their capabilities in the field of climate modeling, where these measures facilitate a spatially explicit model evaluation. Building on a recent study by Feldhoff et al. [1] we comparatively analyze statistical and dynamical regional climate simulations of the South American monsoon system. Three types of climate networks representing different aspects of rainfall dynamics are constructed from the modeled precipitation space-time series. Specifically, we define simple graphs based on positive as well as negative rank correlations between rainfall anomaly time series at different locations, and such based on spatial synchronizations of extreme rain events. An evaluation against respective networks built from daily satellite data provided by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42 V7 reveals far greater differences in model performance between network types for a fixed but arbitrary climate model than between climate models for a fixed but arbitrary network type. We identify two sources of uncertainty in this respect. Firstly, climate variability limits fidelity, particularly in the case of the extreme event network; and secondly, larger geographical link lengths render link misplacements more likely, most notably in the case of the anticorrelation network; both contributions are quantified using suitable ensembles of surrogate networks. Our model evaluation approach is applicable to any multidimensional dynamical system and especially our simple graph difference measures are highly versatile as the graphs to be compared may be constructed in whatever way required. Generalizations to directed as well as edge- and node

  3. A Thorax Simulator for Complex Dynamic Bioimpedance Measurements With Textile Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Mark; Muhlsteff, Jens; Teichmann, Daniel; Leonhardt, Steffen; Walter, Marian

    2015-06-01

    Bioimpedance measurements on the human thorax are suitable for assessment of body composition or hemodynamic parameters, such as stroke volume; they are non-invasive, easy in application and inexpensive. When targeting personal healthcare scenarios, the technology can be integrated into textiles to increase ease, comfort and coverage of measurements. Bioimpedance is generally measured using two electrodes injecting low alternating currents (0.5-10 mA) and two additional electrodes to measure the corresponding voltage drop. The impedance is measured either spectroscopically (bioimpedance spectroscopy, BIS) between 5 kHz and 1 MHz or continuously at a fixed frequency around 100 kHz (impedance cardiography, ICG). A thorax simulator is being developed for testing and calibration of bioimpedance devices and other new developments. For the first time, it is possible to mimic the complete time-variant properties of the thorax during an impedance measurement. This includes the dynamic real part and dynamic imaginary part of the impedance with a peak-to-peak value of 0.2 Ω and an adjustable base impedance (24.6 Ω ≥ Z0 ≥ 51.6 Ω). Another novelty is adjustable complex electrode-skin contact impedances for up to 8 electrodes to evaluate bioimpedance devices in combination with textile electrodes. In addition, an electrocardiographic signal is provided for cardiographic measurements which is used in ICG devices. This provides the possibility to generate physiologic impedance changes, and in combination with an ECG, all parameters of interest such as stroke volume (SV), pre-ejection period (PEP) or extracellular resistance (Re) can be simulated. The speed of all dynamic signals can be altered. The simulator was successfully tested with commercially available BIS and ICG devices and the preset signals are measured with high correlation (r = 0.996).

  4. The use of electrical anisotropy measurements to monitor soil crack dynamics - laboratory evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahraei, Amirhossein; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Zimmermann, Egon; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Swelling and shrinking of soil cracks is a key factor determining water fluxes in many irrigated soils. Most previous studies have used time-intensive and destructive methods for crack characterization, such as depth and volume determination from simplified geometrical measurements or liquid latex filling. Because of their destructive and time-consuming nature, these methods have only provided instantaneous estimates of the geometry and/or volume of cracks. The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of anisotropy in electrical resistivity measured with a square electrode array to determine crack depth dynamics. In a first step, the performance of the method was analyzed using a laboratory experiment where an artificial soil crack was emulated using a plastic plate in a water bath. Since cracking depth was precisely known, this experiment allowed to develop a method to estimate soil crack depth from measurements of the electrical anisotropy. In a second step, electrical anisotropy was measured during soil crack development within a soil monolith consisting of a mix of sand and bentonite. The cracking depth estimated from electrical measurement compared well with reference ruler measurements. These laboratory measurements inspired confidence in the use of electrical anisotropy for soil crack investigations, and consequently the developed methods will be applied to investigate soil crack dynamics in the field in a next step.

  5. Definition and Validation of a Methodology to Measure the Local Static Stiffness of Large Appendages Interfaces Using Dynamic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, M.; Rodriguez Senin, A.; Laduree, G.

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the methodology developed under the Sentinel 1 spacecraft structure project to measure the local static stiffness of synthetic aperture radar antenna (SAR-A) interfaces using dynamic measurements. The methodology used consists in measuring accelerance [acceleration/force] frequency response functions (FRF) at the SAR-A interfaces and at several points selected as boundary conditions used for the derivation of the local stiffness [1]. The accelerance FRF is used to calculate the flexibility FRF [displacement/force] from which the static term of the flexibility is extracted. The static term is obtained via a least squares approximation at low frequency of the real part of the flexibility FRF (curve fitting approach) and extrapolation of the curve down to 0 Hz.Since the test was performed with the launch vehicle adapter ring clamped, the direct results of these measurements lead to global stiffness values. To calculate the local stiffness values the results were post- processed to subtract the contribution of the global deformation of the spacecraft structure. The local flexibility matrix at the SAR-A interfaces is calculated by imposing zero displacement at those points selected as virtual boundary conditions. Then, the local stiffness components were obtained inverting the diagonal terms of the local flexibility matrix for the three translational and the two in-plane rotational degrees of freedom in 9 SAR-A interfaces.The results obtained using this methodology were validated with a classical static test at one of the interfaces showing a good correlation between static and dynamic tests results. It was concluded that this methodology is suitable for the verification of static stiffness of large appendages interfaces and it can be applied to future missions that carry large payloads with critical structural interfaces.

  6. Electron Dynamics in Nanocrystalline TiO2 and ZnO Measured by Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmuttenmaer, Charles; Baxter, Jason

    2009-03-01

    Understanding the microscopic details of carrier transport in nanocrystalline colloidal thin films is required for complete understanding of a variety of photochemical and photoelectrochemical cells utilizing interpenetrating networks. Measuring the photoconductivity in these materials, however, is a challenging problem because of the inherent difficulty of attaching wires to nanometer-sized objects. Furthermore, picosecond carrier dynamics play an important role in efficient charge separation and transport, but the low temporal resolution of traditional methods used to determine their photoconductivity precludes their use in studying sub-ps to ps dynamics. This talk will present recent advances utilizing THz spectroscopy to investigate and elucidate the microscopic behavior of carrier dynamics within the context of materials for energy applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells and solar-driven cells for catalytic chemistry.

  7. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    PubMed Central

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  8. Investigating DOC export dynamics using high-frequency instream concentration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterwoud, Marieke; Keller, Toralf; Musolff, Andreas; Frei, Sven; Park, Ji-Hyung; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2014-05-01

    Being able to monitor DOC concentrations using in-situ high frequency measurements makes it possible to better understand concentration-discharge behavior under different hydrological conditions. We developed a UV-Vis probe setup for modified/adapted use under field conditions. The quasi mobile probe setup allows a more flexible probe deployment. New or existing monitoring sites can easily be equipped for quasi-continuous monitoring or measurements can be performed at changing locations, without the need for additional infrastructure. We were able to gather high frequency data on DOC dynamics for one year in two streams in the Harz mountains in Germany. It proved that obtaining accurate DOC concentrations from the UV-Vis probes required frequent maintenance and probe calibration. The advantage of the setup over standard monitoring protocols becomes evident when comparing net exports over a year. In addition to mass improved balance calculations the high-frequency measurements can reveal intricate hysteretic relationships between discharge and concentrations that can provide valuable insights into the hydrologic dynamics and mechanisms that govern the delivery of DOC to the receiving waters. Measurements with similar probes from two additional catchments in Southern Germany and South Korea will be used to illustrate different discharge-concentration relationships and what can be learned from them about the hydrologic mechanisms that control the dynamics of DOC export.

  9. Dynamic BOTDA measurements based on Brillouin phase-shift and RF demodulation.

    PubMed

    Urricelqui, Javier; Zornoza, Ander; Sagues, Mikel; Loayssa, Alayn

    2012-11-19

    We demonstrate a novel dynamic BOTDA sensor based, for the first time to our knowledge, on the use of the Brillouin phase-shift in addition to the conventional Brillouin gain. This provides the advantage of measurements that are largely immune to variations in fiber attenuation or changes in pump pulse power. Furthermore, the optical detection deployed leads to an enhanced precision or measurement time and to the broadening of the measurement range. Proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate 1.66-kHz measurement rate with 1-m resolution over a 160 m sensing fiber length. Moreover, a measurement range of 2560 µε with a precision of 20 µε is successfully proved.

  10. Dynamic assessment of center of pressure measurements from an instrumented AMTI treadmill with controlled precision.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Emma; Crenshaw, Jeremy; Lugade, Vipul; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2017-04-01

    With the increasing use of instrumented force treadmills in biomechanical research, it is imperative that the validity of center of pressure (COP) measurements is established. The study aims were to compare an instrumented treadmill's static-belt COP accuracy to that of a floor-embedded platform, develop a novel method to quantify dynamic-belt COP accuracy with controlled precision and perform an initial investigation of how dynamic COP accuracy changes with weight and velocity. Static COP accuracy was assessed by applying a force while moving a rigid rod in a circular clockwise motion at nine positions of interest on the two treadmill and two ground-embedded force plates. Dynamic COP accuracy was assessed for weights (68.0, 102.1, and 136.1kg), applied through a ball bearing of 2.54cm circumference, with peak treadmill belt speeds of 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0m/s. COP accuracy was assessed relative to motion capture marker trajectories. Statically, treadmill COP error was similar to that of the ground-embedded force plates and that reported for other treadmills. Dynamically, COP error appeared to vary systematically with weight and velocity and in the case of anteroposterior COP error, shear force, although testing with a larger number of weights and velocities is needed to fully define the relationship. This novel method can be used to assess any instrumented treadmill's dynamic COP accuracy with controlled precision.

  11. The coupled dynamics of fluids and spacecraft in low gravity and low gravity fluid measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John; Peterson, Lee D.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1987-01-01

    The very large mass fraction of liquids stored on broad current and future generation spacecraft has made critical the technologies of describing the fluid-spacecraft dynamics and measuring or gauging the fluid. Combined efforts in these areas are described, and preliminary results are presented. The coupled dynamics of fluids and spacecraft in low gravity study is characterizing the parametric behavior of fluid-spacecraft systems in which interaction between the fluid and spacecraft dynamics is encountered. Particular emphasis is given to the importance of nonlinear fluid free surface phenomena to the coupled dynamics. An experimental apparatus has been developed for demonstrating a coupled fluid-spacecraft system. In these experiments, slosh force signals are fed back to a model tank actuator through a tunable analog second order integration circuit. In this manner, the tank motion is coupled to the resulting slosh force. Results are being obtained in 1-g and in low-g (on the NASA KC-135) using dynamic systems nondimensionally identical except for the Bond numbers.

  12. Measuring and modeling cellular contact guidance through dynamic sensing of nanotopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Can; Driscoll, Meghan; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fourkas, John; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the shape dynamics of the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum on nanotopographical gratings. Multiple studies have previously implicated the patterning of focal adhesion complexes (FACs) in contact guidance. However, we observe significant contact guidance of Dictyostelium along ridge-shaped nano- and microtopographic surface features, even though Dictyostelium lacks FACs. We measure the surface contact guidance efficiency, which we calculate from the statistics of cell orientations, as a function of the distance between parallel ridges. Ridges with a spacing of about 1.5 μm lead to the greatest contact guidance efficiency. We previously observed that Dictyostelium cells exhibit oscillatory shape dynamics. Therefore, we model contact guidance as a resonance between the cell oscillations and the nanogratings. In particular, we model cells as stochastic cellular harmonic oscillators that couple to the periodicity of the ridges. The spatial and temporal scales of the oscillations that best couple to the surface are consistent with those of protrusive dynamics. Our results suggest that the coupling of protrusive dynamics, which are governed by actin dynamics, to surface topography is one possible mechanism for contact guidance.

  13. Instrumentation for measuring dynamic spinal load moment exposures in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Marras, William S; Lavender, Steven A; Ferguson, Sue A; Splittstoesser, Riley E; Yang, Gang; Schabo, Pete

    2010-02-01

    Prior research has shown the load moment exposure to be one of the strongest predictors of low back disorder risk in manufacturing jobs. However, to extend these finding to the manual lifting and handling of materials in distribution centers, where the layout of the lifting task changes from one lift to the next and the lifts are highly dynamic, would be very challenging without an automated means of quantifying reach distances and item weights. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and validation of automated instrumentation, the Moment Exposure Tracking System (METS), designed to capture the dynamic load moment exposures and spine postures used in distribution center jobs. This multiphase process started by obtaining baseline data describing the accuracy of existing manual methods for obtaining moment arms during the observation of dynamic lifting for the purposes of benchmarking the automated system. The process continued with the development and calibration of an ultrasonic system to track hand location and the development of load sensing handles that could be used to assess item weights. The final version of the system yielded an average absolute error in the load's moment arm of 4.1cm under the conditions of trunk flexion and load asymmetry. This compares well with the average absolute error of 10.9cm obtained using manual methods of measuring moment arms. With the item mass estimates being within half a kilogram, the instrumentation provides a reliable and valid means for assessing dynamic load moment exposures in dynamic distribution center lifting tasks.

