Science.gov

Sample records for dynamic material flow

  1. Dynamic modelling of packaging material flow systems.

    PubMed

    Tsiliyannis, Christos A

    2005-04-01

    A dynamic model has been developed for reused and recycled packaging material flows. It allows a rigorous description of the flows and stocks during the transition to new targets imposed by legislation, product demand variations or even by variations in consumer discard behaviour. Given the annual reuse and recycle frequency and packaging lifetime, the model determines all packaging flows (e.g., consumption and reuse) and variables through which environmental policy is formulated, such as recycling, waste and reuse rates and it identifies the minimum number of variables to be surveyed for complete packaging flow monitoring. Simulation of the transition to the new flow conditions is given for flows of packaging materials in Greece, based on 1995--1998 field inventory and statistical data.

  2. Dynamic material flow modeling: an effort to calibrate and validate aluminum stocks and flows in Austria.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Hanno; Laner, David; Rechberger, Helmut; Fellner, Johann

    2015-05-05

    A calibrated and validated dynamic material flow model of Austrian aluminum (Al) stocks and flows between 1964 and 2012 was developed. Calibration and extensive plausibility testing was performed to illustrate how the quality of dynamic material flow analysis can be improved on the basis of the consideration of independent bottom-up estimates. According to the model, total Austrian in-use Al stocks reached a level of 360 kg/capita in 2012, with buildings (45%) and transport applications (32%) being the major in-use stocks. Old scrap generation (including export of end-of-life vehicles) amounted to 12.5 kg/capita in 2012, still being on the increase, while Al final demand has remained rather constant at around 25 kg/capita in the past few years. The application of global sensitivity analysis showed that only small parts of the total variance of old scrap generation could be explained by the variation of single parameters, emphasizing the need for comprehensive sensitivity analysis tools accounting for interaction between parameters and time-delay effects in dynamic material flow models. Overall, it was possible to generate a detailed understanding of the evolution of Al stocks and flows in Austria, including plausibility evaluations of the results. Such models constitute a reliable basis for evaluating future recycling potentials, in particular with respect to application-specific qualities of current and future national Al scrap generation and utilization.

  3. Modeling metal stocks and flows: a review of dynamic material flow analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Müller, Esther; Hilty, Lorenz M; Widmer, Rolf; Schluep, Mathias; Faulstich, Martin

    2014-02-18

    Dynamic material flow analysis (MFA) is a frequently used method to assess past, present, and future stocks and flows of metals in the anthroposphere. Over the past fifteen years, dynamic MFA has contributed to increased knowledge about the quantities, qualities, and locations of metal-containing goods. This article presents a literature review of the methodologies applied in 60 dynamic MFAs of metals. The review is based on a standardized model description format, the ODD (overview, design concepts, details) protocol. We focus on giving a comprehensive overview of modeling approaches and structure them according to essential aspects, such as their treatment of material dissipation, spatial dimension of flows, or data uncertainty. The reviewed literature features similar basic modeling principles but very diverse extrapolation methods. Basic principles include the calculation of outflows of the in-use stock based on inflow or stock data and a lifetime distribution function. For extrapolating stocks and flows, authors apply constant, linear, exponential, and logistic models or approaches based on socioeconomic variables, such as regression models or the intensity-of-use hypothesis. The consideration and treatment of further aspects, such as dissipation, spatial distribution, and data uncertainty, vary significantly and highly depends on the objectives of each study.

  4. Material Cycles and Chemicals: Dynamic Material Flow Analysis of Contaminants in Paper Recycling.

    PubMed

    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn; Laner, David; Astrup, Thomas F

    2016-11-15

    This study provides a systematic approach for assessment of contaminants in materials for recycling. Paper recycling is used as an illustrative example. Three selected chemicals, bisphenol A (BPA), diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and mineral oil hydrocarbons (MOHs), are evaluated within the paper cycle. The approach combines static material flow analysis (MFA) with dynamic material and substance flow modeling. The results indicate that phasing out of chemicals is the most effective measure for reducing chemical contamination. However, this scenario was also associated with a considerable lag phase (between approximately one and three decades) before the presence of chemicals in paper products could be considered insignificant. While improved decontamination may appear to be an effective way of minimizing chemicals in products, this may also result in lower production yields. Optimized waste material source-segregation and collection was the least effective strategy for reducing chemical contamination, if the overall recycling rates should be maintained at the current level (approximately 70% for Europe). The study provides a consistent approach for evaluating contaminant levels in material cycles. The results clearly indicate that mass-based recycling targets are not sufficient to ensure high quality material recycling.

  5. Simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the CRBR Upper-Core Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, D.; Starkovich, V.S.; Chapyak, E.J.

    1982-09-01

    The results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Upper Core Structure are described. The methodology used to design the experimental apparatus and select test conditions is detailed. Numerous comparisons between experimental data and SIMMER-II Code calculations are presented with both advantages and limitations of the SIMMER modeling features identified.

  6. Towards a dynamic assessment of raw materials criticality: linking agent-based demand--with material flow supply modelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Knoeri, Christof; Wäger, Patrick A; Stamp, Anna; Althaus, Hans-Joerg; Weil, Marcel

    2013-09-01

    Emerging technologies such as information and communication-, photovoltaic- or battery technologies are expected to increase significantly the demand for scarce metals in the near future. The recently developed methods to evaluate the criticality of mineral raw materials typically provide a 'snapshot' of the criticality of a certain material at one point in time by using static indicators both for supply risk and for the impacts of supply restrictions. While allowing for insights into the mechanisms behind the criticality of raw materials, these methods cannot account for dynamic changes in products and/or activities over time. In this paper we propose a conceptual framework intended to overcome these limitations by including the dynamic interactions between different possible demand and supply configurations. The framework integrates an agent-based behaviour model, where demand emerges from individual agent decisions and interaction, into a dynamic material flow model, representing the materials' stocks and flows. Within the framework, the environmental implications of substitution decisions are evaluated by applying life-cycle assessment methodology. The approach makes a first step towards a dynamic criticality assessment and will enhance the understanding of industrial substitution decisions and environmental implications related to critical metals. We discuss the potential and limitation of such an approach in contrast to state-of-the-art methods and how it might lead to criticality assessments tailored to the specific circumstances of single industrial sectors or individual companies.

  7. Dynamic analysis of global copper flows. Global stocks, postconsumer material flows, recycling indicators, and uncertainty evaluation.

    PubMed

    Glöser, Simon; Soulier, Marcel; Tercero Espinoza, Luis A

    2013-06-18

    We present a dynamic model of global copper stocks and flows which allows a detailed analysis of recycling efficiencies, copper stocks in use, and dissipated and landfilled copper. The model is based on historical mining and refined copper production data (1910-2010) enhanced by a unique data set of recent global semifinished goods production and copper end-use sectors provided by the copper industry. To enable the consistency of the simulated copper life cycle in terms of a closed mass balance, particularly the matching of recycled metal flows to reported historical annual production data, a method was developed to estimate the yearly global collection rates of end-of-life (postconsumer) scrap. Based on this method, we provide estimates of 8 different recycling indicators over time. The main indicator for the efficiency of global copper recycling from end-of-life (EoL) scrap--the EoL recycling rate--was estimated to be 45% on average, ± 5% (one standard deviation) due to uncertainty and variability over time in the period 2000-2010. As uncertainties of specific input data--mainly concerning assumptions on end-use lifetimes and their distribution--are high, a sensitivity analysis with regard to the effect of uncertainties in the input data on the calculated recycling indicators was performed. The sensitivity analysis included a stochastic (Monte Carlo) uncertainty evaluation with 10(5) simulation runs.

  8. Numerical investigations on flow dynamics of prismatic granular materials using the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, W.; Weatherley, D.; Wruck, B.; Chitombo, G. P.

    2012-04-01

    The flow dynamics of granular materials is of broad interest in both the geosciences (e.g. landslides, fault zone evolution, and brecchia pipe formation) and many engineering disciplines (e.g chemical engineering, food sciences, pharmaceuticals and materials science). At the interface between natural and human-induced granular media flow, current underground mass-mining methods are trending towards the induced failure and subsequent gravitational flow of large volumes of broken rock, a method known as cave mining. Cave mining relies upon the undercutting of a large ore body, inducement of fragmentation of the rock and subsequent extraction of ore from below, via hopper-like outlets. Design of such mines currently relies upon a simplified kinematic theory of granular flow in hoppers, known as the ellipsoid theory of mass movement. This theory assumes that the zone of moving material grows as an ellipsoid above the outlet of the silo. The boundary of the movement zone is a shear band and internal to the movement zone, the granular material is assumed to have a uniformly high bulk porosity compared with surrounding stagnant regions. There is however, increasing anecdotal evidence and field measurements suggesting this theory fails to capture the full complexity of granular material flow within cave mines. Given the practical challenges obstructing direct measurement of movement both in laboratory experiments and in-situ, the Discrete Element Method (DEM [1]) is a popular alternative to investigate granular media flow. Small-scale DEM studies (c.f. [3] and references therein) have confirmed that movement within DEM silo flow models matches that predicted by ellipsoid theory, at least for mono-disperse granular material freely outflowing at a constant rate. A major draw-back of these small-scale DEM studies is that the initial bulk porosity of the simulated granular material is significantly higher than that of broken, prismatic rock. In this investigation, more

  9. Stability and dynamical properties of material flow systems on random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, K.; Galla, T.

    2009-04-01

    The theory of complex networks and of disordered systems is used to study the stability and dynamical properties of a simple model of material flow networks defined on random graphs. In particular we address instabilities that are characteristic of flow networks in economic, ecological and biological systems. Based on results from random matrix theory, we work out the phase diagram of such systems defined on extensively connected random graphs, and study in detail how the choice of control policies and the network structure affects stability. We also present results for more complex topologies of the underlying graph, focussing on finitely connected Erdös-Réyni graphs, Small-World Networks and Barabási-Albert scale-free networks. Results indicate that variability of input-output matrix elements, and random structures of the underlying graph tend to make the system less stable, while fast price dynamics or strong responsiveness to stock accumulation promote stability.

  10. Quasi-dynamic Material Flow Analysis applied to the Austrian Phosphorus cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoboli, Ottavia; Rechberger, Helmut

    2013-04-01

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the key elements that sustain life on earth and that allow achieving the current high levels of food production worldwide. It is a non-renewable resource, without any existing substitute. Because of its current dissipative use by mankind and to its very slow geochemical cycle, this resource is rapidly depleting and it is strongly connected to the problem of ensuring food security. Moreover P is also associated to important environmental problems. Its extraction often generates hazardous wastes, while its accumulation in water bodies can lead to eutrophication, with consequent severe ecological damages. It is therefore necessary to analyze and understand in detail the system of P, in regard to its use and management, to identify the processes that should be targeted in order to reduce the overall consumption of this resource. This work aims at establishing a generic quasi-dynamic model, which describes the Austrian P-budget and which allows investigating the trends of P use in the past, but also selected future scenarios. Given the importance of P throughout the whole anthropogenic metabolism, the model is based on a comprehensive system that encompasses several economic sectors, from agriculture and animal husbandry to industry, consumption and waste and wastewater treatment. Furthermore it includes the hydrosphere, to assess the losses of P into water bodies, due to the importance of eutrophication problems. The methodology applied is Material Flow Analysis (MFA), which is a systemic approach to assess and balance the stocks and flows of a material within a system defined in space and time. Moreover the model is integrated in the software STAN, a freeware tailor-made for MFA. Particular attention is paid to the characteristics and the quality of the data, in order to include data uncertainty and error propagation in the dynamic balance.

  11. Dynamic power flow controllers

    DOEpatents

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Prasai, Anish

    2017-03-07

    Dynamic power flow controllers are provided. A dynamic power flow controller may comprise a transformer and a power converter. The power converter is subject to low voltage stresses and not floated at line voltage. In addition, the power converter is rated at a fraction of the total power controlled. A dynamic power flow controller controls both the real and the reactive power flow between two AC sources having the same frequency. A dynamic power flow controller inserts a voltage with controllable magnitude and phase between two AC sources; thereby effecting control of active and reactive power flows between two AC sources.

  12. Tool design in friction stir processing: dynamic forces and material flow

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Clark; K. S. Miller; C. R. Tolle

    2006-08-01

    Friction stir processing involves severe plastic flow within the material; the nature of this flow determines the final morphology of the weld, the resulting microstructures, and the presence or absence of defects such as internal cavities or "wormholes." The forces causing this plastic flow are a function of process parameters, including spindle speed, travel speed, and tool design and angle. Some of these forces are directly applied or a result of the mechanical constraints and compliance of the apparatus, while others are resolved forces resulting from an interaction of these applied forces and tool forces governed by processing parameters, and can be diminished or even reversed in sign with appropriate choices of process parameters. The present investigation is concerned mostly with the friction stir processing of 6061-T6 aluminum plates in a low-cost apparatus built from a commercial milling machine. A rotating dynamometer allows in-process measurement of actual spindle speed, torque, and forces in the x-, y-, and z-directions, as well as force control on these axes. Two main types of tool, both unthreaded, were used. The first had a pin about 4 mm in diameter and 4 mm in length, with a shoulder about 10 mm in diameter, and produced wormhole defects; the second, with a tapered pin about 5 mm long, a base diameter of about 6 mm, a tip diameter of about 4 mm, and a shoulder diameter (flat or dished) of about 19 mm, produced sound welds over a wide range of parameters.

  13. Materials Flow and Sustainability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sznopek, John L.; Brown, William M.

    1998-01-01

    Materials extracted from the Earth are necessary to produce our most fundamental needs – food, clothing, and shelter. Materials are needed to maintain and improve our standard of living. Understanding the whole system of materials flow, from source to ultimate disposition, can help us better manage the use of natural resources and protect the environment.

  14. Lava Flow Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    1996-01-01

    This grant originally had four major tasks, all of which were addressed to varying extents during the course of the research: (1) Measure the fractal dimensions of lava flows as a function of topography, substrate, and rheology; (2) The nature of lava tube systems and their relation to flow fields; (3) A quantitative assessment of lava flow dynamics in light of the fractal nature of lava flow margins; and (4) Development and application of a new remote sensing tool based on fractal properties. During the course of the research, the project expanded to include the following projects: (1) A comparison of what we can-learn from remote sensing studies of lava flow morphology and from studies of samples of lava flows; (2) Study of a terrestrial analog of the nakhlites, one of the groups of meteorites from Mars; and (3) Study of the textures of Hawaiian basalts as an aid in understanding the dynamics (flow rates, inflation rates, thermal history) of flow interiors. In addition, during the first year an educational task (development and writing of a teacher's guide and activity set to accompany the lunar sample disk when it is sent to schools) was included.

  15. Segregation dynamics in debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Fei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Debris flows are massive flows consisting of mixtures of particles of different sizes and interstitial fluids such as water and mud. In sheared mixtures of different-sized (same density) particles, it is well known that larger particles tend to go up (toward the free surface), and the smaller particles, down, commonly referred to as the "Brazil-nut problem" or "kinetic sieving". When kinetic sieving fluxes are combined with advection in flows, they can give rise to a spectacular range of segregation patterns. These segregation / advection dynamics are recognized as playing a role in the coarsening of a debris flow front (its "snout") and the coarsening of the self-formed channel sides or levees. Since particle size distribution influences the flow dynamics including entrainment of bed materials, modeling segregation dynamics in debris flows is important for modeling the debris flows themselves. In sparser systems, the Brazil-nut segregation is well-modeled using kinetic theory applied to dissipative systems, where an underlying assumption involves random, uncorrelated collisions. In denser systems, where kinetic theory breaks down we have recently developed a new mixture model that demonstrates the segregation fluxes are driven by two effects associated with the kinetic stress or granular temperature (the kinetic energy associated with velocity fluctuations): (1) the difference between the partitioning of kinetic and contact stresses among the species in the mixture and (2) a kinetic stress gradient. Both model frameworks involve the temperature gradient as a driving force for segregation, but kinetic theory sends larger particles toward lower temperatures, and our mixture model sends larger particles away from lower temperatures. Which framework works under what conditions appears to depend on correlations in the flow such as those manifested in clusters and force chains. We discuss the application of each theoretical framework to representing segregation dynamics

  16. Dynamics of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, Robert P.

    1996-01-01

    Granular materials exhibit a rich variety of dynamical behavior, much of which is poorly understood. Fractal-like stress chains, convection, a variety of wave dynamics, including waves which resemble capillary waves, l/f noise, and fractional Brownian motion provide examples. Work beginning at Duke will focus on gravity driven convection, mixing and gravitational collapse. Although granular materials consist of collections of interacting particles, there are important differences between the dynamics of a collections of grains and the dynamics of a collections of molecules. In particular, the ergodic hypothesis is generally invalid for granular materials, so that ordinary statistical physics does not apply. In the absence of a steady energy input, granular materials undergo a rapid collapse which is strongly influenced by the presence of gravity. Fluctuations on laboratory scales in such quantities as the stress can be very large-as much as an order of magnitude greater than the mean.

  17. Assessment of the effects of the Japanese shift to lead-free solders and its impact on material substitution and environmental emissions by a dynamic material flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Masaaki; Tsunemi, Kiyotaka

    2012-11-01

    Lead-free electronics has been extensively studied, whereas their adoption by society and their impact on material substitution and environmental emissions are not well understood. Through a material flow analysis (MFA), this paper explores the life cycle flows for solder-containing metals in Japan, which leads the world in the shift to lead-free solders in electronics. The results indicate that the shift has been progressing rapidly for a decade, and that substitutes for lead in solders, which include silver and copper, are still in the early life cycle stages. The results also show, however, that such substitution slows down during the late life cycle stages owing to long electronic product lifespans. This deceleration of material substitution in the solder life cycle may not only preclude a reduction in lead emissions to air but also accelerate an increase in silver emissions to air and water. As an effective measure against ongoing lead emissions, our scenario analysis suggests an aggressive recycling program for printed circuit boards that utilizes an existing recycling scheme.

  18. Dynamic indentation hardness of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeppel, Brian James

    Indentation hardness is one of the simplest and most commonly used measures for quickly characterizing material response under static loads. Hardness may mean resistance to cutting to a machinist, resistance to wear to a tribologist, or a measure of flow stress to a design engineer. In this simple technique, a predetermined force is applied to an indenter for 5-30 seconds causing it to penetrate a specimen. By measuring the load and the indentation size, a hardness value is determined. However, the rate of deformation during indenter penetration is of the order of 10sp{-4}\\ ssp{-1}. In most practical applications, such as high speed machining or impact, material deforms at strain rates in excess of 10sp3{-}10sp5\\ ssp{-1}. At such high rates, it is well established that the plastic behavior of materials is considerably different from their static counterpart. For example, materials exhibit an increase in their yield stress, flow stress, fracture stress, and fracture toughness at high strain rates. Hence, the use of static hardness as an indicator of material response under dynamic loads may not be appropriate. Accordingly, a simple dynamic indentation hardness tester is developed for characterizing materials at strain rates similar to those encountered in realistic situations. The experimental technique uses elastic stress wave propagation phenomena in a slender rod. The technique is designed to deliver a single indentation load of 100-200 mus duration. Similar to static measurements, the dynamic hardness is determined from the measured load and indentation size. Hardness measurements on a range of metals have revealed that the dynamic hardness is consistently greater than the static hardness. The increase in hardness is strongly dependent on the crystal structure of the material. The observed trends in hardness are also found to be consistent with the yield and flow stresses of these materials under uniaxial compression. Therefore, it is suggested that the

  19. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T.

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  20. Material Flows and Carbon Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrell, E.

    2003-12-01

    The industrial sector emits almost 43 percent of the global anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions to produce materials and products. Furthermore, energy is used to move materials and products and process the waste. Hence, a large amount of energy is consumed and CO2 is emitted to sustain our materials system. Until recently, studies investigating mitigation options focused on changes in the energy system. For industrial processes most studies evaluate how the current materials system can be maintained producing fewer greenhouse gas emissions. Three elements of a strategy to improve the long-term materials productivity are the reduction of dissipative uses of non-biodegradable materials, secondly, the re-design of products to use less material or design for re-use or recycling, and thirdly, develop more efficient technologies for material conversion and recycling. This will reduce or eliminate the need to extract virgin materials from the environment, and reduce CO2 emissions from the energy-intensive production processes. To assess measures to reduce materials consumption, fossil fuels consumption and CO2 emissions, detailed understanding of the material system is needed. The lifecycle of materials has to be investigated including all branches of industry with all the inputs and outputs. We start with a discussion of materials and the carbon cycle focusing on the contribution of materials to anthropogenic carbon flows. We discuss CO2 emissions from energy use in materials extraction and production, fossil (e.g. plastics) and biomass carbon (e.g. lumber, paper) used as feedstock of materials, and mineral sources (e.g. cement). We discuss opportunities to reduce CO2 emissions by improving the efficiency with which society uses materials through product design, material substitution, product reuse and material recycling.

  1. The Dynamics of Flowing Waters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattingly, Rosanna L.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a series of activities designed to help students understand the dynamics of flowing water. Includes investigations into determining water discharge, calculating variable velocities, utilizing flood formulas, graphing stream profiles, and learning about the water cycle. (TW)

  2. Dynamic compaction of granular materials

    PubMed Central

    Favrie, N.; Gavrilyuk, S.

    2013-01-01

    An Eulerian hyperbolic multiphase flow model for dynamic and irreversible compaction of granular materials is constructed. The reversible model is first constructed on the basis of the classical Hertz theory. The irreversible model is then derived in accordance with the following two basic principles. First, the entropy inequality is satisfied by the model. Second, the corresponding ‘intergranular stress’ coming from elastic energy owing to contact between grains decreases in time (the granular media behave as Maxwell-type materials). The irreversible model admits an equilibrium state corresponding to von Mises-type yield limit. The yield limit depends on the volume fraction of the solid. The sound velocity at the yield surface is smaller than that in the reversible model. The last one is smaller than the sound velocity in the irreversible model. Such an embedded model structure assures a thermodynamically correct formulation of the model of granular materials. The model is validated on quasi-static experiments on loading–unloading cycles. The experimentally observed hysteresis phenomena were numerically confirmed with a good accuracy by the proposed model. PMID:24353466

  3. Mixing, segregation, and flow of granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Joseph J.

    1998-11-01

    This dissertation addresses mixing, segregation, and flow of granular materials with the ultimate goal of providing fundamental understanding and tools for the rational design and optimization of mixing devices. In particular, the paradigm cases of a slowly rotated tumbler mixer and flow down an inclined plane are examined. Computational work, as well as supporting experiments, are used to probe both two and three dimensional systems. In the avalanching regime, the mixing and flow can be viewed either on a global-scale or a local-scale. On the global-scale, material is transported via avalanches whose gross motion can be well described by geometrical considerations. On the local-scale, the dynamics of the particle motion becomes important; particles follow complicated trajectories that are highly sensitive to differences in size/density/morphology. By decomposing the problem in this way, it is possible to study the implications of the geometry and dynamics separately and to add complexities in a controlled fashion. This methodology allows even seemingly difficult problems (i.e., mixing in non-convex geometries, and mixing of dissimilar particles) to be probed in a simple yet methodical way. In addition this technique provides predictions of optimal mixing conditions in an avalanching tumbler, a criterion for evaluating the effect of mixer shape, and mixing enhancement strategies for both two and three dimensional mixers. In the continuous regime, the flow can be divided into two regions: a rapid flow region of the cascading layer at the free surface, and a fixed bed region undergoing solid body rotation. A continuum-based description, in which averages are taken across the layer, generates quantitative predictions about the flow in the cascading layer and agrees well with experiment. Incorporating mixing through a diffusive flux (as well as constitutive expression for segregation) within the cascading layer allows for the determination of optimal mixing conditions

  4. Materials in the economy; material flows, scarcity, and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Lorie A.

    2002-01-01

    The importance of materials to the economy of the United States is described, including the levels of consumption and uses of materials. The paths (or flows) that materials take from extraction, through processing, to consumer products, and then final disposition are illustrated. Scarcity and environmental issues as they relate to the flow of materials are discussed. Examples for the three main themes of the report (material flows, scarcity, and the environment) are presented.

  5. Dynamic fracture of heterogeneous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.G.; Liu, C.; Addessio, F.L.; Williams, T.O.; Bennett, J.G.; Haberman, K.S.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to investigate the fundamental aspects of the process of dynamic fracture propagation in heterogeneous materials. The work focused on three important, but poorly understood, aspects of dynamic fracture for materials with a heterogeneous microstructure. These were: the appropriateness of using a single-parameter asymptotic analysis to describe dynamic crack-tip deformation fields, the temperature rises at the tip and on the flanks of a running crack, and the constitutive modeling of damage initiation and accumulation.

  6. Fouling dynamics in suspension flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakib-Manesh, A.; Åström, J. A.; Koponen, A.; Raiskinmäki, P.; Timonen, J.

    2002-09-01

    A particle suspension flowing in a channel in which fouling layers are allowed to form on the channel walls is investigated by numerical simulation. A two-dimensional phase diagram with at least four different behaviors is constructed. The fouling is modeled by attachment during collision with the deposits and by detachment caused by large enough hydrodynamic drag. For fixed total number of particles and small Reynolds numbers, the relevant parameters governing the fouling dynamics are the solid volume fraction of the suspension and the detachment drag force threshold. Below a critical curve in this 2D phase space only transient fouling takes place when the suspension is accelerated from rest by a pressure gradient. Above the fouling transition line, persistent fouling layers are formed via ballistic deposition for low and via homogeneous deposition for large solid volume fractions. Close to the fouling transition line, the flow path between the deposited layers meanders, while necking appears for increasing distance from the transition. Finally, another transition to a fully blocked flow path takes place. As determined by the estimated amount of deposited particles at saturation, both transitions seem to be discontinuous. Large fluctuations and long saturation times are typical of the dynamics of the system.

  7. Particle cage dynamics in flowing colloidal dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marenne, Stephanie; Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2016-11-01

    The idea of the particle in a suspension at rest being trapped in a cage formed by its neighbors, widely used to understand glassy suspensions, has been applied to freely flowing suspensions. Stokesian Dynamics, a discrete particle simulation, is used to simulate the flow of monodisperse colloidal hard sphere suspensions. The cage analogy is useful to study the nonlinear stress in the material during start-up of shear flow, where the neighbor cage deforms and breaks, and during oscillatory shear flow where, depending on the amplitude of oscillation, the particle is trapped inside the cage or escapes during the oscillation cycle. A precise statistical definition of the cage in terms of the nearest neighbor ring in the pair distribution function is developed. We examine the dependence of the cage dynamics on the volume fraction of particles and the Peclet number Pe , the ratio between shear and Brownian forces. Under flow, the cage is found to break at quite definite positions, and the structural distortion is found to be clearly related to the shear and normal stress response. The shear strain needed to break the neighbor cage depends on Pe as Brownian motion enhances the total deformation. A simple model captures the strain at the stress overshoot for start-up of steady shear.

  8. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Wise, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Controlled impact methods have been employed to obtain dynamic response properties of armor materials. Experimental data have been obtained for high-strength ceramics. Continued analysis of time-resolved velocity interferometer measurements has produced systematic material-property data for Hugoniot and release response, initial and post-yield strength, pressure-induced phase transformation, and dynamic fracture strength. A new technique has been developed to measure hydrodynamic properties of ceramic through shock-wave experiments on metal-ceramic composites and data obtained for silicon carbide. Additional data on several titanium diboride ceramics and high-quality aluminum oxide ceramic have been acquired, and issues regarding the influence of microstructure on dynamic properties have emerged. Comparison of dynamic (Hugoniot elastic limit) strength and indentation hardness data has been performed and important correlations revealed. Innovative impact experiments on confined and unconfined alumina rods using axial and transverse VISAR diagnostics have been demonstrated which permit acquisition of multiaxial dynamic response data. Dynamic failure properties of a high-density aluminosilicate glass, similar in composition to the intergranular glassy phase of some aluminas, have been investigated with regard to yield, spall, and failure-wave propagation.

  9. Dynamics of assembly production flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezaki, Takahiro; Yanagisawa, Daichi; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-06-01

    Despite recent developments in management theory, maintaining a manufacturing schedule remains difficult because of production delays and fluctuations in demand and supply of materials. The response of manufacturing systems to such disruptions to dynamic behavior has been rarely studied. To capture these responses, we investigate a process that models the assembly of parts into end products. The complete assembly process is represented by a directed tree, where the smallest parts are injected at leaves and the end products are removed at the root. A discrete assembly process, represented by a node on the network, integrates parts, which are then sent to the next downstream node as a single part. The model exhibits some intriguing phenomena, including overstock cascade, phase transition in terms of demand and supply fluctuations, nonmonotonic distribution of stockout in the network, and the formation of a stockout path and stockout chains. Surprisingly, these rich phenomena result from only the nature of distributed assembly processes. From a physical perspective, these phenomena provide insight into delay dynamics and inventory distributions in large-scale manufacturing systems.

  10. Autogenic dynamics of debris-flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Wilco; de Haas, Tjalling; Braat, Lisanne; Kleinhans, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    Alluvial fans develop their semi-conical shape by cyclic avulsion of their geomorphologically active sector from a fixed fan apex. These cyclic avulsions have been attributed to both allogenic and autogenic forcings and processes. Autogenic dynamics have been extensively studied on fluvial fans through physical scale experiments, and are governed by cyclic alternations of aggradation by unconfined sheet flow, fanhead incision leading to channelized flow, channel backfilling and avulsion. On debris-flow fans, however, autogenic dynamics have not yet been directly observed. We experimentally created debris-flow fans under constant extrinsic forcings, and show that autogenic dynamics are a fundamental intrinsic process on debris-flow fans. We found that autogenic cycles on debris-flow fans are driven by sequences of backfilling, avulsion and channelization, similar to the cycles on fluvial fans. However, the processes that govern these sequences are unique for debris-flow fans, and differ fundamentally from the processes that govern autogenic dynamics on fluvial fans. We experimentally observed that backfilling commenced after the debris flows reached their maximum possible extent. The next debris flows then progressively became shorter, driven by feedbacks on fan morphology and flow-dynamics. The progressively decreasing debris-flow length caused in-channel sedimentation, which led to increasing channel overflow and wider debris flows. This reduced the impulse of the liquefied flow body to the flow front, which then further reduced flow velocity and runout length, and induced further in-channel sedimentation. This commenced a positive feedback wherein debris flows became increasingly short and wide, until the channel was completely filled and the apex cross-profile was plano-convex. At this point, there was no preferential transport direction by channelization, and the debris flows progressively avulsed towards the steepest, preferential, flow path. Simultaneously

  11. Physical Properties of Various Materials Relevant to Granular Flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of the ubiquitous nature of granular materials, ranging from natural avalanches to industrial storage and processing operations, interest in quantifying and predicting the dynamics of granular flow continues to increase. The objective of this study was to investigate various physical proper...

  12. Flow chemistry meets advanced functional materials.

    PubMed

    Myers, Rebecca M; Fitzpatrick, Daniel E; Turner, Richard M; Ley, Steven V

    2014-09-22

    Flow chemistry and continuous processing techniques are beginning to have a profound impact on the production of functional materials ranging from quantum dots, nanoparticles and metal organic frameworks to polymers and dyes. These techniques provide robust procedures which not only enable accurate control of the product material's properties but they are also ideally suited to conducting experiments on scale. The modular nature of flow and continuous processing equipment rapidly facilitates reaction optimisation and variation in function of the products.

  13. Material flows generated by pyromet copper smelting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, T.G.

    2005-01-01

    Copper production through smelting generates large volumes of material flows. As copper contained in ore becomes copper contained in concentrate to be fed into the smelting process, it leaves behind an altered landscape, sometimes mine waste, and always mill tailings. Copper concentrate, fluxing materials, fuels, oxygen, recyclables, scrap and water are inputs to the process. Dust (recycled), gases - containing carbon dioxide (CO2) (dissipated) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) (mostly collected, transformed and sold) and slag (discarded or sold) - are among the significant process outputs. This article reports estimates of the flows of these input/output materials for a particular set of smelters studied in some countries.

  14. Particle Dynamics in Tangential Flow Filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Mike; Pennathur, Sumita

    2015-11-01

    Tangential Flow Filtration (TFF) is a rapid and efficient method for filtration and separation of solutions containing particles such as viruses, bacteria or cellular material. Enhancing the efficiency of TFF not only requires a detailed understanding of the individual mechanisms behind particle transport, but the interaction between these transport mechanisms and a porous wall. In this work, we numerically and experimentally explore how inertial migration is affected by the presence of a permeate flow through the porous walls of a microchannel in order to develop a platform for further studies of particle transport in a TFF device. Numerically, we use COMSOL multiphysics to model the large parameter space of permeate versus inertial forces. Experimentally, we develop a MEMS fabricated TFF device to confirm the results of the numerical model, where the permeate flow is controlled using multiple pumps and pressure transducers regulated by a feedback loop. Experimental and numerical results reveal interesting dynamics, including the competition between permeate and inertial forces and the consequences of this competition on particle trajectories and equilibrium location.

  15. Tethered DNA dynamics in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Donev, Aleksandar; Weisgraber, Todd; Alder, Berni J; Graham, Michael D; de Pablo, Juan J

    2009-06-21

    We study the cyclic dynamics of a single polymer tethered to a hard wall in shear flow using Brownian dynamics, the lattice Boltzmann method, and a recent stochastic event-driven molecular dynamics algorithm. We focus on the dynamics of the free end (last bead) of the tethered chain and we examine the cross-correlation function and power spectral density of the chain extensions in the flow and gradient directions as a function of chain length N and dimensionless shear rate Wi. Extensive simulation results suggest a classical fluctuation-dissipation stochastic process and question the existence of periodicity of the cyclic dynamics, as previously claimed. We support our numerical findings with a simple analytical calculation for a harmonic dimer in shear flow.

  16. Dynamics of flexible fibers in shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Słowicka, Agnieszka M.; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Ekiel-Jeżewska, Maria L.

    2015-09-28

    Dynamics of flexible non-Brownian fibers in shear flow at low-Reynolds-number are analyzed numerically for a wide range of the ratios A of the fiber bending force to the viscous drag force. Initially, the fibers are aligned with the flow, and later they move in the plane perpendicular to the flow vorticity. A surprisingly rich spectrum of different modes is observed when the value of A is systematically changed, with sharp transitions between coiled and straightening out modes, period-doubling bifurcations from periodic to migrating solutions, irregular dynamics, and chaos.

  17. Granular Material Flows with Interstitial Fluid Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Melany L.; Brennen, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    The research focused on experimental measurements of the rheological properties of liquid-solid and granular flows. In these flows, the viscous effects of the interstitial fluid, the inertia of the fluid and particles, and the collisional interactions of the particles may all contribute to the flow mechanics. These multiphase flows include industrial problems such as coal slurry pipelines, hydraulic fracturing processes, fluidized beds, mining and milling operation, abrasive water jet machining, and polishing and surface erosion technologies. In addition, there are a wide range of geophysical flows such as debris flows, landslides and sediment transport. In extraterrestrial applications, the study of transport of particulate materials is fundamental to the mining and processing of lunar and Martian soils and the transport of atmospheric dust (National Research Council 2000). The recent images from Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft dramatically depict the complex sand and dust flows on Mars, including dune formation and dust avalanches on the slip-face of dune surfaces. These Aeolian features involve a complex interaction of the prevailing winds and deposition or erosion of the sediment layer; these features make a good test bed for the verification of global circulation models of the Martian atmosphere.

  18. Dynamics of Sheared Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondic, Lou; Utter, Brian; Behringer, Robert P.

    2002-01-01

    This work focuses on the properties of sheared granular materials near the jamming transition. The project currently involves two aspects. The first of these is an experiment that is a prototype for a planned ISS (International Space Station) flight. The second is discrete element simulations (DES) that can give insight into the behavior one might expect in a reduced-g environment. The experimental arrangement consists of an annular channel that contains the granular material. One surface, say the upper surface, rotates so as to shear the material contained in the annulus. The lower surface controls the mean density/mean stress on the sample through an actuator or other control system. A novel feature under development is the ability to 'thermalize' the layer, i.e. create a larger amount of random motion in the material, by using the actuating system to provide vibrations as well control the mean volume of the annulus. The stress states of the system are determined by transducers on the non-rotating wall. These measure both shear and normal components of the stress on different size scales. Here, the idea is to characterize the system as the density varies through values spanning dense almost solid to relatively mobile granular states. This transition regime encompasses the regime usually thought of as the glass transition, and/or the jamming transition. Motivation for this experiment springs from ideas of a granular glass transition, a related jamming transition, and from recent experiments. In particular, we note recent experiments carried out by our group to characterize this type of transition and also to demonstrate/ characterize fluctuations in slowly sheared systems. These experiments give key insights into what one might expect in near-zero g. In particular, they show that the compressibility of granular systems diverges at a transition or critical point. It is this divergence, coupled to gravity, that makes it extremely difficult if not impossible to

  19. TORAC. Tornado-Induced Flow Material Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Andrae, R.W.; Gregory, W.S.; Martin, R.A.; Tang, P.K.

    1992-01-13

    TORAC models tornado-induced flows, pressures, and material transport within structures. Its use is directed toward nuclear fuel cycle facilities and their primary release pathway, the ventilation system. However, it is applicable to other structures and can model other airflow pathways within a facility. In a nuclear facility, this network system could include process cells, canyons, laboratory offices, corridors, and offgas systems. TORAC predicts flow through a network system that also includes ventilation system components such as filters, dampers, ducts, and blowers. These ventilation system components are connected to the rooms and corridors of the facility to form a complete network for moving air through the structure and, perhaps, maintaining pressure levels in certain areas. The material transport capability in TORAC is very basic and includes convection, depletion, entrainment, and filtration of material.

  20. Fluid dynamics: Water flows out of touch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hof, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces reduce the frictional drag between water and solid materials, but this effect is often temporary. The realization of sustained drag reduction has applications for water vehicles and pipeline flows.

  1. Information flow dynamics in the brain.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I; Afraimovich, Valentin S; Bick, Christian; Varona, Pablo

    2012-03-01

    Timing and dynamics of information in the brain is a hot field in modern neuroscience. The analysis of the temporal evolution of brain information is crucially important for the understanding of higher cognitive mechanisms in normal and pathological states. From the perspective of information dynamics, in this review we discuss working memory capacity, language dynamics, goal-dependent behavior programming and other functions of brain activity. In contrast with the classical description of information theory, which is mostly algebraic, brain flow information dynamics deals with problems such as the stability/instability of information flows, their quality, the timing of sequential processing, the top-down cognitive control of perceptual information, and information creation. In this framework, different types of information flow instabilities correspond to different cognitive disorders. On the other hand, the robustness of cognitive activity is related to the control of the information flow stability. We discuss these problems using both experimental and theoretical approaches, and we argue that brain activity is better understood considering information flows in the phase space of the corresponding dynamical model. In particular, we show how theory helps to understand intriguing experimental results in this matter, and how recent knowledge inspires new theoretical formalisms that can be tested with modern experimental techniques.

  2. Information flow dynamics in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I.; Afraimovich, Valentin S.; Bick, Christian; Varona, Pablo

    2012-03-01

    Timing and dynamics of information in the brain is a hot field in modern neuroscience. The analysis of the temporal evolution of brain information is crucially important for the understanding of higher cognitive mechanisms in normal and pathological states. From the perspective of information dynamics, in this review we discuss working memory capacity, language dynamics, goal-dependent behavior programming and other functions of brain activity. In contrast with the classical description of information theory, which is mostly algebraic, brain flow information dynamics deals with problems such as the stability/instability of information flows, their quality, the timing of sequential processing, the top-down cognitive control of perceptual information, and information creation. In this framework, different types of information flow instabilities correspond to different cognitive disorders. On the other hand, the robustness of cognitive activity is related to the control of the information flow stability. We discuss these problems using both experimental and theoretical approaches, and we argue that brain activity is better understood considering information flows in the phase space of the corresponding dynamical model. In particular, we show how theory helps to understand intriguing experimental results in this matter, and how recent knowledge inspires new theoretical formalisms that can be tested with modern experimental techniques.

  3. Material Flow During Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, M.; McClure, J. C.; Murr, L. E.; Nunes, A. C.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flow of metal during Friction Stir Welding is clarified using a faying surface tracer and a nib frozen in place during welding. It is shown that material is transported in two distinct streams or currents. One stream is a wiping of material from the advancing front side of the nib onto a plug of material that rotates and advances with the nib. The material undergoes a helical motion within the plug that both rotates and advances with the plug and descends in the wash of the threads on the nib and rises on the outer part of the plug. After one or more rotations, this material is sloughed off the plug in the wake of the tool primarily on the advancing side. The second stream of material is an entrainment of material from the retreating side of the nib that fills in between the sloughed off pieces from the advancing side. These two processes produce material with different mechanical properties and the strength of a weld should depend on the relative importance of the processes.

  4. Gold recycling; a materials flow study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amey, Earle B.

    2000-01-01

    This materials flow study includes a description of trends in consumption, loss, and recycling of gold-containing materials in the United States in 1998 in order to illustrate the extent to which gold is presently being recycled and to identify recycling trends. The quantity of gold recycled, as a percent of the apparent supply of gold, was estimated to be about 30 percent. Of the approximately 446 metric tons of gold refined in the United States in 1998, the fabricating and industrial use losses were 3 percent.

  5. Energy and material flows of megacities

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Christopher A.; Stewart, Iain; Facchini, Angelo; Cersosimo, Igor; Mele, Renata; Chen, Bin; Uda, Mariko; Kansal, Arun; Chiu, Anthony; Kim, Kwi-gon; Dubeux, Carolina; Lebre La Rovere, Emilio; Cunha, Bruno; Pincetl, Stephanie; Keirstead, James; Barles, Sabine; Pusaka, Semerdanta; Gunawan, Juniati; Adegbile, Michael; Nazariha, Mehrdad; Hoque, Shamsul; Marcotullio, Peter J.; González Otharán, Florencia; Genena, Tarek; Ibrahim, Nadine; Farooqui, Rizwan; Cervantes, Gemma; Sahin, Ahmet Duran

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the drivers of energy and material flows of cities is important for addressing global environmental challenges. Accessing, sharing, and managing energy and material resources is particularly critical for megacities, which face enormous social stresses because of their sheer size and complexity. Here we quantify the energy and material flows through the world’s 27 megacities with populations greater than 10 million people as of 2010. Collectively the resource flows through megacities are largely consistent with scaling laws established in the emerging science of cities. Correlations are established for electricity consumption, heating and industrial fuel use, ground transportation energy use, water consumption, waste generation, and steel production in terms of heating-degree-days, urban form, economic activity, and population growth. The results help identify megacities exhibiting high and low levels of consumption and those making efficient use of resources. The correlation between per capita electricity use and urbanized area per capita is shown to be a consequence of gross building floor area per capita, which is found to increase for lower-density cities. Many of the megacities are growing rapidly in population but are growing even faster in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) and energy use. In the decade from 2001–2011, electricity use and ground transportation fuel use in megacities grew at approximately half the rate of GDP growth. PMID:25918371

  6. Energy and material flows of megacities.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Christopher A; Stewart, Iain; Facchini, Angelo; Cersosimo, Igor; Mele, Renata; Chen, Bin; Uda, Mariko; Kansal, Arun; Chiu, Anthony; Kim, Kwi-Gon; Dubeux, Carolina; Lebre La Rovere, Emilio; Cunha, Bruno; Pincetl, Stephanie; Keirstead, James; Barles, Sabine; Pusaka, Semerdanta; Gunawan, Juniati; Adegbile, Michael; Nazariha, Mehrdad; Hoque, Shamsul; Marcotullio, Peter J; González Otharán, Florencia; Genena, Tarek; Ibrahim, Nadine; Farooqui, Rizwan; Cervantes, Gemma; Sahin, Ahmet Duran

    2015-05-12

    Understanding the drivers of energy and material flows of cities is important for addressing global environmental challenges. Accessing, sharing, and managing energy and material resources is particularly critical for megacities, which face enormous social stresses because of their sheer size and complexity. Here we quantify the energy and material flows through the world's 27 megacities with populations greater than 10 million people as of 2010. Collectively the resource flows through megacities are largely consistent with scaling laws established in the emerging science of cities. Correlations are established for electricity consumption, heating and industrial fuel use, ground transportation energy use, water consumption, waste generation, and steel production in terms of heating-degree-days, urban form, economic activity, and population growth. The results help identify megacities exhibiting high and low levels of consumption and those making efficient use of resources. The correlation between per capita electricity use and urbanized area per capita is shown to be a consequence of gross building floor area per capita, which is found to increase for lower-density cities. Many of the megacities are growing rapidly in population but are growing even faster in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) and energy use. In the decade from 2001-2011, electricity use and ground transportation fuel use in megacities grew at approximately half the rate of GDP growth.

  7. Superelevation and overspill control secondary flow dynamics in submarine channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorrell, R. M.; Darby, S. E.; Peakall, J.; Sumner, E. J.; Parsons, D. R.; Wynn, R. B.

    2013-08-01

    In subaerial and submarine meander bends, fluid flow travels downstream in a helical spiral, the structure of which is determined by centrifugal, hydrostatic, baroclinic, and Coriolis forces that together balance frictional stresses generated by the flow. The sense of rotation of this helical flow, and in particular, whether the near bed flow is directed toward the inner bank, e.g., "river-normal," or outer bank, e.g., "river-reversed," is crucial to the morphodynamic evolution of the channel. However, in recent years, there has been a debate over the river-normal or river-reversed nature of submarine flows. Herein, we develop a novel three-dimensional closure of secondary flow dynamics, incorporating downstream convective material transport, to cast new light on this debate. Specifically, we show that the presence of net radial material transport, arising from flow superelevation and overspill, exerts a key control on the near bed orientation of secondary flow in submarine meanders. Our analysis implies that river-reversed flows are likely to be much more prevalent throughout submarine-canyon fan systems than prior studies have indicated.

  8. DYNAMERS: dynamic polymers as self-healing materials.

    PubMed

    Roy, Nabarun; Bruchmann, Bernd; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-07

    Importing self-repair or self-healing features into inert materials is of great relevance to material scientists, since it is expected to eliminate the necessity of replenishing a damaged material. Be it material chemistry or more specifically polymer chemistry, such materials have attracted the imagination of both material scientists and chemists. A stroll down the memory lane 70 years back, this might have sounded utopian. However with the current progress in supramolecular chemistry and the emergence of dynamic covalent and non-covalent chemistries, novel perspectives have been opened up to materials science towards the development of dynamic materials (DYNAMATS) and in particular dynamic polymers (DYNAMERS), with the ability to produce such species by custom made designs. Chemistry took giant strides to gain control over the structure and features of materials and, besides basic progress, to apply it for tailor-making matter for applications in our daily life. In that applied perspective, materials science plays a paramount role in shaping our present and in contributing to a sustainable future. The goal is to develop materials, which would be dynamic enough to carry out certain functions as effectively as in biological systems with, however, the freedom to recruit the powers of chemistry on a wider scale, without the limitation imposed by life. Material scientists and in particular polymer chemists may build on chemistry, physics and biology for bridging the gap to develop dynamic materials presenting a wide range of novel functionalities and to convert dreams into reality. In this current review we will focus on developments in the area of dynamic polymers, as a class of dynamic materials presenting self-healing features and, more generally, the ability to undergo adaptation under the effect of physical and/or chemical agents, and thus function as adaptive polymers or ADAPTAMERS.

  9. Dynamic Fracture in Brittle Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    of hyperelastic material bodies are: the loss of strong ellipticity for hyperelastic materials characterized by the classical Fung strain energy...everyday life. Understanding the fracture behavior of such materials is of paramount importance. Many fiber reinforced composites utilize polymeric binders...and 2 III). The viscoelasticity is intended to model a polymeric binder matrix while the anisotropy models fiber orientation. 2 Accomplishments

  10. Vesicle dynamics in shear and capillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2005-11-01

    The deformation of vesicles in flow is studied by a mesoscopic simulation technique, which combines multi-particle collision dynamics for the solvent with a dynamically triangulated surface model for the membrane. Shape transitions are investigated both in simple shear flows and in cylindrical capillary flows. We focus on reduced volumes, where the discocyte shape of fluid vesicles is stable, and the prolate shape is metastable. In simple shear flow at low membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from discocyte to prolate with increasing shear rate, while at high membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from prolate to discocyte, or tumbling motion accompanied by oscillations between these two morphologies. In capillary flow, at small flow velocities the symmetry axis of the discocyte is found not to be oriented perpendicular to the cylinder axis. With increasing flow velocity, a transition to a prolate shape occurs for fluid vesicles, while vesicles with shear-elastic membranes (like red blood cells) transform into a coaxial parachute-like shape.

  11. Patterns and dynamics in transitional shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuckerman, Laurette

    2009-11-01

    One of the greatest mysteries in fluid dynamics is surely transition to turbulence. The classic shear flows -- channel, plane Couette and pipe flow -- while linearly stable, undergo sudden transition to 3D turbulence. In recent years, transition has been attacked with an arsenal of weapons from dynamical systems theory, such as low-dimensional chaos, unstable periodic orbits, heteroclinic connections, fractal basin boundaries. At the same time, 3D physical mechanisms such as streamwise vorticity and streaks have supplanted the 2D picture of linear instability long promoted by Squire's theorem. A striking recent discovery by experimentalists at CEA-Saclay is that large-aspect-ratio plane Couette flow near transition actually takes the form of a steady pattern of wide turbulent and laminar bands, with a fixed angle and wavelength. We have been able to reproduce these remarkable flows in numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. Simulations display a rich variety of variants of these patterns, including spatio-temporal intermittency, branching and travelling states, and localized states analogous to spots. Because similar patterns have since also been observed in Taylor-Couette, channel and pipe flow, it appears that they are inevitable intermediate states on the route from turbulent to laminar flow in large aspect-ratio shear flows. In addition to their intrinsic interest, these patterns provide clues to the transition to turbulence.

  12. Dynamics of fluid mixing in separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leder, A.

    1991-05-01

    Separated flows at high Re (>103) are highly turbulent. In some situations the turbulence generation and mixing processes associated with flow separation are desirable, e.g., in heat exchangers or in many chemical engineering applications. In others, e.g., stalled airfoils, separation must be avoided as it causes loss in pressure and kinetic energy. To control the phenomenon effectively, physical mechanisms of flow separation and related aspects, such as the growth of flow instabilities in shear layers, the process of vortex formation, and the dynamics of fluid mixing in recirculating flow regions, must be understood. In many cases numerical procedures, e.g., Navier-Stokes calculations including k-ɛ turbulence modeling, fail to predict real physical mechanisms in separated flows.1,2 Separated flows in the lee of bluff bodies have been studied for many years.3,4 However, accurate measurements of the magnitude and direction of velocities and the magnitude of the terms of the Reynolds stress tensor have been restricted by the unsuitability of the hot-wire anemometer in recirculating flows. The development of the pulsed-wire anemometer, flying hot-wire anemometer, and laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) allows more reliable measurements also in turbulent separated flows.5-8 The aim of this paper is to investigate the dynamics of undisturbed fluid mixing in separated regions of 2-D, incompressible flows with visualization techniques and LDA. Measurements were performed with a vertical flat plate model, mounted in a closed-circuit wind tunnel at low blockage ratio. Because of the noninvasive character, optical techniques like LDA are more suitable to analyze complex fluid motions than pulsed-wire and flying-wire anemometry. The LDA system used to investigate turbulent flow structures consists of a two-channel version operating in backscatter mode and a specifically developed phase detector to extract phase-averaged information from recorded measurement ensembles.9 Endplates

  13. Flow dynamics in a trough blowout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.

    1996-02-01

    The dynamics and geomorphological development of a trough blowout located at Fiona Beach in the Myall Lakes National Park in NSW, Australia are examined. Wind velocities and flow structure were measured utilising an array of miniature Rimco cup anemometers, Gill bi-vane and UVW instruments, and wind vanes. Flow measurements indicate that when the wind approaches the trough blowout parallel to the throat orientation, jets occur both in the deflation basin and along the erosional walls, relative flow deceleration and expansion occur up the depositional lobe, jets are formed over the depositional lobe crest accompanied by downwind flow separation on the leeward side of the lobe, and flow separation and the formation of corkscrew vortices occur over the crests of the erosional walls. Maximum erosion and transport occur up the deflation basin and onto the depositional lobe. Trough blowout morphologies are explained as a function of these flow patterns. When the wind approaches the blowout obliquely, the flow is steered considerably within the blowout. The degree and complexity of topographic steering is dependent on the blowout topography. The flow is usually extremely turbulent and large corkscrew vortices are common. The local topography of a blowout can be very important in determining flow patterns, overall sand transport and blowout evolutionary conditions and paths. Estimates of potential sand transport within the blowout may be up to two orders of magnitude lower than actual rates if remote wind data are used.

  14. Dynamic feature analysis in bidirectional pedestrian flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Xia, Yang; Winnie, Daamen; Serge, Paul Hoogendoorn; Hai-Rong, Dong; Xiu-Ming, Yao

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of dynamic features of pedestrian flows is one of the most exciting topics in pedestrian dynamics. This paper focuses on the effect of homogeneity and heterogeneity in three parameters of the social force model, namely desired velocity, reaction time, and body size, on the moving dynamics of bidirectional pedestrian flows in the corridors. The speed and its deviation in free flows are investigated. Simulation results show that the homogeneous higher desired speed which is less than a critical threshold, shorter reaction time or smaller body size results in higher speed of flows. The free dynamics is more sensitive to the heterogeneity in desired speed than that in reaction time or in body size. In particular, an inner lane formation is observed in normal lanes. Furthermore, the breakdown probability and the start time of breakdown are focused on. This study reveals that the sizes of homogeneous desired speed, reaction time or body size play more important roles in affecting the breakdown than the heterogeneities in these three parameters do. Project supported jointly by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61233001) and the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities of China (Grant No. 2013JBZ007).

  15. Martian Mystery: Do Some Materials Flow Uphill?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Some of the geological features of Mars defy conventional, or simple, explanations. A recent example is on the wall of a 72 kilometer-wide (45 mile-wide) impact crater in Promethei Terra. The crater (above left) is located at 39oS, 247oW. Its inner walls appear in low-resolution images to be deeply gullied.

    A high resolution Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows that each gully on the crater's inner wall contains a tongue of material that appears to have flowed (to best see this, click on the icon above right and examine the full image). Ridges and grooves that converge toward the center of each gully and show a pronounced curvature are oriented in a manner that seems to suggest that material has flowed from the top toward the bottom of the picture. This pattern is not unlike pouring pancake batter into a pan... the viscous fluid will form a steep, lobate margin and spread outward across the pan. The ridges and grooves seen in the image are also more reminiscent of the movement of material out and away from a place of confinement, as opposed to the types of features seen when they flow into a more confined area. Mud and lava-flows, and even some glaciers, for the most part behave in this manner. From these observations, and based solely on the appearance, one might conclude that the features formed by moving from the top of the image towards the bottom.

    But this is not the case! The material cannot have flowed from the top towards the bottom of the area seen in the high resolution image (above, right), because the crater floor (which is the lowest area in the image) is at the top of the picture. The location and correct orientation of the high resolution image is shown by a white box in the context frame on the left. Since gravity pulls the material in the gullies downhill not uphill the pattern of ridges and grooves found on these gully-filling materials is puzzling. An explanation may lie in the nature of the material (e.g., how viscous was

  16. From connected pathway flow to ganglion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rücker, M.; Berg, S.; Armstrong, R. T.; Georgiadis, A.; Ott, H.; Schwing, A.; Neiteler, R.; Brussee, N.; Makurat, A.; Leu, L.; Wolf, M.; Khan, F.; Enzmann, F.; Kersten, M.

    2015-05-01

    During imbibition, initially connected oil is displaced until it is trapped as immobile clusters. While initial and final states have been well described before, here we image the dynamic transient process in a sandstone rock using fast synchrotron-based X-ray computed microtomography. Wetting film swelling and subsequent snap off, at unusually high saturation, decreases nonwetting phase connectivity, which leads to nonwetting phase fragmentation into mobile ganglia, i.e., ganglion dynamics regime. We find that in addition to pressure-driven connected pathway flow, mass transfer in the oil phase also occurs by a sequence of correlated breakup and coalescence processes. For example, meniscus oscillations caused by snap-off events trigger coalescence of adjacent clusters. The ganglion dynamics occurs at the length scale of oil clusters and thus represents an intermediate flow regime between pore and Darcy scale that is so far dismissed in most upscaling attempts.

  17. Material Flows in an Active Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decamp, Stephen; Redner, Gabriel; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael; Dogic, Zvonimir

    Active matter systems are composed of energy consuming constituent components which drive far-from-equilibrium dynamics. As such, active materials exhibit energetic states which would be unfavorable in passive, equilibrium materials. We study one such material; an active nematic liquid crystal which exists in a dynamical steady state where +/-1/2 defects are continuously generated and annihilated at a constant rate. The active nematic is composed of micron-sized microtubule filaments which are highly concentrated into a quasi-2D film that resides on an oil-water interface. Kinesin motor proteins drive inter-filament sliding which results in net extensile motion of the microtubule film. Notably, we find a mesophase in which motile +1/2 defects, acquire system-spanning orientational order. Currently, we are tracking material flows generated by the active stresses in the system to measure length scales at which energy is dissipated, and to measure the relation between internally generated flows and bend in the nematic field.

  18. Mixing dynamics of cutting and shuffling for granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Zaman, Zafir; Yu, Mengqi; Park, Paul P.; Ottino, Julio M.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.

    2016-11-01

    Chaotic dynamics has been shown to play a major role in fluid mixing, but the study of its relevance to granular flows has only recently begun. We utilize a simple 3D geometry, a half-filled spherical tumbler rotated alternately by <= π /2 about two perpendicular horizontal axes, to develop a dynamical systems framework for granular mixing and non-mixing. In these systems, mixing can only occur during flow (from stretching due to shear and from collisional diffusion in the flowing layer) or by material separation intrinsic to the rotation protocol resulting from cutting and shuffling. In X-ray subsurface visualization experiments, surprisingly persistent (O(100) iterations) non-mixing elliptical regions and larger non-mixing barriers occur as predicted by both a continuum model and an idealized theoretical model (with an infinitely thin flowing layer) based on the mathematics of piece-wise isometries. In these models, the stretching in the flowing layer vanishes as the flowing layer thickness decreases to reveal the underlying skeleton of the mixing. This dynamical systems perspective provides insight into mixing and non-mixing phenomena unique to granular materials. Funded by NSF Grant CMMI-1435065.

  19. Using magma flow indicators to infer flow dynamics in sills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Lauren; Watkeys, Michael K.

    2017-03-01

    Fabrics from Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) analyses and Shape Preferred Orientation (SPO) of plagioclase are compared with field structures (such as bridge structures, intrusive steps and magma lobes) formed during magma intrusion in Jurassic sills. This is to constrain magma flow directions in the sills of the Karoo Igneous Province along the KwaZulu-Natal North Coast and to show how accurately certain structures predict a magma flow sense, thus improving the understanding of the Karoo sub-volcanic dynamics. The AMS fabrics are derived from magnetite grains and are well constrained, however the SPO results are commonly steeply inclined, poorly constrained and differ to the AMS fabrics. Both techniques resulted in asymmetrical fabrics. Successful relationships were established between the AMS fabric and the long axes of the magma flow indicators, implying adequate magma flow prediction. However, where numerous sill segments merge, either in the form of magma lobes or bridge structures, the coalescence process creates a new fabric between the segments preserving late-stage magma migration between the merged segments, overprinting the initial magma flow direction.

  20. Wind-Flow Dynamics Over a Vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahine, Ali; Dupont, Sylvain; Sinfort, Carole; Brunet, Yves

    2014-06-01

    Wind-flow dynamics has been extensively studied over horizontally uniform canopies, but agricultural plantations structured in rows such as vineyards have received less attention. Here, the wind flow over a vineyard is studied in neutral stratification from both large-eddy simulation (LES) and in situ measurements. The impact of row structure on the wind dynamics is investigated over a range of wind directions from cross-row to down-row, and a typical range of row aspect ratio (row separation/height ratio). It is shown that the mean flow over a vineyard is similar to that observed in uniform canopies, especially for wind directions from cross-row to diagonal. For down-row winds, the mean flow exhibits noticeable spatial variability across each elementary row-gap pattern, as the wind is channeled in the inter-row. This spatial variability increases with the aspect ratio. With down-row winds the turbulent structures are also more intermittent and generate larger turbulent kinetic energy and momentum flux. The displacement height and roughness length of the vineyard vary with the aspect ratio in a way similar to their variation with canopy density in uniform canopies. Both parameters take smaller values in down-row wind flow, for which the canopy appears more open. The analysis of velocity spectra and autocorrelation functions shows that vineyard canopies share similar features to uniform canopies in terms of turbulent coherent structures, with only minor changes with wind direction.

  1. FlowSim/FlowRisk: A code system for studying risk associated with material process flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, A.M.

    1993-10-01

    The need to study and assess life-cycle risks of Pu release by nuclear warheads during peace time lead to the development of a code suite which could model day to day operations involving nuclear weapons and calculate the associated risk involved in these proceedings. The life-cycle study called LIONSHARE is described in Reference 1. The code that models the flow is called FlowSim. The code that evaluates the associated risk is called FlowRisk. We shall concentrate here on the methodology used by FlowSim in modeling material flows. FlowRisk, mainly a postprocessor of FlowSim runs, will be dealt with in less detail.

  2. Noisy Nonlinear Dynamics of Vesicles in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, David; Seifert, Udo

    2013-06-01

    We present a model for the dynamics of fluid vesicles in linear flow which consistently includes thermal fluctuations and nonlinear coupling between different modes. At the transition between tank treading and tumbling, we predict a trembling motion which is at odds with the known deterministic motions and for which thermal noise is strongly amplified. In particular, highly asymmetric shapes are observed even though the deterministic flow only allows for axisymmetric ones. Our results explain quantitatively recent experimental observations [Levant and Steinberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 268103 (2012)PRLTAO0031-9007].

  3. Dynamic Deformation Properties of Energetic Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    the dynamic mechanical properties and detonation of energetic materials. It also included some preliminary data on the effect of particle size on the...study of the dynamic mechanical properties and detonation of energetic materials. It also included some preliminary data on the effect of particle size...qualitative only. 33 5. DEFLAGRATION-TO- DETONATION (DDT) STUDIES As part of an on-going programme to investigate the properties of ultrafine energetic

  4. Potential Flow Analysis of Dynamic Ground Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feifel, W. M.

    1999-01-01

    Interpretation of some flight test data suggests the presence of a 'dynamic ground effect'. The lift of an aircraft approaching the ground depends on the rate of descent and is lower than the aircraft steady state lift at a same height above the ground. Such a lift deficiency under dynamic conditions could have a serious impact on the overall aircraft layout. For example, the increased pitch angle needed to compensate for the temporary loss in lift would reduce the tail strike margin or require an increase in landing gear length. Under HSR2 an effort is under way to clarify the dynamic ground effect issue using a multi-pronged approach. A dynamic ground effect test has been run in the NASA Langley 14x22 ft wind tunnel. Northup-Grumman is conducting time accurate CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) Euler analyses on the National Aerodynamic Simulator facility. Boeing has been using linear potential flow methodology which are thought to provide much needed insight in, physics of this very complex problem. The present report summarizes the results of these potential flow studies.

  5. Continuum modeling of cooperative traffic flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngoduy, D.; Hoogendoorn, S. P.; Liu, R.

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a continuum approach to model the dynamics of cooperative traffic flow. The cooperation is defined in our model in a way that the equipped vehicle can issue and receive a warning massage when there is downstream congestion. Upon receiving the warning massage, the (up-stream) equipped vehicle will adapt the current desired speed to the speed at the congested area in order to avoid sharp deceleration when approaching the congestion. To model the dynamics of such cooperative systems, a multi-class gas-kinetic theory is extended to capture the adaptation of the desired speed of the equipped vehicle to the speed at the downstream congested traffic. Numerical simulations are carried out to show the influence of the penetration rate of the equipped vehicles on traffic flow stability and capacity in a freeway.

  6. Flow dynamics of spheromaks in SSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael; Cothran, Chris; Cohen, David; Horwitz, Jason; Chaplin, Vernon

    2006-10-01

    We report several new experimental results related to flow dynamics from single dipole-trapped spheromaks and spheromak merging studies at SSX. Local spheromak flow is studied with two Mach probes (r1<=ρi, r2>=ρi) calibrated by time-of-flight with a fast set of magnetic probes at the edge of the device. Both Mach probes feature six ion collectors housed in a boron nitride sheath. The larger Mach probe will ultimately be used in the MST reversed field pinch. Line averaged flow is measured by ion Doppler spectroscopy at the midplane. The SSX IDS instrument measures with 1 μs or better time resolution the width and Doppler shift of the CIII impurity (H plasma) 229.7 nm line to determine the temperature and line- averaged flow velocity. We find axial flows up to 100 km/s during formation of the dipole trapped spheromak. Flow returns at the wall to form a large vortex. We also measure Ti>=50 eV and Te>=20 eV during spheromak merging events after all plasma facing surfaces are cleaned with helium glow discharge conditioning. Te is measured with a 4-channel soft x-ray array. These studies are performed in the prolate 0.4 m diameter, L=0.6 m length copper flux conserver in SSX. The spheromaks are also characterized by a suite of magnetic probe arrays for magnetic structure B(r,t), and interferometry for ne.

