Science.gov

Sample records for dynamic molecular interactions

  1. Interactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Daniel V.

    2015-03-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in html5 and javascript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  2. Theoretical Analysis of Dynamic Processes for Interacting Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-02-13

    Biological transport is supported by collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by analyzing a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes where interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. It allows us to connect explicitly microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. Theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on interactions, and correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motors transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed.

  3. Theoretical analysis of dynamic processes for interacting molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-02-01

    Biological transport is supported by the collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by carrying out an analysis of a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes, in which interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. This allows us to explicitly connect microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. A theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that the dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on the interactions, and that the correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motor transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed.

  4. Electron-phonon interaction within classical molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tamm, A.; Samolyuk, G.; Correa, A. A.; Klintenberg, M.; Aabloo, A.; Caro, A.

    2016-07-14

    Here, we present a model for nonadiabatic classical molecular dynamics simulations that captures with high accuracy the wave-vector q dependence of the phonon lifetimes, in agreement with quantum mechanics calculations. It is based on a local view of the e-ph interaction where individual atom dynamics couples to electrons via a damping term that is obtained as the low-velocity limit of the stopping power of a moving ion in a host. The model is parameter free, as its components are derived from ab initio-type calculations, is readily extended to the case of alloys, and is adequate for large-scale molecular dynamics computer simulations. We also show how this model removes some oversimplifications of the traditional ionic damped dynamics commonly used to describe situations beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

  5. Electron-phonon interaction within classical molecular dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Tamm, A.; Samolyuk, G.; Correa, A. A.; ...

    2016-07-14

    Here, we present a model for nonadiabatic classical molecular dynamics simulations that captures with high accuracy the wave-vector q dependence of the phonon lifetimes, in agreement with quantum mechanics calculations. It is based on a local view of the e-ph interaction where individual atom dynamics couples to electrons via a damping term that is obtained as the low-velocity limit of the stopping power of a moving ion in a host. The model is parameter free, as its components are derived from ab initio-type calculations, is readily extended to the case of alloys, and is adequate for large-scale molecular dynamics computermore » simulations. We also show how this model removes some oversimplifications of the traditional ionic damped dynamics commonly used to describe situations beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.« less

  6. Electron-phonon interaction within classical molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamm, A.; Samolyuk, G.; Correa, A. A.; Klintenberg, M.; Aabloo, A.; Caro, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a model for nonadiabatic classical molecular dynamics simulations that captures with high accuracy the wave-vector q dependence of the phonon lifetimes, in agreement with quantum mechanics calculations. It is based on a local view of the e -ph interaction where individual atom dynamics couples to electrons via a damping term that is obtained as the low-velocity limit of the stopping power of a moving ion in a host. The model is parameter free, as its components are derived from ab initio-type calculations, is readily extended to the case of alloys, and is adequate for large-scale molecular dynamics computer simulations. We also show how this model removes some oversimplifications of the traditional ionic damped dynamics commonly used to describe situations beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

  7. Molecular Dynamics of "Fuzzy" Transcriptional Activator-Coactivator Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Natalie S.; Weinzierl, Robert O. J.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (ADs) are generally thought to be intrinsically unstructured, but capable of adopting limited secondary structure upon interaction with a coactivator surface. The indeterminate nature of this interface made it hitherto difficult to study structure/function relationships of such contacts. Here we used atomistic accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations to study the conformational changes of the GCN4 AD and variants thereof, either free in solution, or bound to the GAL11 coactivator surface. We show that the AD-coactivator interactions are highly dynamic while obeying distinct rules. The data provide insights into the constant and variable aspects of orientation of ADs relative to the coactivator, changes in secondary structure and energetic contributions stabilizing the various conformers at different time points. We also demonstrate that a prediction of α-helical propensity correlates directly with the experimentally measured transactivation potential of a large set of mutagenized ADs. The link between α-helical propensity and the stimulatory activity of ADs has fundamental practical and theoretical implications concerning the recruitment of ADs to coactivators. PMID:27175900

  8. Molecular dynamics study on hydrocarbon interaction with plasma facing walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohya, K.; Inai, K.; Kikuhara, Y.; Mohara, N.; Ito, A.; Nakamura, H.; Tanabe, T.

    2011-10-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was undertaken to investigate hydrocarbon interactions with fusion related W and C surfaces. W-C mixed and hydrogenated amorphous C layers on the surface were prepared by collisions of C and H atoms at different impact energies on a W crystalline cell. The reflection coefficient for CH y and C 2H y and the distribution of the reflected species were calculated and we determined their dependence on energy and angle. The mixing of W with C reduces the reflection coefficient where C atoms dominate the distribution at energies of 30 eV or more, and this is similar to non-doped W. The amorphization of graphite strongly decreases the reflection coefficient where the emission of small hydrocarbons is suppressed but hydrogen uptake in the amorphous C increases it slightly. The amount of injected hydrogen per hydrocarbon impact on different material surfaces is discussed in relation to the fuel retention of plasma facing walls.

  9. Elucidating nitric oxide synthase domain interactions by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Scott A; Holden, Jeffrey K; Li, Huiying; Poulos, Thomas L

    2016-02-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is a multidomain enzyme that catalyzes the production of nitric oxide (NO) by oxidizing L-Arg to NO and L-citrulline. NO production requires multiple interdomain electron transfer steps between the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and heme domain. Specifically, NADPH-derived electrons are transferred to the heme-containing oxygenase domain via the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and FMN containing reductase domains. While crystal structures are available for both the reductase and oxygenase domains of NOS, to date there is no atomic level structural information on domain interactions required for the final FMN-to-heme electron transfer step. Here, we evaluate a model of this final electron transfer step for the heme-FMN-calmodulin NOS complex based on the recent biophysical studies using a 105-ns molecular dynamics trajectory. The resulting equilibrated complex structure is very stable and provides a detailed prediction of interdomain contacts required for stabilizing the NOS output state. The resulting equilibrated complex model agrees well with previous experimental work and provides a detailed working model of the final NOS electron transfer step required for NO biosynthesis.

  10. Unraveling Hydrophobic Interactions at the Molecular Scale Using Force Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Stock, Philipp; Monroe, Jacob I; Utzig, Thomas; Smith, David J; Shell, M Scott; Valtiner, Markus

    2017-03-28

    Interactions between hydrophobic moieties steer ubiquitous processes in aqueous media, including the self-organization of biologic matter. Recent decades have seen tremendous progress in understanding these for macroscopic hydrophobic interfaces. Yet, it is still a challenge to experimentally measure hydrophobic interactions (HIs) at the single-molecule scale and thus to compare with theory. Here, we present a combined experimental-simulation approach to directly measure and quantify the sequence dependence and additivity of HIs in peptide systems at the single-molecule scale. We combine dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy on model peptides with fully atomistic, both equilibrium and nonequilibrium, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the same systems. Specifically, we mutate a flexible (GS)5 peptide scaffold with increasing numbers of hydrophobic leucine monomers and measure the peptides' desorption from hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer surfaces. Based on the analysis of nonequilibrium work-trajectories, we measure an interaction free energy that scales linearly with 3.0-3.4 kBT per leucine. In good agreement, simulations indicate a similar trend with 2.1 kBT per leucine, while also providing a detailed molecular view into HIs. This approach potentially provides a roadmap for directly extracting qualitative and quantitative single-molecule interactions at solid/liquid interfaces in a wide range of fields, including interactions at biointerfaces and adhesive interactions in industrial applications.

  11. Evaluating Molecular Interactions in Polycaprolactone-Biomineralized Hydroxyapatite Nanocomposites using Steered Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anurag; Payne, Scott; Katti, Kalpana S.; Katti, Dinesh R.

    2015-04-01

    An experimental and modeling study of a complex nanoclay-based polymeric scaffold system is presented here. A representative molecular model of polymeric nanocomposite scaffold system for bone tissue engineering applications was developed. Polymeric scaffolds were synthesized using organically modified montmorillonite clay (OMMT) with biomineralized hydroxyapatite and polycaprolactone (OMMT-HAP-PCL). The OMMT-HAP-PCL representative model was constructed and validated using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and material density results. We observed strong molecular interactions between OMMT, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and polycaprolactone (PCL) in the OMMT-HAP-PCL system. Attractive and repulsive interactions between PCL and different constituents of OMMT and HAP indicate influence of OMMT-HAP on PCL. Polymeric scaffolds were found to have improved nanomechanical properties as compared to pristine PCL due to the introduction of OMMT-HAP. Stress-strain response for the representative OMMT-HAP-PCL model was evaluated using constant force steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations. Two distinct stress-strain responses observed in the system indicate a two-phase nanomechanical behavior of OMMT-HAP-PCL obtained at low and high applied stresses. The results obtained from the MD and SMD simulations provide quantitative understanding of molecular interactions between different constituents of OMMT, HAP and PCL and mechanical response in the OMMT-HAP-PCL system.

  12. Molecular dynamics modeling of a nanomaterials-water surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat Pishkenari, Hossein; Keramati, Ramtin; Abdi, Ahmad; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2016-04-01

    In this article, we study the formation of nanomeniscus around a nanoneedle using molecular dynamics simulation approach. The results reveal three distinct phases in the time-evolution of meniscus before equilibrium according to the contact angle, meniscus height, and potential energy. In addition, we investigated the correlation between the nanoneedle diameter and nanomeniscus characteristics. The results have applications in various fields such as scanning probe microscopy and rheological measurements.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations on the interactions of low molecular weight natural organic acids with C60.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Xie, Hong-Bin; Chen, Jingwen; Li, Xuehua; Wang, Zhuang; Sheng, Lianxi

    2013-07-01

    As an important part of dissolved organic matter (DOM), low molecular weight organic acids (LOAs) may play a key role in the process for DOM stabilizing carbon nanomaterials (e.g. C60) suspensions in aquatic environment. In addition, both LOAs and C60 have been detected in the troposphere and therefore have a chance to interact with each other in the gaseous phase. However, the mechanism for LOAs-C60 interactions and their environmental implications need further investigations. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was employed to investigate the interactions between both neutral and ionic LOAs with C60 in vacuum and water. The results showed that the adsorptions of all LOAs on C60 in energy are favorable, and the aromatic acids have stronger interactions with C60 than the aliphatic acids in vacuum and water. The interaction energies (Eint) of the LOA anions with C60 were weaker than those of their corresponding neutral LOA molecules. The models were also developed to predict and interpret Eint based on the results from MD simulations. Dispersion, induction and hydrophobic interactions were found to be the dominating factor in Eint. These findings indicate that cost-efficient MD simulation can be employed as an important tool to predict the adsorption behavior of LOAs on carbon nanomaterials.

  14. Influence of solid-liquid interactions on dynamic wetting: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Emilie; Blake, Terence D; Coninck, Joël De

    2009-11-18

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid drops spreading on a solid substrate have been carried out for a very wide range of solid-liquid interactions and equilibrium contact angles. The results for these systems are shown to be consistent with the molecular-kinetic theory (MKT) of dynamic wetting, which emphasizes the role of contact-line friction as the principal channel of energy dissipation. Several predictions have been confirmed. These include a quantitative link between the dynamics of wetting and the work of adhesion and the existence of an optimum equilibrium contact angle that maximizes the speed of wetting. A feature of the new work is that key parameters (κ(0) and λ), normally accessible only by fitting the MKT to dynamic contact angle data, are also obtained directly from the simulations, with good agreement between the two sources. This validates the MKT at some fundamental level. Further verification is provided by contact angle relaxation studies, which also lend support to the interfacial tension relaxation process invoked in Shikhmurzaev's hydrodynamic model of dynamic wetting.

  15. Influence of solid-liquid interactions on dynamic wetting: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Emilie; Blake, Terence D.; De Coninck, Joël

    2009-11-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid drops spreading on a solid substrate have been carried out for a very wide range of solid-liquid interactions and equilibrium contact angles. The results for these systems are shown to be consistent with the molecular-kinetic theory (MKT) of dynamic wetting, which emphasizes the role of contact-line friction as the principal channel of energy dissipation. Several predictions have been confirmed. These include a quantitative link between the dynamics of wetting and the work of adhesion and the existence of an optimum equilibrium contact angle that maximizes the speed of wetting. A feature of the new work is that key parameters (κ0 and λ), normally accessible only by fitting the MKT to dynamic contact angle data, are also obtained directly from the simulations, with good agreement between the two sources. This validates the MKT at some fundamental level. Further verification is provided by contact angle relaxation studies, which also lend support to the interfacial tension relaxation process invoked in Shikhmurzaev's hydrodynamic model of dynamic wetting.

  16. Ranking of Molecular Biomarker Interaction with Targeted DNA Nucleobases via Full Atomistic Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.; Cranford, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based sensors can detect disease biomarkers, including acetone and ethanol for diabetes and H2S for cardiovascular diseases. Before experimenting on thousands of potential DNA segments, we conduct full atomistic steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to screen the interactions between different DNA sequences with targeted molecules to rank the nucleobase sensing performance. We study and rank the strength of interaction between four single DNA nucleotides (Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C), and Thymine (T)) on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with acetone, ethanol, H2S and HCl. By sampling forward and reverse interaction paths, we compute the free-energy profiles of eight systems for the four targeted molecules. We find that dsDNA react differently than ssDNA to the targeted molecules, requiring more energy to move the molecule close to DNA as indicated by the potential of mean force (PMF). Comparing the PMF values of different systems, we obtain a relative ranking of DNA base for the detection of each molecule. Via the same procedure, we could generate a library of DNA sequences for the detection of a wide range of chemicals. A DNA sensor array built with selected sequences differentiating many disease biomarkers can be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:26750747

  17. Ranking of Molecular Biomarker Interaction with Targeted DNA Nucleobases via Full Atomistic Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.; Cranford, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based sensors can detect disease biomarkers, including acetone and ethanol for diabetes and H2S for cardiovascular diseases. Before experimenting on thousands of potential DNA segments, we conduct full atomistic steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to screen the interactions between different DNA sequences with targeted molecules to rank the nucleobase sensing performance. We study and rank the strength of interaction between four single DNA nucleotides (Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C), and Thymine (T)) on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with acetone, ethanol, H2S and HCl. By sampling forward and reverse interaction paths, we compute the free-energy profiles of eight systems for the four targeted molecules. We find that dsDNA react differently than ssDNA to the targeted molecules, requiring more energy to move the molecule close to DNA as indicated by the potential of mean force (PMF). Comparing the PMF values of different systems, we obtain a relative ranking of DNA base for the detection of each molecule. Via the same procedure, we could generate a library of DNA sequences for the detection of a wide range of chemicals. A DNA sensor array built with selected sequences differentiating many disease biomarkers can be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring.