  14. Helicopter blade dynamic loads measured during performance testing of two scaled rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.

    1987-01-01

    A test to determine the performance differences between the 27-percent-scale models of two rotors for the U.S. Army AH-64 helicopter was conducted in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. One rotor, referred to as the baseline rotor, simulated the geometry and dynamic characteristics of the production baseline rotor, and the other rotor, referred to as the advanced rotor, was designed to have improved hover performance. During the performance test, the dynamic pitch-link forces and blade bending and torsion moments were also measured. Dynamic data from the forward flight investigation are reduced and presented. The advanced blade set was designed to have dynamic characteristics similar to those of the baseline rotor so that test conditions would not be limited by potential rotor instability and blade resonances, and so that the measured performance increments could be considered to be due purely to aerodynamic causes. Data show consistent trends with advance ratio for both blade sets with generally higher oscillatory loads occurring for the advanced blade set when compared with the baseline blade set.

  15. In Situ Space Gas Dynamic Measurements by the ROSINA Comet Pressure Sensor COPS Onboard Rosetta Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, Chia-Yu; Altwegg, Kathrin; Fiethe, Björn; Gasc, Sébastien; Rubin, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Rosetta is part of the cornerstone missions executed by the European Space Agency. It is the first space mission to orbit and also land on a comet. The Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) is one of the core payloads on board of the Rosetta spacecraft [Balsiger et al, 2007]. ROSINA's main objective is to determine the major atmospheric and ionospheric composition in the coma and to investigate the gas dynamics around the comet. ROSINA consists of two mass spectrometers and a pressure sensor. The COmet Pressure Sensor (COPS) includes two gauges: the "nude gauge" measures total neutral density in the coma and the "ram gauge" measures the dynamic pressure of the cometary gas flux. The combination of these two gauges makes COPS capable to derive the gas dynamics (velocity and temperature) at the location of the spacecraft. Over several months Rosetta has been carrying out a close study of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. In early August 2014 COPS detected the faint and expanding atmosphere of the comet while it was still outside of 3.5 AU from the Sun. We will present ROSINA COPS observations of the evolution and gas dynamics of the cometary coma following these first observations until spring 2015. Reference: Balsiger, H. et al.: ROSINA-Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis, Space Science Reviews, Vol. 128, 745-801, 2007.

  16. Measurement of dynamic interaction between a vibrating fuel element and its support

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, N.J.; Tromp, J.H.; Smith, B.A.W.

    1996-12-01

    Flow-induced vibration of CANDU{reg_sign} fuel can result in fretting damage of the fuel and its support. A WOrk-Rate Measuring Station (WORMS) was developed to measure the relative motion and contact forces between a vibrating fuel element and its support. The fixture consists of a small piece of support structure mounted on a micrometer stage. This arrangement permits position of the support relative to the fuel element to be controlled to within {+-} {micro}m. A piezoelectric triaxial load washer is positioned between the support and micrometer stage to measure contact forces, and a pair of miniature eddy-current displacement probes are mounted on the stage to measure fuel element-to-support relative motion. WORMS has been utilized to measure dynamic contact forces, relative displacements and work-rates between a vibrating fuel element and its support. For these tests, the fuel element was excited with broadband random force excitation to simulate flow-induced vibration due to axial flow. The relationship between fuel element-to-support gap or preload (i.e., interference or negative gap) and dynamic interaction (i.e., relative motion, contact forces and work-rates) was derived. These measurements confirmed numerical simulations of in-reactor interaction predicted earlier using the VIBIC code.

  17. Dynamic Proteomics: In Vivo Proteome-Wide Measurement of Protein Kinetics Using Metabolic Labeling.

    PubMed

    Holmes, W E; Angel, T E; Li, K W; Hellerstein, M K

    2015-01-01

    Control of biosynthetic and catabolic rates of polymers, including proteins, stands at the center of phenotype, physiologic adaptation, and disease pathogenesis. Advances in stable isotope-labeling concepts and mass spectrometric instrumentation now allow accurate in vivo measurement of protein synthesis and turnover rates, both for targeted proteins and for unbiased screening across the proteome. We describe here the underlying principles and operational protocols for measuring protein dynamics, focusing on metabolic labeling with (2)H2O (heavy water) combined with tandem mass spectrometric analysis of mass isotopomer abundances in trypsin-generated peptides. The core principles of combinatorial analysis (mass isotopomer distribution analysis or MIDA) are reviewed in detail, including practical advantages, limitations, and technical procedures to ensure optimal kinetic results. Technical factors include heavy water labeling protocols, optimal duration of labeling, clean up and simplification of sample matrices, accurate quantitation of mass isotopomer abundances in peptides, criteria for adequacy of mass spectrometric abundance measurements, and calculation algorithms. Some applications are described, including the noninvasive "virtual biopsy" strategy for measuring molecular flux rates in tissues through measurements in body fluids. In addition, application of heavy water labeling to measure flux lipidomics is noted. In summary, the combination of stable isotope labeling, particularly from (2)H2O, with tandem mass spectrometric analysis of mass isotopomer abundances in peptides, provides a powerful approach for characterizing the dynamics of proteins across the global proteome. Many applications in research and clinical medicine have been achieved and many others can be envisioned.

  18. Super-resolution infrared time measurement method based on target dynamic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Hu, Qiuping; Tang, Zili; Zhang, Sanxi; Zhang, Hua; Yue, Peng; Liu, Biao

    2016-10-01

    High precision time control in the use of weapons and equipment is an important part of product design and development. In order to satisfy the data acquisition requirement of high accuracy and reliability in the rapid flight process, the super-resolution time measurement method based on target dynamic characteristics was put forward and proved by the cabin opening time measurement experiment. First, the changes of explosion pressure wave and image in the cabin opening process were analyzed in detail. The change regulation of explosion flame shape was analyzed by the characteristics of typical pressure wave, and then the high frequency images of the explosion process were shot by high speed camera. The change regulation of the infrared image was obtained through the comparison of visible and infrared image mechanism. Then, combined with the target motion features, and the observed station parameters, the observation model of movement process was built. On the basis of the above research, the infrared characteristic and the movement characteristic were transformed, and the super resolution model was established. For test method, combined with the actual class time measuring process in experimental design, to obtain the special radar for measuring high precision open class time as the true value of the precision appraisal. Experimental results show that the infrared feature and motion feature can realize open class time super resolution measurement, can effectively improve the accuracy and reliability of the data, to achieve specific action of high accuracy measurement that plays an important role by making use of the target dynamic characteristics.

  19. Towards a standard for the dynamic measurement of pressure based on laser absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Douglass, K O; Olson, D A

    2016-01-01

    We describe an approach for creating a standard for the dynamic measurement of pressure based on the measurement of fundamental quantum properties of molecular systems. From the linewidth and intensities of ro-vibrational transitions we plan on making an accurate determination of pressure and temperature. The goal is to achieve an absolute uncertainty for time-varying pressure of 5 % with a measurement rate of 100 kHz, which will in the future serve as a method for the traceable calibration of pressure sensors used in transient processes. To illustrate this concept we have used wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS), due to inherent advantages over direct absorption spectroscopy, to perform rapid measurements of carbon dioxide in order to determine the pressure. The system records the full lineshape profile of a single ro-vibrational transition of CO2 at a repetition rate of 4 kHz and with a systematic measurement uncertainty of 12 % for the linewidth measurement. A series of pressures were measured at a rate of 400 Hz (10 averages) and from these measurements the linewidth was determined with a relative uncertainty of about 0.5 % on average. The pressures measured using WMS have an average difference of 0.6 % from the absolute pressure measured with a capacitance diaphragm sensor. PMID:27881884

  20. Towards a standard for the dynamic measurement of pressure based on laser absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Douglass, K O; Olson, D A

    2016-06-01

    We describe an approach for creating a standard for the dynamic measurement of pressure based on the measurement of fundamental quantum properties of molecular systems. From the linewidth and intensities of ro-vibrational transitions we plan on making an accurate determination of pressure and temperature. The goal is to achieve an absolute uncertainty for time-varying pressure of 5 % with a measurement rate of 100 kHz, which will in the future serve as a method for the traceable calibration of pressure sensors used in transient processes. To illustrate this concept we have used wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS), due to inherent advantages over direct absorption spectroscopy, to perform rapid measurements of carbon dioxide in order to determine the pressure. The system records the full lineshape profile of a single ro-vibrational transition of CO2 at a repetition rate of 4 kHz and with a systematic measurement uncertainty of 12 % for the linewidth measurement. A series of pressures were measured at a rate of 400 Hz (10 averages) and from these measurements the linewidth was determined with a relative uncertainty of about 0.5 % on average. The pressures measured using WMS have an average difference of 0.6 % from the absolute pressure measured with a capacitance diaphragm sensor.

  1. Rotational dynamics of benzene and water in an ionic liquid explored via molecular dynamics simulations and NMR T1 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasaka, Yoshiro; Klein, Michael L.; Nakahara, Masaru; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2012-02-01

    The rotational dynamics of benzene and water in the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and NMR T1 measurements. MD trajectories based on an effective potential are used to calculate the 2H NMR relaxation time, T1 via Fourier transform of the relevant rotational time correlation function, C2R(t). To compensate for the lack of polarization in the standard fixed-charge modeling of the IL, an effective ionic charge, which is smaller than the elementary charge is employed. The simulation results are in closest agreement with NMR experiments with respect to the temperature and Larmor frequency dependencies of T1 when an effective charge of ±0.5e is used for the anion and the cation, respectively. The computed C2R(t) of both solutes shows a bi-modal nature, comprised of an initial non-diffusive ps relaxation plus a long-time ns tail extending to the diffusive regime. Due to the latter component, the solute dynamics is not under the motional narrowing condition with respect to the prevalent Larmor frequency. It is shown that the diffusive tail of the C2R(t) is most important to understand frequency and temperature dependencies of T1 in ILs. On the other hand, the effect of the initial ps relaxation is an increase of T1 by a constant factor. This is equivalent to an "effective" reduction of the quadrupolar coupling constant (QCC). Thus, in the NMR T1 analysis, the rotational time correlation function can be modeled analytically in the form of aexp (-t/τ) (Lipari-Szabo model), where the constant a, the Lipari-Szabo factor, contains the integrated contribution of the short-time relaxation and τ represents the relaxation time of the exponential (diffusive) tail. The Debye model is a special case of the Lipari-Szabo model with a = 1, and turns out to be inappropriate to represent benzene and water dynamics in ILs since a is as small as 0.1. The use of the Debye model would result in an underestimation

  2. Perturbation Centrality and Turbine: A Novel Centrality Measure Obtained Using a Versatile Network Dynamics Tool

    PubMed Central

    Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Csermely, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of network dynamics became a focal point to understand and predict changes of complex systems. Here we introduce Turbine, a generic framework enabling fast simulation of any algorithmically definable dynamics on very large networks. Using a perturbation transmission model inspired by communicating vessels, we define a novel centrality measure: perturbation centrality. Hubs and inter-modular nodes proved to be highly efficient in perturbation propagation. High perturbation centrality nodes of the Met-tRNA synthetase protein structure network were identified as amino acids involved in intra-protein communication by earlier studies. Changes in perturbation centralities of yeast interactome nodes upon various stresses well recapitulated the functional changes of stressed yeast cells. The novelty and usefulness of perturbation centrality was validated in several other model, biological and social networks. The Turbine software and the perturbation centrality measure may provide a large variety of novel options to assess signaling, drug action, environmental and social interventions. PMID:24205090

  3. Dynamic measurement of the force required to move a liquid drop on a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Pilat, D W; Papadopoulos, P; Schäffel, D; Vollmer, D; Berger, R; Butt, H-J

    2012-12-11

    We measured the forces required to slide sessile drops over surfaces. The forces were measured by means of a vertical deflectable capillary stuck in the drop. The drop adhesion force instrument (DAFI) allowed the investigation of the dynamic lateral adhesion force of water drops of 0.1 to 2 μL volume at defined velocities. On flat PDMS surfaces, the dynamic lateral adhesion force increases linearly with the diameter of the contact area of the solid-liquid interface and linearly with the sliding velocity. The movement of the drop relative to the surfaces enabled us to resolve the pinning of the three-phase contact line to individual defects. We further investigated a 3D superhydrophobic pillar array. The depinning of the receding part of the rim of the drop occurred almost simultaneously from four to five pillars, giving rise to peaks in the lateral adhesion force.

  4. Difference in the odor concentrations measured by the triangle odor bag method and dynamic olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Ueno, H; Amano, S; Merecka, B; Kośmider, J

    2009-01-01

    'The triangle odor bag method', which has been adopted for the offensive odor control law in Japan, and the dynamic olfactometry defined by EN 13725 have been compared. The odor concentration measured by the triangle odor bag method tends to be higher than that of the dynamic olfactometry in the forced choice mode, while well agreed in the Yes/No mode olfactometry when the panel is the same. The difference can be minimized by applying the panel selection criterion of EN13725 to the triangle odor bag method. The European panel selection test is useful to negate the difference in the measurement equipments although the criteria seem to be strict considering the individual threshold data of n-butanol.