  7. Dynamics of Polymers in Colloidal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsieh; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2011-03-01

    This research is motivated by recent studies on the von Willebrand factor (vWF), a large multimeric protein that plays an essential role in the initial stages of blood clotting in blood vessels. Recent experiments substantiated the hypothesis that the vWF is activated by shear stress in blood flow that causes its shape to transform from a compact globule to an extended state, and biological function is obtained only in the extended state. Simple simulations (which only consider a single polymer in bulk shear flow) have successfully reproduced the observed dynamics of the vWF. However, a more refined model is still demanding for the better understanding of the behaviors of this biomolecule in the physiological environments. Here we refine the existing model by adding the drifting colloids into the flows to mimic the presence of the blood cells in the bloodstream. Preliminary result shows that colloids greatly influence the dynamics of the polymers. It is observed that the average extensions of polymers along and perpendicular to the shear flow direction are both increased with the presence of the colloids.

  8. Fluid dynamics of rivulet flow between plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenckhan, W.; Ritacco, H.; Saint-Jalmes, A.; Saugey, A.; McGuinness, P.; van der Net, A.; Langevin, D.; Weaire, D.

    2007-10-01

    We present computational and experimental investigations into the fluid dynamics of a narrow stream of surfactant solutions, which descends under gravity between two narrowly spaced, vertical glass plates. Such a "rivulet" is bounded by two liquid/solid and two mobile liquid/gas interfaces, posing fluid dynamic problems of direct relevance to local fluid flow in liquid foams and recently reported meandering phenomena. The rivulet presents a system in which the coupling between the bulk flow and the rheological properties of the gas/liquid interface can be systematically investigated. In particular, it carries the promise of providing an alternative measuring technique for interfacial shear viscosities. We present finite element simulations in conjunction with experiments in order to describe the relationship between the rivulet geometry, the flow field, and the interfacial shear viscosities. We also report on the role of the boundary condition between the liquid-carrying channels (surface Plateau borders) and the thin soap film, which spans the two plates at low flow rates.

  9. Dynamics of individual polymers using microfluidic based microcurvilinear flow.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Kim, Yongtae; Yang, Jui-Ming; Leuba, Sanford H; Leduc, Philip R

    2009-08-21

    Polymer dynamics play an important role in a diversity of fields including materials science, physics, biology and medicine. The spatiotemporal responses of individual molecules such as biopolymers have been critical to the development of new materials, the expanded understanding of cell structures including cytoskeletal dynamics, and DNA replication. The ability to probe single molecule dynamics however is often limited by the availability of small-scale technologies that can manipulate these systems to uncover highly intricate behaviors. Advances in micro- and nano-scale technologies have simultaneously provided us with valuable tools that can interface with these systems including methods such as microfluidics. Here, we report on the creation of micro-curvilinear flow through a small-scale fluidic approach, which we have been used to impose a flow-based high radial acceleration ( approximately 10(3) g) on individual flexible polymers. We were able to employ this microfluidic-based approach to adjust and control flow velocity and acceleration to observe real-time dynamics of fluorescently labeled lambda-phage DNA molecules in our device. This allowed us to impose mechanical stimulation including stretching and bending on single molecules in localized regimes through a simple and straightforward technology-based method. We found that the flexible DNA molecules exhibited multimodal responses including distinct conformations and controllable curvatures; these characteristics were directly related to both the elongation and bending dynamics dictated by their locations within the curvilinear flow. We analyzed the dynamics of these individual molecules to determine their elongation strain rates and curvatures ( approximately 0.09 microm(-1)) at different locations in this system to probe the individual polymer structural response. These results demonstrate our ability to create high radial acceleration flow and observe real-time dynamic responses applied directly to

  10. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process.

  11. Microscale flow dynamics of ribbons and sheets.

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas D; Koens, Lyndon; Lauga, Eric

    2017-01-18

    Numerical study of the hydrodynamics of thin sheets and ribbons presents difficulties associated with resolving multiple length scales. To circumvent these difficulties, asymptotic methods have been developed to describe the dynamics of slender fibres and ribbons. However, such theories entail restrictions on the shapes that can be studied, and often break down in regions where standard boundary element methods are still impractical. In this paper we develop a regularised stokeslet method for ribbons and sheets in order to bridge the gap between asymptotic and boundary element methods. The method is validated against the analytical solution for plate ellipsoids, as well as the dynamics of ribbon helices and an experimental microswimmer. We then demonstrate the versatility of this method by calculating the flow around a double helix, and the swimming dynamics of a microscale "magic carpet".

  12. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilat, Amos; Seidt, Jeremy D.

    2015-09-01

    New techniques for dynamic characterization of materials that have been developed in the last three years (since the last DYMAT conference in 2012), and results from recent dynamic testing of Inconel 718 are presented. The first development is a dynamic punch test in which three dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is used to measure the deformation of the rear surface of a specimen as it being penetrated. The second experimental technique that is under development is a dynamic tension experiment in which full-field strain measurement with DIC and full-field temperature measurement are done simultaneously during the test.

  13. Flow dynamics of a pulsed planar expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biennier, Ludovic; Benidar, Abdessamad; Salama, Farid

    2006-08-01

    Plasma expansion sources are popular in molecular spectroscopy and in astrochemistry because they generate cold radicals and ions in detectable amounts. The dynamics of a planar flow generated by a pulsed discharge slit nozzle (PDN) have been numerically investigated for a variety of carrier gases seeded with various molecular species. The determination of the bulk flow characteristics is key to a comprehensive modeling of the plasma that is produced in PDN sources. It is found that the flow is established and stabilized within 75 and 25 μs when Ar and He are used as carrier gases, respectively. The residence time in the inter-electrode active region is found to be considerably shorter with He than with Ar gas carrier. The detection signal observed upon injection of astrochemical species such as polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in moderate amounts in the carrier gas exhibits a non linear relation with the initial PAH concentration in the reservoir which is governed by the temperature. The local temperature along the flow axis can be predicted from the initial conditions using the isentropic equation. However, the local pressure and density behavior diverge significantly from an isentropic flow. Finally, implications for the characteristics of the plasma expansion are discussed to help design future laboratory simulations.

  14. Dynamic Multiscale Averaging (DMA) of Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson

    2012-09-01

    A new approach called dynamic multiscale averaging (DMA) for computing the effects of turbulent flow is described. The new method encompasses multiple applications of temporal and spatial averaging, that is, multiscale operations. Initially, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed for a relatively short time; it is envisioned that this short time should be long enough to capture several fluctuating time periods of the smallest scales. The flow field variables are subject to running time averaging during the DNS. After the relatively short time, the time-averaged variables are volume averaged onto a coarser grid. Both time and volume averaging of the describing equations generate correlations in the averaged equations. These correlations are computed from the flow field and added as source terms to the computation on the next coarser mesh. They represent coupling between the two adjacent scales. Since they are computed directly from first principles, there is no modeling involved. However, there is approximation involved in the coupling correlations as the flow field has been computed for only a relatively short time. After the time and spatial averaging operations are applied at a given stage, new computations are performed on the next coarser mesh using a larger time step. The process continues until the coarsest scale needed is reached. New correlations are created for each averaging procedure. The number of averaging operations needed is expected to be problem dependent. The new DMA approach is applied to a relatively low Reynolds number flow in a square duct segment. Time-averaged stream-wise velocity and vorticity contours from the DMA approach appear to be very similar to a full DNS for a similar flow reported in the literature. Expected symmetry for the final results is produced for the DMA method. The results obtained indicate that DMA holds significant potential in being able to accurately compute turbulent flow without modeling for practical

  15. Dynamical Model of Flow in Martian Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechowski, Leszek; Witek, Piotr; Misiura, Katarzyna

    On the surface of Mars, under current conditions, liquid water could exist only occasionally in lowest regions of the planet. This water contains probably some components that decrease its freezing point and raised its boiling point. However billions years ago more dense atmosphere on the Mars allows for the presence of large volume of liquid water. There are a number of structures apparently resulting from flowing liquid water in the past. They are of two types: outflow channels and valley networks. We investigate here the possible flow in some chosen valley networks. The numerical model is used. We try to determine the basic properties of the flow, its erosion as well as the transport efficiencies of the material. The comparison with the terrestrial rivers indicates some important differences. Acknowledgments This work was partially supported by the National Science Centre (grant 2011/01/B/ST10/06653).

  16. Flow dynamics around downwelling submarine canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgin, J. M.; Allen, S. E.

    2014-10-01

    Flow dynamics around a downwelling submarine canyon were analysed with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model. Blanes Canyon (northwestern Mediterranean) was used for topographic and initial forcing conditions. Fourteen scenarios were modelled with varying forcing conditions. Rossby and Burger numbers were used to determine the significance of Coriolis acceleration and stratification (respectively) and their impacts on flow dynamics. A new non-dimensional parameter (χ) was introduced to determine the significance of vertical variations in stratification. Some simulations do see brief periods of upwards displacement of water during the 10-day model period; however, the presence of the submarine canyon is found to enhance downwards advection of density in all model scenarios. High Burger numbers lead to negative vorticity and a trapped anticyclonic eddy within the canyon, as well as an increased density anomaly. Low Burger numbers lead to positive vorticity, cyclonic circulation, and weaker density anomalies. Vertical variations in stratification affect zonal jet placement. Under the same forcing conditions, the zonal jet is pushed offshore in more uniformly stratified domains. The offshore jet location generates upwards density advection away from the canyon, while onshore jets generate downwards density advection everywhere within the model domain. Increasing Rossby values across the canyon axis, as well as decreasing Burger values, increase negative vertical flux at shelf break depth (150 m). Increasing Rossby numbers lead to stronger downwards advection of a passive tracer (nitrate), as well as stronger vorticity within the canyon. Results from previous studies are explained within this new dynamic framework.

  17. Flow dynamics around downwelling submarine canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgin, J. M.; Allen, S. E.

    2014-05-01

    Flow dynamics around a downwelling submarine canyon were analysed with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model. Blanes Canyon (Northwest Mediterranean) was used for topographic and initial forcing conditions. Fourteen scenarios were modelled with varying forcing conditions. Rossby number and Burger number were used to determine the significance of Coriolis acceleration and stratification (respectively) and their impacts on flow dynamics. A new non-dimensional parameter (χ) was introduced to determine the significance of vertical variations in stratification. Some simulations do see brief periods of upwards displacement of water during the 10 day model period, however, the presence of the submarine canyon is found to enhance downwards advection of density in all model scenarios. High Burger numbers lead to negative vorticity and a trapped anticyclonic eddy within the canyon, as well as an increased density anomaly. Low Burger numbers lead to positive vorticity, cyclonic circulation and weaker density anomalies. Vertical variations in stratification affect zonal jet placement. Under the same forcing conditions, the zonal jet is pushed offshore in more uniformly stratified domains. Offshore jet location generates upwards density advection away from the canyon, while onshore jets generate downwards density advection everywhere within the model domain. Increasing Rossby values across the canyon axis, as well as decreasing Burger values, increase negative vertical flux at shelf break depth (150 m). Increasing Rossby numbers lead to stronger downwards advection of a passive tracer (nitrate) as well as stronger vorticity within the canyon. Results from previous studies were explained within this new dynamic framework.

  18. Dynamic proliferation assessment in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Diermeier-Daucher, Simone; Brockhoff, Gero

    2010-09-01

    Dynamic proliferation assessment via flow cytometry is legitimately supposed to be the most powerful tool for recording cell cycle kinetics in-vitro. The preeminent feature is a single cell-based multi-informative analysis by temporal high-resolution. Flow cytometric approaches are based on labeling of proliferating cells via thymidine substitution by a base analog (e.g., 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, BrdU) that is added to cell cultures either for a short period of time (pulse labeling) or continuously until cell harvesting. This unit describes the alternative use of the thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) in place of BrdU for three different applications: (1) dynamic proliferation assessment by EdU pulse cell labeling; (2) the same approach as (1) but in combination with live/dead cell discrimination; and (3) dynamic cell cycle analysis based on continuous cell labeling with EdU and Hoechst fluorochrome quenching. In contrast to the detection of BrdU incorporation, EdU-positive cells can be identified by taking advantage of click chemistry, which facilitates a simplified and fast cell preparation. Further analysis options but also limitations of the utilization of EdU are discussed.

  19. Modeling Tools Predict Flow in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    "Because rocket engines operate under extreme temperature and pressure, they present a unique challenge to designers who must test and simulate the technology. To this end, CRAFT Tech Inc., of Pipersville, Pennsylvania, won Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Marshall Space Flight Center to develop software to simulate cryogenic fluid flows and related phenomena. CRAFT Tech enhanced its CRUNCH CFD (computational fluid dynamics) software to simulate phenomena in various liquid propulsion components and systems. Today, both government and industry clients in the aerospace, utilities, and petrochemical industries use the software for analyzing existing systems as well as designing new ones."

  20. A study of temporal estaurine flow dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mairs, R. L.; Clark, D. K.

    1972-01-01

    Multispectral photography,infrared imagery, image enhancement, and oceanographic, radiometric, and meteorological data were used in the study of temporal estuarine flow dynamics, nearshore circulation, and the resulting dispersal of suspended and dissolved substances introduced from the continent. Repetitive multispectral photography, IR imagery, total radiance and irradiance, water surface temperatures, salinity, total suspended solids, visibility, current velocity, winds, dye implants, and high contrast image enhancement were used to observe and describe water mass boundaries in the nearshore zone and to attempt to establish on what repetitive scale these coastal features should be observed to better understand their behavior. Water mass variability patterns, seen naturally and with the use of dyes, along the North Carolina coast and in the Chesapeake Bay are being studied as synoptic data on the basic dynamics of circulation, flushing, and mixing in coastal waters.

  1. Characterization of Concrete Material Flow During Projectile Penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobeski, Robert

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has an operational requirement to predict, quickly and accurately, the depth of penetration that a projectile can achieve for a given target and impact scenario. Fast-running analytical models can provide reliable predictions, but they often require the use of one or more dimensionless parameters that are derived from experimental data. These analytical models are continually evolving, and the dimensionless parameters are often adjusted to obtain new analytical models without a true understanding of the change in characteristics of material flow across targets of varying strength and projectile impact velocities. In this dissertation, the penetration of ogive-nose projectiles into concrete targets is investigated using finite element analyses. The Elastic-Plastic Impact Computation (EPIC) code is used to examine the velocity vector fields and their associated direction cosines for high and low-strength concrete target materials during projectile penetration. Two methodologies, referred as Normal Expansion Comparison Methodology (NECM) and Spherical Expansion Comparison Methodology (SECM), are developed in MATLAB to quantify the change in concrete material flow during this short-duration dynamic event. Improved velocity profiles are proposed for better characterization of cavity expansion stresses based on the application of NECM and SECM to EPIC outputs. Structural engineers and model developers working on improving the accuracy of current analytical concrete penetration models and potentially reducing their reliance on fitting parameters will benefit from the findings of this research.

  2. Dynamic flow reattachment on a rotating blade undergoing dynamic stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghav, Vrishank; Komerath, Narayanan

    2016-11-01

    A 2-bladed rigid rotor undergoing retreating blade dynamic stall in a low-speed wind tunnel was used to study the 3-dimensional flow reattachment at the end of the dynamic stall cycle. Phase-locked stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry was used to capture the velocity field during reattachment. Continuing from prior studies on the inception and progression of 3-D rotating dynamic stall for this test case, phase-resolved, ensemble-averaged results are presented for different values of rotor advance ratio at varying spanwise stations along the blade. The results show the nominal reattachment getting delayed in rotor azimuth with higher advance ratio. At low advance ratio reattachment starts at the leading-edge and progresses towards the trailing-edge with vortex shedding transporting excess vorticity away from the leading-edge. At higher advance ratio, vortex shedding is not observed, instead the vortical structure shrinks in size while the flow close to the trailing-edge appears to reattach. At the higher advance ratio conditions, spanwise vorticity transport appears to be the mechanism to transport excess vorticity away from the leading-edge. The possible causes for a switch in mechanism of vorticity transport are also presented.

  3. Measurements of granular flow dynamics with high speed digital images

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.

    1994-12-31

    The flow of granular materials is common to many industrial processes. This dissertation suggests and validates image processing algorithms applied to high speed digital images to measure the dynamics (velocity, temperature and volume fraction) of dry granular solids flowing down an inclined chute under the action of gravity. Glass and acrylic particles have been used as granular solids in the experiment. One technique utilizes block matching for spatially averaged velocity measurements of the glass particles. This technique is compared with the velocity measurement using an optic probe which is a conventional granular flow velocity measurement device. The other technique for measuring the velocities of individual acrylic particles is developed with correspondence using a Hopfield network. This technique first locates the positions of particles with pattern recognition techniques, followed by a clustering technique, which produces point patterns. Also, several techniques are compared for particle recognition: synthetic discriminant function (SDF), minimum average correlation energy (MACE) filter, modified minimum average correlation energy (MMACE) filter and variance normalized correlation. The author proposes an MMACE filter which improves generalization of the MACE filter by adjusting the amount of averaged spectrum of training images in the spectrum whitening stages of the MACE filter. Variance normalized correlation is applied to measure the velocity and temperature of flowing glass particles down the inclined chute. The measurements are taken for the steady and wavy flow and qualitatively compared with a theoretical model of granular flow.

  4. Blood flow dynamics in heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Naylor, H. L.; Hogeman, C. S.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise intolerance in heart failure (HF) may be due to inadequate vasodilation, augmented vasoconstriction, and/or altered muscle metabolic responses that lead to fatigue. METHODS AND RESULTS: Vascular and metabolic responses to rhythmic forearm exercise were tested in 9 HF patients and 9 control subjects (CTL) during 2 protocols designed to examine the effect of HF on the time course of oxygen delivery versus uptake (protocol 1) and on vasoconstriction during exercise with 50 mm Hg pressure about the forearm to evoke a metaboreflex (protocol 2). In protocol 1, venous lactate and H+ were greater at 4 minutes of exercise in HF versus CTL (P<0.05) despite similar blood flow and oxygen uptake responses. In protocol 2, mean arterial pressure increased similarly in each group during ischemic exercise. In CTL, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were similar at the end of ischemic and ambient exercise. In HF, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were reduced during ischemic exercise compared with the ambient trial. CONCLUSIONS: Intrinsic differences in skeletal muscle metabolism, not vasodilatory dynamics, must account for the augmented glycolytic metabolic responses to moderate-intensity exercise in class II and III HF. The inability to increase forearm vascular conductance during ischemic handgrip exercise, despite a normal pressor response, suggests that enhanced vasoconstriction of strenuously exercising skeletal muscle contributes to exertional fatigue in HF.

  5. Parametric Flow Visualization of Dynamic Roughness Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakkali, Vinay

    The ever growing need in the aircraft industry to enhance the performance of a flight vehicle has led to active areas of research which focus on the control of the local boundary layer by both passive and active methods. An effective flow control mechanism can improve the performance of a flight vehicle in various ways, one of which is eliminating boundary layer separation. To be effective the mechanism not only needs to control the boundary layer as desired, but also use less energy than the resulting energy savings. In this study, the effectiveness of an active flow control technique known as dynamic roughness (DR) has been explored to eliminate the laminar separation bubble near the leading edge and also to eliminate the stall on a NACA 0012 airfoil wing. As opposed to static roughness, dynamic roughness utilizes small time-dependent deforming elements or humps with displacement amplitudes that are on the order of the local boundary layer height to energize the local boundary layer. DR is primarily characterized by the maximum amplitude and operating frequency. A flow visualization study was conducted on a 2D NACA 0012 airfoil model at different angles of attack, and also varying the Reynolds number and DR actuation frequency with fixed maximum DR amplitude. The experimental results from this study suggests that DR is an effective method of reattaching a totally separated boundary layer. In addition, this study discusses some of the fundamental physics behind the working of DR and proposes some non-dimensional terms that may help to explain the driving force behind the mechanism.

  6. Experiments showing dynamics of materials interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, R.F.

    1997-02-01

    The discipline of materials science and engineering often involves understanding and controlling properties of interfaces. The authors address the challenge of educating students about properties of interfaces, particularly dynamic properties and effects of unstable interfaces. A series of simple, inexpensive, hands-on activities about fluid interfaces provides students with a testbed to develop intuition about interface dynamics. The experiments highlight the essential role of initial interfacial perturbations in determining the dynamic response of the interface. The experiments produce dramatic, unexpected effects when initial perturbations are controlled and inhibited. These activities help students to develop insight about unstable interfaces that can be applied to analogous problems in materials science and engineering. The lessons examine ``Rayleigh-Taylor instability,`` an interfacial instability that occurs when a higher-density fluid is above a lower-density fluid.

  7. Fluid flow dynamics under location uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mémin, Etienne

    2014-03-01

    We present a derivation of a stochastic model of Navier Stokes equations that relies on a decomposition of the velocity fields into a differentiable drift component and a time uncorrelated uncertainty random term. This type of decomposition is reminiscent in spirit to the classical Reynolds decomposition. However, the random velocity fluctuations considered here are not differentiable with respect to time, and they must be handled through stochastic calculus. The dynamics associated with the differentiable drift component is derived from a stochastic version of the Reynolds transport theorem. It includes in its general form an uncertainty dependent "subgrid" bulk formula that cannot be immediately related to the usual Boussinesq eddy viscosity assumption constructed from thermal molecular agitation analogy. This formulation, emerging from uncertainties on the fluid parcels location, explains with another viewpoint some subgrid eddy diffusion models currently used in computational fluid dynamics or in geophysical sciences and paves the way for new large-scales flow modelling. We finally describe an applications of our formalism to the derivation of stochastic versions of the Shallow water equations or to the definition of reduced order dynamical systems.

  8. The behavior of a macroscopic granular material in vortex flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Asami

    A granular material is defined as a collection of discrete particles such as powder and grain. Granular materials display a large number of complex behaviors. In this project, the behavior of macroscopic granular materials under tornado-like vortex airflow, with varying airflow velocity, was observed and studied. The experimental system was composed of a 9.20-cm inner diameter acrylic pipe with a metal mesh bottom holding the particles, a PVC duct, and an airflow source controlled by a variable auto-transformer, and a power-meter. A fixed fan blade was attached to the duct's inner wall to create a tornado-like vortex airflow from straight flow. As the airflow velocity was increased gradually, the behavior of a set of same-diameter granular materials was observed. The observed behaviors were classified into six phases based on the macroscopic mechanical dynamics. Through this project, we gained insights on the significant parameters for a computer simulation of a similar system by Heath Rice [5]. Comparing computationally and experimentally observed phase diagrams, we can see similar structure. The experimental observations showed the effect of initial arrangement of particles on the phase transitions.

  9. Flow enhancement in nanotubes of different materials and lengths

    SciTech Connect

    Ritos, Konstantinos; Mattia, Davide; Calabrò, Francesco; Reese, Jason M.

    2014-01-07

    The high water flow rates observed in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have previously been attributed to the unfavorable energetic interaction between the liquid and the graphitic walls of the CNTs. This paper reports molecular dynamics simulations of water flow in carbon, boron nitride, and silicon carbide nanotubes that show the effect of the solid-liquid interactions on the fluid flow. Alongside an analytical model, these results show that the flow enhancement depends on the tube's geometric characteristics and the solid-liquid interactions.

  10. Dynamic Flow Management Problems in Air Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Sarah Stock

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, over six hundred thousand licensed pilots flew nearly thirty-five million flights into over eighteen thousand U.S. airports, logging more than 519 billion passenger miles. Since demand for air travel has increased by more than 50% in the last decade while capacity has stagnated, congestion is a problem of undeniable practical significance. In this thesis, we will develop optimization techniques that reduce the impact of congestion on the national airspace. We start by determining the optimal release times for flights into the airspace and the optimal speed adjustment while airborne taking into account the capacitated airspace. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Problem (TFMP). We address the complexity, showing that it is NP-hard. We build an integer programming formulation that is quite strong as some of the proposed inequalities are facet defining for the convex hull of solutions. For practical problems, the solutions of the LP relaxation of the TFMP are very often integral. In essence, we reduce the problem to efficiently solving large scale linear programming problems. Thus, the computation times are reasonably small for large scale, practical problems involving thousands of flights. Next, we address the problem of determining how to reroute aircraft in the airspace system when faced with dynamically changing weather conditions. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Rerouting Problem (TFMRP) We present an integrated mathematical programming approach for the TFMRP, which utilizes several methodologies, in order to minimize delay costs. In order to address the high dimensionality, we present an aggregate model, in which we formulate the TFMRP as a multicommodity, integer, dynamic network flow problem with certain side constraints. Using Lagrangian relaxation, we generate aggregate flows that are decomposed into a collection of flight paths using a randomized rounding heuristic. This collection of paths is used in a packing integer

  11. Dynamics of a fluid flow on Mars: Lava or mud?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Lionel; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2014-05-01

    A distinctive flow deposit southwest of Cerberus Fossae on Mars is analyzed. The flow source is a ∼20 m deep, ∼12 × 1.5 km wide depression within a yardang associated with the Medusae Fossae Formation. The flow traveled for ∼40 km following topographic lows to leave a deposit on average 3-4 km wide. The surface morphology of the deposit suggests that it was produced by the emplacement of a fluid flowing in a laminar fashion and possessing a finite yield strength. We use topographic data from a digital elevation model (DEM) to model the dynamics of the motion and infer that the fluid had a Bingham rheology with a plastic viscosity of ∼1 Pa s and a yield strength of ∼185 Pa. Although the low viscosity is consistent with the properties of komatiite-like lava, the combination of values of viscosity and yield strength, as well as the surface morphology of the flow, suggests that this was a mud flow. Comparison with published experimental data implies a solids content close to 60% by volume and a grain size dominated by silt-size particles. Comparison of the ∼1.5 km3 deposit volume with the ∼0.03 km3 volume of the source depression implies that ∼98% of the flow material was derived from depth in the crust. There are similarities between the deposit studied here, which we infer to be mud, and other flow deposits on Mars currently widely held to be lavas. This suggests that a re-appraisal of many of these deposits is now in order.

  12. High Speed Dynamics in Brittle Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiermaier, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Brittle Materials under High Speed and Shock loading provide a continuous challenge in experimental physics, analysis and numerical modelling, and consequently for engineering design. The dependence of damage and fracture processes on material-inherent length and time scales, the influence of defects, rate-dependent material properties and inertia effects on different scales make their understanding a true multi-scale problem. In addition, it is not uncommon that materials show a transition from ductile to brittle behavior when the loading rate is increased. A particular case is spallation, a brittle tensile failure induced by the interaction of stress waves leading to a sudden change from compressive to tensile loading states that can be invoked in various materials. This contribution highlights typical phenomena occurring when brittle materials are exposed to high loading rates in applications such as blast and impact on protective structures, or meteorite impact on geological materials. A short review on experimental methods that are used for dynamic characterization of brittle materials will be given. A close interaction of experimental analysis and numerical simulation has turned out to be very helpful in analyzing experimental results. For this purpose, adequate numerical methods are required. Cohesive zone models are one possible method for the analysis of brittle failure as long as some degree of tension is present. Their recent successful application for meso-mechanical simulations of concrete in Hopkinson-type spallation tests provides new insight into the dynamic failure process. Failure under compressive loading is a particular challenge for numerical simulations as it involves crushing of material which in turn influences stress states in other parts of a structure. On a continuum scale, it can be modeled using more or less complex plasticity models combined with failure surfaces, as will be demonstrated for ceramics. Models which take microstructural

  13. Toward sustainable material usage: evaluating the importance of market motivated agency in modeling material flows.

    PubMed

    Gaustad, Gabrielle; Olivetti, Elsa; Kirchain, Randolph

    2011-05-01

    Increasing recycling will be a key strategy for moving toward sustainable materials usage. There are many barriers to increasing recycling, including quality issues in the scrap stream. Repeated recycling can compound this problem through the accumulation of tramp elements over time. This paper explores the importance of capturing recycler decision-making in accurately modeling accumulation and the value of technologies intended to mitigate it. A method was developed combining dynamic material flow analysis with allocation of those materials into production portfolios using blending models. Using this methodology, three scrap allocation methods were explored in the context of a case study of aluminum use: scrap pooling, pseudoclosed loop, and market-based. Results from this case analysis suggest that market-driven decisions and upgrading technologies can partially mitigate the negative impact of accumulation on scrap utilization, thereby increasing scrap use and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. A market-based allocation method for modeling material flows suggests a higher value for upgrading strategies compared to a pseudoclosed loop or pooling allocation method for the scenarios explored.

  14. Erosion and flow of hydrophobic granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utter, Brian; Benns, Thomas; Foltz, Benjamin; Mahler, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    We experimentally investigate submerged granular flows of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains both in a rotating drum geometry and under erosion by a surface water flow. While slurry and suspension flows are common in nature and industry, effects of surface chemistry on flow behavior have received relatively little attention. In the rotating drum, we use varying concentrations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains of sand submerged in water rotated at a constant angular velocity. Sequential images of the resulting avalanches are taken and analyzed. High concentrations of hydrophobic grains result in an effectively cohesive interaction between the grains forming aggregates, with aggregate size and repose angle increasing with hydrophobic concentration. However, the formation and nature of the aggregates depends significantly on the presence of air in the system. We present results from a related experiment on erosion by a surface water flow designed to characterize the effects of heterogeneous granular surfaces on channelization and erosion.

  15. Erosion and flow of hydrophobic granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utter, Brian; Benns, Thomas; Mahler, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally investigate submerged granular flows of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains both in a rotating drum geometry and under erosion by a surface water flow. While slurry and suspension flows are common in nature and industry, effects of surface chemistry on flow behavior have received relatively little attention. In the rotating drum , we use varying concentrations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains of sand submerged in water rotated at a constant angular velocity. Sequential images of the resulting avalanches are taken and analyzed. High concentrations of hydrophobic grains result in an effectively cohesive interaction between the grains forming aggregates, with aggregate size and repose angle increasing with hydrophobic concentration. However, the formation and nature of the aggregates depends significantly on the presence of air in the system. We present results from a related experiment on erosion by a surface water flow designed to characterize the effects of heterogeneous granular surfaces on channelization and erosion. Supported by NSF CBET Award 1067598.

  16. Quantitative flow analysis of swimming dynamics with coherent Lagrangian vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, F.; van Rees, W. M.; Gazzola, M.; Rossinelli, D.; Haller, G.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2015-08-01

    Undulatory swimmers flex their bodies to displace water, and in turn, the flow feeds back into the dynamics of the swimmer. At moderate Reynolds number, the resulting flow structures are characterized by unsteady separation and alternating vortices in the wake. We use the flow field from simulations of a two-dimensional, incompressible viscous flow of an undulatory, self-propelled swimmer and detect the coherent Lagrangian vortices in the wake to dissect the driving momentum transfer mechanisms. The detected material vortex boundary encloses a Lagrangian control volume that serves to track back the vortex fluid and record its circulation and momentum history. We consider two swimming modes: the C-start escape and steady anguilliform swimming. The backward advection of the coherent Lagrangian vortices elucidates the geometry of the vorticity field and allows for monitoring the gain and decay of circulation and momentum transfer in the flow field. For steady swimming, momentum oscillations of the fish can largely be attributed to the momentum exchange with the vortex fluid. For the C-start, an additionally defined jet fluid region turns out to balance the high momentum change of the fish during the rapid start.

  17. Quantitative flow analysis of swimming dynamics with coherent Lagrangian vortices.

    PubMed

    Huhn, F; van Rees, W M; Gazzola, M; Rossinelli, D; Haller, G; Koumoutsakos, P

    2015-08-01

    Undulatory swimmers flex their bodies to displace water, and in turn, the flow feeds back into the dynamics of the swimmer. At moderate Reynolds number, the resulting flow structures are characterized by unsteady separation and alternating vortices in the wake. We use the flow field from simulations of a two-dimensional, incompressible viscous flow of an undulatory, self-propelled swimmer and detect the coherent Lagrangian vortices in the wake to dissect the driving momentum transfer mechanisms. The detected material vortex boundary encloses a Lagrangian control volume that serves to track back the vortex fluid and record its circulation and momentum history. We consider two swimming modes: the C-start escape and steady anguilliform swimming. The backward advection of the coherent Lagrangian vortices elucidates the geometry of the vorticity field and allows for monitoring the gain and decay of circulation and momentum transfer in the flow field. For steady swimming, momentum oscillations of the fish can largely be attributed to the momentum exchange with the vortex fluid. For the C-start, an additionally defined jet fluid region turns out to balance the high momentum change of the fish during the rapid start.

  18. Influence of surface clinker on the crustal structures and dynamics of 'a'ā lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegarth, L. J.; James, M. R.; van Wyk de Vries, B.; Pinkerton, H.

    2010-07-01

    Surface structures on 'a'ā and blocky lavas reflect the internal flow dynamics during emplacement and also influence the dynamics of developing flows. To investigate the effects of brittle, clinkery 'a'ā flow crusts on flow dynamics and surface structures, we conducted sand and silicone laboratory experiments that simulated the advance of lava into a preexisting channelized flow with a surface crust. Experiments carried out with relatively thin crusts produced apparently ductile surface deformation structures, while thick crusts behaved dominantly in a brittle manner. Increased crustal thickness led to increased strength under compression but favored more disruption under tension, as the flow core welled up through tensile fractures, entraining crustal material. At lava flow fronts, upwelling and entrainment would increase heat losses by radiation and advection, respectively, resulting in a positive-feedback cooling loop. Fracturing caused heterogeneous crustal distribution near the flow front, which resulted in lobate flow advance, despite the absence of the viscoelastic layer that has previously been inferred as the primary control on flow advance and lobe formation. We therefore conclude that the influence of a purely brittle crust on the dynamics and surface morphologies of lava flows is more significant than often thought. All of the surface structures produced in the experiments have been observed on lavas or glaciers and many also on landslides and debris flows, suggesting the results can assist in the understanding of a range of natural flows.

  19. Dynamic failure in two-phase materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, S. J.; Walker, E. K.; Cerreta, E. K.; Trujillo, C. P.; Martinez, D. T.; Gray, G. T.

    2015-12-21

    Previous experimental research has shown that microstructural features such as interfaces, inclusions, vacancies, and heterogeneities can all act as voidnucleation sites. However, it is not well understood how important these interfaces are to damage evolution and failure as a function of the surrounding parentmaterials. In this work, we present results on three different polycrystallinematerials: (1) Cu, (2) Cu-24 wt. %Ag, and (3) Cu-15 wt. %Nb which were studied to probe the influence of bi-metal interfaces onvoidnucleation and growth. These materials were chosen due to the range of difference in structure and bulk properties between the two phases. The initial results suggest that when there are significant differences between the bulk properties (for example: stacking fault energy, melting temperature, etc.) the type of interface between the two parent materials does not principally control the damage nucleation and growth process. Rather, it is the “weaker” material that dictates the dynamic spall strength of the overall two-phase material.

  20. Turbulence dynamics in unsteady atmospheric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momen, Mostafa; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2016-11-01

    Unsteady pressure-gradient forcing in geophysical flows challenges the quasi-steady state assumption, and can strongly impact the mean wind and higher-order turbulence statistics. Under such conditions, it is essential to understand when turbulence is in quasi-equilibrium, and what are the implications of unsteadiness on flow characteristics. The present study focuses on the unsteady atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) where pressure gradient, Coriolis, buoyancy, and friction forces interact. We perform a suite of LES with variable pressure-gradient. The results indicate that the dynamics are mainly controlled by the relative magnitudes of three time scales: Tinertial, Tturbulence, and Tforcing. It is shown that when Tf Tt , the turbulence is no longer in a quasi-equilibrium state due to highly complex mean-turbulence interactions; consequently, the log-law and turbulence closures are no longer valid in these conditions. However, for longer and, surprisingly, for shorter forcing times, quasi-equilibrium is maintained. Varying the pressure gradient in the presence of surface buoyancy fluxes primarily influences the buoyant destruction in the stable ABLs, while under unstable conditions it mainly influences the transport terms. NSF-PDM under AGS-10266362. Cooperative Institute for Climate Science, NOAA-Princeton University under NA08OAR4320752. Simulations performed at NCAR, and Della server at Princeton University.

  1. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor.

  2. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3 mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67 kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3 mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7 mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor.

  3. Optical dynamic deformation measurements at translucent materials.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Katrin; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Kuschmierz, Robert; Leithold, Christoph; Fischer, Andreas; Czarske, Jürgen

    2015-02-15

    Due to their high stiffness-to-weight ratio, glass fiber-reinforced polymers are an attractive material for rotors, e.g., in the aerospace industry. A fundamental understanding of the material behavior requires non-contact, in-situ dynamic deformation measurements. The high surface speeds and particularly the translucence of the material limit the usability of conventional optical measurement techniques. We demonstrate that the laser Doppler distance sensor provides a powerful and reliable tool for monitoring radial expansion at fast rotating translucent materials. We find that backscattering in material volume does not lead to secondary signals as surface scattering results in degradation of the measurement volume inside the translucent medium. This ensures that the acquired signal contains information of the rotor surface only, as long as the sample surface is rough enough. Dynamic deformation measurements of fast-rotating fiber-reinforced polymer composite rotors with surface speeds of more than 300 m/s underline the potential of the laser Doppler sensor.

  4. Dynamic Magnetic Field Applications for Materials Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Grugel, Richard N.; Motakef, S.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic fields, variable in time and space, can be used to control convection in electrically conducting melts. Flow induced by these fields has been found to be beneficial for crystal growth applications. It allows increased crystal growth rates, and improves homogeneity and quality. Particularly beneficial is the natural convection damping capability of alternating magnetic fields. One well-known example is the rotating magnetic field (RMF) configuration. RMF induces liquid motion consisting of a swirling basic flow and a meridional secondary flow. In addition to crystal growth applications, RMF can also be used for mixing non-homogeneous melts in continuous metal castings. These applied aspects have stimulated increasing research on RMF-induced fluid dynamics. A novel type of magnetic field configuration consisting of an axisymmetric magnetostatic wave, designated the traveling magnetic field (TMF), has been recently proposed. It induces a basic flow in the form of a single vortex. TMF may find use in crystal growth techniques such as the vertical Bridgman (VB), float zone (FZ), and the traveling heater method. In this review, both methods, RMF and TMF are presented. Our recent theoretical and experimental results include such topics as localized TMF, natural convection dumping using TMF in a vertical Bridgman configuration, the traveling heater method, and the Lorentz force induced by TMF as a function of frequency. Experimentally, alloy mixing results, with and without applied TMF, will be presented. Finally, advantages of the traveling magnetic field, in comparison to the more mature rotating magnetic field method, will be discussed.

  5. Nonlinear Dynamics of Structures with Material Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, P.; Wagg, D. J.; Pinna, C.; Whear, R.; Briody, C.

    2016-09-01

    Structures usually experience deterioration during their working life. Oxidation, corrosion, UV exposure, and thermo-mechanical fatigue are some of the most well-known mechanisms that cause degradation. The phenomenon gradually changes structural properties and dynamic behaviour over their lifetime, and can be more problematic and challenging in the presence of nonlinearity. In this paper, we study how the dynamic behaviour of a nonlinear system changes as the thermal environment causes certain parameters to vary. To this end, a nonlinear lumped mass modal model is considered and defined under harmonic external force. Temperature dependent material functions, formulated from empirical test data, are added into the model. Using these functions, bifurcation parameters are defined and the corresponding nonlinear responses are observed by numerical continuation. A comparison between the results gives a preliminary insight into how temperature induced properties affects the dynamic response and highlights changes in stability conditions of the structure.

  6. Entrainment of granular substrate by pyroclastic flows: an experimental study and its implications for flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, O.; Niño, Y.; Mangeney, A.; Brand, B. D.; Valentine, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    Pyroclastic flows deposits may contain lithics entrained from an unconsolidated granular substrate on which the flows emplaced. In order to address this issue, analog experiments on dense gas-particle flows propagating on a horizontal granular layer were carried out to elucidate the entrainment mechanisms and to infer the dynamics of pyroclastic flows. The experimental flows were generated from the release of gas-fluidized columns of fine (80 μm) particles in a horizontal channel whose base was made of an unconsolidated granular layer. The flows consisted of a fluidized air-particles mixture, and the small hydraulic permeability of the material allowed for long-lived high interstitial pore fluid pressure during emplacement. Basal pore pressure measurements in preliminary experiments involving a rigid substrate revealed that the sliding head of the flows generated a dynamic underpressure (relative to atmosphere) proportional to the square of the front velocity. As such underpressure at the flow base was likely to promote an upward pressure gradient that could cause uplift of particles of a granular substrate, we did a theoretical analysis in order to determine the critical underpressure and the corresponding flow velocity (Uc) at which uplift could occur. This analysis showed that Uc~(dρpg/Cρ)1/2 for spherical particles, where d and ρp are the particle diameter and density, respectively, C is an empirical constant, and is ρ is the bulk flow density. It was validated with experiments on flows propagating on 3 cm-thick substrates of steel beads of diameter d=1.6 mm. The beads were first dragged horizontally individually due to basal shear, and onset of uplift did occur at Uc~0.9 m/s. The beads uplifted were incorporated within the flow base, to a height that increased up to 6-8 mm at flow velocities up to 2.5-3 m/s, and were entrained over distances of several tens of cm representing a significant part of the flow runout. The flow deposits hence had a well

  7. IR DIAGNOSTICS FOR DYNAMIC FAILURE OF MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    McElfresh, M; DeTeresa, S

    2006-02-13

    This project explores the thermodynamics of dynamic deformation and failure of materials using high-speed spatially-resolved infrared (IR) measurements of temperature. During deformation mechanical work is converted to different forms of energy depending on the deformation processes. For example, it can be dissipated as heat in purely plastic deformation, stored as strain energy in dislocations in metals and in oriented polymeric molecular structures, and expended during the generation of new surfaces during damage and fracture. The problem of how this work is converted into these various forms is not well understood. In fact, there exists a controversy for the relatively simple case regarding the amount of work dissipated as heat during uniform plastic deformation. The goals of this work are to develop dynamic IR temperature measurement techniques and then apply them to gain a better understanding of the dynamic failure processes in both metals and polymeric composite materials. The experimental results will be compared against predictions of existing constitutive models and guide the development of higher fidelity models if needed.

  8. Global nuclear material flow/control model

    SciTech Connect

    Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.S.; Fasel, P.K.; Riese, J.M.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The nuclear danger can be reduced by a system for global management, protection, control, and accounting as part of an international regime for nuclear materials. The development of an international fissile material management and control regime requires conceptual research supported by an analytical and modeling tool which treats the nuclear fuel cycle as a complete system. The prototype model developed visually represents the fundamental data, information, and capabilities related to the nuclear fuel cycle in a framework supportive of national or an international perspective. This includes an assessment of the global distribution of military and civilian fissile material inventories, a representation of the proliferation pertinent physical processes, facility specific geographic identification, and the capability to estimate resource requirements for the management and control of nuclear material. The model establishes the foundation for evaluating the global production, disposition, and safeguards and security requirements for fissile nuclear material and supports the development of other pertinent algorithmic capabilities necessary to undertake further global nuclear material related studies.

  9. Optical techniques for determining dynamic material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Stahl, D.B.

    1996-12-31

    Miniature plates are laser-launched with a 10-Joule Nd:YAG for one-dimensional (1-D) impacts on to target materials much like gas gun experiments and explosive plane wave plate launch. By making the experiments small, flyer plates (3 mm diameter x 50 micron thick) and targets (10 mm diameter x 200 micron thick), 1-D impact experiments can be performed in a standard laser-optical laboratory with minimum confinement and collateral damage. The laser-launched plates do not require the traditional sabot on gas guns nor the explosives needed for explosive planewave lenses, and as a result are much more amenable to a wide variety of materials and applications. Because of the small size very high pressure gradients can be generated with relative ease. The high pressure gradients result in very high strains and strain rates that are not easily generated by other experimental methods. The small size and short shock duration (1 - 20 ns) are ideal for dynamically measuring bond strengths of micron-thick coatings. Experimental techniques, equipment, and dynamic material results are reported.

  10. Theoretical and computational dynamics of a compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shih-I; Luo, Shijun

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to the theoretical and computational fluid dynamics of a compressible fluid is presented. The general topics addressed include: thermodynamics and physical properties of compressible fluids; 1D flow of an inviscid compressible fluid; shock waves; fundamental equations of the dynamics of a compressible inviscid non-heat-conducting and radiating fluid, method of small perturbations, linearized theory; 2D subsonic steady potential flow; hodograph and rheograph methods, exact solutions of 2D insentropic steady flow equations, 2D steady transonic and hypersonic flows, method of characteristics, linearized theory of 3D potential flow, nonlinear theory of 3D compressibe flow, anisentropic (rotational) flow of inviscid compressible fluid, electromagnetogasdynamics, multiphase flows, flows of a compressible fluid with transport phenomena.

  11. Flow Dynamics and HSPC Homing in Bone Marrow Microvessels.

    PubMed

    Bixel, M Gabriele; Kusumbe, Anjali P; Ramasamy, Saravana K; Sivaraj, Kishor K; Butz, Stefan; Vestweber, Dietmar; Adams, Ralf H

    2017-02-14

    Measurements of flow velocities at the level of individual arterial vessels and sinusoidal capillaries are crucial for understanding the dynamics of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell homing in the bone marrow vasculature. We have developed two complementary intravital two-photon imaging approaches to determine blood flow dynamics and velocities in multiple vessel segments by capturing the motion of red blood cells. High-resolution spatiotemporal measurements through a cranial window to determine short-time dynamics of flowing blood cells and repetitive centerline scans were used to obtain a detailed flow-profile map with hemodynamic parameters. In addition, we observed the homing of individual hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and obtained detailed information on their homing behavior. With our imaging setup, we determined flow patterns at cellular resolution, blood flow velocities and wall shear stress in small arterial vessels and highly branched sinusoidal capillaries, and the cellular dynamics of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell homing.

  12. Wigner flow reveals topological order in quantum phase space dynamics.

    PubMed

    Steuernagel, Ole; Kakofengitis, Dimitris; Ritter, Georg

    2013-01-18

    The behavior of classical mechanical systems is characterized by their phase portraits, the collections of their trajectories. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle precludes the existence of sharply defined trajectories, which is why traditionally only the time evolution of wave functions is studied in quantum dynamics. These studies are quite insensitive to the underlying structure of quantum phase space dynamics. We identify the flow that is the quantum analog of classical particle flow along phase portrait lines. It reveals hidden features of quantum dynamics and extra complexity. Being constrained by conserved flow winding numbers, it also reveals fundamental topological order in quantum dynamics that has so far gone unnoticed.

  13. Evolution of a natural debris flow: In situ measurements of flow dynamics, video imagery, and terrestrial laser scanning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, S.W.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.; Staley, D.M.; Wasklewicz, T.A.; Tucker, G.E.

    2010-01-01

    Many theoretical and laboratory studies have been undertaken to understand debris-flow processes and their associated hazards. However, complete and quantitative data sets from natural debris flows needed for confirmation of these results are limited. We used a novel combination of in situ measurements of debris-flow dynamics, video imagery, and pre- and postflow 2-cm-resolution digital terrain models to study a natural debris-flow event. Our field data constrain the initial and final reach morphology and key flow dynamics. The observed event consisted of multiple surges, each with clear variation of flow properties along the length of the surge. Steep, highly resistant, surge fronts of coarse-grained material without measurable pore-fluid pressure were pushed along by relatively fine-grained and water-rich tails that had a wide range of pore-fluid pressures (some two times greater than hydrostatic). Surges with larger nonequilibrium pore-fluid pressures had longer travel distances. A wide range of travel distances from different surges of similar size indicates that dynamic flow properties are of equal or greater importance than channel properties in determining where a particular surge will stop. Progressive vertical accretion of multiple surges generated the total thickness of mapped debris-flow deposits; nevertheless, deposits had massive, vertically unstratified sedimentological textures. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  14. Computational Unsteady Flow Dynamics: Oscillating Flow About a Circular Cylinder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    that the calculations can be carried out only for short times (less than two cycles of flow oscillation) with a non-super computer. Murashige , Hinatsu...Flow Round a Circu- lar Cylinder," Computers &Fluids, Vol. 12, No. 4, pp. 255-280. 6. Murashige , S., Hinatsu, M., and Kinoshita, T, 1989, "Direct

  15. Flow of granular materials down an inclined plane

    SciTech Connect

    Gudhe, R.; Rajagopal, K.R.; Massoudi, M.; Chi, R.

    1993-05-01

    The mechanics of flowing granular materials such as coal, sand, fossil-fuel energy recovery, metal ores, etc., and their flow characteristics have received considerable attention in recent years because it has relevance to several technological problems. In a number of instances these materials are also heated prior to processing, or cooled after processing. The governing equations for the flow of granular materials taking into account the heat transfer mechanism are derived using the continuum model proposed by Rajagopal and Massoudi (1990). For a fully developed flow of granular materials down an inclined plane, these equations reduce to a system of coupled ordinary differential equations. The resulting boundary value problem is solved numerically and the results are presented. For a special case, it is possible to obtain an analytic solution; this is given in the Appendix A of this report.

  16. Isotope specific arbitrary material flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P. J.; Post, John C.; Jones, Edwin

    2016-10-25

    A laser-based mono-energetic gamma-ray source is used to provide non-destructive and non-intrusive, quantitative determination of the absolute amount of a specific isotope contained within pipe as part of a moving fluid or quasi-fluid material stream.

  17. Dynamic failure in two-phase materials

    DOE PAGES

    Fensin, S. J.; Walker, E. K.; Cerreta, E. K.; ...

    2015-12-21

    Previous experimental research has shown that microstructural features such as interfaces, inclusions, vacancies, and heterogeneities can all act as voidnucleation sites. However, it is not well understood how important these interfaces are to damage evolution and failure as a function of the surrounding parentmaterials. In this work, we present results on three different polycrystallinematerials: (1) Cu, (2) Cu-24 wt. %Ag, and (3) Cu-15 wt. %Nb which were studied to probe the influence of bi-metal interfaces onvoidnucleation and growth. These materials were chosen due to the range of difference in structure and bulk properties between the two phases. The initial resultsmore » suggest that when there are significant differences between the bulk properties (for example: stacking fault energy, melting temperature, etc.) the type of interface between the two parent materials does not principally control the damage nucleation and growth process. Rather, it is the “weaker” material that dictates the dynamic spall strength of the overall two-phase material.« less

  18. Dynamic Behavior of Engineered Lattice Materials

    PubMed Central

    Hawreliak, J. A.; Lind, J.; Maddox, B.; Barham, M.; Messner, M.; Barton, N.; Jensen, B. J.; Kumar, M.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is enabling the fabrication of materials with engineered lattice structures at the micron scale. These mesoscopic structures fall between the length scale associated with the organization of atoms and the scale at which macroscopic structures are constructed. Dynamic compression experiments were performed to study the emergence of behavior owing to the lattice periodicity in AM materials on length scales that approach a single unit cell. For the lattice structures, both bend and stretch dominated, elastic deflection of the structure was observed ahead of the compaction of the lattice, while no elastic deformation was observed to precede the compaction in a stochastic, random structure. The material showed lattice characteristics in the elastic response of the material, while the compaction was consistent with a model for compression of porous media. The experimental observations made on arrays of 4 × 4 × 6 lattice unit cells show excellent agreement with elastic wave velocity calculations for an infinite periodic lattice, as determined by Bloch wave analysis, and finite element simulations. PMID:27321697

  19. Information systems for material flow management in construction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesároš, P.; Mandičák, T.

    2015-01-01

    The article describes the options for the management of material flows in the construction process. Management and resource planning is one of the key factors influencing the effectiveness of construction project. It is very difficult to set these flows correctly. The current period offers several options and tools to do this. Information systems and their modules can be used just for the management of materials in the construction process.

  20. Transient Heat and Material Flow Modeling of Friction Stir Processing of Magnesium Alloy using Threaded Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Wei; Choo, Hahn; Feng, Zhili

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to investigate the material flow and heat transfer during friction stir processing (FSP) in an AZ31B magnesium alloy. The material was assumed to be a non-Newtonian viscoplastic fluid, and the Zener-Hollomon parameter was used to describe the dependence of material viscosity on temperature and strain rate. The material constants used in the constitutive equation were determined experimentally from compression tests of the AZ31B Mg alloy under a wide range of strain rates and temperatures. A dynamic mesh method, combining both Lagrangian and Eulerian formulations, was used to capture the material flow induced by the movement of the threaded tool pin. Massless inert particles were embedded in the simulation domain to track the detailed history of material flow. The actual FSP was also carried out on a wrought Mg plate where temperature profiles were recorded by embedding thermocouples. The predicted transient temperature history was found to be consistent with that measured during FSP. Finally, the influence of the thread on the simulated results of thermal history and material flow was studied by comparing two models: one with threaded pin and the other with smooth pin surface.

  1. A dynamic plug flow reactor model for a vanadium redox flow battery cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifeng; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria; Bao, Jie

    2016-04-01

    A dynamic plug flow reactor model for a single cell VRB system is developed based on material balance, and the Nernst equation is employed to calculate cell voltage with consideration of activation and concentration overpotentials. Simulation studies were conducted under various conditions to investigate the effects of several key operation variables including electrolyte flow rate, upper SOC limit and input current magnitude on the cell charging performance. The results show that all three variables have a great impact on performance, particularly on the possibility of gassing during charging at high SOCs or inadequate flow rates. Simulations were also carried out to study the effects of electrolyte imbalance during long term charging and discharging cycling. The results show the minimum electrolyte flow rate needed for operation within a particular SOC range in order to avoid gassing side reactions during charging. The model also allows scheduling of partial electrolyte remixing operations to restore capacity and also avoid possible gassing side reactions during charging. Simulation results also suggest the proper placement for cell voltage monitoring and highlight potential problems associated with setting the upper charging cut-off limit based on the inlet SOC calculated from the open-circuit cell voltage measurement.

  2. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in

  3. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, and COMSOL. Using the new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (Geol Soc SP, 2015) as a guide, we model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal and sloping surfaces, topographic obstacles, and digital elevation models of natural topography. We compare model results to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We can apply these models to reconstruct past lava flows in Hawai'i and Saudi Arabia using parameters assembled from morphology, textural analysis, and eruption observations as natural test cases. Our study highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection.

  4. Flux flow and flux dynamics in high-Tc superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, L. H.; Turchinskaya, M.; Swartzendruber, L. J.; Roitburd, A.; Lundy, D.; Ritter, J.; Kaiser, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Because high temperature superconductors, including BYCO and BSSCO, are type 2 superconductors with relatively low H(sub c 1) values and high H(sub c 2) values, they will be in a critical state for many of their applications. In the critical state, with the applied field between H(sub c 1) and H(sub c 2), flux lines have penetrated the material and can form a flux lattice and can be pinned by structural defects, chemical inhomogeneities, and impurities. A detailed knowledge of how flux penetrates the material and its behavior under the influence of applied fields and current flow, and the effect of material processing on these properties, is required in order to apply, and to improve the properties of these superconductors. When the applied field is changed rapidly, the time dependence of flux change can be divided into three regions, an initial region which occurs very rapidly, a second region in which the magnetization has a 1n(t) behavior, and a saturation region at very long times. A critical field is defined for depinning, H(sub c,p) as that field at which the hysteresis loop changes from irreversible to reversible. As a function of temperature, it is found that H(sub c,p) is well described by a power law with an exponent between 1.5 and 2.5. The behavior of H(sub c,p) for various materials and its relationship to flux flow and flux dynamics are discussed.

  5. Characterizing He II flow through porous materials using counterflow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, J. R.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1991-01-01

    An empirical extension of the two-fluid model is used to characterize He II flow through porous materials. It is shown that four empirical parameters are necessary to describe the pressure and temperature differences induced by He II flow through a porous sample. The three parameters required to determine pressure differences are measured in counterflow and found to compare favorably with those for isothermal flow. The fourth parameter, the Gorter-Mellink constant, differs substantially from smooth tube values. It is concluded that parameter values determined from counterflow can be used to predict pressure and temperature differences in a variety of flows to an accuracy of about +/- 20 percent.

  6. Application of porous materials for laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Fairly smooth porous materials were elected for study Doweave; Fibermetal; Dynapore; and perforated titanium sheet. Factors examined include: surface smoothness; suction characteristics; porosity; surface impact resistance; and strain compatibility. A laminar flow control suction glove arrangement was identified with material combinations compatible with thermal expansion and structural strain.

  7. A model of material flow during friction stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Carter Dymek, Stanislaw; Blicharski, Marek

    2008-09-15

    Tin plated 6061-T6 aluminum extrusions were friction stir welded in a 90 deg. butt-weld configuration. A banded microstructure of interleaved layers of particle-rich and particle-poor material comprised the weld nugget. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed the strong presence of tin within the particle-rich bands, but TEM foils taken from the TMAZ, HAZ and base material showed no indication of Sn-containing phases. Since tin is limited to the surface of the pre-weld extrusions, surface material flowed into the nugget region, forming the particle-rich bands. Similarly, the particle-poor bands with no tin originated from within the thickness of the extrusions. A model of material flow during friction stir welding is proposed for which the weld nugget forms as surface material extrudes from the retreating side into a plasticized zone surrounding the FSW pin. The extruded column buckles between the extrusion force driving the material into the zone and the drag force of the in-situ material resisting its entry. A banded microstructure of interleaved surface material and in-situ material, therefore, develops. The model successfully describes several of the experimentally observed weld characteristics, but the model is limited to specific conditions of material flow and assumptions regarding steady-state.

  8. Optical Window Materials For Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Robert H.

    1989-09-01

    Optical window materials were investigated for infrared sensor systems used in observing ground targets from a hypersonic-glide vehicle. The equilibrium temperature of the window in the glide region depends on the emissivity and varied between 1,370 and 2,250 K. The high temperatures showed that a protective cover over the window is required during the entire glide region of the trajectory. Ejection of the window cover at 70-kft altitude in the terminal region was assumed, resulting in maximum window temperatures of 565 K and 592 K for magnesium oxide and diamond windows, respectively, both 0.8-in thick. The window temperatures for germanium and sapphire were also calculated. Thermal shock, thermal expansion, the effects of the window radiation on the infrared detectors and methods to reduce the hot window problem were examined.

  9. Comminution of Ceramic Materials Under High-Shear Dynamic Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homel, Michael; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Herbold, Eric; Hogan, Jamie

    The post-failure ``granular flow'' response of high-strength lightweight ceramics has important implications on the materials' effectiveness for ballistic protection. We study the dynamic compaction and shear flow of ceramic fragments and powders using computational and experimental analysis of a collapsing thick-walled cylinder geometry. Using newly developed tools for mesoscale simulation of brittle materials, we study the effect of fracture, comminution, shear-enhanced dilatation, and frictional contact on the continuum compaction response. Simulations are directly validated through particle Doppler velocimetry measurements at the inner surface of the cylindrical powder bed. We characterize the size distribution and morphologies of the initial and compacted material fragments to both validate the computational model and to elucidate the dominant failure processes. A portion of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-678862.

  10. MPD (magnetoplasmadynamic) thrust chamber flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-09-01

    Performance characteristics of Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arcjets depend on proper matching of electromagnetic and fluid mechanical constraints within the thrust chamber. Experimental measurements of internal flow conditions during MPD arcjet operation are needed to guide development of flow models and to assess the validity of theoretical predictions. Efforts are continuing in a corporative effort to apply an array of diagnostic techniques including time-, space-, and spectrally-resolved photography to examine MPD arcjet internal flows. Experimental elucidation of the internal flow structure is used to develop predictive models for optimal geometries and operating parameters. Probes have been used to map the current and voltage distributions within uniform height and flared annular channels. This work is concerned with the effect of thruster channel variations on the current conduction regions of the MPD internal flow. Other aspects of the internal flow structure that have been modeled involve the transition of the input mass flow from neutral gas to electrically-conducting plasma. Scale sizes for the transition region were estimated in terms of the electrical and thermodynamic properties of the propellant gas (e.g., argon). These estimates indicate that the electrical conductivity of the flow can be established in distances that are small compared to the characteristic dimension for current conduction near the entrance to the arcjet thrust chamber.

  11. Dendritic Growth with Fluid Flow for Pure Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, Jun-Ho; Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional, adaptive, parallel finite element code to examine solidification of pure materials under conditions of forced flow. We have examined the effect of undercooling, surface tension anisotropy and imposed flow velocity on the growth. The flow significantly alters the growth process, producing dendrites that grow faster, and with greater tip curvature, into the flow. The selection constant decreases slightly with flow velocity in our calculations. The results of the calculations agree well with the transport solution of Saville and Beaghton at high undercooling and high anisotropy. At low undercooling, significant deviations are found. We attribute this difference to the influence of other parts of the dendrite, removed from the tip, on the flow field.

  12. Fundamental Study of Material Flow in Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Anthony P.

    1999-01-01

    The presented research project consists of two major parts. First, the material flow in solid-state, friction stir, butt-welds as been investigated using a marker insert technique. Changes in material flow due to welding parameter as well as tool geometry variations have been examined for different materials. The method provides a semi-quantitative, three-dimensional view of the material transport in the welded zone. Second, a FSW process model has been developed. The fully coupled model is based on fluid mechanics; the solid-state material transport during welding is treated as a laminar, viscous flow of a non-Newtonian fluid past a rotating circular cylinder. The heat necessary for the material softening is generated by deformation of the material. As a first step, a two-dimensional model, which contains only the pin of the FSW tool, has been created to test the suitability of the modeling approach and to perform parametric studies of the boundary conditions. The material flow visualization experiments agree very well with the predicted flow field. Accordingly, material within the pin diameter is transported only in the rotation direction around the pin. Due to the simplifying assumptions inherent in the 2-D model, other experimental data such as forces on the pin, torque, and weld energy cannot be directly used for validation. However, the 2-D model predicts the same trends as shown in the experiments. The model also predicts a deviation from the "normal" material flow at certain combinations of welding parameters, suggesting a possible mechanism for the occurrence of some typical FSW defects. The next step has been the development of a three-dimensional process model. The simplified FSW tool has been designed as a flat shoulder rotating on the top of the workpiece and a rotating, cylindrical pin, which extends throughout the total height of the flow domain. The thermal boundary conditions at the tool and at the contact area to the backing plate have been varied

  13. Efficient material flow in mixed model assembly lines.

    PubMed

    Alnahhal, Mohammed; Noche, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    In this study, material flow from decentralized supermarkets to stations in mixed model assembly lines using tow (tugger) trains is investigated. Train routing, scheduling, and loading problems are investigated in parallel to minimize the number of trains, variability in loading and in routes lengths, and line-side inventory holding costs. The general framework for solving these problems in parallel contains analytical equations, Dynamic Programming (DP), and Mixed Integer Programming (MIP). Matlab in conjunction with LP-solve software was used to formulate the problem. An example was presented to explain the idea. Results which were obtained in very short CPU time showed the effect of using time buffer among routes on the feasible space and on the optimal solution. Results also showed the effect of the objective, concerning reducing the variability in loading, on the results of routing, scheduling, and loading. Moreover, results showed the importance of considering the maximum line-side inventory beside the capacity of the train in the same time in finding the optimal solution.

  14. Toward a dynamical understanding of planetary-scale flow regimes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Molteni, F.

    1993-06-01

    A strategy for diagnosing and interpreting flow regimes that is firmly rooted in dynamical theory is presented and applied to the study of observed and modeled planetary-scale regimes of the wintertime circulation in the Northern Hemisphere.

  15. Spin Dynamics in Novel Materials Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Howard

    Spintronics and organic electronics are fields that have made considerable advances in recent years, both in fundamental research and in applications. Organic materials have a number of attractive properties that enable them to complement applications traditionally fulfilled by inorganic materials, while spintronics seeks to take advantage of the spin degree of freedom to produce new applications. My research is aimed at combining these two fields to develop organic materials for spintronics use. My thesis is divided into three primary projects centered around an organic-based semiconducting ferrimagnet, vanadium tetracyanoethylene. First, we investigated the transport characteristics of a hybrid organic-inorganic heterostructure. Semiconductors form the basis of the electronics industry, and there has been considerable effort put forward to develop organic semiconductors for applications like organic light-emitting diodes and organic thin film transistors. Working with hybrid organic-inorganic semiconductor device structures allows us to potentially take advantage of the infrastructure that has already been developed for silicon and other inorganic semiconductors. This could potentially pave the way for a new class of active hybrid devices with multifunctional behavior. Second, we investigated the magnetic resonance characteristics of V[TCNE]x, in multiple measurement schemes and exploring the effect of temperature, frequency, and chemical tuning. Recently, the spintronics community has shifted focus from static electrical spin injection to various dynamic processes, such as spin pumping and thermal effects. Spin pumping in particular is an intriguing way to generate pure spin currents via magnetic resonance that has attracted a high degree of interest, with the FMR linewidth being an important metric for spin injection. Furthermore, we can potentially use these measurements to probe the magnetic properties as we change the physical properties of the materials by

  16. Fluid mechanics of dynamic stall. I - Unsteady flow concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced military aircraft 'supermaneuverability' requirements entail the sustained operation of airfoils at stalled flow conditions. The present work addresses the effects of separated flow on vehicle dynamics; an analytic method is presented which employs static experimental data to predict the separated flow effect on incompressible unsteady aerodynamics. The key parameters in the analytic relationship between steady and nonsteady aerodynamics are the time-lag before a change of flow conditions can affect the separation-induced aerodynamic loads, the accelerated flow effect, and the moving wall effect.