  18. Phase equilibrium calculations of ternary liquid mixtures with binary interaction parameters and molecular size parameters determined from molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Oh, Suk Yung; Bae, Young Chan

    2010-07-15

    The method presented in this paper was developed to predict liquid-liquid equilibria in ternary liquid mixtures by using a combination of a thermodynamic model and molecular dynamics simulations. In general, common classical thermodynamic models have many parameters which are determined by fitting a model with experimental data. This proposed method, however, provides a simple procedure for calculating liquid-liquid equilibria utilizing binary interaction parameters and molecular size parameters determined from molecular dynamics simulations. This method was applied to mixtures containing water, hydrocarbons, alcohols, chlorides, ketones, acids, and other organic liquids over various temperature ranges. The predicted results agree well with the experimental data without the use of adjustable parameters.

  19. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Interaction of an AFM Probe with the Surface of an SCN Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Adris; Kaukler, William; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations is conducted in order to estimate forces of probe-substrate interaction in the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). First a review of available molecular dynamic techniques is given. Implementation of MD simulation is based on an object-oriented code developed at the University of Delft. Modeling of the sample material - succinonitrile (SCN) - is based on the Lennard-Jones potentials. For the polystyrene probe an atomic interaction potential is used. Due to object-oriented structure of the code modification of an atomic interaction potential is straight forward. Calculation of melting temperature is used for validation of the code and of the interaction potentials. Various fitting parameters of the probe-substrate interaction potentials are considered, as potentials fitted to certain properties and temperature ranges may not be reliable for the others. This research provides theoretical foundation for an interpretation of actual measurements of an interaction forces using AFM.

  20. DyNet: visualization and analysis of dynamic molecular interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Goenawan, Ivan H.; Lynn, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The ability to experimentally determine molecular interactions on an almost proteome-wide scale under different conditions is enabling researchers to move from static to dynamic network analysis, uncovering new insights into how interaction networks are physically rewired in response to different stimuli and in disease. Dynamic interaction data presents a special challenge in network biology. Here, we present DyNet, a Cytoscape application that provides a range of functionalities for the visualization, real-time synchronization and analysis of large multi-state dynamic molecular interaction networks enabling users to quickly identify and analyze the most ‘rewired’ nodes across many network states. Availability and Implementation: DyNet is available at the Cytoscape (3.2+) App Store (http://apps.cytoscape.org/apps/dynet). Contact: david.lynn@sahmri.com. Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153624

  1. Correlations and symmetry of interactions influence collective dynamics of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis-Garza, Daniel; Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-04-01

    Enzymatic molecules that actively support many cellular processes, including transport, cell division and cell motility, are known as motor proteins or molecular motors. Experimental studies indicate that they interact with each other and they frequently work together in large groups. To understand the mechanisms of collective behavior of motor proteins we study the effect of interactions in the transport of molecular motors along linear filaments. It is done by analyzing a recently introduced class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes that takes into account the intermolecular interactions via thermodynamically consistent approach. We develop a new theoretical method that allows us to compute analytically all dynamic properties of the system. Our analysis shows that correlations play important role in dynamics of interacting molecular motors. Surprisingly, we find that the correlations for repulsive interactions are weaker and more short-range than the correlations for the attractive interactions. In addition, it is shown that symmetry of interactions affect dynamic properties of molecular motors. The implications of these findings for motor proteins transport are discussed. Our theoretical predictions are tested by extensive Monte Carlo computer simulations.

  2. A molecular dynamics study on slow ion interactions with the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecule anthracene

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, J.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2014-03-01

    Atomic collisions with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are astrophysically particularly relevant for collision energies of less than 1 keV. In this regime, the interaction dynamics are dominated by elastic interactions. We have employed a molecular dynamics simulation based on analytical interaction potentials to model the interaction of low energy hydrogen and helium projectiles with isolated anthracene (C{sub 14}H{sub 10}) molecules. This approach allows for a very detailed investigation of the elastic interaction dynamics on an event by event basis. From the simulation data the threshold projectile kinetic energies above which direct C atom knock out sets in were determined. Anthracene differential energy transfer cross sections and total (dissociation) cross sections were computed for a wide range of projectile kinetic energies. The obtained results are interpreted in the context of PAH destruction in astrophysical environments.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Study on the Biophysical Interactions of Seven Green Tea Catechins with Cell Membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the interactions of bioactive catechins (flavonoids) commonly found in green tea with lipid bilayers, as model for cell membranes. Previously, a number of experimental studies rationalized catechin’s anticarcinogenic, antibacterial, and other be...

  4. Multilevel summation with B-spline interpolation for pairwise interactions in molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Matthew A.; Xia, Jianlin; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The multilevel summation method for calculating electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations constructs an approximation to a pairwise interaction kernel and its gradient, which can be evaluated at a cost that scales linearly with the number of atoms. The method smoothly splits the kernel into a sum of partial kernels of increasing range and decreasing variability with the longer-range parts interpolated from grids of increasing coarseness. Multilevel summation is especially appropriate in the context of dynamics and minimization, because it can produce continuous gradients. This article explores the use of B-splines to increase the accuracy of the multilevel summation method (for nonperiodic boundaries) without incurring additional computation other than a preprocessing step (whose cost also scales linearly). To obtain accurate results efficiently involves technical difficulties, which are overcome by a novel preprocessing algorithm. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the resulting method offers substantial improvements in accuracy and that its performance is competitive with an implementation of the fast multipole method in general and markedly better for Hamiltonian formulations of molecular dynamics. The improvement is great enough to establish multilevel summation as a serious contender for calculating pairwise interactions in molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, the method appears to be uniquely capable for molecular dynamics in two situations, nonperiodic boundary conditions and massively parallel computation, where the fast Fourier transform employed in the particle–mesh Ewald method falls short. PMID:27004867

  5. Three-dimensional interactive Molecular Dynamics program for the study of defect dynamics in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriarca, M.; Kuronen, A.; Robles, M.; Kaski, K.

    2007-01-01

    The study of crystal defects and the complex processes underlying their formation and time evolution has motivated the development of the program ALINE for interactive molecular dynamics experiments. This program couples a molecular dynamics code to a Graphical User Interface and runs on a UNIX-X11 Window System platform with the MOTIF library, which is contained in many standard Linux releases. ALINE is written in C, thus giving the user the possibility to modify the source code, and, at the same time, provides an effective and user-friendly framework for numerical experiments, in which the main parameters can be interactively varied and the system visualized in various ways. We illustrate the main features of the program through some examples of detection and dynamical tracking of point-defects, linear defects, and planar defects, such as stacking faults in lattice-mismatched heterostructures. Program summaryTitle of program:ALINE Catalogue identifier:ADYJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYJ_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Computers:DEC ALPHA 300, Intel i386 compatible computers, G4 Apple Computers Installations:Laboratory of Computational Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, Helsinki, Finland Operating systems under which the program has been tested:True64 UNIX, Linux-i386, Mac OS X 10.3 and 10.4 Programming language used:Standard C and MOTIF libraries Memory required to execute with typical data:6 Mbytes but may be larger depending on the system size No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:16 901 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:449 559 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of physical problem:Some phenomena involving defects take place inside three-dimensional crystals at times which can be hardly predicted. For this reason they are

  6. Multiscale modeling of dislocation-precipitate interactions in Fe: From molecular dynamics to discrete dislocations.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Arttu; Granberg, Fredric; Laurson, Lasse; Nordlund, Kai; Alava, Mikko J

    2016-01-01

    The stress-driven motion of dislocations in crystalline solids, and thus the ensuing plastic deformation process, is greatly influenced by the presence or absence of various pointlike defects such as precipitates or solute atoms. These defects act as obstacles for dislocation motion and hence affect the mechanical properties of the material. Here we combine molecular dynamics studies with three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to model the interaction between different kinds of precipitates and a 1/2〈111〉{110} edge dislocation in BCC iron. We have implemented immobile spherical precipitates into the ParaDis discrete dislocation dynamics code, with the dislocations interacting with the precipitates via a Gaussian potential, generating a normal force acting on the dislocation segments. The parameters used in the discrete dislocation dynamics simulations for the precipitate potential, the dislocation mobility, shear modulus, and dislocation core energy are obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. We compare the critical stresses needed to unpin the dislocation from the precipitate in molecular dynamics and discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to fit the two methods together and discuss the variety of the relevant pinning and depinning mechanisms.

  7. An investigation of molecular dynamics simulation and molecular docking: interaction of citrus flavonoids and bovine β-lactoglobulin in focus.

    PubMed

    Sahihi, M; Ghayeb, Y

    2014-08-01

    Citrus flavonoids are natural compounds with important health benefits. The study of their interaction with a transport protein, such as bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG), at the atomic level could be a valuable factor to control their transport to biological sites. In the present study, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation methods were used to investigate the interaction of hesperetin, naringenin, nobiletin and tangeretin as citrus flavonoids and BLG as transport protein. The molecular docking results revealed that these flavonoids bind in the internal cavity of BLG and the BLG affinity for binding the flavonoids follows naringenin>hesperetin>tangeretin>nobiletin. The docking results also indicated that the BLG-flavonoid complexes are stabilized through hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bond interactions and π-π stacking interactions. The analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories showed that the root mean square deviation (RMSD) of various systems reaches equilibrium and fluctuates around the mean value at various times. Time evolution of the radius of gyration, total solvent accessible surface of the protein and the second structure of protein showed as well that BLG and BLG-flavonoid complexes were stable around 2500ps, and there was not any conformational change as for BLG-flavonoid complexes. Further, the profiles of atomic fluctuations indicated the rigidity of the ligand binding site during the simulation.

  8. Parallel implementation of three-dimensional molecular dynamic simulation for laser-cluster interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Holkundkar, Amol R.

    2013-11-15

    The objective of this article is to report the parallel implementation of the 3D molecular dynamic simulation code for laser-cluster interactions. The benchmarking of the code has been done by comparing the simulation results with some of the experiments reported in the literature. Scaling laws for the computational time is established by varying the number of processor cores and number of macroparticles used. The capabilities of the code are highlighted by implementing various diagnostic tools. To study the dynamics of the laser-cluster interactions, the executable version of the code is available from the author.

  9. Large-scale molecular-dynamics simulation of nanoscale hydrophobic interaction and nanobubble formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koishi, Takahiro; Yasuoka, Kenji; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Yoo, S.; Zeng, X. C.

    2005-11-01

    We performed large-scale molecular-dynamics simulation of nanoscale hydrophobic interaction manifested by the formation of nanobubble between nanometer-sized hydrophobic clusters at constrained equilibrium. Particular attention is placed on the tendency of formation and stability of nanobubbles in between model nanoassemblies which are composed of hydrophobic clusters (or patches) embedded in a hydrophilic substrate. On the basis of physical behavior of nanobubble formation, we observed a change from short-range molecular hydrophobic interaction to midrange nanoscopic interaction when the length scale of hydrophobe approaches to about 1 nm. We investigated the behavior of nanobubble formation with several different patterns of nonpolar-site distribution on the nanoassemblies but always keeping a constant ratio of nonpolar to polar monomer sites. Dynamical properties of confined water molecules in between nanoassemblies are also calculated.

  10. Molecular mechanics and dynamics studies on the interaction of gallic acid with collagen-like peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhan, B.; Thanikaivelan, P.; Subramanian, V.; Raghava Rao, J.; Unni Nair, Balachandran; Ramasami, T.

    2001-10-01

    Molecular modelling approaches have been used to understand the interaction of collagen-like peptides with gallic acid, which mimic vegetable tanning processes involved in protein stabilization. Several interaction sites have been identified and the binding energies of the complexes have been calculated. The calculated binding energies for various geometries are in the range 6-13 kcal/mol. It is found that some complexes exhibit hydrogen bonding, and electrostatic interaction plays a dominant role in the stabilization of the peptide by gallic acid. The π-OH type of interaction is also observed in the peptide stabilization. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for 600 ps revealed the possibility of hydrogen bonding between the collagen-like peptide and gallic acid.

  11. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation studies on the interactions of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls with estrogen receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolin; Ye, Li; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Shi, Wei; Qian, XiangPing; Zhu, YongLiang; Yu, HongXia

    2013-10-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals have attracted great concern. As major metabolites of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (HO-PCBs) may disrupt estrogen hormone status because of their structural similarity to estrogen endogenous compounds. However, interactions between HO-PCBs and estrogen receptors (ERs) are not fully understood. In the present work, a molecular modeling study combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations was performed to characterize the interactions of three HO-PCBs (4'-HO-PCB50, 2'-HO-PCB65, and 4'-HO-PCB69) having much different estrogenic activities with ERβ. Docking results showed that binding between ligands and ERβ was stabilized by hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions. The binding free energies of three ligands with ERβ were calculated, and further binding free energy decomposition analysis indicated that the dominating driving force of the binding between the ligands and ERβ was the van der Waals interaction. Some key residues, such as Leu298, Phe356, Gly472, His475, and Leu476, played important roles in ligand-receptor interactions by forming hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions with ligands. The results may be beneficial to increase understanding of the interactions between HO-PCBs and ERβ.

  12. Probing Silica-Biomolecule Interactions by Solid-State NMR and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Stephan Ingmar; Donets, Sergii; Dianat, Arezoo; Bobeth, Manfred; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Brunner, Eike

    2016-11-08

    Understanding the molecular interactions between inorganic phases such as silica and organic material is fundamental for chromatographic applications, for tailoring silica-enzyme interactions, and for elucidating the mechanisms of biomineralization. The formation, structure, and properties of the organic/inorganic interface is crucial in this context. Here, we investigate the interaction of selectively (13)C-labeled choline with (29)Si-labeled monosilicic acid/silica at the molecular level. Silica/choline nanocomposites were analyzed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy in combination with extended molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand the silica/organic interface. Cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP MAS)-based NMR experiments like (1)H-(13)C CP-REDOR (rotational-echo double resonance), (1)H-(13)C HETCOR (heteronuclear correlation), and (1)H-(29)Si-(1)H double CP are employed to determine spatial parameters. The measurement of (29)Si-(13)C internuclear distances for selectively (13)C-labeled choline provides an experimental parameter that allows the direct verification of MD simulations. Atomistic modeling using classical MD methodologies is performed using the INTERFACE force field. The modeling results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data and reveal the relevant molecular conformations as well as the nature and interplay of the interactions between the choline cation and the silica surface. Electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding are both important and depend strongly on the hydration level as well as the charge state of the silica surface.