  5. Parallel measurement of dynamic changes in translation rates in single cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyuho; Jaimovich, Ariel; Dey, Gautam; Ruggero, Davide; Meyuhas, Oded; Sonenberg, Nahum; Meyer, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Protein concentrations are often regulated by dynamic changes in translation rates. Nevertheless, it has been challenging to directly monitor changes in translation in living cells. We have developed a reporter system to measure real-time changes of translation rates in human or mouse individual cells by conjugating translation regulatory motifs to sequences encoding a nuclear targeted fluorescent protein and a controllable destabilization domain. Application of the method showed that individual cells undergo marked fluctuations in the translation rate of mRNAs whose 5' terminal oligopyrimidine (5' TOP) motif regulates the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. Furthermore, we show that small reductions in amino acid levels signal through different mTOR-dependent pathways to control TOP mRNA translation, whereas larger reductions in amino acid levels control translation through eIF2A. Our study demonstrates that dynamic measurements of single-cell activities of translation regulatory motifs can be used to identify and investigate fundamental principles of translation.

  6. Flow Angularity Measurements in the NASA-Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Mirick, Paul H.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    An investigation using a survey rake with 11 five-hole pyramid-head probes has been conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) to measure the test section flow angularity. Flow measurements were made in a 10-ft square grid centered about the test section centerline at a single streamwise location for nine Mach numbers ranging from 0.50 to 1.19 at dynamic pressures of 100 and 225 pounds per square foot. Test section flow angularity was found to be minimal with a generally random flow pattern. Corrections for survey rake induced in-plane flow were determined to be necessary; however, corrections for rake induced lift effects were not required.

  7. Studying Vortex Dynamics of Rotating Convection with High-resolution PIV Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hao; Sun, Shiwei; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Bowen; Wang, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    A novel experimental setup for studying vortex dynamics in rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection has been made in School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University. With water as the working fluid, three lasers with different frequencies and the corresponding three CCDs have been placed to complete 2D2C (two dimensions, two components) PIV measurement. The lasers are fixed on two crossing guiding ways and can move up and down to scan the flow field. An algorithm has been made to reconstruct 3D velocity field based on multiple 2D2C PIV data. This time, we are going to present the details of this new machine and algorithm, as well as some scientific understanding of vortex dynamics owing to this high-resolution velocity measurement system. This work was supported by "LMSWE Lab Funding No. 14380001".

  8. Dynamic cure measurement of dental polymer composites using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlins, Peter H.; Palin, Will M.; Shortall, Adrian C.

    2008-02-01

    Dental amalgam is being increasingly replaced by Light-activated resin-based dental composites. However, these materials are limited by inefficient setting reactions as a function of depth, constraining the maximum extent of cure and reducing biocompatibility. In this paper we demonstrate a novel metrological tool for dynamic monitoring of refractive index and thickness change through curing resins using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. We present real-time measurements from pre- to post-cure of a series of un-filled bisphenol-A diglycidyl ether dimethacrylate (bisGMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resins with different inhibitor concentrations. Our results demonstrate that refractive index measurements are sensitive to the extent of cure of such resins and that the inhibitor concentration strongly affects the cure dynamics and final extent of cure.

  9. Working Memory and Dynamic Measures of Analogical Reasoning as Predictors of Children's Math and Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Claire E.; Bergwerff, Catharina E.; Heiser, Willem J.; Resing, Wilma C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Working memory and inductive reasoning ability each appear related to children's achievement in math and reading. Dynamic measures of reasoning, based on an assessment procedure including feedback, may provide additional predictive value. The aim of this study was to investigate whether working memory and dynamic measures of analogical…

  10. Method and means for dynamic measurement of rates of adsorption from solutions

    DOEpatents

    Slomka, Bogdan J.; Buttermore, William H.

    1992-05-05

    A method and apparatus for dynamic measurement of rates of absorption from solutions. The method has the advantage of avoiding the use of solvent normally used to establish a baseline. The method involves pre-evacuating the adsorbent contained in an adsorbent cell and thereafter rapidly contacting the adsorbent with analytical solution, all without prior exposure of adsorbent to pure solvent. The result is a sharp characteristic adsorption line.

  11. Development of Ultrasound to Measure In-Vivo Dynamic Cervical Spine Intervertebral Disc Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    system was validated ex-vivo using cadaveric C-spines mounted in a servo-hydraulic material testing machine by comparing dynamic US measurement to direct...in certain degree without loss of ultrasound images. Figure 2. Human volunteer performing repetitive jumping task with a geared helmet. Impact to...landing with both feet on force plate while maintaining upright posture for 4 minutes, wearing a helmet to simulate military head gear (Figure 2). The

  12. Symbolic dynamic filtering and language measure for behavior identification of mobile robots.

    PubMed

    Mallapragada, Goutham; Ray, Asok; Jin, Xin

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a procedure for behavior identification of mobile robots, which requires limited or no domain knowledge of the underlying process. While the features of robot behavior are extracted by symbolic dynamic filtering of the observed time series, the behavior patterns are classified based on language measure theory. The behavior identification procedure has been experimentally validated on a networked robotic test bed by comparison with commonly used tools, namely, principal component analysis for feature extraction and Bayesian risk analysis for pattern classification.

  13. Method and means for dynamic measurement of rates of adsorption from solutions

    DOEpatents

    Slomka, B.J.; Buttermore, W.H.

    1992-05-05

    A method and apparatus are described for the dynamic measurement of rates of absorption from solutions. The method has the advantage of avoiding the use of solvent normally used to establish a baseline. The method involves pre-evacuating the adsorbent contained in an adsorbent cell and thereafter rapidly contacting the adsorbent with analytical solution, all without prior exposure of adsorbent to pure solvent. The result is a sharp characteristic adsorption line. 5 figs.

  14. Monitoring hillslope moisture dynamics with surface ERT for enhancing spatial significance of hydrometric point measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, R.; Heller, K.; Günther, T.; Kleber, A.

    2015-01-01

    Besides floodplains, hillslopes are basic units that mainly control water movement and flow pathways within catchments of subdued mountain ranges. The structure of their shallow subsurface affects water balance, e.g. infiltration, retention, and runoff. Nevertheless, there is still a gap in the knowledge of the hydrological dynamics on hillslopes, notably due to the lack of generalization and transferability. This study presents a robust multi-method framework of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in addition to hydrometric point measurements, transferring hydrometric data into higher spatial scales to obtain additional patterns of distribution and dynamics of soil moisture on a hillslope. A geoelectrical monitoring in a small catchment in the eastern Ore Mountains was carried out at weekly intervals from May to December 2008 to image seasonal moisture dynamics on the hillslope scale. To link water content and electrical resistivity, the parameters of Archie's law were determined using different core samples. To optimize inversion parameters and methods, the derived spatial and temporal water content distribution was compared to tensiometer data. The results from ERT measurements show a strong correlation with the hydrometric data. The response is congruent to the soil tension data. Water content calculated from the ERT profile shows similar variations as that of water content from soil moisture sensors. Consequently, soil moisture dynamics on the hillslope scale may be determined not only by expensive invasive punctual hydrometric measurements, but also by minimally invasive time-lapse ERT, provided that pedo-/petrophysical relationships are known. Since ERT integrates larger spatial scales, a combination with hydrometric point measurements improves the understanding of the ongoing hydrological processes and better suits identification of heterogeneities.

  15. A new method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of complex-mixture liquid drops

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Harris, M.T.; Basaran, O.A.

    1994-06-29

    A simple and accurate technique has been developed for measuring dynamic surface tension. The new technique is based on growing a drop at the end of a fine capillary into another immiscible fluid and can follow the changes in tension at a freshly formed interface during its entire period of evolution. When the relative importance of the surface tension force is large compared to gravitational and viscous forces, shapes of growing drops are sections of spheres and the difference in pressure between the interior and the exterior of the drop {triangle}p is related to the surface tension {sigma} and the radius of curvature R by the static Young-Laplace formula {triangle}p = 2{sigma}/R. In contrast to related work, the new technique can determine the surface tension of an interface with a surface age of a few to tens of milliseconds by measuring transient drop shapes and pressures in 1/6 to 1 millisecond. The capabilities of the new method are demonstrated by performing tension measurements on liquid systems that do not exhibit dynamic surface tension as well as ones that exhibit significant dynamic tension effects. Tension measurements made with surfactant-laden solutions show that variation of surface tension is nonmonotonic in time. In such systems, the dynamic behavior of surface tension is shown to depend upon both the rate of interfacial dilatation and that of surfactant transport. A maximum in the surface tension is attained when the lowering of the surfactant concentration on the drop interface due to its dilatation is balanced by the addition of fresh surfactant to the interface by convection and diffusion.

  16. Measurements of dynamic Young's modulus in short specimens with the PUCOT. [Piezoelectric Ultrasonic Composite Oscillator Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickstrom, S. N.; Wolfenden, A.

    1990-01-01

    The piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique (PUCOT) was used at frequencies in the range 40 to 150 kHz to measure dynamic Young's modulus for short-length single crystals of copper at temperatures in the range 25 to 650 C and for polycrystalline copper at room temperature. Corrections to the modulus for variations in length/diameter resulted in no loss of precision due to wave velocity dispersion.

  17. Myocardial physiology measurements using contrast enhanced dynamic computed tomography: simulation of beam hardening effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Minsong; Stantz, Keith M.; Liang, Yun

    2006-03-01

    Initial animal study for quantifying myocardial physiology through contrast-enhanced dynamic x-ray CT suggested that beam hardening is one of the limiting factors for accurate regional physiology measurement. In this study, a series of simulations were performed to investigate its deterioration effects and two correction algorithms were adapted to evaluate for their efficiency in improving the measurements. The simulation tool consists of a module simulating data acquisition of a real polyenergetic scanner system and a heart phantom consisting of simple geometric objects representing ventricles and myocardium. Each phantom component was modeled with time-varying attenuation coefficients determined by ideal iodine contrast dynamic curves obtained from experimental data or simulation. A compartment model was used to generate the ideal myocardium contrast curve using physiological parameters consistent with measured values. Projection data of the phantom were simulated and reconstructed to produce a sequence of simulated CT images. Simulated contrast dynamic curves were fitted to the compartmental model and the resultant physiological parameters were compared with ideal values to estimate the errors induced by beam hardening artifacts. The simulations yielded similar deterioration patterns of contrast dynamic curves as observed in the initial study. Significant underestimation of left ventricle curves and corruption of regional myocardium curves result in systematic errors of regional perfusion up to approximately 24% and overestimates of fractional blood volume (f iv) up to 13%. The correction algorithms lead to significant improvement with errors of perfusion reduced to 7% and errors of f iv within 2% which shows promise for more robust myocardial physiology measurement.

  18. Validity and Reliability of a Commercial Fitness Watch for Measuring Running Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Adams, Douglas; Pozzi, Federico; Carroll, Anthony; Rombach, Andrew; Zeni, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Validity and reliability study. Background Providing feedback on running mechanics is a common intervention to decrease the risk of injury or to restore running after an injury. Commercially available devices are able to measure running dynamics, such as cadence, ground contact time (GCT), and vertical oscillation (VO), but there is limited evidence on the validity and reliability of these measures. Objective To determine the validity and reliability of measures of cadence, GCT, and VO with a fitness watch compared to a motion-analysis system. Methods Twenty runners ran in 3 conditions: (1) baseline (self-selected speed and cadence), (2) higher cadence, and (3) decreased vertical motion (minimal oscillation). Ten runners also performed an additional baseline running session to measure intrasession reliability. For each condition, the average cadence, GCT, and VO were collected from a watch and from a motion-capture system. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to assess validity between devices. An analysis of variance with 2 repeated measures was used to determine the ability of the watch and motion analysis to detect change in running dynamics. Results The ICCs between the 2 measuring systems were 0.931, 0.963, and 0.749 for cadence, VO, and GCT, respectively (P<.01). The minimal detectable changes at the 95% confidence interval for cadence, VO, and GCT were 2.53 steps per minute, 0.45 cm, and 0.01 seconds, respectively, for the watch. There were no interaction effects, but there was a main effect for condition; both devices detected changes in running dynamics. Conclusion The watch is a valid and reliable tool for detecting changes in cadence, VO, and GCT. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(6):471-476. Epub 26 Apr 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6391.

  19. Effect of musical training on static and dynamic measures of spectral-pattern discrimination.

    PubMed

    Sheft, Stanley; Smayda, Kirsten; Shafiro, Valeriy; Maddox, W Todd; Chandrasekaran, Bharath

    2013-06-01

    Both behavioral and physiological studies have demonstrated enhanced processing of speech in challenging listening environments attributable to musical training. The relationship, however, of this benefit to auditory abilities as assessed by psychoacoustic measures remains unclear. Using tasks previously shown to relate to speech-in-noise perception, the present study evaluated discrimination ability for static and dynamic spectral patterns by 49 listeners grouped as either musicians or nonmusicians. The two static conditions measured the ability to detect a change in the phase of a logarithmic sinusoidal spectral ripple of wideband noise with ripple densities of 1.5 and 3.0 cycles per octave chosen to emphasize either timbre or pitch distinctions, respectively. The dynamic conditions assessed temporal-pattern discrimination of 1-kHz pure tones frequency modulated by different lowpass noise samples with thresholds estimated in terms of either stimulus duration or signal-to-noise ratio. Musicians performed significantly better than nonmusicians on all four tasks. Discriminant analysis showed that group membership was correctly predicted for 88% of the listeners with the structure coefficient of each measure greater than 0.51. Results suggest that enhanced processing of static and dynamic spectral patterns defined by low-rate modulation may contribute to the relationship between musical training and speech-in-noise perception. [Supported by NIH.].