  17. Electromagnetic valve for controlling the flow of molten, magnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Richter, T.

    1998-06-16

    An electromagnetic valve for controlling the flow of molten, magnetic material is provided, which comprises an induction coil for generating a magnetic field in response to an applied alternating electrical current, a housing, and a refractory composite nozzle. The nozzle is comprised of an inner sleeve composed of an erosion resistant refractory material (e.g., a zirconia ceramic) through which molten, magnetic metal flows, a refractory outer shell, and an intermediate compressible refractory material, e.g., unset, high alumina, thermosetting mortar. The compressible refractory material is sandwiched between the inner sleeve and outer shell, and absorbs differential expansion stresses that develop within the nozzle due to extreme thermal gradients. The sandwiched layer of compressible refractory material prevents destructive cracks from developing in the refractory outer shell. 5 figs.

  18. Electromagnetic valve for controlling the flow of molten, magnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Richter, Tomas

    1998-01-01

    An electromagnetic valve for controlling the flow of molten, magnetic material is provided, which comprises an induction coil for generating a magnetic field in response to an applied alternating electrical current, a housing, and a refractory composite nozzle. The nozzle is comprised of an inner sleeve composed of an erosion resistant refractory material (e.g., a zirconia ceramic) through which molten, magnetic metal flows, a refractory outer shell, and an intermediate compressible refractory material, e.g., unset, high alumina, thermosetting mortar. The compressible refractory material is sandwiched between the inner sleeve and outer shell, and absorbs differential expansion stresses that develop within the nozzle due to extreme thermal gradients. The sandwiched layer of compressible refractory material prevents destructive cracks from developing in the refractory outer shell.

  19. Importance of considering intraborehole flow in solute transport modeling under highly dynamic flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tonkin, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-04-01

    Correct interpretation of tracer test data is critical for understanding transport processes in the subsurface. This task can be greatly complicated by the presence of intraborehole flows in a highly dynamic flow environment. At a new tracer test site (Hanford IFRC) a dynamic flow field created by changes in the stage of the adjacent Columbia River, coupled with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, leads to considerable variations in vertical hydraulic gradients. These variations, in turn, create intraborehole flows in fully-screened (6.5 m) observation wells with frequently alternating upward and downward movement. This phenomenon, in conjunction with a highly permeable aquifer formation and small horizontal hydraulic gradients, makes modeling analysis and model calibration a formidable challenge. Groundwater head data alone were insufficient to define the flow model boundary conditions, and the movement of the tracer was highly sensitive to the dynamics of the flow field. This study shows that model calibration can be significantly improved by explicitly considering (a) dynamic flow model boundary conditions and (b) intraborehole flow. The findings from this study underscore the difficulties in interpreting tracer tests and understanding solute transport under highly dynamic flow conditions.

  20. Importance of considering intraborehole flow in solute transport modeling under highly dynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tonkin, Matt; Zachara, John M

    2011-04-01

    Correct interpretation of tracer test data is critical for understanding transport processes in the subsurface. This task can be greatly complicated by the presence of intraborehole flows in a highly dynamic flow environment. At a new tracer test site (Hanford IFRC) a dynamic flow field created by changes in the stage of the adjacent Columbia River, coupled with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, leads to considerable variations in vertical hydraulic gradients. These variations, in turn, create intraborehole flows in fully-screened (6.5m) observation wells with frequently alternating upward and downward movement. This phenomenon, in conjunction with a highly permeable aquifer formation and small horizontal hydraulic gradients, makes modeling analysis and model calibration a formidable challenge. Groundwater head data alone were insufficient to define the flow model boundary conditions, and the movement of the tracer was highly sensitive to the dynamics of the flow field. This study shows that model calibration can be significantly improved by explicitly considering (a) dynamic flow model boundary conditions and (b) intraborehole flow. The findings from this study underscore the difficulties in interpreting tracer tests and understanding solute transport under highly dynamic flow conditions.

  1. Nebkha flow dynamics and shadow dune formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.; Smyth, Thomas A. G.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, wind flow is simulated via CFD over five 'nebkha' dune forms that range in shape from a cone, to a hemisphere (approximately) and to a dome in order to examine the structure of the wake zone formed downwind and the effect on the leeward flow separation zone and shadow dune formation. Dune height was fixed at 0.5 m while the nebkha diameter increased in 0.25 m increments from 0.5 m to 1.5 m and aspect ratio (h/D) from 1.0 to 0.3. The mean flow comprises an upwind region of reduced velocity which expands as nebkha width increases, high velocity marginal wings, and paired counter-rotating reversing vortices leeward of the nebkha. The point at which flow separation occurs moves further downwind as the nebkha diameter increases. The core regions of the reversing vortices are situated further downwind behind the smaller nebkha than in the case of the larger nebkha. These factors in combination allow for higher velocity perturbations (TKE) and narrower wake behind the smaller nebkha, and the suppression of downwind wake development in the case of the increasingly larger nebkha. Shadow dune length increases as nebkha width increases for lower incident velocity flow and is barely affected by nebkha width at higher flows. The extent of the leeward separation or wake zone, and hence shadow dune length, more strongly varies as a function of wind velocity.

  2. Granular Flow and Dynamics of Lunar Simulants in Excavating Implements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of the lunar surface will rely on properly designed excavation equipment for surface preparations and for collection of lunar regolith in In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) processes. Performance efficiency, i.e minimizing loading forces while maximizing material collection, and mass and volume reductions are major design goals. The NASA Glenn Research Center has embarked on an experimental program to determine the flow characteristics and dynamic forces produced by excavation operations using various excavator bucket designs. A new large scale soil bin facility, 2.27 m x 5.94 m x 0.76 m (nominally 8 ft. x 20 ft. x 27 in.) in size, capable of accommodating moderately large test implements was used for the simulations of lunar operations. The soil bin is filled with GRC-3simulant (a mixture of industrial sands and silt with a particle size distribution and the bulk mechanical (shear) strength representative of an average of lunar regolith from different regions) and uses motorized horizontal rails and a vertical actuator to drive the implement through the lunar simulant soil. A six-axis load cell and encoders provide well resolved measurements of the three dimensional forces and torques and motion of the bucket. In addition, simultaneous video allows for the analysis of the flow behavior and structure formation of the regolith during excavation. The data may be useful in anchoring soil mechanic models and to provide engineering data for design consideration.

  3. Elucidating Dynamical Processes Relevant to Flow Encountering Abrupt Topography (FLEAT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Elucidating Dynamical Processes Relevant to Flow ...dynamical explorations using numerical models. To put the in-situ measurements in context, we plan to analyze the output from the submesoscale eddy

  4. An ultrasonic flowmeter for measuring dynamic liquid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpini, T. D.; Monteith, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    A novel oscillating pipe system was developed to provide dynamic calibration wherein small sinusoidal signals with amplitudes of 0.5 to 10% of the steady-state flow were added to the steady-state flow by oscillating the flowmeter relative to the fixed pipes in the flow system. Excellent agreement was obtained between the dynamic velocities derived from an accelerometer mounted on the oscillating pipe system and those sensed by the flowmeter at frequencies of 7, 19, and 30 Hz. Also described were the signal processing techniques used to retrieve the small sinusoidal signals which were obscured by the fluid turbulence.

  5. Flow Visualization of Dynamic Stall on an Oscillating Airfoil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Dynamic Stall; Dynamic lift, ’Unsteady lift; Helicopter retreating blade stall; Oscillating airfoil ; Flow visualization,’Schlieren method ;k ez.S-,’ .0...the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL September 1989 Author...and moment behavior is quite different from the static stall associated with fixed-wing airfoils . Helicopter retreating blade stall is a dynamic

  6. Dynamics and Control of Turbulent Shear Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    Significant Results A. Mathematical theory of channel flows. This is a joint research with Professor J. G. Heywood of the University of British Columbia. We...supported by URI contract). J. G. Heywood , Professor, University of British Columbia, consultant. I I I I I I I I I I I 37 Ii I AIAA-88-0134 l The...VISCOUS FLOW PAST PLANE DOMAINS WITH I NIONCOMPACT BOUNDARIES I gJ. G. Heywood Department of Mathematics 3 University of British Columbia I 3 S. S

  7. Pattern Dynamics in Taylor Vortex Flow with Double Hourglass Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, Richard; Olsen, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    In previous investigations ootnotetextWiener et al., Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997) & Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2340 (1999) we have demonstrated experimentally that Taylor vortex flow in an hourglass geometry undergoes a period-doubling cascade to chaotic pattern dynamics that can be controlled by proportional feedback with small perturbations. The hourglass geometry creates a spatial ramp in the Reynolds number. This results in a region of supercritical vortex flow between regions of subcritical structureless flow that provide the pattern with soft boundaries that allow for persistent dynamics. For a range of reduced Reynolds numbers, the Taylor vortex pattern exhibits persistent dynamics consisting of drifting and stretching vortices punctuated with phase slips. Each phase slip corresponds to the generation of a new vortex pair. We are currently investigating the phase dynamics of Tayor vortex flow with a double hourglass geometry which consists of two regions of supercritical flow in which phase slips occur, separated by a narrow region of subcritical flow. Initial results indicate that at some reduced Reynolds numbers there is synchronization between the vortex dynamics in the two regions, both in the temporal occurrence of the phase slips as well as the drift directions of the vortices.

  8. Sample Preheating Capability for Dynamic Material Studies*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, J.; Dalton, D.; Hickman, R.; Kaufman, M.; Leffler, S.; Jones, M.; Lynch, J.; Bowers, A.

    2013-06-01

    Coordinated analysis, design, software development, hardware fabrication, and testing activities have yielded a new control system and experimental load design for dynamic material studies on specimens heated to temperatures exceeding 650°C prior to high-rate compression on a pulsed-power (e.g., Z machine) or gun platform. A proportional integral derivative controller supplies power for up to 16 resistive cartridge heaters mounted in a load assembly containing one or more test samples. The electrical output from this LabVIEW-based controller to each heater is continuously adjusted using feedback from thermocouples embedded in the load and in each heater. Experiments confirm steady temperature regulation to within +/-2°C of the selected set point, as well as adequate surge protection from built-in electromagnetic pulse isolation circuitry. ANSYS thermomechanical simulations have guided the refinement of load design to minimize sample temperature gradients and thermal distortion. Improved thin-film coatings for the sample/window interface are being developed to ensure the viability of velocity interferometry measurements on preheated samples. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000;

  9. Dynamic-Active Flow Control - Phase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-18

    Section, 4: Plenum Chamber, 5: Rear Observation Window, 6: Return Pipework , 7: Filtration Isolation Valve, 8: AC Motor and Centrifugal Pump, 10: Return... Pipework (pressure side), 11: Filtration Circuit. A large settling chamber existed upstream of the test section. The pump flow was introduced

  10. Lava flow materials in the Tharsis region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, G. G.; Horstman, K. C.; Dial, A. L., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Lava-flow materials in the Tharsis region of Mars were studied from moderate-resolution (100-280 m/pixel) Viking Orbiter imagery. Individual eruptive sequences were recognized primarily by stratigraphic relations, density of superimposed impact craters, flow morphology, flow trend, and variations in surface albedo. Nine detailed maps of lava flows based on delineation of flow scarps were compiled for a total area of 7.25 million sq km. Two thirds of this area was covered by mappable flows representing at least 14 distinct eruptive sequences. Assuming a rate of crater production twice that of the moon, the observed range of superimposed crater densities (90 to 3200 craters at least 1 km in diameter per sq km) indicates an age range of 100 m.y. to several billion years for these flows. The youngest lavas are associated with flood lavas filling the depression surrounding the Olympus Mons shield. Flow thicknesses range from less than 5 meters to 20 meters on steeper shield slopes (0.5 to 4.5 deg) and from 20 to 65 meters on relatively flat (less than 0.5 deg slope) terrain.

  11. Disturbance Dynamics in Transitional and Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Chester E.

    1999-01-01

    In order to expand the predictive capability of single-point turbulence closure models to account for the early-stage transition regime, a methodology for the formulation and calibration of model equations for the ensemble-averaged disturbance kinetic energy and energy dissipation rate is presented. First the decay of laminar disturbances and turbulence in mean shear-free flows is studied. In laminar flows, such disturbances are linear superpositions of modes governed by the Orr-Sommerfeld equation. In turbulent flows, disturbances are described through transport equations for representative mean quantities. The link between a description based on a deterministic evolution equation and a probability based mean transport equation is established. Because an uncertainty in initial conditions exists in the laminar as well as the turbulent regime, a probability distribution must be defined even in the laminar case. Using this probability distribution, it is shown that the exponential decay of the linear modes in the laminar regime can be related to a power law decay of both the (ensemble) mean disturbance kinetic energy and the dissipation rate. The evolution of these mean disturbance quantities is then described by transport equations similar to those for the corresponding turbulent decaying flow. Second, homogeneous shear flow, where disturbances can be described by rapid distortion theory (RDT), is studied. The relationship between RDT and linear stability theory is exploited in order to obtain a closed set of modeled equations. The linear disturbance equations are solved directly so that the numerical simulation yields a database from which the closure coefficients in the ensemble-averaged disturbance equations can be determined.

  12. Inhomogeneous shear flows in soft jammed materials with tunable attractive forces.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Pinaki; Berthier, Ludovic; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2012-02-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the occurrence of inhomogeneous shear flows in soft jammed materials. We use rough walls to impose a simple shear flow and study the athermal motion of jammed assemblies of soft particles in two spatial dimensions, both for purely repulsive interactions and in the presence of an additional short-range attraction of varying strength. In steady state, pronounced flow inhomogeneities emerge for all systems when the shear rate becomes small. Deviations from linear flow are stronger in magnitude and become very long lived when the strength of the attraction increases, but differ from permanent shear bands. Flow inhomogeneities occur in a stress window bounded by the dynamic and static yield stress values. Attractive forces enhance the flow heterogeneities because they accelerate stress relaxation, thus effectively moving the system closer to the yield stress regime where inhomogeneities are most pronounced. The present scenario for understanding the effect of particle adhesion on shear localization, which is based on detailed molecular dynamics simulations with realistic particle interactions, differs qualitatively from previous qualitative explanations and ad hoc theoretical modeling.

  13. Computational Analysis of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of AA5059 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, G.; Pandurangan, B.; Ochterbeck, J. M.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.; Reynolds, A. P.; Sutton, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Workpiece material flow and stirring/mixing during the friction stir welding (FSW) process are investigated computationally. Within the numerical model of the FSW process, the FSW tool is treated as a Lagrangian component while the workpiece material is treated as an Eulerian component. The employed coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian computational analysis of the welding process was of a two-way thermo-mechanical character (i.e., frictional-sliding/plastic-work dissipation is taken to act as a heat source in the thermal-energy balance equation) while temperature is allowed to affect mechanical aspects of the model through temperature-dependent material properties. The workpiece material (AA5059, solid-solution strengthened and strain-hardened aluminum alloy) is represented using a modified version of the classical Johnson-Cook model (within which the strain-hardening term is augmented to take into account for the effect of dynamic recrystallization) while the FSW tool material (AISI H13 tool steel) is modeled as an isotropic linear-elastic material. Within the analysis, the effects of some of the FSW key process parameters are investigated (e.g., weld pitch, tool tilt-angle, and the tool pin-size). The results pertaining to the material flow during FSW are compared with their experimental counterparts. It is found that, for the most part, experimentally observed material-flow characteristics are reproduced within the current FSW-process model.

  14. Discharge effects on gas flow dynamics in a plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Yu Bin; Hasnain Qaisrani, M.; Yue, Yuan Fu; Lu, Xin Pei

    2016-10-01

    Plasma is used as a flow visualization method to display the gas flow of a plasma jet. Using this method, it is found that a discharge in a plasma jet promotes the transition of the gas flow to turbulence. A discharge at intermediate frequency (˜6 kHz in this paper) has a stronger influence on the gas flow than that at lower or higher frequencies. Also, a higher discharge voltage enhances the transition of the gas flow to turbulence. Analysis reveals that pressure modulation induced both by the periodically directed movement of ionized helium and Ohmic heating on the gas flow plays an important role in inducing the transition of the helium flow regime. In addition, since the modulations induced by the high- and low-frequency discharges are determined by the frequency-selective effect, only intermediate-frequency (˜6 kHz) discharges effectively cause the helium flow transition from the laminar to the turbulent flow. Moreover, a discharge with a higher applied voltage makes a stronger impact on the helium flow because it generates stronger modulations. These conclusions are useful in designing cold plasma jets and plasma torches. Moreover, the relationship between the discharge parameters and the gas flow dynamics is a useful reference on active flow control with plasma actuators.

  15. The very local Hubble flow: Computer simulations of dynamical history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Makarov, D. I.

    2004-02-01

    The phenomenon of the very local (≤3 Mpc) Hubble flow is studied on the basis of the data of recent precision observations. A set of computer simulations is performed to trace the trajectories of the flow galaxies back in time to the epoch of the formation of the Local Group. It is found that the ``initial conditions'' of the flow are drastically different from the linear velocity-distance relation. The simulations enable one also to recognize the major trends of the flow evolution and identify the dynamical role of universal antigravity produced by the cosmic vacuum.

  16. On the Thermal Model of Transverse Flow of Unidirectional Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Hsiang

    2002-01-01

    The thermal model for transverse heat flow of having single filament in a unit cell is extended. In this model, we proposed that two circular filaments in a unit cell of square packing array and obtained the transverse thermal conductivity of an unidirectional material.

  17. Active dynamics of tissue shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Marko; Nandi, Amitabha; Merkel, Matthias; Etournay, Raphaël; Eaton, Suzanne; Jülicher, Frank; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2017-03-01

    We present a hydrodynamic theory to describe shear flows in developing epithelial tissues. We introduce hydrodynamic fields corresponding to state properties of constituent cells as well as a contribution to overall tissue shear flow due to rearrangements in cell network topology. We then construct a generic linear constitutive equation for the shear rate due to topological rearrangements and we investigate a novel rheological behaviour resulting from memory effects in the tissue. We identify two distinct active cellular processes: generation of active stress in the tissue, and actively driven topological rearrangements. We find that these two active processes can produce distinct cellular and tissue shape changes, depending on boundary conditions applied on the tissue. Our findings have consequences for the understanding of tissue morphogenesis during development.

  18. Analysis of Material Flow in Screw Extrusion of Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Haugen, Bjoern; Oernskar, Magnus; Welo, Torgeir; Wideroee, Fredrik

    2010-06-15

    Screw extrusion of aluminum is a new process for production of aluminum profiles. The commercial potential could be large. Little experimental and numerical work has been done with respect to this process.The material flow of hot aluminum in a screw extruder has been analyzed using finite element formulations for the non-Newtonian Navier-Stokes equations. Aluminum material properties are modeled using the Zener-Holloman material model. Effects of stick-slip conditions are investigated with respect to pressure build up and mixing quality of the extrusion process.The numerical results are compared with physical experiments using an experimental screw extruder.

  19. Distinguishing features of flow in heterogeneous porous media: 4, Is a more general dynamic description required

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.W.

    1990-11-01

    Groundwater theory that applies to only homogeneous systems is often too restricted to adequately solve actual groundwater pollution problems. For adequate solutions, the more general theory for heterogeneous porous systems is needed. However, the present dynamic and kinematic descriptions in heterogeneous materials have evolved largely from the restricted and less general homogeneous theory. These descriptions are inadequate because they fail to account for all the energy dissipation in the system. The basic distinguishing dynamic feature of heterogeneous flow theory from the less general homogeneous-based theory is the macroscopic rotational flow component. Specifically, existence of rotational flow components and their independence from the translational flow components are the necessary and sufficient conditions that completely differentiate between the complex lamellar heterogeneous flow theory and the simpler lamellar flow of homogeneous theory. This paper proposes a more general dynamic form of the flow equation to include the added rotational dissipation that is missing from the present Darcian description of flow in heterogeneous media. 31 refs.

  20. Zonal flow dynamics in the double tearing mode with antisymmetric shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Aohua; Li, Jiquan; Liu, Jinyuan; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2014-05-15

    The generation dynamics and the structural characteristics of zonal flows are investigated in the double tearing mode (DTM) with antisymmetric shear flows. Two kinds of zonal flow oscillations are revealed based on reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations, which depend on the shear flow amplitudes corresponding to different DTM eigen mode states, elaborated by Mao et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20, 022114 (2013)]. For the weak shear flows below an amplitude threshold, v{sub c}, at which two DTM eigen states with antisymmetric or symmetric magnetic island structure are degenerated, the zonal flows grow oscillatorily in the Rutherford regime during the nonlinear evolution of the DTMs. It is identified that the oscillation mechanism results from the nonlinear interaction between the distorted islands and the zonal flows through the modification of shear flows. However, for the medium shear flows above v{sub c} but below the critical threshold of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, an oscillatory growing zonal flow occurs in the linear phase of the DTM evolution. It is demonstrated that the zonal flow oscillation originates from the three-wave mode coupling or a modulation instability pumped by two DTM eigen modes with the same frequency but opposite propagating direction. With the shear flows increasing, the amplitude of zonal flow oscillation increases first and then decreases, whilst the oscillation frequency as twice of the Doppler frequency shift increases. Furthermore, impacts of the oscillatory zonal flows on the nonlinear evolution of DTM islands and the global reconnection are also discussed briefly.

  1. The Steady Flow Resistance of Perforated Sheet Materials in High Speed Grazing Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Asif A.; Yu, Jia; Kwan, H. W.; Chien, E.; Jones, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of high speed grazing air flow on the acoustic resistance of perforated sheet materials used in the construction of acoustically absorptive liners placed in commercial aircraft engine nacelles. Since DC flow resistance of porous sheet materials is known to be a major component of the acoustic resistance of sound suppression liners, the DC flow resistance of a set of perforated face-sheets and linear 'wiremesh' face-sheets was measured in a flow duct apparatus (up to Mach 0.8). Samples were fabricated to cover typical variations in perforated face-sheet parameters, such as hole diameter, porosity and sheet thickness, as well as those due to different manufacturing processes. The DC flow resistance data from perforated sheets were found to correlate strongly with the grazing flow Mach number and the face-sheet porosity. The data also show correlation against the boundary layer displacement thickness to hole-diameter ratio. The increase in resistance with grazing flow for punched aluminum sheets is in good agreement with published results up to Mach 0.4, but is significantly larger than expected above Mach 0.4. Finally, the tests demonstrated that there is a significant increase in the resistance of linear 'wiremesh' type face-sheet materials.

  2. Code System to Calculate Tornado-Induced Flow Material Transport.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDRAE, R. W.

    1999-11-18

    Version: 00 TORAC models tornado-induced flows, pressures, and material transport within structures. Its use is directed toward nuclear fuel cycle facilities and their primary release pathway, the ventilation system. However, it is applicable to other structures and can model other airflow pathways within a facility. In a nuclear facility, this network system could include process cells, canyons, laboratory offices, corridors, and offgas systems. TORAC predicts flow through a network system that also includes ventilation system components such as filters, dampers, ducts, and blowers. These ventilation system components are connected to the rooms and corridors of the facility to form a complete network for moving air through the structure and, perhaps, maintaining pressure levels in certain areas. The material transport capability in TORAC is very basic and includes convection, depletion, entrainment, and filtration of material.

  3. Angular dynamics of small crystals in viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, J.; Einarsson, J.; Mehlig, B.

    2017-01-01

    The angular dynamics of a very small ellipsoidal particle in a viscous flow decouples from its translational dynamics and the particle angular velocity is given by Jeffery's theory. It is known that cuboid particles share these properties. In the literature a special case is most frequently discussed, namely that of axisymmetric particles with a continuous rotation symmetry. Here we compute the angular dynamics of crystals that possess a discrete rotation symmetry and certain mirror symmetries but do not have a continuous rotation symmetry. We give examples of such particles that nevertheless obey Jeffery's theory. However, there are other examples where the angular dynamics is determined by a more general equation of motion.

  4. Internet traffic load balancing using dynamic hashing with flow volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Ju-Yeon; Kim, Yoohwan; Chao, H. Jonathan; Merat, Francis L.

    2002-07-01

    Sending IP packets over multiple parallel links is in extensive use in today's Internet and its use is growing due to its scalability, reliability and cost-effectiveness. To maximize the efficiency of parallel links, load balancing is necessary among the links, but it may cause the problem of packet reordering. Since packet reordering impairs TCP performance, it is important to reduce the amount of reordering. Hashing offers a simple solution to keep the packet order by sending a flow over a unique link, but static hashing does not guarantee an even distribution of the traffic amount among the links, which could lead to packet loss under heavy load. Dynamic hashing offers some degree of load balancing but suffers from load fluctuations and excessive packet reordering. To overcome these shortcomings, we have enhanced the dynamic hashing algorithm to utilize the flow volume information in order to reassign only the appropriate flows. This new method, called dynamic hashing with flow volume (DHFV), eliminates unnecessary flow reassignments of small flows and achieves load balancing very quickly without load fluctuation by accurately predicting the amount of transferred load between the links. In this paper we provide the general framework of DHFV and address the challenges in implementing DHFV. We then introduce two algorithms of DHFV with different flow selection strategies and show their performances through simulation.

  5. A material with electrically tunable strength and flow stress.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hai-Jun; Weissmüller, Jörg

    2011-06-03

    The selection of a structural material requires a compromise between strength and ductility. The material properties will then be set by the choice of alloy composition and microstructure during synthesis and processing, although the requirements may change during service life. Materials design strategies that allow for a recoverable tuning of the mechanical properties would thus be desirable, either in response to external control signals or in the form of a spontaneous adaptation, for instance in self-healing. We have designed a material that has a hybrid nanostructure consisting of a strong metal backbone that is interpenetrated by an electrolyte as the second component. By polarizing the internal interface via an applied electric potential, we accomplish fast and repeatable tuning of yield strength, flow stress, and ductility. The concept allows the user to select, for instance, a soft and ductile state for processing and a high-strength state for service as a structural material.

  6. Embrittlement and Flow Localization in Reactor Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xianglin Wu; Xiao Pan; James Stubbins

    2006-10-06

    Many reactor components and structural members are made from metal alloys due, in large part, to their strength and ability to resist brittle fracture by plastic deformation. However, brittle fracture can occur when structural material cannot undergo extensive, or even limited, plastic deformation due to irradiation exposure. Certain irradiation conditions lead to the development of a damage microstructure where plastic flow is limited to very small volumes or regions of material, as opposed to the general plastic flow in unexposed materials. This process is referred to as flow localization or plastic instability. The true stress at the onset of necking is a constant regardless of the irradiation level. It is called 'critical stress' and this critical stress has strong temperature dependence. Interrupted tensile testes of 316L SS have been performed to investigate the microstructure evolution and competing mechanism between mechanic twinning and planar slip which are believed to be the controlling mechanism for flow localization. Deformation twinning is the major contribution of strain hardening and good ductility for low temperatures, and the activation of twinning system is determined by the critical twinning stress. Phases transform and texture analyses are also discussed in this study. Finite element analysis is carried out to complement the microstructural analysis and for the prediction of materaials performance with and without stress concentration and irradiation.

  7. Computation of free-molecular flow in nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casella, Andrew M.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2009-11-01

    Generally, the transport of gases and vapors in nuclear materials is adequately described by the diffusion equation with an effective diffusion coefficient. There are instances however, in which the flow pathway can be so restrictive that the diffusion description has limitations. In general, molecular transport is governed by intermolecular forces and collisions (interactions between multiple gas/vapor molecules) and by molecule-surface interactions. However, if nano-scale pathways exist within these materials, as has been suggested, then molecular transport can be characterized as being in the free-molecular flow regime where intermolecular interactions can be ignored and flow is determined entirely by molecule-surface collisions. Our purpose in this investigation is to focus on free-molecular transport in fine capillaries of a range of shapes and to explore the effect of geometry on this transport. We have employed Monte Carlo techniques in our calculations, and for simple geometries we have benchmarked our results against some analytical and previously available results. We have used Mathematica ® which has exceptional built-in symbolic and graphical capabilities, permitting easy handling of complicated geometries and good visualization of the results. Our computations provide insights into the role of geometry in molecular transport in nuclear materials with narrow pathways for flows, and also will be useful in guiding computations that include intermolecular collisions and more realistic gas-surface collision operators.

  8. Reutilisation-extended material flows and circular economy in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Zhang, Tianzhu; Liang, Sai

    2013-06-01

    Circular economy (CE), with its basic principle of Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle, has been determined as the key strategy for the national development plan by the Chinese government. Given the economy-wide material flow analysis (EW-MFA) that leaves the inner flow of resource reutilisation unidentified, the reutilisation-extended EW-MFA is first introduced to evaluate and analyse the material input, solid waste generation, and reutilisation simultaneously. The total amount of comprehensive reutilisation (CR) is divided into three sub-flows, namely, reutilisation, recycle, and reuse. Thus, this model is used to investigate the resource CR in China from 2000 to 2010. China's total amount of CR and its sub-flows, as well as the CR rate, remain to have a general upward trend. By the year 2010, about 60% of the overall solid waste generation had already been reutilised, and more than 20% of the total resource requirement was reutilised resource. Moreover, the growth patterns of the CR sub flows show different characteristics. Interpretations of resource reutilisation-related laws and regulations of CE and the corresponding policy suggestions are proposed based on the results.

  9. Landslide on Valles Marineris: morphology and flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Kurita, K.; Baratoux, D.; Pinet, P.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction: Valles Marineris is known as a place of numerous and well preserved landslides on Mars. In comparison with terrestrial landslides, martian landslides are distinctive in their size and morphology. As a consequence of the topography of the canyon, the averaged drop height of these landslides is about 6.5 km and the averaged volume is about 102~4 km3[1], which is 2~3 orders of magnitude larger than terrestrial ones, at the exception of marine landslides[2]. As for the morphology, clear levees with longitudinal lineations are typical features of martian landslides, whereas surfaces of the terrestrial mass movements are dominated by a rather chaotic topography with, in some cases, the occurrence of transverse ridges. The characteristics of the deposits should reflect the dynamics of the emplacement and the subsurface material properties. In particular, there is a longstanding debate about the relation between the long run-out length and the existence of subsurface volatiles (water ice, clathrates, ground water) [1,3,4,5,6,7]. The motivation of our research is the fact that material properties are expected to be deduced from the morphology of the deposits and the knowledge of the flow dynamics. Then, the characteristics of subsurface materials partially collapsed as mass movements could be documented as a function of time, considering the age of each landslide. In this study, we focus on the longitudinal grooves which are found on the surface of landslide deposits at Valles Marineris (Fig.1). This pattern is a typical feature in the martian landslides[3], and extremely rarely observed in the terrestrial mass movements. The origin is not well clarified, but it seems strong relation with the flow style or physical property of transported materials. With the objective to determine the condition of formation of the lineations, the geometric characteristics (volume, surface, thickness, run-out length) of lineated and non-lineated landslides are compared. Then

  10. Dynamic flow control strategies of vehicle SCR Urea Dosing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei; Zhang, Youtong; Asif, Malik

    2015-03-01

    Selective Catalyst Reduction(SCR) Urea Dosing System(UDS) directly affects the system accuracy and the dynamic response performance of a vehicle. However, the UDS dynamic response is hard to keep up with the changes of the engine's operating conditions. That will lead to low NO X conversion efficiency or NH3 slip. In order to optimize the injection accuracy and the response speed of the UDS in dynamic conditions, an advanced control strategy based on an air-assisted volumetric UDS is presented. It covers the methods of flow compensation and switching working conditions. The strategy is authenticated on an UDS and tested in different dynamic conditions. The result shows that the control strategy discussed results in higher dynamic accuracy and faster dynamic response speed of UDS. The inject deviation range is improved from being between -8% and 10% to -4% and 2% and became more stable than before, and the dynamic response time was shortened from 200 ms to 150 ms. The ETC cycle result shows that after using the new strategy the NH3 emission is reduced by 60%, and the NO X emission remains almost unchanged. The trade-off between NO X conversion efficiency and NH3 slip is mitigated. The studied flow compensation and switching working conditions can improve the dynamic performance of the UDS significantly and make the UDS dynamic response keep up with the changes of the engine's operating conditions quickly.

  11. Multimillion atom molecular dynamics simulations of glasses and ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashishta, Priya; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro

    1999-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are a powerful tool for studying physical and chemical phenomena in materials. In these lectures we shall review the molecular dynamics method and its implementation on parallel computer architectures. Using the molecular dynamics method we will study a number of materials in different ranges of density, temperature, and uniaxial strain. These include structural correlations in silica glass under pressure, crack propagation in silicon nitride films, sintering of silicon nitride nanoclusters, consolidation of nanophase materials, and dynamic fracture. Multimillion atom simulations of oxidation of aluminum nanoclusters and nanoindentation in silicon nitride will also be discussed.

  12. Lattice fluid dynamics from perfect discretizations of continuum flows

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, E.; Wiese, U.

    1998-11-01

    We use renormalization group methods to derive equations of motion for large scale variables in fluid dynamics. The large scale variables are averages of the underlying continuum variables over cubic volumes and naturally exist on a lattice. The resulting lattice dynamics represents a perfect discretization of continuum physics, i.e., grid artifacts are completely eliminated. Perfect equations of motion are derived for static, slow flows of incompressible, viscous fluids. For Hagen-Poiseuille flow in a channel with a square cross section the equations reduce to a perfect discretization of the Poisson equation for the velocity field with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The perfect large scale Poisson equation is used in a numerical simulation and is shown to represent the continuum flow exactly. For nonsquare cross sections one can use a numerical iterative procedure to derive flow equations that are approximately perfect. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Field Flumes to Floodplains: Revealing the Influence of Flow Dynamics in Structuring Aquatic Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Decades of research has demonstrated the role of flood pulses in energy flow and nutrient cycling in large rivers. However, the study of hydroecology in small to medium size channels has often focused on static processes occurring during steady channel baseflow. Yet storm dynamics and their ecological effects are key issues for land managers responding to accelerating land use change in urban and agricultural areas, grazing lands, and in forested watersheds. As a means to understand the role of variable flows, researchers are increasingly moving towards study designs that explicitly address natural or experimentally altered flows in streams, or manipulation of flow in controlled "stair step" of experimental discharges in smaller field flumes. Studies often focus on both dissolved and fine particulate materials, their redistribution by stormflow, and physical effects of bedform migration and expansion and contraction of surface-water storage and hyporheic zones. In this framework investigators are seeking not only to identify the factors causing "hot spots" of biogeochemical transformation in streams, but also the "hot moments" related to flow variation and its interactions with geomorphic, sediment, and solute dynamics. Examples illustrating these advancements come from studies of flash floods from urban areas and their effects of solute and sediment dynamics in a 2nd order stream, nitrogen cycling and floodplain dynamics in a 5th order river, and longer term co-evolution of pulsed flow hydraulics, geomorphic form, and sediment and nutrient retention in two contrasting river and wetland corridors in the southwestern U.S. and southern Florida.

  14. Effects of the Basal Boundary on Debris-flow Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, R. M.; Logan, M.; Lahusen, R. G.; Berti, M.

    2006-12-01

    Data aggregated from 37 large-scale experiments reveal some counterintuitive effects of bed roughness on debris-flow dynamics. In each experiment 10 m3 of water-saturated sand and gravel, mixed with 1 to 12% silt and clay by dry weight, was abruptly released from a gate at the head of a 2-m wide, 1.2-m deep, 82.5-m long rectangular flume inclined 31° throughout most of its length and adjoined to a gently sloping, planar runout surface at its toe. The flume's basal boundary consisted of either a smooth, planar concrete surface or a concrete surface roughened with a grid of conical bumps. Tilt-table tests with dry debris-flow sediment showed that this roughness imparted a basal friction angle of 38°, comparable to the sediment's internal friction angle of 38-42°, whereas the smooth-bed friction angle was 28°. About 20 electronic sensors installed in the flume yielded data on flow speeds and depths as well as basal stresses and pore pressures. Behavior observed in all experiments included development of steep, unsaturated, coarse-grained debris-flow snouts and tapering, liquefied, fine-grained tails. Flows on the rough bed were typically about 50% thicker and 20% slower than flows on the smooth bed, although the rough bed caused snout steepening that enabled flow fronts to move faster than expected, given the increased bed friction. Moreover, flows on rough beds ran out further than flows on smooth beds owing to enhanced grain-size segregation and lateral levee formation. With the rough bed, measured basal stresses and pore pressures differed little from values expected from static gravitational loading of partially liquefied debris. With the smooth bed, however, measured basal stresses and pore pressures were nearly twice as large as expected values. This anomaly resulted from flow disturbance at the upstream lips of steel plates in which sensors were mounted. The lips produced barely visible ripples in otherwise smooth flow surfaces, yet sufficed to generate

  15. Flow in the well: computational fluid dynamics is essential in flow chamber construction.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Markus; Franke, Jörg; Frank, Wolfram; Schroten, Horst

    2007-09-01

    A perfusion system was developed to generate well defined flow conditions within a well of a standard multidish. Human vein endothelial cells were cultured under flow conditions and cell response was analyzed by microscopy. Endothelial cells became elongated and spindle shaped. As demonstrated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD), cells were cultured under well defined but time varying shear stress conditions. A damper system was introduced which reduced pulsatile flow when using volumetric pumps. The flow and the wall shear stress distribution were analyzed by CFD for the steady and unsteady flow field. Usage of the volumetric pump caused variations of the wall shear stresses despite the controlled fluid environment and introduction of a damper system. Therefore the use of CFD analysis and experimental validation is critical in developing flow chambers and studying cell response to shear stress. The system presented gives an effortless flow chamber setup within a 6-well standard multidish.

  16. Nonlinear Dynamic Properties of Layered Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, Igor V.; Topol, Heiko; Weichert, Dieter; Danishevs'kyy, Vladyslav V.

    2010-09-30

    We present an application of the asymptotic homogenization method to study wave propagation in a one-dimensional composite material consisting of a matrix material and coated inclusions. Physical nonlinearity is taken into account by considering the composite's components as a Murnaghan material, structural nonlinearity is caused by the bonding condition between the components.

  17. Eight energy and material flow characteristics of urban ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xuemei

    2016-11-01

    Recent decades have seen an expanding literature exploring urban energy and material flows, loosely branded as urban metabolism analysis. However, this has occurred largely in parallel to the mainstream studies of cities as ecosystems. This paper aims to conceptually bridge these two distinctive fields of research, by (a) identifying the common aspects between them; (b) identifying key characteristics of urban ecosystems that can be derived from energy and material flow analysis, namely energy and material budget and pathways; flow intensity; energy and material efficiency; rate of resource depletion, accumulation and transformation; self-sufficiency or external dependency; intra-system heterogeneity; intersystem and temporal variation; and regulating mechanism and governing capacity. I argue that significant ecological insight can be, or has the potential to be, drawn from the rich and rapidly growing empirical findings of urban metabolism studies to understand the behaviour of cities as human-dominated, complex systems. A closer intellectual linkage and cross pollination between urban metabolism and urban ecosystem studies will advance our scientific understanding and better inform urban policy and management practices.

  18. Vortex dynamics in nonlinear free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Christopher W.; Kalisch, Henrik

    2017-03-01

    The two-dimensional motion of point vortices in an inviscid fluid with a free surface and an impenetrable bed is investigated. The work is based on forming a closed system of equations for surface variables and vortex positions using a variant of the Ablowitz, Fokas, and Musslimani formulation [M. J. Ablowitz, A. S. Fokas, and Z. H. Musslimani, J. Fluid Mech. 562, 313-343 (2006)] of the water-wave free-surface problem. The equations are approximated with a dealiased spectral method making use of a high-order approximation of the Dirichlet-Neumann operator and a high-order time-stepping scheme. Numerical simulations reveal that the combination of vortex motion and solid bottom boundary yields interesting dynamics not seen in the case of vortex motion in an infinitely deep fluid. In particular, strong deformations of the free surface, including non-symmetric surface profiles and regions of large energy concentration, are observed. Our simulations also uncover a rich variety of vortex trajectories including orbiting and nearly parallel patterns of motion. The dynamics of the free surface and of the point vortices are strongly influenced by the initial placement and polarity of the vortices. The method put forward here is flexible enough to handle a large number of vortices and may easily be extended to include the effects of varying bathymetry, stratification, and background shear currents.

  19. Fluid dynamics aspects of miniaturized axial-flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kang, Can; Huang, Qifeng; Li, Yunxiao

    2014-01-01

    Rotary blood pump (RBP) is a kind of crucial ventricular assist device (VAD) and its advantages have been evidenced and acknowledged in recent years. Among the factors that influence the operation performance and the durability of various rotary blood pumps, medium property and the flow features in pump's flow passages are conceivably significant. The major concern in this paper is the fluid dynamics aspects of such a kind of miniaturized pump. More specifically, the structural features of axial-flow blood pump and corresponding flow features are analyzed in detail. The narrow flow passage between blade tips and pump casing and the rotor-stator interaction (RSI) zone may exert a negative effect on the shear stress distribution in the blood flow. Numerical techniques are briefly introduced in view of their contribution to facilitating the optimal design of blood pump and the visualization of shear stress distribution and multiphase flow analysis. Additionally, with the development of flow measurement techniques, the high-resolution, effective and non-intrusive flow measurement techniques catering to the measurement of the flows inside rotary blood pumps are highly anticipated.

  20. Dynamically orthogonal field equations for stochastic flows and particle dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    where uncertainty ‘lives’ as well as a system of Stochastic Di erential Equations that de nes how the uncertainty evolves in the time varying stochastic ... stochastic dynamical component that are both time and space dependent, we derive a system of field equations consisting of a Partial Differential Equation...a system of Stochastic Differential Equations that defines how the stochasticity evolves in the time varying stochastic subspace. These new

  1. Identification of internal flow dynamics in two experimental catchments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, D.P.; Jakeman, A.J.; Kendall, C.; Weizu, G.

    1997-01-01

    Identification of the internal flow dynamics in catchments is difficult because of the lack of information in precipitation -stream discharge time series alone. Two experimental catchments, Hydrohill and Nandadish, near Nanjing in China, have been set up to monitor internal flows reaching the catchment stream at various depths, from the surface runoff to the bedrock. With analysis of the precipitation against these internal discharges, it is possible to quantify the time constants and volumes associated with various flowpaths in both catchments.

  2. Fluid Dynamic Mechanisms and Interactions within Separated Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    for this research has I been Dr. Thomas L. Doligalski, Chief, Fluid Dynamics Branch, Engineering and Environmental Sciences Division. The authors of...KOOIO, with Thomas L. gation of the Effects of a Base Cavity on the Near-Wake Flowfiel od a Body at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds," Department of...F.. Quincey , V. G., and Callinan, J., "Experiments on Flow." ARC R&M No. 3323. March 1962. Two-Dimensional Base Flow at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds

  3. Flapping dynamics of an inverted flag in a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaeha; Park, Sung Goon; Kim, Boyoung; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2015-11-01

    Much research in recent years has focused on the flow dynamics of flexible structures in a uniform flow and particularly on the flow dynamics related to energy harvesting systems. An energy harvesting system comprising piezoelectric patches attached to the surface of a flexible structure can convert the energy stored in solid deformations into an electric current that powers a purely resistive output circuit. Recently, an inverted flag which has the freely moving leading edge and the clamped trailing edge was suggested. The inverted flag improved the amount of strain energy that was converted into the flag deformations from the surrounding fluid. In this study, the flapping dynamics of an inverted flag in a uniform flow were simulated using the immersed boundary method. The flapping dynamics of and vortical structures around the inverted flag were examined in terms of the bending rigidity and the Reynolds number. The strain energy of the inverted flag and the proportion of the strain energy of the inverted flag to the kinetic energy of the flow were considered as an indicator of the energy harvesting system efficiency.

  4. Nonlinear dynamics of tube arrays in cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Cai, Y.; Zhu, S.

    1994-04-01

    Fluidelastic instability of loosely supported tube arrays was studied analytically and experimentally. This is one of the important practical problems of autonomous fluid-structure systems with many interesting motions. Both fluid-damping and fluid-stiffness controlled instabilities were investigated. Depending on the system parameter, the dynamic response of the tubes includes periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic motions. The analytical model is based on the unsteady flow theory, which can predict the nonlinear dynamics of tube arrays in cross flow. For fluid-damping controlled instability, analytical results and experimental data agree reasonably well. This study was applied to heat exchangers.

  5. Angular dynamics of small crystals in viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Johan; Einarsson, Jonas; Mehlig, Bernhard

    2016-11-01

    The angular dynamics of a very small ellipsoidal particle in a viscous flow decouples from its translational dynamics, and the particle angular velocity is given by Jeffery's theory. It is known that cuboid particles share these properties. In the literature a special case is most frequently discussed, that of axisymmetric particles, with a continuous rotational symmetry. Here we compute the angular dynamics of crystals that possess a discrete rotational symmetry and certain mirror symmetries, but that do not have a continuous rotational symmetry. We give examples of such particles that nevertheless obey Jeffery's theory. But there are other examples where the angular dynamics is determined by a more general equation of motion. Vetenskapsrådet [Grant Number 2013-3992], Formas [Grant Number 2014-585], "Bottlenecks for particle growth in turbulent aerosols" from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, Dnr. KAW 2014.0048, MPNS COST Action MP1305 "Flowing matter".

  6. Stochastic dynamics of particles trapped in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machicoane, N.; López-Caballero, M.; Fiabane, L.; Pinton, J.-F.; Bourgoin, M.; Burguete, J.; Volk, R.

    2016-02-01

    The long-time dynamics of large particles trapped in two nonhomogeneous turbulent shear flows is studied experimentally. Both flows present a common feature, a shear region that separates two colliding circulations, but with different spatial symmetries and temporal behaviors. Because large particles are less and less sensitive to flow fluctuations as their size increases, we observe the emergence of a slow dynamics corresponding to back-and-forth motions between two attractors, and a super-slow regime synchronized with flow reversals when they exist. Such dynamics is substantially reproduced by a one-dimensional stochastic model of an overdamped particle trapped in a two-well potential, forced by a colored noise. An extended model is also proposed that reproduces observed dynamics and trapping without potential barrier: the key ingredient is the ratio between the time scales of the noise correlation and the particle dynamics. A total agreement with experiments requires the introduction of spatially nonhomogeneous fluctuations and a suited confinement strength.

  7. Dynamic deformability of sickle red blood cells in microphysiological flow.

    PubMed

    Alapan, Y; Matsuyama, Y; Little, J A; Gurkan, U A

    2016-06-01

    In sickle cell disease (SCD), hemoglobin molecules polymerize intracellularly and lead to a cascade of events resulting in decreased deformability and increased adhesion of red blood cells (RBCs). Decreased deformability and increased adhesion of sickle RBCs lead to blood vessel occlusion (vaso-occlusion) in SCD patients. Here, we present a microfluidic approach integrated with a cell dimensioning algorithm to analyze dynamic deformability of adhered RBC at the single-cell level in controlled microphysiological flow. We measured and compared dynamic deformability and adhesion of healthy hemoglobin A (HbA) and homozygous sickle hemoglobin (HbS) containing RBCs in blood samples obtained from 24 subjects. We introduce a new parameter to assess deformability of RBCs: the dynamic deformability index (DDI), which is defined as the time-dependent change of the cell's aspect ratio in response to fluid flow shear stress. Our results show that DDI of HbS-containing RBCs were significantly lower compared to that of HbA-containing RBCs. Moreover, we observed subpopulations of HbS containing RBCs in terms of their dynamic deformability characteristics: deformable and non-deformable RBCs. Then, we tested blood samples from SCD patients and analyzed RBC adhesion and deformability at physiological and above physiological flow shear stresses. We observed significantly greater number of adhered non-deformable sickle RBCs than deformable sickle RBCs at flow shear stresses well above the physiological range, suggesting an interplay between dynamic deformability and increased adhesion of RBCs in vaso-occlusive events.

  8. Stochastic dynamics of particles trapped in turbulent flows.

    PubMed

    Machicoane, N; López-Caballero, M; Fiabane, L; Pinton, J-F; Bourgoin, M; Burguete, J; Volk, R

    2016-02-01

    The long-time dynamics of large particles trapped in two nonhomogeneous turbulent shear flows is studied experimentally. Both flows present a common feature, a shear region that separates two colliding circulations, but with different spatial symmetries and temporal behaviors. Because large particles are less and less sensitive to flow fluctuations as their size increases, we observe the emergence of a slow dynamics corresponding to back-and-forth motions between two attractors, and a super-slow regime synchronized with flow reversals when they exist. Such dynamics is substantially reproduced by a one-dimensional stochastic model of an overdamped particle trapped in a two-well potential, forced by a colored noise. An extended model is also proposed that reproduces observed dynamics and trapping without potential barrier: the key ingredient is the ratio between the time scales of the noise correlation and the particle dynamics. A total agreement with experiments requires the introduction of spatially nonhomogeneous fluctuations and a suited confinement strength.

  9. Dynamics of blood flow in a microfluidic ladder network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddala, Jeevan; Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; McCarty, Owen

    The dynamics of a complex mixture of cells and proteins, such as blood, in perturbed shear flow remains ill-defined. Microfluidics is a promising technology for improving the understanding of blood flow under complex conditions of shear; as found in stent implants and in tortuous blood vessels. We model the fluid dynamics of blood flow in a microfluidic ladder network with dimensions mimicking venules. Interaction of blood cells was modeled using multiagent framework, where cells of different diameters were treated as spheres. This model served as the basis for predicting transition regions, collision pathways, re-circulation zones and residence times of cells dependent on their diameters and device architecture. Based on these insights from the model, we were able to predict the clot formation configurations at various locations in the device. These predictions were supported by the experiments using whole blood. To facilitate platelet aggregation, the devices were coated with fibrillar collagen and tissue factor. Blood was perfused through the microfluidic device for 9 min at a physiologically relevant venous shear rate of 600 s-1. Using fluorescent microscopy, we observed flow transitions near the channel intersections and at the areas of blood flow obstruction, which promoted larger thrombus formation. This study of integrating model predictions with experimental design, aids in defining the dynamics of blood flow in microvasculature and in development of novel biomedical devices.

  10. Dynamics of generalized Gaussian polymeric structures in random layered flows.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Divya; Kant, Rama

    2015-04-01

    We develop a formalism for the dynamics of a flexible branched polymer with arbitrary topology in the presence of random flows. This is achieved by employing the generalized Gaussian structure (GGS) approach and the Matheron-de Marsily model for the random layered flow. The expression for the average square displacement (ASD) of the center of mass of the GGS is obtained in such flow. The averaging is done over both the thermal noise and the external random flow. Although the formalism is valid for branched polymers with various complex topologies, we mainly focus here on the dynamics of the flexible star and dendrimer. We analyze the effect of the topology (the number and length of branches for stars and the number of generations for dendrimers) on the dynamics under the influence of external flow, which is characterized by their root-mean-square velocity, persistence flow length, and flow exponent α. Our analysis shows two anomalous power-law regimes, viz., subdiffusive (intermediate-time polymer stretching and flow-induced diffusion) and superdiffusive (long-time flow-induced diffusion). The influence of the topology of the GGS is unraveled in the intermediate-time regime, while the long-time regime is only weakly dependent on the topology of the polymer. With the decrease in the value of α, the magnitude of the ASD decreases, while the temporal exponent of the ASD increases in both the time regimes. Also there is an increase in both the magnitude of the ASD and the crossover time (from the subdiffusive to the superdiffusive regime) with an increase in the total mass of the polymeric structure.

  11. Dynamics of generalized Gaussian polymeric structures in random layered flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katyal, Divya; Kant, Rama

    2015-04-01

    We develop a formalism for the dynamics of a flexible branched polymer with arbitrary topology in the presence of random flows. This is achieved by employing the generalized Gaussian structure (GGS) approach and the Matheron-de Marsily model for the random layered flow. The expression for the average square displacement (ASD) of the center of mass of the GGS is obtained in such flow. The averaging is done over both the thermal noise and the external random flow. Although the formalism is valid for branched polymers with various complex topologies, we mainly focus here on the dynamics of the flexible star and dendrimer. We analyze the effect of the topology (the number and length of branches for stars and the number of generations for dendrimers) on the dynamics under the influence of external flow, which is characterized by their root-mean-square velocity, persistence flow length, and flow exponent α . Our analysis shows two anomalous power-law regimes, viz., subdiffusive (intermediate-time polymer stretching and flow-induced diffusion) and superdiffusive (long-time flow-induced diffusion). The influence of the topology of the GGS is unraveled in the intermediate-time regime, while the long-time regime is only weakly dependent on the topology of the polymer. With the decrease in the value of α , the magnitude of the ASD decreases, while the temporal exponent of the ASD increases in both the time regimes. Also there is an increase in both the magnitude of the ASD and the crossover time (from the subdiffusive to the superdiffusive regime) with an increase in the total mass of the polymeric structure.

  12. Mineralogy of Deposit Material from Debris Flows, a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardou, E.; Petrova, S.; Favre-Boivin, F.; Boivin, P.

    2003-04-01

    Extended survey on debris flow deposits show a wide variety of morphology, from well defined boundaries with smooth surface (muddy debris flow) to vague boundaries with rough surface (granular debris flow). To explain these differences we investigated the morphological and mineralogical properties of some fresh debris flow deposits. Due to the wide influence of fine components on rheological properties, particular attention was given to characterization of these components. Debris flow deposits from 4 different watersheds where sampled and analysed. Mechanical analysis was performed using laser grain size analysis. Clay fraction was extracted and analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Critical Coagulation Curves (CCC) of extracted clays where established for a large range of Sodium Adsorption Ratio (SAR) and Total Electrolyte Concentration (TEC) and where compared. The grains size distribution shows significant differences between the different kind of deposit, mainly on the fine fraction (clays and silts). This figures the importance of the fine content of the whole mass on the mechanical behaviour. XRD analysis show sharp differences between the extracted clays. Two of the deposits contain a high proportion of smectites, which are well known to be far much dispersive than the other clays identified (mainly illite, chlorite and vermiculite). CCC determinations are in good agreement with XRD results. The clays with appreciable amount of smectite have much higher CCC values than others. This means that these clays will disperse more easily, and will induce lower shear strength of materials as previously demonstrated in literature. Moreover, it is suspected that a major proportion of the more dispersive clay was leached during deposition. The results of the mineralogical analysis and the deposit shape can be correlated. This could be a valuable tool for risk assessment in watershed prone to debris flows. Therefore, it is suggested that more attention should be given

  13. Material development for laminar flow control wing panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    The absence of suitable porous materials or techniques for the economic perforation of surface materials has previously restricted the design of laminar flow control (LFC) wing panels to a consideration of mechanically slotted LFC surfaces. A description is presented of a program which has been conducted to exploit recent advances in materials and manufacturing technology for the fabrication of reliable porous or perforated LFC surface panels compatible with the requirements of subsonic transport aircraft. Attention is given to LFC design criteria, surface materials, surface concepts, the use of microporous composites, perforated composites, and perforated metal. The described program was successful in that fabrication processes were developed for producing predictable perforated panels both of composite and of metal.

  14. Research on regulating technique of material flow for 2-person and 30-day integrated CELSS test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuangsheng; Dong, Wenping; Ai, Weidang; Feng, Hongqi; Tang, Yongkang; Huang, Zhide; Shen, Yunze; Ren, Jin; Qin, Lifeng; Zeng, Gu; Zhang, Lihong; Zhu, Jingtao; Fei, Jinxue; Xu, Guoxin

    2014-07-01

    A man-plant integration test was processed using the CELSS integration experiment platform in which 4 kinds of plants were grown (Lactuca sativa L var. Dasusheng, L. sativa L var. Youmaicai, Gynura bicolor and Cichorium endivia L) to exchange material with 2 persons in order to research the dynamic changing laws and balanced regulation of air and water between man and plant in an inclosed system. In the test the material flow was measured so that the dynamically changing laws and balanced regulation of air and water between man and plant in the closed system were mostly mastered. The material closure degree of air, water and food reached 100%, 90% and 13.9% respectively with the whole system closure degree up to 95.1%. Meanwhile, it was proved that a 13.5 m2 planting area could meet the demand of one person for O2 in the system, and the energy efficiency ratio of which reached 59.56 g/(kW m2 day). The material flow dynamic balance-regulating technology was initially mastered between man and plant through the test. The interaction was realized among man, plant and environment in the closed system, which is of great significance to the advancement of long-term manned environment control and life support technology for China.

  15. Dynamics of a fluid flow on Mars: lava or mud?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    We have identified an enigmatic flow in S.W. Cerberus Fossae, Mars. The flow originates from an almost circular pit within a remnant of a yardang at 0.58 degrees N, 155.28 degrees E, within the lower unit of the Medusae Fossae Formation. The flow is ~42 km long and 0.5 to 2.0 km wide. The surface textures of the resulting deposit show that the material flowed in such a way that the various deformation patterns on its surface were generally preserved as it moved, only being distorted or disrupted when the flow encountered major topographic obstacles or was forced to make rapid changes of direction. This observation of a stiff, generally undeformed surface layer overlying a relatively mobile base suggests that, while it was moving, the fluid material flowed in a laminar, and possibly non-Newtonian, fashion. The least-complicated non-Newtonian fluids are Bingham plastics. On this basis we use measurements of flow width, length, thickness and substrate slope obtained from images, a DEM constructed from stereo pairs of Context Camera (CTX) images, and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) altimetry points to deduce the rheological properties of the fluid, treating it as both a Newtonian and a Bingham material for comparison. The Newtonian option requires the fluid to have a viscosity close to 100 Pa s and to have flowed everywhere in a turbulent fashion. The Bingham option requires laminar flow, a plastic viscosity close to 1 Pa s, and a yield strength of ~185 Pa. We compare these parameters values with those of various environmental fluids on Earth in an attempt to narrow the range of possible materials forming the martian flow. A mafic to ultramafic lava would fit the Newtonian option but the required turbulence does not seem consistent with the surface textures. The Bingham option satisfies the morphological constraint of laminar motion if the material is a mud flow consisting of ~40% water and ~60% silt-sized silicate solids. Elsewhere on Mars, deposits with similar

  16. Modelling of Time-Variant Flows Using Vortex Dynamics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    Like Euler methods, these methods are based on inviscid flow but they can be used in viscous-inviscid coupling schemes in combination with boundary layer...strategies between viscous solutions and vortex dynamics simu- lation is in progress. 5, R E F E R E N C E S [I) LEONHARD , A. Vortex Method for Flow...Simulation J. of Comp. Phys. 37,289-335 ( 1980 [2] LEONHARD , A. Computing Three-Dimensional Incompressible Flows with Vortex Elements Ann. Rev. Fluid Mech

  17. Redistribution of energy flow in a material due to damping.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Pierce, Donna M; Arnoldus, Henk F

    2011-02-01

    The field lines of energy flow of the radiation emitted by a linear dipole in free space are straight lines, running radially outward from the source. When the dipole is embedded in a medium, the field lines are curves when the imaginary part of the relative permittivity is finite. It is shown that due to the damping in the material all radiation is emitted in directions perpendicular to the dipole axis, whereas for a dipole in free space the radiation is emitted in all directions except along the dipole axis. It is also shown that some field lines in the near field form semiloops. Energy flowing along these semiloops is absorbed by the material and does not contribute to the radiative power in the far field.

  18. Field-Flow Fractionation of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Selegue

    2011-11-17

    During the grant period, we carried out FFF studies of carbonaceous soot, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nano-onions and polyoxometallates. FFF alone does not provide enough information to fully characterize samples, so our suite of characterization techniques grew to include light scattering (especially Photon Correlation Spectroscopy), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and spectroscopic methods. We developed convenient techniques to deposit and examine minute FFF fractions by electron microscopy. In collaboration with Arthur Cammers (University of Kentucky), we used Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (Fl-FFF) to monitor the solution-phase growth of keplerates, a class of polyoxometallate (POM) nanoparticles. We monitored the evolution of Mo-POM nanostructures over the course of weeks by by using flow field-flow fractionation and corroborated the nanoparticle structures by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total molybdenum in the solution and precipitate phases was monitored by using inductively coupled plasma analyses, and total Mo-POM concentration by following the UV-visible spectra of the solution phase. We observe crystallization-driven formation of (Mo132) keplerate and solution phase-driven evolution of structurally related nanoscopic species (3-60 nm). FFF analyses of other classes of materials were less successful. Attempts to analyze platelets of layered materials, including exfoliated graphite (graphene) and TaS2 and MoS2, were disappointing. We were not able to optimize flow conditions for the layered materials. The metal sulfides react with the aqueous carrier liquid and settle out of suspension quickly because of their high density.

  19. Modeling of the Bosphorus exchange flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sözer, Adil; Özsoy, Emin

    2017-01-01

    The fundamental hydrodynamic behavior of the Bosphorus Strait is investigated through a numerical modeling study using alternative configurations of idealized or realistic geometry. Strait geometry and basin stratification conditions allow for hydraulic controls and are ideally suited to support the maximal-exchange regime, which determines the rate of exchange of waters originating from the adjacent Black and Mediterranean Seas for a given net transport. Steady-state hydraulic controls are demonstrated by densimetric Froude number calculations under layered flow approximations when corrections are applied to account for high velocity shears typically observed in the Bosphorus. Analyses of the model results reveal many observed features of the strait, including critical transitions at hydraulic controls and dissipation by turbulence and hydraulic jumps. It is found that the solution depends on initialization, especially with respect to the basin initial conditions. Significant differences between the controlled maximal-exchange and drowned solutions suggest that a detailed modeling implementation involving coupling with adjacent basins needs to take full account of the Bosphorus Strait in terms of the physical processes to be resolved.

  20. Sediment dynamics in an overland flow-prone forest catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Alexander; Elsenbeer, Helmut

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation controls erosion in many respects, and it is assumed that forest cover is an effective control. Currently, most literature on erosion processes in forest ecosystems support this impression and estimates of sediment export from forested catchments serve as benchmarks to evaluate erosion processes under different land uses. Where soil properties favor near-surface flow paths, however, vegetation may not mitigate surface erosion. In the forested portion of the Panama Canal watershed overland flow is widespread and occurs frequently, and indications of active sediment transport are hard to overlook. In this area we selected a 9.7 ha catchment for a high-resolution study of suspended sediment dynamics. We equipped five nested catchments to elucidate sources, drivers, magnitude and timing of suspended sediment export by continuous monitoring of overland flow and stream flow and by simultaneous, event-based sediment sampling. The support program included monitoring throughfall, splash erosion, overland-flow connectivity and a survey of infiltrability, permeability, and aggregate stability. This dataset allowed a comprehensive view on erosion processes. We found that overland flow controls the suspended-sediment dynamics in channels. Particularly, rainfalls of high intensity at the end of the rainy season have a superior impact on the overall sediment export. During these events, overland flow occurs catchment-wide up to the divide and so does erosion. With our contribution we seek to provide evidence that forest cover and large sediment yields are no contradiction in terms even in the absence of mass movements.

  1. Improving flow distribution in influent channels using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Park, No-Suk; Yoon, Sukmin; Jeong, Woochang; Lee, Seungjae

    2016-10-01

    Although the flow distribution in an influent channel where the inflow is split into each treatment process in a wastewater treatment plant greatly affects the efficiency of the process, and a weir is the typical structure for the flow distribution, to the authors' knowledge, there is a paucity of research on the flow distribution in an open channel with a weir. In this study, the influent channel of a real-scale wastewater treatment plant was used, installing a suppressed rectangular weir that has a horizontal crest to cross the full channel width. The flow distribution in the influent channel was analyzed using a validated computational fluid dynamics model to investigate (1) the comparison of single-phase and two-phase simulation, (2) the improved procedure of the prototype channel, and (3) the effect of the inflow rate on flow distribution. The results show that two-phase simulation is more reliable due to the description of the free-surface fluctuations. It should first be considered for improving flow distribution to prevent a short-circuit flow, and the difference in the kinetic energy with the inflow rate makes flow distribution trends different. The authors believe that this case study is helpful for improving flow distribution in an influent channel.

  2. Material flow-based economic assessment of landfill mining processes.

    PubMed

    Kieckhäfer, Karsten; Breitenstein, Anna; Spengler, Thomas S

    2017-02-01

    This paper provides an economic assessment of alternative processes for landfill mining compared to landfill aftercare with the goal of assisting landfill operators with the decision to choose between the two alternatives. A material flow-based assessment approach is developed and applied to a landfill in Germany. In addition to landfill aftercare, six alternative landfill mining processes are considered. These range from simple approaches where most of the material is incinerated or landfilled again to sophisticated technology combinations that allow for recovering highly differentiated products such as metals, plastics, glass, recycling sand, and gravel. For the alternatives, the net present value of all relevant cash flows associated with plant installation and operation, supply, recycling, and disposal of material flows, recovery of land and landfill airspace, as well as landfill closure and aftercare is computed with an extensive sensitivity analyses. The economic performance of landfill mining processes is found to be significantly influenced by the prices of thermal treatment (waste incineration as well as refuse-derived fuels incineration plant) and recovered land or airspace. The results indicate that the simple process alternatives have the highest economic potential, which contradicts the aim of recovering most of the resources.