  13. Characterization of the Interaction between Gallic Acid and Lysozyme by Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Optical Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Minzhong; Guo, Ming; Jiang, Yanke; Wang, Xiaomeng

    2015-01-01

    The binding interaction between gallic acid (GA) and lysozyme (LYS) was investigated and compared by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and spectral techniques. The results from spectroscopy indicate that GA binds to LYS to generate a static complex. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. MD simulation revealed that the main driving forces for GA binding to LYS are hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. The root-mean-square deviation verified that GA and LYS bind to form a stable complex, while the root-mean-square fluctuation results showed that the stability of the GA-LYS complex at 298 K was higher than that at 310 K. The calculated free binding energies from the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method showed that van der Waals forces and electrostatic interactions are the predominant intermolecular forces. The MD simulation was consistent with the spectral experiments. This study provides a reference for future study of the pharmacological mechanism of GA. PMID:26140374

  14. Phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron: A combined molecular and spin dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Dilina Landau, David P.; Nicholson, Don M.; Malcolm Stocks, G.; Eisenbach, Markus; Yin, Junqi; Brown, Gregory

    2014-05-07

    Combining an atomistic many-body potential with a classical spin Hamiltonian parameterized by first principles calculations, molecular-spin dynamics computer simulations were performed to investigate phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron. Results obtained for spin-spin and density-density dynamic structure factors show that noticeable softening and damping of magnon modes occur due to the presence of lattice vibrations. Furthermore, as a result of the phonon-magnon coupling, additional longitudinal spin wave excitations are observed, with the same frequencies as the longitudinal phonon modes.

  15. Phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron: A combined molecular and spin dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N; Landau, David P; Nicholson, Don M; Stocks, George Malcolm; Eisenbach, Markus; Yin, Junqi; Brown, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Combining an atomistic many-body potential with a classical spin Hamiltonian pa- rameterized by first principles calculations, molecular-spin dynamics computer sim- ulations were performed to investigate phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron. Results obtained for spin-spin and density-density dynamic structure factors show that noticeable softening and damping of magnon modes occur due to the presence of lattice vibrations. Furthermore, as a result of the phonon-magnon coupling, addi- tional longitudinal spin wave excitations are observed, with the same frequencies as the longitudinal phonon modes.

  16. Interactions between Ether Phospholipids and Cholesterol as Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Heberle, Frederick A; Mostofian, Barmak; Kucerka, Norbert; Drazba, Paul; Katsaras, John

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol and ether lipids are ubiquitous in mammalian cell membranes, and their interactions are crucial in ether lipid mediated cholesterol trafficking. We report on cholesterol s molecular interactions with ether lipids as determined using a combination of small-angle neutron and Xray scattering, and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A scattering density profile model for an ether lipid bilayer was developed using MD simulations, which was then used to simultaneously fit the different experimental scattering data. From analysis of the data the various bilayer structural parameters were obtained. Surface area constrained MD simulations were also performed to reproduce the experimental data. This iterative analysis approach resulted in good agreement between the experimental and simulated form factors. The molecular interactions taking place between cholesterol and ether lipids were then determined from the validated MD simulations. We found that in ether membranes cholesterol primarily hydrogen bonds with the lipid headgroup phosphate oxygen, while in their ester membrane counterparts cholesterol hydrogen bonds with the backbone ester carbonyls. This different mode of interaction between ether lipids and cholesterol induces cholesterol to reside closer to the bilayer surface, dehydrating the headgroup s phosphate moiety. Moreover, the three-dimensional lipid chain spatial density distribution around cholesterol indicates anisotropic chain packing, causing cholesterol to tilt. These insights lend a better understanding of ether lipid-mediated cholesterol trafficking and the roles that the different lipid species have in determining the structural and dynamical properties of membrane associated biomolecules.

  17. Interactions of lipids and detergents with a viral ion channel protein: molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Sarah L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-01-22

    Structural studies of membrane proteins have highlighted the likely influence of membrane mimetic environments (i.e., lipid bilayers versus detergent micelles) on the conformation and dynamics of small α-helical membrane proteins. We have used molecular dynamics simulations to compare the conformational dynamics of BM2 (a small α-helical protein from the membrane of influenza B) in a model phospholipid bilayer environment with its behavior in protein-detergent complexes with either the zwitterionic detergent dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) or the nonionic detergent dodecylmaltoside (DDM). We find that DDM more closely resembles the lipid bilayer in terms of its interaction with the protein, while the short-tailed DHPC molecule forms "nonphysiological" interactions with the protein termini. We find that the intrinsic micelle properties of each detergent are conserved upon formation of the protein-detergent complex. This implies that simulations of detergent micelles may be used to help select optimal conditions for experimental studies of membrane proteins.

  18. Three-body interactions and solid-liquid phase equilibria: application of a molecular dynamics algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Sadus, Richard J

    2006-09-01

    The effect of three-body interactions on the solid-liquid phase boundaries of argon, krypton, and xenon is investigated via a novel technique that combines both nonequilibrium and equilibrium molecular dynamics. The simulations involve the evaluation of two- and three-body forces using accurate two-body and three-body intermolecular potentials. The effect of three-body interactions is to substantially increase the coexistence pressure and to lower the densities of liquid and solid phases. Comparison with experiment indicates that three-body interactions are required to accurately determine the total pressure. In contrast to vapor-liquid phase equilibria, the relative contribution of three-body interactions to the freezing pressure exceeds the contribution of two-body interactions at all temperatures.

  19. NMR and molecular dynamics studies of the interaction of melatonin with calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Adrián G.; Estrin, Darío A.; Rosenstein, Ruth E.; McCormick, John E.; Martin, Stephen R.; Pastore, Annalisa; Biekofsky, Rodolfo R.; Martorana, Vincenzo

    2004-01-01

    Pineal hormone melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is thought to modulate the calcium/calmodulin signaling pathway either by changing intracellular Ca2+ concentration via activation of its G-protein–coupled membrane receptors, or through a direct interaction with calmodulin (CaM). The present work studies the direct interaction of melatonin with intact calcium-saturated CaM both experimentally, by fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and theoretically, by molecular dynamics simulations. The analysis of the experimental data shows that the interaction is calcium-dependent. The affinity, as obtained from monitoring 15N and 1H chemical shift changes for a melatonin titration, is weak (in the millimolar range) and comparable for the N- and C-terminal domains. Partial replacement of diamagnetic Ca2+ by paramagnetic Tb3+ allowed the measurement of interdomain NMR pseudocontact shifts and residual dipolar couplings, indicating that each domain movement in the complex is not correlated with the other one. Molecular dynamics simulations allow us to follow the dynamics of melatonin in the binding pocket of CaM. Overall, this study provides an example of how a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches can shed light on a weakly interacting system of biological and pharmacological significance. PMID:15498938

  20. PLUMED-GUI: An environment for the interactive development of molecular dynamics analysis and biasing scripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgino, Toni

    2014-03-01

    PLUMED-GUI is an interactive environment to develop and test complex PLUMED scripts within the Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD) environment. Computational biophysicists can take advantage of both PLUMED’s rich syntax to define collective variables (CVs) and VMD’s chemically-aware atom selection language, while working within a natural point-and-click interface. Pre-defined templates and syntax mnemonics facilitate the definition of well-known reaction coordinates. Complex CVs, e.g. involving reference snapshots used for RMSD or native contacts calculations, can be built through dialogs that provide a synoptic view of the available options. Scripts can be either exported for use in simulation programs, or evaluated on the currently loaded molecular trajectories. Script development takes place without leaving VMD, thus enabling an incremental try-see-modify development model for molecular metrics.

  1. Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Beta-Amyloid Interactions with Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liming; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kelvin

    2012-10-01

    Early events of human beta-amyloid protein interactions with cholesterol-containing membranes are critical to understanding the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to exploring new therapeutic interventions of AD. Atomistic molecular dynamics (AMD) simulations have been extensively used to study the protein-lipid interaction at high atomic resolutions. However, traditional MD simulations are not efficient in sampling the phase space of complex lipid/protein systems with rugged free energy landscapes. Meanwhile, coarse-grained MD (CGD) simulations are efficient in the phase space sampling but suffered from low spatial resolutions and from the fact that the energy landscapes are not identical to those of the AMD. Here, a multiscale approach was employed to simulate the protein-lipid interactions of beta-amyloid upon its release from proteolysis residing in the neuronal membranes. We utilized a forward (AMD to CGD) and reverse (CGD-AMD) strategy to explore new transmembrane and surface protein configuration and evaluate the stabilization mechanisms by measuring the residue-specific protein-lipid or protein conformations. The detailed molecular interactions revealed in this multiscale MD approach will provide new insights into understanding the early molecular events leading to the pathogenesis of AD.

  2. Amorphous silica modeled with truncated and screened Coulomb interactions: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carré, Antoine; Berthier, Ludovic; Horbach, Jürgen; Ispas, Simona; Kob, Walter

    2007-09-01

    We show that finite-range alternatives to the standard long-range pair potential for silica by van Beest et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1955 (1990)] might be used in molecular dynamics simulations. We study two such models that can be efficiently simulated since no Ewald summation is required. We first consider the Wolf method, where the Coulomb interactions are truncated at a cutoff distance rc such that the requirement of charge neutrality holds. Various static and dynamic quantities are computed and compared to results from simulations using Ewald summations. We find very good agreement for rc≈10Å. For lower values of rc, the long-range structure is affected which is accompanied by a slight acceleration of dynamic properties. In a second approach, the Coulomb interaction is replaced by an effective Yukawa interaction with two new parameters determined by a force fitting procedure. The same trend as for the Wolf method is seen. However, slightly larger cutoffs have to be used in order to obtain the same accuracy with respect to static and dynamic quantities as for the Wolf method.

  3. Generalized image charge solvation model for electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shaozhong; Xue, Changfeng; Baumketner, Andriy; Jacobs, Donald; Cai, Wei

    2013-07-01

    This paper extends the image charge solvation model (ICSM) [Y. Lin, A. Baumketner, S. Deng, Z. Xu, D. Jacobs, W. Cai, An image-based reaction field method for electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions, J. Chem. Phys. 131 (2009) 154103], a hybrid explicit/implicit method to treat electrostatic interactions in computer simulations of biomolecules formulated for spherical cavities, to prolate spheroidal and triaxial ellipsoidal cavities, designed to better accommodate non-spherical solutes in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In addition to the utilization of a general truncated octahedron as the MD simulation box, central to the proposed extension is an image approximation method to compute the reaction field for a point charge placed inside such a non-spherical cavity by using a single image charge located outside the cavity. The resulting generalized image charge solvation model (GICSM) is tested in simulations of liquid water, and the results are analyzed in comparison with those obtained from the ICSM simulations as a reference. We find that, for improved computational efficiency due to smaller simulation cells and consequently a less number of explicit solvent molecules, the generalized model can still faithfully reproduce known static and dynamic properties of liquid water at least for systems considered in the present paper, indicating its great potential to become an accurate but more efficient alternative to the ICSM when bio-macromolecules of irregular shapes are to be simulated.

  4. Molecular dynamic and docking interaction study of Heterodera glycines serine proteinase with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Prasad, C V S Siva; Gupta, Saurabh; Gaponenko, Alex; Tiwari, Murlidhar

    2013-08-01

    Many plants do produce various defense proteins like proteinase inhibitors (PIs) to protect them against various pests. PIs function as pseudosubstrates of digestive proteinase, which inhibits proteolysis in pests and leads to amino acid deficiency-based mortality. This work reports the structural interaction studies of serine proteinase of Heterodera glycines (SPHG) with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor (VMPI). 3D protein structure modeling, validation of SPHG and VMPI, and their putative protein-protein binding sites were predicted. Protein-protein docking followed by molecular dynamic simulation was performed to find the reliable confirmation of SPHG-VMPI complex. Trajectory analysis of each successive conformation concludes better interaction of first loop in comparison with second loop. Lysine residues of first loop were actively participating in complex formation. Overall, this study discloses the structural aspects and interaction mechanisms of VMPI with SPHG, and it would be helpful in the development of pest-resistant genetically modified crops.

  5. Molecular-dynamic investigation of the interaction of vacancies with symmetrical tilt grain boundaries in aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckman, A. V.; Demyanov, B. F.; Dragunov, A. S.

    2015-06-01

    The molecular-dynamic method has been used to study the interaction of lattice vacancies with symmetrical grain boundaries (GBs) in aluminum. The fraction of trapped vacancies has been found to depend linearly on the distance to the GB plane. The average velocity of the vacancy migration toward the boundary decreases exponentially with an increase in the distance between the GB plane and vacancy. The radius of the region of trapping of a vacancy by the boundary is limited to two to three lattice parameters and grows with an increase in temperature. Four types of boundaries, which are characterized by different capability for the trapping of vacancies, have been determined.

  6. Predicting the molecular shape of polysaccharides from dynamic interactions with water.

    PubMed

    Almond, Andrew; Sheehan, John K

    2003-04-01

    How simple monosaccharides, once polymerized, become the basis for structural materials remains a mystery. A framework is developed to investigate the role of water in the emergence of dynamic structure in polysaccharides, using the important beta(1-->4) linkage as an example. This linkage is studied within decasaccharide fragments of cellulose, chitin, mannan, xylan, and hyaluronan, using molecular simulations in the presence of explicit water solvent. Although cellulose, mannan, chitin, and xylan are chemically similar, their intramolecular hydrogen-bond dynamics and interaction with water are predicted to differ. Cellulose, mannan, and chitin favor relatively static intramolecular hydrogen bonds, xylan prefers dynamic water bridges, and multiple water configurations are predicted at the beta(1-->4) linkages of hyaluronan. With such a variety of predicted dynamics, the hypothesis that the beta(1-->4) linkage is stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonds was rejected. Instead, it is proposed that favored molecular configurations are consistent with maximum rotamer and water degrees of freedom, explaining observations made previously by X-ray diffraction. Furthermore, polysaccharides predicted to be conformationally restricted in simulations (cellulose, chitin, and mannan) prefer the solid state in reality, even as oligosaccharides. Those predicted to be more flexible (xylan and hyaluronan) are known to be soluble, even as high polymers. Therefore an intriguing correlation between chemical composition, water organization, polymer properties, and biological function is proposed.

  7. Dynamics of Humic Acid and Its Interaction with Uranyl in the Presence of Hydrophobic Surface Implicated by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tu; Wang, Hui; Liao, Jiali; Yang, Yuanyou; Chai, Zhifang; Liu, Ning; Wang, Dongqi

    2016-10-07

    This work targeted a molecular level of understanding on the dynamics of humic acid (HA) and its interaction with uranyl in the presence of hydrophobic surface mimicked by a carbon nanotube (CNT), which also represents a potential intruder in the environment accompanying with the development of nanotechnology. In aqueous phase, uranyl and HA were observed to build close contact spontaneously, driven by electrostatic interaction, leading to a more compact conformation of HA. The presence of CNT unfolds HA via π-π interactions with the aromatic rings of HA without significant perturbation on the interaction strength between HA and uranyl. These results show that the hydrophilic uranyl and the hydrophobic CNT influence the folding behavior of HA in distinct manners, which represents two fundamental mechanisms that the folding behavior of HA may be modulated in the environment, that is, uranyl enhances the folding of HA via electrostatic interactions, whereas CNT impedes its spontaneous folding via van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The work also provides molecular level of evidence on the transformation of a hydrophobic surface into a hydrophilic one via noncovalent functionalization by HA, which in turn affects the migration of HA and the cations it binds to.