  20. Polymer Droplet Dynamic Wetting Measurement at the Nanometer Scale on Smooth Surfaces Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleymaniha, Mohammadreza; Felts, Jonathan Robert; Anml Team

    2016-11-01

    Fluid spreading is a complex phenomenon driven strongly by intermolecular forces that requires nanometer scale microscopy to observe and understand. We present a technique for measuring molten polymer spreading dynamics with nanometer scale spatial resolution at elevated temperatures on sapphire, silicon oxide and mica using tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The experimental setup is used to measure the spreading dynamics of polystyrene droplets with 2 μ m diameters at 115-175 C. Custom image processing algorithms realize the droplet height, radius, volume and contact angle of the droplet over time. The contact angle evolution followed a power law with time with experimental exponent values of -0.26, -0.08, and -0.2 for sapphire, silicon oxide, and mica, respectively at 115 C. The non-zero steady state contact angles result in a slower evolution of contact angle with time compared to Tanner's Law, as expected. We observe local crystallinity on the molten droplet surface, where crystalline structures appear to nucleate at the contact line and migrate toward the top of the droplet. Increasing the temperature from 115 C to 175 C reduced surface crystallinity from 35% to 12%, consistent with increasingly energetically favorable amorphous phase as the temperature approaches the melting temperature. This platform provides a way to measure spreading dynamics of extremely small volumes of heterogeneously complex fluids not possible through other means. Dr.Jonathan Felts is the principal investigator of the ANML research group in Mechanical Engineering Department of Texas A&M University.

  1. Transmission-speckle correlation for measuring dynamic deformation of liquid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhanwei; Guo, Jing; Shi, Wenxiong; Huang, Xianfu; Xie, Huimin

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a method based on transmission-speckle correlation is proposed for measuring static and dynamic deformation of liquid surface. In the method, a high-speed camera placed vertically above the tested liquid surface is used to observe and record a special speckle pattern put in advance at the bottom of liquid. According to the Snell's law, the deformation of liquid surface will lead to the movement of the transmission-speckles. In terms of this, the quantitative relationship between height changes of liquid surface and the in-plane displacement of transmission-speckles can be deduced. Combining with multi-directional Newton iteration algorithm, the dynamic deformation field of liquid surface can be calculated from the in-plane displacement vector field of transmission-speckle images in different moment using speckle correlation method. The sensitivity of the method in measuring height changes of liquid surface is discussed. In this paper, a validation test to measure the surface morphology of a plano-convex lens demonstrates the feasibility and the effectiveness of the method. In addition, the dynamic deformation and propagation process of ripples in the water surface caused by a droplet were investigated.

  2. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia probed by both calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guibert, Clément; Fresnais, Jérôme; Peyre, Véronique; Dupuis, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report an investigation of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using combined calorimetric and newly implemented dynamic hysteresis measurements for two sets of well characterized size-sorted maghemite nanoparticles (with diameters of about 10 nm and 20 nm) dispersed in water and in glycerol. Our primary goal was to assess the influence of viscosity on the heating efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles described in terms of specific loss power (SLP or specific absorption rate, SAR) and dynamic hysteresis. In particular, we aimed to investigate how this SLP depends on the transition from Néelian to Brownian behavior of nanoparticles expected to occur between 10 nm and 20 nm (for maghemite) and dependent on the viscosity. While we observed a good agreement between calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements, we found that the SLP measured for the different systems do not depend noticeably on the viscosity of solvent. Calculations performed according to Rosensweig's linear model [1] allow us to quantitatively reproduce our results at low field intensities, provided we use a value for the magnetic anisotropy constant much smaller than the one commonly used in the literature. This raises the question of the temperature dependance of the magnetic anisotropy constant and its relevance for a quantitative description of MFH.

  3. Direct Measurement of the Electron Energy Relaxation Dynamics in Metallic Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsolle, Edouard; Rousseau, Alexandre; Lupien, Christian; Reulet, Bertrand

    2016-06-01

    We present measurements of the dynamical response of thermal noise to an ac excitation in conductors at low temperature. From the frequency dependence of this response function—the (noise) thermal impedance—in the range 1 kHz-1 GHz we obtain direct determinations of the inelastic relaxation times relevant in metallic wires at low temperature: the electron-phonon scattering time and the diffusion time of electrons along the wires. Combining these results with that of resistivity provides a measurement of heat capacity of samples made of thin film. The simplicity and reliability of this technique makes it very promising for future applications in other systems.

  4. Human tissue color as viewed in high dynamic range optical spectral transmission measurements.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Georgi I; Doronin, Alexander; Whelan, Harry T; Meglinski, Igor; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2012-09-01

    High dynamic range optical-to-near-infrared transmission measurements for different parts of human body in the spectral range from 650 to 950 nm have been performed. Experimentally measured spectra are correlated with Monte Carlo simulations using chromaticity coordinates in CIE 1976 L*a*b* color space. Both a qualitative and a quantitative agreement have been found, paving a new way of characterizing human tissues in vivo. The newly developed experimental and computational platform for assessing tissue transmission spectra is anticipated to have a considerable impact on identifying favorable conditions for laser surgery and optical diagnostics, while providing supplementary information about tissue properties.

  5. Metabolic analyzer. [for measuring metabolic rate and breathing dynamics of human beings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Perry, C. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An apparatus is described for the measurement of metabolic rate and breathing dynamics in which inhaled and exhaled breath are sensed by sealed, piston-displacement type spirometers. These spirometers electrically measure the volume of inhaled and exhaled breath. A mass spectrometer analyzes simultaneously for oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water vapor. Computation circuits are responsive to the outputs of the spirometers, mass spectrometer, temperature, pressure and timing signals and compute oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute volume and respiratory exchange ratio. A selective indicator provides for read-out of these data at predetermined cyclic intervals.

  6. Dynamic gas temperature measurements using a personal computer for data acquisition and reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Oberle, Lawrence G.; Greer, Lawrence C., III

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a dynamic gas temperature measurement system. It has frequency response to 1000 Hz, and can be used to measure temperatures in hot, high pressure, high velocity flows. A personal computer is used for collecting and processing data, which results in a much shorter wait for results than previously. The data collection process and the user interface are described in detail. The changes made in transporting the software from a mainframe to a personal computer are described in appendices, as is the overall theory of operation.

  7. Brain network dynamics characterization in epileptic seizures. Joint directed graph and pairwise synchronization measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, A. C.; Machado, B. S.; Florence, G.; Hamad, A. P.; Sakamoto, A. C.; Fujita, A.; Baccalá, L. A.; Amaro, E.; Sameshima, K.

    2014-12-01

    Here we propose and evaluate a new approach to analyse multichannel mesial temporal lobe epilepsy EEG data from eight patients through complex network and synchronization theories. The method employs a Granger causality test to infer the directed connectivity graphs and a wavelet transform based phase synchronization measure whose characteristics allow studying dynamical transitions during epileptic seizures. We present a new combined graph measure that quantifies the level of network hub formation, called network hub out-degree, which closely reflects the level of synchronization observed during the ictus.

  8. Measuring subsurface water distribution using the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons instrument on Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Michael W.; Aharonson, Oded

    2008-07-01

    The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument, a neutron scattering instrument currently being constructed by IKI, is a component of the science payload of the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. Based on simulations using the Monte-Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) particle physics code, DAN is able to measure bulk water content and to detect variations in water concentration up to ˜50 cm beneath the ground surface, assuming perfect detector performance. Data from DAN, combined with measurements from other instruments on MSL, allow derivation of profiles of water content to a depth of ˜15 cm.

  9. Slip-length measurement of confined air flow using dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Maali, Abdelhamid; Bhushan, Bharat

    2008-08-01

    We present an experimental measurement of the slip length of air flow close to solid surfaces using an atomic force microscope (AFM) in dynamic mode. The air was confined between a glass surface and a spherical glass particle glued to an AFM cantilever. The Knudsen number was varied continuously over three decades by varying the distance between the two surfaces. Our results show that the effect of confining the air is purely dissipative. The data are described by an isothermal Maxwell slip-boundary condition, and the measured slip-length value was 118 nm .

  10. Precision Measurement of the Casimir Force for Au Using a Dynamic Afm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.-C.; Banishev, A. A.; Castillo-Garza, R.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Mohideen, U.

    2012-07-01

    The gradient of the Casimir force between carefully cleaned Au surfaces of a sphere and a plate is measured using a dynamic atomic force microscope in the frequency modulation regime in high vacuum. The electrostatic calibration of the setup did not reveal any effect of patches or surface contaminants. The experimental data for the force gradient are found to be consistent with theory using the plasma model approach over the entire measurement range. The Drude model approach is excluded by the data at separations from 235 to 400 nm at a 67% confidence level.

  11. Interferometric Dynamic Measurement: Techniques Based on High-Speed Imaging or a Single Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu; Pedrini, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, optical interferometry-based techniques have been widely used to perform noncontact measurement of dynamic deformation in different industrial areas. In these applications, various physical quantities need to be measured in any instant and the Nyquist sampling theorem has to be satisfied along the time axis on each measurement point. Two types of techniques were developed for such measurements: one is based on high-speed cameras and the other uses a single photodetector. The limitation of the measurement range along the time axis in camera-based technology is mainly due to the low capturing rate, while the photodetector-based technology can only do the measurement on a single point. In this paper, several aspects of these two technologies are discussed. For the camera-based interferometry, the discussion includes the introduction of the carrier, the processing of the recorded images, the phase extraction algorithms in various domains, and how to increase the temporal measurement range by using multiwavelength techniques. For the detector-based interferometry, the discussion mainly focuses on the single-point and multipoint laser Doppler vibrometers and their applications for measurement under extreme conditions. The results show the effort done by researchers for the improvement of the measurement capabilities using interferometry-based techniques to cover the requirements needed for the industrial applications. PMID:24963503

  12. An adaptive scheme for robot localization and mapping with dynamically configurable inter-beacon range measurements.

    PubMed

    Torres-González, Arturo; Martinez-de Dios, Jose Ramiro; Ollero, Anibal

    2014-04-25

    This work is motivated by robot-sensor network cooperation techniques where sensor nodes (beacons) are used as landmarks for range-only (RO) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). This paper presents a RO-SLAM scheme that actuates over the measurement gathering process using mechanisms that dynamically modify the rate and variety of measurements that are integrated in the SLAM filter. It includes a measurement gathering module that can be configured to collect direct robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements with different inter-beacon depth levels and at different rates. It also includes a supervision module that monitors the SLAM performance and dynamically selects the measurement gathering configuration balancing SLAM accuracy and resource consumption. The proposed scheme has been applied to an extended Kalman filter SLAM with auxiliary particle filters for beacon initialization (PF-EKF SLAM) and validated with experiments performed in the CONET Integrated Testbed. It achieved lower map and robot errors (34% and 14%, respectively) than traditional methods with a lower computational burden (16%) and similar beacon energy consumption.

  13. An Adaptive Scheme for Robot Localization and Mapping with Dynamically Configurable Inter-Beacon Range Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Torres-González, Arturo; Martinez-de Dios, Jose Ramiro; Ollero, Anibal

    2014-01-01

    This work is motivated by robot-sensor network cooperation techniques where sensor nodes (beacons) are used as landmarks for range-only (RO) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). This paper presents a RO-SLAM scheme that actuates over the measurement gathering process using mechanisms that dynamically modify the rate and variety of measurements that are integrated in the SLAM filter. It includes a measurement gathering module that can be configured to collect direct robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements with different inter-beacon depth levels and at different rates. It also includes a supervision module that monitors the SLAM performance and dynamically selects the measurement gathering configuration balancing SLAM accuracy and resource consumption. The proposed scheme has been applied to an extended Kalman filter SLAM with auxiliary particle filters for beacon initialization (PF-EKF SLAM) and validated with experiments performed in the CONET Integrated Testbed. It achieved lower map and robot errors (34% and 14%, respectively) than traditional methods with a lower computational burden (16%) and similar beacon energy consumption. PMID:24776938

  14. Dynamic displacement estimation by fusing LDV and LiDAR measurements via smoothing based Kalman filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kiyoung; Sohn, Hoon

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a smoothing based Kalman filter to estimate dynamic displacement in real-time by fusing the velocity measured from a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) and the displacement from a light detection and ranging (LiDAR). LiDAR can measure displacement based on the time-of-flight information or the phase-shift of the laser beam reflected off form a target surface, but it typically has a high noise level and a low sampling rate. On the other hand, LDV primarily measures out-of-plane velocity of a moving target, and displacement is estimated by numerical integration of the measured velocity. Here, the displacement estimated by LDV suffers from integration error although LDV can achieve a lower noise level and a much higher sampling rate than LiDAR. The proposed data fusion technique estimates high-precision and high-sampling rate displacement by taking advantage of both LiDAR and LDV measurements and overcomes their limitations by adopting a real-time smoothing based Kalman filter. To verify the performance of the proposed dynamic displacement estimation technique, a series of lab-scale tests are conducted under various loading conditions.