  3. Unsteady fluid flow in smart material actuated fluid pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Shaju; Cadou, Christopher

    2005-05-01

    Smart materials' ability to deliver large block forces in a small package while operating at high frequencies makes them extremely attractive for converting electrical to mechanical power. This has led to the development of hybrid actuators consisting of co-located smart material actuated pumps and hydraulic cylinders that are connected by a set of fast-acting valves. The overall success of the hybrid concept hinges on the effectiveness of the coupling between the smart material and the fluid. This, in turn, is strongly dependent on the resistance to fluid flow in the device. This paper presents results from three-dimensional unsteady simulations of fluid flow in the pumping chamber of a prototype hybrid actuator powered by a piezo-electric stack. The results show that the forces associated with moving the fluid into and out of the pumping chamber already exceed 10% of the piezo stack blocked force at relatively low frequencies ~120 Hz and approach 40% of the blocked force at 800 Hz. This reduces the amplitude of the piston motion in such a way that the volume flow rate remains approximately constant above operating frequencies of 500 Hz while the efficiency of the pump decreases rapidly.

  4. Design considerations for pulsed-flow comprehensive two-dimensional GC: dynamic flow model approach.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Paul McA; Shellie, Robert A; Haddad, Paul R

    2010-04-01

    A dynamic flow model, which maps carrier gas pressures and carrier gas flow rates through the first dimension separation column, the modulator sample loop, and the second dimension separation column(s) in a pulsed-flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (PFM-GCxGC) system is described. The dynamic flow model assists design of a PFM-GCxGC modulator and leads to rapid determination of pneumatic conditions, timing parameters, and the dimensions of the separation columns and connecting tubing used to construct the PFM-GCxGC system. Three significant innovations are introduced in this manuscript, which were all uncovered by using the dynamic flow model. A symmetric flow path modulator improves baseline stability, appropriate selection of the flow restrictors in the first dimension column assembly provides a generally more stable and robust system, and these restrictors increase the modulation period flexibility of the PFM-GCxGC system. The flexibility of a PFM-GCxGC system resulting from these innovations is illustrated using the same modulation interface to analyze Special Antarctic Blend (SAB) diesel using 3 s and 9 s modulation periods.

  5. Dynamic characterization of permeabilities and flows in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Castro, M; Bravo-Gutiérrez, M E; Hernández-Machado, A; Poiré, E Corvera

    2008-11-28

    We make an analytical study of the nonsteady flow of Newtonian fluids in microchannels. We consider the slip boundary condition at the solid walls with Navier hypothesis and calculate the dynamic permeability, which gives the system's response to dynamic pressure gradients. We find a scaling relation in the absence of slip that is broken in its presence. We discuss how this might be useful to experimentally determine--by means of microparticle image velocimetry technology--whether slip exists or not in a system, the value of the slip length, and the validity of Navier hypothesis in dynamic situations.

  6. Nonlinear Dynamics of a Microswimmer in Poiseuille Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöttl, Andreas; Stark, Holger

    2012-05-01

    We study the three-dimensional dynamics of a spherical microswimmer in cylindrical Poiseuille flow which can be mapped onto a Hamiltonian system. Swinging and tumbling trajectories are identified. In 2D they are equivalent to oscillating and circling solutions of a mathematical pendulum. Hydrodynamic interactions between the swimmer and confining channel walls lead to dissipative dynamics and result in stable trajectories, different for pullers and pushers. We demonstrate this behavior in the dipole approximation of the swimmer and with simulations using the method of multiparticle collision dynamics.

  7. Nonlinear dynamics of a microswimmer in Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Zöttl, Andreas; Stark, Holger

    2012-05-25

    We study the three-dimensional dynamics of a spherical microswimmer in cylindrical Poiseuille flow which can be mapped onto a Hamiltonian system. Swinging and tumbling trajectories are identified. In 2D they are equivalent to oscillating and circling solutions of a mathematical pendulum. Hydrodynamic interactions between the swimmer and confining channel walls lead to dissipative dynamics and result in stable trajectories, different for pullers and pushers. We demonstrate this behavior in the dipole approximation of the swimmer and with simulations using the method of multiparticle collision dynamics.

  8. Intraoperative Analysis of Flow Dynamics in Arteriovenous Composite Y Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Lobo Filho, Heraldo Guedis; Lobo Filho, José Glauco; Pimentel, Matheus Duarte; Silva, Bruno Gadelha Bezerra; de Souza, Camylla Santos; Montenegro, Marília Leitão; Leitão, Maria Cláudia de Azevedo; Jamacuru, Francisco Vagnaldo Fechine

    2016-01-01

    Objective Composite graft of left internal thoracic artery and great saphenous vein in revascularization of the left coronary system is a technique well described in literature. The aim of this study is to analyze blood flow dynamics in this configuration of composite graft especially in what concerns left internal thoracic artery's adaptability and influence of great saphenous vein segment on left internal thoracic artery's flow. Methods Revascularization of left coronary system with composite graft, with left internal thoracic artery revascularizing the anterior interventricular artery and a great saphenous vein segment, anastomosed to the left internal thoracic artery, revascularizing another branch of the left coronary system, was performed in 23 patients. Blood flow was evaluated by transit time flowmetry in all segments of the composite graft (left internal thoracic artery proximal segment, left internal thoracic artery distal segment and great saphenous vein segment). Measures were performed in baseline condition and after dobutamine-induced stress, without and with non-traumatic temporary clamping of the distal segments of the composite graft. Results Pharmacological stress resulted in increase of blood flow values in the analyzed segments (P<0.05). Non-traumatic temporary clamping of great saphenous vein segment did not result in statistically significant changes in the flow of left internal thoracic artery distal segment, both in baseline condition and under pharmacological stress. Similarly, non-traumatic temporary clamping of left internal thoracic artery distal segment did not result in statistically significant changes in great saphenous vein segment flow. Conclusion Composite grafts with left internal thoracic artery and great saphenous vein for revascularization of left coronary system, resulted in blood flow dynamics with physiological adaptability, both at rest and after pharmacological stress, according to demand. Presence of great saphenous vein

  9. Polymer-based micro flow sensor for dynamical flow measurements in hydraulic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, R.; Festa, M.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we present a micro flow sensor from a polymer for dynamical flow measurements in hydraulic systems. The flow sensor is based on the thermal anemometric principle and consists of two micro-structured housing shells from polysulfone (PSU) which form a small fluidic channel with a cross-section of 580 µm × 400 µm. In between there is a thin polyimide membrane supporting three gold track structures forming an electrical heater and two resistive thermometers which allows the detection of the flow direction, too. The complete sensor is inserted into the hydraulic system, but only a small bypass flow is directed through the fluidic channel by means of a special splitting system. Due to its small heat capacity, the sensor is suitable to detect flow pulsations up to about 1200 Hz which allows the sensor to be used for the condition monitoring or preventive maintenance of hydraulic systems.

  10. Experimental characterization of energetic material dynamics for multiphase blast simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Beresh, Steven Jay; Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Wright, Elton K.; Baer, Melvin R.; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2011-09-01

    Currently there is a substantial lack of data for interactions of shock waves with particle fields having volume fractions residing between the dilute and granular regimes, which creates one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the simulation of energetic material detonation. To close this gap, a novel Multiphase Shock Tube has been constructed to drive a planar shock wave into a dense gas-solid field of particles. A nearly spatially isotropic field of particles is generated in the test section by a gravity-fed method that results in a spanwise curtain of spherical 100-micron particles having a volume fraction of about 19%. Interactions with incident shock Mach numbers of 1.66, 1.92, and 2.02 were achieved. High-speed schlieren imaging simultaneous with high-frequency wall pressure measurements are used to reveal the complex wave structure associated with the interaction. Following incident shock impingement, transmitted and reflected shocks are observed, which lead to differences in particle drag across the streamwise dimension of the curtain. Shortly thereafter, the particle field begins to propagate downstream and spread. For all three Mach numbers tested, the energy and momentum fluxes in the induced flow far downstream are reduced about 30-40% by the presence of the particle field. X-Ray diagnostics have been developed to penetrate the opacity of the flow, revealing the concentrations throughout the particle field as it expands and spreads downstream with time. Furthermore, an X-Ray particle tracking velocimetry diagnostic has been demonstrated to be feasible for this flow, which can be used to follow the trajectory of tracer particles seeded into the curtain. Additional experiments on single spherical particles accelerated behind an incident shock wave have shown that elevated particle drag coefficients can be attributed to increased compressibility rather than flow unsteadiness, clarifying confusing results from the historical database of shock tube

  11. Can the flow dynamics of debris flows be identified from seismic data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, J. W.; Coe, J. A.; Smith, J. B.; Coviello, V.; McCoy, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    There is growing interest in the use of seismic and acoustic data to interpret a variety of geomorphic processes including landslides and debris flows. This measurement technique is attractive because a broad area can be monitored from a safe distance, unlike more direct methods of instrumentation, which are restricted to known flow paths and are vulnerable to damage by the flow. Previous work has shown that measurements of ground vibrations are capable of detecting the timing, speed, and location of landslides and debris flows. A remaining question is whether or not additional flow properties, such as basal stress, impact force, or flow magnitude can be inferred reliably from seismic data. This question has been difficult to answer, because detailed, independent measurements of flow dynamics are lacking. Here, we explore characteristics of debris-flow induced ground vibrations using new data from the Chalk Cliffs monitoring site in central Colorado. Monitoring included a heavily instrumented cross-section consisting of two tri-axial geophones to record ground vibrations (at 333 Hz), a small, 225 cm2 force plate to record basal impact forces (at 333 Hz), a laser distance meter to record flow stage over the plate (at 10 Hz), and a high definition camera to record flow dynamics (at 24 Hz). One geophone (A) was mounted on a boulder partially buried in colluvium; the other (B) was mounted directly to weathered bedrock typical of the site. This combination of instrumentation allowed us to compare the spectral response of different geophone installations to independently measured flow depth and basal impact force. We also compared the response of the geophones to surges that flowed over a sediment-covered bed (40-cm thick) to surges that flowed over a bare bedrock channel. Preliminary results showed that site conditions have a large effect on recorded debris-flow vibrations. The seismic signature of debris flow was very different between the geophones, with geophone B

  12. Material flow analysis of used personal computers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Aya; Tasaki, Tomohiro; Terazono, Atsushi

    2009-05-01

    Most personal computers (PCs) are discarded by consumers after the data files have been moved to a new PC. Therefore, a used PC collection scheme should be created that does not depend on the distribution route of new PCs. In Japan, manufacturers' voluntary take-back recycling schemes were established in 2001 (for business PCs) and 2003 (for household PCs). At the same time, the export of used PCs from Japan increased, affecting the domestic PC reuse market. These regulatory and economic conditions would have changed the flow of used PCs. In this paper, we developed a method of minimizing the errors in estimating the material flow of used PCs. The method's features include utilization of both input and output flow data and elimination of subjective estimation as much as possible. Flow rate data from existing surveys were used for estimating the flow of used PCs in Japan for fiscal years (FY) 2000, 2001, and 2004. The results show that 3.92 million and 4.88 million used PCs were discarded in FY 2000 and 2001, respectively. Approximately two-thirds of the discarded PCs were disposed of or recycled within the country, one-fourth was reused within the country, and 8% were exported. In FY 2004, 7.47 million used PCs were discarded. The ratio of domestic disposal and recycling decreased to 37% in FY 2004, whereas the domestic reuse and export ratios increased to 37% and 26%, respectively. Flows from businesses to retailers in FY 2004 increased dramatically, which led to increased domestic reuse. An increase in the flow of used PCs from lease and rental companies to secondhand shops has led to increased exports. Results of interviews with members of PC reuse companies were and trade statistics were used to verify the results of our estimation of domestic reuse and export of used PCs.

  13. Bubbly flow model for the dynamic characteristics of cavitating pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennen, C.

    1978-01-01

    The recent experimental transfer matrices obtained by Ng and Brennen (1978) for some axial flow pumps revealed some dynamic characteristics which were unaccounted for by any existing theoretical analysis; their visual observations suggested that the bubbly cavitating flow in the blade passages could be responsible for these effects. A theoretical model of the dynamic response of this bubbly blade-passage flow is described in the present paper. Void-fraction fluctuations in this flow result not only from pressure fluctuations but also because the fluctuating angle of attack causes fluctuations in the rate of production of bubbles near the leading edge. The latter causes kinematic waves which interact through the boundary conditions with the dynamic waves caused by pressure fluctuation. The resulting theoretical transfer functions which results are in good qualitative agreement with the experiments; with appropriate choices of two parameters good quantitative agreement is also obtained. The theoretical model also provides one possible explanation of the observation that the pump changes from an essentially passive dynamic element in the absence of cavitation to a progressively more active element as the extent of cavitation increases.

  14. Particle hopping vs. fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although particle hopping models have been introduced into traffic science in the 19509, their systematic use has only started recently. Two reasons for this are, that they are advantageous on modem computers, and that recent theoretical developments allow analytical understanding of their properties and therefore more confidence for their use. In principle, particle hopping models fit between microscopic models for driving and fluiddynamical models for traffic flow. In this sense, they also help closing the conceptual gap between these two. This paper shows connections between particle hopping models and traffic flow theory. It shows that the hydrodynamical limits of certain particle hopping models correspond to the Lighthill-Whitham theory for traffic flow, and that only slightly more complex particle hopping models produce already the correct traffic jam dynamics, consistent with recent fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. By doing so, this paper establishes that, on the macroscopic level, particle hopping models are at least as good as fluid-dynamical models. Yet, particle hopping models have at least two advantages over fluid-dynamical models: they straightforwardly allow microscopic simulations, and they include stochasticity.

  15. Molecular dynamics study of tethered polymers in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Gratton, Y; Slater, G W

    2005-08-01

    Single macromolecules can now be isolated and characterized experimentally using techniques such as optical tweezers and videomicroscopy. An interesting and important single-molecule problem is that of the dynamics of a polymer chain tethered to a solid surface and subjected to a shear flow. An experimental study of such a system was reported by Doyle et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4769 (2000)), and their results showed a surprising recirculating motion of the DNA chain. We explore this problem using molecular dynamics computer simulations with explicit hydrodynamic interactions. The dynamical properties of a Freely Jointed Chain (FJC) with Finitely Extensible Nonlinear Elastic (FENE) links are examined in similar conditions (i.e., confined between two surfaces and in the presence of a Poiseuille flow). We see the remarkable cyclic polymer motion observed experimentally, and we show that a simple cross-correlation function can be used to measure the corresponding period of motion. We also propose a new empirical equation relating the magnitude of the shear flow to the amount of chain deformation, an equation that appears to apply for both weak and strong flows. Finally, we report on packing effects near the molecularly flat wall, an associated chain-sticking phenomenon, and the impact of the chain hydrodynamic drag on the local fluid flow.

  16. Dynamic Mode Decomposition of Flow Around Interacting Barchan Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, Nathaniel; Blois, Gianluca; Kim, Taehoon; Schmid, Peter; Best, Jim; Christensen, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    Barchan dunes are crescentic bedforms located in environments with unidirectional flow and limited sediment supply, including deserts, river beds and the craters of Mars. The evolution of, and interactions between, barchans are highly dynamic, involving feedback mechanisms between the fluid flow, morphological change and sediment transport. A series of experiments were undertaken to discretely simulate the collision of a smaller barchan with a larger, downstream one using fixed bedform models, each experiment representing a successive snapshot in the dune collision process. These experiments thus capture the turbulent flow over fixed-bed morphologies that correlate with rapid morphological change and high rates of sediment transport using time-resolved PIV in the wall-parallel plane. The use of a Refractive Index Matching (RIM) flow facility allows for the light to pass through the model, capturing areas which are otherwise obscured, such as around the horns of the dune and the sheltered region behind the crest. Dynamic Mode Decomposition is used to identify the most dominant modes contributing to flow dynamics in each collision stage.

  17. Incompressible material point method for free surface flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Xiong; Sze, Kam Yim; Lian, Yanping; Liu, Yan

    2017-02-01

    To overcome the shortcomings of the weakly compressible material point method (WCMPM) for modeling the free surface flow problems, an incompressible material point method (iMPM) is proposed based on operator splitting technique which splits the solution of momentum equation into two steps. An intermediate velocity field is first obtained by solving the momentum equations ignoring the pressure gradient term, and then the intermediate velocity field is corrected by the pressure term to obtain a divergence-free velocity field. A level set function which represents the signed distance to free surface is used to track the free surface and apply the pressure boundary conditions. Moreover, an hourglass damping is introduced to suppress the spurious velocity modes which are caused by the discretization of the cell center velocity divergence from the grid vertexes velocities when solving pressure Poisson equations. Numerical examples including dam break, oscillation of a cubic liquid drop and a droplet impact into deep pool show that the proposed incompressible material point method is much more accurate and efficient than the weakly compressible material point method in solving free surface flow problems.

  18. Dynamic Young's moduli of space materials at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L. Z.; Tu, Z. H.; Zhang, P. Q.

    Using vibration analysis methods, the dynamic mechanical properties of space materials at low temperatures (from 4.2 to 300 K) are studied in this paper. System identification techniques in the time domain are used to identify the dynamic parameters of the space materials Ti-5Al-2.5Sn extra-low-interstitial (ELI) alloy and Al-2.5Li-1.3Cu-0.9Mg-0.13Zr (Al-Li) alloy. The dynamic Young's moduli of these materials are calculated using the basic natural frequencies at different temperatures.

  19. Material handling robot system for flow-through storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, James F.; Candiloro, Brian; Downer, James; Wiesman, Richard; Fallin, Larry; Smith, Ron

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the design, development and planned implementation of a system of mobile robots for use in flow through storage applications. The robots are being designed with on-board embedded controls so that they can perform their tasks as semi-autonomous workers distributed within a centrally controlled network. On the storage input side, boxes will be identified by bar-codes and placed into preassigned flow through bins. On the shipping side, orders will be forwarded to the robots from a central order processing station and boxes will be picked from designated storage bins following proper sequencing to permit direct loading into trucks for shipping. Because of the need to maintain high system availability, a distributed control strategy has been selected. When completed, the system will permit robots to be dynamically reassigned responsibilities if an individual unit fails. On-board health diagnostics and condition monitoring will be used to maintain high reliability of the units.

  20. Flow dynamics of bank-attached instream structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seokkoo

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations and experiments for flow past a bank-attached vane, a widely-used instream structure for stream restoration, are carried out to study the turbulent flow dynamics occurring around the structure. In the numerical simulation, the details of the natural rocks that constitute the vane are directly resolved by employing the recently developed computational fluid dynamics model of Kang et al. (2011). The time-averaged flowfield is shown to be in good agreement with the results of laboratory measurements. Analysis of the simulated flow shows that there exist two counter-rotating secondary flows cells downstream of the vane, one of which is located near the center of the channel and the other is located near the corner between the channel bed and the sidewall to which the vane is attached. The formation of the two counter-rotating secondary flow cells is shown to be linked to the plunging of the mean three-dimensional streamlines originating upstream of the vane onto a point downstream of the vane positioned on the lower part of the sidewall. The laboratory experiment also reveals the existence of such flow structures.

  1. Granular crystals: Nonlinear dynamics meets materials engineering

    DOE PAGES

    Porter, Mason A.; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    In this article, the freedom to choose the size, stiffness, and spatial distribution of macroscopic particles in a lattice makes granular crystals easily tailored building blocks for shock-absorbing materials, sound-focusing devices, acoustic switches, and other exotica.

  2. Macro material flow modeling for analyzing solid waste management options

    SciTech Connect

    Holter, G.M.; Pennock, K.A.; Shaver, S.R.

    1993-06-01

    A Macro Material Flow Modeling (MMFM) concept and approach are being adopted to develop a predictive modeling capability. This capability is intended to provide part of the basis for evaluating potential impacts from various solid waste management system configurations and operating scenarios, as well as evaluating the impacts of various policies on solid waste quantities and compositions. The MMFM capability, as part of a broader Solid Waste Initiative at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is intended to provide an increased understanding of solid waste as a disposal, energy, and resource problem on a national and global scale, particularly over the long term. This model is a macro-level simulation of the flows of the various materials through the solid waste management system, and also through the associated materials production and use system. Inclusion of materials production and use within the modeling context allows a systems approach to be used, providing a much more complete understanding of the origins of the solid waste materials and also of possible options for materials recovery and reuse than if a more traditional ``end-of-pipe`` view of solid waste is adopted. The MMFM is expected to be useful in evaluating longer-term, broader-ranging solid waste impacts than are traditionally evaluated by decision-makers involved in implementing solutions to local or regional solid waste management problems. This paper discusses the types of questions of interest in evaluating long-term, broad-range impacts from solid waste. It then identifies the basic needs for predictive modeling capabilities like the MMFM, and provides a basic description of the conceptual framework for the model and the associated data. Status of the MMFM implementation is also discussed.

  3. Macro material flow modeling for analyzing solid waste management options

    SciTech Connect

    Holter, G.M.; Pennock, K.A.; Shaver, S.R.

    1993-06-01

    A Macro Material Flow Modeling (MMFM) concept and approach are being adopted to develop a predictive modeling capability. This capability is intended to provide part of the basis for evaluating potential impacts from various solid waste management system configurations and operating scenarios, as well as evaluating the impacts of various policies on solid waste quantities and compositions. The MMFM capability, as part of a broader Solid Waste Initiative at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is intended to provide an increased understanding of solid waste as a disposal, energy, and resource problem on a national and global scale, particularly over the long term. This model is a macro-level simulation of the flows of the various materials through the solid waste management system, and also through the associated materials production and use system. Inclusion of materials production and use within the modeling context allows a systems approach to be used, providing a much more complete understanding of the origins of the solid waste materials and also of possible options for materials recovery and reuse than if a more traditional end-of-pipe'' view of solid waste is adopted. The MMFM is expected to be useful in evaluating longer-term, broader-ranging solid waste impacts than are traditionally evaluated by decision-makers involved in implementing solutions to local or regional solid waste management problems. This paper discusses the types of questions of interest in evaluating long-term, broad-range impacts from solid waste. It then identifies the basic needs for predictive modeling capabilities like the MMFM, and provides a basic description of the conceptual framework for the model and the associated data. Status of the MMFM implementation is also discussed.

  4. Upper-Mantle Flow Driven Dynamic Topography in Eastern Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengul Uluocak, Ebru; Pysklywec, Russell; Eken, Tuna; Hakan Gogus, Oguz

    2016-04-01

    Eastern Anatolia is characterized by 2 km plateau uplift -in the last 10 Myrs-, high surface heat flow distribution, shallow Curie-point depth, anomalous gravity field. Seismological observations indicate relatively high Pn and Sn attenuation and significant low seismic velocity anomalies in the region. Moreover, the surface geology is associated predominantly with volcanic rocks in which melt production through mantle upwelling (following lithospheric delamination) has been suggested. It has been long known that the topographic loading in the region cannot be supported by crustal thickness (~45 km) based on the principle of Airy isostasy. Recent global geodynamic studies carried out for evaluating the post-collisional processes imply that there is an explicit dynamic uplift in Eastern Anatolia and its adjacent regions. In this study we investigate the instantaneous dynamic topography driven by 3-D upper-mantle flow in Eastern Anatolia. For this purpose we conducted numerous thermo-mechanical models using a 2-D Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) finite element method. The available P-wave tomography data extracted along 10 profiles were used to obtain depth-dependent density anomalies in the region. We present resulting dynamic topography maps and estimated 3D mantle flow velocity vectors along these 2-D cross sections for each profile. The residual topography based on crustal thickness and observed topography was calculated and compared with other independent datasets concerning geological deformation and dynamic topography predictions. The results indicate an upper mantle driven dynamic uplift correlated with the under-compensated characteristic in Eastern Anatolia. We discuss our results combined with 3D mantle flow by considering seismic anisotropy studies in the region. Initial results indicate that high dynamic uplift and the localized low Pn velocities in concurrence with Pn anisotropy structures show nearly spatial coherence in Eastern Anatolia.

  5. Material flow data for numerical simulation of powder injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretek, I.; Holzer, C.

    2017-01-01

    The powder injection molding (PIM) process is a cost efficient and important net-shape manufacturing process that is not completely understood. For the application of simulation programs for the powder injection molding process, apart from suitable physical models, exact material data and in particular knowledge of the flow behavior are essential in order to get precise numerical results. The flow processes of highly filled polymers are complex. Occurring effects are very hard to separate, like shear flow with yield stress, wall slip, elastic effects, etc. Furthermore, the occurrence of phase separation due to the multi-phase composition of compounds is quite probable. In this work, the flow behavior of a 316L stainless steel feedstock for powder injection molding was investigated. Additionally, the influence of pre-shearing on the flow behavior of PIM-feedstocks under practical conditions was examined and evaluated by a special PIM injection molding machine rheometer. In order to have a better understanding of key factors of PIM during the injection step, 3D non-isothermal numerical simulations were conducted with a commercial injection molding simulation software using experimental feedstock properties. The simulation results were compared with the experimental results. The mold filling studies amply illustrate the effect of mold temperature on the filling behavior during the mold filling stage. Moreover, the rheological measurements showed that at low shear rates no zero shear viscosity was observed, but instead the viscosity further increased strongly. This flow behavior could be described with the Cross-WLF approach with Herschel-Bulkley extension very well.

  6. Dynamics of Plasma Blobs in a Shear Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, A.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Labit, B.; Podesta, M.; Theiler, C.

    2008-09-12

    The global dynamic of plasma blobs in a shear flow is investigated in a simple magnetized torus using the spatial Fourier harmonics (k-space) framework. Direct experimental evidence of a linear drift in k space of the density fluctuation energy synchronized with blob events is presented. During this drift, an increase of the fluctuation energy and a production of the kinetic energy associated with blobs are observed. The energy source of the blob is analyzed using an advection-dissipation-type equation that includes blob-flow exchange energy, linear drift in k space, nonlinear processes, and viscous dissipations. We show that blobs tap their energy from the dominant ExB vertical background flow during the linear drift stage. The exchange of energy is unidirectional as there is no evidence that blobs return energy to the flow.

  7. A new dynamic model for heterogeneous traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, T. Q.; Huang, H. J.; Zhao, S. G.; Shang, H. Y.

    2009-06-01

    Based on the property of heterogeneous traffic flow, we in this Letter present a new car-following model. Applying the relationship between the micro and macro variables, a new dynamic model for heterogeneous traffic flow is obtained. The fundamental diagram and the jam density of the heterogeneous traffic flow consisting of bus and car are studied under three different conditions: (1) without any restrictions, (2) under the action of the traffic control policy that restrains some private cars and (3) using bus to replace the private cars restrained by the traffic control policy. The numerical results show that our model can describe some qualitative properties of the heterogeneous traffic flow consisting of bus and car, which verifies that our model is reasonable.

  8. Grow with the Flow: A Dynamic Tale of Blood Clot Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiderman, Karin; Fogelson, Aaron

    2008-11-01

    The body heals injured blood vessels and prevents bleeding by clotting the blood. Clots are primarily made of blood-borne cells and a fibrous material that is assembled at the site of injury in flowing blood. Clot composition and structure change with local chemistry and fluid dynamics, which in turn alter the flow. To better understand this fluid-structure coupling, we have created a mathematical model to simulate the formation of a blood clot in a dynamic fluid environment. The growing clot is represented as a mixed porous medium whose permeability is dependent on the coagulation chemistry within it. The flow field resulting from a clot with specific calculated permeability and size can then be recovered by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with an added friction term. We report on how this complex fluid-structure interaction affects the limiting factor(s) of blood clot growth.

  9. Thermal/chemical stability of ceramic cross flow filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Bahovchin, D.M.; Lippert, T.E.; Tressler, R.E.; McNerney, K.B.

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse has undertaken a two phase program to determine possible long-term, high temperature influence that advanced coal-based power system environments may have on the stability of the ceramic cross flow filter elements. During the past year, we have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100[degrees]C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. The alumina/mullite cross flow liter material that has consistently been used throughout the flow-through gas phase alkali testing segment of this program, consists of mullite rods or needles that are embedded within an amorphous phase which contains corundum (Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) and anorthite (CaAl[sub 2]Si[sub 2]O[sub 8]). Due to the rapid cooling rate that was used to produce the alumina/mullite filter disc material from high fire, the matrix consists of 59.6 wt% mullite, 30.5 wt% amorphous, 5.1 wt% anorthite, and 4.8 wt% alumina. The relatively low, as-fabricated, hot strength of this material (841[plus minus]259 psi at 870[degrees]C) is a direct result of the high amorphous content which softens at temperatures of 870[degrees]C. Load versus deflection curves as a function of temperature indicate that this material is relatively brittle up to temperatures of 600[degrees]C. Both a loss of strength, as well as plastic deformation of the matrix occurs at [approximately]700[degrees]C. If cross flow filters are manufactured from an alumina/mullite matrix that contains an [approximately]30.5 wt% amorphous content, we suspect that the plastic nature of the glass phase could potentially serve as a substrate for fines collection during initial filter operation at 700[degrees]C. Similarly the plastic nature could potentially cause deformation of the liter under load.

  10. Thermal/chemical stability of ceramic cross flow filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Bahovchin, D.M.; Lippert, T.E.; Tressler, R.E.; McNerney, K.B.

    1992-11-01

    Westinghouse has undertaken a two phase program to determine possible long-term, high temperature influence that advanced coal-based power system environments may have on the stability of the ceramic cross flow filter elements. During the past year, we have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100{degrees}C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. The alumina/mullite cross flow liter material that has consistently been used throughout the flow-through gas phase alkali testing segment of this program, consists of mullite rods or needles that are embedded within an amorphous phase which contains corundum (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and anorthite (CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}). Due to the rapid cooling rate that was used to produce the alumina/mullite filter disc material from high fire, the matrix consists of 59.6 wt% mullite, 30.5 wt% amorphous, 5.1 wt% anorthite, and 4.8 wt% alumina. The relatively low, as-fabricated, hot strength of this material (841{plus_minus}259 psi at 870{degrees}C) is a direct result of the high amorphous content which softens at temperatures of 870{degrees}C. Load versus deflection curves as a function of temperature indicate that this material is relatively brittle up to temperatures of 600{degrees}C. Both a loss of strength, as well as plastic deformation of the matrix occurs at {approximately}700{degrees}C. If cross flow filters are manufactured from an alumina/mullite matrix that contains an {approximately}30.5 wt% amorphous content, we suspect that the plastic nature of the glass phase could potentially serve as a substrate for fines collection during initial filter operation at 700{degrees}C. Similarly the plastic nature could potentially cause deformation of the liter under load.

  11. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrane, Shawn David; Bolme, Cindy B; Whitley, Von H; Moore, David S

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  12. A dilation-driven vortex flow in sheared granular materials explains a rheometric anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaraj, K. P.; Nott, Prabhu R.

    2016-01-01

    Granular flows occur widely in nature and industry, yet a continuum description that captures their important features is yet not at hand. Recent experiments on granular materials sheared in a cylindrical Couette device revealed a puzzling anomaly, wherein all components of the stress rise nearly exponentially with depth. Here we show, using particle dynamics simulations and imaging experiments, that the stress anomaly arises from a remarkable vortex flow. For the entire range of fill heights explored, we observe a single toroidal vortex that spans the entire Couette cell and whose sense is opposite to the uppermost Taylor vortex in a fluid. We show that the vortex is driven by a combination of shear-induced dilation, a phenomenon that has no analogue in fluids, and gravity flow. Dilatancy is an important feature of granular mechanics, but not adequately incorporated in existing models. PMID:26864086

  13. Flow-induced compaction of soft poroelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijjer, Japinder S.; Hewitt, Duncan R.; Worster, M. Grae; Neufeld, Jerome A.

    2016-11-01

    Fluid flows through poroelastic materials can result in solid deformation driven by the distribution of viscous shear stresses. The porosity and permeability of the solid matrix is altered spatially through a non-trivial coupling to the fluid flow. This behaviour is studied experimentally by examining fluid flow through a packing of soft hydrogel spheres driven by an imposed pressure head. The pressure head is varied, and, for each pressure, the steady-state mass flux and solid deformation are measured. For large pressure gradients, the fluid flow is found to decrease the permeability in such a way as to produce a flux that is independent of the applied pressure gradient. Measurements of the internal deformation, obtained by particle tracking, show that the medium compacts non-uniformly, with the porosity being lower at the outlet compared to the inlet. Intriguingly, we find a reproducible hysteresis of the poroelastic deformation between increasing and decreasing increments of the applied pressure head. The experimental results are compared to a simple one-dimensional model that accounts for non-linear elasticity of the solid and non-constant permeability.

  14. Characterizing He II flow through porous materials using counterflow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, J. R., Jr.; Vansciver, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed space applications, such as the cooling of infrared and x ray telescopes, have generated substantial interest in the behavior of He II flowing in porous materials. For design purposes, classical porous media correlations and room temperature data are often used to obtain order of magnitude estimates of expected pressure drops, while the attendant temperature differences are either ignored or estimated using smooth tube correlations. A more accurate alternative to this procedure is suggested by an empirical extension of the two fluid model. It is shown that four empirical parameters are necessary to describe the pressure and temperature differences induced by He II flow through a porous sample. The three parameters required to determine pressure differences are measured in counterflow and found to compare favorably with those for isothermal flow. The fourth parameter, the Gorter-Mellink constant, differs substantially from smooth tube values. It is concluded that parameter values determined from counterflow can be used to predict pressure and temperature differences in a variety of flows to an accuracy of about + or - 20 pct.

  15. Characterizing He 2 flow through porous materials using counterflow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansciver, Steven W.; Maddocks, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed space applications, such as the cooling of infrared and x ray telescopes, have generated substantial interest in the behavior of He(2) flowing in porous materials. For design purposes, classical porous media correlations and room temperature data are often used to obtain order of magnitude estimates of expected pressure drops, while the attendant temperature differences are either ignored or estimated using smooth tube correlations. A more accurate alternative to this procedure is suggested by an empirical extension of the two fluid models. It is shown that four empirical parameters are necessary to describe the pressure and temperature differences induced by He(2) flow through a porous sample. The three parameters required to determine pressure differences are measured in counterflow and found to compare favorably with those for isothermal flow. The fourth parameter, the Gorter-Mellink constant, differs substantially from smooth tube values. It is concluded that parameter values determined from counterflow can be used to predict pressure and temperature differences in a variety of flows to an accuracy of about + or - 20 percent.

  16. Dynamic Deformation Properties of Energetic Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    references are provided for further reading. Materials The materials that have been used are ultrafine PETN and RDX prepared by a proprietary method by ICI...density of the loose powder on delivery is ~15 % of the theoretical maximum density (TMD). The ultrafine HNS that was used was HNS IV as supplied by...ultrafine PETN . A - Point at which initiation takes place; B - Detonation wave travelling at 5.6 ± 0.3 mm ms-1. 37 Figure 1.31. Negative streak

  17. Dynamic Failure of Materials: A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Investigation of the Rupture of a Plexiglass Plate by Means of an Optical Method Involving High Speed Filming of the Shadows Originating Around Holes...Neville Mott (3) proposed a theoretical framework that includes inertial effects during the rapid crack growth phase. At high crack speeds , Mott... high speeds in high -energy events where other crack modes are prohibited by confinement. 14 Dynamic brittle fracture has a rich history and a

  18. Dynamics of prolate spheroidal elastic particles in confined shear flow.

    PubMed

    Villone, M M; D'Avino, G; Hulsen, M A; Maffettone, P L

    2015-12-01

    We investigate through numerical simulations the dynamics of a neo-Hookean elastic prolate spheroid suspended in a Newtonian fluid under shear flow. Both initial orientations of the particle within and outside the shear plane and both unbounded and confined flow geometries are considered. In unbounded flow, when the particle starts on the shear plane, two stable regimes of motion are found, i.e., trembling, where the particle shape periodically elongates and compresses in the shear plane and the angle between its major semiaxis and the flow direction oscillates around a positive mean value, and tumbling, where the particle shape periodically changes and its major axis performs complete revolutions around the vorticity axis. When the particle is initially oriented out of the shear plane, more complex dynamics arise. Geometric confinement of the particle between the moving walls also influences its deformation and regime of motion. In addition, when the particle is initially located in an asymmetric position with respect to the moving walls, particle lateral migration is detected. The effects on the particle dynamics of the geometric and physical parameters that rule the system are investigated.

  19. Single file dynamics in soft materials.

    PubMed

    Taloni, Alessandro; Flomenbom, Ophir; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón; Marchesoni, Fabio

    2017-02-08

    The term single file (SF) dynamics refers to the motion of an assembly of particles through a channel with cross-sections comparable to the particles' diameter. Single file diffusion (SFD) is then the diffusion of a tagged particle in a single file, i.e., under the condition that particle passing is not allowed. SFD accounts for a large variety of processes in nature, including diffusion of colloids in synthetic and natural channels, biological motors along molecular chains, electrons in proteins and liquid helium, ions through membranes, just to mention a few examples. Albeit introduced in 1965s, over the last decade the classical notion of SF dynamics has been generalised to account for a more realistic modelling of the particle properties, file geometry, particle-particle and channel-particle interactions, which paves the way to remarkable applications of the SF model, for instance, in the technology of bio-integrated nanodevices. We provide here a comprehensive review of the recent advances in the theory of SF dynamics with the purpose of spurring further experimental work.

  20. Granular Dilatancy and its Effect on Debris-flow Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, R. M.; George, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    Landslides and debris flows commonly exhibit the effects of variable granular dilatancy, but incorporation of these effects in predictive models of debris-flow dynamics has been lacking. We have developed a depth-averaged model of debris-flow initiation and motion that includes the effects of variable dilatancy without stipulating its influence on rheology. Instead, the apparent rheology of Coulomb-frictional debris evolves during coupled evolution of the grain concentration m, basal pore-fluid pressure, flow thickness, and flow velocity. The dilatancy angle ψ plays an intermediary role in this evolution and obeys the simple relationship tan ψ = m-meq, where meq is the grain concentration in equilibrium with the ambient stress state and flow rate. Results of recent stress-controlled rheometric experiments by Boyer et al. (DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.188301) provide our basis for estimating meq. Relaxation of m toward meq, coupled with evolution of pore pressure, allows our model to simulate a smooth transition from static limiting equilibrium of slopes to disequilibrium flow dynamics. Use of variable friction coefficients or dam-break initial conditions is unnecessary. We have evaluated predictions of our model in three ways: (1) by examining physical implications of exact solutions of simplified model equations, (2) by comparing numerical solutions with results of controlled experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume, and (3) by comparing numerical predictions with the behavior of a large (~50 million m3) debris flow that occurred at Mt. Meager, British Columbia, in 2010. Model predictions depend mostly on initial conditions, flow-path topography, and the value of a single dimensionless parameter that represents the ratio of two key timescales. One timescale governs downslope, gravity-driven motion of debris, and the other governs pore-pressure diffusion. Values of these timescales are readily calculated from source-area geometry and standard geotechnical

  1. Dissipative particle dynamics modeling of blood flow in arterial bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuejin; Lykov, Kirill; Pivkin, Igor V.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-11-01

    The motion of a suspension of red blood cells (RBCs) flowing in bifurcations is investigated using both low-dimensional RBC (LD-RBC) and multiscale RBC (MS-RBC) models based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The blood flow is first simulated in a symmetric geometry between the diverging and converging channels to satisfy the periodic flow assumption along the flow direction. The results show that the flowrate ratio of the daughter channels and the feed hematocrit level has considerable influence on blood-plasma separation. We also propose a new method to model the inflow and outflow boundaries for the blood flow simulations: the inflow at the inlet is duplicated from a fully developed flow generated by DPD fluid with periodic boundary conditions; the outflow in two adjacent regions near the outlet is controlled by adaptive forces to keep the flowrate and velocity gradient equal, while the particles leaving the microfluidic channel at the outlet at each time step are removed from the system. The simulation results of the developing flow match analytical solutions from continuum theory. Plasma skimming and the all-or-nothing phenomenon of RBCs in bifurcation have been investigated in the simulations. The simulation results are consistent with previous experimental results and theoretical predictions. This work is supported by the NIH Grant R01HL094270.

  2. Simulations of ductile flow in brittle material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Luh, M.H.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research is continuing on the effects of thermal properties of the cutting tool and workpiece on the overall temperature distribution. Using an Eulerian finite element model, diamond and steel tools cutting aluminum have been simulated at various, speeds, and depths of cut. The relative magnitude of the thermal conductivity of the tool and the workpiece is believed to be a primary factor in the resulting temperature distribution in the workpiece. This effect is demonstrated in the change of maximum surface temperatures for diamond on aluminum vs. steel on aluminum. As a preliminary step toward the study of ductile flow in brittle materials, the relative thermal conductivities of diamond on polycarbonate is simulated. In this case, the maximum temperature shifts from the rake face of the tool to the surface of the machined workpiece, thus promoting ductile flow in the workpiece surface.

  3. Importance of material matching in the calibration of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation: material specificity and nanoparticle surface coating effects on retention time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Haiou; Quevedo, Ivan R.; Linder, Sean W.; Fong, Andrew; Mudalige, Thilak K.

    2016-10-01

    Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with dynamic light scattering or multiangle light scattering detectors is a promising technique for the size-based separation of colloidal particles (nano- and submicron scale) and the online determination of the particle size of the separated fractions in aqueous suspensions. In most cases, the applications of these detectors are problematic due to the material-specific properties of the analyte that results in erroneous calculations, and as an alternative, different nanoparticle size standards are required to properly calibrate the size-based retention in AF4. The availability of nanoparticle size standards in different materials is limited, and this deviation from ideal conditions of retention is mainly due to material-specific and particle coating-specific membrane-particle interactions. Here, we present an experimental method on the applicability of polystyrene nanoparticles (PS NP) as standard for AF4 calibration and compare with gold nanoparticle (Au NP) standards having different nominal sizes and surface functionalities.

  4. Dynamics of an inverted flexible plate in a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chao; Liu, Nan-Sheng; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of an inverted flexible plate with a free leading-edge and a fixed trailing-edge in a uniform flow has been studied numerically by an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for the fluid flow and a finite element method for the plate deformation. Mechanisms underlying the dynamics of the fluid-plate system are elucidated systematically. A series of distinct states of the plate deformation and motion are identified and can be described as straight, flapping, deflected, deflected-flapping, and asymmetric-flapping states. Which state to occur depends mainly on the bending stiffness and aspect ratio of the plate. The forces exerted on the plate and the elastic strain energy of the plate are analyzed. It is found that the flapping state can improve the conversion of fluid kinetic energy to elastic strain energy. In addition, the effects of the mass ratio of the plate and the fluid, the Reynolds number, and the angle of attack of the uniform flow on the dynamics and the elastic strain energy of flexible plate are also investigated in detail. The vortical structures around the plate are given to discuss the connection of the evolution of vortices with the plate deformation and motion. The results obtained in this study provide physical insight into the understanding of the mechanisms on the dynamics of the fluid-plate system.

  5. Dynamic strength properties of permeable fibrous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanchuk, A.A.; Karpinos, D.M.; Kondrat'ev, Yu.V.; Nezhentsev, Yu.I.; Rutkovskii, A.E.; Bikernieks, V.Ya.; Peterson, O.O.; Pekhovich, V.A.

    1986-11-01

    The authors assess the porosity and fracture properties of porous samples of molybdenum, tungsten, and steel-Kh18N9T through a variety of mechanical tests including impact, bend, and notch. They study the interplay and interdependence of these properties in view of looking for materials suited for processes of transpiration cooling and sound and vibration damping.

  6. Visualization of water flow during filtration using flat filtration materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bílek, Petr; Šidlof, Petr; Hrůza, Jakub

    2012-04-01

    Filtration materials are very important elements of some industrial appliances. Water filtration is a separation of solid materials from fluid. Solid particles are captured on the frontal area of the filtration textile and only liquid passes through it. It is important to know the filtration process in a detailed way to be able to develop filtration materials. Visualization of filtration process enables a better view of the filtration. This method also enables to determine efficiency and homogeneity of filtration using image analysis. For this purpose, a new waterfiltration measuring setup was proposed and constructed. Filtration material is mounted into the optically transparent place in the setup. Laser sheet is directed into this place as in the case of Particle Image Velocimetry measuring method. Monochrome and sensitive camera records the light scattered by seeding particles in water. The seeding particles passing through the filter serve for measuring filtration efficiency, and also for visualization of filtration process. Filtration setup enables to measure also the pressure drop and a flow. The signals are processed by National Instruments compactDAQ system and UMA software. Microfibrous and nanofibrous filtration materials are tested by this measuring method. In the case of nanofibrous filtration, appropriate size of seeding particles is needed to be used to perform a process of filtration.

  7. Mantle Flow Pattern and Dynamic Topography beneath the Eastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; King, S. D.; Adam, C. M.; Long, M. D.; Benoit, M. H.; Kirby, E.

    2015-12-01

    The complex tectonic history of the eastern US over the past billion years includes episodes of subduction and rifting associated with two complete cycles of supercontinent assembly and breakup. Both the previous global tomography models (S40RTS, SAVANI, TX2011, GyPSuM, SMEAN) and the analysis of the shear-wave splitting from the broadband seismic stations find a distinct coast-to-inland differentiation pattern in the lithosphere and upper mantle. The Mid-Atlantic Geophysical Integrative Collaboration (MAGIC) includes a dense linear seismic array from the Atlantic coast of Virginia to the western boarder of Ohio, crossing several different tectonic zones. To derive the regional mantle flow pattern along with its surface expression such as dynamic topography and aid the interpretation of the seismic observations, we are building a new geodynamic model based on ASPECT (Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth CovecTion) that uses buoyancy derived from seismic tomography along with realistic lithosphere and sub-lithosphere structure. At present, we use S40RTS and SAVANI tomography models together with the temperature-dependent viscosity to compute the mantle flow and dynamic topography. Beneath the eastern US, the upper mantle flow in our model is primarily parallel to the trend of the Appalachian belt, which is broadly consistent with the direction of the local shear-wave splitting. The dynamic topography results exhibit a coast-to-inland magnitude differentiation along the MAGIC seismic deployment. The numerical tests also show that both the magnitude and pattern of the dynamic topography are quite sensitive to the density perturbation and rigidity of the lithosphere/sub-lithosphere. Our future work involves using other tomography and viscosity models to obtain the mantle flow pattern as well as the resulting dynamic topography and geoid.

  8. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of Steel and Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisada, Yoshiaki; Imaizumi, Takuya; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Matsushita, Muneo; Ikeda, Rinsei

    2014-11-01

    Material flow is a key phenomenon to obtain sound joints by friction stir welding (FSW), and it is highly dependent of the welded material. It is well known that the optimal FSW condition depends on the welded material. However, the material flow during FSW has not been totally clarified in spite of many researches. Especially, the material flow of steel during FSW is still unclear. It seems difficult to understand the material flow by the traditional method such as the tracer method or observation of the microstructure in the stir zone. Therefore, in this study, the material flow of steel was three dimensionally visualized by x-ray radiography using two pairs of x-ray transmission real-time imaging systems, and was then compared with the material flow of aluminum. The result revealed the effect of the welded material on the material flow during FSW.

  9. Effects of polymer retention on dynamics of single phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsa, Shima; Weitz, David

    2014-11-01

    We study the effect of adsorption of polymer solution on dynamics of a single phase flow in a model porous medium. We use confocal microscopy to fully visualize the flow of fluid in 3D micromodel of porous media. Polymer flooding is known to be an effective method for enhanced oil recovery. However, the physical mechanism is not clearly understood. We study the effect of polymer retention on the dynamics of single phase flow using particle image velocimetery. The distribution of velocities in the medium changes greatly after flow of high concentrations of polymer through the medium. Comparing the magnitude of velocities before and after the polymer flow, we observe reduction of accessible pores to the fluid at similar injection rates. Independent measurement of the permeability of the medium confirms the decrease in the porosity. Measurements of the retention of polymer in porous media shows a weak dependence on the hydrodynamic radius of the polymer. In these experiments, the viscoelastic behavior of the polymer is isolated from velocity measurements.

  10. Three-dimensional flow dynamics of an active submarine channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, E. J.; Dorrell, R. M.; Peakall, J.; Darby, S. E.; Parsons, D. R.; Wynn, R.

    2012-12-01

    Field scale submarine channel gravity currents are notoriously difficult to measure and thus directly investigate due to their inaccessible location and infrequent nature, which is compounded by present sea-level high-stand. An exception to this is the almost continuous density-driven current that results from the inflow of saline Mediterranean water, via the Bosporus strait, into the Black Sea. This flow has carved a sinuous channel system in water depths of 70 to 120 m. The relatively shallow depths of the channel and the continuous nature of this current provide a rare opportunity to study three-dimensional flow dynamics and the interaction of the flow with a seafloor channel network. Thus, it provides a rare analogue for channelized dilute sediment-laden turbidity currents. Sediment erosion, transport and deposition within submarine channel bends is primarily controlled by the magnitude and direction of near bed flow. Flow around channel bends is characterized by a helical or spiralling structure. In rivers this helical flow is characterized by near-surface fluid moving toward the outer bank and near-bed fluid moving toward the inner bank. Following fierce debate over the last decade, it is now accepted that helical flow in submarine channel bends can display a variety of complex structures. Most importantly for understanding sediment transport, near bed flow can be directed towards the outer bank, which is in the opposite sense to in a river. The next challenge is to understand what the exact controls on the orientation of helical flow cells within submarine flows are, and their spatial evolution around bends. We present data from the Black Sea showing how the three-dimensional velocity and density of a submarine gravity current evolves at multiple cross sections as the flow travels around a bend. We use this data to calculate the magnitude, relative importance and interaction of centrifugal, coriolis and pressure gradients in controlling the structure of

  11. Anomalous flow behavior in nanochannels: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, Sohail; Luo, Lin; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2010-06-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of flow of water in nanochannels with a range of surface wettability characteristics (hydrophobic to strongly hydrophilic) and driving forces (pressures). Our results show apparently anomalous behavior. At low pressures, the rate is higher in nanochannels with hydrophilic surfaces than that with hydrophobic surfaces; however, with high pressure driven flow we observe opposite trends. This apparently anomalous behavior can be explained on the basis of molecular thermodynamics and fluid mechanics considerations. Understanding such behavior is important in many nanofluidic devices such as nanoreactors, nanosensors, and nanochips that are increasingly being designed and used.

  12. Dynamics of poloidal flows in enhanced reverse shear bifurcation

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, R.; Avinash, K.

    2005-07-15

    A simple reduced enhanced reverse shear (RERS) model is constructed to study the dynamics of poloidal flows during the ERS transition. This model predicts that a reversal of poloidal flow shear occurs just prior to the transition, as seen in experiment [R. E. Bell et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1429 (1998)]. This transition front propagates until the radial location where the safety factor (q) is minimum and becomes locked there due to insufficient input power to overcome the threshold requirement for the bifurcation. This study also reveals that there can be many routes to ERS transition depending upon various tunable parameters.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of salivary flow and its effect on sialolithogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, P; Lin, Y; Lin, H; Xu, Y; Zheng, QY; Han, Y

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Sialolithiasis is a common disease caused by intraductal stones, formed by reduction in salivary flow, salivary stagnation, and metabolic events. We used computational fluid dynamics to investigate changes in salivary flow field around parotid stones of different shapes. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three-dimensional configurations of the Stensen’s duct were reconstructed from computed tomography sialographic images. Fluid dynamics modeling was used to analyze the salivary flow field around stones under unstimulated and stimulated conditions. RESULTS The majority of sialoliths were oval-shaped (59/98), followed by irregular (24/98) and round (15/98). Salivary velocity was significantly higher around streamlined stones, compared with round (P = 0.013) and oval (P = 0.025) types. Changes in salivary flow field around sialoliths were found to affect the pattern of mineral deposition in saliva. The area of low velocity around the round stone was double the size observed around the streamlined stone during the unstimulated state, whereas in the stimulated state, local vortexes were formed on the downstream side of round and oval stones. CONCLUSIONS Salivary flow field around sialoliths plays an important role in the progression of multicentric stones, and analysis of the salivary dynamics during sialolithiasis may provide deeper understandings of the condition and aid in developing successful treatment strategies. PMID:24164693

  14. A continuum theory for modeling the dynamics of crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Liming; Chen, Youping; Lee, James D

    2009-02-01

    This paper introduces a multiscale field theory for modeling and simulation of the dynamics of crystalline materials. The atomistic formulation of a multiscale field theory is briefly introduced. Its applicability is discussed. A few application examples, including phonon dispersion relations of ferroelectric materials BiScO3 and MgO nano dot under compression are presented.

  15. Dynamics of AHL mediated quorum sensing under flow and non-flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Andrea; Megerle, Judith A.; Kuttler, Christina; Müller, Johannes; Aguilar, Claudio; Eberl, Leo; Hense, Burkhard A.; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2012-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) describes the capability of microbes to communicate with each other by the aid of small molecules. Here we investigate the dynamics of QS-regulated gene expression induced by acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) in Pseudomonas putida IsoF containing a green fluorescent protein-based AHL reporter. The fluorescence time course of individual colonies is monitored following the external addition of a defined AHL concentration to cells which had previously reached the QS-inactive state in AHL-free medium. Using a microfluidic setup the experiment is performed both under flow and non-flow conditions. We find that without supplying external AHL gene expression is induced without flow while flow suppresses the induction. Both without and with flow, at a low AHL concentration the fluorescence onset is significantly delayed while fluorescence starts to increase directly upon the addition of AHL at a high concentration. The differences between no flow and flow can be accounted for using a two-compartment model. This indicates AHL accumulation in a volume which is not affected by the flow. The experiments furthermore show significant cell-to-cell and colony-to-colony variability which is discussed in the context of a compartmentalized QS mechanism.

  16. Flow Simulations of The Dynamics of a Perturbed Solid-Body Rotation Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shixiao; Feng, Chunjuan; Liu, Feng; Rusak, Zvi

    2016-11-01

    DNS is conducted to study the 3-D flow dynamics of a base solid-body rotation flow with a uniform axial velocity in a finite-length pipe. The simulation results describe the neutral stability line in response to either axisymmetric or 3-dimensional perturbations in a diagram of Reynolds number (Re , based on inlet axial velocity and pipe radius) versus the incoming flow swirl ratio (ω). This line is in good agreement with the neutral stability line recently predicted by the linear stability theory of Wang et al. (2016). The Wang & Rusak (1996) axisymmetric instability mechanism and evolution to an axisymmetric breakdown state is recovered in the simulations at certain operational conditions in terms of Re and ω. However, at other operational conditions there exists a dominant, 3-dimensional spiral type of instability mode that agrees with the linear stability theory of Wang et al. (2016). The growth of this mode leads to a spiral type of flow roll-up that subsequently nonlinearly saturates on a rotating spiral type of vortex breakdown. The computed time history of the velocity components at a certain point in the flow is used to describe 3-dimensional phase portraits of the flow global dynamics and its long-term behavior.

  17. Dynamical structure of magnetized dissipative accretion flow around black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Biplob; Das, Santabrata

    2016-09-01

    We study the global structure of optically thin, advection dominated, magnetized accretion flow around black holes. We consider the magnetic field to be turbulent in nature and dominated by the toroidal component. With this, we obtain the complete set of accretion solutions for dissipative flows where bremsstrahlung process is regarded as the dominant cooling mechanism. We show that rotating magnetized accretion flow experiences virtual barrier around black hole due to centrifugal repulsion that can trigger the discontinuous transition of the flow variables in the form of shock waves. We examine the properties of the shock waves and find that the dynamics of the post-shock corona (PSC) is controlled by the flow parameters, namely viscosity, cooling rate and strength of the magnetic field, respectively. We separate the effective region of the parameter space for standing shock and observe that shock can form for wide range of flow parameters. We obtain the critical viscosity parameter that allows global accretion solutions including shocks. We estimate the energy dissipation at the PSC from where a part of the accreting matter can deflect as outflows and jets. We compare the maximum energy that could be extracted from the PSC and the observed radio luminosity values for several supermassive black hole sources and the observational implications of our present analysis are discussed.

  18. Fluid dynamic mechanisms and interactions within separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, J. C.; Addy, A. L.

    1990-02-01

    The significant results of a joint research effort investigating the fundamental fluid dynamic mechanisms and interactions within high-speed separated flows are presented in detail. The results have obtained through analytical and numerical approaches, but with primary emphasis on experimental investigations of missile and projectile base flow-related configurations. The objectives of the research program focus on understanding the component mechanisms and interactions which establish and maintain high-speed separated flow regions. The analytical and numerical efforts have centered on unsteady plume-wall interactions in rocket launch tubes and on predictions of the effects of base bleed on transonic and supersonic base flowfields. The experimental efforts have considered the development and use of a state-of-the-art two component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system for experiments with planar, two-dimensional, small-scale models in supersonic flows. The LDV experiments have yielded high quality, well documented mean and turbulence velocity data for a variety of high-speed separated flows including initial shear layer development, recompression/reattachment processes for two supersonic shear layers, oblique shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions in a compression corner, and two-stream, supersonic, near-wake flow behind a finite-thickness base.

  19. Performance and Flow Dynamics Studies of Polymeric Optofluidic SERS Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uusitalo, S.; Hiltunen, J.; Karioja, P.; Siitonen, S.; Kontturi, V.; Myllylä, R.; Kinnunen, M.; Meglinski, I.

    2015-09-01

    We present a polymer-based optofluidic surface enhanced Raman scattering chip for biomolecule detection, serving as a disposable sensor choice with cost-effective production. The SERS substrate is fabricated by using industrial roll-to-roll UV-nanoimprinting equipment and integrated with adhesive-based polymeric microfluidics. The functioning of the SERS detection on-chip is confirmed and the effect of the polymer lid on the obtainable Raman spectra is analysed. Rhodamine 6G is used as a model analyte to demonstrate continuous flow measurements on a planar SERS substrate in a microchannel. The relation between the temporal response of the sensors and sample flow dynamics is studied with varied flow velocities, using SERS and fluorescence detection. The response time of the surface-dependent SERS signal is longer than the response time of the fluorescence signal of the bulk flow. This observation revealed the effect of convection on the temporal SERS responses at 25 μl/min to 1000 µl/min flow velocities. The diffusion of analyte molecules from the bulk concentration into the sensing surface induces about a 40-second lag time in the SERS detection. This lag time, and its rising trend with slower flow velocities, has to be taken into account in future trials of the optofluidic SERS sensor, with active analyte binding on the sensing surface.

  20. Regional material flow accounting and environmental pressures: the Spanish case.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Sergio; Carpintero, Óscar; Lomas, Pedro L

    2015-02-17

    This paper explores potential contributions of regional material flow accounting to the characterization of environmental pressures. With this aim, patterns of material extraction, trade, consumption, and productivity for the Spanish regions were studied within the 1996-2010 period. The main methodological variation as compared to whole-country based approaches is the inclusion of interregional trade, which can be separately assessed from the international exchanges. Each region was additionally profiled regarding its commercial exchanges with the rest of the regions and the rest of the world and the related environmental pressures. Given its magnitude, interregional trade is a significant source of environmental pressure. Most of the exchanges occur across regions and different extractive and trading patterns also arise at this scale. These differences are particularly great for construction minerals, which in Spain represent the largest share of extracted and consumed materials but do not cover long distances, so their impact is visible mainly at the regional level. During the housing bubble, economic growth did not improve material productivity.

  1. Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations for Realistic Flows (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    these calculations, the reference length is the vortex core radius, the reference flow conditions are the free stream conditions with the Mach number M...currently valid OMB control number . PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED...From - To) 11-10-2007 Technical Paper & Briefing Charts 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics

  2. Laser Velocimetry Measurements of Oscillating Airfoil Dynamic Stall Flow Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Velocimetry Measurements of Oscillating Airfoil Dynamic Stall Flow Field By M.S.Chandrasekharal Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics and Fluid Mechanics ...tunnel of the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory(FML) angle information. The other could be used for the at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). It is one of...were on throat is always kept choked so that no disturbances a different traverse mechanism , but this was driven as can propagate upstream into the

  3. Diabetes augments in vivo microvascular blood flow dynamics after stroke.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Kelly A; Brown, Craig E

    2013-12-04

    Stroke usually affects people with underlying medical conditions. In particular, diabetics are significantly more likely to have a stroke and the prognosis for recovery is poor. Because diabetes is associated with degenerative changes in the vasculature of many organs, we sought to determine how hyperglycemia affects blood flow dynamics after an ischemic stroke. Longitudinal in vivo two-photon imaging was used to track microvessels before and after photothrombotic stroke in a diabetic mouse model. Chronic hyperglycemia exacerbated acute (3-7 d) ischemia-induced increases in blood flow velocity, vessel lumen diameter, and red blood cell flux in peri-infarct regions. These changes in blood flow dynamics were most evident in superficial blood vessels within 500 μm from the infarct, rather than deeper or more distant cortical regions. Long-term imaging of diabetic mice not subjected to stroke indicated that these acute stroke-related changes in vascular function could not be attributed to complications from hyperglycemia alone. Treating diabetic mice with insulin immediately after stroke resulted in less severe alterations in blood flow within the first 7 d of recovery, but had more variable results at later time points. Analysis of microvessel branching patterns revealed that stroke led to a pruning of microvessels in peri-infarct cortex, with very few instances of sprouting. These results indicate that chronic hyperglycemia significantly affects the vascular response to ischemic stroke and that insulin only partially mitigates these changes. The combination of these acute and chronic alterations in blood flow dynamics could underlie diabetes-related deficits in cortical plasticity and stroke recovery.

  4. Meeting on flows of granular materials in complex geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Passman, S.L.; Fukushima, E.; Evans, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    The International Energy Agency Fossil Fuel Multiphase Flow Sciences Agreement has been in effect since 1986. The traditional mechanism for the effort has been information exchange, effected by the inclusion of scientists in annual Executive committee meetings, by exchange of reports and papers, and by visits of scientists to one another`s institutions. In a sequence of informal meetings and at the 1993 Executive committee meeting, held in Pittsburgh, US in March 1994, it was decided that more intensive interactions could be productive. A candidate for such interactions would be specific projects. Each of these would be initiated through a meeting of scientists in which feasibility of the particular project was decided, followed by relatively intense international co-operation in which the work would be done. This is a report of the first of these meetings. Official or unofficial representatives from Canada, italy, japan, mexico, the United Kingdom, and the US met in Albuquerque, New Mexico, US, to consider the subject Flows of Granular Materials in Complex Geometries. Representatives of several other countries expressed interest but were unable to attend this meeting. Sixteen lectures were given on aspects of this topic. It was decided that a co-operative effort was desirable and possible. The most likely candidate for the area of study would be flows in bins and hoppers. Each of the countries wishing to co-operate will pursue funding for its effort. This report contains extended abstracts of the sixteen presentations and a transcription of the final discussion.

  5. Hydro-dynamic damping theory in flowing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monette, C.; Nennemann, B.; Seeley, C.; Coutu, A.; Marmont, H.

    2014-03-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) has a major impact on the dynamic response of the structural components of hydroelectric turbines. On mid-head to high-head Francis runners, the rotor-stator interaction (RSI) phenomenon always has to be considered carefully during the design phase to avoid operational issues later on. The RSI dynamic response amplitudes are driven by three main factors: (1) pressure forcing amplitudes, (2) excitation frequencies in relation to natural frequencies and (3) damping. The prediction of the two first factors has been largely documented in the literature. However, the prediction of fluid damping has received less attention in spite of being critical when the runner is close to resonance. Experimental damping measurements in flowing water on hydrofoils were presented previously. Those results showed that the hydro-dynamic damping increased linearly with the flow. This paper presents development and validation of a mathematical model, based on momentum exchange, to predict damping due to fluid structure interaction in flowing water. The model is implemented as an analytical procedure for simple structures, such as cantilever beams, but is also implemented in more general ways using three different approaches for more complex structures such as runner blades: a finite element procedure, a CFD modal work based approach and a CFD 1DOF approach. The mathematical model and all three implementation approaches are shown to agree well with experimental results.

  6. Flow Dynamics of Contrast Dispersion in the Aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Parastou; Seo, Jung-Hee; Chen, Marcus; Mittal, Rajat

    2016-11-01

    The time profile of the contrast concentration or arterial input function (AIF) has many fundamental clinical implications and is of importance for many imaging modalities and diagnosis such as MR perfusion, CT perfusion and CT angiography (CTA). Contrast dispersion in CTA has been utilized to develop a novel method- Transluminal Attenuation Flow Encoding (TAFE)- to estimate coronary blood flow (CBF). However, in clinical practice, AIF is only available in the descending aorta and is used as a surrogate of the AIF at the coronary ostium. In this work we use patient specific computational models of the complete aorta to investigate the fluid dynamics of contrast dispersion in the aorta. The simulation employs a realistic kinematic model of the aortic valve and the dispersion patterns are correlated with the complex dynamics of the pulsatile flow in the curved aorta. The simulations allow us to determine the implications of using the descending aorta AIF as a surrogate for the AIF at the coronary ostium. PE is supported by the NIH Individual Partnership Program. -/abstract- Category: 4.7.1: Biological fluid dynamics: Physiological - Cardiovasc This work was done at Johns Hopkins University.