  8. How does the molecular linker in dynamic force spectroscopy affect probing molecular interactions at the single-molecule level?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taninaka, Atsushi; Aizawa, Kota; Hanyu, Tatsuya; Hirano, Yuuichi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) based on atomic force microscopy, which enables us to obtain information on the interaction potential between molecules such as antigen-antibody complexes at the single-molecule level, is a key technique for advancing molecular science and technology. However, to ensure the reliability of DFS measurement, its basic mechanism must be well understood. We examined the effect of the molecular linker used to fix the target molecule to the atomic force microscope cantilever, i.e., the force direction during measurement, for the first time, which has not been discussed until now despite its importance. The effect on the lifetime and barrier position, which can be obtained by DFS, was found to be ˜10 and ˜50%, respectively, confirming the high potential of DFS.

  9. A combined spectroscopic, molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulation study on the interaction of quercetin with β-casein nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mehranfar, Fahimeh; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Parastar, Hadi

    2013-10-05

    The interaction of quercetin with β-casein nanoparticle micelle was studied at various temperatures in order to do a complete thermodynamic and molecular analysis on the binding process. The results of fluorescence studies showed the possibility of fluorescence energy transfer between excited tryptophan and quercetin. The determined values of critical transfers distance and the mean distance of ligand from Trp-143 residues in β-casein micelle represents a non-radiative energy transfer mechanism for quenching and the existence of a significant interaction between this flavonoid and β-casein nanoparticle. The equilibrium binding of quercetin with β-casein micelle at different temperatures was studied by using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The chemometric analysis (principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) methods) on spectrophotometric data revealed the existence of two components in solution (quercetin and β-casein-quercetin complex) and resolved their pure concentration and spectral profiles. This information let us to calculate the equilibrium binding constant at various temperatures and the relevant thermodynamic parameters of interaction (enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy) with low uncertainty. The negative values of entropy and enthalpy changes represent the predominate role of hydrogen binding and van der Waals interactions in the binding process. Docking calculations showed the probable binding site of quercetin is located in the hydrophobic core of β-casein where the quercetin molecule is lined by hydrophobic residues and make five hydrogen bonds and several van der Waals contacts with them. Moreover, molecular dynamic (MD) simulation results suggested that this flavonoid can interact with β-casein, without affecting the secondary structure of β-casein. Simulations, molecular docking and experimental data reciprocally supported each other.

  10. Molecular dynamic simulation of tip-polymer interaction in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofrio, N.; Venturini, G. N.; Strachan, A.

    2013-09-01

    We present a molecular dynamic study of the interaction between an amorphous silica tip (SiO2) and an amorphous poly-(methyl-methacrylate) substrate under conditions relevant for tapping-mode atomic force microscopy. To capture the actual dynamics of the tip, we use the dynamic contact simulation method [Kim et al., J. Appl. Phys. 112, 094325 (2012)]. We obtain force-displacement relationships both for neat polymer substrates and a sample with a sub-surface nanotube and extract the local stiffness and energy dissipation per cycle. The simulations capture non-trivial aspects of the interaction that originate from the viscoelastic nature of the polymer including an increase in repulsive interaction force during approach with tip velocity and an increase in adhesion during retraction with decreasing tip velocity. Scans of local stiffness and dissipation over the samples reveal intrinsic variability in the amorphous polymer but also the effect of local surface topography on the extracted properties as well as the ability of the method to detect a sub-surface nanotube. This insight and quantitative data should be valuable to interpret the results of atomic force microscopy studies.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanochannel flows with effects of wall lattice-fluid interactions.

    PubMed

    Soong, C Y; Yen, T H; Tzeng, P Y

    2007-09-01

    In the present paper, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to explore the effects of wall lattice-fluid interactions on the hydrodynamic characteristics in nanochannels. Couette and Poiseuille flows of liquid argon with channel walls of face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice structure are employed as the model configurations. Truncated and shifted Lennard-Jones (LJ) 12-6 potentials for evaluations of fluid-fluid and wall-fluid interactions, and a nonlinear spring potential for wall-wall interaction, are used as interatomistic or molecular models. The hydrodynamics at various flow orientation angles with respect to channel walls of lattice planes (111), (100), and (110) are explored. The present work discloses that the effects of key parameters, such as wall density, lattice plane, flow orientation, and LJ interaction energy, have a very significant impact on the nanochannel flow characteristics. The related interfacial phenomena and the underlying physical mechanisms are explored and interpreted. These results are significant in the understanding of nanoscale hydrodynamics, as well as in various applications where an accurate nanoscale flow rate control is necessary.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation study of a pulmonary surfactant film interacting with a carbonaceous nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Choe, Seungho; Chang, Rakwoo; Jeon, Jonggu; Violi, Angela

    2008-11-01

    This article reports an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation to study a model pulmonary surfactant film interacting with a carbonaceous nanoparticle. The pulmonary surfactant is modeled as a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayer with a peptide consisting of the first 25 residues from surfactant protein B. The nanoparticle model with a chemical formula C188H53 was generated using a computational code for combustion conditions. The nanoparticle has a carbon cage structure reminiscent of the buckyballs with open ends. A series of molecular-scale structural and dynamical properties of the surfactant film in the absence and presence of nanoparticle are analyzed, including radial distribution functions, mean-square displacements of lipids and nanoparticle, chain tilt angle, and the surfactant protein B peptide helix tilt angle. The results show that the nanoparticle affects the structure and packing of the lipids and peptide in the film, and it appears that the nanoparticle and peptide repel each other. The ability of the nanoparticle to translocate the surfactant film is one of the most important predictions of this study. The potential of mean force for dragging the particle through the film provides such information. The reported potential of mean force suggests that the nanoparticle can easily penetrate the monolayer but further translocation to the water phase is energetically prohibitive. The implication is that nanoparticles can interact with the lung surfactant, as supported by recent experimental data by Bakshi et al.

  13. From protein denaturant to protectant: Comparative molecular dynamics study of alcohol/protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qiang; Fan, Yubo; Yang, Lijiang; Qin Gao, Yi

    2012-03-01

    It is well known that alcohols can have strong effects on protein structures. For example, monohydric methanol and ethanol normally denature, whereas polyhydric glycol and glycerol protect, protein structures. In a recent combined theoretical and NMR experimental study, we showed that molecular dynamics simulations can be effectively used to understand the molecular mechanism of methanol denaturing protein. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations to investigate how alcohols with varied hydrophobicity and different numbers of hydrophilic groups (hydroxyl groups) exert effects on the structure of the model polypeptide, BBA5. First, we showed that methanol and trifluoroethanol (TFE) but not glycol or glycerol disrupt hydrophobic interactions. The latter two alcohols instead protect the assembly of the α- and β-domains of the polypeptide. Second, all four alcohols were shown to generally increase the stability of secondary structures, as revealed by the increased number of backbone hydrogen bonds formed in alcohol/water solutions compared to that in pure water, although individual hydrogen bonds can be weakened by certain alcohols, such as TFE. The two monohydric alcohols, methanol and TFE, display apparently different sequence-dependence in affecting the backbone hydrogen bond stability: methanol tends to enhance the stability of backbone hydrogen bonds of which the carbonyl groups are from polar residues, whereas TFE tends to stabilize those involving non-polar residues. These results demonstrated that subtle differences in the solution environment could have distinct consequences on protein structures.

  14. Prediction of drug-packaging interactions via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, Peter; Brunsteiner, Michael; Khinast, Johannes

    2012-07-15

    The interaction between packaging materials and drug products is an important issue for the pharmaceutical industry, since during manufacturing, processing and storage a drug product is continuously exposed to various packaging materials. The experimental investigation of a great variety of different packaging material-drug product combinations in terms of efficacy and safety can be a costly and time-consuming task. In our work we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in order to evaluate the applicability of such methods to pre-screening of the packaging material-solute compatibility. The solvation free energy and the free energy of adsorption of diverse solute/solvent/solid systems were estimated. The results of our simulations agree with experimental values previously published in the literature, which indicates that the methods in question can be used to semi-quantitatively reproduce the solid-liquid interactions of the investigated systems.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Transportan 10 (Tp10) Interacting with a POPC Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Dunkin, Christina M.; Pokorny, Antje; Almeida, Paulo F.; Lee, Hee-Seung

    2011-01-01

    We performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations to study the nature of interactions between transportan 10 (tp10) and a zwitterionic POPC bilayer. Tp10 is an amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide with a net positive charge of +5 and is known to adopt an α-helical secondary structure on the surface of POPC membranes. The study showed that tp10 preferentially binds to the membrane surface with its hydrophobic side facing the hydrophobic lipid core. Such orientation allows Lys residues, with positively charged long side chains, to stay in the polar environment during the insertion process. The simulations revealed that the Lys–phosphate salt bridge is a key factor in determining the orientation of the peptide in the interfacial region as well as in stabilizing the peptide-membrane interaction. The electrostatic attraction between Lys and phosphate groups is also believed to be the main bottleneck for the translocation of tp10 across the membrane. PMID:21194203

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of individual alpha-helices of bacteriorhodopsin in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. II. Interaction energy analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, T B

    1998-01-01

    The concepts of hydrophobicity and hydrophobic moments have been applied in attempts to predict membrane protein secondary and tertiary structure. The current paper uses molecular dynamics computer calculations of individual bacteriorhodopsin helices in explicit dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers to examine the atomic basis of these approaches. The results suggest that the types of interactions between a particular amino acid and the surrounding bilayer depend on the position and type of the amino acid. In particular, aromatic residues are seen to interact favorably at the interface region. Analysis of the trajectories in terms of hydrophobic moments suggests the presence of a particular face that prefers lipid. The results of these simulations may be used to improve secondary structure prediction methods and to provide further insights into the two-stage model of protein folding. PMID:9449316

  17. Interactions of borneol with DPPC phospholipid membranes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qianqian; Shi, Xinyuan; Ding, Haiou; Dai, Xingxing; Wan, Guang; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2014-11-06

    Borneol, known as a "guide" drug in traditional Chinese medicine, is widely used as a natural penetration enhancer in modern clinical applications. Despite a large number of experimental studies on borneol's penetration enhancing effect, the molecular basis of its action on bio-membranes is still unclear. We carried out a series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the borneol concentration ranging from 3.31% to 54.59% (v/v, lipid-free basis) to study the interactions of borneol with aDPPC(1,2-dipalmitoylsn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) bilayer membrane, and the temperature effects were also considered. At concentrations below 21.89%, borneol's presence only caused DPPC bilayer thinning and an increase in fluidity; A rise in temperature could promote the diffusing progress of borneol. When the concentration was 21.89% or above, inverted micelle-like structures were formed within the bilayer interior, which led to increased bilayer thickness, and an optimum temperature was found for the interaction of borneol with the DPPC bilayer membrane. These findings revealed that the choice of optimal concentration and temperature is critical for a given application in which borneol is used as a penetration enhancer. Our results not only clarify some molecular basis for borneol's penetration enhancing effects, but also provide some guidance for the development and applications of new preparations containing borneol.

  18. Interactions of Borneol with DPPC Phospholipid Membranes: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Qianqian; Shi, Xinyuan; Ding, Haiou; Dai, Xingxing; Wan, Guang; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2014-01-01

    Borneol, known as a “guide” drug in traditional Chinese medicine, is widely used as a natural penetration enhancer in modern clinical applications. Despite a large number of experimental studies on borneol’s penetration enhancing effect, the molecular basis of its action on bio-membranes is still unclear. We carried out a series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the borneol concentration ranging from 3.31% to 54.59% (v/v, lipid-free basis) to study the interactions of borneol with aDPPC(1,2-dipalmitoylsn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) bilayer membrane, and the temperature effects were also considered. At concentrations below 21.89%, borneol’s presence only caused DPPC bilayer thinning and an increase in fluidity; A rise in temperature could promote the diffusing progress of borneol. When the concentration was 21.89% or above, inverted micelle-like structures were formed within the bilayer interior, which led to increased bilayer thickness, and an optimum temperature was found for the interaction of borneol with the DPPC bilayer membrane. These findings revealed that the choice of optimal concentration and temperature is critical for a given application in which borneol is used as a penetration enhancer. Our results not only clarify some molecular basis for borneol’s penetration enhancing effects, but also provide some guidance for the development and applications of new preparations containing borneol. PMID:25383679

  19. Interactions of Lipids and Detergents with a Viral Ion Channel Protein: Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Structural studies of membrane proteins have highlighted the likely influence of membrane mimetic environments (i.e., lipid bilayers versus detergent micelles) on the conformation and dynamics of small α-helical membrane proteins. We have used molecular dynamics simulations to compare the conformational dynamics of BM2 (a small α-helical protein from the membrane of influenza B) in a model phospholipid bilayer environment with its behavior in protein–detergent complexes with either the zwitterionic detergent dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) or the nonionic detergent dodecylmaltoside (DDM). We find that DDM more closely resembles the lipid bilayer in terms of its interaction with the protein, while the short-tailed DHPC molecule forms “nonphysiological” interactions with the protein termini. We find that the intrinsic micelle properties of each detergent are conserved upon formation of the protein–detergent complex. This implies that simulations of detergent micelles may be used to help select optimal conditions for experimental studies of membrane proteins. PMID:25286030

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of amorphous indomethacin-poly(vinylpyrrolidone) glasses: solubility and hydrogen bonding interactions.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tian-Xiang; Anderson, Bradley D

    2013-03-01

    Amorphous drug dispersions are frequently employed to enhance solubility and dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs and thereby increase their oral bioavailability. Because these systems are metastable, phase separation of the amorphous components and subsequent drug crystallization may occur during storage. Computational methods to determine the likelihood of these events would be very valuable, if their reliability could be validated. This study investigates amorphous systems of indomethacin (IMC) in poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and their molecular interactions by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. IMC and PVP molecules were constructed using X-ray diffraction data, and force-field parameters were assigned by analogy with similar groups in Amber-ff03. Five assemblies varying in PVP and IMC composition were equilibrated in their molten states then cooled at a rate of 0.03 K/ps to generate amorphous glasses. Prolonged aging dynamic runs (100 ns) at 298 K and 1 bar were then carried out, from which solubility parameters, the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter, and associated hydrogen bonding properties were obtained. Calculated glass transition temperature (T(g)) values were higher than experimental results because of the faster cooling rates in MD simulations. Molecular mobility as characterized by atomic fluctuations was substantially reduced below the T(g) with IMC-PVP systems exhibiting lower mobilities than that found in amorphous IMC, consistent with the antiplasticizing effect of PVP. The number of IMC-IMC hydrogen bonds (HBs) formed per IMC molecule was substantially lower in IMC-PVP mixtures, particularly the fractions of IMC molecules involved in two or three HBs with other IMC molecules that may be potential precursors for crystal growth. The loss of HBs between IMC molecules in the presence of PVP was largely compensated for by the formation of IMC-PVP HBs. The difference (6.5 MPa(1/2)) between the solubility parameters in amorphous IMC