  15. Fast three-dimensional measurements for dynamic scenes with shiny surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shijie; Chen, Qian; Zuo, Chao; Asundi, Anand

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel fringe projection technique for fast three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurements of moving highly reflective objects. By combining the standard three-step phase-shifting fringe patterns with a digital speckle image, dynamic 3-D reconstructions of shiny surfaces can be efficiently achieved with only four projected patterns. The phase measurement is performed by three-step phase-shifting algorithm as it uses the theoretical minimum number of fringe patterns for phase-shifting profilometry. To avoid the camera saturation, a dual-camera fringe projection system is built to measure shiny objects from two different directions. The erroneous phase obtained from a saturated pixel is corrected by the phase of its corresponding pixel in the other view which is free from the saturation problem. To achieve high measurement accuracy, the corresponding high light intensity areas in cameras are found by sub-pixel matches of the speckle pattern in either view. Benefited from the trifocal tensor constraint, the corresponding points in the two wrapped phase maps can be directly established, and thus, the difficulties in determining the correct fringe order for the discontinuous or isolated surfaces can be effectively bypassed. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method is able to successfully measure highly reflective surfaces for both stationary and dynamic scenes.

  16. Non-Markovianity Measure Based on Brukner–Zeilinger Invariant Information for Unital Quantum Dynamical Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi; Zhu, Lie-Qiang; Li, Li

    2017-03-01

    A non-Markovianity measure based on Brukner–Zeilinger invariant information to characterize non-Markovian effect of open systems undergoing unital dynamical maps is proposed. The method takes advantage of non-increasing property of the Brukner–Zeilinger invariant information under completely positive and trace-preserving unital maps. The simplicity of computing the Brukner–Zeilinger invariant information is the advantage of the proposed measure because of mainly depending on the purity of quantum state. The measure effectively captures the characteristics of non-Markovianity of unital dynamical maps. As some concrete application, we consider two typical non-Markovian noise channels, i.e., the phase damping channel and the random unitary channel to show the sensitivity of the proposed measure. By investigation, we find that the conditions of detecting the non-Markovianity for the phase damping channel are consistent with the results of existing measures for non-Markovianity, i.e., information flow, divisibility and quantum mutual information. However, for the random unitary channel non-Markovian conditions are same to that of the information flow, but is different from that of the divisibility and quantum mutual information. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 61505053, the Natural Science Foundation of Hunan Province under Grant No. 2015JJ3092, the Research Foundation of Education Bureau of Hunan Province, China under Grant No. 16B177, the School Foundation from the Hunan University of Arts and Science under Grant No. 14ZD01

  17. Novel dynamic flux chamber for measuring air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils.

    PubMed

    Lin, Che-Jen; Zhu, Wei; Li, Xianchang; Feng, Xinbin; Sommar, Jonas; Shang, Lihai

    2012-08-21

    Quantifying the air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils is critical to understanding the cycling of mercury in different environmental compartments. Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) have been widely employed for Hg(o) flux measurement over soils. However, DFCs of different sizes, shapes, and sampling flow rates yield distinct measured fluxes for a soil substrate under identical environmental conditions. In this study, we performed an integrated modeling, laboratory and field study to design a DFC capable of producing a steady and uniform air flow over a flat surface. The new DFC was fabricated using polycarbonate sheets. The internal velocity field was experimentally verified against model predictions using both theoretical and computational fluid dynamics techniques, suggesting fully developed flow with velocity profiles in excellent agreement with model results. Laboratory flux measurements demonstrated that the new design improves data reproducibility as compared to a conventional DFC, and reproduces the model-predicted flux trend with increasing sampling flow. A mathematical relationship between the sampling flow rate and surface friction velocity, a variable commonly parametrized in atmospheric models, was developed for field application. For the first time, the internal shear property of a DFC can be precisely controlled using the sampling flow rate, and the flux under atmospheric condition can be inferred from the measured flux and surface shear property. The demonstrated methodology potentially bridges the gap in measured fluxes obtained by the DFC method and the micrometeorological methods.

  18. Dynamic measurement via laser interferometry: crystal growth monitoring and modal parameter analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chong; Fu, Yu; Zhao, Jing; Miao, Hong; Zhu, Changchun; Zhang, Ping

    2015-03-01

    Generally there are two categories of noncontact laser interferometric methods commonly used in dynamic measurement, camera-based full-field interferometry and photo-sensor-based laser Doppler interferometry. The two methods have different advantages and disadvantages thus are suitable for different applications. The camera-based interferometry enjoys the valuable merit of full-field observation and measurement. In this paper, one typical full-field interferometry, digital holography, is employed to monitor the growth process of aqueous sodium chlorate crystals. The phase proportional to the solution concentration is retrieved from the holograms captured by CCD camera in real time. There exist no phase ambiguity problem in holography compared with other optical interferometric methods. On the other hand, laser Doppler interferometry is usually a point-wise measurement but with a very high temporal sampling rate. A multipoint laser Doppler interferometer is proposed for modal parameter measurement in this paper. The multiple transient vibration signals of spatially separated points on a beam structure subjected to a shock excitation are recorded synchronously. The natural frequencies and mode shapes are extracted in the signal processing stage. This paper shows that laser interferometry is able to contribute more to the practical applications in dynamic measurement related fields.

  19. Dynamic Measurement of Temperature, Velocity, and Density in Hot Jets Using Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.

    2009-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is utilized to measure gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded gas flows at sampling rates up to 10 kHz, providing fluctuation information up to 5 kHz based on the Nyquist theorem. A high-power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to a Fabry-Perot interferometer for spectral analysis. Photomultiplier tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high-frequency sampling of the total signal level and the circular interference pattern to provide dynamic density, temperature, and velocity measurements. Mean and root mean square velocity, temperature, and density, as well as power spectral density calculations, are presented for measurements in a hydrogen-combustor heated jet facility with a 50.8-mm diameter nozzle at NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The Rayleigh measurements are compared with particle image velocimetry data and computational fluid dynamics predictions. This technique is aimed at aeronautics research related to identifying noise sources in free jets, as well as applications in supersonic and hypersonic flows where measurement of flow properties, including mass flux, is required in the presence of shocks and ionization occurrence.

  20. The use of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy for the measurement of flame dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, A. G.; Vandsburger, U.; Saunders, W. R.; Baumann, W. T.

    2006-01-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy was used to measure temperature fluctuations in acoustically forced laminar and turbulent flames. The absorption of two high-temperature water lines, at 7444.37 cm-1 (v1+v3 bands) and 7185.59 cm-1 (2v1, v1+v3 bands), yielded an instantaneous temperature measurement of the product stream. The instantaneous temperature of the gases was used as an indicator of the energy transferred to the product stream from the combustion process. The frequency response of product gas temperature to velocity perturbations was compared to the frequency response of OH* chemiluminescence, an indicator of the chemical heat release rate. Past measurements of flame dynamics used chemiluminescence as the sole indicator of heat release rate, in effect assuming that the energy input rate from the flame into the acoustic field is dynamically equivalent to the chemical reaction rate. Through the use of TDLAS, the unsteady enthalpy of the gases was measured, which includes the effects of thermal diffusion and heat transfer. The measurements show that the frequency response function of gas temperature differs significantly from the chemiluminescence frequency response.

  1. Optical Measurement Techniques for Rocket Engine Testing and Component Applications: Digital Image Correlation and Dynamic Photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been advancing dynamic optical measurement systems, primarily Digital Image Correlation, for extreme environment rocket engine test applications. The Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technology is used to track local and full field deformations, displacement vectors and local and global strain measurements. This technology has been evaluated at MSFC through lab testing to full scale hotfire engine testing of the J-2X Upper Stage engine at Stennis Space Center. It has been shown to provide reliable measurement data and has replaced many traditional measurement techniques for NASA applications. NASA and AMRDEC have recently signed agreements for NASA to train and transition the technology to applications for missile and helicopter testing. This presentation will provide an overview and progression of the technology, various testing applications at NASA MSFC, overview of Army-NASA test collaborations and application lessons learned about Digital Image Correlation.

  2. Modeling the dynamic behavior of turbine runner blades during transients using indirect measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diagne, I.; Gagnon, M.; Tahan, A.

    2016-11-01

    Turbine start-up transients are induced by the wicket gates opening sequence and generate high amplitude stress cycles. These stress cycles have a detrimental effect leading to faster crack growth in the runner blades. Using a series of direct measurements taken on a prototype runner in order to find the optimal start-up parameters exposes both the runner and the instrumentation to a series of successive damaging transient events during the optimization process. To solve this, finding sensors strongly correlated to strain gauges and whose signals can be easily obtained to identify a model to predict the strain, instead of directly measuring it, would reduce the risk, cost and downtime associated with a measurement campaign. This paper shows that turbine shaft torsion measurements is highly correlated to the strain at a runner blade hotspot, and we demonstrate that the ARMAX model can be used to represent the dynamic system in order to minimize the strain on blades.

  3. Measuring dynamics of the subjective vertical and tilt using a joystick.

    PubMed

    Correia Grácio, Bruno J; Bos, Jelte E

    2012-01-01

    Humans are able to estimate the vertical direction of an Earth fixed reference frame, which estimate is known as the subjective vertical (SV). To identify the SV, a distinction must be made between accelerations due to self-motion and gravity. Previous studies on this topic measured the SV using a variety of methods possibly affecting the outcome differently. In this study subjects were sinusoidally moved around their naso-occipital axis and their SV was dynamically measured using a joystick. In half the experimental conditions, the joystick was moved with the motion and was kept vertical on other experimental conditions, thus moving against self-motion. Although physically indicating the same angle, the average perceived angle was larger when moving the joystick with the motion than against. The difference can be explained by assuming an idiotropic vector being at issue when measuring the subjective vertical, and not when measuring subjective tilt.

  4. Virtual instrument based measurement system for analysis of static and dynamic characteristics of temperature transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walendziuk, Wojciech; Baczewski, Michał

    2014-11-01

    The present work shows the structure of a measurement system dedicated to examine static and dynamic characteristics of sensors used to measure temperature. The measurement system was built on the basis of a set of signal conditioners connected with a data acquisition card built in a PC. The data acquisition was completed with the use of a virtual measurement device developed in the LabVIEW environment. A was used as the source of reference temperature. During the experiments, the sensors were submersed in water of given temperature with the use of a computer controlled arm. The article also presents the results of the calibration procedure which was carried out, as well as selected application schemes.

  5. Measuring dynamical randomness of quantum chaos by statistics of Schmidt eigenvalues.

    PubMed

    Kubotani, Hiroto; Adachi, Satoshi; Toda, Mikito

    2013-06-01

    We study statistics of entanglement generated by quantum chaotic dynamics. Using an ensemble of the very large number (>/~10(7)) of quantum states obtained from the temporally evolving coupled kicked tops, we verify that the estimated one-body distribution of the squared Schmidt eigenvalues for the quantum chaotic dynamics can agree surprisingly well with the analytical one for the universality class of the random matrices described by the fixed trace ensemble (FTE). In order to quantify this agreement, we introduce the L(1) norm of the difference between the one-body distributions for the quantum chaos and FTE and use it as an indicator of the dynamical randomness. As we increase the scaled coupling constant, the L(1) difference decreases. When the effective Planck constant is not small enough, the decrease saturates, which implies quantum suppression of dynamical randomness. On the other hand, when the effective Planck constant is small enough, the decrease of the L(1) difference continues until it is masked by statistical fluctuation due to finiteness of the ensemble. Furthermore, we carry out two statistical analyses, the χ(2) goodness of fit test and an autocorrelation analysis, on the difference between the distributions to seek for dynamical remnants buried under the statistical fluctuation. We observe that almost all fluctuating deviations are statistical. However, even for well-developed quantum chaos, unexpectedly, we find a slight nonstatistical deviation near the largest Schmidt eigenvalue. In this way, the statistics of Schmidt eigenvalues enables us to measure dynamical randomness of quantum chaos with reference to the random matrix theory of FTE.

  6. Assessment of measurement errors and dynamic calibration methods for three different tipping bucket rain gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedekar, Vinayak S.; King, Kevin W.; Fausey, Norman R.; Soboyejo, Alfred B. O.; Harmel, R. Daren; Brown, Larry C.