  7. The dynamics of semiflexible actin filaments in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanan; Lindner, Anke; Du Roure, Olivia

    2016-11-01

    The rheological properties of complex fluids made of particles in a suspended fluid depend on the behavior of microscopic particles in flow. A first step to understand this link is to investigate the individual particle dynamics in simple shear flows. A rigid rod will perform so-called Jeffery orbits, however when the rod becomes flexible and Brownian, the behavior in terms of deformation and migration is still to be fully understood. We chose here to address this situation by studying experimentally the behavior of semiflexible polymers. We use actin filaments and combine fluorescent labeling techniques, microfluidic devices to carry out controlled systematical experiments. Different dynamics are observed as a function of the elasto-viscous number, comparing viscous forces to elastic restoring forces ζ = (8 πηγ˙L4) / (LpkB T) . The bending modulus of the actin filaments is given by its persistence length Lp = 17 +/- 1 μm . When increasing the elasto-visous number we subsequently observe tumbling, buckling, and bending under flow. Those observations seem to be in good agreement with recent numerical simulations. At the same time, actin filaments fluctuate due to Brownian motion and these fluctuations can modify the individual dynamics of actin filaments. ERC PaDy No.682367.

  8. A note on the theory of fast money flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, A.; Kieu, T.; Melatos, A.

    2010-08-01

    The gauge theory of arbitrage was introduced by Ilinski in [K. Ilinski, preprint arXiv:hep-th/9710148 (1997)] and applied to fast money flows in [A. Ilinskaia, K. Ilinski, preprint arXiv:cond-mat/9902044 (1999); K. Ilinski, Physics of finance: gauge modelling in non-equilibrium pricing (Wiley, 2001)]. The theory of fast money flow dynamics attempts to model the evolution of currency exchange rates and stock prices on short, e.g. intra-day, time scales. It has been used to explain some of the heuristic trading rules, known as technical analysis, that are used by professional traders in the equity and foreign exchange markets. A critique of some of the underlying assumptions of the gauge theory of arbitrage was presented by Sornette in [D. Sornette, Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 9, 505 (1998)]. In this paper, we present a critique of the theory of fast money flow dynamics, which was not examined by Sornette. We demonstrate that the choice of the input parameters used in [K. Ilinski, Physics of finance: gauge modelling in non-equilibrium pricing (Wiley, 2001)] results in sinusoidal oscillations of the exchange rate, in conflict with the results presented in [K. Ilinski, Physics of finance: gauge modelling in non-equilibrium pricing (Wiley, 2001)]. We also find that the dynamics predicted by the theory are generally unstable in most realistic situations, with the exchange rate tending to zero or infinity exponentially.

  9. Distortion and flow of nematics simulated by dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tongyang; Wang, Xiaogong

    2014-05-14

    In this study, we simulated distortion and flow of nematics by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The nematics were modeled by a binary mixture that contained rigid rods composed of DPD particles as mesogenic units and normal DPD particles as solvent. Elastic distortions were investigated by monitoring director orientation in space under influences of boundary anchoring and external fields. Static distortion demonstrated by the simulation is consistent with the prediction of Frank elastic theory. Spatial distortion profile of the director was examined to obtain static elastic constants. Rotational motions of the director under influence of the external field were simulated to understand the dynamic process. The rules revealed by the simulation are in a good agreement with those obtained from dynamical experiments and classical theories for nematics. Three Miesowicz viscosities were obtained by using external fields to hold the orientation of the rods in shear flows. The simulation showed that the Miesowicz viscosities have the order of ηc > ηa > ηb and the rotational viscosity γ1 is about two orders larger than the Miesowicz viscosity ηb. The DPD simulation correctly reproduced the non-monotonic concentration dependence of viscosity, which is a unique property of lyotropic nematic fluids. By comparing simulation results with classical theories for nematics and experiments, the DPD nematic fluids are proved to be a valid model to investigate the distortion and flow of lyotropic nematics.

  10. Flow path and travel time dynamics in a lowland catchment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velde, Ype; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of time it takes water from the moment of precipitation to reach the catchment outlet is widely used as a characteristic for catchment flow path contributions, catchment vulnerability to pollution spreading and pollutant loads from catchments to downstream waters. However, this distribution tends to vary in time driven by variability in precipitation and evapotranspiration. Catchment scale mixing of water controls how dynamics in rainfall and evapotranspiration are translated into dynamics of travel time distributions. In this presentation we use the concept of StorAge selection (SAS) functions, that quantify catchment scale mixing of water, to describe chloride and nitrate flow. We will show how SAS functions relate to the topography and subsurface and how they are effective in describing nitrate and chloride transport. The presented analyses will combine unique datasets of high-frequency discharge and water quality concentrations with conceptual models of water flow and solute transport. Remarkable findings are the large contrasts in travel times between lowland and sloping catchments and the strong relationship between evapotranspiration and stream water nutrient concentration dynamics.

  11. Drops subjected to surface acoustic waves: flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Philippe; Baudoin, Michael; Bou Matar, Olivier; Dynamique Des Systèmes Hors Equilibre Team; Aiman-Films Team

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic waves of frequency beyond the MHz are known to induce streaming flow in fluids that can be suitable to perform elementary operations in microfluidics systems. One of the currently appealing geometry is that of a sessile drop subjected to surface acoustic waves (SAW). Such Rayleigh waves produce non-trival actuation in the drop leading to internal flow, drop displacement, free-surface oscillations and atomization. We recently carried out experiments and numerical simulations that allowed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms that couple acoustic propagation and fluid actuation. We varied the frequency and amplitude of actuation, as well as the properties of the fluid, and we measured the effects of these parameters on the dynamics of the flow. We compared these results to finite-elements numerical simulations.

  12. Dynamic continuum pedestrian flow model with memory effect.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yinhua; Wong, S C; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we develop a macroscopic model for pedestrian flow using the dynamic continuum modeling approach. We consider a two-dimensional walking facility that is represented as a continuum within which pedestrians can move freely in any direction. A pedestrian chooses a route based on his or her memory of the shortest path to the desired destination when the facility is empty and, at the same time, tries to avoid high densities. In this model, pedestrian flow is governed by a two-dimensional conservation law, and a general speed-flow-density relationship is considered. The model equation is solved numerically using the discontinuous Galerkin method, and a numerical example is employed to demonstrate both the model and the effectiveness of the numerical method.

  13. Modeling granular material flows: The angle of repose, fluidization and the cliff collapse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holsapple, Keith A.

    2013-07-01

    I discuss theories of granular material flows, with application to granular flows on the earth and planets. There are two goals. First, there is a lingering belief of some that the standard continuum plasticity Mohr-Coulomb and/or Drucker-Prager models are not adequate for many large-scale granular flow problems. The stated reason for those beliefs is the fact that the final slopes of the run-outs in collapse, landslide problems, and large-scale cratering are well below the angle of repose of the material. That observation, combined with the supposition that in those models flow cannot occur with slopes less than the angle of repose, has led to a number of researchers suggesting a need for lubrication or fluidization mechanisms and modeling. That issue is investigated in detail and shown to be false. A complete analysis of slope failures according to the Mohr-Coulomb model is presented, with special attention to the relations between the angle of repose and slope failures. It is shown that slope failure can occur for slope angles both larger than and smaller than the angle of repose. Second, to study the details of landslide run-outs, finite-difference continuum code simulations of the prototypical cliff collapse problem, using the classical plasticity models, are presented, analyzed and compared to experiments. Although devoid of any additional fluidization models, those simulations match experiments in the literature extremely well. The dynamics of this problem introduces additional important features relating to the run-out and final slope angles. The vertical free surface begins to fall at the initial 90° and flow continues to a final slope less than 10°. The detail in the calculation is examined to show why flow persists at slope angles that appear to be less than the angle of repose. The motions include regions of solid-like, fluid-like, and gas-like flows without invoking any additional models.

  14. Dynamic Mode Decomposition Bio-Markers for Left Ventricle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja, Maria; Martinez-Legazpi, Pablo; Benito, Yolanda; Yotti, Raquel; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Bermejo, Javier; Del Alamo, Juan C.

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is a tool used in the fluid community to extract a set of modes that describe the underling fluid dynamics in a set of flow fields generated experimentally or by numerical simulations. Despite advances in medical imaging, characterization of some cardiac dysfunctions has remained a challenge and diagnosis is often subjective. This study presents a novel DMD method to objectively characterize left ventricular (LV) flow in healthy volunteers and patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Our approach is based on assessing temporal evolution dependent mode structures from two-dimensional velocity fields, obtained experimentally using echocardiographic color Doppler velocimetry, and defined with a common unit normal moving LV coordinate system. Using the mode structures as a basis, we reconstruct the flow field, determine the key contributing modes, and obtain a reduce order model. Using 20 healthy volunteers, 20 DCM patients and 20 HCM patients, our results show quantitative and qualitative differences between healthy and in the DCM and HCM patients. This study suggests that temporal evolution dependent modes can be used as bio-markers to asses in-vivo LV flow.

  15. Slow dynamics at Re =108 in turbulent Helium flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, Javier; Roche, Philippe; Rousset, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    The presence of slow dynamics is a recurrent feature of many turbulent flows. This behaviour can be created by instabilities of the mean flow or by other mechanisms. In this work we analyze the behavior of a highly turbulent flow (maximum Reynolds number Re =108 , with a Reynolds based on the Taylor microscale Reλ = 2000). The experimental cell consists on a closed cavity filled with liquid Helium (330 liters) close to the lambda point (between 1.8 and 2.5 K) where two inhomogeneous and strongly turbulent flows collide in a thin region. The cylindrical cavity has a diameter of 78cm and two impellers rotate in opposite directions with rotation frequencies up to 2 Hz. The distance between the propellers is 70 cm. Different experimental runs have been performed, both in the normal and superfluid phases. We have performed velocity measurements using home-made Pitot tubes. Here we would like to present preliminary results on this configuration. The analysis of the data series reveals that below the injection frequencies there are different dynamical regimes with time scales two orders of magnitude below the injection scale. We acknowledge support from the EuHIT network and the SHREK Collaboration.

  16. Nonlinear dynamics in eccentric Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Benoît; Caulfield, C. P.

    2015-11-01

    The flow in the gap between two parallel but eccentric cylinders and driven by an axial pressure gradient and inner cylinder rotation is characterized by two geometrical parameters (radius ratio and eccentricity) and two dynamic parameters (axial and azimuthal Reynolds numbers). Such a theoretical configuration is a model for the flow between drill string and wellbore in the hydrocarbon drilling industry. The linear convective and absolute instability properties have been systematically derived in a recent study [Leclercq, Pier & Scott, J. Fluid Mech. 2013 and 2014]. Here we address the nonlinear dynamics resulting after saturation of exponentially growing small-amplitude perturbations. By using direct numerical simulations, a range of finite-amplitude states are found and characterized: nonlinear traveling waves (an eccentric counterpart of Taylor vortices, associated with constant hydrodynamic loading on the inner cylinder), modulated nonlinear waves (with time-periodic torque and flow rate) and more irregular states. In the nonlinear regime, the hydrodynamic forces are found to depart significantly from those prevailing for the base flow, even in situations of weak linear instability.

  17. Calculational investigation of impact cratering dynamics - Early time material motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, J. M.; Austin, M. G.; Ruhl, S. F.; Schultz, P. H.; Orphal, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Early time two-dimensional finite difference calculations of laboratory-scale hypervelocity (6 km/sec) impact of 0.3 g spherical 2024 aluminum projectiles into homogeneous plasticene clay targets were performed and the resulting material motions analyzed. Results show that the initial jetting of vaporized target material is qualitatively similar to experimental observation. The velocity flow field developed within the target is shown to have features quite similar to those found in calculations of near-surface explosion cratering. Specific application of Maxwell's analytic Z-Model (developed to interpret the flow fields of near-surface explosion cratering calculations), shows that this model can be used to describe the flow fields resulting from the impact cratering calculations, provided that the flow field center is located beneath the target surface, and that application of the model is made late enough in time that most of the projectile momentum has been dissipated.

  18. Diode laser absorption sensors for gas-dynamic and combustion flows.

    PubMed

    Allen, M G

    1998-04-01

    Recent advances in room-temperature, near-IR and visible diode laser sources for tele-communication, high-speed computer networks, and optical data storage applications are enabling a new generation of gas-dynamic and combustion-flow sensors based on laser absorption spectroscopy. In addition to conventional species concentration and density measurements, spectroscopic techniques for temperature, velocity, pressure and mass flux have been demonstrated in laboratory, industrial and technical flows. Combined with fibreoptic distribution networks and ultrasensitive detection strategies, compact and portable sensors are now appearing for a variety of applications. In many cases, the superior spectroscopic quality of the new laser sources compared with earlier cryogenic, mid-IR devices is allowing increased sensitivity of trace species measurements, high-precision spectroscopy of major gas constituents, and stable, autonomous measurement systems. The purpose of this article is to review recent progress in this field and suggest likely directions for future research and development. The various laser-source technologies are briefly reviewed as they relate to sensor applications. Basic theory for laser absorption measurements of gas-dynamic properties is reviewed and special detection strategies for the weak near-IR and visible absorption spectra are described. Typical sensor configurations are described and compared for various application scenarios, ranging from laboratory research to automated field and airborne packages. Recent applications of gas-dynamic sensors for air flows and fluxes of trace atmospheric species are presented. Applications of gas-dynamic and combustion sensors to research and development of high-speed flows aeropropulsion engines, and combustion emissions monitoring are presented in detail, along with emerging flow control systems based on these new sensors. Finally, technology in nonlinear frequency conversion, UV laser materials, room

  19. Diode laser absorption sensors for gas-dynamic and combustion flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. G.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in room-temperature, near-IR and visible diode laser sources for tele-communication, high-speed computer networks, and optical data storage applications are enabling a new generation of gas-dynamic and combustion-flow sensors based on laser absorption spectroscopy. In addition to conventional species concentration and density measurements, spectroscopic techniques for temperature, velocity, pressure and mass flux have been demonstrated in laboratory, industrial and technical flows. Combined with fibreoptic distribution networks and ultrasensitive detection strategies, compact and portable sensors are now appearing for a variety of applications. In many cases, the superior spectroscopic quality of the new laser sources compared with earlier cryogenic, mid-IR devices is allowing increased sensitivity of trace species measurements, high-precision spectroscopy of major gas constituents, and stable, autonomous measurement systems. The purpose of this article is to review recent progress in this field and suggest likely directions for future research and development. The various laser-source technologies are briefly reviewed as they relate to sensor applications. Basic theory for laser absorption measurements of gas-dynamic properties is reviewed and special detection strategies for the weak near-IR and visible absorption spectra are described. Typical sensor configurations are described and compared for various application scenarios, ranging from laboratory research to automated field and airborne packages. Recent applications of gas-dynamic sensors for air flows and fluxes of trace atmospheric species are presented. Applications of gas-dynamic and combustion sensors to research and development of high-speed flows aeropropulsion engines, and combustion emissions monitoring are presented in detail, along with emerging flow control systems based on these new sensors. Finally, technology in nonlinear frequency conversion, UV laser materials, room

  20. Dynamics of model blood cells in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorski, Thomas; Callens, Natacha; Minetti, Christophe; Coupier, Gwennou; Dubois, Frank; Misbah, Chaouqi

    The dynamics of a vesicle suspension in shear flow was investigated by digital holographic microscopy [1] in parabolic flights and in the MASER 11 sounding rocket. Vesicles are lipid membranes which mimic the mechanical behaviour of cells, such as red blood cells in flow. In a simple shear flow between parallel walls, a lift force of purely viscous origin pushes vesicles away from walls. Our parabolic flight experiments [2] reveal that the lift velocity in a dilute suspen-sion is well described by theoretical predictions by Olla. As vesicles gather near the center of the flow chamber due to lift forces from both walls, one expects hydrodynamic interactions of pairs of vesicles to result in shear induced diffusion in the suspension. The BIOMICS experi-ment in the MASER 11 sounding rocket revealed a complex spatial structure of a polydisperse vesicle suspension due to the interplay between lift forces from the walls and hydrodynamic interactions. These phenomena have a strong impact on the structure and rheology of blood in small vessels, and a precise knowledge of the dynamics of migration and diffusion of soft particles in flow can lead to alternative ways to separate and sort blood cells. 1. Dubois, F., Schockaert, C., Callens, N., Yourrassowsky, C., "Focus plane detection criteria in digital holography microscopy by amplitude analysis", Opt. Express, Vol. 14, pp 5895-5908, 2006 2. Callens, N., Minetti, C., Coupier, G., Mader, M.-A., Dubois, F., Misbah, C., Podgorski, T., "Hydrodynamics lift of vesicles under shear flow in microgravity", Europhys. Lett., Vol. 83, p. 24002, 2008

  1. A restricted nonlinear-dynamics model for turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-Durán, Adrián; Jiménez, Javier; Farrell, Brian F.; Ioannou, Petros J.; Nikolaidis, Marios A.; Constantinou, Navid C.

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of the formation of very-large scale structure in turbulent plane Poiseuille flow is studied by restricting the nonlinearity in the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations to interactions between the streamwise-averaged flow and perturbations. Using comparisons with DNS, we show that this restricted nonlinear dynamics (RNL) supports essentially realistic turbulence at Reτ = 900 , despite the naturally occurring severe reduction in the set of streamwise wavenumbers supporting the turbulence. Using statistical diagnostics we verify that there are similar self-sustaining processes (SSP) underlying turbulence in the RNL and in the NS dynamics, separate manifestations of which operate in the buffer and outer layers. In the buffer layer, the SSP supports the familiar roll-streak mechanism of wall-bounded turbulence, while the outer-layer streaks in the RNL are probably the streamwise elongated structures referred to as VLSI. It is argued that the formation of the roll-streak structure is a universal mechanism that can be fruitfully studied in the minimal dynamics of RNL. Funded by Multiflow project of the ERC, Navid Constantinou acknowledges the support of the Alexander S. Onassis Public Benefit Foundation. Brian Farrell was supported by NSF AGS-1246929.

  2. Regularization of hidden dynamics in piecewise smooth flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaes, Douglas D.; Jeffrey, Mike R.

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the equivalence between differentiable and non-differentiable dynamics in Rn. Filippov's theory of discontinuous differential equations allows us to find flow solutions of dynamical systems whose vector fields undergo switches at thresholds in phase space. The canonical convex combination at the discontinuity is only the linear part of a nonlinear combination that more fully explores Filippov's most general problem: the differential inclusion. Here we show how recent work relating discontinuous systems to singular limits of continuous (or regularized) systems extends to nonlinear combinations. We show that if sliding occurs in a discontinuous systems, there exists a differentiable slow-fast system with equivalent slow invariant dynamics. We also show the corresponding result for the pinching method, a converse to regularization which approximates a smooth system by a discontinuous one.

  3. Flow dynamics and energy efficiency of flow in the left ventricle during myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Vivek; Low, Adriel Jia Jun; Annamalai, Sarayu Parimal; Sampath, Smita; Poh, Kian Keong; Totman, Teresa; Mazlan, Muhammad; Croft, Grace; Richards, A Mark; de Kleijn, Dominique P V; Chin, Chih-Liang; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2017-03-31

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, where myocardial infarction (MI) is a major category. After infarction, the heart has difficulty providing sufficient energy for circulation, and thus, understanding the heart's energy efficiency is important. We induced MI in a porcine animal model via circumflex ligation and acquired multiple-slice cine magnetic resonance (MR) images in a longitudinal manner-before infarction, and 1 week (acute) and 4 weeks (chronic) after infarction. Computational fluid dynamic simulations were performed based on MR images to obtain detailed fluid dynamics and energy dynamics of the left ventricles. Results showed that energy efficiency flow through the heart decreased at the acute time point. Since the heart was observed to experience changes in heart rate, stroke volume and chamber size over the two post-infarction time points, simulations were performed to test the effect of each of the three parameters. Increasing heart rate and stroke volume were found to significantly decrease flow energy efficiency, but the effect of chamber size was inconsistent. Strong complex interplay was observed between the three parameters, necessitating the use of non-dimensional parameterization to characterize flow energy efficiency. The ratio of Reynolds to Strouhal number, which is a form of Womersley number, was found to be the most effective non-dimensional parameter to represent energy efficiency of flow in the heart. We believe that this non-dimensional number can be computed for clinical cases via ultrasound and hypothesize that it can serve as a biomarker for clinical evaluations.

  4. Calculational investigation of impact cratering dynamics - Material motions during the crater growth period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, M. G.; Thomsen, J. M.; Ruhl, S. F.; Orphal, D. L.; Schultz, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    The considered investigation was conducted in connection with studies which are to provide a better understanding of the detailed dynamics of impact cratering processes. Such an understanding is vital for a comprehension of planetary surfaces. The investigation is the continuation of a study of impact dynamics in a uniform, nongeologic material at impact velocities achievable in laboratory-scale experiments conducted by Thomsen et al. (1979). A calculation of a 6 km/sec impact of a 0.3 g spherical 2024 aluminum projectile into low strength (50 kPa) homogeneous plasticene clay has been continued from 18 microseconds to past 600 microseconds. The cratering flow field, defined as the material flow field in the target beyond the transient cavity but well behind the outgoing shock wave, has been analyzed in detail to see how applicable the Maxwell Z-Model, developed from analysis of near-surface explosion cratering calculations, is to impact cratering

  5. Enhanced transport of materials into enamel nanopores via electrokinetic flow.

    PubMed

    Gan, H Y; Sousa, F B; Carlo, H L; Maciel, P P; Macena, M S; Han, J

    2015-04-01

    The ability to infiltrate various molecules and resins into dental enamel is highly desirable in dentistry, yet transporting materials into dental enamel is limited by the nanometric scale of their pores. Materials that cannot be infiltrated into enamel by diffusion/capillarity are often considered molecules with sizes above a critical threshold, which are often considered to be larger than the pores of enamel. We challenge this notion by reporting the use of electrokinetic flow to transport solutions with molecules with sizes above a critical threshold-namely, an aqueous solution with a high refractive index (Thoulet's solution) and a curable fluid resin infiltrant (without acid etching)-deep into the normal enamel layer. Volume infiltration by Thoulet's solution is increased by 5- to 6-fold, and resin infiltration depths as large as 600 to 2,000 µm were achieved, in contrast to ~10 µm resulting from diffusion/capillarity. Incubation with demineralization solution for 192 h resulted in significant demineralization at noninfiltrated histologic points but not at resin infiltrated. These results open new avenues for the transport of materials in dental enamel.

  6. Studies of shock induced flows in strengthless materials on Pegasus

    SciTech Connect

    Oro, D.M.; Fulton, R.D.; Stokes, J.; Guzik, J.A.; Adams, P.J.; Morgan, D.; Platts, D.; Obst, A.W.; Fell, M.

    1998-12-31

    Experiments on the Pegasus II pulsed power facility at Los Alamos are being conducted to study the evolution and flow of strengthless materials as a result of being shocked. Of particular interest is vorticity and mixing that is induced in the materials by a shock-wave passing through a non-uniform boundary. The experiments provide an important benchmark for hydrodynamic codes, and are a precursor to experiments planned on Atlas in which the materials will be pre-ionized before being shocked. For these experiments, flash radiography is used to image the position of the target boundaries at specific times. In these experiments 3 radiographs along target radii and 2 radiographs along the target axis are taken at independent times. The central cavity of the target is imaged with visible framing cameras. The Xe in this cavity radiates when shocked, and therefore the shape and timing of the shock front in the Xe can be determined from the images. Other diagnostics employed for this work include electric and magnetic field probes that are used to determine the current through the liner and when the liner impacts the target. Both the 1-d magnetohydrodynamics code RAVEN, and the 2-d/3-d adaptive grid eulerian code RAGE are used for pre-shot calculations. In this talk the authors will discuss the motivation for these experiments, compare calculations with radiographs and visible images and discuss future experiments on Pegasus and Atlas.

  7. Connecting exact coherent states to turbulent dynamics in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Sung; Graham, Michael D.

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of nonlinear traveling wave solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations or exact coherent states has greatly advanced the understanding of the nature of turbulent shear flows. These solutions are unstable saddle points in state space, while the time evolution of a turbulent flow is a dynamical trajectory wandering around them. In this regard, it is of interest to investigate how closely the turbulent trajectories approach these invariant states. Here, we present connections between turbulent trajectories and one intriguing solution family in channel flow. A state space visualization of turbulent trajectories is presented in a three-dimensional space. The lifetime of the trajectories is well represented by closeness to two distinct solutions resembling in many ways the active and hibernating phases of minimal channel turbulence (Xi & Graham PRL 2010). The connections are then examined by comparing mean profiles and flow structures. More importantly, the connections are confirmed by calculating the L2 distance between the trajectories and the traveling waves. Lastly, paths of an intermittent bursting phenomenon are identified in state space and the relationship between bursting paths and the traveling waves or hibernating turbulence is further discussed. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research through grant FA9550-15-1-0062 (Flow Interactions and Control Program).

  8. Visualization of bacterial flagella dynamics in a viscous shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Jamel; Kim, Minjun

    2016-11-01

    We report on the dynamics of tethered bacterial flagella in an applied viscous shear flow and analyze their behavior using image processing. Flagellin proteins were repolymerized into flagellar filaments functionalized with biotin at their proximal end, and allowed to self-assemble within a micro channel coated with streptavidin. It was observed that all attached flagellar filaments aligned with the steady shear flow of various polymeric solutions. Furthermore it was observed that many of the filaments were stretched, and at elevated flow rates began to undergo polymorphic transformations, which were initiated at one end of the flagellum. When undergoing a change to a different helical form the flagellum was observed to transform to an oppositely handed helix, as to counteract the viscous torque imparted by the shear flow. It was also observed that some flagellar filaments did not undergo polymorphic transformations, but rotated about their helical axis. The rate of this rotation appears to be a function of the applied flow rate. These results expand on previous experimental work and aid in the development of a novel platform that harnesses the autonomic response of a 'forest' of bacterial flagella for engineering applications. This work was funded by NSF Grant CMMI-1000255, KEIT MOTIE Grant No. 10052980, and with Government support under and awarded by DoD, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship, 32 CFR 168a.

  9. Droplet sizes, dynamics and deposition in vertical annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, J C.B.; Dukler, A E

    1985-10-01

    The role of droplets in vertical upwards annular flow is investigated, focusing on the droplet size distributions, dynamics, and deposition phenomena. An experimental program was performed based on a new laser optical technique developed in these laboratories and implemented here for annular flow. This permitted the simultaneous measurement of droplet size, axial and radial velocity. The dependence of droplet size distributions on flow conditions is analyzed. The Upper-Log Normal function proves to be a good model for the size distribution. The mechanism controlling the maximum stable drop size was found to result from the interaction of the pressure fluctuations of the turbulent flow of the gas core with the droplet. The average axial droplet velocity showed a weak dependence on gas rates. This can be explained once the droplet size distribution and droplet size-velocity relationship are analyzed simultaneously. The surprising result from the droplet conditional analysis is that larger droplet travel faster than smaller ones. This dependence cannot be explained if the drag curves used do not take into account the high levels of turbulence present in the gas core in annular flow. If these are considered, then interesting new situations of multiplicity and stability of droplet terminal velocities are encountered. Also, the observed size-velocity relationship can be explained. A droplet deposition is formulated based on the particle inertia control. This permitted the calculation of rates of drop deposition directly from the droplet size and velocities data.

  10. Deconvolution of reacting-flow dynamics using proper orthogonal and dynamic mode decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sukesh; Hua, Jia-Chen; Barnhill, Will; Gunaratne, Gemunu H.; Gord, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical and computational studies of reacting flows are extremely challenging due in part to nonlinearities of the underlying system of equations and long-range coupling mediated by heat and pressure fluctuations. However, many dynamical features of the flow can be inferred through low-order models if the flow constituents (e.g., eddies or vortices) and their symmetries, as well as the interactions among constituents, are established. Modal decompositions of high-frequency, high-resolution imaging, such as measurements of species-concentration fields through planar laser-induced florescence and of velocity fields through particle-image velocimetry, are the first step in the process. A methodology is introduced for deducing the flow constituents and their dynamics following modal decomposition. Proper orthogonal (POD) and dynamic mode (DMD) decompositions of two classes of problems are performed and their strengths compared. The first problem involves a cellular state generated in a flat circular flame front through symmetry breaking. The state contains two rings of cells that rotate clockwise at different rates. Both POD and DMD can be used to deconvolve the state into the two rings. In POD the contribution of each mode to the flow is quantified using the energy. Each DMD mode can be associated with an energy as well as a unique complex growth rate. Dynamic modes with the same spatial symmetry but different growth rates are found to be combined into a single POD mode. Thus, a flow can be approximated by a smaller number of POD modes. On the other hand, DMD provides a more detailed resolution of the dynamics. Two classes of reacting flows behind symmetric bluff bodies are also analyzed. In the first, symmetric pairs of vortices are released periodically from the two ends of the bluff body. The second flow contains von Karman vortices also, with a vortex being shed from one end of the bluff body followed by a second shedding from the opposite end. The way in which

  11. On the dynamics of shallow gravel bed flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohajeri, Seyed Hossein; Righetti, Maurizio; Wharton, Geraldene; Gurnell, Angela

    2013-04-01

    Flow dynamics on a gravel bed is a popular research subject because of environmental implications and especially in the presence of sediment transport. However, some features of flow dynamics on gravel beds are not completely understood and many questions remain open, especially in the context of the turbulence structure of the flow field and sediment transport. Due to the low submergence characteristics of the flow, the dynamics of the turbulent flow field, especially at the bed region, cannot be regarded as a classical boundary roughness problem, sensu Nikuradse (Nezu and Nakagawa, 1993) due to the strong spatial and temporal variation of the flow field. Over the past decade, in order to properly take into account the spatial heterogeneity, spatial averaging of time averaged values have become common. Besides,recently a trend to understand the role of gravel bed statistical properties, such as structure function of the bed elevation, on the statistics of the near-bed flow has been proposed. Although much research considers gravel beds by spatial averaging and research has been conducted on the effects of bed characteristics on near bed flow and sediment transport, only a few studies consider both together. In the present study, the results of 2D PIV measurement coupled with high accurate measurement of the gravel bed characteristics and the turbulence properties of the low submergence gravel bed flow as related to the bed properties are presented. The double averaging method was used in the analysis. Furthermore, in order to have a better insight into the dynamics of transport processes at the bed, a simple quadrant analysis, based on the Lu and Willmarth method, was implemented (Lu and Willmarth, 1973). Finally, the turbulent integral length scale was calculated both near and far from the gravel bed. The time and double averaged results show an agreement with the previous studies. Moreover, the result of quadrant analysis shows the sweep is dominant between

  12. Cavitation erosion prediction based on analysis of flow dynamics and impact load spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihatsch, Michael S.; Schmidt, Steffen J.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2015-10-01

    Cavitation erosion is the consequence of repeated collapse-induced high pressure-loads on a material surface. The present paper assesses the prediction of impact load spectra of cavitating flows, i.e., the rate and intensity distribution of collapse events based on a detailed analysis of flow dynamics. Data are obtained from a numerical simulation which employs a density-based finite volume method, taking into account the compressibility of both phases, and resolves collapse-induced pressure waves. To determine the spectrum of collapse events in the fluid domain, we detect and quantify the collapse of isolated vapor structures. As reference configuration we consider the expansion of a liquid into a radially divergent gap which exhibits unsteady sheet and cloud cavitation. Analysis of simulation data shows that global cavitation dynamics and dominant flow events are well resolved, even though the spatial resolution is too coarse to resolve individual vapor bubbles. The inviscid flow model recovers increasingly fine-scale vapor structures and collapses with increasing resolution. We demonstrate that frequency and intensity of these collapse events scale with grid resolution. Scaling laws based on two reference lengths are introduced for this purpose. We show that upon applying these laws impact load spectra recorded on experimental and numerical pressure sensors agree with each other. Furthermore, correlation between experimental pitting rates and collapse-event rates is found. Locations of high maximum wall pressures and high densities of collapse events near walls obtained numerically agree well with areas of erosion damage in the experiment. The investigation shows that impact load spectra of cavitating flows can be inferred from flow data that captures the main vapor structures and wave dynamics without the need for resolving all flow scales.

  13. Cavitation erosion prediction based on analysis of flow dynamics and impact load spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mihatsch, Michael S. Schmidt, Steffen J.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2015-10-15

    Cavitation erosion is the consequence of repeated collapse-induced high pressure-loads on a material surface. The present paper assesses the prediction of impact load spectra of cavitating flows, i.e., the rate and intensity distribution of collapse events based on a detailed analysis of flow dynamics. Data are obtained from a numerical simulation which employs a density-based finite volume method, taking into account the compressibility of both phases, and resolves collapse-induced pressure waves. To determine the spectrum of collapse events in the fluid domain, we detect and quantify the collapse of isolated vapor structures. As reference configuration we consider the expansion of a liquid into a radially divergent gap which exhibits unsteady sheet and cloud cavitation. Analysis of simulation data shows that global cavitation dynamics and dominant flow events are well resolved, even though the spatial resolution is too coarse to resolve individual vapor bubbles. The inviscid flow model recovers increasingly fine-scale vapor structures and collapses with increasing resolution. We demonstrate that frequency and intensity of these collapse events scale with grid resolution. Scaling laws based on two reference lengths are introduced for this purpose. We show that upon applying these laws impact load spectra recorded on experimental and numerical pressure sensors agree with each other. Furthermore, correlation between experimental pitting rates and collapse-event rates is found. Locations of high maximum wall pressures and high densities of collapse events near walls obtained numerically agree well with areas of erosion damage in the experiment. The investigation shows that impact load spectra of cavitating flows can be inferred from flow data that captures the main vapor structures and wave dynamics without the need for resolving all flow scales.

  14. Managing critical materials with a technology-specific stocks and flows model.

    PubMed

    Busch, Jonathan; Steinberger, Julia K; Dawson, David A; Purnell, Phil; Roelich, Katy

    2014-01-21

    The transition to low carbon infrastructure systems required to meet climate change mitigation targets will involve an unprecedented roll-out of technologies reliant upon materials not previously widespread in infrastructure. Many of these materials (including lithium and rare earth metals) are at risk of supply disruption. To ensure the future sustainability and resilience of infrastructure, circular economy policies must be crafted to manage these critical materials effectively. These policies can only be effective if supported by an understanding of the material demands of infrastructure transition and what reuse and recycling options are possible given the future availability of end-of-life stocks. This Article presents a novel, enhanced stocks and flows model for the dynamic assessment of material demands resulting from infrastructure transitions. By including a hierarchical, nested description of infrastructure technologies, their components, and the materials they contain, this model can be used to quantify the effectiveness of recovery at both a technology remanufacturing and reuse level and a material recycling level. The model's potential is demonstrated on a case study on the roll-out of electric vehicles in the UK forecast by UK Department of Energy and Climate Change scenarios. The results suggest policy action should be taken to ensure Li-ion battery recycling infrastructure is in place by 2025 and NdFeB motor magnets should be designed for reuse. This could result in a reduction in primary demand for lithium of 40% and neodymium of 70%.

  15. Managing Critical Materials with a Technology-Specific Stocks and Flows Model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The transition to low carbon infrastructure systems required to meet climate change mitigation targets will involve an unprecedented roll-out of technologies reliant upon materials not previously widespread in infrastructure. Many of these materials (including lithium and rare earth metals) are at risk of supply disruption. To ensure the future sustainability and resilience of infrastructure, circular economy policies must be crafted to manage these critical materials effectively. These policies can only be effective if supported by an understanding of the material demands of infrastructure transition and what reuse and recycling options are possible given the future availability of end-of-life stocks. This Article presents a novel, enhanced stocks and flows model for the dynamic assessment of material demands resulting from infrastructure transitions. By including a hierarchical, nested description of infrastructure technologies, their components, and the materials they contain, this model can be used to quantify the effectiveness of recovery at both a technology remanufacturing and reuse level and a material recycling level. The model’s potential is demonstrated on a case study on the roll-out of electric vehicles in the UK forecast by UK Department of Energy and Climate Change scenarios. The results suggest policy action should be taken to ensure Li-ion battery recycling infrastructure is in place by 2025 and NdFeB motor magnets should be designed for reuse. This could result in a reduction in primary demand for lithium of 40% and neodymium of 70%. PMID:24328245

  16. Dynamics of Diffusion Flames in von Karman Swirling Flows Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Williams, Forman A.

    2002-01-01

    Von Karman swirling flow is generated by the viscous pumping action of a solid disk spinning in a quiescent fluid media. When this spinning disk is ignited in an oxidizing environment, a flat diffusion flame is established adjacent to the disk, embedded in the boundary layer (see the preceding illustration). For this geometry, the conservation equations reduce to a system of ordinary differential equations, enabling researchers to carry out detailed theoretical models to study the effects of varying strain on the dynamics of diffusion flames. Experimentally, the spinning disk burner provides an ideal configuration to precisely control the strain rates over a wide range. Our original motivation at the NASA Glenn Research Center to study these flames arose from a need to understand the flammability characteristics of solid fuels in microgravity where slow, subbuoyant flows can exist, producing very small strain rates. In a recent work (ref. 1), we showed that the flammability boundaries are wider and the minimum oxygen index (below which flames cannot be sustained) is lower for the von Karman flow configuration in comparison to a stagnation-point flow. Adding a small forced convection to the swirling flow pushes the flame into regions of higher strain and, thereby, decreases the range of flammable strain rates. Experiments using downward facing, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) disks spinning in air revealed that, close to the extinction boundaries, the flat diffusion flame breaks up into rotating spiral flames (refs. 2 and 3). Remarkably, the dynamics of these spiral flame edges exhibit a number of similarities to spirals observed in biological systems, such as the electric pulses in cardiac muscles and the aggregation of slime-mold amoeba. The tail of the spiral rotates rigidly while the tip executes a compound, meandering motion sometimes observed in Belousov-Zhabotinskii reactions.

  17. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopy of laser shocked materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bolme, Cynthia A; Mc Grane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Whitley, Von H; Moore, David S.

    2011-01-20

    Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry is used to measure the material motion and changes in the optical refractive index of laser shock compressed materials. This diagnostic has shown us that the ultrafast laser driven shocks are the same as shocks on longer timescales and larger length scales. We have added spectroscopic diagnostics of infrared absorption, ultra-violet - visible transient absorption, and femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering to begin probing the initiation chemistry that occurs in shock reactive materials. We have also used the femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering to measure the vibrational temperature of materials using the Stokes gain to anti-Stokes loss ratio.

  18. Structure and Dynamics of a Model Discotic Organic Conducting Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbiri, Mohamed; Haverkate, Lucas A.; Kearley, Gordon J.; Johnson, Mark R.; Mulder, Fokko M.

    2016-10-01

    Organic conducting materials exhibit promising functionalities, inducing hence a keen interest due to their potential use as a next generation photoconverters. However, unlike the more expensive inorganic analogues, the underlying properties that give rise to these advantages also cause organic materials to be inherently inefficient as photovoltaics. Understanding their properties at the microscopic level is a major step towards an efficient and targeted design. We probed the morphological and dynamical aspects of a model organic discotic liquid crystal material hexakis(n-hexyloxy)triphenylene (HAT6) by using neutron-based diffraction and quasielastic scattering techniques to gain deeper insights into structure and dynamics. The neutron measurements are accompanied, in a synergistic way, by molecular dynamics simulations for the sake of the analysis and interpretation of the observations

  19. Open problems in active chaotic flows: Competition between chaos and order in granular materials.

    PubMed

    Ottino, J. M.; Khakhar, D. V.

    2002-06-01

    There are many systems where interaction among the elementary building blocks-no matter how well understood-does not even give a glimpse of the behavior of the global system itself. Characteristic for these systems is the ability to display structure without any external organizing principle being applied. They self-organize as a consequence of synthesis and collective phenomena and the behavior cannot be understood in terms of the systems' constitutive elements alone. A simple example is flowing granular materials, i.e., systems composed of particles or grains. How the grains interact with each other is reasonably well understood; as to how particles move, the governing law is Newton's second law. There are no surprises at this level. However, when the particles are many and the material is vibrated or tumbled, surprising behavior emerges. Systems self-organize in complex patterns that cannot be deduced from the behavior of the particles alone. Self-organization is often the result of competing effects; flowing granular matter displays both mixing and segregation. Small differences in either size or density lead to flow-induced segregation and order; similar to fluids, noncohesive granular materials can display chaotic mixing and disorder. Competition gives rise to a wealth of experimental outcomes. Equilibrium structures, obtained experimentally in quasi-two-dimensional systems, display organization in the presence of disorder, and are captured by a continuum flow model incorporating collisional diffusion and density-driven segregation. Several open issues remain to be addressed. These include analysis of segregating chaotic systems from a dynamical systems viewpoint, and understanding three-dimensional systems and wet granular systems (slurries). General aspects of the competition between chaos-enhanced mixing and properties-induced de-mixing go beyond granular materials and may offer a paradigm for other kinds of physical systems. (c) 2002 American Institute of

  20. River flow regimes and vegetation dynamics along a river transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doulatyari, Behnam; Basso, Stefano; Schirmer, Mario; Botter, Gianluca

    2014-11-01

    Ecohydrological processes occurring within fluvial landscapes are strongly affected by natural streamflow variability. In this work the patterns of vegetation biomass in two rivers characterized by contrasting flow regimes were investigated by means of a comprehensive stochastic model which explicitly couples catchment-scale hydroclimatic processes, morphologic attributes of the river transect and in-stream bio-ecological features. The hydrologic forcing is characterized by the probability distribution (pdf) of streamflows and stages resulting from stochastic precipitation dynamics, rainfall-runoff transformation and reach scale morphologic attributes. The model proved able to reproduce the observed pdf of river flows and stages, as well as the pattern of exposure/inundation along the river transect in both regimes. Our results suggest that in persistent regimes characterized by reduced streamflow variability, mean vegetation biomass is chiefly controlled by the pattern of groundwater availability along the transect, leading to a marked transition between aquatic and terrestrial environments. Conversely, erratic regimes ensure wider aquatic-terrestrial zones in which optimal elevation ranges for species with different sensitivity to flooding and access to groundwater are separated. Patterns of mean biomass in erratic regimes were found to be more sensitive to changes in the underlying hydroclimatic conditions, notwithstanding the reduced responsiveness of the corresponding flow regimes. The framework developed highlights the important role played by streamflow regimes in shaping riverine environments, and may eventually contribute to identifying the influence of landscape, climate and morphologic features on in-stream ecological dynamics.

  1. Wake flow control using a dynamically controlled wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Ricardo; Wang, Yeqin; Pol, Suhas; Swift, Andy; Hussain, Fazle; Westergaard, Carsten; Texas Tech University Team

    2016-11-01

    A wind tunnel based "Hyper Accelerated Wind Farm Kinematic-Control Simulator" (HAWKS) is being built at Texas Tech University to emulate controlled wind turbine flow physics. The HAWKS model turbine has pitch, yaw and speed control which is operated in real model time, similar to that of an equivalent full scale turbine. Also, similar to that of a full scale wind turbine, the controls are developed in a Matlab Simulink environment. The current diagnostic system consists of power, rotor position, rotor speed measurements and PIV wake characterization with four cameras. The setup allows up to 7D downstream of the rotor to be mapped. The purpose of HAWKS is to simulate control strategies at turnaround times much faster than CFD and full scale testing. The fundamental building blocks of the simulator have been tested, and demonstrate wake steering for both static and dynamic turbine actuation. Parameters which have been studied are yaw, rotor speed and combinations hereof. The measured wake deflections for static yaw cases are in agreement with previously reported research implying general applicability of the HAWKS platform for the purpose of manipulating the wake. In this presentation the general results will be introduced followed by an analysis of the wake turbulence and coherent structures when comparing static and dynamic flow cases. The outcome of such studies could ultimately support effective wind farm wake flow control strategies. Texas Emerging Technology Fund (ETF).

  2. Extensional Flow-Induced Dynamic Phase Transitions in Isotactic Polypropylene.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jianzhu; Wang, Zhen; Su, Fengmei; Ji, Youxin; Yang, Haoran; Chang, Jiarui; Ali, Sarmad; Li, Xiangyang; Li, Liangbin

    2016-09-01

    With a combination of fast extension rheometer and in situ synchrotron radiation ultra-fast small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, flow-induced crystallization (FIC) of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) is studied at temperatures below and above the melting point of α crystals (Tmα). A flow phase diagram of iPP is constructed in strain rate-temperature space, composing of melt, non-crystalline shish, α and α&β coexistence regions, based on which the kinetic and dynamic competitions among these four phases are discussed. Above Tmα , imposing strong flow reverses thermodynamic stabilities of the disordered melt and the ordered phases, leading to the occurrence of FIC of β and α crystals as a dynamic phase transition. Either increasing temperature or stain rate favors the competiveness of the metastable β over the stable α crystals, which is attributed to kinetic rate rather than thermodynamic stability. The violent competitions among four phases near the boundary of crystal-melt may frustrate crystallization and result in the non-crystalline shish winning out.

  3. A material flow of lithium batteries in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, T C; You, S J; Yu, B S; Yao, K F

    2009-04-30

    Li batteries, including secondary and cylindrical/button primary Li batteries, are used worldwide in computers, communications and consumer electronics products. However, there are several dangerous issues that occur during the manufacture, shipping, and storage of Li batteries. This study analyzes the material flow of lithium batteries and their valuable heavy metals in Taiwan for the year 2006 by material flow analysis. According to data from the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration, Taiwan External Trade Development Council, Bureau of Foreign Trade, Directorate General of Customs, and the Li batteries manufactures/importers/exporters. It was found that 2,952,696 kg of Li batteries was input into Taiwan for the year 2006, including 2,256,501 kg of imported Li batteries and 696,195 kg of stock Li batteries in 2005. In addition, 1,113,867 and 572,215 kg of Li batteries was domestically produced and sold abroad, revealing that 3,494,348 kg of different types of Li batteries was sold in Taiwan. Of these domestically sold batteries, 504,663 and 146,557 kg were treated domestically and abroad. Thus, a total of 2,843,128 kg of Li batteries was stored by individual/industry users or illegally disposed. In addition, it was also observed that 2,120,682 kg of heavy metals contained in Li batteries, including Ni, Co, Al, Cu and Ni, was accumulated in Taiwan, with a recycled value of 38.8 million USD. These results suggest that these heavy metals should be recovered by suitable collection, recycling and reuse procedures.

  4. Flow injection spectrophotometric determination of boron in ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Ramos, S; Medina-Hernández, M J; Sagrado, S

    1998-03-01

    A flow injection spectrophotometric method for the determination of boron in ceramic materials is described. The method is based on spectrophotometric measurement of the decrease in the pH produced by the reaction between boric acid and mannitol in the presence of an acid-base indicator. A bichannel FI (flow injection) manifold in which the sample solutions were injected into deionized water (at pH 5.4) and the stream was later merged with the reagent stream (a mannitol solution containing 1x10(-4) mol l(-1) bromocresol green at pH 5.4), was used. Transient signals were monitored at 616 nm. A theoretical model which describes the dependence between the absorbance values and boric acid concentration is presented. The model predicts a non linear dependence between the absorbance or increment in absorbance and the boric acid concentration. In contrast, the model predicts a linear dependence between the inverse of the absorbance values and the boric acid concentration. The calibration graphs (1/A vs mug ml(-1) B(2)O(3)) were linear over the range 1-30 mug ml(-1) of B(2)O(3). The relative standard deviations were 0.7 and 0.4% for 4 and 8 mug ml(-1) of B(2)O(3), respectively. The limit of detection was 0.02 mug ml(-1) of B(2)O(3) (3sigma criterium). The method was used to determine boron in nine ceramic materials with very different nominal boron compositions. The results were compared with those obtained using a potentiometric titration method as reference method. No significant differences (at 95% probability level) were found between the proposed and reference methods. The method is rapid, reliable, precise and free of interferences.

  5. Assessing computer waste generation in Chile using material flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Steubing, Bernhard; Böni, Heinz; Schluep, Mathias; Silva, Uca; Ludwig, Christian

    2010-03-01

    The quantities of e-waste are expected to increase sharply in Chile. The purpose of this paper is to provide a quantitative data basis on generated e-waste quantities. A material flow analysis was carried out assessing the generation of e-waste from computer equipment (desktop and laptop PCs as well as CRT and LCD-monitors). Import and sales data were collected from the Chilean Customs database as well as from publications by the International Data Corporation. A survey was conducted to determine consumers' choices with respect to storage, re-use and disposal of computer equipment. The generation of e-waste was assessed in a baseline as well as upper and lower scenarios until 2020. The results for the baseline scenario show that about 10,000 and 20,000 tons of computer waste may be generated in the years 2010 and 2020, respectively. The cumulative e-waste generation will be four to five times higher in the upcoming decade (2010-2019) than during the current decade (2000-2009). By 2020, the shares of LCD-monitors and laptops will increase more rapidly replacing other e-waste including the CRT-monitors. The model also shows the principal flows of computer equipment from production and sale to recycling and disposal. The re-use of computer equipment plays an important role in Chile. An appropriate recycling scheme will have to be introduced to provide adequate solutions for the growing rate of e-waste generation.

  6. Dynamic Characterization and Modeling of Potting Materials for Electronics Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vasant; Lee, Gilbert; Santiago, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Prediction of survivability of encapsulated electronic components subject to impact relies on accurate modeling. Both static and dynamic characterization of encapsulation material is needed to generate a robust material model. Current focus is on potting materials to mitigate high rate loading on impact. In this effort, encapsulation scheme consists of layers of polymeric material Sylgard 184 and Triggerbond Epoxy-20-3001. Experiments conducted for characterization of materials include conventional tension and compression tests, Hopkinson bar, dynamic material analyzer (DMA) and a non-conventional accelerometer based resonance tests for obtaining high frequency data. For an ideal material, data can be fitted to Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model. A new temperature-time shift (TTS) macro was written to compare idealized temperature shift factor (WLF model) with experimental incremental shift factors. Deviations can be observed by comparison of experimental data with the model fit to determine the actual material behavior. Similarly, another macro written for obtaining Ogden model parameter from Hopkinson Bar tests indicates deviations from experimental high strain rate data. In this paper, experimental results for different materials used for mitigating impact, and ways to combine data from resonance, DMA and Hopkinson bar together with modeling refinements will be presented.

  7. Dynamically Scaled Glottal Flow Through Symmetrically Oscillating Vocal Fold Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halvorson, Lori; Baitinger, Andrew; Sherman, Erica; Krane, Michael; Zhang, Lucy; Wei, Timothy

    2011-11-01

    Experimental results derived from DPIV measurements in a scaled up dynamic human vocal fold model are presented. The 10x scale vocal fold model is a new design that incorporates key features of vocal fold oscillatory motion. This includes coupling of down/upstream rocking as well as the oscillatory open/close motions. Experiments were dynamically scaled to examine a range of frequencies, 100 - 200 Hz, corresponding to the male and female voice. By using water as the working fluid, very high resolution, both spatial and temporal resolution, was achieved. Time resolved movies of flow through symmetrically oscillating vocal folds will be presented. Both individual realizations as well as phase-averaged data will be shown. Key features, such as randomness and development time of the Coanda effect, vortex shedding, and volume flow rate data will be shown. In this talk, effects associated with paralysis of one vocal fold will be discussed. This talk provides the baseline fluid dynamics for the vocal fold paralysis study presented in Sherman, et al. Supported by the NIH.

  8. Unbounded dynamics in dissipative flows: Rössler model

    SciTech Connect

    Barrio, Roberto Serrano, Sergio; Blesa, Fernando

    2014-06-15

    Transient chaos and unbounded dynamics are two outstanding phenomena that dominate in chaotic systems with large regions of positive and negative divergences. Here, we investigate the mechanism that leads the unbounded dynamics to be the dominant behavior in a dissipative flow. We describe in detail the particular case of boundary crisis related to the generation of unbounded dynamics. The mechanism of the creation of this crisis in flows is related to the existence of an unstable focus-node (or a saddle-focus) equilibrium point and the crossing of a chaotic invariant set of the system with the weak-(un)stable manifold of the equilibrium point. This behavior is illustrated in the well-known Rössler model. The numerical analysis of the system combines different techniques as chaos indicators, the numerical computation of the bounded regions, and bifurcation analysis. For large values of the parameters, the system is studied by means of Fenichel's theory, providing formulas for computing the slow manifold which influences the evolution of the first stages of the orbit.

  9. Unbounded dynamics in dissipative flows: Rössler model.

    PubMed

    Barrio, Roberto; Blesa, Fernando; Serrano, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Transient chaos and unbounded dynamics are two outstanding phenomena that dominate in chaotic systems with large regions of positive and negative divergences. Here, we investigate the mechanism that leads the unbounded dynamics to be the dominant behavior in a dissipative flow. We describe in detail the particular case of boundary crisis related to the generation of unbounded dynamics. The mechanism of the creation of this crisis in flows is related to the existence of an unstable focus-node (or a saddle-focus) equilibrium point and the crossing of a chaotic invariant set of the system with the weak-(un)stable manifold of the equilibrium point. This behavior is illustrated in the well-known Rössler model. The numerical analysis of the system combines different techniques as chaos indicators, the numerical computation of the bounded regions, and bifurcation analysis. For large values of the parameters, the system is studied by means of Fenichel's theory, providing formulas for computing the slow manifold which influences the evolution of the first stages of the orbit.

  10. Dynamics of monocytes flowing in a model pulmonary capillary bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallat, Annie; Dupire, Jules; Adhesion and Inflammation lab Team

    2012-11-01

    The dynamics of blood cells in the pulmonary bed is an issue for tissue perfusion and host defense. The capillary segments in the lungs are smaller than the size of leukocytes so that most of them change their shape to enter and travel through a capillary pathway. During inflammation, changes in the cytoskeleton of leukocytes may stiffen them, resulting in their massive stop and sequestration within lung capillaries. However, due to difficulties of in vivo studies, little is known about the dynamics of leukocytes in the microcirculation and about the coupling between cellular rheology, capillary geometry and flow. We report the dynamics of monocytes (THP-1 cell line) flowing under constant pressure drop in a periodic network of capillaries that mimics the capillary bed. The analysis of cell entrance in the first segment allows the estimation of effective cellular elasticity, viscosity and cortical tension. Cells then present an unsteady regime, with a non-periodic trajectory, a stretching of their average shape and an increase of their velocity. This regime is interpreted from a parameter equivalent to the Deborah number of the system. Finally, a periodic regime is reached with alternatively left and right turns at capillary bifurcations. The reduced cell velocity is governed by an effective friction coefficient between the cell and the capillary walls. Both transient and final regimes depend on cell deformability, as shown by modifying the cortical actin of the cytoskeleton. This work has been supported by the French Research. National Agency (ANR) under reference ChipCellTrap.

  11. Material and Energy Flows in the Production of Cathode and Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Jennifer B.; James, Christine; Gaines, Linda; Gallagher, Kevin; Dai, Qiang; Kelly, Jarod C.

    2015-09-01

    The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model has been expanded to include four new cathode materials that can be used in the analysis of battery-powered vehicles: lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide (LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2 [NMC]), lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4 [LFP]), lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2 [LCO]), and an advanced lithium cathode (0.5Li2MnO3∙0.5LiNi0.44Co0.25Mn0.31O2 [LMR-NMC]). In GREET, these cathode materials are incorporated into batteries with graphite anodes. In the case of the LMR-NMC cathode, the anode is either graphite or a graphite-silicon blend. Lithium metal is also an emerging anode material. This report documents the material and energy flows of producing each of these cathode and anode materials from raw material extraction through the preparation stage. For some cathode materials, we considered solid state and hydrothermal preparation methods. Further, we used Argonne National Laboratory’s Battery Performance and Cost (BatPaC) model to determine battery composition (e.g., masses of cathode, anode, electrolyte, housing materials) when different cathode materials were used in the battery. Our analysis concluded that cobalt- and nickel-containing compounds are the most energy intensive to produce.

  12. Vertical Wellbore Flow Monitoring for Assessing Spatial and Temporal Flow Relationships with a Dynamic River Boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, Darrell R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Vermeul, Vincent R.

    2010-10-01

    A useful tool for identifying the temporal and spatial ambient wellbore flow relationships near a dynamic river boundary is to continuously monitor ambient vertical wellbore flow with an electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF). This is important because the presence of the wellbore can result in significant mixing or exchange of groundwater vertically across the aquifer. Mixing or exchanging groundwater within the well-screen section can have significant impacts on the distribution of contaminants within the aquifer and adverse effects on the representativeness of groundwater samples collected from the monitoring well. EBF monitoring data collected from long, fully screened wells at Hanford’s 300-Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site, located ~260 to 290 m from the Columbia River, demonstrate that ambient vertical wellbore flow exhibits both a positive (direct) and inverse temporal relationship with periodic river-stage fluctuations over short distances. The ambient flow monitoring wells fully penetrate a highly transmissive unconfined aquifer that consists of unconsolidated coarse sediments of the Hanford formation. The spatial distribution of ambient vertical wellbore flows across the IFRC’s ~2,200 m2 well-field size indicates two general regions of inverse ambient wellbore flow behavior. The western region of the IFRC site is characterized by ambient vertical wellbore flows that are positively related to river-stage fluctuations. In contrast, the eastern region of the site exhibits ambient wellbore flows that are inversely related to river-stage fluctuations. The cause of this opposite relationship between ambient wellbore flows and river-stage changes is not completely understood; however, the positive relationships appear to be associated with high-energy Hanford formation flood deposits. These flood deposits have a well-defined northwest-southeast trend and are believed to coincide with a local paleochannel. This local paleochannel bisects

  13. Dynamics of nonspherical compound capsules in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zheng Yuan; Bai, Bo Feng

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of an initially ellipsoidal compound capsule in a simple shear flow is investigated numerically using a three-dimensional front-tracking finite-difference model. Membrane bending resistance is included based on Helfrich's energy function besides the resistances against shear deformation and area dilatation governed by the constitutive law of Skalak et al. In this paper, we focus specifically on how the presence of a spherical inner capsule and its size affects the characteristics and transition of various dynamical states of nonspherical compound capsules (i.e., the outer capsule). Significant differences in the dynamical characteristics are observed between compound capsules and homogeneous capsules in both qualitative and quantitative terms. We find the transition from swinging to tumbling can occur at vanishing viscosity mismatch through increasing the inner capsule size alone to a critical value regardless of the initial shape of the nonspherical compound capsule (i.e., prolate or oblate). Besides, for compound capsules with viscosity mismatch, the critical viscosity ratio for the swinging-to-tumbling transition remarkably decreases by increasing the inner capsule size. It is thus concluded that the inner capsule size is a key governing parameter of compound capsule dynamics apart from the capillary number, aspect ratio, and viscosity ratio that have been long identified for homogeneous capsules. Further, we discuss the mechanisms underlying the effects of the inner capsule on the compound capsule dynamics from the viewpoint of the effective viscosity of internal fluid and find that the effects of the inner capsule on compound capsule dynamics are qualitatively similar to that of increasing the internal viscosity on homogeneous capsule dynamics. However, in quantitative terms, the compound capsule cannot be viewed as a homogeneous capsule with higher viscosity as obvious inhomogeneity in fluid stress distribution is induced by the inner membrane.

  14. Grain-level simulation of dynamic failure in ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Spandan

    2002-04-01

    Advanced ceramic materials are finding increasing use in different adverse mechanical and chemical situations due to their good mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and thermal stability. Their wider use is however impeded by their brittleness, especially in applications involving dynamic loads, in which dynamic fracture and fragmentation events are often observed. Most of the research aimed at the understanding of dynamic crack initiation and propagation mechanisms in this class of materials do not take into account the inherent granular microstructure of ceramics. In this project, we develop a grain-based finite element scheme that allows for the mesoscale study of a range of dynamic failure events in granular media, including propagation and branching of inter-granular cracks and fragmentation. The scheme relies on Voronoi tessellation to generate the granular microstructure and on a 2-D explicit cohesive/volumetric finite element (CVFE) scheme to simulate the constitutive and failure response of the material under dynamic loads. A non-linear kinematics description is used in our analysis to account for the possible large deformations and/or rotations of the grains during the fracture event. A viscoplastic update algorithm is also introduced to model problems (such as dynamic indentation and grinding) for which localized plasticity plays a key role. The numerical scheme finally relies on robust contact search and enforcement algorithms to capture the complex contact events between fracture surfaces, between individual grains and between the impactor/tool and the ceramic specimen. To demonstrate the capabilities and versatility of the grain-based CVFE code, we investigate four dynamic fracture problems. The first one is concerned with the propagation of dynamic intergranular cracks under mode I loading, with special emphasis on the effect of the microstructure on the branching instability of the crack motion. The second problem is that of dynamic fracture

  15. Dynamic Power Flow Controller: Compact Dynamic Phase Angle Regulators for Transmission Power Routing

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-03

    GENI Project: Varentec is developing compact, low-cost transmission power controllers with fractional power rating for controlling power flow on transmission networks. The technology will enhance grid operations through improved use of current assets and by dramatically reducing the number of transmission lines that have to be built to meet increasing contributions of renewable energy sources like wind and solar. The proposed transmission controllers would allow for the dynamic control of voltage and power flow, improving the grid’s ability to dispatch power in real time to the places where it is most needed. The controllers would work as fail-safe devices whereby the grid would be restored to its present operating state in the event of a controller malfunction instead of failing outright. The ability to affordably and dynamically control power flow with adequate fail-safe switchgear could open up new competitive energy markets which are not possible under the current regulatory structure and technology base.

  16. A numerical model for dynamic crustal-scale fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Fluid flow in the crust is often envisaged and modeled as continuous, yet minimal flow, which occurs over large geological times. This is a suitable approximation for flow as long as it is solely controlled by the matrix permeability of rocks, which in turn is controlled by viscous compaction of the pore space. However, strong evidence (hydrothermal veins and ore deposits) exists that a significant part of fluid flow in the crust occurs strongly localized in both space and time, controlled by the opening and sealing of hydrofractures. We developed, tested and applied a novel computer code, which considers this dynamic behavior and couples it with steady, Darcian flow controlled by the matrix permeability. In this dual-porosity model, fractures open depending on the fluid pressure relative to the solid pressure. Fractures form when matrix permeability is insufficient to accommodate fluid flow resulting from compaction, decompression (Staude et al. 2009) or metamorphic dehydration reactions (Weisheit et al. 2013). Open fractures can close when the contained fluid either seeps into the matrix or escapes by fracture propagation: mobile hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). In the model, closing and sealing of fractures is controlled by a time-dependent viscous law, which is based on the effective stress and on either Newtonian or non-Newtonian viscosity. Our simulations indicate that the bulk of crustal fluid flow in the middle to lower upper crust is intermittent, highly self-organized, and occurs as mobile hydrofractures. This is due to the low matrix porosity and permeability, combined with a low matrix viscosity and, hence, fast sealing of fractures. Stable fracture networks, generated by fluid overpressure, are restricted to the uppermost crust. Semi-stable fracture networks can develop in an intermediate zone, if a critical overpressure is reached. Flow rates in mobile hydrofractures exceed those in the matrix porosity and fracture networks by orders of magnitude

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation investigation on the plastic flow behaviour of silicon during nanometric cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare Chavoshi, Saeed; Goel, Saurav; Luo, Xichun

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was carried out to acquire an in-depth understanding of the flow behaviour of single crystal silicon during nanometric cutting on three principal crystallographic planes and at different cutting temperatures. The key findings were that (i) the substrate material underneath the cutting tool was observed for the first time to experience a rotational flow akin to fluids at all the tested temperatures up to 1200 K. (ii) The degree of flow in terms of vorticity was found higher on the (1 1 1) crystal plane signifying better machinability on this orientation in accord with the current pool of knowledge (iii) an increase in the machining temperature reduces the spring-back effect and thereby the elastic recovery and (iv) the cutting orientation and the cutting temperature showed significant dependence on the location of the stagnation region in the cutting zone of the substrate.

  18. Vortical Flows Research Program of the Fluid Dynamics Research Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The research interests of the staff of the Fluid Dynamics Research Branch in the general area of vortex flows are summarized. A major factor in the development of enchanced maneuverability and reduced drag by aerodynamic means is the use of effective vortex control devices. The key to control is the use of emerging computational tools for predicting viscous fluid flow in close coordination with fundamental experiments. In fact, the extremely complex flow fields resulting from numerical solutions to boundary value problems based on the Navier-Stokes equations requires an intimate relationship between computation and experiment. The field of vortex flows is important in so many practical areas that a concerted effort in this area is justified. A brief background of the research activity undertaken is presented, including a proposed classification of the research areas. The classification makes a distinction between issues related to vortex formation and structure, and work on vortex interactions and evolution. Examples of current research results are provided, along with references where available. Based upon the current status of research and planning, speculation on future research directions of the group is also given.