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of a DMPC Bilayer Using Nonadditive Interaction Models

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joseph E.; Rahaman, Obaidur; Patel, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We present a polarizable force field based on the charge-equilibration formalism for molecular dynamics simulations of phospholipid bilayers. We discuss refinement of headgroup dihedral potential parameters to reproduce ab initio conformational energies of dimethylphosphate calculated at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. We also address the refinement of electrostatic and Lennard-Jones (van der Waals) parameters to reproduce ab initio polarizabilities and water interaction energies of dimethylphosphate and tetramethylammonium. We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of a solvated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer using this polarizable force field as well as the nonpolarizable, fixed-charge CHARMM27 and CHARMM27r force fields for comparison. Calculated atomic and electron-density profiles, deuterium order parameters, and headgroup orientations are found to be consistent with previous simulations and with experiment. Polarizable interaction models for solvent and lipid exhibit greater water penetration into the lipid interior; this is due to the variation of water molecular dipole moment from a bulk value of 2.6 Debye to a value of 1.9 Debye in the membrane interior. The reduction in the electrostatic component of the desolvation free-energy penalty allows for greater water density. The surface dipole potential predicted by the polarizable model is 0.95 V compared to the value of 0.8 V based on nonpolarizable force-field calculations. Effects of inclusion of explicit polarization are discussed in relation to water dipole moment and varying charge distributions. Dielectric permittivity profiles for polarizable and nonpolarizable interactions exhibit subtle differences arising from the nature of the individual component parameterizations; for the polarizable force field, we obtain a bulk dielectric permittivity of 79, whereas the nonpolarizable force field plateaus at 97 (the value for pure TIP3P water). In the membrane interior, both models

  2. Atomic detail peptide-membrane interactions: molecular dynamics simulation of gramicidin S in a DMPC bilayer.

    PubMed Central

    Mihailescu, D; Smith, J C

    2000-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed of the sequence-symmetric cyclic decapeptide antibiotic gramicidin S (GS), in interaction with a hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer, and the results compared with a "control" simulation of the system in the absence of GS. Following experimental evidence, the GS was initially set in a single antiparallel beta-sheet conformation with two Type II' beta-turns in an amphiphilic interaction with the membrane. This conformation and position remained in the 6.5 ns simulation. Main-chain dihedrals are on average approximately 26 degrees from those determined by NMR experiment on GS in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution. Sequence-symmetric main-chain and side-chain dihedral angle pairs converge to within approximately 5 degrees and approximately 10 degrees, respectively. The area per lipid, lipid tail order parameters, and quadrupole spin-lattice relaxation times of the control simulation are mostly in good agreement with corresponding experiments. The GS has little effect on the membrane dipole potential or water permeability. However, it is found to have a disordering effect (in agreement with experiment) and a fluidifying effect on lipids directly interacting with it, and an ordering effect on those not directly interacting. PMID:11023880

  3. Ibalizumab-human CD4 receptor interaction: computational alanine scanning molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhi-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Antibody drugs are used in the treatment of many chronic diseases. Recently, however, patients and doctors have encountered problems with drug resistance, and improving the affinity of antibody drugs has therefore become a pressing issue. Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In this study, we sought to identify the key residues of the complementaritydetermining regions (CDRs) of ibalizumab. Virtual alanine mutations (complementarity-determining regions of ibalizumab) were also studied using solvated interaction energies derived from molecular dynamics and the explicit water model. Using 1,000 nanosecond molecular dynamic simulations, we identified six residues: Tyr50 [HCDR2], Tyr53 [HCDR3], Asp58 [HCDR2], Glu95 [HCDR2], and Arg95 [LCDR3]. The Robetta alanine-scanning mutagenesis method and crystallographic information were used to verify our simulations. Our simulated binding affinity of -17.33 kcal/mol is close to the experimentally determined value of -16.48 kcal/mol. Our findings may be useful for protein engineering the structure of the ibalizumab-human CD4 receptor complex. Moreover, the six residues that we identified may play a significant role in the development of bioactive antibody analogues.

  4. Docking and Molecular Dynamics of Steviol Glycoside-Human Bitter Receptor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Waldo; González-Nilo, Fernando; Agosin, Eduardo

    2016-10-12

    Stevia is one of the sweeteners with the greatest consumer demand because of its natural origin and minimal calorie content. Steviol glycosides (SG) are the main active compounds present in the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana and are responsible for its sweetness. However, recent in vitro studies in HEK 293 cells revealed that SG specifically activate the hT2R4 and hT2R14 bitter taste receptors, triggering this mouth feel. The objective of this study was to characterize the interaction of SG with these two receptors at the molecular level. The results showed that SG have only one site for orthosteric binding to these receptors. The binding free energy (ΔGbinding) between the receptor and SG was negatively correlated with SG bitterness intensity, for both hT2R4 (r = -0.95) and hT2R14 (r = -0.89). We also determined, by steered molecular dynamics simulations, that the force required to extract stevioside from the receptors was greater than that required for rebaudioside A, in accordance with the ΔG values obtained by molecular docking. Finally, we identified the loop responsible for the activation by SG of both receptors. As a whole, these results contribute to a better understanding of the resulting off-flavor perception of these natural sweeteners in foods and beverages, allowing for better prediction, and control, of the resulting bitterness.

  5. Structure and Dynamics of Antifreeze Protein--Model Membrane Interactions: A Combined Spectroscopic and Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Kar, Rajiv K; Mroue, Kamal H; Kumar, Dinesh; Tejo, Bimo A; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-02-11

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are the key biomolecules that enable species to survive under subzero temperature conditions. The physiologically relevant activities of AFPs are based on the adsorption to ice crystals, followed by the inhibition of subsequent crystal layer growth of ice, routed with depression in freezing point in a noncolligative manner. The functional attributes governing the mechanism by which AFPs inhibit freezing of body fluids in bacteria, fungi, plants, and fishes are mainly attributed to their adsorption onto the surface of ice within the physiological system. Importantly, AFPs are also known for their application in cryopreservation of biological samples that might be related to membrane interaction. To date, there is a paucity of information detailing the interaction of AFPs with membrane structures. Here, we focus on elucidating the biophysical properties of the interactions between AFPs and micelle models that mimic the membrane system. Micelle model systems of zwitterionic DPC and negatively charged SDS were utilized in this study, against which a significant interaction is experienced by two AFP molecules, namely, Peptide 1m and wfAFP (the popular AFP sourced from winter flounder). Using low- and high-resolution biophysical characterization techniques, such as circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy, a strong evidence for the interactions of these AFPs with the membrane models is revealed in detail and is corroborated by in-depth residue-specific information derived from molecular dynamics simulation. Altogether, these results not only strengthen the fact that AFPs interact actively with membrane systems, but also demonstrate that membrane-associated AFPs are dynamic and capable of adopting a number of conformations rendering fluidity to the system.

  6. Mapping Cholesterol Interaction Sites on Serotonin Transporter through Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Mariarosaria; Masetti, Matteo; Recanatini, Maurizio; Cavalli, Andrea; Bottegoni, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) modulates serotonergic signaling via re-uptake of serotonin in pre-synaptic cells. The inclusion in cholesterol-enriched membrane domains is crucial for SERT activity, suggesting a cross-talk between the protein and the sterol. Here, we develop a protocol to identify potential cholesterol interaction sites coupling statistical analysis to multi-microsecond coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of SERT in a previously validated raft-like membrane model. Six putative sites were found, including a putative CRAC motif on TM4 and a CARC motif on TM10. Among them, four hot-spots near regions related to ion binding, transport, and inhibition were detected. Our results encourage prospective studies to unravel mechanistic features of the transporter and related drug discovery implications. PMID:27907003

  7. Compressive characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube with water interactions investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C. H.; Vijayaraghavan, V.

    2014-01-01

    The elastic properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with surrounding water interactions are studied using molecular dynamics simulation technique. The compressive loading characteristic of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a fluidic medium such as water is critical for its role in determining the lifetime and stability of CNT based nano-fluidic devices. In this paper, we conducted a comprehensive analysis on the effect of geometry, chirality and density of encapsulated water on the elastic properties of SWCNT. Our studies show that defect density and distribution can strongly impact the compressive resistance of SWCNTs in water. Further studies were conducted on capped SWCNTs with varying densities of encapsulated water, which is necessary to understand the strength of CNT as a potential drug carrier. The results obtained from this paper will help determining the potential applications of CNTs in the field of nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) such as nano-biological and nano-fluidic devices.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Suggests Possible Interaction Patterns at Early Steps of β2-Microglobulin Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Viglino, Paolo; Zuccato, Pierfrancesco; Pieri, Lidia; Faccioli, Pietro; Bellotti, Vittorio; Esposito, Gennaro

    2007-01-01

    Early events in aggregation of proteins are not easily accessible by experiments. In this work, we perform a 5-ns molecular dynamics simulation of an ensemble of 27 copies of β2-microglobulin in explicit solvent. During the simulation, the formation of intermolecular contacts is observed. The simulation highlights the importance of apical residues and, in particular, of those at the N-terminus end of the molecule. The most frequently found pattern of interaction involves a head-to-head contact arrangement of molecules. Hydrophobic contacts appear to be important for the establishment of long-lived (on the simulation timescale) contacts. Although early events on the pathway to aggregation and fibril formation are not directly related to the end-state of the process, which is reached on a much longer timescale, simulation results are consistent with experimental data and in general with a parallel arrangement of intermolecular β-strand pairs. PMID:17158575

  9. Mesoscale Thermodynamic Analysis of Atomic-Scale Dislocation-Obstacle Interactions Simulated by Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Monet, Giath; Bacon, David J; Osetskiy, Yury N

    2010-01-01

    Given the time and length scales in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of dislocation-defect interactions, quantitative MD results cannot be used directly in larger scale simulations or compared directly with experiment. A method to extract fundamental quantities from MD simulations is proposed here. The first quantity is a critical stress defined to characterise the obstacle resistance. This mesoscopic parameter, rather than the obstacle 'strength' designed for a point obstacle, is to be used for an obstacle of finite size. At finite temperature, our analyses of MD simulations allow the activation energy to be determined as a function of temperature. The results confirm the proportionality between activation energy and temperature that is frequently observed by experiment. By coupling the data for the activation energy and the critical stress as functions of temperature, we show how the activation energy can be deduced at a given value of the critical stress.

  10. Protein-Protein Interaction Investigated by Steered Molecular Dynamics: The TCR-pMHC Complex

    PubMed Central

    Cuendet, Michel A.; Michielin, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel steered molecular dynamics scheme to induce the dissociation of large protein-protein complexes. We apply this scheme to study the interaction of a T cell receptor (TCR) with a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presenting a peptide (p). Two TCR-pMHC complexes are considered, which only differ by the mutation of a single amino acid on the peptide; one is a strong agonist that produces T cell activation in vivo, while the other is an antagonist. We investigate the interaction mechanism from a large number of unbinding trajectories by analyzing van der Waals and electrostatic interactions and by computing energy changes in proteins and solvent. In addition, dissociation potentials of mean force are calculated with the Jarzynski identity, using an averaging method developed for our steering scheme. We analyze the convergence of the Jarzynski exponential average, which is hampered by the large amount of dissipative work involved and the complexity of the system. The resulting dissociation free energies largely underestimate experimental values, but the simulations are able to clearly differentiate between wild-type and mutated TCR-pMHC and give insights into the dissociation mechanism. PMID:18621828

  11. Characterization of Monobody Scaffold Interactions with Ligand via Force Spectroscopy and Steered Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Luthur Siu-Lun; Shea, Daniel J.; Nicholes, Nathan; Date, Amol; Ostermeier, Marc; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-02-01

    Monobodies are antibody alternatives derived from fibronectin that are thermodynamically stable, small in size, and can be produced in bacterial systems. Monobodies have been engineered to bind a wide variety of target proteins with high affinity and specificity. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis simulations, we identified two scaffold residues that are critical to the binding interaction between the monobody YS1 and its ligand, maltose-binding protein (MBP). Steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations predicted that the E47A and R33A mutations in the YS1 scaffold substantially destabilize the YS1-MBP interface by reducing the bond rupture force and the lifetime of single hydrogen bonds. SMD simulations further indicated that the R33A mutation weakens the hydrogen binding between all scaffold residues and MBP and not just between R33 and MBP. We validated the simulation data and characterized the effects of mutations on YS1-MBP binding by using single-molecule force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. We propose that interfacial stability resulting from R33 of YS1 stacking with R344 of MBP synergistically stabilizes both its own bond and the interacting scaffold residues of YS1. Our integrated approach improves our understanding of the monobody scaffold interactions with a target, thus providing guidance for the improved engineering of monobodies.

  12. Loop–loop interaction in an adenine-sensing riboswitch: A molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Allnér, Olof; Nilsson, Lennart; Villa, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches are mRNA-based molecules capable of controlling the expression of genes. They undergo conformational changes upon ligand binding, and as a result, they inhibit or promote the expression of the associated gene. The close connection between structural rearrangement and function makes a detailed knowledge of the molecular interactions an important step to understand the riboswitch mechanism and efficiency. We have performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the adenine-sensing add A-riboswitch to study the breaking of the kissing loop, one key tertiary element in the aptamer structure. We investigated the aptamer domain of the add A-riboswitch in complex with its cognate ligand and in the absence of the ligand. The opening of the hairpins was simulated using umbrella sampling using the distance between two loops as the reaction coordinate. A two-step process was observed in all the simulated systems. First, a general loss of stacking and hydrogen bond interactions is seen. The last interactions that break are the two base pairs G37-C61 and G38-C60, but the break does not affect the energy profile, indicating their pivotal role in the tertiary structure formation but not in the structure stabilization. The junction area is partially organized before the kissing loop formation and residue A24 anchors together the loop helices. Moreover, when the distance between the loops is increased, one of the hairpins showed more flexibility by changing its orientation in the structure, while the other conserved its coaxial arrangement with the rest of the structure. PMID:23716711

  13. Insights into molecular interactions between CaM and its inhibitors from molecular dynamics simulations and experimental data.