    2016-09-01

    Three different models of tipping bucket rain gauges (TBRs), viz. HS-TB3 (Hydrological Services Pty Ltd.), ISCO-674 (Isco, Inc.) and TR-525 (Texas Electronics, Inc.), were calibrated in the lab to quantify measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities (5 mm·h- 1 to 250 mm·h- 1) and three different volumetric settings. Instantaneous and cumulative values of simulated rainfall were recorded at 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20-min intervals. All three TBR models showed a substantial deviation (α = 0.05) in measurements from actual rainfall depths, with increasing underestimation errors at greater rainfall intensities. Simple linear regression equations were developed for each TBR to correct the TBR readings based on measured intensities (R2 > 0.98). Additionally, two dynamic calibration techniques, viz. quadratic model (R2 > 0.7) and T vs. 1/Q model (R2 = > 0.98), were tested and found to be useful in situations when the volumetric settings of TBRs are unknown. The correction models were successfully applied to correct field-collected rainfall data from respective TBR models. The calibration parameters of correction models were found to be highly sensitive to changes in volumetric calibration of TBRs. Overall, the HS-TB3 model (with a better protected tipping bucket mechanism, and consistent measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities) was found to be the most reliable and consistent for rainfall measurements, followed by the ISCO-674 (with susceptibility to clogging and relatively smaller measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities) and the TR-525 (with high susceptibility to clogging and frequent changes in volumetric calibration, and highly intensity-dependent measurement errors). The study demonstrated that corrections based on dynamic and volumetric calibration can only help minimize-but not completely eliminate the measurement errors. The findings from this study will be useful for correcting field data from TBRs; and may have major

  7. Laboratory Gas Dynamic Measurements of the Comet Pressure Sensor COPS on the Rosetta Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, Chia-Yu; Altwegg, Kathrin; Gasc, Sébastien; Rubin, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Rosetta is part of the cornerstone missions executed by the European Space Agency (ESA). It is the first space mission to orbit and also land on a comet. By the end of July 2014 Rosetta will be able to carry out a close study of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) is one of the core payloads on board of the Rosetta spacecraft [Balsiger et al, 2007]. ROSINA's main objective is to determine the major atmospheric and ionospheric composition in the coma and to investigate the gas dynamics around the comet. ROSINA consists of two mass spectrometers and a pressure sensor. The Comet Pressure Sensor (COPS) is not only a pressure sensor but also plays the role of a safety instrument for Rosetta by providing high-density alerts to the other payload instruments. It includes two gauges: the "nude gauge" measures total neutral density in the coma and the "ram gauge" measures the dynamic pressure of the cometary gas flux to obtain the bulk velocity of the neutral gas. The combination of these two gauges makes COPS capable to derive the gas dynamics in the coma. We recently performed laboratory gas dynamic measurements with the identical flight-spare instrument of COPS. Using the Calibration System for The Mass Spectrometer Instrument ROSINA (CASYMIR) we produce neutral gas beams to model cometary gas jets with velocities from thermal to 2 km/s. For COPS calibration we measure gas beams with different incident angles to derive the velocity and the temperature of the gas using different mixtures expected at the comet. We demonstrate that COPS will be ready for the prime mission and it will be fascinating to compare COPS measurements with numerous observation results and computer models starting in summer 2014 to gain new insights into the gas dynamics around a comet. Reference: Balsiger, H. et al.: ROSINA-Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis, Space Science Reviews, Vol. 128, 745-801, 2007.

  8. Foam Rolling for Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness and Recovery of Dynamic Performance Measures

    PubMed Central

    Pearcey, Gregory E. P.; Bradbury-Squires, David J.; Kawamoto, Jon-Erik; Drinkwater, Eric J.; Behm, David G.; Button, Duane C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: After an intense bout of exercise, foam rolling is thought to alleviate muscle fatigue and soreness (ie, delayed-onset muscle soreness [DOMS]) and improve muscular performance. Potentially, foam rolling may be an effective therapeutic modality to reduce DOMS while enhancing the recovery of muscular performance. Objective: To examine the effects of foam rolling as a recovery tool after an intense exercise protocol through assessment of pressure-pain threshold, sprint time, change-of-direction speed, power, and dynamic strength-endurance. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 8 healthy, physically active males (age = 22.1 ± 2.5 years, height = 177.0 ± 7.5 cm, mass = 88.4 ± 11.4 kg) participated. Intervention(s): Participants performed 2 conditions, separated by 4 weeks, involving 10 sets of 10 repetitions of back squats at 60% of their 1-repetition maximum, followed by either no foam rolling or 20 minutes of foam rolling immediately, 24, and 48 hours postexercise. Main Outcome Measure(s): Pressure-pain threshold, sprint speed (30-m sprint time), power (broad-jump distance), change-of-direction speed (T-test), and dynamic strength-endurance. Results: Foam rolling substantially improved quadriceps muscle tenderness by a moderate to large amount in the days after fatigue (Cohen d range, 0.59 to 0.84). Substantial effects ranged from small to large in sprint time (Cohen d range, 0.68 to 0.77), power (Cohen d range, 0.48 to 0.87), and dynamic strength-endurance (Cohen d = 0.54). Conclusions: Foam rolling effectively reduced DOMS and associated decrements in most dynamic performance measures. PMID:25415413

  9. Stable force identification in structural dynamics using Kalman filtering and dummy-measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naets, F.; Cuadrado, J.; Desmet, W.

    2015-01-01

    Many engineering applications require the knowledge of input forces to mechanical systems. However, in practice, it is quite difficult to measure these forces directly. In order to obtain an estimate of the input forces to structural systems, Kalman filtering based techniques have recently been introduced. These state-estimation techniques allow estimating the forces concurrent with the states of a system, based on a limited number of measurements. In practice, acceleration measurements are most convenient to use in structural dynamics applications. This paper proposes an analytical analysis of the stability of the Kalman based force estimation techniques and shows that only using acceleration measurements inherently leads to unreliable results. In order to circumvent this issue, the addition of dummy-measurements on a position level is proposed. These fictitious measurements dictate the estimator to return to an undeformed state and lead to a stable estimation approach. The proposed method is validated through both a numerical and a practical experiment. Both experiments show the inadequacy of the augmented Kalman filter based on only acceleration measurements to provide stable results. The estimator with dummy measurements on the other hand provides good results in the case of an unbiased external load.

  10. Invariant measures of smooth dynamical systems, generalized functions and summation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss conditions for the existence of invariant measures of smooth dynamical systems on compact manifolds. If there is an invariant measure with continuously differentiable density, then the divergence of the vector field along every solution tends to zero in the Cesàro sense as time increases unboundedly. Here the Cesàro convergence may be replaced, for example, by any Riesz summation method, which can be arbitrarily close to ordinary convergence (but does not coincide with it). We give an example of a system whose divergence tends to zero in the ordinary sense but none of its invariant measures is absolutely continuous with respect to the `standard' Lebesgue measure (generated by some Riemannian metric) on the phase space. We give examples of analytic systems of differential equations on analytic phase spaces admitting invariant measures of any prescribed smoothness (including a measure with integrable density), but having no invariant measures with positive continuous densities. We give a new proof of the classical Bogolyubov-Krylov theorem using generalized functions and the Hahn-Banach theorem. The properties of signed invariant measures are also discussed.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M.; Coolens, C.

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  12. Reflective SOA fiber cavity adaptive laser source for measuring dynamic strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Heming; Tao, Chuanyi; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2016-04-01

    Smart sensors based on Optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are suitable for structural health monitoring of dynamic strains in civil, aerospace, and mechanical structures. In these structures, dynamic strains with high frequencies reveal acoustic emissions cracking or impact loading. It is necessary to find a practical tool for monitoring such structural damages. In this work, we explore an intelligent system based on a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA)- FBG composed as a fiber cavity for measuring dynamic strain in intelligent structures. The ASE light emitted from a RSOA laser and reflected by a FBG is amplified in the fiber cavity and coupled out by a 90:10 coupler, which is demodulated by a low frequency compensated Michelson interferometer using a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller and is monitored via a photodetector. As the wavelength of the FBG shifts due to dynamic strain, the wavelength of the optical output from the laser cavity shifts accordingly, which is demodulated by the Michelson Interferometer. Because the RSOA has a quick transition time, the RSOA- FBG fiber cavity shows an ability of high frequency response to the FBG reflective spectrum shift, with frequency response extending to megahertz.

  13. Investigation of a Technique for Measuring Dynamic Ground Effect in a Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Sharon S.

    1999-01-01

    To better understand the ground effect encountered by slender wing supersonic transport aircraft, a test was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center's 14 x 22 foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel in October, 1997. Emphasis was placed on improving the accuracy of the ground effect data by using a "dynamic" technique in which the model's vertical motion was varied automatically during wind-on testing. This report describes and evaluates different aspects of the dynamic method utilized for obtaining ground effect data in this test. The method for acquiring and processing time data from a dynamic ground effect wind tunnel test is outlined with details of the overall data acquisition system and software used for the data analysis. The removal of inertial loads due to sting motion and the support dynamics in the balance force and moment data measurements of the aerodynamic forces on the model is described. An evaluation of the results identifies problem areas providing recommendations for future experiments. Test results are validated by comparing test data for an elliptical wing planform with an Elliptical wing planform section with a NACA 0012 airfoil to results found in current literature. Major aerodynamic forces acting on the model in terms of lift curves for determining ground effect are presented. Comparisons of flight and wind tunnel data for the TU-144 are presented.

  14. Dynamic strain measurements of marine propellers under non-uniform inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jin; Croaker, Paul; Zhang, Zhiyi; Hua, Hongxing

    2016-09-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the dynamic strain characteristics of marine propellers under non-uniform inflow. Two 7-bladed highly skewed model propellers of identical geometries, but different elastic characteristics were tested at various rotational speeds and free stream velocities in the water tunnel. Two kinds of wire mesh wake screens located 400mm upstream of the propeller plane were used to generate four-cycle and six-cycle inflows. A laser doppler velocimetry (LDV) system located 100mm downstream of the wake screen plane was used to measure the axial velocity distributions produced by the wake screens. Strain gauges were bonded onto the propeller blades in different positions. A customized underwater data acquisition system which can record data off-line was used to record the dynamic strain. The results show that the frequency properties of the blade dynamic strain are determined by the harmonics of the inflow and that the stiffness of the propeller has an essential effect on the dynamic strain amplitudes.

  15. Innovative LIDAR 3D Dynamic Measurement System to estimate fruit-tree leaf area.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Cortiella, Ricardo; Llorens-Calveras, Jordi; Escolà, Alexandre; Arnó-Satorra, Jaume; Ribes-Dasi, Manel; Masip-Vilalta, Joan; Camp, Ferran; Gràcia-Aguilá, Felip; Solanelles-Batlle, Francesc; Planas-DeMartí, Santiago; Pallejà-Cabré, Tomàs; Palacin-Roca, Jordi; Gregorio-Lopez, Eduard; Del-Moral-Martínez, Ignacio; Rosell-Polo, Joan R

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a LIDAR-based 3D Dynamic Measurement System is presented and evaluated for the geometric characterization of tree crops. Using this measurement system, trees were scanned from two opposing sides to obtain two three-dimensional point clouds. After registration of the point clouds, a simple and easily obtainable parameter is the number of impacts received by the scanned vegetation. The work in this study is based on the hypothesis of the existence of a linear relationship between the number of impacts of the LIDAR sensor laser beam on the vegetation and the tree leaf area. Tests performed under laboratory conditions using an ornamental tree and, subsequently, in a pear tree orchard demonstrate the correct operation of the measurement system presented in this paper. The results from both the laboratory and field tests confirm the initial hypothesis and the 3D Dynamic Measurement System is validated in field operation. This opens the door to new lines of research centred on the geometric characterization of tree crops in the field of agriculture and, more specifically, in precision fruit growing.

  16. Angular motion estimation using dynamic models in a gyro-free inertial measurement unit.

    PubMed

    Edwan, Ezzaldeen; Knedlik, Stefan; Loffeld, Otmar

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize the results of using dynamic models borrowed from tracking theory in describing the time evolution of the state vector to have an estimate of the angular motion in a gyro-free inertial measurement unit (GF-IMU). The GF-IMU is a special type inertial measurement unit (IMU) that uses only a set of accelerometers in inferring the angular motion. Using distributed accelerometers, we get an angular information vector (AIV) composed of angular acceleration and quadratic angular velocity terms. We use a Kalman filter approach to estimate the angular velocity vector since it is not expressed explicitly within the AIV. The bias parameters inherent in the accelerometers measurements' produce a biased AIV and hence the AIV bias parameters are estimated within an augmented state vector. Using dynamic models, the appended bias parameters of the AIV become observable and hence we can have unbiased angular motion estimate. Moreover, a good model is required to extract the maximum amount of information from the observation. Observability analysis is done to determine the conditions for having an observable state space model. For higher grades of accelerometers and under relatively higher sampling frequency, the error of accelerometer measurements is dominated by the noise error. Consequently, simulations are conducted on two models, one has bias parameters appended in the state space model and the other is a reduced model without bias parameters.

  17. The dynamics of stock exchange based on the formalism of weak continuous quantum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnyk, S.; Tuluzov, I.

    2010-07-01

    The problem of measurement in economic models and the possibility of their quantum-mechanical description are considered. It is revealed that the apparent paradox of such a description is associated with a priori requirement of conformity of the model to all the alternatives of free choice of the observer. The measurement of the state of a trader on a stock exchange is formally defined as his responses to the proposals of sale at a fixed price. It is shown that an analogue of Bell's inequalities for this measurement model is violated at the most general assumptions related to the strategy of the trader and requires a quantum-mechanical description of the dynamics of his condition. In the framework of the theory of weak continuous quantum measurements, the equation of stock price dynamics and the quantum-mechanical generalization of the F. Black and M. Scholes model for pricing options are obtained. The fundamental distinctions between the obtained model and the classical one are discussed.