  19. Dynamic wall shear stress measurements in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amili, Omid; Soria, Julio

    2010-11-01

    To quantify and understand the dynamics of near wall momentum transfer, high spatial resolution, time-resolved measurements of wall shear stress distribution are essential. In this study, a film-based shear stress sensor has been used to measure the time-resolved local wall shear stress distribution in a turbulent channel flow. Measurements have been undertaken in a turbulent channel flow at Reynolds numbers up to 130,000 based on the bulk velocity and channel height. The measured fluctuating wall shear stress distribution provides spatio-temporal information of the characteristics of near wall structures by detecting their footprints. The span-wise extent of the positive two-point correlation of the stream-wise shear stress fluctuations provides the average width in the order of 100 wall units for the near-wall coherent structures. An investigation of the topological features of the velocity gradient and rate of strain tensors enables us to show an intrinsic characteristic of the near wall flow, which follows a two-dimensional flow pattern.

  20. Chaotic dynamics of a microswimmer in Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón, Ricardo

    2013-11-01

    The chaotic dynamics of pointlike, spherical particles in cylindrical Poiseuille flow is theoretically characterized and numerically confirmed when their own intrinsic swimming velocity undergoes temporal fluctuations around an average value. Two dimensionless ratios associated with the three significant temporal scales of the problem are identified that fully determine the chaos scenario. In particular, small but finite periodic fluctuations of swimming speed result in chaotic or regular motion depending on the position and orientation of the microswimmer with respect to the flow center line. Remarkably, the spatial extension of chaotic microswimmers is found to depend crucially on the fluctuations' period and amplitude and to be highly sensitive to the Fourier spectrum of the fluctuations. This has implications for the design of artificial microswimmers.

  1. Cascading dynamics with local weighted flow redistribution in interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuzhuo

    2013-07-01

    We study load cascading dynamics in a system composed of coupled interdependent networks while adopting a local weighted flow redistribution rule. We find that when the intra- or inter-connectivity increases, robustness against the cascade of load failures in the symmetrically coupled interdependent networks increases. In addition, when a failed link has to first split its flow asymmetrically to its neighbouring link groups according to the link types, even though there exists an optimal split, the robustness is lowered in contrast with the non-split situation. Furthermore, the optimal weighting mechanism in an isolated network no longer holds in interdependent networks. Finally, robustness against the cascade of load failures is not guaranteed to increase by making the distribution of the degree of intra-connectivity broader. We confirm these phenomena by theoretical analysis based on mean-field theory. Our findings might have great implications for preventing load-failure-induced local cascades in symmetrically coupled interdependent networks.

  2. Chaotic dynamics of a microswimmer in Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Ricardo

    2013-11-01

    The chaotic dynamics of pointlike, spherical particles in cylindrical Poiseuille flow is theoretically characterized and numerically confirmed when their own intrinsic swimming velocity undergoes temporal fluctuations around an average value. Two dimensionless ratios associated with the three significant temporal scales of the problem are identified that fully determine the chaos scenario. In particular, small but finite periodic fluctuations of swimming speed result in chaotic or regular motion depending on the position and orientation of the microswimmer with respect to the flow center line. Remarkably, the spatial extension of chaotic microswimmers is found to depend crucially on the fluctuations' period and amplitude and to be highly sensitive to the Fourier spectrum of the fluctuations. This has implications for the design of artificial microswimmers.

  3. Optical studies of dynamical processes in disordered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, W.M.

    1990-12-01

    Our research continues to focus on the study of the structure and the dynamic behavior of insulating solids which can be activated optically. We have been particularly interested in the physical processes which produce relaxation and energy transfer in the optical excited states. Our studies have been based principally on optical laser spectroscopic techniques which reveal a more detailed view of the materials of interest and which will ultimately lead to the development of more efficient optoelectronic materials. 13 refs.

  4. Simulation of dynamic material response with the PAGOSA code

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, K.S.; Adams, T.F.

    1993-08-01

    The 3D Eulerian PAGOSA hydrocode is being run on the massively parallel Connection Machine (CM) to simulate the response of materials to dynamic loading, such as by high explosives or high velocity impact. The code has a variety of equation of state forms, plastic yield models, and fracture and fragmentation models. The numerical algorithms in PAGOSA and the implementation of material models are discussed briefly.

  5. Dynamic Modelling of Erosion and Deposition Processes in Debris Flows With Application to Real Debris Flow Events in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deubelbeiss, Y.; McArdell, B. W.; Graf, C.

    2011-12-01

    The dynamics of a debris flow can be significantly influenced by erosion and deposition processes during an event because volume changes have a strong influence on flow properties such as flow velocity, flow heights and runout distances. It is therefore worth exploring how to include these processes in numerical models, which are used for hazard assessment and mitigation measure planning. However, it is still under debate, what mechanism drives the erosion of material at the base of a debris flow. There are different processes attributed to erosion: it has been proposed that erosion correlates with the stresses due to granular interactions at the front, which in turn strongly depend on particle size or it may be related to basal shear forces. Because it is expected that larger flow heights result in larger stresses one can additionally hypothesize that there is a correlation between erosion rate and flow height. To test different erosion laws in a numerical model and its influence on the flow behavior we implement different relationships and compare simulation results with field data. Herefore, we use the numerical model, RAMMS (Christen et al., 2010), employing the Voellmy-fluid friction law. While it has already been shown that a correlation of erosion with velocity does not lead to a satisfying result (too high entrainment in the tail) a correlation with flow height combined with velocity (momentum) has been successfully applied to ice-avalanches. Currently, we are testing the momentum-driven and for comparison we reconsider the simple velocity-driven erosion rate. However, these laws do not consider processes on a smaller scale such as particle fluctuations resulting in energy production, which might play an important role. Therefore, we additionally consider an erosion model that has potential to draw new insights on the erosion process in debris flows. The model is based on an extended Voellmy model, which additionally employs an equation, which is a measure

  6. Dynamics of a polyelectrolyte in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasree, Kandiledath; Kumar Manna, Raj; Banerjee, Debapriya; Kumar, P. B. Sunil

    2013-12-01

    The configurational dynamics of a polyelectrolyte (PE), subjected to a simple shear flow, is studied using Brownian dynamics (BD) and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulations of a bead-spring model with explicit counterions. We explore the effect of counterion condensation on the tumbling and extension of PEs by varying the shear rates for a range of values of the electrostatic coupling parameter A (which is defined as the ratio of the Bjerrum length to the size of the monomer). In all cases, the power spectrum of Rs(t) (which characterizes the projected length of the PE in the flow direction as a function of time) exhibits a power law decay at high frequencies, similar to that for a dumbbell in shear flow. For lower values of A (A ˜ 2), the tumbling of the PE is periodic and is always associated with folding and stretching, which is in contrast to the oscillatory transition between the extended and globular states seen at higher values of A (A ˜ 15). We observe that for A ˜ 2 the tumbling frequency decreases and the average tumbling time increases with hydrodynamic interaction (HI). For A > 15, we observe a critical shear rate {dot{γ }}_c below which there is considerable counterion condensation and the PE remains in the globular state with a structure akin to that of a neutral polymer in poor solvent. The {dot{γ }}_c and the behavior of the PE above the critical shear rate are dependent on the HI. For a given shear rate, when there is considerable condensed counterion fluctuation, the PE extends as a whole and then collapses by the formation of folds with no observable periodicity in tumbling. When the condensed counterion fluctuations are suppressed, the polymer exhibits periodic tumbling. Simulation artifacts resulting from the implicit nature of the solvent and that due to boundary conditions are discussed by comparing the BD results with that obtained from the DPD simulations incorporating Ewald summation for electrostatics.

  7. Channel Geometry and Flood Flows: Quantifying over-bank flow dynamics during high-flow events in North Carolina's floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovette, J. P.; Duncan, J. M.; Vimal, S.; Band, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Natural riparian areas play numerous roles in the maintenance and improvement of stream water quality. Both restoration of riparian areas and improvement of hydrologic connectivity to the stream are often key goals of river restoration projects. These management actions are designed to improve nutrient removal by slowing and treating overland flow delivered from uplands and by storing, treating, and slowly releasing streamwater from overbank inundation during flood events. A major question is how effective this storage of overbank flow is at treating streamwater based on the cumulative time stream discharge at a downstream location has spent in shallower, slower overbank flow. The North Carolina Floodplain Mapping Program maintains a detailed statewide Flood Risk Information System (FRIS) using HEC-RAS modeling, lidar, and detailed surveyed river cross-sections. FRIS provides extensive information regarding channel geometry on approximately 39,000 stream reaches (a slightly coarser spatial resolution than the NHD+v2 dataset) with tens of cross-sections for each reach. We use this FRIS data to calculate volume and discharge from floodplain riparian areas separately from in-channel flow during overbank events. Preliminary results suggest that a small percentage of total annual discharge interacts with the full floodplain extent along a stream reach due to the infrequency of overbank flow events. However, with the significantly different physical characteristics of the riparian area when compared to the channel itself, this overbank flow can provide unique services to water quality. Our project aims to use this information in conjunction with data from the USGS SPARROW program to target non-point source hotspots of Nitrogen and Phosphorus addition and removal. By better understanding the flow dynamics within riparian areas during high flow events, riparian restoration projects can be carried out with improved efficacy.

  8. Material and Energy Flows in the Production of Cathode and Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Jennifer B.; James, Christine; Gaines, Linda G.; Gallagher, Kevin

    2014-09-30

    The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model has been expanded to include four new cathode materials that can be used in the analysis of battery-powered vehicles: lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide (LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2 [NMC]), lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4 [LFP]), lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2 [LCO]), and an advanced lithium cathode (0.5Li2MnO3∙0.5LiNi0.44Co0.25Mn0.31O2 [LMR-NMC]). In GREET, these cathode materials are incorporated into batteries with graphite anodes. In the case of the LMR-NMC cathode, the anode is either graphite or a graphite-silicon blend. This report documents the material and energy flows of producing each of these cathode and anode materials from raw material extraction through the preparation stage. For some cathode materials, we considered solid state and hydrothermal preparation methods. Further, we used Argonne National Laboratory’s Battery Performance and Cost (BatPaC) model to determine battery composition (e.g., masses of cathode, anode, electrolyte, housing materials) when different cathode materials were used in the battery. Our analysis concluded that cobalt- and nickel-containing compounds are the most energy intensive to produce.

  9. Transverse flow reactor studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, R.G.

    1993-12-01

    Radical reactions are in important in combustion chemistry; however, little state-specific information is available for these reactions. A new apparatus has been constructed to measure the dynamics of radical reactions. The unique feature of this apparatus is a transverse flow reactor in which an atom or radical of known concentration will be produced by pulsed laser photolysis of an appropriate precursor molecule. The time dependence of individual quantum states or products and/or reactants will be followed by rapid infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. The reaction H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O will be studied.

  10. Dielectric barrier plasma dynamics for active control of separated flows

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Subrata; Singh, K.P.; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2006-03-20

    The dynamics of separation mitigation with asymmetric dielectric barrier discharges is explored by considering the gas flow past a flat plate at an angle of attack. A self-consistent model utilizing motion of electrons, ions, and neutrals is employed to couple the electric force field to the momentum of the fluid. The charge separation and concomitant electric field yield a time-averaged body force which is oriented predominantly downstream, with a smaller transverse component towards the wall. This induces a wall-jet-like feature that effectively eliminates the separation bubble. The impact of several geometric and electrical operating parameters is elucidated.

  11. Unified power flow controller: modeling and dynamic characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, D. H.; Loc, H. D.

    2005-12-01

    Unified power flow controller (UPFC) consists two converters. There are three purposes of this paper, firstly to illustrate the UPFC device based VSC designs, then to describe a decoupling method the UPFC's controller into two separate control systems of the shunt and the series converters respectively in realizing an appropriate coordination between them. Finally, using the Matlab tool to build a discrete simulator for the UPFC with 12 pulse converters. The simulation results show that the developed UPFC model is reflected the static and dynamic characteristics of the UPFC. The harmonics of the output of the model were analyzed. Using the simple power system with UPFC as an example, the dynamics characteristics were studied. The fault status of the system with UPFC was analyzed too.

  12. Dislocation dynamics: simulation of plastic flow of bcc metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D H

    2001-02-20

    This is the final report for the LDRD strategic initiative entitled ''Dislocation Dynamic: Simulation of Plastic Flow of bcc Metals'' (tracking code: 00-SI-011). This report is comprised of 6 individual sections. The first is an executive summary of the project and describes the overall project goal, which is to establish an experimentally validated 3D dislocation dynamics simulation. This first section also gives some information of LLNL's multi-scale modeling efforts associated with the plasticity of bcc metals, and the role of this LDRD project in the multiscale modeling program. The last five sections of this report are journal articles that were produced during the course of the FY-2000 efforts.

  13. The computational modeling of supercritical carbon dioxide flow in solid wood material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gething, Brad Allen

    , respectively. This sensitivity requires that the input parameters, principally permeability, be relatively accurate to evaluate the appropriateness of the phenomenological relationships of the computational flow model. Providing this stipulation, it was observed that below the region of transition from CO2 gas to supercritical fluid, the computational flow model has the potential to predict flow accurately. However, above the transition region, the model does not fully account for the physics of the flow process, resulting in prediction inaccuracy. One potential cause for the loss of prediction accuracy in the supercritical region was attributed to a dynamic change in permeability that is likely caused by an interaction between the flowing SC CO2 and the wood material. Furthermore, a hysteresis was observed between the pressurization and depressurization stages of treatment, which cannot be explained by the current flow model. If greater accuracy in the computational flow model is desired, a more complex approach to the model is necessary, which would include non-constant input parameters of temperature and permeability. Furthermore, the implications of a multi-scale methodology for the flow model were explored from a qualitative standpoint.

  14. Flow Dynamics and Plasma Heating of Spheromaks in SSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. R.; Cothran, C. D.; Cohen, D. H.; Horwitz, J.; Chaplin, V.

    2008-06-01

    We report several new experimental results related to flow dynamics and heating from single dipole-trapped spheromaks and spheromak merging studies at SSX. Single spheromaks (stabilized with a pair of external coils, see Brown, Phys. Plasmas 13 102503 (2006)) and merged FRC-like configurations (see Brown, Phys. Plasmas 13, 056503 (2006)) are trapped in our prolate ( R = 0.2 m, L = 0.6 m) copper flux conserver. Local spheromak flow is studied with two Mach probes ( r 1 ≤ ρ i , r 2 ≥ ρ i ) calibrated by time-of-flight with a fast set of magnetic probes at the edge of the device. Both Mach probes feature six ion collectors housed in a boron nitride sheath. The larger Mach probe will ultimately be used in the MST reversed field pinch. Line averaged flow is measured by ion Doppler spectroscopy (IDS) at the midplane. The SSX IDS instrument measures with 1 μ s or better time resolution the width and Doppler shift of the C III impurity (H plasma) 229.7 nm line to determine the temperature and line-averaged flow velocity (see Cothran, RSI 77, 063504 (2006)). We find axial flows up to 100 km/s during formation of the dipole trapped spheromak. Flow returns at the wall to form a large vortex. Recent high-resolution IDS velocity measurements during spheromak merging show bi-directional outflow jets at ±40 km/s (nearly the Alfvén speed). We also measure T i ≥ 80 eV and T e ≥ 20 eV during spheromak merging events after all plasma facing surfaces are cleaned with helium glow discharge conditioning. Transient electron heating is inferred from bursts on a four-channel soft x-ray array. The spheromaks are also characterized by a suite of magnetic probe arrays for magnetic structure B(r,t), and interferometry for n e . Finally, we are designing a new oblate, trapezoidal flux conserver for FRC studies. Equilibrium and dynamical simulations suggest that a tilt-stable, oblate FRC can be formed by spheromak merging in the new flux conserver.

  15. Research in Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M. (Compiler); Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and Materials (SDM) Conference was held on April 2 to 4, 1990 in Long Beach, California. This publication is a compilation of presentations of the work-in-progress sessions and does not contain papers from the regular sessions since those papers are published by AIAA in the conference proceedings.

  16. Dynamic characterization and modeling of potting materials for electronics assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vasant S.; Lee, Gilbert F.; Santiago, Jaime R.

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of survivability of encapsulated electronic components subject to impact relies on accurate modeling, which in turn needs both static and dynamic characterization of individual electronic components and encapsulation material to generate reliable material parameters for a robust material model. Current focus is on potting materials to mitigate high rate loading on impact. In this effort, difficulty arises in capturing one of the critical features characteristic of the loading environment in a high velocity impact: multiple loading events coupled with multi-axial stress states. Hence, potting materials need to be characterized well to understand its damping capacity at different frequencies and strain rates. An encapsulation scheme to protect electronic boards consists of multiple layers of filled as well as unfilled polymeric materials like Sylgard 184 and Trigger bond Epoxy # 20-3001. A combination of experiments conducted for characterization of materials used Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB), and dynamic material analyzer (DMA). For material which behaves in an ideal manner, a master curve can be fitted to Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model. To verify the applicability of WLF model, a new temperature-time shift (TTS) macro was written to compare idealized temperature shift factor with experimental incremental shift factor. Deviations can be readily observed by comparison of experimental data with the model fit to determine if model parameters reflect the actual material behavior. Similarly, another macro written for obtaining Ogden model parameter from Hopkinson Bar tests can readily indicate deviations from experimental high strain rate data. Experimental results for different materials used for mitigating impact, and ways to combine data from DMA and Hopkinson bar together with modeling refinements are presented.

  17. Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization amplification of NMR flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Lingwood, Mark D; Sederman, Andrew J; Mantle, Mick D; Gladden, Lynn F; Han, Songi

    2012-03-01

    We describe the first study comparing the ability of phase shift velocity imaging and Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced imaging to generate contrast for visualizing the flow of water. Prepolarization of water by the Overhauser DNP mechanism is performed in the 0.35T fringe field of an unshielded 2.0T non-clinical MRI magnet, followed by the rapid transfer of polarization-enhanced water to the 2.0T imaging location. This technique, previously named remotely enhanced liquids for image contrast (RELIC), produces a continuous flow of hyperpolarized water and gives up to an -8.2-fold enhanced signal within the image with respect to thermally polarized signal at 2.0T. Using flow through a cylindrical expansion phantom as a model system, spin-echo intensity images with DNP are compared to 3D phase shift velocity images to illustrate the complementary information available from the two techniques. The spin-echo intensity images enhanced with DNP show that the levels of enhancement provide an estimate of the transient propagation of flow, while the phase shift velocity images quantitatively measure the velocity of each imaging voxel. Phase shift velocity images acquired with and without DNP show that DNP weights velocity values towards those of the inflowing (DNP-enhanced) water, while velocity images without DNP more accurately reflect the average steady-state velocity of each voxel. We conclude that imaging with DNP prepolarized water better captures the transient path of water shortly after injection, while phase shift velocity imaging is best for quantifying the steady-state flow of water throughout the entire phantom.

  18. Hydrogels in Healthcare: From Static to Dynamic Material Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Chelsea M.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in hydrogel design have revolutionized the way biomaterials are applied to address biomedical needs. Hydrogels were introduced in medicine over 50 years ago and have evolved from static, bioinert materials to dynamic, bioactive microenvironments, which can be used to direct specific biological responses such as cellular ingrowth in wound healing or on-demand delivery of therapeutics. Two general classes of mechanisms, those defined by the user and those dictated by the endogenous cells and tissues, can control dynamic hydrogel microenvironments. These highly tunable materials have provided bioengineers and biological scientists with new ways to not only treat patients in the clinic but to study the fundamental cellular responses to engineered microenvironments as well. Here, we provide a brief history of hydrogels in medicine and follow with a discussion of the synthesis and implementation of dynamic hydrogel microenvironments for healthcare-related applications. PMID:23929381

  19. Effect of available entrainable material on a viscous gravity current including run-out characteristics and internal flow properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Belinda; Ancey, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    It has long been accepted that entrainment of loose material by geophysical gravity flows such as dense snow avalanches and debris flows may change their behaviour significantly. Run-out distances and bulk-flow velocities are notable examples of susceptible behaviours. It is still disputed how this has an effect but it has been noted that the availability of entrainable material is a principal parameter. Laboratory and numerical results are studied side-by-side to demonstrate the effects of a finite erodible bed of varying length and depth, which is placed in the path of a flowing gravity current. Both the current and the bed are composed of the same material. Natural geophysical flows are simulated as idealized viscous gravity currents at zero degrees inclination in order to study the link between the internal dynamics and the bulk features in the simplest case. In the laboratory, a PIV configuration using a laser sheet allows the visualization of a vertical stream-wise cross section of the flow in the transition region from rigid to erodible bed, far from the side-walls. This allows the study of the velocity field within the cross-section of the flow in the entrainable region. Run-out speeds and distances are measured after the current exits the erodible bed and flows over a rigid base once more. A relationship is sought between the released volume, the erodible bed dimensions (that is, length and depth) and the run-out characteristics of the flow. This bulk run-out behaviour is investigated with reference to the internal flow dynamics as measured by PIV. This work is supplemented by results obtained modelling the same system using the open source CFD software OpenFOAM. We were able to track the front of the current during the flow and found that even the presence of a shallow entrainable bed (3 mm deep) significantly advanced the run-out front compared to the no-bed case. A further increase in bed depth led to a slight increase in run-out. The length of the bed

  20. Frictional Fluid Dynamics and Plug Formation in Multiphase Millifluidic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumazer, Guillaume; Sandnes, Bjørnar; Ayaz, Monem; Mâløy, Knut Jørgen; Flekkøy, Eirik Grude

    2016-07-01

    We study experimentally the flow and patterning of a granular suspension displaced by air inside a narrow tube. The invading air-liquid interface accumulates a plug of granular material that clogs the tube due to friction with the confining walls. The gas percolates through the static plug once the gas pressure exceeds the pore capillary entry pressure of the packed grains, and a moving accumulation front is reestablished at the far side of the plug. The process repeats, such that the advancing interface leaves a trail of plugs in its wake. Further, we show that the system undergoes a fluidization transition—and complete evacuation of the granular suspension—when the liquid withdrawal rate increases beyond a critical value. An analytical model of the stability condition for the granular accumulation predicts the flow regime.

  1. Evaluation of Local Flow Conditions in Jailed Side Branch Lesions Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Na, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Jeong Chul; Yang, Han-Mo; Park, Kyung-Woo; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Oh, Byung-Hee; Park, Young-Bae

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Lesions of vascular bifurcation and their treatment outcomes have been evaluated by anatomical and physiological methods, such as intravascular ultrasound and fractional flow reserve (FFR). However, local changes in flow dynamics in lesions of bifurcation have not been well evaluated. This study aimed at evaluating changes in the local flow patterns of bifurcation lesions. Materials and Methods Eight (n=8) representative simulation-models were constructed: 1 normal bifurcation, 5 main-branch (MB) stenting models with various side-branch (SB) stenoses (ostial or non-ostial 75% diameter stenosis with 1- or 2-cm lesion lengths, ostial 75% diameter stenosis caused by carina shift), and 2 post-kissing models (no or 50% SB residual stenosis). Pressure, velocity, and wall shear stress (WSS) profiles around the bifurcation sites were investigated using computational fluid dynamics. Results Post-stenting models revealed significant pressure drop in the SB (FFR<0.75), excluding the carina shift model (FFR=0.89). In the post-kissing models, there was no significant pressure drop. All post-stenting models revealed eccentric low velocity flow patterns and areas of low WSS, primarily in the lateral wall on distal MB. Post-kissing angioplasty improved pressure drop in the SB but resulted in alteration of flow distribution in the MB. In the carina shift model, kissing ballooning resulted in deteriorated local flow conditions due to increased area of low velocity and WSS. Conclusion This study suggests that the most commonly used bifurcation intervention strategy may cause local flow disturbances, which may partially explain high restenosis and event rates in patients with bifurcation lesions. PMID:21430994

  2. Applying uncertainty quantification to multiphase flow computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gel, A; Garg, R; Tong, C; Shahnam, M; Guenther, C

    2013-07-01

    Multiphase computational fluid dynamics plays a major role in design and optimization of fossil fuel based reactors. There is a growing interest in accounting for the influence of uncertainties associated with physical systems to increase the reliability of computational simulation based engineering analysis. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has recently undertaken an initiative to characterize uncertainties associated with computer simulation of reacting multiphase flows encountered in energy producing systems such as a coal gasifier. The current work presents the preliminary results in applying non-intrusive parametric uncertainty quantification and propagation techniques with NETL's open-source multiphase computational fluid dynamics software MFIX. For this purpose an open-source uncertainty quantification toolkit, PSUADE developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been interfaced with MFIX software. In this study, the sources of uncertainty associated with numerical approximation and model form have been neglected, and only the model input parametric uncertainty with forward propagation has been investigated by constructing a surrogate model based on data-fitted response surface for a multiphase flow demonstration problem. Monte Carlo simulation was employed for forward propagation of the aleatory type input uncertainties. Several insights gained based on the outcome of these simulations are presented such as how inadequate characterization of uncertainties can affect the reliability of the prediction results. Also a global sensitivity study using Sobol' indices was performed to better understand the contribution of input parameters to the variability observed in response variable.

  3. Quasi-3D Cytoskeletal Dynamics of Osteocytes under Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Baik, Andrew D.; Lu, X. Lucas; Qiu, Jun; Huo, Bo; Hillman, Elizabeth M.C.; Dong, Cheng; Guo, X. Edward

    2010-01-01

    Osteocytes respond to dynamic fluid shear loading by activating various biochemical pathways, mediating a dynamic process of bone formation and resorption. Whole-cell deformation and regional deformation of the cytoskeleton may be able to directly regulate this process. Attempts to image cellular deformation by conventional microscopy techniques have been hindered by low temporal or spatial resolution. In this study, we developed a quasi-three-dimensional microscopy technique that enabled us to simultaneously visualize an osteocyte's traditional bottom-view profile and a side-view profile at high temporal resolution. Quantitative analysis of the plasma membrane and either the intracellular actin or microtubule (MT) cytoskeletal networks provided characterization of their deformations over time. Although no volumetric dilatation of the whole cell was observed under flow, both the actin and MT networks experienced primarily tensile strains in all measured strain components. Regional heterogeneity in the strain field of normal strains was observed in the actin networks, especially in the leading edge to flow, but not in the MT networks. In contrast, side-view shear strains exhibited similar subcellular distribution patterns in both networks. Disruption of MT networks caused actin normal strains to decrease, whereas actin disruption had little effect on the MT network strains, highlighting the networks' mechanical interactions in osteocytes. PMID:21044578

  4. Onset of turbulent mean dynamics in boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamman, Curtis; Sayadi, Taraneh; Moin, Parviz

    2012-11-01

    Statistical properties of turbulence in low Reynolds number boundary layers are compared. Certain properties are shown to approach an asymptotic state resembling higher Reynolds number flow much earlier during transition than previously thought. This incipient turbulence is less stochastic and more organized than developed turbulence farther downstream, but the mean dynamics and production mechanisms are remarkably similar. The onset of turbulence in our recent simulations is also similar to that observed in the bypass transition of Wu & Moin where continuous freestream turbulence, rather than small-amplitude linear waves, triggers transition. For these inflow disturbances, self-sustaining turbulence occurs rapidly after laminar flow breakdown without requiring a significant development length nor significant randomization. Slight disagreements with FST-induced bypass transition are observed that correlate with the extra strain a turbulent freestream would impose upon the near-wall dynamics. Nevertheless, the turbulence statistics are similar shortly after the skin-friction overshoot independent of upstream receptivity. This early onset of deterministic turbulence provides support for reduced-order modeling of turbulent boundary layers based on non-linear stability mechanisms.

  5. Dynamics of Motorized Vehicle Flow under Mixed Traffic Circumstance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hong-Wei; Gao, Zi-You; Zhao, Xiao-Mei; Xie, Dong-Fan

    2011-04-01

    To study the dynamics of mixed traffic flow consisting of motorized and non-motorized vehicles, a car-following model based on the principle of collision free and cautious driving is proposed. Lateral friction and overlapping driving are introduced to describe the interactions between motorized vehicles and non-motorized vehicles. By numerical simulations, the flux-density relation, the temporal-spatial dynamics, and the velocity evolution are investigated in detail. The results indicate non-motorized vehicles have a significant impact on the motorized vehicle flow and cause the maximum flux to decline by about 13%. Non-motorized vehicles can decrease the motorized vehicle velocity and cause velocity oscillation when the motorized vehicle density is low. Moreover, non-motorized vehicles show a significant damping effect on the oscillating velocity when the density is medium and high, and such an effect weakens as motorized vehicle density increases. The results also stress the necessity for separating motorized vehicles from non-motorized vehicles.

  6. Nanoparticle transport and binding dynamics in blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaling; Tan, Jifu; Thomas, Antony

    2012-02-01

    Nanoparticulate systems have been widely used in diagnostic imaging and targeted therapeutic applications in recent years. Most current studies on nanoparticle drug delivery considered a Newtonian fluid with suspending spherical nanoparticles. However, blood is a complex biological fluid composed of deformable cells, proteins, platelets, and plasma. For blood flow in capillary, arterioles and venules, the particulate nature of the blood need to be considered in the delivery process. Non-Newtonian effects such as the cell-free-layer and nanoparticle-cell interaction will largely influence both the dispersion and binding rates, thus impact targeted delivery efficacy. A 3D multiscale particle-cell hybrid model is developed to model nanoparticle transport, dispersion, and adhesion dynamics in blood suspension. The motion and deformation of red blood cell is captured through Immersed Finite Element method. The motions and bindings of individual nanoparticles of various shapes are tracked through Brownian adhesion dynamics and molecular ligand-receptor binding kinetics. Nanoparticle dispersion and binding coefficients are derived from the developed model under various rheology conditions. The influences of vascular flow rate, geometry, nanoparticle size on nanoparticle distribution and delivery efficacy are characterized. A non-uniform nanoparticle distribution profile with higher particle concentration near the vessel wall is observed. Such distribution leads to 50% higher particle binding rate compared to the case without RBC considered. The tumbling motion of RBCs in the core region of the capillary is found to enhance nanoparticle dispersion. The modeled binding results are validated through designed experiments in microfluidic devices.

  7. Particle and Blood Cell Dynamics in Oscillatory Flows Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Juan M. Restrepo

    2008-09-01

    Our aim has been to uncover fundamental aspects of the suspension and dislodgement of particles in wall-bounded oscillatory flows, in flows characterized by Reynolds numbers en- compassing the situation found in rivers and near shores (and perhaps in some industrial processes). Our research tools are computational and our coverage of parameter space fairly broad. Computational means circumvent many complications that make the measurement of the dynamics of particles in a laboratory setting an impractical task, especially on the broad range of parameter space we plan to report upon. The impact of this work on the geophysical problem of sedimentation is boosted considerably by the fact that the proposed calculations can be considered ab-initio, in the sense that little to no modeling is done in generating dynamics of the particles and of the moving fluid: we use a three-dimensional Navier Stokes solver along with straightforward boundry conditions. Hence, to the extent that Navier Stokes is a model for an ideal incompressible isotropic Newtonian fluid, the calculations yield benchmark values for such things as the drag, buoyancy, and lift of particles, in a highly controlled environment. Our approach will be to make measurements of the lift, drag, and buoyancy of particles, by considering progressively more complex physical configurations and physics.

  8. Cellular Manufacturing System with Dynamic Lot Size Material Handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khannan, M. S. A.; Maruf, A.; Wangsaputra, R.; Sutrisno, S.; Wibawa, T.

    2016-02-01

    Material Handling take as important role in Cellular Manufacturing System (CMS) design. In several study at CMS design material handling was assumed per pieces or with constant lot size. In real industrial practice, lot size may change during rolling period to cope with demand changes. This study develops CMS Model with Dynamic Lot Size Material Handling. Integer Linear Programming is used to solve the problem. Objective function of this model is minimizing total expected cost consisting machinery depreciation cost, operating costs, inter-cell material handling cost, intra-cell material handling cost, machine relocation costs, setup costs, and production planning cost. This model determines optimum cell formation and optimum lot size. Numerical examples are elaborated in the paper to ilustrate the characterictic of the model.

  9. Effect of flow field and geometry on the dynamic contact angle.

    PubMed

    Lukyanov, A V; Shikhmurzaev, Y D

    2007-05-01

    A number of recent experiments suggest that, at a given wetting speed, the dynamic contact angle formed by an advancing liquid-gas interface with a solid substrate depends on the flow field and geometry near the moving contact line. In the present work, this effect is investigated in the framework of an earlier developed theory that was based on the fact that dynamic wetting is, by its very name, a process of formation of a new liquid-solid interface (newly "wetted" solid surface) and hence should be considered not as a singular problem but as a particular case from a general class of flows with forming or/and disappearing interfaces. The results demonstrate that, in the flow configuration of curtain coating, where a liquid sheet ("curtain") impinges onto a moving solid substrate, the actual dynamic contact angle indeed depends not only on the wetting speed and material constants of the contacting media, as in the so-called slip models, but also on the inlet velocity of the curtain, its height, and the angle between the falling curtain and the solid surface. In other words, for the same wetting speed the dynamic contact angle can be varied by manipulating the flow field and geometry near the moving contact line. The obtained results have important experimental implications: given that the dynamic contact angle is determined by the values of the surface tensions at the contact line and hence depends on the distributions of the surface parameters along the interfaces, which can be influenced by the flow field, one can use the overall flow conditions and the contact angle as a macroscopic multiparametric signal-response pair that probes the dynamics of the liquid-solid interface. This approach would allow one to investigate experimentally such properties of the interface as, for example, its equation of state and the rheological properties involved in the interface's response to an external torque, and would help to measure its parameters, such as the coefficient of

  10. Theoretical interpretation of abnormal ultrafine-grained material deformation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, Elijah N.; Mayer, Alexander E.

    2016-02-01

    Some recent experiments with ultrafine-grained metal samples reveal that it has an abnormal mechanical response on the intensive dynamical loading caused by its impact or electron beam irradiations. On the basis of the original plasticity model, which takes into account dislocation slip and grain boundary sliding, we show that this response is usual for such structure. Moreover, our calculations predict an inverse Hall-Petch relation for ultrafine grained metals at extremely high strain rates (above 107 s-1), while the classical low strain rate experiments and molecular dynamic simulations detects such inverse Hall-Petch relation only for nanocrystalline materials. The main outcomes of present work are the described plasticity model and the conclusions that the ultrafine-grained metals (with grains of about 100-200 nm in diameter) has to have maximal dynamic shear strength and it is the most persistent to dynamic spall fracture because of maximal energy dissipation in it.

  11. An Experimental Study of Mixing Dynamics in 3D Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Zafir

    Compared with the mixing of fluids, the mixing and segregation of granular materials remains one of the big questions of science. Unlike fluids, granular materials segregate based on differences in particle properties, such as density and size. For 2D granular flows, a dynamical systems framework has been effective in describing regions of mixing and segregation. However, computational and theoretical results are just starting to form a framework for 3D granular flows, such as the bi-axial spherical tumbler (BST) flow. This thesis builds on this emerging framework through a series of experimental studies with theoretical and model support with the goal of better understanding 3D mixing. The first study tests the commonly used assumption in continuum models of granular flow that single axis tumbler flow is two dimensional. Utilizing both surface and destructive subsurface imaging, this study shows that weak 3D deviations occur in the form of an axial drift within single axis tumbler flow of varying material spanwise depth. Afterward, this thesis focuses on the development of a custom-built X-ray imaging system to non-destructively visualize the tumbler subsurface. The second study revisits the axial drift and demonstrates that wall roughness impacts the curvature and overall displacement of particle trajectories throughout the tumbler domain using subsurface particle trajectories provided by the X-ray imaging system. Finally, mixing in the fully 3D BST flow is studied. In particular, 3D persistent mixing barriers that are predicted by the dynamical systems framework are shown to exist. Some barriers are remarkably persistent for as much as 500 protocol iterations despite the presence of collisional diffusion. The structures arise from two competing effects, the cutting and shuffling action of the protocol and the stretching from the flowing layer. The tumbling protocol controls the mixing behavior as well as the types of non-mixing barriers observed. Supplementary

  12. Literature search of publications concerning the prediction of dynamic inlet flow distortion and related topics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweikhhard, W. G.; Chen, Y. S.

    1983-01-01

    Publications prior to March 1981 were surveyed to determine inlet flow dynamic distortion prediction methods and to catalog experimental and analytical information concerning inlet flow dynamic distortion prediction methods and to catalog experimental and analytical information concerning inlet flow dynamics at the engine-inlet interface of conventional aircraft (excluding V/STOL). The sixty-five publications found are briefly summarized and tabulated according to topic and are cross-referenced according to content and nature of the investigation (e.g., predictive, experimental, analytical and types of tests). Three appendices include lists of references, authors, organizations and agencies conducting the studies. Also, selected materials summaries, introductions and conclusions - from the reports are included. Few reports were found covering methods for predicting the probable maximum distortion. The three predictive methods found are those of Melick, Jacox and Motycka. The latter two require extensive high response pressure measurements at the compressor face, while the Melick Technique can function with as few as one or two measurements.

  13. Development of a dynamic flow imaging phantom for dynamic contrast-enhanced CT

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, B.; Keller, H.; Coolens, C.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) studies with modeling of blood flow and tissue perfusion are becoming more prevalent in the clinic, with advances in wide volume CT scanners allowing the imaging of an entire organ with sub-second image frequency and sub-millimeter accuracy. Wide-spread implementation of perfusion DCE-CT, however, is pending fundamental validation of the quantitative parameters that result from dynamic contrast imaging and perfusion modeling. Therefore, the goal of this work was to design and construct a novel dynamic flow imaging phantom capable of producing typical clinical time-attenuation curves (TACs) with the purpose of developing a framework for the quantification and validation of DCE-CT measurements and kinetic modeling under realistic flow conditions. Methods: The phantom is based on a simple two-compartment model and was printed using a 3D printer. Initial analysis of the phantom involved simple flow measurements and progressed to DCE-CT experiments in order to test the phantoms range and reproducibility. The phantom was then utilized to generate realistic input TACs. A phantom prediction model was developed to compute the input and output TACs based on a given set of five experimental (control) parameters: pump flow rate, injection pump flow rate, injection contrast concentration, and both control valve positions. The prediction model is then inversely applied to determine the control parameters necessary to generate a set of desired input and output TACs. A protocol was developed and performed using the phantom to investigate image noise, partial volume effects and CT number accuracy under realistic flow conditionsResults: This phantom and its surrounding flow system are capable of creating a wide range of physiologically relevant TACs, which are reproducible with minimal error between experiments ({sigma}/{mu} < 5% for all metrics investigated). The dynamic flow phantom was capable of producing input and output TACs using

  14. Two-dimensional CFD modeling of wave rotor flow dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Chima, Rodrick V.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver developed for detailed study of wave rotor flow dynamics is described. The CFD model is helping characterize important loss mechanisms within the wave rotor. The wave rotor stationary ports and the moving rotor passages are resolved on multiple computational grid blocks. The finite-volume form of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations with laminar viscosity are integrated in time using a four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme. Roe's approximate Riemann solution scheme or the computationally less expensive advection upstream splitting method (AUSM) flux-splitting scheme is used to effect upwind-differencing of the inviscid flux terms, using cell interface primitive variables set by MUSCL-type interpolation. The diffusion terms are central-differenced. The solver is validated using a steady shock/laminar boundary layer interaction problem and an unsteady, inviscid wave rotor passage gradual opening problem. A model inlet port/passage charging problem is simulated and key features of the unsteady wave rotor flow field are identified. Lastly, the medium pressure inlet port and high pressure outlet port portion of the NASA Lewis Research Center experimental divider cycle is simulated and computed results are compared with experimental measurements. The model accurately predicts the wave timing within the rotor passages and the distribution of flow variables in the stationary inlet port region.

  15. Stochastic Rotation Dynamics simulations of wetting multi-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, Thomas; Sanchez de La Lama, Marta; Brinkmann, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Multi-color Stochastic Rotation Dynamics (SRDmc) has been introduced by Inoue et al. [1,2] as a particle based simulation method to study the flow of emulsion droplets in non-wetting microchannels. In this work, we extend the multi-color method to also account for different wetting conditions. This is achieved by assigning the color information not only to fluid particles but also to virtual wall particles that are required to enforce proper no-slip boundary conditions. To extend the scope of the original SRDmc algorithm to e.g. immiscible two-phase flow with viscosity contrast we implement an angular momentum conserving scheme (SRD+mc). We perform extensive benchmark simulations to show that a mono-phase SRDmc fluid exhibits bulk properties identical to a standard SRD fluid and that SRDmc fluids are applicable to a wide range of immiscible two-phase flows. To quantify the adhesion of a SRD+mc fluid in contact to the walls we measure the apparent contact angle from sessile droplets in mechanical equilibrium. For a further verification of our wettability implementation we compare the dewetting of a liquid film from a wetting stripe to experimental and numerical studies of interfacial morphologies on chemically structured surfaces.

  16. Chaotic Dynamics of Articulated Cylinders in Confined Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Païdoussis, M. P.; Botez, R. M.

    1993-10-01

    A study is presented of the dynamics of an articulated system of cylinders in confined axial flow. The Articulated system is composed of rigid cylindrical segments, interconnected by rotational springs; it is cantilevered, hanging vertically in the centre of a cylindrical pipe, with fluid flowing downwards in the narrow annular passage. For sufficiently high flow velocity, the system generally loses stability sequentially by diverge (pitchfork bifurcation) and flutter (Hopf bifurcation). Once this occurs, the articulated system interacts with the outer pipe, which acts a constraint to free motions. In the present study, which is mainly concerned with possible chaotic motions in this system, the analytical model is highly simplified. Thus, motions are considered to be planar, and the equations of the articulated system are taken to be linear, other than the terms associated with interaction with the outer pipe, which is modelled by either a trilinear or a cubic spring. A linear eigenvalue analysis is first undertaken, and then the nonlinear behaviour of the constrained model is explored numerically for systems of two and three articulations. Phase-plane plots, power spectral densities and bifurcation diagrams indicate in some cases a clear period-doubling cascade leading to chaos, while in others chaos arises via the quasiperiodic route. Poincaré maps and Lyapunov exponent calculations confirm the existence of chaos. Some analytical work is also presented, involving centre manifold theory, in which the post-Hopf limit-cycle amplitude is calculated and compared with that obtained numerically.

  17. Multifractal dynamics of turbulent flows in swimming bacterial suspensions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuo-An; I, Lin

    2012-07-01

    We experimentally investigate the self-propelled two-dimensional turbulent flows of Escherichia coli suspensions in thin liquid films at two different cell concentrations. It is found that the flow has fluctuating vortices with a broad range of scales and intensities through the nonlinear interaction of the swimming bacteria. Increasing cell concentration increases the total propelling power and the nonlinear interaction. It causes the generation of vortices with larger scale, lower frequency, and higher intensity. It also widens the histograms of the flow velocity and the velocity increment between two spatially separated points with more stretched non-Gaussian tails. From the scaling analysis of the structure function S(q)(r) of the qth moment of the velocity increment between two points with spatial separation r, nonlinear relations between the scaling exponent ζ(q) of S(q)(r) and q are found for both cell concentrations, which manifests the multifractal dynamics. The multifractality can be enhanced by increasing cell concentration.

  18. Space-Time Correlations and Dynamic Coupling in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guowei; Jin, Guodong; Yang, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Space-time correlation is a staple method for investigating the dynamic coupling of spatial and temporal scales of motion in turbulent flows. In this article, we review the space-time correlation models in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian frames of reference, which include the random sweeping and local straining models for isotropic and homogeneous turbulence, Taylor's frozen-flow model and the elliptic approximation model for turbulent shear flows, and the linear-wave propagation model and swept-wave model for compressible turbulence. We then focus on how space-time correlations are used to develop time-accurate turbulence models for the large-eddy simulation of turbulence-generated noise and particle-laden turbulence. We briefly discuss their applications to two-point closures for Kolmogorov's universal scaling of energy spectra and to the reconstruction of space-time energy spectra from a subset of spatial and temporal signals in experimental measurements. Finally, we summarize the current understanding of space-time correlations and conclude with future issues for the field.

  19. POD- Mapping and analysis of hydroturbine exit flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Morten; Finstad, Pal Henrik

    2012-11-01

    Pairwise radial dynamic measurements of the swirling draft tube flow have been made at the 25 MW Svorka power plant in Surnadal operating at 48% load at 6 radial and 7 angular positions. The data is analyzed with traditional methods as well as with POD. The measurements were made in the turbine draft tube/exit flow in an axial measurement plane about 1200mm downstream the turbine runner. The draft tube diameter in the measurement plane is about 1300mm. The flow rate during measurements was close to 5.8m3/s. Two probes were used; both of length Le=700 mm and made of stainless steel with an outer diameter of Do=20 mm and inner diameter Di=4mm. At the end of each probe a full bridge cylindrical KULITE xcl152, 0-3.5, was mounted. 90 seconds samples at 10 kS/s were taken. The POD analysis largely follows that of Tutkun et al. (see e.g. AIAA J., 45,5,2008). The analysis shows that 26% of the pressure pulsation energy can be addressed to azimuthal mode 1. The work has been supported by Energy Norway.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of high speed rarefied gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongari, Nishanth; Zhang, Yonghao; Reese, Jason M.

    2012-11-01

    To understand the molecular behaviour of gases in high speed rarefied conditions, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) numerical experiments using the open source code Open FOAM. We use shear-driven Couette flows as test cases, where the two parallel plates are moving with a speed of Uw in opposite directions with their temperatures set to Tw. The gas rarefaction conditions vary from slip to transition, and compressibility conditions vary from low speed isothermal to hypersonic flow regimes, i.e. Knudsen number (Kn) from 0.01 to 1 and Mach number (Ma) from 0.05 to 10. We measure the molecular velocity distribution functions, the spatial variation of gas mean free path profiles and other macroscopic properties. Our MD results convey that flow properties in the near-wall non-equilibrium region do not merely depend on Kn, but they are also significantly affected by Ma. These results may yield new insight into diffusive transport in rarefied gases at high speeds.

  1. Dynamics of an unsteady stagnation vortical flow via dynamic mode decomposition analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chong; Wang, Jianjie; Wang, Jinjun; Sun, Mao

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of a large-scale stagnation vortex pair in an axisymmetric stagnation flow subject to a laminar wake disturbance is measured by time-resolved two-dimensional particle image velocimetry, and then quantitatively characterized by both the Eulerian velocity/vorticity fields and the Lagrangian finite-time Lyapunov exponents fields. This vortex pair is found to be the result of the forced response of the stagnation flow to the upstream shearing disturbances, and presents a dynamical evolution of quasi-periodic shedding due to short-wave elliptical instability. Dynamic mode decomposition analysis of both the Eulerian measure and the Lagrangian measure is taken for a quantitative description of this process. The sparsity-promoting scheme (Jovanović et al. Phys Fluids 26(2):024,103, 2014), which integrates the mode identification and truncation as a whole, is used to distinguish those modes with dynamical significance from irrelevant ones with transient behavior. The superiority of this scheme is evidenced by the facts that it avoids the eigenvalue contamination problem, and credits higher priority to the sub-dominant modes directly associated with the system dynamics. It is found that the energetic mode with a frequency of 0.177 Hz, or about 10% of the maximum shear rate of the upstream wake, determines the quasi-periodical vortex formation process. Its half-order harmonic represents the vortex shedding event along one fixed direction. High-order even-quarter harmonics jointly contribute to the circular pattern of the vortex tube. In addition, a set of low-frequency odd-quarter harmonics are highlighted as the elliptical instability and the following vortex deformation process. Based on this finding, a reduce-order representation with 8 Eulerian modes or 56 Lagrangian modes is proposed to characterize the dominant dynamics of this unsteady vortical stagnation flow. In addition, the Eulerian measure seems to be more efficient than the Lagrangian measure in

  2. Fire, flow and dynamic equilibrium in stream macroinvertebrate communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arkle, R.S.; Pilliod, D.S.; Strickler, K.

    2010-01-01

    The complex effects of disturbances on ecological communities can be further complicated by subsequent perturbations within an ecosystem. We investigated how wildfire interacts with annual variations in peak streamflow to affect the stability of stream macroinvertebrate communities in a central Idaho wilderness, USA. We conducted a 4-year retrospective analysis of unburned (n = 7) and burned (n = 6) catchments, using changes in reflectance values (??NBR) from satellite imagery to quantify the percentage of each catchment's riparian and upland vegetation that burned at high and low severity. For this wildland fire complex, increasing riparian burn severity and extent were associated with greater year-to-year variation, rather than a perennial increase, in sediment loads, organic debris, large woody debris (LWD) and undercut bank structure. Temporal changes in these variables were correlated with yearly peak flow in burned catchments but not in unburned reference catchments, indicating that an interaction between fire and flow can result in decreased habitat stability in burned catchments. Streams in more severely burned catchments exhibited increasingly dynamic macroinvertebrate communities and did not show increased similarity to reference streams over time. Annual variability in macroinvertebrates was attributed, predominantly, to the changing influence of sediment, LWD, riparian cover and organic debris, as quantities of these habitat components fluctuated annually depending on burn severity and annual peak streamflows. These analyses suggest that interactions among fire, flow and stream habitat may increase inter-annual habitat variability and macroinvertebrate community dynamics for a duration approaching the length of the historic fire return interval of the study area. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Spatiotemporal evolution of cavitation dynamics exhibited by flowing microbubbles during ultrasound exposure.

    PubMed

    Choi, James J; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasound and microbubble-based therapies utilize cavitation to generate bioeffects, yet cavitation dynamics during individual pulses and across consecutive pulses remain poorly understood under physiologically relevant flow conditions. SonoVue(®) microbubbles were made to flow (fluid velocity: 10-40 mm/s) through a vessel in a tissue-mimicking material and were exposed to ultrasound [frequency: 0.5 MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure (PRP): 150-1200 kPa, pulse length: 1-100,000 cycles, pulse repetition frequency (PRF): 1-50 Hz, number of pulses: 10-250]. Radiated emissions were captured on a linear array, and passive acoustic mapping was used to spatiotemporally resolve cavitation events. At low PRPs, stable cavitation was maintained throughout several pulses, thus generating a steady rise in energy with low upstream spatial bias within the focal volume. At high PRPs, inertial cavitation was concentrated in the first 6.3 ± 1.3 ms of a pulse, followed by an energy reduction and high upstream bias. Multiple pulses at PRFs below a flow-dependent critical rate (PRF(crit)) produced predictable and consistent cavitation dynamics. Above the PRF(crit), energy generated was unpredictable and spatially biased. In conclusion, key parameters in microbubble-seeded flow conditions were matched with specific types, magnitudes, distributions, and durations of cavitation; this may help in understanding empirically observed in vivo phenomena and guide future pulse sequence designs.

  4. Low frequency sound attenuation in a flow duct using a thin slow sound material.

    PubMed

    Aurégan, Yves; Farooqui, Maaz; Groby, Jean-Philippe

    2016-05-01

    A thin subwavelength material that can be flush mounted in a duct and that gives an attenuation band at low frequencies in air flow channels is presented. To decrease the material thickness, the sound is slowed in the material using folded side branch tubes. The impedance of the material is compared to the optimal value given by the Cremer condition, which can differ greatly from the air characteristic impedance. Grazing flow on this material increases the losses at the interface between the flow and the material.

  5. Anisotropic material synthesis by capillary flow in a fluid stripe.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Matthew J; Piraino, Francesco; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Rasponi, Marco; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-09-01

    We present a simple bench-top technique to produce centimeter long concentration gradients in biomaterials incorporating soluble, material, and particle gradients. By patterning hydrophilic regions on a substrate, a stripe of prepolymer solution is held in place on a glass slide by a hydrophobic boundary. Adding a droplet to one end of this "pre-wet" stripe causes a rapid capillary flow that spreads the droplet along the stripe to generate a gradient in the relative concentrations of the droplet and pre-wet solutions. The gradient length and shape are controlled by the pre-wet and droplet volumes, stripe thickness, fluid viscosity and surface tension. Gradient biomaterials are produced by crosslinking gradients of prepolymer solutions. Demonstrated examples include a concentration gradient of cells encapsulated in three dimensions (3D) within a homogeneous biopolymer and a constant concentration of cells encapsulated in 3D within a biomaterial gradient exhibiting a gradient in cell spreading. The technique employs coated glass slides that may be purchased or custom made from tape and hydrophobic spray. The approach is accessible to virtually any researcher or student and should dramatically reduce the time required to synthesize a wide range of gradient biomaterials. Moreover, since the technique employs passive mechanisms it is ideal for remote or resource poor settings.

  6. Material Flow for the Intentional Use of Mercury in China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Wang, Shuxiao; Wu, Qingru; Larssen, Thorjørn

    2016-03-01

    Intentional use of mercury (Hg) is an important contributor to the release of Hg into the environment. This study presents the first inventory of material flow for intentional use of Hg in China. The total amount of Hg used in China increased from 803 ± 95 tons in 2005 to its peak level of 1272 ± 110 tons in 2011. Vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) production is the largest user of Hg, accounting for over 60% of the total demand. As regulations on Hg content in products are tightening globally against the background of the Minamata Convention, the total demand will decrease. Medical devices will likely still use a significant amount of Hg and become the second largest user of Hg if no proactive measures are taken. Significant knowledge gaps exist in China for catalyst recycling sector. Although more than half of the Hg used is recycled, this sector has not drawn enough attention. There are also more than 200 tons of Hg that had unknown fates in 2011; very little information exists related to this issue. Among the final environmental fates, landfill is the largest receiver of Hg, followed by air, water, and soil.

  7. Hyperfast Correlated Dynamics of Radiation Damage and Recovery in Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xiaojun

    The response of solid-state materials to radiation is governed through a host of mechanisms that have time scales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds and years. Metastable liquid-like regions that typically last for several picoseconds and more are commonly observed in ultra-fast experiments and simulations. In this investigation, we make quantitative predictions on correlated dynamical motion of the atoms as the liquid-like state is formed and condensed following an ion or neutron impact. Simulations on three materials -- copper, silicon and argon -- that have very different bond structures reveal an anisotropic and heterogeneous dynamical structure. Of utmost importance are the dynamical correlations during the recovery period, which corresponds to the condensation of the liquid-like state. Using molecular dynamics simulations and with the appropriate non-equilibrium shock physics formalism, the dynamical metrics of the liquid-like state are evaluated through the density correlator and van Hove self-correlation function, as well as through defect, thermodynamic and hydrodynamic field data, following a confined ion/neutron impact. These correlation functions can also be experimentally accessed or inferred from the state-of-the-art ultrafast pump-probe experimental methods. The hopping mechanism from the van-Hove self-correlation, the fractallike condensation and the fast decay of the density correlator attest to a rapid defect recovery in copper. In contrast, silicon portrays dynamically heterogeneous regions that resist recovery to the underlying lattice structure, and exhibits a non-decaying density correlator that is strikingly analogous to that of a supercooled liquid. Ion hammering and pump-probe experiments allude to a liquid-liquid phase transition in silicon -- from a high density liquid to a low density liquid -- before silicon is amorphized; the inference, however, is based on indirect interpretations. The simulations presented in this dissertation

  8. The influence of cooling on the advance of lava flows: insights from analogue experiments on the feedbacks between flow dynamics and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, F.; Kaminski, E.; Tait, S.; Limare, A.

    2012-12-01

    During an effusive volcanic eruption, the crisis management is mainly based on the prediction of lava flows advance and its velocity. The spreading of a lava flow, seen as a gravity current, depends on its "effective rheology" and the eruptive mass flux. These two parameters are not known a priori during an eruption and a key question is how to evaluate them in near real-time (rather than afterwards.) There is no generic macroscopic model for the rheology of an advancing lava flow, and analogue modelling is a precious tool to empirically estimate the rheology of a complex flow. We investigate through laboratory experiments the simultaneous spreading and cooling of horizontal currents fed at constant rate from a point source. The materials used are silicone oil (isoviscous), and poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) wax injected in liquid state and solidiying during its advance. In the isoviscous case, the temperature field is a passive tracer of the flow dynamics, whereas in the PEG experiments there is a feedback between the cooling of the flow and its effective rheology. We focus on the evolution of the current area and of the surface thermal structure, imaged with an infrared camera, to assess how the thermal structure can be related to the flow rate. The flow advance is continuous in the viscous case, and follows the predictions of Huppert (1982); in that case the surface temperature become steady after a transient time and the radiated heat flux is shown to be proportional to the input rate. For the PEG experiments, the spreading occurs through an alternation of stagnation and overflow phases, with a mean spreading rate decreasing as the experiment goes on. As in the case of lava flows, these experiments can exhibit a compound flow field, solid levees, thermal erosion, liquid overflows and channelization. A key observation is that the effective rheology of the solifying PEG material depends on the input flow rate, with high input rates yielding a rheology closer to the

  9. Effects of material degradation on large space structures dynamic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigao, Alan J.

    1992-08-01

    Composite Large Space Structures (LSS) including booms, planar surfaces, antennas, platforms, and space stations are proposed for use in NASA's Space Station 'Freedom' and the DOD's Global Protection Against Limited Strikes programs. Because of their low mass and high strength and stiffness, composite repetitive lattice structures are ideal for these space applications. LSS will be required to sustain severe environmental effects - radiation, thermal cycling, atomic oxygen bombardment, collision with micrometeoroids and space debris, and hostile actions - and transient operational loads - docking, slewing, manned activities, control system, and the mobile service center - while maintaining strict mission parameters. Platform pointing is one example of these requirements and necessitates tolerances of less than one thousandth of a degree. Over time, material and structural degradation will occur due to environmental effects causing a change in the structure's stiffness and dynamic response. Likely, this structural damage will require immediate repair to restore the LSS to full mission capability. This thesis investigates the dynamic response of one LSS - the NASA Dual-Keel Space Station with 5 meter graphite epoxy erectable truss under one operational load - shuttle docking - and Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environmental conditions, and predicts how the material, structural properties, and dynamic response change over the 20-30 year design life. Results show the effects of material degradation on the station's dynamic response and mission requirements and has applications for NASA and DOD logistics planning for future LSS.

  10. Experimental and Numerical Study of Swirling Flows and Flame Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abricka, M.; Barmina, I.; Valdmanis, R.; Zake, M.

    2014-08-01

    The effect of swirling air on the flow dynamics was investigated for the cold non-reacting flows and the flame arising at thermo-chemical conversion of biomass pellets downstream of a cylindrical channel. Under experimental and numerical investigation was the swirling flow dynamics with the primary axial air supply below a biomass layer and swirling air supply above it. The results indicate that for cold flows the swirling air jet outflow from tangential nozzles leads to the formation of a complex flow dynamics which is influenced both by upstream and downstream air swirl propagation near the channel walls, with correlating swirl-enhanced formation of the upstream and downstream axial flows close to the flow centreline depending on the swirling air supply rate. These axial flows can be completely balanced at their stagnation within the axial recirculation zone. It is shown that at equal boundary conditions for the swirling flame and the cold flows the swirling flow dynamics is influenced by the upstream air swirl-enhanced mixing of the reactants below the air swirl nozzles. This determines the formation of a downstream reaction zone with correlating development of the flow velocity, temperature and composition profiles in the downstream flame regions with improved combustion stability. The low swirl intensity in these regions prevents the formation of a recirculation zone Ir veikti kompleksi aukstu nereaģējošu un liesmas virpuļplūsmu dinamikas veidošanās eksperimentālie pētījumi, izvērtējot galvenos faktorus, kas ietekmē šo plūsmu dinamikas veidošanos cilindriskā kanālā virs granulēta biomasas slāņa pie aksiālas primārā gaisa padeves zem granulu slāņa un gaisa virpuļplūsmas padeves virs tā. Auksto virpuļplūsmu pētījumi apliecina, ka plūsmas dinamiku būtiski ietekmē divu savstarpēji konkurējošu un pretēji vērstu virpuļplūsmu veidošanās pie tangenciālās gaisa padeves sprauslas izejas. Lejupvērstā virpuļplūsma, kas

  11. Numerical simulation of two-dimensional single- and multiple-material flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.R.; Baty, R.S. ); Kashiwa, B.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Over the last several years, Sandia National Laboratories has had an interest in developing capabilities to predict the flow fields around vehicles entering or exiting the water at a wide range of speeds. Such prediction schemes have numerous engineering applications in the design of weapon systems. For example, such a scheme could be used to predict the forces and moments experienced by an air-launched anti-submarine weapon on water-entry. Furthermore, a water-exit prediction capability could be used to model the complicated surface closure jet resulting from a missile being shot out of the water. The CCICE (Cell-Centered Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian) code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was chosen to provide the fluid dynamics solver for high speed water-entry and water-exit problems. This implicit time-marching, two-dimensional, conservative, finite-volume code solves the multi-material, compressible, inviscid fluid dynamics equations. The incompressible version of the CCICE code, CCMAC (cell-Centered Marker and Cell), was chosen for low speed water- entry and water-exit problems in order to reduce the computational expense. These codes were chosen to take advantage of certain advances in numerical methods for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that have taken place at LANL. Notable among these advances is the ability to perform implicit, multi-material, compressible flow simulations, with a fully cell-centered data structure. This means that a single set of control volumes are used, on which a discrete form of the conservation laws is satisfied. This is in control to the more classical staggered mesh methods, in which separate control volumes are defined for mass and momentum. 12 refs.

  12. Numerical simulation of two-dimensional single- and multiple-material flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.R.; Baty, R.S.; Kashiwa, B.A.

    1992-03-01

    Over the last several years, Sandia National Laboratories has had an interest in developing capabilities to predict the flow fields around vehicles entering or exiting the water at a wide range of speeds. Such prediction schemes have numerous engineering applications in the design of weapon systems. For example, such a scheme could be used to predict the forces and moments experienced by an air-launched anti-submarine weapon on water-entry. Furthermore, a water-exit prediction capability could be used to model the complicated surface closure jet resulting from a missile being shot out of the water. The CCICE (Cell-Centered Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian) code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was chosen to provide the fluid dynamics solver for high speed water-entry and water-exit problems. This implicit time-marching, two-dimensional, conservative, finite-volume code solves the multi-material, compressible, inviscid fluid dynamics equations. The incompressible version of the CCICE code, CCMAC (cell-Centered Marker and Cell), was chosen for low speed water- entry and water-exit problems in order to reduce the computational expense. These codes were chosen to take advantage of certain advances in numerical methods for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that have taken place at LANL. Notable among these advances is the ability to perform implicit, multi-material, compressible flow simulations, with a fully cell-centered data structure. This means that a single set of control volumes are used, on which a discrete form of the conservation laws is satisfied. This is in control to the more classical staggered mesh methods, in which separate control volumes are defined for mass and momentum. 12 refs.

  13. Large-eddy simulation of combustion dynamics in swirling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Christopher Pritchard

    The impact of premixer swirl number, S, and overall fuel equivalence ratio, phi, on the stability of a model swirl-stabilized, lean-premixed gas turbine combustor has been numerically investigated using a massively-parallel Large-Eddy Simulations Combustion Dynamics model. Through the use of a premixed combustion model, unsteady vortex-flame and acoustic-flame interactions are captured. It is observed that for flows with swirl intensity high enough to form Vortex-Breakdown (i.e., a phenomena associated with a large region of reverse or recirculating flow along the axis of rotation), the measured rms pressure amplitude (p') are attenuated significantly (over 6.6 dB reduction) compared to flows without this phenomena. The reduced p' amplitudes are accompanied by reduced longitudinal flame-front oscillations and reduced coherence in the shed vortices. Similar p' reduction levels are achieved through changes in the operating equivalence ratio, phi. Compared to the leanest equivalence ratio simulated (phi = 0.52), p' at a stoichiometric mixture is reduced by 6.0 dB. Methodologies for active control based on modulation of the inlet Swirl number (S, a measure of the intensity of swirl) and phi are also investigated. Open-loop control through S variation is demonstrated for a lean mixture with a significant reduction in the fluctuating mass-flow-rate and p' after a convective time-delay. A partially-premixed combustion model, which allows for variations in the local phi, is used to model both temporal and spatial variations in phi. It is found that the response time to changes in phi are much faster than those for changes in S. Also, it is shown that spatial variations in phi (or unmixedness) actually lead to p' attenuation in the current combustor configuration.

  14. Accurate direct Eulerian simulation of dynamic elastic-plastic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James R; Walter, John W

    2009-01-01

    The simulation of dynamic, large strain deformation is an important, difficult, and unsolved computational challenge. Existing Eulerian schemes for dynamic material response are plagued by unresolved issues. We present a new scheme for the first-order system of elasto-plasticity equations in the Eulerian frame. This system has an intrinsic constraint on the inverse deformation gradient. Standard Godunov schemes do not satisfy this constraint. The method of Flux Distributions (FD) was devised to discretely enforce such constraints for numerical schemes with cell-centered variables. We describe a Flux Distribution approach that enforces the inverse deformation gradient constraint. As this approach is new and novel, we do not yet have numerical results to validate our claims. This paper is the first installment of our program to develop this new method.