    PubMed

    González-Andrade, Martin; Rodríguez-Sotres, Rogelio; Madariaga-Mazón, Abraham; Rivera-Chávez, José; Mata, Rachel; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro; Del Pozo-Yauner, Luis; Arias-Olguín, Imilla I

    2016-01-01

    In order to contribute to the structural basis for rational design of calmodulin (CaM) inhibitors, we analyzed the interaction of CaM with 14 classic antagonists and two compounds that do not affect CaM, using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and the data were compared to available experimental data. The Ca(2+)-CaM-Ligands complexes were simulated 20 ns, with CaM starting in the "open" and "closed" conformations. The analysis of the MD simulations provided insight into the conformational changes undergone by CaM during its interaction with these ligands. These simulations were used to predict the binding free energies (ΔG) from contributions ΔH and ΔS, giving useful information about CaM ligand binding thermodynamics. The ΔG predicted for the CaM's inhibitors correlated well with available experimental data as the r(2) obtained was 0.76 and 0.82 for the group of xanthones. Additionally, valuable information is presented here: I) CaM has two preferred ligand binding sites in the open conformation known as site 1 and 4, II) CaM can bind ligands of diverse structural nature, III) the flexibility of CaM is reduced by the union of its ligands, leading to a reduction in the Ca(2+)-CaM entropy, IV) enthalpy dominates the molecular recognition process in the system Ca(2+)-CaM-Ligand, and V) the ligands making more extensive contact with the protein have higher affinity for Ca(2+)-CaM. Despite their limitations, docking and MD simulations in combination with experimental data continue to be excellent tools for research in pharmacology, toward a rational design of new drugs.

  14. [Molecular interactions in dilute supercritical mixtures: Molecular dynamics investigation]. Final technical report, December 1, 1990--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Debenedetti, P.G.

    1993-12-31

    Research was done in the following areas: computational and theoretical studies of molecular interactions in supercritical mixtures; supercooled liquids, network fluids, and glasses; and fast algorithms for simulating large systems on a vector processor.

  15. Exploration micromechanism of VP35 IID interaction and recognition dsRNA: A molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Jun; Ding, Jing-Na; Zhong, Hui; Han, Ju-Guang

    2017-02-16

    Multifunctional viral protein (VP35) encoded by the highly pathogenic Ebola viruses (EBOVs) can antagonize host double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) sensors and immune response because of the simultaneous recognition of dsRNA backbone and blunt ends. Mutation of select hydrophobic conserved basic residues within the VP35 inhibitory domain (IID) abrogates its dsRNA-binding activity, and impairs VP35-mediated interferon (IFN) antagonism. Herein the detailed binding mechanism between dsRNA and WT, single mutant, and double mutant were investigated by all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and binding energy calculation. R312A/R322A double mutations results in a completely different binding site and orientation upon the structure analyses. The calculated binding free energy results reveal that R312A, R322A, and K339A single mutations decrease the binding free energies by 17.82, 13.18, and 13.68 kcal/mol, respectively. The binding energy decomposition indicates that the strong binding affinity of the key residues are mainly due to the contributions of electrostatic interactions in the gas phase, where come from the positively charged side chain and the negatively charged dsRNA backbone. R312A, R322A, and K339A single mutations have no significant effect on VP35 IID conformation, but the mutations influence the contributions of electrostatic interactions in the gas phase. The calculated results reveal that end-cap residues which mainly contribute VDW interactions can recognize and capture dsRNA blunt ends, and the central basic residues (R312, R322, and K339) which mainly contribute favorable electrostatic interactions with dsRNA backbone can fix dsRNA binding site and orientation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Interaction of counterions with subtilisin in acetonitrile: insights from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lousa, Diana; Cianci, Michele; Helliwell, John R; Halling, Peter J; Baptista, António M; Soares, Cláudio M

    2012-05-24

    A recent X-ray structure has enabled the location of chloride and cesium ions on the surface of subtilisin Carlsberg in acetonitrile soaked crystals. (1) To complement the previous study and analyze the system in solution, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, in acetonitrile, were performed using this structure. Additionally, Cl(-) and Cs(+) ions were docked on the protein surface and this system was also simulated. Our results indicate that chloride ions tend to stay close to the protein, whereas cesium ions frequently migrate to the solvent. The distribution of the ions around the enzyme surface is not strongly biased by their initial locations. Replacing cesium by sodium ions showed that the distribution of the two cations is similar, indicating that Cs(+) can be used to find the binding sites of cations like Na(+) and K(+), which, unlike Cs(+), have physiological and biotechnological roles. The Na(+)Cl(-) is more stable than the Cs(+)Cl(-) ion pair, decreasing the probability of interaction between Cl(-) and subtilisin. The comparison of water and acetonitrile simulations indicates that the solvent influences the distribution of the ions. This work provides an extensive theoretical analysis of the interaction between ions and the model enzyme subtilisin in a nonaqueous medium.

  17. The interaction between electrolyte and surfaces decorated with charged groups: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Calero, Carles; Faraudo, Jordi

    2010-01-14

    In this paper, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of an interface containing charged functional groups of different valences in contact with 2:1 ionic solution. We take into account both the finite sizes of the ions in solution and the functional groups but we neglect the structural details of the solvent (primitive model). We show that the distribution of ions and the electrostatic properties of the system depend strongly on the valence of the interfacial charged groups. In the case of surfaces containing well-separated charged interfacial groups, we observe counterion binding at these groups induced by electrostatic interactions. A detailed analysis of the potential of mean force between interfacial charged groups and ions reveals significant features not anticipated by present theories of electrolytes near interfaces. Overall, our results show that, in primitive models of the ion-interface interaction, not only the ionic size and valence are important but the size and valence of the interfacial charged groups also have a significant impact.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations on the interaction between polymers and hydroxyapatite with and without coupling agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-ping; Lu, Xiong; Leng, Yang; Fang, Liming; Qu, Shuxin; Feng, Bo; Weng, Jie; Wang, Jianxin

    2009-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to study hydroxyapatite/biopolymer interface interactions in composites for biomedical applications. The study analyzed the binding energies between hydroxyapatite (HA) and three polymers: polyethylene (PE), polyamide (PA) and polylactic acid (PLA). The interactions of polymers on HA crystallographic planes (001), (100) and (110) were simulated. The effects of the silane coupling agent (A174) on interfacial binding energies were also examined. The results show that HA (110) has the highest binding energy with these polymers because of its higher planar atom density than that of HA (001) and (100). The binding energies of PA/HA and PLA/HA are much higher than that of PE/HA, which might be attributed to large number of polar groups in PA and PLA chains. The silane coupling agent A174 increases the binding energy between PE and HA, but not for the PA/HA and PLA/HA systems. The MD results can be used to guide the design of polymer/HA composites and to select proper coupling agents.

  19. Targeting electrostatic interactions in accelerated molecular dynamics with application to protein partial unfolding.

    PubMed

    Flores-Canales, Jose C; Kurnikova, Maria

    2015-06-09

    Accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) is a promising sampling method to generate an ensemble of conformations and to explore the free energy landscape of proteins in explicit solvent. Its success resides in its ability to reduce barriers in the dihedral and the total potential energy space. However, aMD simulations of large proteins can generate large fluctuations of the dihedral and total potential energy with little conformational changes in the protein structure. To facilitate wider conformational sampling of large proteins in explicit solvent, we developed a direct intrasolute electrostatic interactions accelerated MD (DISEI-aMD) approach. This method aims to reduce energy barriers within rapidly changing electrostatic interactions between solute atoms at short-range distances. It also results in improved reconstruction quality of the original statistical ensemble of the system. Recently, we characterized a pH-dependent partial unfolding of diphtheria toxin translocation domain (T-domain) using microsecond long MD simulations. In this work, we focus on the study of conformational changes of a low-pH T-domain model in explicit solvent using DISEI-aMD. On the basis of the simulations of the low-pH T-domain model, we show that the proposed sampling method accelerates conformational rearrangement significantly faster than multiple standard aMD simulations and microsecond long conventional MD simulations.

  20. Molecular dynamics modeling the synthetic and biological polymers interactions pre-studied via docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Vladimir B.; Serbin, Alexander V.

    2014-06-01

    In previous works we reported the design, synthesis and in vitro evaluations of synthetic anionic polymers modified by alicyclic pendant groups (hydrophobic anchors), as a novel class of inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 ( HIV-1) entry into human cells. Recently, these synthetic polymers interactions with key mediator of HIV-1 entry-fusion, the tri-helix core of the first heptad repeat regions [ HR1]3 of viral envelope protein gp41, were pre-studied via docking in terms of newly formulated algorithm for stepwise approximation from fragments of polymeric backbone and side-group models toward real polymeric chains. In the present article the docking results were verified under molecular dynamics ( MD) modeling. In contrast with limited capabilities of the docking, the MD allowed of using much more large models of the polymeric ligands, considering flexibility of both ligand and target simultaneously. Among the synthesized polymers the dinorbornen anchors containing alternating copolymers of maleic acid were selected as the most representative ligands (possessing the top anti-HIV activity in vitro in correlation with the highest binding energy in the docking). To verify the probability of binding of the polymers with the [HR1]3 in the sites defined via docking, various starting positions of polymer chains were tried. The MD simulations confirmed the main docking-predicted priority for binding sites, and possibilities for axial and belting modes of the ligands-target interactions. Some newly MD-discovered aspects of the ligand's backbone and anchor units dynamic cooperation in binding the viral target clarify mechanisms of the synthetic polymers anti-HIV activity and drug resistance prevention.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Study of Interaction between Acrylamide Copolymers and Alumina Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng-he; Wang, Feng-yun; Gong, Xue-dong

    2012-10-01

    Four acrylamide polymer flocculants, anionic polyacrylamide P(AA-co-AM), cationic polyacrylamide P(DMB-co-AM), nonionic polyacrylamide P(AM), and hydrophobical polyacrylamide P(OA-co-AM) have been prepared by copolymerizing with acrylic acid, cationic monomer dimethylethyl (acryloxyethyl) ammonium bromide (DMB) and hydrophobical monomer octadecyl acrylate with acrylamide. The interactions between the flocculants with the (012) surface of alumina crystal (Al2O3) have been simulated by molecular dynamics method. All the polymers can bind tightly with Al2O3 crystal, the interaction between the O of polymers and Al of the (012) surface of Al2O3 is significantly strong. The order of binding energy is as follows: P(DMB-co-AM)>P(OA-co-AM)>P(AA-co-AM)>P(AM), implying a better flocculation performance of P(DMB-co-AM) than the others. Analysis indicates that binding energy is mainly determined by Coulomb interaction. Bonds are found between the O atoms of the polymers and the Al atoms of Al2O3. The polymers' structures deform when they combine with Al2O3 crystal, but the deformation energies are low and far less than non-bonding energies. Flocculation experiments in suspension medium of 1%Kaolin show a transmittancy of 90.8% for 6 mg/L P(DMB-co-AM) and 73.0% for P(AM). The sequence of flocculation performance of four polymers is P(DMB-co-AM)>P(OA-co-AM)>P(AA-co-AM)>P(AM), which is in excellent agreement with the simulation results of binding energy.

  2. The Importance of Three-Body Interactions in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water with the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method

    SciTech Connect

    Pruitt, Spencer R.; Nakata, Hiroya; Nagata, Takeshi; Mayes, Maricris; Alexeev, Yuri; Fletcher, Graham D.; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Gordon, M

    2016-04-12

    The analytic first derivative with respect to nuclear coordinates is formulated and implemented in the framework of the three-body fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. The gradient has been derived and implemented for restricted Hartree-Fock, second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation, and density functional theories. The importance of the three-body fully analytic gradient is illustrated through the failure of the two-body FMO method during molecular dynamics simulations of a small water cluster. The parallel implementation of the fragment molecular orbital method, its parallel efficiency, and its scalability on the Blue Gene/Q architecture up to 262,144 CPU cores, are also discussed.

  3. Interactions of fatty acids with phosphatidylethanolamine membranes: X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics studies

    PubMed Central

    Cordomí, Arnau; Prades, Jesús; Frau, Juan; Vögler, Oliver; Funari, Sérgio S.; Perez, Juan J.; Escribá, Pablo V.; Barceló, Francisca

    2010-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study on 1,2-dielaidoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DEPE) membranes containing fatty acids (FAs) was performed by means of X-ray diffraction analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The study was aimed at understanding the interactions of several structurally related FAs with biomembranes, which is necessary for further rational lipid drug design in membrane-lipid therapy. The main effect of FAs was to promote the formation of a HII phase, despite a stabilization of the coexisting Lα + HII phases. Derivatives of OA exhibited a specific density profile in the direction perpendicular to the bilayer that reflects differences in the relative localization of the carboxylate group within the polar region of the membrane as well as in the degree of membrane penetration of the FA acyl chain. Hydroxyl and methyl substituents at carbon-2 in the FA acyl chain were identified as effective modulators of the position of carboxylate group in the lipid bilayer. Our data highlight the specific potential of each FA in modulating the membrane structure properties. PMID:19965616

  4. Molecular dynamics investigation of the interaction of dislocations with carbides in BCC Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granberg, F.; Terentyev, D.; Nordlund, K.

    2015-06-01

    Different types of carbides are present in many steels used as structural materials. To safely use steel in demanding environments, like nuclear power plants, it is important to know how defects will affect the mechanical properties of the material. In this study, the effect of carbide precipitates on the edge dislocation movement is investigated. Three different types of carbides were investigated by means of molecular dynamics, with a Tersoff-like bond order interatomic potential by Henriksson et al. The obstacles were 4 nm in diameter and were of Fe3C- (cementite-), Fe23C6- and Cr23C6-type. The critical unpinning stress was calculated for each type at different temperatures, to get the temperature-dependent obstacle strength. The results showed a decreasing critical stress with increasing temperature, consistent with previous studies. The critical unpinning stress was seen to be dependent on the type of carbide, but the differences were small. A difference was also observed between the obstacles with the same structure, but with different composition. This study shows the relation between the existing Cr23C6 carbide and the experimentally non-existing Fe23C6 carbide, which needs to be used as a model system for investigations with interatomic potentials not able to describe the interaction of Cr in the Fe-C-system. We found the difference to be a between 7% and 10% higher critical unpinning stress for the chromium carbide, than for the iron carbide of the same type.

  5. Interaction of Curcumin with PEO-PPO-PEO block copolymers: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Susruta; Roccatano, Danilo

    2013-03-21

    Curcumin, a naturally occurring drug molecule, has been extensively investigated for its various potential usages in medicine. Its water insolubility and high metabolism rate require the use of drug delivery systems to make it effective in the human body. Among various types of nanocarriers, block copolymer based ones are the most effective. These polymers are broadly used as drug-delivery systems, but the nature of this process is poorly understood. In this paper, we propose a molecular dynamics simulation study of the interaction of Curcumin with block copolymer based on polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polypropylene oxide (PPO). The study has been conducted considering the smallest PEO and PPO oligomers and multiple chains of the block copolymer Pluronic P85. Our study shows that the more hydrophobic 1,2-dimethoxypropane (DMP) molecules and PPO block preferentially coat the Curcumin molecule. In the case of the Pluronic P85, simulation shows formation of a drug-polymer aggregate within 50 ns. This process leaves exposed the PEO part of the polymers, resulting in better solvation and stability of the drug in water.