  18. Field instrument for simultaneous large dynamic range measurement of atmospheric hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, and sulfur dioxide.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kei; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Tanaka, Takayoshi; Nishimura, Tomohiko; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2004-03-01

    We describe a membrane-based collection/analysis system that differentially monitors H2S and CH3SH, and to which a conductometric SO2 analyzer using the same collector was coupled. A diffusion scrubber (DS) comprised of a Nafion tube collects H2S selectively while a porous polytetrafluoroethylene (pPTFE) DS collects both H2S and CH3SH. Both gases are measured via their ability to react with fluorescein mercuric acetate (FMA) which results in decreased fluorescence. The limited dynamic range of a negative signal procedure was overcome by using dual DS units comprised of short and long scrubbers, placed serially in the liquid flow line. Different DS designs and membrane materials were investigated. H2S, CH3SH, and SO2 from a biogenic point source were continuously measured, and the H2S/CH3SH data compared well with a standard procedure involving Tedlar bag collection, preconcentration and thermal desorption from a Tenax trap, and measurement by gas chromatography/flame photometric detection. Walkaround portability of the instrument and very large dynamic range measurement of H2S and SO2 were demonstrated around the Mt. Aso volcano.

  19. Using Photobleaching to Measure Spindle Microtubule Dynamics in Primary Cultures of Dividing Drosophila Meiotic Spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In dividing animal cells, a microtubule (MT)-based bipolar spindle governs chromosome movement. Current models propose that the spindle facilitates and/or generates translocating forces by regionally depolymerizing the kinetochore fibers (k-fibers) that bind each chromosome. It is unclear how conserved these sites and the resultant chromosome-moving mechanisms are between different dividing cell types because of the technical challenges of quantitatively studying MTs in many specimens. In particular, our knowledge of MT kinetics during the sperm-producing male meiotic divisions remains in its infancy. In this study, I use an easy-to-implement photobleaching-based assay for measuring spindle MT dynamics in primary cultures of meiotic spermatocytes isolated from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. By use of standard scanning confocal microscopy features, fiducial marks were photobleached on fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged MTs. These were followed by time-lapse imaging during different division stages, and their displacement rates were calculated using public domain software. I find that k-fibers continually shorten at their poles during metaphase and anaphase A through the process of MT flux. Anaphase chromosome movement is complemented by Pac-Man, the shortening of the k-fiber at its chromosomal interface. Thus, Drosophila spermatocytes share the sites of spindle dynamism and mechanisms of chromosome movement with mitotic cells. The data reveal the applicability of the photobleaching assay for measuring MT dynamics in primary cultures. This approach can be readily applied to other systems. PMID:25802491

  20. Quantifying the dynamic of OSA brain using multifractal formalism: A novel measure for sleep fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Raiesdana, Somayeh

    2016-11-18

    It is thought that the critical brain dynamics in sleep is modulated during frequent periods of wakefulness. This paper utilizes the capacity of EEG based scaling analysis to quantify sleep fragmentation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The scale-free (fractal) behavior refers to a state where no characteristic scale dominates the dynamics of the underlying process which is evident as long range correlations in a time series. Here, Multiscaling (multifractal) spectrum is utilized to quantify the disturbed dynamic of an OSA brain with fragmented sleep. The whole night multichannel sleep EEG recordings of 18 subjects were employed to compute and quantify variable power-law long-range correlations and singularity spectra. Based on this characteristic, a new marker for sleep fragmentation named ``scaling based sleep fragmentation'' was introduced. This measure takes into account the sleep run length and stage transition quality within a fuzzy inference system to improve decisions made on sleep fragmentation. The proposed index was implemented, validated with sleepiness parameters and compared to some common indexes including sleep fragmentation index, arousal index, sleep diversity index, and sleep efficiency index. Correlations were almost significant suggesting that the sleep characterizing measure, based on singularity spectra range, could properly detect fragmentations and quantify their rate. This method can be an alternative for quantifying the sleep fragmentation in clinical practice after being approved experimentally. Control of sleep fragmentation and, subsequently, suppression of excessive daytime sleepiness will be a promising outlook of this kind of researches.

  1. Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling technique for measuring CBF dynamics with high temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Silva, A C; Kim, S G

    1999-09-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) can be measured noninvasively with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by using arterial water as an endogenous perfusion tracer. However, the arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques suffer from poor temporal resolution due to the need to wait for the exchange of labeled arterial spins with tissue spins to produce contrast. In this work, a new ASL technique is introduced, which allows the measurement of CBF dynamics with high temporal and spatial resolution. This novel method was used in rats to determine the dynamics of CBF changes elicited by somatosensory stimulation with a temporal resolution of 108 ms. The onset time of the CBF response was 0.6 +/- 0.4 sec (mean +/- SD) after onset of stimulation (n = 10). The peak response was observed 4.4 +/- 3.7 sec (mean +/- SD) after stimulation began. These results are in excellent agreement with previous data obtained with invasive techniques, such as laser-Doppler flowmetry and hydrogen clearance, and suggest the appropriateness of this novel technique to probe CBF dynamics in functional and pathological studies with high temporal and spatial resolution. Magn Reson Med 42:425-429, 1999.

  2. Real-time high-resolution heterodyne-based measurements of spectral dynamics in fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugavanam, Srikanth; Fabbri, Simon; Le, Son Thai; Lobach, Ivan; Kablukov, Sergey; Khorev, Serge; Churkin, Dmitry

    2016-03-01

    Conventional tools for measurement of laser spectra (e.g. optical spectrum analysers) capture data averaged over a considerable time period. However, the generation spectrum of many laser types may involve spectral dynamics whose relatively fast time scale is determined by their cavity round trip period, calling for instrumentation featuring both high temporal and spectral resolution. Such real-time spectral characterisation becomes particularly challenging if the laser pulses are long, or they have continuous or quasi-continuous wave radiation components. Here we combine optical heterodyning with a technique of spatio-temporal intensity measurements that allows the characterisation of such complex sources. Fast, round-trip-resolved spectral dynamics of cavity-based systems in real-time are obtained, with temporal resolution of one cavity round trip and frequency resolution defined by its inverse (85 ns and 24 MHz respectively are demonstrated). We also show how under certain conditions for quasi-continuous wave sources, the spectral resolution could be further increased by a factor of 100 by direct extraction of phase information from the heterodyned dynamics or by using double time scales within the spectrogram approach.

  3. High-throughput microfluidics to control and measure signaling dynamics in single yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anders S.; Hao, Nan; O'Shea, Erin K.

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics coupled to quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy is transforming our ability to control, measure, and understand signaling dynamics in single living cells. Here we describe a pipeline that incorporates multiplexed microfluidic cell culture, automated programmable fluid handling for cell perturbation, quantitative time-lapse microscopy, and computational analysis of time-lapse movies. We illustrate how this setup can be used to control the nuclear localization of the budding yeast transcription factor Msn2. Using this protocol, we generate oscillations of Msn2 localization and measure the dynamic gene expression response of individual genes in single cells. The protocol allows a single researcher to perform up to 20 different experiments in a single day, whilst collecting data for thousands of single cells. Compared to other protocols, the present protocol is relatively easy to adopt and higher-throughput. The protocol can be widely used to control and monitor single-cell signaling dynamics in other signal transduction systems in microorganisms. PMID:26158443

  4. Real-time high-resolution heterodyne-based measurements of spectral dynamics in fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Sugavanam, Srikanth; Fabbri, Simon; Le, Son Thai; Lobach, Ivan; Kablukov, Sergey; Khorev, Serge; Churkin, Dmitry

    2016-03-17

    Conventional tools for measurement of laser spectra (e.g. optical spectrum analysers) capture data averaged over a considerable time period. However, the generation spectrum of many laser types may involve spectral dynamics whose relatively fast time scale is determined by their cavity round trip period, calling for instrumentation featuring both high temporal and spectral resolution. Such real-time spectral characterisation becomes particularly challenging if the laser pulses are long, or they have continuous or quasi-continuous wave radiation components. Here we combine optical heterodyning with a technique of spatio-temporal intensity measurements that allows the characterisation of such complex sources. Fast, round-trip-resolved spectral dynamics of cavity-based systems in real-time are obtained, with temporal resolution of one cavity round trip and frequency resolution defined by its inverse (85 ns and 24 MHz respectively are demonstrated). We also show how under certain conditions for quasi-continuous wave sources, the spectral resolution could be further increased by a factor of 100 by direct extraction of phase information from the heterodyned dynamics or by using double time scales within the spectrogram approach.

  5. X-ray scattering measurements of dissociation-induced metallization of dynamically compressed deuterium

    DOE PAGES

    Davis, P.; Döppner, T.; Rygg, J. R.; ...

    2016-04-18

    Hydrogen, the simplest element in the universe, has a surprisingly complex phase diagram. Because of applications to planetary science, inertial confinement fusion and fundamental physics, its high-pressure properties have been the subject of intense study over the past two decades. While sophisticated static experiments have probed hydrogen’s structure at ever higher pressures, studies examining the higher-temperature regime using dynamic compression have mostly been limited to optical measurement techniques. Here we present spectrally resolved x-ray scattering measurements from plasmons in dynamically compressed deuterium. Combined with Compton scattering, and velocity interferometry to determine shock pressure and mass density, this allows us tomore » extract ionization state as a function of compression. Finally, the onset of ionization occurs close in pressure to where density functional theory-molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations show molecular dissociation, suggesting hydrogen transitions from a molecular and insulating fluid to a conducting state without passing through an intermediate atomic phase.« less

  6. Using Photobleaching to Measure Spindle Microtubule Dynamics in Primary Cultures of Dividing Drosophila Meiotic Spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Savoian, Matthew S

    2015-07-01

    In dividing animal cells, a microtubule (MT)-based bipolar spindle governs chromosome movement. Current models propose that the spindle facilitates and/or generates translocating forces by regionally depolymerizing the kinetochore fibers (k-fibers) that bind each chromosome. It is unclear how conserved these sites and the resultant chromosome-moving mechanisms are between different dividing cell types because of the technical challenges of quantitatively studying MTs in many specimens. In particular, our knowledge of MT kinetics during the sperm-producing male meiotic divisions remains in its infancy. In this study, I use an easy-to-implement photobleaching-based assay for measuring spindle MT dynamics in primary cultures of meiotic spermatocytes isolated from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. By use of standard scanning confocal microscopy features, fiducial marks were photobleached on fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged MTs. These were followed by time-lapse imaging during different division stages, and their displacement rates were calculated using public domain software. I find that k-fibers continually shorten at their poles during metaphase and anaphase A through the process of MT flux. Anaphase chromosome movement is complemented by Pac-Man, the shortening of the k-fiber at its chromosomal interface. Thus, Drosophila spermatocytes share the sites of spindle dynamism and mechanisms of chromosome movement with mitotic cells. The data reveal the applicability of the photobleaching assay for measuring MT dynamics in primary cultures. This approach can be readily applied to other systems.

  7. Real-time high-resolution heterodyne-based measurements of spectral dynamics in fibre lasers

    PubMed Central

    Sugavanam, Srikanth; Fabbri, Simon; Le, Son Thai; Lobach, Ivan; Kablukov, Sergey; Khorev, Serge; Churkin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Conventional tools for measurement of laser spectra (e.g. optical spectrum analysers) capture data averaged over a considerable time period. However, the generation spectrum of many laser types may involve spectral dynamics whose relatively fast time scale is determined by their cavity round trip period, calling for instrumentation featuring both high temporal and spectral resolution. Such real-time spectral characterisation becomes particularly challenging if the laser pulses are long, or they have continuous or quasi-continuous wave radiation components. Here we combine optical heterodyning with a technique of spatio-temporal intensity measurements that allows the characterisation of such complex sources. Fast, round-trip-resolved spectral dynamics of cavity-based systems in real-time are obtained, with temporal resolution of one cavity round trip and frequency resolution defined by its inverse (85 ns and 24 MHz respectively are demonstrated). We also show how under certain conditions for quasi-continuous wave sources, the spectral resolution could be further increased by a factor of 100 by direct extraction of phase information from the heterodyned dynamics or by using double time scales within the spectrogram approach. PMID:26984634

  8. Predicting the similarity between expressive performances of music from measurements of tempo and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmers, Renee

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of tempo and dynamics from audio files or MIDI data are frequently used to get insight into a performer's contribution to music. The measured variations in tempo and dynamics are often represented in different formats by different authors. Few systematic comparisons have been made between these representations. Moreover, it is unknown what data representation comes closest to subjective perception. The reported study tests the perceptual validity of existing data representations by comparing their ability to explain the subjective similarity between pairs of performances. In two experiments, 40 participants rated the similarity between performances of a Chopin prelude and a Mozart sonata. Models based on different representations of the tempo and dynamics of the performances were fitted to these similarity ratings. The results favor other data representations of performances than generally used, and imply that comparisons between performances are made perceptually in a different way than often assumed. For example, the best fit was obtained with models based on absolute tempo and absolute tempo times loudness, while conventional models based on normalized variations, or on correlations between tempo profiles and loudness profiles, did not explain the similarity ratings well. .