  15. Greenland Flow Dynamics: (De)coding Process Understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, R. B.; Parizek, B. R.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Applegate, P. J.; Christianson, K. A.; Dixon, T. H.; Holland, D. M.; Holschuh, N.; Keller, K.; Koellner, S. J.; Lampkin, D. J.; Muto, A.; Nicholas, R.; Stevens, N. T.; Voytenko, D.; Walker, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Extensive modeling informed by the growing body of observational data yields important insights to the controlling processes operating across a range of spatiotemporal scales that have influenced the dynamic variability of the Greenland ice sheet. Pressurized basal lubrication enhances ice flow. This lubricating water is largely produced by basal and/or surface melt. For the North East Greenland Ice Stream, elevated geothermal heat flux (GHF) near its onset helps initiate the streaming flow. We suggest that the elevated GHF is likely caused by melt production and migration due to cyclical loading of the lithosphere over glacial timescales. On sub-seasonal timescales, surface meltwater production and transmission to the subglacial environment can enhance flow for pressurized, distributed hydraulic systems and diminish regional sliding for lower-pressure, channelized systems. However, in a warming climate, this lubricating source occurs across an expanding ablation zone, possibly softening shear margins and triggering basal sliding over previously frozen areas. Yet, the existence of active englacial conduits can lead to a plumbing network that helps preserve ice tongues and limit the loss of important buttressing of outlet glacier flow. Ocean forcing has been implicated in the variability of outlet glacier speeds around the periphery of Greenland. The extent and timescale over which those marginal changes influence inland flow depends on the basal rheology that, on a local scale, also influences the concentration of englacial stresses. Detailed observations of a calving event on Helheim Glacier have helped constrain diagnostic simulations of the pre- and post-calving stress states conducted in hopes of informing improved calving relationships. Furthermore, warm-water-mass variability within Irminger/Atlantic Waters off Greenland may play an important role in the monthly modulation of outlet glacier flow speeds, as has been observed for an ice stream draining into

  16. Dynamic deformation of heterogeneous media: A materials scientist's perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukul

    2015-06-01

    Traditionally, materials design assumes full density during the usage of materials, and rather explicitly excludes open spaces. However, with increasing usage in structural applications of cellular solids and the advent of additive manufacturing to make intricate shapes this assumption is flying out the window. But this raises the question of how we deal with the underlying physics associated with the void space, particularly when such materials architectures are dynamically loaded. This builds upon decades of work on granular systems, particularly powder composites and sand. Using as examples polymeric structured lattices and particle composite mixtures we will examine the influence of the void space on the overall response of the material mesostructure. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DOE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Dynamic coupling between fluid flow and vein growth in fractures: a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J.-O.; Enzmann, F.

    2012-04-01

    chemical species to the growth site or by incorporation of material into the crystal structure. Hence a flexible growth rate is applied that adapts for both cases. After reaching a threshold value of generated vein material, the simulation is stopped and the generated geometry exported. Subsequently the fluid flow field for the new geometry is simulated by GeoDict, followed by simulation of vein growth. By iterative calculations of fluid flow and vein growth we couple the two processes and simulate dynamic vein growth. Although the model is very simplistic in the current state, we anticipate that it reproduces crucial characteristics of vein growth and hence yield further insights into vein generation in 3D. Ogilvie SR, Isakov E, Glover PWJ (2006) Fluid flow through rough fractures in rocks. II: A new matching model for rough rock fractures. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 241:454-465 Wiegmann A (2007) Computation of the permeability of porous materials from their microstructure by FFF-Stokes. In: Prätzel-Wolters D (ed) Berichte des Fraunhofer ITWM, vol. 129, Kaiserslautern, p 24

  18. Modeling the dynamic crush of impact mitigating materials

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, R.W.; McMichael, L.D.

    1995-05-12

    Crushable materials are commonly utilized in the design of structural components to absorb energy and mitigate shock during the dynamic impact of a complex structure, such as an automobile chassis or drum-type shipping container. The development and application of several finite-element material models which have been developed at various times at LLNL for DYNA3D will be discussed. Between the models, they are able to account for several of the predominant mechanisms which typically influence the dynamic mechanical behavior of crushable materials. One issue we addressed was that no single existing model would account for the entire gambit of constitutive features which are important for crushable materials. Thus, we describe the implementation and use of an additional material model which attempts to provide a more comprehensive model of the mechanics of crushable material behavior. This model combines features of the pre-existing DYNA models and incorporates some new features as well in an invariant large-strain formulation. In addition to examining the behavior of a unit cell in uniaxial compression, two cases were chosen to evaluate the capabilities and accuracy of the various material models in DYNA. In the first case, a model for foam filled box beams was developed and compared to test data from a 4-point bend test. The model was subsequently used to study its effectiveness in energy absorption in an aluminum extrusion, spaceframe, vehicle chassis. The second case examined the response of the AT-400A shipping container and the performance of the overpack material during accident environments selected from 10CFR71 and IAEA regulations.

  19. Statistical prediction of dynamic distortion of inlet flow using minimum dynamic measurement. An application to the Melick statistical method and inlet flow dynamic distortion prediction without RMS measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweikhard, W. G.; Chen, Y. S.

    1986-01-01

    The Melick method of inlet flow dynamic distortion prediction by statistical means is outlined. A hypothetic vortex model is used as the basis for the mathematical formulations. The main variables are identified by matching the theoretical total pressure rms ratio with the measured total pressure rms ratio. Data comparisons, using the HiMAT inlet test data set, indicate satisfactory prediction of the dynamic peak distortion for cases with boundary layer control device vortex generators. A method for the dynamic probe selection was developed. Validity of the probe selection criteria is demonstrated by comparing the reduced-probe predictions with the 40-probe predictions. It is indicated that the the number of dynamic probes can be reduced to as few as two and still retain good accuracy.

  20. Dynamic fatigue and strength characterization of three ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Erica C; Piascik, Jeffrey R; Stoner, Brian R; Thompson, Jeffrey Y

    2007-06-01

    Fracture strength and fatigue parameters of three ceramic materials submitted to dynamic fatigue were evaluated. A machinable leucite-reinforced dental ceramic, aluminum oxide, and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were tested. The inert strength of the materials was determined in air (25 degrees C) at stressing rates of 70, 250, 400 MPa/s for Porcelain, Alumina and YSZ respectively. The data was analyzed using a two-parameter Weibull distribution. The Weibull modulus (m) and the characteristic of fracture (sigma0) parameters were determined for each material. Specimens were also tested in 3-point bending at different stressing rates in distilled/deionized water at 37 degrees C (dynamic fatigue) in order to calculate the fatigue parameters n and ln B. The strength for each material was characterized using Strength-Probability-Time (SPT) diagrams for 1 day, 1 year and 10 years. YSZ showed a high-fracture strength sigma0 (1,459 MPa) at a failure probability of 63.2% and high resistance to subcritical crack growth. YSZ and alumina showed better resistance to slow crack growth than porcelain, indicating less susceptibility to strength degradation by stress corrosion. Lifetime predictions after 10 years indicate a reduction of 50%, 36% and 29% in strength for porcelain, alumina and YSZ respectively. YSZ seems to be a very promising material for long-term dental and biomedical applications.

  1. Two-dimensional carbon-based conductive materials with dynamically controlled asymmetric Dirac cones.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Delia; Márquez, Irene R; Álvarez de Cienfuegos, Luis; Fuentes, Noelia; Rodríguez-Bolivar, Salvador; Cárdenas, Diego J; Mota, Antonio J; Gómez-Campos, Francisco; Cuerva, Juan M

    2015-12-21

    The design of two dimensional graphene-type materials with an anisotropic electron flow direction in the X- and Y-axes opens the door for the development of novel electronic materials with multiple functions in nanoelectronics. In the present work, we have studied the electronic transport properties of a new family of 2D graphene-graphyne hybrids presenting conformationally free phenylethylene subunits. This system ensures two different conductive pathways that are perpendicular to each other: an acene nanoribbon subunit, in the X-axis, with graphene-type conduction, and a free to rotate phenylethylene subunit, in the Y-axis, in which the magnitude of the conduction depends dynamically on the corresponding torsion angle. Our calculations have confirmed that this system presents two different conduction pathways, which are related to the presence of asymmetric Dirac-type cones. Moreover, the Dirac cones can be dynamically modified in the presence of an external gate electrode, which is unprecedented in the literature.

  2. Mixing dynamics and pattern formation around flow stagnation points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Juan J.; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    We study the mixing of two reactive fluids in the presence of convective instabilities. Such system is characterized by the formation of unique porosity patterns and mixing dynamics linked to the evolution of vortices and stagnation points. Around them, the fluid-fluid interface is stretched and compressed, which enhances mixing and triggers chemical reactions, and the system can be analyzed using fluid deformation model. We consider velocity fields generated by a double gyre synthetic velocity field and Rayleigh-Bénard and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The different flow structures can be visualized by the strain rate and the finite time Lyapunov exponents. We show that the mixing enhancement given by the scalar dissipation rate is controlled by the equilibrium between interface compression and diffusion, which depends on the velocity field configuration. Furthermore, we establish a quantitative relation between the mixing rate and the evolution of the potential energy of the fluid when convection is driven by density instabilities.

  3. Axisymmetric and asymmetric vortex dynamics in convergent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, David Scott, Jr.

    1997-08-01

    In this thesis two distinct and complementary approaches are used to investigate the dynamics of natural vortices that are maintained by the sustained convergence of rotating fluid. These approaches are motivated by our need for better understanding of the dynamics of tornadoes and other vortices associated with convection. The first approach is the direct numerical simulation of an axisymmetric model of a vortex created by the forced convection near a lower boundary of a fluid in solid body rotation. A numerical model of axisymmetric incompressible fluid, based on recently developed numerical techniques, is presented and the results are shown to compare very favorably with results from older models. It is found that while the maximum windspeeds depend almost completely on the strength of the convective forcing, the structure and time-dependent behavior of the vortex depend exclusively on the rotational forcing and the model eddy viscosity parameter. The formation of transient vortices, analogous to natural dust devils, from finite-sized regions of rotation is simulated and the dependence of these results on the model parameters are explored. The second approach is the study of two-dimensional (r, /theta) asymmetric perturbations in idealized two- dimensional vortex flows that are maintained by radial inflow (convergence), such as the potential vortex and the Burgers' vortex solution. We develop a mathematical model of these perturbations that allows us to describe, for each azimuthal wavenumber, their evolution as a linear dynamical system. This formulation allows us to investigate the stability of these vortices to both exponentially growing and transient perturbations. We find that while these two-dimensional vortices are linearly stable, optimally configured transient perturbations can experience significant growth before decaying. These optimal transients use the deformation of the mean flow to evolve their vorticity field into a configuration with higher

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamic simulations of pipe elbow flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Homicz, Gregory Francis

    2004-08-01

    One problem facing today's nuclear power industry is flow-accelerated corrosion and erosion in pipe elbows. The Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is performing experiments in their Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) test loop to better characterize these phenomena, and develop advanced sensor technologies for the condition monitoring of critical elbows on a continuous basis. In parallel with these experiments, Sandia National Laboratories is performing Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the flow in one elbow of the FAC test loop. The simulations are being performed using the FLUENT commercial software developed and marketed by Fluent, Inc. The model geometry and mesh were created using the GAMBIT software, also from Fluent, Inc. This report documents the results of the simulations that have been made to date; baseline results employing the RNG k-e turbulence model are presented. The predicted value for the diametrical pressure coefficient is in reasonably good agreement with published correlations. Plots of the velocities, pressure field, wall shear stress, and turbulent kinetic energy adjacent to the wall are shown within the elbow section. Somewhat to our surprise, these indicate that the maximum values of both wall shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy occur near the elbow entrance, on the inner radius of the bend. Additional simulations were performed for the same conditions, but with the RNG k-e model replaced by either the standard k-{var_epsilon}, or the realizable k-{var_epsilon} turbulence model. The predictions using the standard k-{var_epsilon} model are quite similar to those obtained in the baseline simulation. However, with the realizable k-{var_epsilon} model, more significant differences are evident. The maximums in both wall shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy now appear on the outer radius, near the elbow exit, and are {approx}11% and 14% greater, respectively, than those predicted in the baseline calculation

  5. Dynamic Photonic Materials Based on Liquid Crystals (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2015-0059 DYNAMIC PHOTONIC MATERIALS BASED ON LIQUID CRYSTALS (POSTPRINT) Luciano De Sio and Cesare Umeton University...ON LIQUID CRYSTALS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) (see back...10.1016/B978-0-444-62644-8.00001-7. 14. ABSTRACT Liquid crystals, combining optical non-linearity and self-organizing properties with fluidity, and being

  6. Modelling dynamic compaction of porous materials with the overstress approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Y.

    2014-05-01

    To model compaction of a porous material we need 1) an equation of state of the porous material in terms of the equation of state of its matrix, and 2) a compaction law. For an equation of state it is common to use Herrmann's suggestion, as in his Pα model. For a compaction law it is common to use a quasi-static compaction relation obtained from 1) a meso-scale model (as in Carroll and Holt's spherical shell model), or from 2) quasi-static tests. Here we are interested in dynamic compaction, like in a planar impact test. In dynamic compaction the state may change too fast for the state point to follow the quasi-static compaction curve. We therefore get an overstress situation. The state point moves out of the quasi-static compaction boundary, and only with time collapses back towards it at a certain rate. In this way the dynamic compaction event becomes rate dependent. In the paper we first write down the rate equations for dynamic compaction according to the overstress approach. We then implement these equations in a hydro-code and run some examples. We show how the overstress rate parameter can be calibrated from tests.

  7. Tensile properties and flow behavior analysis of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kanwarjeet; Latha, S.; Nandagopal, M.; Mathew, M. D.; Laha, K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-11-01

    The tensile properties and flow behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube have been investigated in the framework of various constitutive equations for a wide range of temperatures (300-923 K) and strain rates (3 × 10-3 s-1, 3 × 10-4 s-1 and 3 × 10-5 s-1). The tensile flow behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube was most accurately described by Voce equation. The variation of instantaneous work hardening rate (θ = dσ/dε) and σθ with stress (σ) indicated two stage behavior characterized by rapid decrease at low stresses (transient stage) followed by a gradual decrease in high stresses (Stage III). The variation of work hardening parameters and work hardening rate in terms of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ with temperature exhibited three distinct regimes. Rapid decrease in flow stress and work hardening parameters and rapid shift of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ towards low stresses with increase in temperature indicated dynamic recovery at high temperatures. Tensile properties of the material have been best predicted from Voce equation.

  8. Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for multiphase flow: Surface tension and contact line dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Panchenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel formulation of the Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model (PF-SPH) and use it to simulate two- and three-phase flows in bounded domains. In the PF-SPH model, the Navier-Stokes equations are discretized with the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method and the Young-Laplace boundary condition at the fluid-fluid interface and the Young boundary condition at the fluid-fluid-solid interface are replaced with pairwise forces added into the Navier-Stokes equations. We derive a relationship between the parameters in the pairwise forces and the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we demonstrate the accuracy of the model under static and dynamic conditions. Finally, to demonstrate the capabilities and robustness of the model we use it to simulate flow of three fluids in a porous material.

  9. Continuous Processing of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients Suspensions via Dynamic Cross-Flow Filtration.

    PubMed

    Gursch, Johannes; Hohl, Roland; Toschkoff, Gregor; Dujmovic, Diana; Brozio, Jörg; Krumme, Markus; Rasenack, Norbert; Khinast, Johannes

    2015-10-01

    Over the last years, continuous manufacturing has created significant interest in the pharmaceutical industry. Continuous filtration at low flow rates and high solid loadings poses, however, a significant challenge. A commercially available, continuously operating, dynamic cross-flow filtration device (CFF) is tested and characterized. It is shown that the CFF is a highly suitable technology for continuous filtration. For all tested model active pharmaceutical ingredients, a material-specific strictly linear relationship between feed and permeate rate is identified. Moreover, for each tested substance, a constant concentration factor is reached. A one-parameter model based on a linear equation is suitable to fully describe the CFF filtration performance. This rather unexpected finding and the concentration polarization layer buildup is analyzed and a basic model to describe the observed filtration behavior is developed.

  10. Flow dynamics over a foredune at Prince Edward Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.; Davidson-Arnott, Robin; Walker, Ian J.; Ollerhead, Jeff

    2005-02-01

    Time-averaged windspeed profiles at eight locations over a relatively high (8 m), vegetated, topographically simple foredune were measured using cup and ultrasonic anemometry during an onshore wind event in May 2002. The experiment was part of a larger study on the sedimentary dynamics of a beach-dune complex in the Greenwich Dunes, Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada. The foredune is vegetated with Ammophila breviligulata, and vegetation density ranged from 0% on the foredune ramp to upward of 70% at the dune crest. Topographic forcing and resulting flow acceleration was observed distinctly in windspeed profiles, and linear speedup occurred for all elevations above the vegetation canopy. A distinct inflection point is evident in normalized windspeed profiles over the dune indicating a net momentum sink below the vegetation canopy top, and systematic speed-down within the vegetation was observed up the foredune stoss slope. Wind speed profile structure was consistent for the range of incident wind speeds measured. A comparison of normal and slightly oblique incident winds indicated that for similar approach winds, wind speeds are consistently higher during oblique flow conditions. The implications for foredune morphodynamics and sedimentation are discussed.

  11. A Lagrangian model of Copepod dynamics in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardeshiri, Hamidreza; Benkeddad, Ibtissem; Schmitt, Francois G.; Souissi, Sami; Toschi, Federico; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Planktonic copepods are small crustaceans that have the ability to swim by quick powerful jumps. Such an aptness is used to escape from high shear regions, which may be caused either by flow perturbations, produced by a large predator such as fish larave, or by the inherent highly turbulent dynamics of the ocean. Through a combined experimental and numerical study, we investigate the impact of jumping behaviour on the small-scale patchiness of copepods in a turbulent environment. Recorded velocity tracks of copepods displaying escape response jumps in still water are used to define and tune a Lagrangian Copepod (LC) model. The model is further employed to simulate the behaviour of thousands of copepods in a fully developed hydrodynamic turbulent flow obtained by direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. First, we show that the LC velocity statistics is in qualitative agreement with available experimental observations of copepods in turbulence. Second, we quantify the clustering of LC, via the fractal dimension D2. We show that D2 can be as low as 2.3, corresponding to local sheetlike aggregates, and that it critically depends on the shear-rate sensitivity of the proposed LC model. We further investigate the effect of jump intensity, jump orientation and geometrical aspect ratio of the copepods on the small-scale spatial distribution. Possible ecological implications of the observed clustering on encounter rates and mating success are discussed.

  12. Dynamic Load Balancing Strategies for Parallel Reacting Flow Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciuneri, Patrick; Meneses, Esteban; Givi, Peyman

    2014-11-01

    Load balancing in parallel computing aims at distributing the work as evenly as possible among the processors. This is a critical issue in the performance of parallel, time accurate, flow simulators. The constraint of time accuracy requires that all processes must be finished with their calculation for a given time step before any process can begin calculation of the next time step. Thus, an irregularly balanced compute load will result in idle time for many processes for each iteration and thus increased walltimes for calculations. Two existing, dynamic load balancing approaches are applied to the simplified case of a partially stirred reactor for methane combustion. The first is Zoltan, a parallel partitioning, load balancing, and data management library developed at the Sandia National Laboratories. The second is Charm++, which is its own machine independent parallel programming system developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The performance of these two approaches is compared, and the prospects for their application to full 3D, reacting flow solvers is assessed.

  13. Investigating flow behaviors of colloidal materials at the single-particle scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Chih

    My thesis work focuses on the nonlinear mechanical behaviors of colloidal suspensions at the particle-level. This work covers both quiescent and strongly sheared suspensions. For quiescent suspensions, we image their 3D structures with confocal microscopy, and implement Stress Assessment from Local Structural Anisotropy (SALSA) to visualize the stress fields in them. Unlike traditional numerical methods, SALSA takes a statistical approach converting the probability of hard-sphere Brownian collisions to stresses. This direct stress measurement allows us to quantify the particle-level stresses surrounding vacancies, dislocations, and grain boundaries in crystalline materials. To drive the suspensions away from equilibrium, we develop a confocal-rheoscope, which is able to shear and image colloidal materials simultaneously. Using this device, we investigate the nonlinear flow behavior governed by Brownian motion, shear induced diffusion, and advection, and more importantly, disentangle them. We also study particle assembly and its corresponding rheological properties under confinement. Finally, we study even more strongly sheared suspensions, in which particle dynamics are too fast to be imaged by a confocal microscope. Here, we use flow reversal rheometry to reveal the underlying mechanism of suspension shear thickening where the viscosity increases with shear rate. We show that the thickening behavior of a suspension arises from the particle contact forces rather than hydrodynamic interactions. Such findings then lead us to design a biaxial shear protocol that can tune the suspension viscosity on demand. This viscosity tuning capability is a foundational step toward using dense suspensions in 3D printing, energy storage, and robotics.

  14. Dynamics and friction drag behavior of viscoelastic flows in complex geometries: A multiscale simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppol, Anantha Padmanabha Rao

    Flows of viscoelastic polymeric fluids are of great fundamental and practical interest as polymeric materials for commodity and value-added products are processed typically in a fluid state. The nonlinear coupling between fluid motion and microstructure, which results in highly non-Newtonian theology, memory/relaxation and normal stress development or tension along streamlines, greatly complicates the analysis, design and control of such flows. This has posed tremendous challenges to researchers engaged in developing first principles models and simulations that can accurately and robustly predict the dynamical behavior of polymeric flows. Despite this, the past two decades have witnessed several significant advances towards accomplishing this goal. Yet a problem of fundamental and great pragmatic interest has defied solution to years of ardent research by several groups, namely the relationship between friction drag and flow rate in inertialess flows of highly elastic polymer solutions in complex kinematics flows. First principles-based solution of this long-standing problem in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics is the goal of this research. To achieve our objective, it is essential to develop the capability to perform large-scale multiscale simulations, which integrate continuum-level finite element solvers for the conservation of mass and momentum with fast integrators of stochastic differential equations that describe the evolution of polymer configuration. Hence, in this research we have focused our attention on development of a parallel, multiscale simulation algorithm that is capable of robustly and efficiently simulating complex kinematics flows of dilute polymeric solutions using the first principles based bead-spring chain description of the polymer molecules. The fidelity and computational efficiency of the algorithm has been demonstrated via three benchmark flow problems, namely, the plane Couette flow, the Poiseuille flow and the 4:1:4 axisymmetric

  15. Static and dynamic angles of repose in loose granular materials under reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinhans, M. G.; Markies, H.; de Vet, S. J.; in't Veld, A. C.; Postema, F. N.

    2011-11-01

    Granular materials avalanche when a static angle of repose is exceeded and freeze at a dynamic angle of repose. Such avalanches occur subaerially on steep hillslopes and wind dunes and subaqueously at the lee side of deltas. Until now it has been assumed that the angles of repose are independent of gravitational acceleration. The objective of this work is to experimentally determine whether the angles of repose depend on gravity. In 33 parabolic flights in a well-controlled research aircraft we recorded avalanching granular materials in rotating drums at effective gravitational accelerations of 0.1, 0.38 and 1.0 times the terrestrial value. The granular materials varied in particle size and rounding and had air or water as interstitial fluid. Materials with angular grains had time-averaged angles of about 40° and with rounded grains about 25° for all effective gravitational accelerations, except the finest glass beads in air, which was explained by static electricity. For all materials, the static angle of repose increases about 5° with reduced gravity, whereas the dynamic angle decreases with about 10°. Consequently, the avalanche size increases with reduced gravity. The experimental results suggest that relatively low slopes of granular material on Mars may have formed by dry flows without a lubricating fluid. On asteroids even lower slopes are expected. The dependence on gravity of angle of repose may require reanalysis of models for many phenomena involving sediment, also at much lower slope angles.

  16. Modeling self-consistent multi-class dynamic traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hsun-Jung; Lo, Shih-Ching

    2002-09-01

    In this study, we present a systematic self-consistent multiclass multilane traffic model derived from the vehicular Boltzmann equation and the traffic dispersion model. The multilane domain is considered as a two-dimensional space and the interaction among vehicles in the domain is described by a dispersion model. The reason we consider a multilane domain as a two-dimensional space is that the driving behavior of road users may not be restricted by lanes, especially motorcyclists. The dispersion model, which is a nonlinear Poisson equation, is derived from the car-following theory and the equilibrium assumption. Under the concept that all kinds of users share the finite section, the density is distributed on a road by the dispersion model. In addition, the dynamic evolution of the traffic flow is determined by the systematic gas-kinetic model derived from the Boltzmann equation. Multiplying Boltzmann equation by the zeroth, first- and second-order moment functions, integrating both side of the equation and using chain rules, we can derive continuity, motion and variance equation, respectively. However, the second-order moment function, which is the square of the individual velocity, is employed by previous researches does not have physical meaning in traffic flow. Although the second-order expansion results in the velocity variance equation, additional terms may be generated. The velocity variance equation we propose is derived from multiplying Boltzmann equation by the individual velocity variance. It modifies the previous model and presents a new gas-kinetic traffic flow model. By coupling the gas-kinetic model and the dispersion model, a self-consistent system is presented.

  17. Pulsatility role in cylinder flow dynamics at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamar, Adnan; Samtaney, Ravi; Bull, Joseph L.

    2012-08-01

    We present dynamics of pulsatile flow past a stationary cylinder characterized by three non-dimensional parameters: the Reynolds number (Re), non-dimensional amplitude (A) of the pulsatile flow velocity, and Keulegan-Carpenter number (KC = Uo/Dωc). This work is motivated by the development of total artificial lungs (TAL) device, which is envisioned to provide ambulatory support to patients. Results are presented for 0.2 ≤ A ≤ 0.6 and 0.57 ≤ KC ≤ 2 at Re = 5 and 10, which correspond to the operating range of TAL. Two distinct fluid regimes are identified. In both regimes, the size of the separated zone is much greater than the uniform flow case, the onset of separation is function of KC, and the separation vortex collapses rapidly during the last fraction of the pulsatile cycle. The vortex size is independent of KC, but with an exponential dependency on A. In regime I, the separation point remains attached to the cylinder surface. In regime II, the separation point migrates upstream of the cylinder. Two distinct vortex collapse mechanisms are observed. For A < 0.4 and all KC and Re values, collapse occurs on the cylinder surface, whereas for A > 0.4 the separation vortex detaches from the cylinder surface and collapses at a certain distance downstream of the cylinder. The average drag coefficient is found to be independent of A and KC, and depends only on Re. However, for A > 0.4, for a fraction of the pulsatile cycle, the instantaneous drag coefficient is negative indicating a thrust production.

  18. Studies of powder flow using a recording powder flowmeter and measurement of the dynamic angle of repose.

    PubMed

    Hegde, R P; Rheingold, J L; Welch, S; Rhodes, C T

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the utility of the dynamic measurement of the angle of repose for pharmaceutical systems, using a variable rotating cylinder to quantify powder flow. The dynamic angle of repose of sodium chloride powder sieve fractions was evaluated using a variable rotating cylinder. The relationship between the static and the dynamic angle of repose is discussed. The dynamic angle of repose of six lots of a multivitamin preparation were compared for inter- and intralot variation. In both cases, no significant differences (p greater than 0.05) were observed. In the multivitamin formulation, lubricants at lower concentration levels did not show a significant effect (p greater than 0.05) on the dynamic angle of repose when compared with flow rates. The effect of different hopper sizes and geometry has been evaluated using the recording powder flowmeter. The results indicate that although different hoppers affect the quantitative nature of the results, the same general trends are apparent. Thus, it appears possible to use a recording powder flowmeter with small quantities of material to predict the effect of formulation and processing variables on the flow of production scale quantities. This paper does not describe a comprehensive evaluation of the pharmaceutical utility of measuring the dynamic angle of repose. However, the results discussed are not encouraging and suggest that the recording powder flowmeter is more sensitive to the effects of formulation and production variables on powder flow.

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of spherical particles in Poiseuille flow under creeping-flow condition.

    PubMed

    Reddig, S; Stark, H

    2013-06-21

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of spherical colloids under the influence of a pressure driven flow at vanishing Reynolds number. The colloids are confined between two parallel planar walls with a distance comparable to the particle diameter and they interact hydrodynamically via the solvent. We show that the bounded Poiseuille flow gives rise to new classes of trajectories resulting in cross-streamline migration. Two particles moving on these new trajectories exhibit either bound or unbound states. In the first case they oscillate on closed trajectories in the center-of-mass frame. In the second case, they exhibit cross-swapping trajectories in addition to swapping trajectories which were already observed in unbounded or bounded linear shear flow. The different classes of trajectories occur depending on the initial positions of the two particles and their size. We present state diagrams in the lateral positions, where we categorize the trajectories and color code the oscillation frequencies of the bound states. Finally we discuss how the results on the two-particle system help to understand the stability of particle trains composed of several particles.

  20. Microalgae fractionation using steam explosion, dynamic and tangential cross-flow membrane filtration.

    PubMed

    Lorente, E; Hapońska, M; Clavero, E; Torras, C; Salvadó, J

    2017-03-24

    In this study, the microalga Nannochloropsis gaditana was subjected to acid catalysed steam explosion treatment and the resulting exploded material was subsequently fractionated to separate the different fractions (lipids, sugars and solids). Conventional and vibrational membrane setups were used with several polymeric commercial membranes. Two different routes were followed: 1) filtration+lipid solvent extraction and 2) lipid solvent extraction+filtration. Route 1 revealed to be much better since the used membrane for filtration was able to permeate the sugar aqueous phase and retained the fraction containing lipids; after this, an extraction required a much lower amount of solvent and a better recovering yield. Filtration allowed complete lipid rejection. Dynamic filtration improved permeability compared to the tangential cross-flow filtration. Best membrane performance was achieved using a 5000Da membrane with the dynamic system, obtaining a permeability of 6L/h/m(2)/bar.

  1. Dynamic stochastic optimization models for air traffic flow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Avijit

    This dissertation presents dynamic stochastic optimization models for Air Traffic Flow Management (ATFM) that enables decisions to adapt to new information on evolving capacities of National Airspace System (NAS) resources. Uncertainty is represented by a set of capacity scenarios, each depicting a particular time-varying capacity profile of NAS resources. We use the concept of a scenario tree in which multiple scenarios are possible initially. Scenarios are eliminated as possibilities in a succession of branching points, until the specific scenario that will be realized on a particular day is known. Thus the scenario tree branching provides updated information on evolving scenarios, and allows ATFM decisions to be re-addressed and revised. First, we propose a dynamic stochastic model for a single airport ground holding problem (SAGHP) that can be used for planning Ground Delay Programs (GDPs) when there is uncertainty about future airport arrival capacities. Ground delays of non-departed flights can be revised based on updated information from scenario tree branching. The problem is formulated so that a wide range of objective functions, including non-linear delay cost functions and functions that reflect equity concerns can be optimized. Furthermore, the model improves on existing practice by ensuring efficient use of available capacity without necessarily exempting long-haul flights. Following this, we present a methodology and optimization models that can be used for decentralized decision making by individual airlines in the GDP planning process, using the solutions from the stochastic dynamic SAGHP. Airlines are allowed to perform cancellations, and re-allocate slots to remaining flights by substitutions. We also present an optimization model that can be used by the FAA, after the airlines perform cancellation and substitutions, to re-utilize vacant arrival slots that are created due to cancellations. Finally, we present three stochastic integer programming

  2. IWRM decision support with material flow analysis: consideration of urban system input.

    PubMed

    Terekhanova, T A; Helm, B; Traenckner, J; Krebs, P

    2012-01-01

    A review of material flow analysis (MFA) tools, comparison of case studies and analysis of approximately 20 MFA tools (static, semi-empirical models) are performed. The evaluation of the quantification procedures revealed several deficits in the approaches. The following principal complications for a reliable quantification of inputs from the urban water system are identified: (1) frequently insufficient data for urban system model validation (e.g. combined sewer overflow (CSO) discharges); (2) the necessity for additionally quantifying diffuse sources in order to verify modelling results at basin scale, where both input pathways occur, and (3) the contradictions arising when describing the highly dynamic urban system with the help of static MFA models. However, a wise selection of appropriate calculation procedures with regard to the concrete systems characteristics and available data can minimize the model deviations significantly. Criteria and suggestions for designing adapted quantification procedures are given.

  3. The Use of Logistics n the Quality Parameters Control System of Material Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpova, Natalia P.; Toymentseva, Irina A.; Shvetsova, Elena V.; Chichkina, Vera D.; Chubarkova, Elena V.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research problem is conditioned on the need to justify the use of the logistics methodologies in the quality parameters control process of material flows. The goal of the article is to develop theoretical principles and practical recommendations for logistical system control in material flows quality parameters. A leading…

  4. The dynamics of a channel-fed lava flow on Pico Partido volcano, Lanzarote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, Duncan; Harris, Andrew

    2006-09-01

    A short length of channel on Pico Partido volcano, Lanzarote, provides us the opportunity to examine the dynamics of lava flowing in a channel that extends over a sudden break in slope. The 1 2-m-wide, 0.5 2-m-deep channel was built during the 1730 1736 eruptions on Lanzarote and exhibits a sinuous, well-formed channel over a steep (11° slope) 100-m-long proximal section. Over-flow units comprising smooth pahoehoe sheet flow, as well as evidence on the inner channel walls for multiple (at least 11) flow levels, attest to unsteady flow in the channel. In addition, superelevation is apparent at each of the six bends along the proximal channel section. Superelevation results from banking of the lava as it moves around the bend thus causing preferential construction of the outer bank. As a result, the channel profile at each bend is asymmetric with an outer bank that is higher than the inner bank. Analysis of superelevation indicates flow velocities of ~8 m s 1. Our analysis of the superelevation features is based on an inertia-gravity balance, which we show is appropriate, even though the down-channel flow is in laminar flow. We use a viscosity-gravity balance model, together with the velocities calculated from superelevation, to obtain viscosities in the range 25 60 Pa s (assuming that the lava behaved as a Newtonian liquid). Estimated volume fluxes are in the range 7 12 m3 s 1. An apparent down-flow increase in derived volume flux may have resulted from variable supply or bulking up of the flow due to vesiculation. Where the channel moves over a sharp break in slope and onto slopes of ~6°, the channel becomes less well defined and widens considerably. At the break of slope, an elongate ridge extends across the channel. We speculate that this ridge was formed as a result of a reduction in velocity immediately below the break of slope to allow deposition of entrained material or accretion of lava to the channel bed as a result of a change in flow regime or depth.

  5. Arcjets for Aerodynamic and Materials Testing: Flow Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Fletcher, Doug; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Potential use of Arcjets as a hypersonic ground test facility for aerodynamic testing of future space vehicles is examined. Since high fidelity simulation of flight freestream conditions is a basic requirement for any useful ground test facility, it is imperative that the Arcjet flow field be thoroughly investigated in a systematic and orderly manner. At the same time we must know how and to what extent an inaccurate simulation of the flight freestream will effect the test data. The paper after discussing these two topics, describes various experimental techniques for Arcjet flow characterization. Results from an on-going Arcjet flow characterization program are also presented.

  6. Sources of debris flow material in burned areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Santi, P.M.; deWolfe, V.G.; Higgins, J.D.; Cannon, S.H.; Gartner, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    The vulnerability of recently burned areas to debris flows has been well established. Likewise, it has been shown that many, if not most, post-fire debris flows are initiated by runoff and erosion and grow in size through erosion and scour by the moving debris flow, as opposed to landslide-initiated flows with little growth. To better understand the development and character of these flows, a study has been completed encompassing 46 debris flows in California, Utah, and Colorado, in nine different recently burned areas. For each debris flow, progressive debris production was measured at intervals along the length of the channel, and from these measurements graphs were developed showing cumulative volume of debris as a function of channel length. All 46 debris flows showed significant bulking by scour and erosion, with average yield rates for each channel ranging from 0.3 to 9.9??m3 of debris produced for every meter of channel length, with an overall average value of 2.5??m3/m. Significant increases in yield rate partway down the channel were identified in 87% of the channels, with an average of a three-fold increase in yield rate. Yield rates for short reaches of channels (up to several hundred meters) ranged as high as 22.3??m3/m. Debris was contributed from side channels into the main channels for 54% of the flows, with an average of 23% of the total debris coming from those side channels. Rill erosion was identified for 30% of the flows, with rills contributing between 0.1 and 10.5% of the total debris, with an average of 3%. Debris was deposited as levees in 87% of the flows, with most of the deposition occurring in the lower part of the basin. A median value of 10% of the total debris flow was deposited as levees for these cases, with a range from near zero to nearly 100%. These results show that channel erosion and scour are the dominant sources of debris in burned areas, with yield rates increasing significantly partway down the channel. Side channels are

  7. Advanced material distribution measurement in multiphase flows: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    George, D.L.; Ceccio, S.L.; O`Hern, T.J.; Shollenberger, K.A.; Torczynski, J.R.

    1998-08-01

    A variety of tomographic techniques that have been applied to multiphase flows are described. The methods discussed include electrical impedance tomography (EIT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), gamma-densitometry tomography (GDT), radiative particle tracking (RDT), X-ray imaging, and acoustic tomography. Also presented is a case study in which measurements were made with EIT and GDT in two-phase flows. Both solid-liquid and gas-liquid flows were examined. EIT and GDT were applied independently to predict mean and spatially resolved phase volume fractions. The results from the two systems compared well.

  8. Tracing Material Flow Paths in Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Johnny; Schneider, Judy; Numes, Arthur, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Heat and mechanical work are coupled in the friction stir welding process. The process variables are RPM, translational weld speed, and downward plunge force. The strain-temperature history of a metal element at each point on the cross-section of the weld is determined by the process variables plus the individual flow path taken by the particular filament of metal flowing around the tool and ending on flat point. The strain-temperature history determines the properties of a metal element on the weld cross-section. The strain-temperature history is carefully controlled in metal processes where direct control is feasible. Indirect estimates of the flow paths and the strain-temperature histories of filaments comprising friction stir welds can be made from a model, if the model is good enough. This paper describes marker studies of flow path geometries for various process parameters. Observed geometries are compared with geometries estimated from models.

  9. Dynamic fracture of functionally graded magnetoelectroelastic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoynov, Y.; Dineva, P.

    2014-11-01

    The stress, magnetic and electric field analysis of multifunctional composites, weakened by impermeable cracks, is of fundamental importance for their structural integrity and reliable service performance. The aim is to study dynamic behavior of a plane of functionally graded magnetoelectroelastic composite with more than one crack. The coupled material properties vary exponentially in an arbitrary direction. The plane is subjected to anti-plane mechanical and in-plane electric and magnetic load. The boundary value problem described by the partial differential equations with variable coefficients is reduced to a non-hypersingular traction boundary integral equation based on the appropriate functional transform and frequency-dependent fundamental solution derived in a closed form by Radon transform. Software code based on the boundary integral equation method (BIEM) is developed, validated and inserted in numerical simulations. The obtained results show the sensitivity of the dynamic stress, magnetic and electric field concentration in the cracked plane to the type and characteristics of the dynamic load, to the location and cracks disposition, to the wave-crack-crack interactions and to the magnitude and direction of the material gradient.

  10. Dynamic fracture of functionally graded magnetoelectroelastic composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stoynov, Y.; Dineva, P.

    2014-11-12

    The stress, magnetic and electric field analysis of multifunctional composites, weakened by impermeable cracks, is of fundamental importance for their structural integrity and reliable service performance. The aim is to study dynamic behavior of a plane of functionally graded magnetoelectroelastic composite with more than one crack. The coupled material properties vary exponentially in an arbitrary direction. The plane is subjected to anti-plane mechanical and in-plane electric and magnetic load. The boundary value problem described by the partial differential equations with variable coefficients is reduced to a non-hypersingular traction boundary integral equation based on the appropriate functional transform and frequency-dependent fundamental solution derived in a closed form by Radon transform. Software code based on the boundary integral equation method (BIEM) is developed, validated and inserted in numerical simulations. The obtained results show the sensitivity of the dynamic stress, magnetic and electric field concentration in the cracked plane to the type and characteristics of the dynamic load, to the location and cracks disposition, to the wave-crack-crack interactions and to the magnitude and direction of the material gradient.

  11. A micromechanical constitutive model for the dynamic response of brittle materials "Dynamic response of marble"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberman, Keith

    2001-07-01

    A micromechanically based constitutive model for the dynamic inelastic behavior of brittle materials, specifically "Dionysus-Pentelicon marble" with distributed microcracking is presented. Dionysus-Pentelicon marble was used in the construction of the Parthenon, in Athens, Greece. The constitutive model is a key component in the ability to simulate this historic explosion and the preceding bombardment form cannon fire that occurred at the Parthenon in 1678. Experiments were performed by Rosakis (1999) that characterized the static and dynamic response of this unique material. A micromechanical constitutive model that was previously successfully used to model the dynamic response of granular brittle materials is presented. The constitutive model was fitted to the experimental data for marble and reproduced the experimentally observed basic uniaxial dynamic behavior quite well. This micromechanical constitutive model was then implemented into the three dimensional nonlinear lagrangain finite element code Dyna3d(1998). Implementing this methodology into the three dimensional nonlinear dynamic finite element code allowed the model to be exercised on several preliminary impact experiments. During future simulations, the model is to be used in conjunction with other numerical techniques to simulate projectile impact and blast loading on the Dionysus-Pentelicon marble and on the structure of the Parthenon.

  12. Influence of material transition and interfacial area changes on flow and concentration in electro-osmotic flows.

    PubMed

    Rani, Sudheer D; You, Byoung-Hee; Soper, Steve A; Murphy, Michael C; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E

    2013-04-03

    This paper presents a numerical study to investigate the effect of geometrical and material transition on the flow and progression of a sample plug in electrokinetic flows. Three cases were investigated: (a) effect of sudden cross-sectional area change (geometrical transition or mismatch) at the interface, (b) effect of only material transition (i.e. varying ζ-potential), and (c) effect of combined material transition and cross-sectional area change at the interface. The geometric transition was quantified based on the ratio of reduced flow area A2 at the mismatch plane to the original cross-sectional area A1. Multiple simulations were performed for varying degrees of area reduction i.e. 0-75% reduction in the available flow area, and the effect of dispersion on the sample plug was quantified by standard metrics. Simulations showed that a 13% combined material and geometrical transition can be tolerated without significant loss of sample resolution. A 6.54% reduction in the flow rates was found between 0% and 75% combined material and geometrical transition.

  13. Internal dynamics of a free-surface viscoplastic flow down an inclined plane: experimental results through PIV measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freydier, Perrine; Chambon, Guillaume; Naaim, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    Debris flows constitute one of the most important natural hazards throughout the mountainous regions of the world, causing significant damages and economic losses. These mass are composed of particles of all sizes from clay to boulders suspended in a viscous fluid. An important goal resides in developing models that are able to accurately predict the hydraulic properties of debris flows. First, these flows are generally represented using models based on a momentum integral approach that consists in assuming a shallow flow and in depth averaging the local conservation equations. These models take into account closure terms depending on the shape of the velocity profile inside the flow. Second, the specific migration mechanisms of the suspended particles, which have a strong influence on the propagation of the surges, also depend on the internal dynamics within the flow. However, to date, few studies concerning the internal dynamics in particular in the vicinity of the front, of such flows have been carried out. The aim of this study is to document the internal dynamics in free-surface viscoplastic flows down an inclined channel. The rheological studies concerning natural muddy debris flows, rich in fine particles, have shown that these materials can be modeled, at least as a first approximation as non-Newtonian viscoplastic fluids. Experiments are conducted in an inclined channel whose bottom is constituted by an upward-moving conveyor belt with controlled velocity. Carbopol microgel has been used as a homogeneous transparent viscoplastic fluid. This experimental setup allows generating and monitoring stationary gravity-driven surges in the laboratory frame. We use PIV technique (Particle Image Velocimetry) to obtain velocity fields both in the uniform zone and within the front zone where flow thickness is variable and where recirculation takes place. Experimental velocity profiles and determination of plug position will be presented and compared to theoretical

  14. Structure and dynamics in network-forming materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Mark

    2016-12-01

    The study of the structure and dynamics of network-forming materials is reviewed. Experimental techniques used to extract key structural information are briefly considered. Strategies for building simulation models, based on both targeting key (experimentally-accessible) materials and on systematically controlling key model parameters, are discussed. As an example of the first class of materials, a key target system, SiO2, is used to highlight how the changing structure with applied pressure can be effectively modelled (in three dimensions) and used to link to both experimental results and simple structural models. As an example of the second class the topology of networks of tetrahedra in the MX2 stoichiometry are controlled using a single model parameter linked to the M-X-M bond angles. The evolution of ordering on multiple length-scales is observed as are the links between the static structure and key dynamical properties. The isomorphous relationship between the structures of amorphous Si and SiO2 is discussed as are the similarities and differences in the phase diagrams, the latter linked to potential polyamorphic and ‘anomalous’ (e.g. density maxima) behaviour. Links to both two-dimensional structures for C, Si and Ge and near-two-dimensional bilayers of SiO2 are discussed. Emerging low-dimensional structures in low temperature molten carbonates are also uncovered.

  15. Structure and dynamics in network-forming materials.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark

    2016-12-21

    The study of the structure and dynamics of network-forming materials is reviewed. Experimental techniques used to extract key structural information are briefly considered. Strategies for building simulation models, based on both targeting key (experimentally-accessible) materials and on systematically controlling key model parameters, are discussed. As an example of the first class of materials, a key target system, SiO2, is used to highlight how the changing structure with applied pressure can be effectively modelled (in three dimensions) and used to link to both experimental results and simple structural models. As an example of the second class the topology of networks of tetrahedra in the MX2 stoichiometry are controlled using a single model parameter linked to the M-X-M bond angles. The evolution of ordering on multiple length-scales is observed as are the links between the static structure and key dynamical properties. The isomorphous relationship between the structures of amorphous Si and SiO2 is discussed as are the similarities and differences in the phase diagrams, the latter linked to potential polyamorphic and 'anomalous' (e.g. density maxima) behaviour. Links to both two-dimensional structures for C, Si and Ge and near-two-dimensional bilayers of SiO2 are discussed. Emerging low-dimensional structures in low temperature molten carbonates are also uncovered.

  16. Dynamic evolution process of turbulent channel flow after opposition control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Mingwei; Tian, De; Yongqian, Liu

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic evolution of turbulent channel flow after application of opposition control (OC), together with the mechanism of drag reduction, is studied through direct numerical simulation (DNS). In the simulation, the pressure gradient is kept constant, and the flow rate increases due to drag reduction. In the transport of mean kinetic energy (MKE), one part of the energy from the external pressure is dissipated by the mean shear, and the other part is transported to the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) through a TKE production term (TKP). It is found that the increase of MKE is mainly induced by the reduction of TKP that is directly affected by OC. Further analysis shows that the suppression of the redistribution term of TKE in the wall normal direction plays a key role in drag reduction, which represses the wall normal velocity fluctuation and then reduces TKP through the attenuation of its main production term. When OC is suddenly applied, an acute imbalance of energy in space is induced by the wall blowing and suction. Both the skin-friction and TKP terms exhibit a transient growth in the initial phase of OC, which can be attributed to the local effect of and <-u‧v‧> in the viscous sublayer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402088 and Grant No. 51376062) , State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources (Grant No. LAPS15005), and ‘the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities’ (Grant No.2014MS33).

  17. Modeling Dynamic Compaction of Porous Materials with the Overstress Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda

    2013-06-01

    To model compaction of a porous material (PM) we need 1) an equation of state (EOS) of the PM in terms of the EOS of its matrix, and 2) a compaction law. For the EOS it is common to use Herrmann's suggestion, as in his P α model. For a compaction law it is common to use a quasi-static compaction relation obtained from 1) a mezzo-scale model (as in Carroll and Holt's spherical shell model), or from 2) quasi-static tests. Here we are interested in dynamic compaction, like in a planar impact test. In dynamic compaction, the state may change too fast for the state point to follow the quasi-static compaction curve. We therefore get an overstress situation. The state point moves out of the quasi-static compaction boundary, and only with time collapses back towards it at a certain rate. In this way the dynamic compaction event becomes rate dependent. In the paper we first write down the rate equations for dynamic compaction according to this overstress approach. We then implement these equations in a hydro-code, and run some examples. We show how the overstress rate parameter can be calibrated from tests.

  18. Optimization of the dynamic behavior of strongly nonlinear heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbold, Eric B.

    New aspects of strongly nonlinear wave and structural phenomena in granular media are developed numerically, theoretically and experimentally. One-dimensional chains of particles and compressed powder composites are the two main types of materials considered here. Typical granular assemblies consist of linearly elastic spheres or layers of masses and effective nonlinear springs in one-dimensional columns for dynamic testing. These materials are highly sensitive to initial and boundary conditions, making them useful for acoustic and shock-mitigating applications. One-dimensional assemblies of spherical particles are examples of strongly nonlinear systems with unique properties. For example, if initially uncompressed, these materials have a sound speed equal to zero (sonic vacuum), supporting strongly nonlinear compression solitary waves with a finite width. Different types of assembled metamaterials will be presented with a discussion of the material's response to static compression. The acoustic diode effect will be presented, which may be useful in shock mitigation applications. Systems with controlled dissipation will also be discussed from an experimental and theoretical standpoint emphasizing the critical viscosity that defines the transition from an oscillatory to monotonous shock profile. The dynamic compression of compressed powder composites may lead to self-organizing mesoscale structures in two and three dimensions. A reactive granular material composed of a compressed mixture of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), tungsten (W) and aluminum (Al) fine-grain powders exhibit this behavior. Quasistatic, Hopkinson bar, and drop-weight experiments show that composite materials with a high porosity and fine metallic particles exhibit a higher strength than less porous mixtures with larger particles, given the same mass fraction of constituents. A two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode is implemented to investigate the mechanical deformation and failure of the compressed

  19. Spatio-temporal organization of dynamics in a two-dimensional periodically driven vortex flow: A Lagrangian flow network perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Michael; Donner, Reik V.

    2017-03-01

    We study the Lagrangian dynamics of passive tracers in a simple model of a driven two-dimensional vortex resembling real-world geophysical flow patterns. Using a discrete approximation of the system's transfer operator, we construct a directed network that describes the exchange of mass between distinct regions of the flow domain. By studying different measures characterizing flow network connectivity at different time-scales, we are able to identify the location of dynamically invariant structures and regions of maximum dispersion. Specifically, our approach allows us to delimit co-existing flow regimes with different dynamics. To validate our findings, we compare several network characteristics to the well-established finite-time Lyapunov exponents and apply a receiver operating characteristic analysis to identify network measures that are particularly useful for unveiling the skeleton of Lagrangian chaos.

  20. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopy of laser shocked materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrane, Shawn David; Bolme, Cindy B; Whitley, Von H; Moore, David S

    2010-01-01

    Shock waves create extreme states of matter with very high pressures, temperatures, and volumetric compressions, at an exceedingly rapid rate of change. We review how to use a beamsplitter and a note card to turn a typical chirp pulse amplified femtosecond laser system into an ultrafast shock dynamics machine. Open scientific questions that can be addressed with such an apparatus are described. We report on the development of several single shot time resolved diagnostics needed to answer these questions. These single shot diagnostics are expected to be broadly applicable to other types of laser ablation experiments. Experimental results measured from shocked material dynamics of several systems are detailed. Finally, we report on progress towards using transient absorption as a measure of electronic excitation and coherent Raman as a picosecond probe of temperature in shock compressed condensed matter.

  1. Ultrafast Dynamic Ellipsometry And Spectroscopy Of Laser Shocked Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrane, S. D.; Bolme, C. A.; Whitley, V. H.; Moore, D. S.

    2010-10-01

    Shock waves create extreme states of matter with very high pressures, temperatures, and volumetric compressions, at an exceedingly rapid rate of change. We review how to use a beamsplitter and a note card to turn a typical chirp pulse amplified femtosecond laser system into an ultrafast shock dynamics machine. Open scientific questions that can be addressed with such an apparatus are described. We report on the development of several single shot time resolved diagnostics needed to answer these questions. These single shot diagnostics are expected to be broadly applicable to other types of laser ablation experiments. Experimental results measured from shocked material dynamics of several systems are detailed. Finally, we report on progress towards using transient absorption as a measure of electronic excitation and coherent Raman as a picosecond probe of temperature in shock compressed condensed matter.

  2. Ultrafast Dynamic Ellipsometry And Spectroscopy Of Laser Shocked Materials

    SciTech Connect

    McGrane, S. D.; Bolme, C. A.; Whitley, V. H.; Moore, D. S.

    2010-10-08

    Shock waves create extreme states of matter with very high pressures, temperatures, and volumetric compressions, at an exceedingly rapid rate of change. We review how to use a beamsplitter and a note card to turn a typical chirp pulse amplified femtosecond laser system into an ultrafast shock dynamics machine. Open scientific questions that can be addressed with such an apparatus are described. We report on the development of several single shot time resolved diagnostics needed to answer these questions. These single shot diagnostics are expected to be broadly applicable to other types of laser ablation experiments. Experimental results measured from shocked material dynamics of several systems are detailed. Finally, we report on progress towards using transient absorption as a measure of electronic excitation and coherent Raman as a picosecond probe of temperature in shock compressed condensed matter.

  3. Apparatus and method for constant flow oxidizing of organic materials

    DOEpatents

    Surma, Jeffrey E.; Nelson, Norvell; Steward, G. Anthony; Bryan, Garry H.

    1999-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus using high cerium concentration in the anolyte of an electrochemical cell to oxidize organic materials. The method and apparatus further use an ultrasonic mixer to enhance the oxidation rate of the organic material in the electrochemical cell. A reaction vessel provides an advantage of independent reaction temperature control and electrochemical cell temperature control. A separate or independent reaction vessel may be used without an ultrasonic mixer to oxidize gaseous phase organic materials.

  4. Coarse-grained simulations of vortex dynamics and transition in complex high-Re flows

    SciTech Connect

    Grinstein, Fernando F

    2011-01-21

    prohibitively expensive in the foreseeable future for most practical flows of interest at moderate-to-high Reynolds number (Re). On the other end of the simulation spectrum are the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approaches - which model the turbulent effects. In the coarsegrained large eddy simulation (LES) strategies, the large energy containing structures are resolved, the smaller structures are filtered out, and unresolved SGS effects are modeled. By necessity - rather than choice, LES effectively becomes the intermediate approach between DNS and RANS. Extensive work has demonstrated that predictive simulations of turbulent velocity fields are possible using a particular LES denoted implicit LES (ILES), using the class of nonoscillatory finite-volume (NFV) numerical algorithms. Use of the modified equation as framework for theoretical analysis, demonstrates that leading truncation tenns associated with NFV methods provide implicit SGS models of mixed anisotropic type and regularized motion of discrete observables. Tests in fundamental applications ranging from canonical to very complex flows indicate that ILES is competitive with conventional LES in the LES realm proper - flows driven by large scale features. High-Re flows are vortex dominated and governed by short convective timescales compared to those of diffusion, and kinematically characterized at the smallest scales by slender worm vortices with insignificant internal structure. This motivates nominally inviscid ILES methods capable of capturing the high-Re dissipation dynamics and of handling vortices as shocks in shock capturing schemes. Depending on flow regimes, initial conditions, and resolution, additional modeling may be needed to emulate SGS driven physics, such as backscatter, chemical reaction, material mixing, and near-wall flow-dynamics - where typically-intertwined SGS/SPG issues need to be addressed. A major research focus is recognizing when additional explicit models and/or numerical treatments

  5. Dynamic Hybrid Materials: Hydrogel Actuators and Catalytic Microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzar, Lauren Dell

    Dynamic materials which can sense changes in their surroundings and subsequently respond or adapt by autonomously altering their functionality, surface chemistry, transparency, color, wetting behavior, adhesiveness, shape, etc. are primed to be integral components of future "smart" technologies. However, such systems can be quite complex and often require intricate coordination between both chemical and mechanical inputs/outputs as well as the combination of multiple materials working cooperatively to achieve the proper functionality. It is critical to not only understand the fundamental behaviors of existing dynamic chemo-mechanical systems, but also to apply that knowledge and explore new avenues for design of novel materials platforms which could provide a basis for future adaptive technologies. Part 1 explores the use of environmentally-sensitive hydrogels, either alone or within arrays of high-aspect-ratio nano/microstructures, as chemo-mechanical actuators. Chapters 1 through 7 describe a bio-inspired approach to the design of hybrid actuating surfaces in which the volume-changing hydrogel acts as the "muscle" that reversibly actuates the microstructured "bone". In particular, the different actuation mechanisms arising from variations in how the hydrogel is integrated into the structure array, how chemical signals can be used to manipulate actuation parameters, and finally how such a system may be used for applications ranging from adaptive optics to manipulation of chemical reactions are described. Chapter 8 discusses the use of responsive hydrogel scaffolds as a means to mechanically compress cells and direct differentiation. Part II explores dynamic microsystems involving the integration of catalytic sites within intricately structured 3D microenvironments. Specifically, we explore a generalizable and straightforward route to fabricate microscale patterns of nanocrystalline platinum and palladium using multiphoton lithography. The catalytic, electrical

  6. Nonlinear dynamics in flow through unsaturated fractured-porous media: Status and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Faybishenko, Boris

    2002-11-27

    The need has long been recognized to improve predictions of flow and transport in partially saturated heterogeneous soils and fractured rock of the vadose zone for many practical applications, such as remediation of contaminated sites, nuclear waste disposal in geological formations, and climate predictions. Until recently, flow and transport processes in heterogeneous subsurface media with oscillating irregularities were assumed to be random and were not analyzed using methods of nonlinear dynamics. The goals of this paper are to review the theoretical concepts, present the results, and provide perspectives on investigations of flow and transport in unsaturated heterogeneous soils and fractured rock, using the methods of nonlinear dynamics and deterministic chaos. The results of laboratory and field investigations indicate that the nonlinear dynamics of flow and transport processes in unsaturated soils and fractured rocks arise from the dynamic feedback and competition between various nonlinear physical processes along with complex geometry of flow paths. Although direct measurements of variables characterizing the individual flow processes are not technically feasible, their cumulative effect can be characterized by analyzing time series data using the models and methods of nonlinear dynamics and chaos. Identifying flow through soil or rock as a nonlinear dynamical system is important for developing appropriate short- and long-time predictive models, evaluating prediction uncertainty, assessing the spatial distribution of flow characteristics from time series data, and improving chemical transport simulations. Inferring the nature of flow processes through the methods of nonlinear dynamics could become widely used in different areas of the earth sciences.

  7. Headwater sediment dynamics in a debris flow catchment constrained by high-resolution topographic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loye, Alexandre; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Theule, Joshua Isaac; Liébault, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Debris flows have been recognized to be linked to the amounts of material temporarily stored in torrent channels. Hence, sediment supply and storage changes from low-order channels of the Manival catchment, a small tributary valley with an active torrent system located exclusively in sedimentary rocks of the Chartreuse Massif (French Alps), were surveyed periodically for 16 months using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to study the coupling between sediment dynamics and torrent responses in terms of debris flow events, which occurred twice during the monitoring period. Sediment transfer in the main torrent was monitored with cross-section surveys. Sediment budgets were generated seasonally using sequential TLS data differencing and morphological extrapolations. Debris production depends strongly on rockfall occurring during the winter-early spring season, following a power law distribution for volumes of rockfall events above 0.1 m3, while hillslope sediment reworking dominates debris recharge in spring and autumn, which shows effective hillslope-channel coupling. The occurrence of both debris flow events that occurred during the monitoring was linked to recharge from previous debris pulses coming from the hillside and from bedload transfer. Headwater debris sources display an ambiguous behaviour in sediment transfer: low geomorphic activity occurred in the production zone, despite rainstorms inducing debris flows in the torrent; still, a general reactivation of sediment transport in headwater channels was observed in autumn without new debris supply, suggesting that the stored debris was not exhausted. The seasonal cycle of sediment yield seems to depend not only on debris supply and runoff (flow capacity) but also on geomorphic conditions that destabilize remnant debris stocks. This study shows that monitoring the changes within a torrent's in-channel storage and its debris supply can improve knowledge on recharge thresholds leading to debris flow.

  8. Compatibility of molten salts with advanced solar dynamic receiver materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Perry, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    Metal-coated graphite fibers are being considered as a thermal conductivity enhancement filler material for molten salts in solar dynamic thermal energy storage systems. The successful metal coating chosen for this application must exhibit acceptable wettability and must be compatible with the molten salt environment. Contact angle values between molten lithium fluoride and several metal, metal fluoride, and metal oxide substrates have been determined at 892 C using a modification of the Wilhelmy plate technique. Reproducible contact angles with repeated exposure to the molten LiF indicated compatibility.

  9. Dynamic change of collateral flow varying with distribution of regional blood flow in acute ischemic rat cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Luo, Weihua; Zhou, Fangyuan; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Qingming

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is critical for the maintenance of cerebral function by guaranteed constant oxygen and glucose supply to brain. Collateral channels (CCs) are recruited to provide alternatives to CBF to ischemic regions once the primary vessel is occluded during ischemic stroke. However, the knowledge of the relationship between dynamic evolution of collateral flow and the distribution of regional blood flow remains limited. In this study, laser speckle imaging was used to assess dynamic changes of CCs and regional blood flow in a rat cortex with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). We found that CCs immediately provided blood flow to ischemic territories after MCAo. More importantly, there were three kinds of dynamic changes of CCs during acute stroke: persistent CC, impermanent CC, and transient CC, respectively, related to different distributions of regional blood flow. Although there was the possible occurrence of peri-infarct depolarization (PID) during ischemia, there was no obvious significance about the onset time and duration of CCs between rats with and without PID. These results suggest that the initial arising of CCs does not ensure their persistence, and that collateral flow could be varied with distribution of regional blood flow in acute ischemic stroke, which may facilitate the understanding of collateral recruitment and promote the development of collateral therapeutics in the future.

  10. Flow Dynamics of a smart pump: Mytilus Galloprovincialis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekkan, Karem; Uslu, Fazil; Biofluids; Cardiovascular Fluid Mechanics Laboratory Team

    2016-11-01

    Hydrodynamic performance of marine mussel, Mytilus Galloprovincialis, is studied by the time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV). We evaluated inhalant flow, exhalant jet flow, pumping performances, and flow control capabilities of the mussels quantitatively. Inhalant flow structures of mussels are measured at the coronal plane first-time in literature. Nutrient fluid is convected into the mussel by three-dimensional sink type flow that is different than exhalant jet flow. Inhalant velocity reaches its highest magnitude inside of the mussel mantle while accelerating outward the mussel. We calculated pressure gradient at the coronal plane where three-dimensional sink type inhalant flow is observed. As inhalant flow approaches mussel shell tip, suction force generated by the inhalant flow increases. Likewise, unique exhalant jet flow regimes are studied for 17 mussels. Mussels can control their exhalant jet flow structure from single potential core region to double one or vice versa. Peak exhalant jet velocity generated by the mussels changes between 2.77 cm/s and 11.1 cm/s as a function of mussel cavity volume. Hydrodynamic dissipation at sagittal plane is calculated to evaluate whether there is any interference between inhalant sink flow and exhalant jet flow or not. Results showed an efficient synchronized pumping mechanism. This pumping mechanism can feature flow-turning angle, the angle between inhalant and exhalant jet flow, 90°with standard deviation of 16°.

  11. Model for charge/discharge-rate-dependent plastic flow in amorphous battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosrownejad, S. M.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-09-01

    Plastic flow is an important mechanism for relaxing stresses that develop due to swelling/shrinkage during charging/discharging of battery materials. Amorphous high-storage-capacity Li-Si has lower flow stresses than crystalline materials but there is evidence that the plastic flow stress depends on the conditions of charging and discharging, indicating important non-equilibrium aspects to the flow behavior. Here, a mechanistically-based constitutive model for rate-dependent plastic flow in amorphous materials, such as LixSi alloys, during charging and discharging is developed based on two physical concepts: (i) excess energy is stored in the material during electrochemical charging and discharging due to the inability of the amorphous material to fully relax during the charging/discharging process and (ii) this excess energy reduces the barriers for plastic flow processes and thus reduces the applied stresses necessary to cause plastic flow. The plastic flow stress is thus a competition between the time scales of charging/discharging and the time scales of glassy relaxation. The two concepts, as well as other aspects of the model, are validated using molecular simulations on a model Li-Si system. The model is applied to examine the plastic flow behavior of typical specimen geometries due to combined charging/discharging and stress history, and the results generally rationalize experimental observations.