  6. Interactions of sarin with polyelectrolyte membranes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Gor, Gennady Yu; Neimark, Alexander V

    2013-01-10

    Nanostructured polyelectrolyte membranes (PEMs), which are widely used as permselective diffusion barriers in fuel cell technologies and electrochemical processing, are considered as protective membranes suitable for blocking warfare toxins, including water-soluble nerve agents such as sarin. In this article, we examine the mechanisms of sorption and diffusion of sarin in hydrated PEMs by means of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Three PEMs are considered: Nafion, sulfonated polystyrene (sPS) that forms the hydrophilic subphase of segregated sPS-polyolefin block copolymers, and random sPS-polyethylene copolymer. We found that sarin concentrates at the interface between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic subphases of hydrated Nafion acting as a surfactant. In hydrated sPS, where the scale of water-polymer segregation is much smaller (1-2 nm), sarin also interacts favorably with hydrophobic and hydrophilic components. Water diffusion slows as the sarin content increases despite the overall increase in solvent content, which suggests that sarin and water have somewhat different pathways through the segregated membrane. Upon replacement of counterions of monovalent potassium with those of divalent calcium, sarin diffusion slows but remains substantial in all ionomers considered, especially at high sarin concentrations. The behavior of sarin is similar to that of its common simulant, dimethyl methylphosphonate.

  7. A molecular dynamics study of depolarized interaction induced light scattering in room temperature argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teboul, Victor

    Precise experimental measurements by Barocchi, F., Carraresi, L., and Celli, M., 1992, Phys. Rev. A, 46 , R3598 of the interaction induced scattering line shape in argon gas over a wide density range prompted a molecular dynamics study of the line shape density behaviour. Different polarizability models and intermolecular potentials are tested in the simulations. As the density increases, the spectral shape seems to become less dependent on the polarizability model but the absolute intensity value becomes more dependent on it. The scattering intensity is found to depend strongly on the polarizability model used in the simulation and slightly on the intermolecular potential. The SCF polarizability approach by Dacre, P. D., 1982, Molec. Phys., 45 , 1 and the polarizability model of Joslin, C. G., Goddard, J. D., and Goldman, S., 1996, Molec. Phys. , 89 , 791, which includes correlation effects, are found to reproduce the spectra well at every density. The two- and many-body intensity ratios are shown not to decrease systematically with the frequency shift increase, as was supposed previously. Instead, a frequency shift range is found where the global density effect on the spectral intensity on binary units is weak. The dipole-induced dipole model also is found not to reproduce the low frequency shift spectrum in absolute units when the density is sufficiently high.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Interactions Between Tungsten Dust and Beryllium Plasma-Facing Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Guojian; Li, Xiaochun; Xu, Qian; Yang, Zhongshi; Luo, Guangnan

    2015-12-01

    In the present research, molecular dynamics simulation is applied to study the interactions between tungsten dusts and a beryllium plasma-facing material surface. Calculation results show that it is quite difficult for nanometer-size dust particles to damage the plasma-facing material surface, which is different from the micrometer-size ones. The reason may be the size difference between dust and crystal grains. The depth of dust penetration into plasma-facing materials is closely related to the incident velocity, and the impacting angle also plays an important role. Dust and material surface damage is also investigated. Results show that both incident velocity and angle can significantly influence the damage. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB105001, 2013GB105002, and 2015GB109001), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11205198, 11305213 and 11405201), as well as Technological Development Grant of Hefei Science Center of CAS (No. 2014TDG-HSC003)

  9. Electrostatic unfolding and interactions of albumin driven by pH changes: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Baler, K; Martin, O A; Carignano, M A; Ameer, G A; Vila, J A; Szleifer, I

    2014-01-30

    A better understanding of protein aggregation is bound to translate into critical advances in several areas, including the treatment of misfolded protein disorders and the development of self-assembling biomaterials for novel commercial applications. Because of its ubiquity and clinical potential, albumin is one of the best-characterized models in protein aggregation research; but its properties in different conditions are not completely understood. Here, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of albumin to understand how electrostatics can affect the conformation of a single albumin molecule just prior to self-assembly. We then analyzed the tertiary structure and solvent accessible surface area of albumin after electrostatically triggered partial denaturation. The data obtained from these single protein simulations allowed us to investigate the effect of electrostatic interactions between two proteins. The results of these simulations suggested that hydrophobic attractions and counterion binding may be strong enough to effectively overcome the electrostatic repulsions between the highly charged monomers. This work contributes to our general understanding of protein aggregation mechanisms, the importance of explicit consideration of free ions in protein solutions, provides critical new insights about the equilibrium conformation of albumin in its partially denatured state at low pH, and may spur significant progress in our efforts to develop biocompatible protein hydrogels driven by electrostatic partial denaturation.

  10. Visualization for Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Gas and Metal Surface Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzyrkov, D.; Polyakov, S.; Podryga, V.

    2016-02-01

    The development of methods, algorithms and applications for visualization of molecular dynamics simulation outputs is discussed. The visual analysis of the results of such calculations is a complex and actual problem especially in case of the large scale simulations. To solve this challenging task it is necessary to decide on: 1) what data parameters to render, 2) what type of visualization to choose, 3) what development tools to use. In the present work an attempt to answer these questions was made. For visualization it was offered to draw particles in the corresponding 3D coordinates and also their velocity vectors, trajectories and volume density in the form of isosurfaces or fog. We tested the way of post-processing and visualization based on the Python language with use of additional libraries. Also parallel software was developed that allows processing large volumes of data in the 3D regions of the examined system. This software gives the opportunity to achieve desired results that are obtained in parallel with the calculations, and at the end to collect discrete received frames into a video file. The software package "Enthought Mayavi2" was used as the tool for visualization. This visualization application gave us the opportunity to study the interaction of a gas with a metal surface and to closely observe the adsorption effect.

  11. Molecular dynamics investigation of nanoscale substrate topography and its interaction with liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordeiro Rodrigues, Jhonatam

    Nanotechnology has been presenting successful applications in several areas. However, experimentation with nanoscale materials is costly and limited in analysis capability. This research investigates the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to model and study nanomaterials and manufacturing processes. MD simulations are employed to reduce cost, optimize design, increase productivity and allow for the investigation of material interactions not yet observable through experimentation. This work investigates the interaction of water with substrates at the nanoscale. The effect of temperature, droplet impingement velocities and size, as well as substrate material, are investigated at the nanoscale. Several substrate topography designs were modeled to reveal their influence on the wettability of the substrate. Nanoscale gold and silicon substrates are more hydrophilic at higher temperatures than at room temperature. The reduction in droplet diameter increases its wettability. High impingement velocity of droplets does not influence final wettability of substrates but induces higher diffusion rates of droplets in a heated environment. Droplets deposited over a gradient of surface exposure presents spontaneous movement. The Leidenfrost effect was investigated at the nanoscale. Droplets of 4 and 10nm in diameter presented behaviors pertinent to the Leidenfrost effect at 373K, significantly lower than at micro scale and of potential impact to the field. Topographical features were manipulated using superhydrophobic coating resulting in micro whiskers. Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) was used to manufacture substrate topographies at the nanoscale. Water droplets were deposited on the substrates and their wettability was measured using droplet contact angles. Lower surface area exposure resulted in higher contact angles. The experimental relationships between surface topography and substrate wettability were used to validate the insights gained from MD simulations for

  12. Comparison between Free and Immobilized Ion Effects on Hydrophobic Interactions: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Gast, Sebastian; Ma, C Derek; Abbott, Nicholas L; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2015-10-15

    Fundamental studies of the effect of specific ions on hydrophobic interactions are driven by the need to understand phenomena such as hydrophobically driven self-assembly or protein folding. Using β-peptide-inspired nanorods, we investigate the effects of both free ions (dissolved salts) and proximally immobilized ions on hydrophobic interactions. We find that the free ion effect is correlated with the water density fluctuation near a nonpolar molecular surface, showing that such fluctuation can be an indicator of hydrophobic interactions in the case of solution additives. In the case of immobilized ion, our results demonstrate that hydrophobic interactions can be switched on and off by choosing different spatial arrangements of proximal ions on a nanorod. For globally amphiphilic nanorods, we find that the magnitude of the interaction can be further tuned using proximal ions with varying ionic sizes. In general, univalent proximal anions are found to weaken hydrophobic interactions. This is in contrast to the effect of free ions, which according to our simulations strengthen hydrophobic interactions. In addition, immobilized anions of increasing ionic size do not follow the same ordering (Hofmeister-like ranking) as free ions when it comes to their impact on hydrophobic interactions. The immobilized ion effect is not simply correlated with the water density fluctuation near the nonpolar side of the amphiphilic nanorod. We propose a molecular picture that explains the contrasting effects of immobilized versus free ions.

  13. Conformations, dynamics and interactions of di-, tri- and pentamannoside with mannose binding lectin: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Parichita; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2012-02-15

    The binding of serum mannose-binding protein A (MBP-A) to high mannose N-linked glycoproteins, present on the surface of microorganism, activates the complement system. It is very important to explore the overall conformations of these ligands in the binding site of the MBP-A, which is very much dependent on the conformation of the manno-di-, tri- and the penta-saccharides that represent the component structures of these high-mannose type oligosaccharides. Herein, we report the possible conformations of α-(1→6)-linked dimannoside, benzyl-substituted trimannoside and core pentamannoside of the N-linked glycan in the binding site of MBP-A, with the help of molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that for all three ligands in addition to the non-reducing terminal mannose moiety the reducing moieties also interact with protein. Binding free energy calculations also indicate that the benzyl-substituted trisaccharide has higher affinity in comparison to the methyl substituted one. We have also found some conformers of the pentasaccharide, which have higher binding affinity than the monosaccharide.

  14. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of depletion-induced interactions for soft matter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shendruk, Tyler N.; Bertrand, Martin; Harden, James L.; Slater, Gary W.; de Haan, Hendrick W.

    2014-12-01

    Given the ubiquity of depletion effects in biological and other soft matter systems, it is desirable to have coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation approaches appropriate for the study of complex systems. This paper examines the use of two common truncated Lennard-Jones (Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA)) potentials to describe a pair of colloidal particles in a thermal bath of depletants. The shifted-WCA model is the steeper of the two repulsive potentials considered, while the combinatorial-WCA model is the softer. It is found that the depletion-induced well depth for the combinatorial-WCA model is significantly deeper than the shifted-WCA model because the resulting overlap of the colloids yields extra accessible volume for depletants. For both shifted- and combinatorial-WCA simulations, the second virial coefficients and pair potentials between colloids are demonstrated to be well approximated by the Morphometric Thermodynamics (MT) model. This agreement suggests that the presence of depletants can be accurately modelled in MD simulations by implicitly including them through simple, analytical MT forms for depletion-induced interactions. Although both WCA potentials are found to be effective generic coarse-grained simulation approaches for studying depletion effects in complicated soft matter systems, combinatorial-WCA is the more efficient approach as depletion effects are enhanced at lower depletant densities. The findings indicate that for soft matter systems that are better modelled by potentials with some compressibility, predictions from hard-sphere systems could greatly underestimate the magnitude of depletion effects at a given depletant density.

  15. Interactions of anesthetics with the water-hexane interface. A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipot, C.; Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1997-01-01

    The free energy profiles characterizing the transfer of nine solutes across the liquid-vapor interfaces of water and hexane and across the water-hexane interface were calculated from molecular dynamics simulations. Among the solutes were n-butane and three of its halogenated derivatives, as well as three halogenated cyclobutanes. The two remaining molecules, dichlorodifluoromethane and 1,2-dichloroperfluoroethane, belong to series of halo-substituted methanes and ethanes, described in previous studies (J. Chem. Phys. 1996, 104, 3760; Chem. Phys. 1996, 204, 337). Each series of molecules contains structurally similar compounds that differ greatly in anesthetic potency. The accuracy of the simulations was tested by comparing the calculated and the experimental free energies of solvation of all nine compounds in water and in hexane. In addition. the calculated and the measured surface excess concentrations of n-butane at the water liquid-vapor interface were compared. In all cases, good agreement with experimental results was found. At the water-hexane interface, the free energy profiles for polar molecules exhibited significant interfacial minima, whereas the profiles for nonpolar molecules did not. The existence of these minima was interpreted in terms of a balance between the free energy contribution arising from solute-solvent interactions and the work to form a cavity that accommodates the solute. These two contributions change monotonically, but oppositely, across the interface. The interfacial solubilities of the solutes, obtained from the free energy profiles, correlate very well with their anesthetic potencies. This is the case even when the Meyer-Overton hypothesis, which predicts a correlation between anesthetic potency and solubility in oil, fails.

  16. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of depletion-induced interactions for soft matter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shendruk, Tyler N.; Bertrand, Martin; Harden, James L.; Slater, Gary W.; Haan, Hendrick W. de

    2014-12-28

    Given the ubiquity of depletion effects in biological and other soft matter systems, it is desirable to have coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation approaches appropriate for the study of complex systems. This paper examines the use of two common truncated Lennard-Jones (Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA)) potentials to describe a pair of colloidal particles in a thermal bath of depletants. The shifted-WCA model is the steeper of the two repulsive potentials considered, while the combinatorial-WCA model is the softer. It is found that the depletion-induced well depth for the combinatorial-WCA model is significantly deeper than the shifted-WCA model because the resulting overlap of the colloids yields extra accessible volume for depletants. For both shifted- and combinatorial-WCA simulations, the second virial coefficients and pair potentials between colloids are demonstrated to be well approximated by the Morphometric Thermodynamics (MT) model. This agreement suggests that the presence of depletants can be accurately modelled in MD simulations by implicitly including them through simple, analytical MT forms for depletion-induced interactions. Although both WCA potentials are found to be effective generic coarse-grained simulation approaches for studying depletion effects in complicated soft matter systems, combinatorial-WCA is the more efficient approach as depletion effects are enhanced at lower depletant densities. The findings indicate that for soft matter systems that are better modelled by potentials with some compressibility, predictions from hard-sphere systems could greatly underestimate the magnitude of depletion effects at a given depletant density.

  17. Interaction of monovalent ions with the water liquid-vapor interface - A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    Results of molecular dynamics calculations are presented for a series of ions at infinite dilution near the water liquid-vapor interface. The free energies of ion transfer from the bulk to the interface are discussed, as are the accompanying changes of water structure at the surface and ion mobilities as a function of their proximity to the interface. It is shown that simple dielectric models do not provide an accurate description of ions at the water surface. The results of the study should be useful in the development of better models incorporating the shape and molecular structure of the interface.