  9. Measurement techniques for local and global fluid dynamic quantities in two and three phase systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Dudukovic, M.P.; Toseland, B.A.

    1996-03-01

    This report presents a critical review of the methods available for assessing the fluid dynamic parameters in large industrial two and three phase bubble column and slurry bubble column reactors operated at high pressure and temperature. The physical principles behind various methods are explained, and the basic design of the instrumentation needed to implement each measurement principle is discussed. Fluid dynamic properties of interest are: gas, liquid and solids holdup and their axial and radial distribution as well as the velocity distribution of the two (bubble column) or three phases (slurry bubble column). This information on operating pilot plant and plant reactors is essential to verify the computational fluid dynamic codes as well as scale-up rules used in reactor design. Without such information extensive and costly scale-up to large reactors that exploit syngas chemistries, and other reactors in production of fuels and chemicals, cannot be avoided. In this report, available measurement techniques for evaluation of global and local phase holdups, instantaneous and average phase velocities and for the determination of bubble sizes in gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid systems are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of various techniques are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on identifying methods that can be employed on large scale, thick wall, high pressure and high temperature reactors used in the manufacture of fuels and chemicals from synthesis gas and its derivatives.

  10. Microstrain-level measurement of third-order elastic constants applying dynamic acousto-elastic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, Guillaume; Talmant, Maryline; Marrelec, Guillaume

    2016-10-01

    The nonlinear elasticity of solids at the microstrain level has been recently studied by applying dynamic acousto-elastic testing. It is the analog of conventional quasi-static acousto-elastic experiments but the strain-dependence (or stress-dependence) of ultrasonic wave-speed is measured with an applied strain ranging from 10-7 to 10-5 and produced by a stationary elastic wave. In conventional quasi-static acousto-elastic experiments, the strain is applied in a quasi-static manner; it exceeds 10-4 and can reach 10-2. In this work, we apply dynamic acousto-elastic testing to measure the third-order elastic constants of two isotropic materials: polymethyl methacrylate and dry Berea sandstone. The peak amplitude of the dynamic applied strain is 8 × 10-6. The method is shown to be particularly suitable for materials exhibiting large elastic nonlinearity like sandstones, since the measurement is performed in the domain of validity of the third-order hyperelastic model. In contrast, conventional quasi-static acousto-elastic experiments in such materials are often performed outside the domain of validity of the third-order hyperelastic model and the stress-dependence of the ultrasonic wave-speed must be extrapolated at zero stress, leading to approximate values of the third-order elastic constants. The uncertainty of the evaluation of the third-order elastic constants is assessed by repeating multiple times the measurements and with Monte-Carlo simulations. The obtained values of the Murnaghan third-order elastic constants are l = -73 GPa ± 9%, m = -34 GPa ± 9%, and n = -61 GPa ± 10% for polymethyl methacrylate, and l = -17 000 GPa ± 20%, m = -11 000 GPa ± 10%, and n = -30 000 GPa ± 20% for dry Berea sandstone.

  11. Measurement of in vivo anterior cruciate ligament strain during dynamic jump landing

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, K.A.; Terry, M.E.; Utturkar, G.M.; Spritzer, C.E.; Queen, R.M.; Irribarra, L.A.; Garrett, W.E.; DeFrate, L.E.

    2011-01-01

    Despite recent attention in the literature, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury mechanisms are controversial and incidence rates remain high. One explanation is limited data on in vivo ACL strain during high-risk, dynamic movements. The objective of this study was to quantify ACL strain during jump landing. Marker-based motion analysis techniques were integrated with fluoroscopic and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques to measure dynamic ACL strain non-invasively. First, eight subjects’ knees were imaged using MR. From these images, the cortical bone and ACL attachment sites of the tibia and femur were outlined to create 3D models. Subjects underwent motion analysis while jump landing using reflective markers placed directly on the skin around the knee. Next, biplanar fluoroscopic images were taken with the markers in place so that the relative positions of each marker to the underlying bone could be quantified. Numerical optimization allowed jumping kinematics to be superimposed on the knee model, thus reproducing the dynamic in vivo joint motion. ACL length, knee flexion, and ground reaction force were measured. During jump landing, average ACL strain peaked 55 ± 14 ms (mean and 95% confidence interval) prior to ground impact, when knee flexion angles were lowest. The peak ACL strain, measured relative to its length during MR imaging, was 12 ± 7%. The observed trends were consistent with previously described neuromuscular patterns. Unrestricted by field of view or low sampling rate, this novel approach provides a means to measure kinematic patterns that elevate ACL strains and that provide new insights into ACL injury mechanisms. PMID:21092960

  12. Macular SD-OCT Outcome Measures: Comparison of Local Structure-Function Relationships and Dynamic Range

    PubMed Central

    Miraftabi, Arezoo; Amini, Navid; Morales, Esteban; Henry, Sharon; Yu, Fei; Afifi, Abdolmonem; Coleman, Anne L.; Caprioli, Joseph; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that the macular ganglion cell layer (GCL) thickness demonstrates a stronger structure-function (SF) relationship and extends the useful range of macular measurements compared with combined macular inner layer or full thickness. Methods Ninety-eight glaucomatous eyes and eight normal eyes with macular spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) volume scans and 10-2 visual fields were enrolled. Inner plexiform layer (IPL), GCL, macular retinal nerve fiber layer (mRNFL), ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL), ganglion cell complex (GCC), and full thickness (FT) measurements were calculated for 8 × 8 arrays of 3° superpixels. Main outcome measures were local structure-function relationships between macular superpixels and corresponding sensitivities on 10-2 fields after adjusting for ganglion cell displacement, dynamic range of measurements, and the change point (total deviation value where macular parameters reached measurement floor). Results Median (interquartile range [IQR]) mean deviation was −7.2 (−11.6 to −3.2) dB in glaucoma eyes. Strength of SF relationships was highest for GCIPL, GCL, GCC, and IPL (ρ = 0.635, 0.627, 0.621, and 0.577, respectively; P ≤ 0.046 for comparisons against GCIPL). Highest SF correlations coincided with the peak of GCL thickness, where the dynamic range was widest for FT (81.1 μm), followed by GCC (65.7 μm), GCIPL (54.9 μm), GCL (35.2 μm), mRNFL (27.5 μm), and IPL (20.9 μm). Change points were similar for all macular parameters (−7.8 to −8.9 dB). Conclusions GCIPL, GCL, and GCC demonstrated comparable SF relationships while FT, GCC, and GCIPL had the widest dynamic range. Measurement of GCL did not extend the range of useful structural measurements. Measuring GCL does not provide any advantage for detection of progression with current SD-OCT technology. PMID:27623336

  13. Nonlinear analysis and dynamic compensation of stylus scanning measurement with wide range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Heiyang; Liu, Xiaojun; Lu, Wenlong

    2011-12-01

    Surface topography is an important geometrical feature of a workpiece that influences its quality and functions such as friction, wearing, lubrication and sealing. Precision measurement of surface topography is fundamental for product quality characterizing and assurance. Stylus scanning technique is a widely used method for surface topography measurement, and it is also regarded as the international standard method for 2-D surface characterizing. Usually surface topography, including primary profile, waviness and roughness, can be measured precisely and efficiently by this method. However, by stylus scanning method to measure curved surface topography, the nonlinear error is unavoidable because of the difference of horizontal position of the actual measured point from given sampling point and the nonlinear transformation process from vertical displacement of the stylus tip to angle displacement of the stylus arm, and the error increases with the increasing of measuring range. In this paper, a wide range stylus scanning measurement system based on cylindrical grating interference principle is constructed, the originations of the nonlinear error are analyzed, the error model is established and a solution to decrease the nonlinear error is proposed, through which the error of the collected data is dynamically compensated.

  14. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Temperature, Velocity, and Density Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy R.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chi-Jen

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure dynamic gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 16 kHz. A high power CW laser beam is focused at a point in an air jet plume and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and spectrally resolved. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The circular interference fringe pattern is divided into four concentric regions and sampled at 1 and 16 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows for measurement of gas temperature and velocity. Independently monitoring the total scattered light intensity provides a measure of gas density. A low speed heated jet is used to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations and an acoustically excited nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements. Power spectral density calculations of the property fluctuations, as well as mean and fluctuating quantities are presented. Temperature fluctuation results are compared with constant current anemometry measurements and velocity fluctuation results are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements at the same locations.

  15. Retrieval of eddy dynamics from SMOS sea surface salinity measurements in the Algerian Basin (Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern-Fontanet, Jordi; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; García-Ladona, Emilio

    2016-06-01

    The circulation in the Algerian Basin is characterized by the presence of fresh-core eddies that propagate along the coast or at distances between 100 and 200 km from the coast. Enhancements in the processing of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) data have allowed to produce, for the first time, satellite sea surface salinity (SSS) maps in the Mediterranean Sea that capture the signature of Algerian eddies. SMOS data can be used to track them for long periods of time, especially during winter. SMOS SSS maps are well correlated with in situ measurements although the former has a smaller dynamical range. Despite this limitation, SMOS SSS maps capture the key dynamics of Algerian eddies allowing to retrieve velocities from SSS with the correct sign of vorticity.

  16. In vivo measurement of human knee and hip dynamics using MIMO system identification.

    PubMed

    Koopman, B; van Asseldonk, E F; van der Kooij, H

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a new method for the estimation of the dynamic impedance of multi-joint leg movements. The method is based on Multi Input Multi Output (MIMO) system identification techniques and is designed for continuous torque perturbations at the hip and knee joint. Preliminary results from this study indicate that MIMO system identification can successfully be used to estimate the hip and knee impedance and the interaction dynamics between both joints. It is also concluded that, in order to create a good model representation of the leg impedance, the effect of biarticular muscles needs to be taken into account. The obtained measures for joint impedance might be used for clinical assessment and follow up of patients, as well as for the development of supportive devices.

  17. Elastic Dispersion Derived from a Combination of Static and Dynamic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjær, Erling; Stroisz, Anna M.; Holt, Rune M.

    2013-05-01

    Utilization of laboratory tests for calibration and interpretation of data from seismic surveys requires knowledge about elastic dispersion in the range from seismic to ultrasonic frequencies. Data on such dispersion are hard to obtain because it requires specially designed equipment and also relies on simplifying assumptions about rock symmetry. A new method for estimation of dispersion in this frequency range is presented here. This method requires only standard rock mechanical equipment with ultrasonic velocity measurements, and is based on comparison of static and dynamic data. A key element in this method is a procedure for elimination of strain amplitude as a source for differences between static and dynamic moduli. High-quality data is necessary, but the required accuracy is not extreme. Application of the method on one partly saturated shale and two dry sandstone samples indicates that dispersion increases with clay content, and decreases with stress.

  18. A Kalman-filtering approach to high dynamic range imaging for measurement applications.

    PubMed

    Dedrick, Eric; Lau, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    High dynamic range imaging (HDRI) methods in computational photography address situations where the dynamic range of a scene exceeds what can be captured by an image sensor in a single exposure. HDRI techniques have also been used to construct radiance maps in measurement applications; unfortunately, the design and evaluation of HDRI algorithms for use in these applications have received little attention. In this paper, we develop a novel HDRI technique based on pixel-by-pixel Kalman filtering and evaluate its performance using objective metrics that this paper also introduces. In the presented experiments, this new technique achieves as much as 9.4-dB improvement in signal-to-noise ratio and can achieve as much as a 29% improvement in radiometric accuracy over a classic method.

  19. Flow Visualization in Evaporating Liquid Drops and Measurement of Dynamic Contact Angles and Spreading Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Neng-Li; Chao, David F.

    2001-01-01

    A new hybrid optical system, consisting of reflection-refracted shadowgraphy and top-view photography, is used to visualize flow phenomena and simultaneously measure the spreading and instant dynamic contact angle in a volatile-liquid drop on a nontransparent substrate. Thermocapillary convection in the drop, induced by evaporation, and the drop real-time profile data are synchronously recorded by video recording systems. Experimental results obtained from this unique technique clearly reveal that thermocapillary convection strongly affects the spreading process and the characteristics of dynamic contact angle of the drop. Comprehensive information of a sessile drop, including the local contact angle along the periphery, the instability of the three-phase contact line, and the deformation of the drop shape is obtained and analyzed.

  20. Slowing of Dynamics of Hydration Water Depends on Length Scale of Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickels, Jonathan; Atkinson, John; Diallo, Souleymane; Perticaroli, Stefania; Katsaras, John; Dutcher, John

    The dynamics of hydration water associated with biomolecules is often slower than in bulk. We have used quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) to study the dynamics of hydration water associated with soft colloidal, monodisperse phytoglycogen nanoparticles. The large water content of the phytoglycogen nanoparticles makes this an ideal system for investigations of hydration water in hydrophilic environments. We find that the hydration water translation is sub-diffusive, occurring, on average, ~ 5.8 times slower than that of bulk water. Significantly, these data demonstrate a clear q-dependence in the measured retardation factor, implying a corresponding length scale dependence. This observation may help to reconcile the often-conflicting range of hydration water retardation factors reported in the literature using different experimental techniques.