  12. Stick-Slip Dynamics in Sheared Granular Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, K.

    2002-12-01

    The dynamics of sheared granular materials have wide application to faulting and earthquake mechanics. Despite much interest, their complex behaviour is not well understood. Detailed laboratory experiments can reveal how specific granular processes may influence macroscopic strength. Here I demonstrate how loading rate and grain rearrangements affect stick slip in simulated faults. Granular layers (3 mm thick) composed of spherical particles (100μm) were sheared under constant normal stress (5MPa) at a range of loading rates (0.1μm/s to 1 mm/s) in a direct shear apparatus. Changes in layer thickness were monitored to reveal particle dynamics during shear. Tests were conducted in a non-fracture load regime to minimise gouge evolution with accumulated slip. This provides a vital link between geophysical experiments involving pervasive grain fracture and numerical simulations where fracture is absent. During tests, I observe highly repetitive stick-slip events, characterized by a quasi-linear increase in stress, a stage of inelastic rollover then rapid dynamic stress drop correlating to stick, premonitory slip (creep) and rapid (coseismic) slip in the layer. Stress drop amplitudes are 0.2-0.7MPa (15-30% of failure stress). Analysis of many stick-slip cycles reveals a power law relation between stress drop amplitude and recurrence time, indicating a healing rate of 0.1MPa per decade. The yield in frictional strength prior to failure is directly associated with the onset of premonitory slip (5-75μm) in the granular layer. Also, layer dilation rate is enhanced at the onset of premonitory slip (dilation <5μm). Conversely, granular layers compact rapidly at the point of coseismic slip. These observations imply direct links between gouge dynamics and frictional strength. Importantly, I see a direct correlation between the stress drop amplitude and premonitory slip. This indicates that micro-mechanical rearrangements prior to coseismic slip control the characteristics of

  13. Material Discovery and Design with Dynamic Charge Reactive Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnott, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Atomic scale computational simulations of multi-phase systems is increasingly important as our ability to simulate nanometer-sized systems becomes routine. The recently developed charge optimized many body potential (COMB) potentials have significantly enhanced our ability to carry out atomic-scale simulations of heterogeneous material systems. The formalism of this potential combines variable charge electrostatic interactions with a classical analytical bond-order potential. It therefore has the capacity to adaptively model metallic, covalent, ionic, and van der Waals bonding within the same simulation cell and dynamically determine the charges on individual atoms according to the local environment. The utility of the COMB potentials is illustrated for materials design and discovery by exploring the structure, stability, mechanical properties, and thermal properties of intermetallic systems and oxide-metal interfaces. They are also used to address key questions associated with corrosion, thin film growth, and heterogeneous catalysis.

  14. A three dimensional dynamic study of electrostatic charging in materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.; Parks, D. E.; Mandell, M. J.; Harvey, J. M.; Brownell, D. H., Jr.; Wang, S. S.; Rotenberg, M.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of the physical models employed in the NASCAP (NASA Charging Analyzer Program) code, and several test cases are presented. NASCAP dynamically simulates the charging of an object made of conducting segments which may be entirely or partially covered with thin dielectric films. The object may be subject to either ground test or space user-specified environments. The simulation alternately treats (1) the tendency of materials to accumulate and emit charge when subject to plasma environment, and (2) the consequent response of the charged particle environment to an object's electrostatic field. Parameterized formulations of the emission properties of materials subject to bombardment by electrons, protons, and sunlight are presented. Values of the parameters are suggested for clean aluminum, Al2O3, clean magnesium, MgO, SiO2 kapton, and teflon. A discussion of conductivity in thin dielectrics subject to radiation and high fields is given, together with a sample calculation.

  15. Effect of material uncertainties on dynamic analysis of piezoelectric fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Swapnil; Yadav, Shubham Kumar; Mukherjee, Sujoy

    2015-04-01

    A piezofan is a resonant device that uses a piezoceramic material to induce oscillations in a cantilever beam. In this study, lumped-mass modelling is used to analyze a piezoelectric fan. Uncertainties are associated with the piezoelectric structures due to several reasons such as variation during manufacturing process, temperature, presence of adhesive layer between the piezoelectric actuator/sensor and the shim stock etc. Presence of uncertainty in the piezoelectric materials can influence the dynamic behavior of the piezoelectric fan such as natural frequency, tip deflection etc. Moreover, these quantities will also affect the performance parameters of the piezoelectric fan. Uncertainty analysis is performed using classical Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS). It is found that the propagation of uncertainty causes significant deviations from the baseline deterministic predictions, which also affect the achievable performance of the piezofan. The numerical results in this paper provide useful bounds on several performance parameters of the cooling fan and will enhance confidence in the design process.

  16. Zonal-flow dynamics from a phase-space perspective

    DOE PAGES

    Ruiz, D. E.; Parker, J. B.; Shi, E. L.; ...

    2016-12-16

    The wave kinetic equation (WKE) describing drift-wave (DW) turbulence is widely used in the studies of zonal flows (ZFs) emerging from DW turbulence. But, this formulation neglects the exchange of enstrophy between DWs and ZFs and also ignores effects beyond the geometrical-optics limit. Furthermore, we derive a modified theory that takes both of these effects into account, while still treating DW quanta (“driftons”) as particles in phase space. The drifton dynamics is described by an equation of the Wigner–Moyal type, which is commonly known in the phase-space formulation of quantum mechanics. In the geometrical-optics limit, this formulation features additional termsmore » missing in the traditional WKE that ensure exact conservation of the total enstrophy of the system, in addition to the total energy, which is the only conserved invariant in previous theories based on the WKE. We present numerical simulations to illustrate the importance of these additional terms. The proposed formulation can be considered as a phase-space representation of the second-order cumulant expansion, or CE2.« less

  17. Zonal-flow dynamics from a phase-space perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, D. E.; Parker, J. B.; Shi, E. L.; Dodin, I. Y.

    2016-12-16

    The wave kinetic equation (WKE) describing drift-wave (DW) turbulence is widely used in the studies of zonal flows (ZFs) emerging from DW turbulence. But, this formulation neglects the exchange of enstrophy between DWs and ZFs and also ignores effects beyond the geometrical-optics limit. Furthermore, we derive a modified theory that takes both of these effects into account, while still treating DW quanta (“driftons”) as particles in phase space. The drifton dynamics is described by an equation of the Wigner–Moyal type, which is commonly known in the phase-space formulation of quantum mechanics. In the geometrical-optics limit, this formulation features additional terms missing in the traditional WKE that ensure exact conservation of the total enstrophy of the system, in addition to the total energy, which is the only conserved invariant in previous theories based on the WKE. We present numerical simulations to illustrate the importance of these additional terms. The proposed formulation can be considered as a phase-space representation of the second-order cumulant expansion, or CE2.

  18. Adsorbed polymers under flow. A stochastic dynamical system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Robert; Jhon, Myung S.

    1985-09-01

    Recent experiments have shown that porous filters preadsorbed with polymer molecules exhibit an anomalously high pressure drop at high rates of flow. We have modeled the adsorbed polymers as dynamical systems and have found that the introduction of hydrodynamic interaction between molecules destabilizes at a high applied shear. As a direct result this instability will cause the molecules to unravel and stretch far into the cross section of the pore, and thus by inference, cause the observed anomalously high pressure drop. Although much of this paper is devoted to the stability characteristics of the deterministic system, Brownian motion is also considered, and an account of the statistics of the Brownian system when the deterministic system becomes unstable is given. The examples revealed in this paper are not of sufficient complexity to calculate with any accuracy the magnitude of this anomalous pressure drop. We simply present a procedure by which a large variety of more complex models could be undertaken and their ultimate effect clearly understood.

  19. The Flow of American Television Materials to Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Myles P.

    A review of the current situation regarding the media flow between the United States and Australia shows that the traditional pattern--American content dominating the Australian media--still holds, but that there is evidence of movement by the Australians to establish their own media identity. An analysis of the television ratings for Australia's…

  20. Dynamical Modes of Deformed Red Blood Cells and Lipid Vesicles in Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, H.

    Red blood cells and lipid vesicles exhibit rich behaivor in flows.Their dynamics were studied using a particle-based hydrodynamic simulation method, multi-particle collision dynamics. Rupture of lipid vesicles in simple shear flow was simulated by meshless membrane model. Several shape transitions of lipid vesicles and red blood cells are induced by flows. Transition of a lipid vesicle from budded to prolate shapes with increasing shear rate and ordered alignments of deformed elastic vesicles in high density are presented.

  1. Dynamic Simulations of Realistic Upper-Ocean Flow Processes to Support Measurement and Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    physics based wind force modeling for oceanic flows; investigate the impact of spatial and temporal variations of wind forcing on waves, currents, and...flow, which can compute wave breaking; and (iv) A novel dynamic sea-surface roughness model, which together with wind LES can yield accurate...modeling of wind forcing on upper ocean flows 2 dynamically according to environmental conditions. Enabled by these sophisticated simulation tools, we

  2. A Nonlocal Peridynamic Plasticity Model for the Dynamic Flow and Fracture of Concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogler, Tracy; Lammi, Christopher James

    2014-10-01

    A nonlocal, ordinary peridynamic constitutive model is formulated to numerically simulate the pressure-dependent flow and fracture of heterogeneous, quasi-brittle ma- terials, such as concrete. Classical mechanics and traditional computational modeling methods do not accurately model the distributed fracture observed within this family of materials. The peridynamic horizon, or range of influence, provides a characteristic length to the continuum and limits localization of fracture. Scaling laws are derived to relate the parameters of peridynamic constitutive model to the parameters of the classical Drucker-Prager plasticity model. Thermodynamic analysis of associated and non-associated plastic flow is performed. An implicit integration algorithm is formu- lated to calculate the accumulated plastic bond extension and force state. The gov- erning equations are linearized and the simulation of the quasi-static compression of a cylinder is compared to the classical theory. A dissipation-based peridynamic bond failure criteria is implemented to model fracture and the splitting of a concrete cylinder is numerically simulated. Finally, calculation of the impact and spallation of a con- crete structure is performed to assess the suitability of the material and failure models for simulating concrete during dynamic loadings. The peridynamic model is found to accurately simulate the inelastic deformation and fracture behavior of concrete during compression, splitting, and dynamically induced spall. The work expands the types of materials that can be modeled using peridynamics. A multi-scale methodology for simulating concrete to be used in conjunction with the plasticity model is presented. The work was funded by LDRD 158806.

  3. Slowing dynamics in supercooled liquids and other soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardimci, Hasan

    The slow structural dynamics displayed by supercooled liquids and the transition to an out-of-equilibrium glass state that they engender are among the most challenging issues in condensed matter physics. This thesis reports experimental studies designed to elucidate central aspects of these slow dynamics and the nature of the glass state. The subjects of these studies include glass forming molecular liquids and other soft materials that have been advanced as model glassy systems such as clay suspensions and block copolymer micelle solutions. The main experimental techniques employed in these investigations have been dielectric susceptibility and neutron scattering. In the first half of this thesis, we report frequency-dependent dielectric susceptibility measurements characterizing the evolution in the dynamical properties, or aging, of two supercooled liquids, sorbitol and xylitol, quenched below their calorimetric glass transition temperatures, Tg. In addition to the alpha relaxation that tracks the structural dynamics, the susceptibilities of both liquids possess a secondary Johari-Goldstein relaxation at higher frequencies. Following a quench below Tg, the susceptibility slowly approaches equilibrium behavior. For both liquids features of the Johari-Goldstein relaxation display a dependence on the time since the quench, or aging time, that is very similar to the age dependence of the alpha peak. Implications of these findings for aging in glasses and the nature of Johari-Goldstein relaxation are discussed. Further investigation of the aging in sorbitol reveals that it displays memory strikingly similar to that of a variety of glassy materials, particularly spin glasses. During a temporary stop in cooling, the susceptibility changes with time due to aging. The memory is revealed upon reheating as the susceptibility retraces these changes. To investigate the out-of-equilibrium state of the liquid as it displays this memory, we have employed a set of intricate

  4. Dynamics of comb-of-comb-network polymers in random layered flows.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Divya; Kant, Rama

    2016-12-01

    We analyze the dynamics of comb-of-comb-network polymers in the presence of external random flows. The dynamics of such structures is evaluated through relevant physical quantities, viz., average square displacement (ASD) and the velocity autocorrelation function (VACF). We focus on comparing the dynamics of the comb-of-comb network with the linear polymer. The present work displays an anomalous diffusive behavior of this flexible network in the random layered flows. The effect of the polymer topology on the dynamics is analyzed by varying the number of generations and branch lengths in these networks. In addition, we investigate the influence of external flow on the dynamics by varying flow parameters, like the flow exponent α and flow strength W_{α}. Our analysis highlights two anomalous power-law regimes, viz., subdiffusive (intermediate-time polymer stretching and flow-induced diffusion) and superdiffusive (long-time flow-induced diffusion). The anomalous long-time dynamics is governed by the temporal exponent ν of ASD, viz., ν=2-α/2. Compared to a linear polymer, the comb-of-comb network shows a shorter crossover time (from the subdiffusive to superdiffusive regime) but a reduced magnitude of ASD. Our theory displays an anomalous VACF in the random layered flows that scales as t^{-α/2}. We show that the network with greater total mass moves faster.

  5. Dynamics of comb-of-comb-network polymers in random layered flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katyal, Divya; Kant, Rama

    2016-12-01

    We analyze the dynamics of comb-of-comb-network polymers in the presence of external random flows. The dynamics of such structures is evaluated through relevant physical quantities, viz., average square displacement (ASD) and the velocity autocorrelation function (VACF). We focus on comparing the dynamics of the comb-of-comb network with the linear polymer. The present work displays an anomalous diffusive behavior of this flexible network in the random layered flows. The effect of the polymer topology on the dynamics is analyzed by varying the number of generations and branch lengths in these networks. In addition, we investigate the influence of external flow on the dynamics by varying flow parameters, like the flow exponent α and flow strength Wα. Our analysis highlights two anomalous power-law regimes, viz., subdiffusive (intermediate-time polymer stretching and flow-induced diffusion) and superdiffusive (long-time flow-induced diffusion). The anomalous long-time dynamics is governed by the temporal exponent ν of ASD, viz., ν =2 -α /2 . Compared to a linear polymer, the comb-of-comb network shows a shorter crossover time (from the subdiffusive to superdiffusive regime) but a reduced magnitude of ASD. Our theory displays an anomalous VACF in the random layered flows that scales as t-α /2. We show that the network with greater total mass moves faster.

  6. Review of selected dynamic material control functions for international safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, L.L.

    1980-09-01

    With the development of Dynamic Special Nuclear Material Accounting and Control systems used in nuclear manufacturing and reprocessing plants, there arises the question as to how these systems affect the IAEA inspection capabilities. The systems in being and under development provide information and control for a variety of purposes important to the plant operator, the safeguards purpose being one of them. This report attempts to judge the usefulness of these dynamic systems to the IAEA and have defined 12 functions that provide essential information to it. If the information acquired by these dynamic systems is to be useful to the IAEA, the inspectors must be able to independently verify it. Some suggestions are made as to how this might be done. But, even if it should not be possible to verify all the data, the availability to the IAEA of detailed, simultaneous, and plant-wide information would tend to inhibit a plant operator from attempting to generate a floating or fictitious inventory. Suggestions are made that might be helpful in the design of future software systems, an area which has proved to be fatally deficient in some systems and difficult in all.

  7. Chemical Dynamics in Energetic Materials Incorporating Aluminum Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, William K.; Harruff, Barbara A.; Fernando, K. A. Shiral; Smith, Marcus J.; Guliants, Elena A.; Bunker, Christopher E.

    2010-06-01

    Aluminum nanoparticles are widely considered attractive as fuels due to the high heat of reaction associated with their oxidation, and the potential for fast reaction due to their small size. However, the reaction dynamics can also be strongly influenced by the passivation layer that coats the reactive metal surface. Typically, this takes the form of a naturally-occurring oxide shell on the nanoparticle, but other passivation schemes are now available. We have recently developed a sonochemical synthesis procedure to produce aluminum nanoparticles capped with oleic acid. These nanoparticles have an aluminum metal core, some organic-provided oxide, and an organic shell. To investigate the effect of the passivation method on the chemical dynamics in energetic materials, we have studied samples consisting of a mixture of a metal nanoparticle fuel and an ammonium nitrate or ammonium perchlorate oxidizer. The metal fuel is either commercially available oxide-coated aluminum nanoparticles, or the oleic acid-capped nanoparticles. The energetic samples are ignited with an IR laser pulse. Following ignition, the chemical dynamics are studied using visible emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Preliminary results suggest that our Al-oleic acid nanoparticles are able to react more rapidly than those that are conventionally passivated with a naturally-occurring oxide shell. K. A. S. Fernando, M. J. Smith, B. A. Harruff, W. K. Lewis, E. A. Guliants and C. E. Bunker J. Phys. Chem. C, 113, 500 (2009).

  8. Material dynamics under extreme conditions of pressure and strain rate

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Allen, P; Bringa, E; Hawreliak, J; Ho, D; Lorenz, K T; Lorenzana, H; Meyers, M A; Pollaine, S W; Rosolankova, K; Sadik, B; Schneider, M S; Swift, D; Wark, J; Yaakobi, B

    2005-09-06

    Solid state experiments at extreme pressures (10-100 GPa) and strain rates ({approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 8}s{sup -1}) are being developed on high-energy laser facilities, and offer the possibility for exploring new regimes of materials science. These extreme solid-state conditions can be accessed with either shock loading or with a quasi-isentropic ramped pressure drive. Velocity interferometer measurements establish the high pressure conditions. Constitutive models for solid-state strength under these conditions are tested by comparing 2D continuum simulations with experiments measuring perturbation growth due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid-state samples. Lattice compression, phase, and temperature are deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements, from which the shock-induced {alpha}-{omega} phase transition in Ti and the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} phase transition in Fe are inferred to occur on sub-nanosec time scales. Time resolved lattice response and phase can also be measured with dynamic x-ray diffraction measurements, where the elastic-plastic (1D-3D) lattice relaxation in shocked Cu is shown to occur promptly (< 1 ns). Subsequent large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations elucidate the microscopic dynamics that underlie the 3D lattice relaxation. Deformation mechanisms are identified by examining the residual microstructure in recovered samples. The slip-twinning threshold in single-crystal Cu shocked along the [001] direction is shown to occur at shock strengths of {approx}20 GPa, whereas the corresponding transition for Cu shocked along the [134] direction occurs at higher shock strengths. This slip-twinning threshold also depends on the stacking fault energy (SFE), being lower for low SFE materials. Designs have been developed for achieving much higher pressures, P > 1000 GPa, in the solid state on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser.

  9. Data uncertainties in material flow analysis: Municipal solid waste management system in Maputo City, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Dos Muchangos, Leticia Sarmento; Tokai, Akihiro; Hanashima, Atsuko

    2017-01-01

    Material flow analysis can effectively trace and quantify the flows and stocks of materials such as solid wastes in urban environments. However, the integrity of material flow analysis results is compromised by data uncertainties, an occurrence that is particularly acute in low-and-middle-income study contexts. This article investigates the uncertainties in the input data and their effects in a material flow analysis study of municipal solid waste management in Maputo City, the capital of Mozambique. The analysis is based on data collected in 2007 and 2014. Initially, the uncertainties and their ranges were identified by the data classification model of Hedbrant and Sörme, followed by the application of sensitivity analysis. The average lower and upper bounds were 29% and 71%, respectively, in 2007, increasing to 41% and 96%, respectively, in 2014. This indicates higher data quality in 2007 than in 2014. Results also show that not only data are partially missing from the established flows such as waste generation to final disposal, but also that they are limited and inconsistent in emerging flows and processes such as waste generation to material recovery (hence the wider variation in the 2014 parameters). The sensitivity analysis further clarified the most influencing parameter and the degree of influence of each parameter on the waste flows and the interrelations among the parameters. The findings highlight the need for an integrated municipal solid waste management approach to avoid transferring or worsening the negative impacts among the parameters and flows.

  10. Building the Material Flow Networks of Aluminum in the 2007 U.S. Economy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Qiang; Graedel, T E; Nuss, Philip; Ohno, Hajime

    2016-04-05

    Based on the combination of the U.S. economic input-output table and the stocks and flows framework for characterizing anthropogenic metal cycles, this study presents a methodology for building material flow networks of bulk metals in the U.S. economy and applies it to aluminum. The results, which we term the Input-Output Material Flow Networks (IO-MFNs), achieve a complete picture of aluminum flow in the entire U.S. economy and for any chosen industrial sector (illustrated for the Automobile Manufacturing sector). The results are compared with information from our former study on U.S. aluminum stocks and flows to demonstrate the robustness and value of this new methodology. We find that the IO-MFN approach has the following advantages: (1) it helps to uncover the network of material flows in the manufacturing stage in the life cycle of metals; (2) it provides a method that may be less time-consuming but more complete and accurate in estimating new scrap generation, process loss, domestic final demand, and trade of final products of metals, than existing material flow analysis approaches; and, most importantly, (3) it enables the analysis of the material flows of metals in the U.S. economy from a network perspective, rather than merely that of a life cycle chain.

  11. Pattern formation during mixing and segregation of flowing granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Guy; Shattuck, Mark

    1996-02-01

    Powder mixing plays an important role in a number of industries ranging from pharmaceuticals and food to ceramics and mining. Avalanches provide a mechanism for the stretching and folding needed to mix granular solids. However, unlike fluids, when particles dissimilar in size, density, or shape flow, they can spontaneously demix or segregate. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we track the transport of granular solids in a slowly rotating tube both with and without segregation effects. Compared with experiments in a 2-dimensional rotating disk partially filled with colored particles, the mixing kinematics and the granular pattern formation in a tube are changed by an axial flow instability. From simple physical principles we argue how size and density segregation mechanisms can be made to cancel, allowing good mixing of dissimilar particles, and we show experiments verifying this. Further experiments isolate the axial transport in the slowly rotating tube. Axial transport can appear faster with segregation than without.

  12. Flaw-induced plastic-flow dynamics in bulk metallic glasses under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Yue, T. M.; Tsui, C. P.; Chan, K. C.

    2016-10-01

    Inheriting amorphous atomic structures without crystalline lattices, bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are known to have superior mechanical properties, such as high strength approaching the ideal value, but are susceptible to catastrophic failures. Understanding the plastic-flow dynamics of BMGs is important for achieving stable plastic flow in order to avoid catastrophic failures, especially under tension, where almost all BMGs demonstrate limited plastic flow with catastrophic failure. Previous findings have shown that the plastic flow of BMGs displays critical dynamics under compression tests, however, the plastic-flow dynamics under tension are still unknown. Here we report that power-law critical dynamics can also be achieved in the plastic flow of tensile BMGs by introducing flaws. Differing from the plastic flow under compression, the flaw-induced plastic flow under tension shows an upward trend in the amplitudes of the load drops with time, resulting in a stable plastic-flow stage with a power-law distribution of the load drop. We found that the flaw-induced plastic flow resulted from the stress gradients around the notch roots, and the stable plastic-flow stage increased with the increase of the stress concentration factor ahead of the notch root. The findings are potentially useful for predicting and avoiding the catastrophic failures in tensile BMGs by tailoring the complex stress fields in practical structural-applications.

  13. Experimental Investigation of a Yawed Airfoil in Reverse Flow Dynamic Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Luke; Lind, Andrew, , Dr.; Jones, Anya, , Dr.

    2016-11-01

    When a rotating blade enters high advance ratio flight, a significant portion of the blade is subject to reverse flow, where flow travels from the blade's geometric trailing edge to the geometric leading edge. The purpose of this work is to determine the influence of spanwise flow on a blade undergoing dynamic stall in reverse flow. Without spanwise flow, an oscillating sharp trailing edge airfoil in reverse flow experiences separation about its sharp aerodynamic leading edge, leading to the formation of a dynamic stall vortex at low angles of attack. With spanwise flow, an airfoil experiences a delay in lift stall, possibly due to the convection of a vortex along the freestream. This work characterizes the three-dimensional flow field of an oscillating airfoil at static yaw angles in reverse flow. Time-resolved velocity fields and chordwise pressure distributions are presented for several span locations, reduced frequencies, and Reynolds numbers. The unsteady velocity fields allow for the identification of dynamic stall vortex locations, and the unsteady pressure distributions allow for the analysis of spanwise variation in aerodynamic forces. By comparing the yawed and un-yawed cases, this work illustrates the relative importance of spanwise flow in reverse flow dynamic stall.

  14. Effect of Trailing Edge Shape on the Unsteady Aerodynamics of Reverse Flow Dynamic Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2015-11-01

    This work considers dynamic stall in reverse flow, where flow travels over an oscillating airfoil from the geometric trailing edge towards the leading edge. An airfoil with a sharp geometric trailing edge causes early formation of a primary dynamic stall vortex since the sharp edge acts as the aerodynamic leading edge in reverse flow. The present work experimentally examines the potential merits of using an airfoil with a blunt geometric trailing edge to delay flow separation and dynamic stall vortex formation while undergoing oscillations in reverse flow. Time-resolved and phase-averaged flow fields and pressure distributions are compared for airfoils with different trailing edge shapes. Specifically, the evolution of unsteady flow features such as primary, secondary, and trailing edge vortices is examined. The influence of these flow features on the unsteady pressure distributions and integrated unsteady airloads provide insight on the torsional loading of rotor blades as they oscillate in reverse flow. The airfoil with a blunt trailing edge delays reverse flow dynamic stall, but this leads to greater downward-acting lift and pitching moment. These results are fundamental to alleviating vibrations of high-speed helicopters, where much of the rotor operates in reverse flow.

  15. Flaw-induced plastic-flow dynamics in bulk metallic glasses under tension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. H.; Yue, T. M.; Tsui, C. P.; Chan, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    Inheriting amorphous atomic structures without crystalline lattices, bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are known to have superior mechanical properties, such as high strength approaching the ideal value, but are susceptible to catastrophic failures. Understanding the plastic-flow dynamics of BMGs is important for achieving stable plastic flow in order to avoid catastrophic failures, especially under tension, where almost all BMGs demonstrate limited plastic flow with catastrophic failure. Previous findings have shown that the plastic flow of BMGs displays critical dynamics under compression tests, however, the plastic-flow dynamics under tension are still unknown. Here we report that power-law critical dynamics can also be achieved in the plastic flow of tensile BMGs by introducing flaws. Differing from the plastic flow under compression, the flaw-induced plastic flow under tension shows an upward trend in the amplitudes of the load drops with time, resulting in a stable plastic-flow stage with a power-law distribution of the load drop. We found that the flaw-induced plastic flow resulted from the stress gradients around the notch roots, and the stable plastic-flow stage increased with the increase of the stress concentration factor ahead of the notch root. The findings are potentially useful for predicting and avoiding the catastrophic failures in tensile BMGs by tailoring the complex stress fields in practical structural-applications. PMID:27779221

  16. Development and Demonstration of Material Properties Database and Software for the Simulation of Flow Properties in Cementitious Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.; Flach, G.

    2015-03-30

    This report describes work performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in fiscal year 2014 to develop a new Cementitious Barriers Project (CBP) software module designated as FLOExcel. FLOExcel incorporates a uniform database to capture material characterization data and a GoldSim model to define flow properties for both intact and fractured cementitious materials and estimate Darcy velocity based on specified hydraulic head gradient and matric tension. The software module includes hydraulic parameters for intact cementitious and granular materials in the database and a standalone GoldSim framework to manipulate the data. The database will be updated with new data as it comes available. The software module will later be integrated into the next release of the CBP Toolbox, Version 3.0. This report documents the development efforts for this software module. The FY14 activities described in this report focused on the following two items that form the FLOExcel package; 1) Development of a uniform database to capture CBP data for cementitious materials. In particular, the inclusion and use of hydraulic properties of the materials are emphasized; and 2) Development of algorithms and a GoldSim User Interface to calculate hydraulic flow properties of degraded and fractured cementitious materials. Hydraulic properties are required in a simulation of flow through cementitious materials such as Saltstone, waste tank fill grout, and concrete barriers. At SRNL these simulations have been performed using the PORFLOW code as part of Performance Assessments for salt waste disposal and waste tank closure.

  17. Combination of material flow analysis and substance flow analysis: a powerful approach for decision support in waste management.

    PubMed

    Stanisavljevic, Nemanja; Brunner, Paul H

    2014-08-01

    The novelty of this paper is the demonstration of the effectiveness of combining material flow analysis (MFA) with substance flow analysis (SFA) for decision making in waste management. Both MFA and SFA are based on the mass balance principle. While MFA alone has been applied often for analysing material flows quantitatively and hence to determine the capacities of waste treatment processes, SFA is more demanding but instrumental in evaluating the performance of a waste management system regarding the goals "resource conservation" and "environmental protection". SFA focuses on the transformations of wastes during waste treatment: valuable as well as hazardous substances and their transformations are followed through the entire waste management system. A substance-based approach is required because the economic and environmental properties of the products of waste management - recycling goods, residues and emissions - are primarily determined by the content of specific precious or harmful substances. To support the case that MFA and SFA should be combined, a case study of waste management scenarios is presented. For three scenarios, total material flows are quantified by MFA, and the mass flows of six indicator substances (C, N, Cl, Cd, Pb, Hg) are determined by SFA. The combined results are compared to the status quo in view of fulfilling the goals of waste management. They clearly point out specific differences between the chosen scenarios, demonstrating potentials for improvement and the value of the combination of MFA/SFA for decision making in waste management.

  18. Organic (opto)electronic materials: understanding charge carrier dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroverkhova, Oksana

    2008-05-01

    There is growing interest in using organic (opto)electronic materials for applications in electronics and photonics. In particular, organic semiconductor thin films offer several advantages over traditional silicon technology, including low-cost processing, the potential for large-area flexible devices, high-efficiency light emission, and widely tunable properties through functionalization of the molecules. Over the past decade, remarkable progress in materials design and purification has been made, which led to applications of organic semiconductors in light-emitting diodes, polymer lasers, photovoltaic cells, high-speed photodetectors, organic thin-film transistors, and many others. Most of the applications envisioned for organic semiconductors rely on their conductive or photoconductive properties. However, despite remarkable progress in organic electronics and photonics, the nature of charge carrier photogeneration and transport in organic semiconductors is not completely understood and remains controversial, partly due to difficulties in assessing intrinsic properties that are often masked by impurities, grain boundaries, etc. Measurements of charge carrier dynamics at picosecond time scales after excitation reveal the intrinsic nature of mobile charge carriers before they are trapped at defect sites. In this presentation, I will review the current state of the field and summarize our recent results on photoconductivity of novel high-performance organic semiconductors (such as functionalized pentacene and anthradithiophene thin films) from picoseconds to seconds after photoexcitation. Photoluminescent properties of these novel materials will also be discussed.

  19. Simulation of thermal decay and dynamic relaxation in ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, Eric David

    2000-07-01

    Thermal stability of magnetic recording is of great importance. This dissertation discusses the major theories and simulation techniques currently in use. Simulations using a Langevin approach are conducted to examine the thermal decay of ensembles of non-interacting particles with both coherent and non-coherent magnetization. This decay is compared to the simplified model of exponential decay. Understanding the magnetization relaxation process is of importance when trying to understand the reversal of the magnetization within materials. This process becomes increasingly important as data rates increase. Simulations will be conducted that do not assume a phenomenological damping. Instead, it will be seen how the relaxation process begins by dissipating energy to magnetostatic and exchange coupled excitations. A model incorporating damping to lattice vibrations by magnetostriction will also be presented. During the relaxation process energy flows from the magnetic system to the lattice. Results of simulations are compared to the damping obtained via a phenomenological approach.

  20. Flow dynamics and magnetic induction in the von-Kármán plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plihon, N.; Bousselin, G.; Palermo, F.; Morales, J.; Bos, W. J. T.; Godeferd, F.; Bourgoin, M.; Pinton, J.-F.; Moulin, M.; Aanesland, A.

    2015-01-01

    The von-Kármán plasma experiment is a novel versatile experimental device designed to explore the dynamics of basic magnetic induction processes and the dynamics of flows driven in weakly magnetized plasmas. A high-density plasma column (1016-1019 particles. m-3) is created by two radio-frequency plasma sources located at each end of a 1 m long linear device. Flows are driven through J × B azimuthal torques created from independently controlled emissive cathodes. The device has been designed such that magnetic induction processes and turbulent plasma dynamics can be studied from a variety of time-averaged axisymmetric flows in a cylinder. MHD simulations implementing volume-penalization support the experimental development to design the most efficient flow-driving schemes and understand the flow dynamics. Preliminary experimental results show that a rotating motion of up to nearly 1 km/s is controlled by the J × B azimuthal torque.

  1. Work Flow Analysis Report Consisting of Work Management - Preventive Maintenance - Materials and Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    JENNINGS, T.L.

    1999-12-14

    The Work Flow analysis Report will be used to facilitate the requirements for implementing the Work Control module of Passport. The report consists of workflow integration processes for Work Management, Preventative Maintenance, Materials and Equipment

  2. The Interaction between a Compliant Material and an Unstable Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. S.

    1988-05-01

    The response of a compliant coating to pressure fluctuations due to an unsteady boundary layer flow and the effect of the response on the stability of the flow field are examined. A pseudospectral solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is coupled to a finite element calculation of the behavior of the compliant material. In particular, the effect of material response on the growth rate of a Tollmien-Schlichting type instability in an unstable boundary layer is examined. Results are presented for three materials; a soft polyvinylchloride (PVC), a stiffer PVC, and a two-layer material consisting of a thick layer of soft PVC covered by a thin layer of neoprene.

  3. Dynamics of diffusivity and pressure drop in flow-through and parallel-flow bioreactors during tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Podichetty, Jagdeep T; Dhane, Dhananjay V; Madihally, Sundararajan V

    2012-07-01

    In this study, transport characteristics in flow-through and parallel-flow bioreactors used in tissue engineering were simulated using computational fluid dynamics. To study nutrient distribution and consumption by smooth muscle cells colonizing the 100 mm diameter and 2-mm thick scaffold, effective diffusivity of glucose was experimentally determined using a two-chambered setup. Three different concentrations of chitosan-gelatin scaffolds were prepared by freezing at -80°C followed by lyophilization. Experiments were performed in both bioreactors to measure pressure drop at different flow rates. At low flow rates, experimental results were in agreement with the simulation results for both bioreactors. However, increase in flow rate beyond 5 mL/min in flow-through bioreactor showed channeling at the circumference resulting in lower pressure drop relative to simulation results. The Peclet number inside the scaffold indicated nutrient distribution within the flow-through bioreactor to be convection-dependent, whereas the parallel-flow bioreactor was diffusion-dependent. Three alternative design modifications to the parallel-flow were made by (i) introducing an additional inlet and an outlet, (ii) changing channel position, and (iii) changing the hold-up volume. Simulation studies were performed to assess the effect of scaffold thickness, cell densities, and permeability. These new designs improved nutrient distribution for 2 mm scaffolds; however, parallel-flow configuration was found to be unsuitable for scaffolds more than 4-mm thick, especially at low porosities as tissues regenerate. Furthermore, operable flow rate in flow-through bioreactors is constrained by the mechanical strength of the scaffold. In summary, this study showed limitations and differences between flow-through and parallel-flow bioreactors used in tissue engineering.

  4. Skin-Friction Drag Reduction over Super-Hydrophobic Materials in Fully-Developed Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gose, James W.; Golovin, Kevin; Ceccio, Steven L.; Perlin, Marc; Tuteja, Anish

    2015-11-01

    As part an on-going research initiative to develop super-hydrophobic (SH) materials for high-speed naval applications, a team at the University of Michigan investigated SH materials for drag reduction in fully-developed turbulent flow. The SH materials were evaluated in a high-aspect ratio (width/height) channel flow facility capable of producing average flow speeds of 20 m/s, yielding a height (7 mm) based Reynolds number of 140,000. The SH materials examined were developed for large-scale application using various technologies including spraying, chemical etching, and mechanical abrasion. The materials were applied over a 100 mm (spanwise/width) by 1100 mm (streamwise/length) area. The drag measurement methods were pressure drop along the test surface over length 150H (1050 mm) and by means of the velocity profile via particle image velocimetry. The SH materials were investigated further to determine the effects of various flow conditions including low (vacuum) and high pressures. The drag reduction measurements were coupled with extensive topological evaluation of the materials to illustrate the importance of each aspect of the individual SH features, as well as the collective structure of the surface, leading to insight regarding the relevant characteristics of an SH material's ability to reduce skin-friction in fully-developed turbulent flow. The authors recognize the support of ONR.

  5. Left-right organizer flow dynamics: how much cilia activity reliably yields laterality?

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Pedro; Ferreira, Rita R; Guerrero, Adán; Pintado, Petra; Tavares, Bárbara; Amaro, Joana; Smith, Andrew A; Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas; Smith, David J; Lopes, Susana S

    2014-06-23

    Internal organs are asymmetrically positioned inside the body. Embryonic motile cilia play an essential role in this process by generating a directional fluid flow inside the vertebrate left-right organizer. Detailed characterization of how fluid flow dynamics modulates laterality is lacking. We used zebrafish genetics to experimentally generate a range of flow dynamics. By following the development of each embryo, we show that fluid flow in the left-right organizer is asymmetric and provides a good predictor of organ laterality. This was tested in mosaic organizers composed of motile and immotile cilia generated by dnah7 knockdowns. In parallel, we used simulations of fluid dynamics to analyze our experimental data. These revealed that fluid flow generated by 30 or more cilia predicts 90% situs solitus, similar to experimental observations. We conclude that cilia number, dorsal anterior motile cilia clustering, and left flow are critical to situs solitus via robust asymmetric charon expression.

  6. Research on flow mechanism of material for spur gear in closed extruding fine blanking process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ming; Liu, Lu-zhou

    2013-05-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is applied to analyze closed extruding fine blanking gear. The reason of engendering corner collapse is the friction between blank and die. Meanwhile, this paper analyzes effects of various counterpunch forces on the flow characteristics, obtains the fiber distribution on different sections of the gear. The effects of counterpunch forces on material flow characteristics in deformation zone and the swirling flow in scrap are also obtained.

  7. Flux flow and flux dynamics in high-T(sub c) superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, L. H.; Turchinskaya, M.; Roytburd, A.; Swartzendruber, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    Because high temperature superconductors, including BYCO and BSCCO, are type 2 superconductors with relatively low H(sub c 1) values and high H(sub c 2) values, they will be in a critical state for many of their applications. In the critical state, with the applied field between H(sub c 1) and H(sub c 2), flux lines have penetrated the material and can form a flux lattice and can be pinned by structural defects, chemical inhomogeneities, and impurities. A detailed knowledge of how flux penetrates the material and its behavior under the influence of applied fields and current flow, and the effect of material processing on these properties, is required in order to apply, and to improve the properties of, these superconductors. When the applied field is changed rapidly, the time dependence of flux change can be divided into three regions, an initial region which occurs very rapidly, a second region in which the magnetization has a 1n(t) behavior, and a saturation region at very long times. A critical field is defined for depinning, H(sub c,p) as that field at which the hysteresis loop changes from irreversible to reversible. As a function of temperature it is found that H(sub c,p) is well described by a power law with an exponent between 1.5 and 2.5. The behavior of H(sub c,p) for various materials and its relationship to flux flow and flux dynamics are discussed.

  8. Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Grace Woan-chee

    1999-10-01

    Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.

  9. Biofluid dynamics of two phase stratified flow through flexible membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagavatula Nvssr, Dinesh; Pushpavanam, S.

    2016-11-01

    Two phase stratified flows between flexible membranes arise in biological flows like lung airway reopening, blood flow in arteries and movement of spinal cord. It is important to understand the physics behind the interaction of flexible membranes and the fluid flow. In this work, a theoretical model is developed and different types of instabilities that arise due to the fluid flow are understood. The solid membrane is modeled as an incompressible linear viscoelastic solid. To simplify the analysis, inertia in the solid is neglected. Linear stability analysis is carried around the base state velocity of the fluid and displacement field of the solid. The flow is perturbed by a small disturbance and a normal mode analysis is carried out to study the growth rate of the disturbance. An eigenvalue problem in formulated using Chebyshev spectral method and is solved to obtain the growth rate of the disturbance. The effect of different parameters such as thickness of the flexible membrane, Reynolds number, viscosity ratio, density ratio, Capillary number and Weissenberg number on the stability characteristics of the flow is studied in detail. Dispersion curves are obtained which explain the stability of the flow. A detail energy analysis is carried out to determine different ways through which energy transfers from the base flow to the disturbed flow.

  10. Two-dimensional fluid dynamics in a sharply bent channel: Laminar flow, separation bubble, and vortex dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Daichi; Fukudome, Koji; Wada, Hirofumi

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamic properties of fluid flow in a curving pipe and channel is important for controlling the flow behavior in technologies and biomechanics. The nature of the resulting flow in a bent pipe is extremely complicated because of the presence of a cross-stream secondary flow. In an attempt to disentangle this complexity, we investigate the fluid dynamics in a bent channel via the direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equation in two spatial dimensions. We exploit the absence of secondary flow from our model and systematically investigate the flow structure along the channel as a function of both the bend angle and Reynolds number of the laminar-to-turbulent regime. We numerically suggest a scaling relation between the shape of the separation bubble and the flow conductance, and construct an integrated phase diagram.

  11. Role of nonspecific binding: a comparison among flow through and flow over assays in nanoporous material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettotti, P.; Kumar, N.; Guider, R.; Froner, E.; Scarpa, M.

    2014-02-01

    In this article we describe the fabrication of free standing n-type porous silicon microcavity (MC) and their properties as liquid sensors. We have optimized the etching recipe to keep both large pore size and high quality factor (Q-factor). Thus the fabricated porous layers have pore size in the range of 40 to 110 nm and are thus compatible with mass transport across the porous layer. We found that MC with a Q-factor of 60 can measure down to 1.1*10-5 refractive index variations. Furthermore we analyze the role of non specific binding by comparing flow through versus flow over geometries. We compare these two approaches using different techniques and we show that flow over assay systematically overestimates the sensitivity of the device because of an inefficient rinse of the sample. Our work clearly indicates a limit in the reliability of measurements performed in flow over geometry unless specific controls are taken into account.

  12. Ifluence of crystallization and entrainment of cooler material on the emplacement of basaltic aa lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, Joy; Baloga, Stephen

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical model is used to describe and investigate the effects of simultaneous crystallization, radiation loss, and entrainment of cooler material on the temperature of a well-mixed core of an active aa lava flow. Entrainment of crust, levee debris, and base material into the interior of active flows has been observed, but the degree of assimilation and the thermal consequences are difficult to quantify. The rate of entrainment can be constrained by supplementing the theoretical model with information on the crystallization along the path of the flow and estimation of the radiative loss from the flow interior. Application of the model is demonstrated with the 1984 Mauna Loa flow, which was erupted about 30 C undercooled. Without any entrainment of cooler material, the high crystallization rates would have driven temperatures in the core wall above temperatures measured by thermocouple and estimated from glass geothermometry. One plausible scenario for this flow, which agrees with available temperature and crystallinity measurements, has a high initial rate of entrainment during the first 8 hours of travel (a mass ratio of entrained material to fluid core of about 15% if the average temperature of the entrained material was 600 C), which counterbalances the latent heat from approximately 40% crystallization. In this scenario, the model suggests an additional 5% crystallization and a 5% entrainment mass ratio over the subsequent 16-hour period. Measurements of crystallization, radiative losses, and entrainment factors are necessary for understanding the detailed thermal histories of active lava flows.

  13. A High-Resolution Godunov Method for Compressible Multi-Material Flow on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, J W; Schwendeman, D W; Kapila, A K; Henshaw, W D

    2006-02-13

    A numerical method is described for inviscid, compressible, multi-material flow in two space dimensions. The flow is governed by the multi-material Euler equations with a general mixture equation of state. Composite overlapping grids are used to handle complex flow geometry and block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to locally increase grid resolution near shocks and material interfaces. The discretization of the governing equations is based on a high-resolution Godunov method, but includes an energy correction designed to suppress numerical errors that develop near a material interface for standard, conservative shock-capturing schemes. The energy correction is constructed based on a uniform pressure-velocity flow and is significant only near the captured interface. A variety of two-material flows are presented to verify the accuracy of the numerical approach and to illustrate its use. These flows assume an equation of state for the mixture based on Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) forms for the components. This equation of state includes a mixture of ideal gases as a special case. Flow problems considered include unsteady one-dimensional shock-interface collision, steady interaction of an planar interface and an oblique shock, planar shock interaction with a collection of gas-filled cylindrical inhomogeneities, and the impulsive motion of the two-component mixture in a rigid cylindrical vessel.

  14. Comprehensive Flow Meter for All Materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-15

    The electromagnetic flowmeter is obstructionless and insensitive to the metered stuff's constitutive properties. For low zero-point drift, EM flowmeters employ a low frequency alternating induction, usually with square waveshape. With conventional signal conditioning, high frequency induction leads to excessive zero-point drift for the instrument. The conventional instrument is usable with electrically conductive fluids, where there is no triboelectric noise. Nonconductive fluids have substantial triboelectric noise, with spectral density experimentally measured to be f{sup {minus}2.6}. Here we use an electromagnet and signal conditioner that allows high frequency induction, where the noise is low, but eliminates the heretofore excessive drift--such that the EM flowmeter can be used to meter any stuff, whether conductive or insulating, that can be pumped, blown or extruded through a pipe. Designs and test hardware are shown. An injury occurred, with slow recovery: the principal investigator could not do all the flow test stand work desired. As an option, the flow testing has been simulated on a computer. Using characteristics of transformer oil as the metered fluid, the new signal conditioner has produced: (1) signal/noise/drift behavior experienced in prior published work, and (2) signal--without noise and drift--with performance of today's commercial EM flowmeters.

  15. Intrinsic Axial Flows in CSDX and Dynamical Symmetry Breaking in ITG Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiacong; Diamond, P. H.; Hong, R.; Thakur, S. C.; Xu, X. Q.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Toroidal plasma rotation can enhance confinement when combined with weak magnetic shear. Also, external rotation drive in future fusion devices (e.g. ITER) will be weak. Together, these two considerations drive us to study intrinsic rotations with weak magnetic shear. In particular, a global transition is triggered in CSDX when magnetic field B exceeds a critical strength threshold. At the transition an ion feature emerges in the core turbulence. Recent studies show that a dynamical symmetry breaking mechanism in drift wave turbulence can drive intrinsic axial flows in CSDX, as well as enhance intrinsic rotations in tokamaks. Here, we focus on what happens when ion features emerge in CSDX, and how ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence drives intrinsic rotations with weak magnetic shear. The effect of dynamical symmetry breaking in ITG turbulence depends on the stability regime. In a marginally stable regime, dynamical symmetry breaking results in an augmented turbulence viscosity (chi-phi). However, when ITG is far from the stability boundary, a negative increment in turbulent viscosity is induced. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under Award No. DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  16. Dynamics of Unusual Debris Flows on Martian Sand Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Dohm, James M.; Baker, Victor R.; Beyer, Ross A.; Bourke, Mary

    2004-01-01

    Gullies that dissect sand dunes in Russell impact crater often display debris flow-like deposits in their distal reaches. The possible range of both the rheological properties and the flow rates are estimated using a numerical simulation code of a Bingham plastic flow to help explain the formation of these features. Our simulated results are best explained by a rapid debris flow. For example, a debris flow with the viscosity of 10(exp 2) Pa s and the yield strength of 10(exp 2) Pa can form the observed deposits with a flow rate of 0.5 cu m/s sustained over several minutes and total discharged water volume on the order of hundreds of cubic meters, which may be produced by melting a surface layer of interstitial ice within the dune deposits to several centimeters depth.

  17. Dynamics of unusual debris flows on Martian sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Dohm, James M.; Baker, Victor R.; Beyer, Ross A.; Bourke, Mary

    2004-07-01

    Gullies that dissect sand dunes in Russell impact crater often display debris flow-like deposits in their distal reaches. The possible range of both the rheological properties and the flow rates are estimated using a numerical simulation code of a Bingham plastic flow to help explain the formation of these features. Our simulated results are best explained by a rapid debris flow. For example, a debris flow with the viscosity of 102 Pa s and the yield strength of 102 Pa can form the observed deposits with a flow rate of 0.5 m3/s sustained over several minutes and total discharged water volume on the order of hundreds of cubic meters, which may be produced by melting a surface layer of interstitial ice within the dune deposits to several centimeters depth.

  18. A Comparative Study of Material Flow Behavior in Friction Stir Welding Using Laminar and Turbulent Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadian, Arun Kumar; Biswas, Pankaj

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding has been quite successful in joining aluminum alloy which has gained importance in almost all industrial sectors over the past two decades. It is a newer technique and therefore needs more attention in many sectors, flow of material being one among them. The material flow pattern actually helps in deciding the parameters required for particular tool geometry. The knowledge of material flow is very significant in removing defects from the weldment. In the work presented in this paper, the flow behavior of AA6061 under a threaded tool has been studied. The convective heat loss has been considered from all the surfaces, and a comparative study has been made with and without the use of temperature-dependent properties and their significance in the finite volume method model. The two types of models that have been implemented are turbulent and laminar models. Their thermal histories have been studied for all the cases. The material flow velocity has been analyzed to predict the flow of material. A swirl inside the weld material has been observed in all the simulations.

  19. Material Flow Tracking for Various Tool Geometries During the Friction Stir Spot Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan-Ching; Liu, Ju-Jen; Chen, Jiun-Nan

    2013-12-01

    This study applied powder-tracing techniques to mount Cu and W powders on A6061-T6 aluminum sheets to investigate the material flow mechanism of friction stir spot welding (FSSW) using various geometric tools. The experimental results showed that the geometry of the tools plays a crucial role and determines the entrances of material flow during FSSW. It was believed that instantaneous voids were filled up with material flow in all directions for triangular pins, and the voids were located at the pin bottom for cylindrical pins. In accordance with the plastic rule of material flow, the pressure gradient is the necessary condition to cause material flow during FSSW; therefore, the transient constraint space (TCS) is required to generate pressure in this space. Enlargement of the TCS accompanies the evolution of the stir zone (SZ). A generated void causes a steep pressure gradient, which is regarded as the entrance of material flow. A tool with screw threads causes downward driving force, which determines the intermixing behavior between the upper and lower sheets, and also affects the size of the SZs.

  20. Temporal variability of colloidal material in agricultural storm runoff from managed grassland using flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Gimbert, Laura J; Worsfold, Paul J

    2009-12-25

    This paper reports the use of flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) to determine the temporal variability of colloidal (<1mum) particle size distributions in agricultural runoff waters in a small managed catchment in SW England during storm events. Three storm events of varying intensity were captured and the colloidal material in the runoff analysed by FlFFF. The technique had sufficient sensitivity to determine directly the changing colloidal profile over the 0.08-1.0mum size range in the runoff waters during these storm events. Rainfall, total phosphorus and suspended solids in the bulk runoff samples were also determined throughout one storm and showed significant correlation (P<0.01) with the amount of colloidal material. Whilst there are some uncertainties in the resolution and absolute calibration of the FlFFF profiles, the technique has considerable potential for the quantification of colloidal material in storm runoff waters.

  1. Optimal Control of Magnetization Dynamics in Ferromagnetic Materials using TDDFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Peter; Krieger, Kevin; Gross, E. K. U.

    2015-03-01

    Recently intense laser-field induced ultrafast demagnetization was observed in ab-initio simulations using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) for various ferromagnetic materials (Fe,Co,Ni). From a practical and technological viewpoint, it is useful if the induced dynamics (e.g. of the total magnetic moment) are controllable. In this talk we apply optimal control theory together with TDDFT calculations to tailor the intense laser pulses so as to achieve a particular outcome (e.g. maximize the total moment lost) while also including any required constraints (e.g pulse duration, pulse frequencies, maximum fluence, etc). Support from European Communities FP7, through the CRONOS project Grant No. 280879.

  2. Dynamic pressure-shear loading of materials using anisotropic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabildas, L. C.; Swegle, J. W.

    1980-09-01

    An experimental technique is described which uses anisotropic crystals to generate dynamic pressure-shear loading in materials. The coupled longitudinal and shear motion generated upon planar impact of the anisotropic crystal can be transmitted into a specimen bonded to the rear surface of the crystal, and monitored using velocity interferometer techniques. Test results using y-cut quartz generators and x-cut quartz and y-cut quartz samples indicate that shear stresses up to 0.35 GPa can be transmitted across epoxy-bonded interfaces. The technique has been successfully used to detect a 0.2 GPa shear wave in 6061-T6 aluminum at 0.7 GPa longitudinal stress. The shear wave velocity profiles have an accuracy of ±12%. The use of longer delay legs in the interferometer is suggested to improve the accuracy. Results obtained in this investigation are compared with numerical solutions obtained using the finite-difference wave propagation code TOODY.

  3. Total materials consumption; an estimation methodology and example using lead; a materials flow analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biviano, Marilyn B.; Wagner, Lorie A.; Sullivan, Daniel E.

    1999-01-01

    Materials consumption estimates, such as apparent consumption of raw materials, can be important indicators of sustainability. Apparent consumption of raw materials does not account for material contained in manufactured products that are imported or exported and may thus under- or over-estimate total consumption of materials in the domestic economy. This report demonstrates a methodology to measure the amount of materials contained in net imports (imports minus exports), using lead as an example. The analysis presents illustrations of differences between apparent and total consumption of lead and distributes these differences into individual lead-consuming sectors.

  4. Unsteady fluid dynamic model for propeller induced flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Ashby, Dale L.; Yon, Steven

    1991-01-01

    A potential flow based three-dimensional panel method was modified to treat time dependent flow conditions in which the body's geometry may vary with time. The main objective of this effort was the study of a flow field due to a propeller rotating relative to a nonrotating body which is otherwise moving at a constant forward speed. Calculated surface pressure, thrust and torque coefficient data for a four-bladed marine propeller/body compared favorably with previously published experimental results.

  5. Material flow in metal foams studied by neutron radioscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanzick, H.; Klenke, J.; Danilkin, S.; Banhart, J.

    Two kinds of experiments are presented in this paper: In the first lead alloy foams were generated in a furnace by expanding a foamable precursor material containing metal and a blowing agent. Vertical columns of liquid metal foam were scanned with a beam of neutrons while recording the time-dependent local neutron transmission. The resulting transmission profiles reflect the kinetics of material redistribution in liquid metallic foams under the influence of gravity (drainage). In the second experiment pre-fabricated solid lead foams were re-melted in a furnace. Neutron transmission profiles were also obtained in these experiments. Results of each type of experiment are presented and compared with theoretical predictions for the density profile of aqueous foams.

  6. Thermally activated creep and fluidization in flowing disordered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merabia, Samy; Detcheverry, François

    2016-11-01

    When submitted to a constant mechanical load, many materials display power law creep followed by fluidization. A fundamental understanding of these processes is still far from being achieved. Here, we characterize creep and fluidization on the basis of a mesoscopic viscoplastic model that includes thermally activated yielding events and a broad distribution of energy barriers, which may be lowered under the effect of a local deformation. We relate the creep exponent observed before fluidization to the width of barrier distribution and to the specific form of stress redistribution following yielding events. We show that Andrade creep is accompanied by local strain hardening driven by stress redistribution and find that the fluidization time depends exponentially on the applied stress. The simulation results are interpreted in the light of a mean-field analysis, and should help in rationalizing the creep phenomenology in disordered materials.

  7. Thermal/Pyrolysis Gas Flow Analysis of Carbon Phenolic Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2001-01-01

    Provided in this study are predicted in-depth temperature and pyrolysis gas pressure distributions for carbon phenolic materials that are externally heated with a laser source. Governing equations, numerical techniques and comparisons to measured temperature data are also presented. Surface thermochemical conditions were determined using the Aerotherm Chemical Equilibrium (ACE) program. Surface heating simulation used facility calibrated radiative and convective flux levels. Temperatures and pyrolysis gas pressures are predicted using an upgraded form of the SINDA/CMA program that was developed by NASA during the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program (SPIP). Multispecie mass balance, tracking of condensable vapors, high heat rate kinetics, real gas compressibility and reduced mixture viscosity's have been added to the algorithm. In general, surface and in-depth temperature comparisons are very good. Specie partial pressures calculations show that a saturated water-vapor mixture is the main contributor to peak in-depth total pressure. Further, for most of the cases studied, the water-vapor mixture is driven near the critical point and is believed to significantly increase the local heat capacity of the composite material. This phenomenon if not accounted for in analysis models may lead to an over prediction in temperature response in charring regions of the material.

  8. Dynamics of the blood flow in the curved artery with the rolling massage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, H. H.; Wu, X. H.; Yao, Y. L.

    2011-10-01

    Arterial wall shear stress and flow velocity are important factors in the development of some arterial diseases. Here, we aim to investigate the dynamic effect of the rolling massage on the property of the blood flow in the curved artery. The distributions of flow velocity and shear stress for the blood flow are computed by the lattice Boltzmann method, and the dynamic factors under different rolling techniques are studied numerically. The study is helpful to understand the mechanism of the massage and develop the massage techniques.

  9. Complex network analysis of phase dynamics underlying oil-water two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Cai, Qing; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-06-01

    Characterizing the complicated flow behaviors arising from high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows is an important problem of significant challenge. We design a high-speed cycle motivation conductance sensor and carry out experiments for measuring the local flow information from different oil-in-water flow patterns. We first use multivariate time-frequency analysis to probe the typical features of three flow patterns from the perspective of energy and frequency. Then we infer complex networks from multi-channel measurements in terms of phase lag index, aiming to uncovering the phase dynamics governing the transition and evolution of different oil-in-water flow patterns. In particular, we employ spectral radius and weighted clustering coefficient entropy to characterize the derived unweighted and weighted networks and the results indicate that our approach yields quantitative insights into the phase dynamics underlying the high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows.

  10. The Dynamics of Rapidly Emplaced Terrestrial Lava Flows and Implications for Planetary Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, Stephen; Spudis, Paul D.; Guest, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The Kaupulehu 1800-1801 lava flow of Hualalai volcano and the 1823 Keaiwa flow from the Great Crack of the Kilauea southwest rift zone had certain unusual and possibly unique properties for terrestrial basaltic lava flows. Both flows apparently had very low viscosities, high effusion rates, and uncommonly rapid rates of advance. Ultramafic xenolith nodules in the 1801 flow form stacks of cobbles with lava rinds of only millimeter thicknesses. The velocity of the lava stream in the 1801 flow was extremely high, at least 10 m/s (more than 40 km/h). Observations and geological evidence suggest similarly high velocities for the 1823 flow. The unusual eruption conditions that produced these lava flows suggest a floodlike mode of emplacement unlike that of most other present-day flows. Although considerable effort has gone into understanding the viscous fluid dynamics and thermal processes that often occur in basaltic flows, the unusual conditions prevalent for the Kaupulehu and Keaiwa flows necessitate different modeling considerations. We propose an elementary flood model for this type of lava emplacement and show that it produces consistent agreement with the overall dimensions of the flow, channel sizes, and other supporting field evidence. The reconstructed dynamics of these rapidly emplaced terrestrial lava flows provide significant insights about the nature of these eruptions and their analogs in planetary volcanism.

  11. Dynamics of ferrofluidic flow in the Taylor-Couette system with a small aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    We investigate fundamental nonlinear dynamics of ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette flow - flow confined be-tween two concentric independently rotating cylinders - consider small aspect ratio by solving the ferro-hydrodynamical equations, carrying out systematic bifurcation analysis. Without magnetic field, we find steady flow patterns, previously observed with a simple fluid, such as those containing normal one- or two vortex cells, as well as anomalous one-cell and twin-cell flow states. However, when a symmetry-breaking transverse magnetic field is present, all flow states exhibit stimulated, finite two-fold mode. Various bifurcations between steady and unsteady states can occur, corresponding to the transitions between the two-cell and one-cell states. While unsteady, axially oscillating flow states can arise, we also detect the emergence of new unsteady flow states. In particular, we uncover two new states: one contains only the azimuthally oscillating solution in the configuration of the twin-cell flow state, and an-other a rotating flow state. Topologically, these flow states are a limit cycle and a quasiperiodic solution on a two-torus, respectively. Emergence of new flow states in addition to observed ones with classical fluid, indicates that richer but potentially more controllable dynamics in ferrofluidic flows, as such flow states depend on the external magnetic field.

  12. Dynamics of ferrofluidic flow in the Taylor-Couette system with a small aspect ratio

    PubMed Central

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    We investigate fundamental nonlinear dynamics of ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette flow - flow confined be-tween two concentric independently rotating cylinders - consider small aspect ratio by solving the ferro-hydrodynamical equations, carrying out systematic bifurcation analysis. Without magnetic field, we find steady flow patterns, previously observed with a simple fluid, such as those containing normal one- or two vortex cells, as well as anomalous one-cell and twin-cell flow states. However, when a symmetry-breaking transverse magnetic field is present, all flow states exhibit stimulated, finite two-fold mode. Various bifurcations between steady and unsteady states can occur, corresponding to the transitions between the two-cell and one-cell states. While unsteady, axially oscillating flow states can arise, we also detect the emergence of new unsteady flow states. In particular, we uncover two new states: one contains only the azimuthally oscillating solution in the configuration of the twin-cell flow state, and an-other a rotating flow state. Topologically, these flow states are a limit cycle and a quasiperiodic solution on a two-torus, respectively. Emergence of new flow states in addition to observed ones with classical fluid, indicates that richer but potentially more controllable dynamics in ferrofluidic flows, as such flow states depend on the external magnetic field. PMID:28059129

  13. Computational fluid dynamics-based study of possibility of generating pulsatile blood flow via a continuous-flow VAD.

    PubMed

    Nammakie, Erfan; Niroomand-Oscuii, Hanieh; Koochaki, Mojtaba; Ghalichi, Farzan

    2017-01-01

    Until recent years, it was almost beyond remedy to save the life of end-stage heart failure patients without considering a heart transplant. This is while the need for healthy organs has always far exceeded donations. However, the evolution of VAD technology has certainly changed the management of these patients. Today, blood pumps are designed either pulsatile flow or continuous flow, each of which has its own concerns and limitations. For instance, pulsatile pumps are mostly voluminous and hardly can be used for children. On the other hand, the flow generated by continuous-flow pumps is in contrast with pulsatile flow of the natural heart. In this project, having used computational fluid dynamics, we studied the possibility of generating pulsatile blood flow via a continuous-flow blood pump by adjusting the rotational speed of the pump with two distinct patterns (sinusoidal and trapezoidal), both of which have been proposed and set based on physiological needs and blood flow waveform of the natural heart. An important feature of this study is setting the outlet pressure of the pump similar to the physiological conditions of a patient with heart failure, and since these axial pumps are sensitive to outlet pressures, more secure and reliable results of their performance are achieved. Our results show a slight superiority of a sinusoidal pattern compared to a trapezoidal one with the potential to achieve an adequate pulsatile flow by precisely controlling the rotational speed.

  14. Measuring Material Microstructure Under Flow Using 1-2 Plane Flow-Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Gurnon, A. Kate; Godfrin, P. Douglas; Wagner, Norman J.; Eberle, Aaron P. R.; Butler, Paul; Porcar, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    A new small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) sample environment optimized for studying the microstructure of complex fluids under simple shear flow is presented. The SANS shear cell consists of a concentric cylinder Couette geometry that is sealed and rotating about a horizontal axis so that the vorticity direction of the flow field is aligned with the neutron beam enabling scattering from the 1-2 plane of shear (velocity-velocity gradient, respectively). This approach is an advance over previous shear cell sample environments as there is a strong coupling between the bulk rheology and microstructural features in the 1-2 plane of shear. Flow-instabilities, such as shear banding, can also be studied by spatially resolved measurements. This is accomplished in this sample environment by using a narrow aperture for the neutron beam and scanning along the velocity gradient direction. Time resolved experiments, such as flow start-ups and large amplitude oscillatory shear flow are also possible by synchronization of the shear motion and time-resolved detection of scattered neutrons. Representative results using the methods outlined here demonstrate the useful nature of spatial resolution for measuring the microstructure of a wormlike micelle solution that exhibits shear banding, a phenomenon that can only be investigated by resolving the structure along the velocity gradient direction. Finally, potential improvements to the current design are discussed along with suggestions for supplementary experiments as motivation for future experiments on a broad range of complex fluids in a variety of shear motions. PMID:24561395

  15. Measuring material microstructure under flow using 1-2 plane flow-small angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Gurnon, A Kate; Godfrin, P Douglas; Wagner, Norman J; Eberle, Aaron P R; Butler, Paul; Porcar, Lionel

    2014-02-06

    A new small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) sample environment optimized for studying the microstructure of complex fluids under simple shear flow is presented. The SANS shear cell consists of a concentric cylinder Couette geometry that is sealed and rotating about a horizontal axis so that the vorticity direction of the flow field is aligned with the neutron beam enabling scattering from the 1-2 plane of shear (velocity-velocity gradient, respectively). This approach is an advance over previous shear cell sample environments as there is a strong coupling between the bulk rheology and microstructural features in the 1-2 plane of shear. Flow-instabilities, such as shear banding, can also be studied by spatially resolved measurements. This is accomplished in this sample environment by using a narrow aperture for the neutron beam and scanning along the velocity gradient direction. Time resolved experiments, such as flow start-ups and large amplitude oscillatory shear flow are also possible by synchronization of the shear motion and time-resolved detection of scattered neutrons. Representative results using the methods outlined here demonstrate the useful nature of spatial resolution for measuring the microstructure of a wormlike micelle solution that exhibits shear banding, a phenomenon that can only be investigated by resolving the structure along the velocity gradient direction. Finally, potential improvements to the current design are discussed along with suggestions for supplementary experiments as motivation for future experiments on a broad range of complex fluids in a variety of shear motions.

  16. Regional Groundwater Processes and