  18. Importance of Three-Body Interactions in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Demonstrated with the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Spencer R; Nakata, Hiroya; Nagata, Takeshi; Mayes, Maricris; Alexeev, Yuri; Fletcher, Graham; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Gordon, Mark S

    2016-04-12

    The analytic first derivative with respect to nuclear coordinates is formulated and implemented in the framework of the three-body fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. The gradient has been derived and implemented for restricted second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, as well as for both restricted and unrestricted Hartree-Fock and density functional theory. The importance of the three-body fully analytic gradient is illustrated through the failure of the two-body FMO method during molecular dynamics simulations of a small water cluster. The parallel implementation of the fragment molecular orbital method, its parallel efficiency, and its scalability on the Blue Gene/Q architecture up to 262,144 CPU cores are also discussed.

  19. Dynamics and recognition within a protein–DNA complex: a molecular dynamics study of the SKN-1/DNA interaction

    PubMed Central

    Etheve, Loïc; Martin, Juliette; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the Caenorhabditis elegans transcription factor SKN-1 bound to its cognate DNA site show that the protein–DNA interface undergoes significant dynamics on the microsecond timescale. A detailed analysis of the simulation shows that movements of two key arginine side chains between the major groove and the backbone of DNA generate distinct conformational sub-states that each recognize only part of the consensus binding sequence of SKN-1, while the experimentally observed binding specificity results from a time-averaged view of the dynamic recognition occurring within this complex. PMID:26721385

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of human prion protein: importance of correct treatment of electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Zuegg, J; Gready, J E

    1999-10-19

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the dynamical and structural behavior of a homology model of human prion protein HuPrP(90-230) generated from the NMR structure of the Syrian hamster prion protein ShPrP(90-231) and of ShPrP(<90-231) itself. These PrPs have a large number of charged residues on the protein surface. At the simulation pH 7, HuPrP(90-230) has a net charge of -1 eu from 15 positively and 14 negatively charged residues. Simulations for both PrPs, using the AMBER94 force field in a periodic box model with explicit water molecules, showed high sensitivity to the correct treatment of the electrostatic interactions. Highly unstable behavior of the structured region of the PrPs (127-230) was found using the truncation method, and stable trajectories could be achieved only by including all the long-range electrostatic interactions using the particle mesh Ewald (PME) method. The instability using the truncation method could not be reduced by adding sodium and chloride ions nor by replacing some of the sodium ions with calcium ions. The PME simulations showed, in accordance with NMR experiments with ShPrP and mouse PrP, a flexibly disordered N-terminal part, PrP(90-126), and a structured C-terminal part, PrP(127-230), which includes three alpha-helices and a short antiparallel beta-strand. The simulations showed some tendency for the highly conserved hydrophobic segment PrP(112-131) to adopt an alpha-helical conformation and for helix C to split at residues 212-213, a known disease-associated mutation site (Q212P). Three highly occupied salt bridges could be identified (E146/D144<-->R208, R164<-->D178, and R156<-->E196) which appear to be important for the stability of PrP by linking the stable main structured core (helices B and C) with the more flexible structured part (helix A and strands A and B). Two of these salt bridges involve disease-associated mutations (R208H and D178N). Decreased PrP stability shown by protein unfolding

  1. Molecular dynamics analysis of conserved hydrophobic and hydrophilic bond-interaction networks in ErbB family kinases.

    PubMed

    Shih, Andrew J; Telesco, Shannon E; Choi, Sung-Hee; Lemmon, Mark A; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2011-06-01

    The EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor)/ErbB/HER (human EGFR) family of kinases contains four homologous receptor tyrosine kinases that are important regulatory elements in key signalling pathways. To elucidate the atomistic mechanisms of dimerization-dependent activation in the ErbB family, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of the intracellular kinase domains of three members of the ErbB family (those with known kinase activity), namely EGFR, ErbB2 (HER2) and ErbB4 (HER4), in different molecular contexts: monomer against dimer and wild-type against mutant. Using bioinformatics and fluctuation analyses of the molecular dynamics trajectories, we relate sequence similarities to correspondence of specific bond-interaction networks and collective dynamical modes. We find that in the active conformation of the ErbB kinases, key subdomain motions are co-ordinated through conserved hydrophilic interactions: activating bond-networks consisting of hydrogen bonds and salt bridges. The inactive conformations also demonstrate conserved bonding patterns (albeit less extensive) that sequester key residues and disrupt the activating bond network. Both conformational states have distinct hydrophobic advantages through context-specific hydrophobic interactions. We show that the functional (activating) asymmetric kinase dimer interface forces a corresponding change in the hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions that characterize the inactivating bond network, resulting in motion of the αC-helix through allostery. Several of the clinically identified activating kinase mutations of EGFR act in a similar fashion to disrupt the inactivating bond network. The present molecular dynamics study reveals a fundamental difference in the sequence of events in EGFR activation compared with that described for the Src kinase Hck.

  2. A Gas-Surface Interaction Model based on Accelerated Reactive Molecular Dynamics for Hypersonic Conditions including Thermal Conduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-28

    of the arc-jet flow field and predicted convective heat flux. When compared with the measured heat flux, the discrepancy is attributed to...published an AIAA conference paper in 2007 entitled, “Molecular mechanisms of gas surface interactions in hypersonic flow ” [24]. In this paper...Hypersonic Gas -Phase and Gas -Surface Reactions”, proceedings of the 27th International Symposium on Rarefied Gas Dynamics, July 2010, Monterey, CA

  3. Visualizing protein interactions and dynamics: evolving a visual language for molecular animation.

    PubMed

    Jenkinson, Jodie; McGill, Gaël

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate biology education provides students with a number of learning challenges. Subject areas that are particularly difficult to understand include protein conformational change and stability, diffusion and random molecular motion, and molecular crowding. In this study, we examined the relative effectiveness of three-dimensional visualization techniques for learning about protein conformation and molecular motion in association with a ligand-receptor binding event. Increasingly complex versions of the same binding event were depicted in each of four animated treatments. Students (n = 131) were recruited from the undergraduate biology program at University of Toronto, Mississauga. Visualization media were developed in the Center for Molecular and Cellular Dynamics at Harvard Medical School. Stem cell factor ligand and cKit receptor tyrosine kinase were used as a classical example of a ligand-induced receptor dimerization and activation event. Each group completed a pretest, viewed one of four variants of the animation, and completed a posttest and, at 2 wk following the assessment, a delayed posttest. Overall, the most complex animation was the most effective at fostering students' understanding of the events depicted. These results suggest that, in select learning contexts, increasingly complex representations may be more desirable for conveying the dynamic nature of cell binding events.

  4. Cyto•IQ: an adaptive cytometer for extracting the noisy dynamics of molecular interactions in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, David A.; Moody, Stephen E.; Peccoud, Jean

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a fundamentally new type of cytometer to track the statistics of dynamic molecular interactions in hundreds of individual live cells within a single experiment. This entirely new high-throughput experimental system, which we have named Cyto•IQ, reports statistical, rather than image-based data for a large cellular population. Like a flow cytometer, Cyto•IQ rapidly measures several fluorescent probes in a large population of cells to yield a reduced statistical model that is matched to the experimental goals set by the user. However, Cyto•IQ moves beyond flow cytometry by tracking multiple probes in individual cells over time. Using adaptive learning algorithms, we process data in real time to maximize the convergence of the statistical model parameter estimators. Software controlling Cyto•IQ integrates existing open source applications to interface hardware components, process images, and adapt the data acquisition strategy based on previously acquired data. These innovations allow the study of larger populations of cells, and molecular interactions with more complex dynamics, than is possible with traditional microscope-based approaches. Cyto•IQ supports research to characterize the noisy dynamics of molecular interactions controlling biological processes.

  5. The dynamics of molecular interactions and chemical reactions at metal surfaces: testing the foundations of theory.

    PubMed

    Golibrzuch, Kai; Bartels, Nils; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M

    2015-04-01

    We review studies of molecular interactions and chemical reactions at metal surfaces, emphasizing progress toward a predictive theory of surface chemistry and catalysis. For chemistry at metal surfaces, a small number of central approximations are typically made: (a) the Born-Oppenheimer approximation of electronic adiabaticity, (b) the use of density functional theory at the generalized gradient approximation level, (c) the classical approximation for nuclear motion, and (d) various reduced-dimensionality approximations. Together, these approximations constitute a provisional model for surface chemical reactivity. We review work on some carefully studied examples of molecules interacting at metal surfaces that probe the validity of various aspects of the provisional model.

  6. The Dynamics of Molecular Interactions and Chemical Reactions at Metal Surfaces: Testing the Foundations of Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golibrzuch, Kai; Bartels, Nils; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Wodtke, Alec M.

    2015-04-01

    We review studies of molecular interactions and chemical reactions at metal surfaces, emphasizing progress toward a predictive theory of surface chemistry and catalysis. For chemistry at metal surfaces, a small number of central approximations are typically made: (a) the Born-Oppenheimer approximation of electronic adiabaticity, (b) the use of density functional theory at the generalized gradient approximation level, (c) the classical approximation for nuclear motion, and (d) various reduced-dimensionality approximations. Together, these approximations constitute a provisional model for surface chemical reactivity. We review work on some carefully studied examples of molecules interacting at metal surfaces that probe the validity of various aspects of the provisional model.

  7. Structural and dynamic effects of cholesterol at preferred sites of interaction with rhodopsin identified from microsecond length molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Khelashvili, George; Grossfield, Alan; Feller, Scott E.; Pitman, Michael C.; Weinstein, Harel

    2014-01-01

    An unresolved question about GPCR function is the role of membrane components in receptor stability and activation. In particular, cholesterol is known to affect the function of membrane proteins, but the details of its effect on GPCRs are still elusive. Here, we describe how cholesterol modulates the behavior of the TM1-TM2-TM7-helix 8(H8) functional network that comprises the highly conserved NPxxY(x)5,6F motif, through specific interactions with the receptor. The inferences are based on the analysis of microsecond length molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of rhodopsin in an explicit membrane environment. Three regions on the rhodopsin exhibit the highest cholesterol density throughout the trajectory: the extracellular end of TM7, a location resembling the high-density sterol area from the electron microscopy data; the intracellular parts of TM1, TM2, and TM4, a region suggested as the cholesterol binding site in the recent X-ray crystallography data on β2-adrenergic GPCR; and the intracellular ends of TM2-TM3, a location that was categorized as the high cholesterol density area in multiple independent 100 ns MD simulations of the same system. We found that cholesterol primarily affects specific local perturbations of the helical TM domains such as the kinks in TM1, TM2, and TM7. These local distortions, in turn, relate to rigid-body motions of the TMs in the TM1-TM2-TM7-H8 bundle. The specificity of the effects stems from the nonuniform distribution of cholesterol around the protein. Through correlation analysis we connect local effects of cholesterol on structural perturbations with a regulatory role of cholesterol in the structural rearrangements involved in GPCR function. PMID:19173312

  8. Molecular dynamics approaches to the design and synthesis of PCB targeting molecularly imprinted polymers: interference to monomer-template interactions in imprinting of 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Dougal; Olsson, Gustaf D; Karlsson, Björn C G; Nicholls, Ian A; McCluskey, Adam

    2014-02-07

    The interactions between each component of the pre-polymerisation mixtures used in the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) specific for 1,2,3,4,5-pentachlorobenzene (1) and 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene (2) were examined in four molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations revealed that the relative frequency of functional monomer-template (FM-T) interactions was consistent with results obtained by the synthesis and evaluation of the actual MIPs. The higher frequency of 1 interaction with trimethylstyrene (TMS; 54.7%) than 1 interaction with pentafluorostyrene (PFS; 44.7%) correlated with a higher imprinting factor (IF) of 2.1 vs. 1.7 for each functional monomer respectively. The higher frequency of PFS interactions with 2 (29.6%) than TMS interactions with 2 (1.9%) also correlated well with the observed differences in IF (3.7) of 2 MIPs imprinted using PFS as the FM than the IF (2.8) of 2 MIPs imprinted using TMS as the FM. The TMS-1 interaction dominated the molecular simulation due to high interaction energies, but the weaker TMS-2 resulted in low interaction maintenance, and thus lower IF values. Examination of the other pre-polymerisation mixture components revealed that the low levels of TMS-2 interaction was, in part, due to interference caused by the cross linker (CL) ethyleneglycol dimethylacrylate (EGDMA) interactions with TMS. The main reason was, however, attributed to MeOH interactions with TMS in both a hydrogen bond and perpendicular configuration. This positioned a MeOH directly above the π-orbital of all TMS for an average of 63.8% of MD2 creating significant interference to π-π stacking interactions between 2 and TMS. These findings are consistent with the deviation from the 'normal' molecularly imprinted polymer synthesis ratio of 1 : 4 : 20 (T : FM : CL) of 20 : 1 : 29 and 15 : 6 : 29 observed with 2 and TMS and PFS respectively. Our molecular dynamics simulations correctly predicted the high level

  9. Key Structures and Interactions for Binding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protein Kinase B Inhibitors from Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Punkvang, Auradee; Kamsri, Pharit; Saparpakorn, Patchreenart; Hannongbua, Supa; Wolschann, Peter; Irle, Stephan; Pungpo, Pornpan

    2015-07-01

    Substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors have recently been introduced as antituberculosis agents. These inhibitors show impressive activity against protein kinase B, a Ser/Thr protein kinase that is essential for cell growth of M. tuberculosis. However, up to now, X-ray structures of the protein kinase B enzyme complexes with the substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors are currently unavailable. Consequently, structural details of their binding modes are questionable, prohibiting the structural-based design of more potent protein kinase B inhibitors in the future. Here, molecular dynamics simulations, in conjunction with molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area binding free-energy analysis, were employed to gain insight into the complex structures of the protein kinase B inhibitors and their binding energetics. The complex structures obtained by the molecular dynamics simulations show binding free energies in good agreement with experiment. The detailed analysis of molecular dynamics results shows that Glu93, Val95, and Leu17 are key residues responsible to the binding of the protein kinase B inhibitors. The aminopyrazole group and the pyrimidine core are the crucial moieties of substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors for interaction with the key residues. Our results provide a structural concept that can be used as a guide for the future design of protein kinase B inhibitors with highly increased antagonistic activity.

  10. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of ion-solid interactions in zirconate pyrochlores

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen; ...

    2015-01-31

    In this paper, an ab initio molecular dynamics method is employed to study low energy recoil events in zirconate pyrochlores (A2Zr2O7, A = La, Nd and Sm). It shows that both cations and anions in Nd2Zr2O7 and Sm2Zr2O7 are generally more likely to be displaced than those in La2Zr2O7. The damage end states mainly consist of Frenkel pair defects, and the Frenkel pair formation energies in Nd2Zr2O7 and Sm2Zr2O7 are lower than those in La2Zr2O7. These results suggest that the order–disorder structural transition more easily occurs in Nd2Zr2O7 and Sm2Zr2O7 resulting in a defect-fluorite structure, which agrees well with experimentalmore » observations. Our calculations indicate that oxygen migration from 48f and 8b to 8a sites is dominant under low energy irradiation. A number of new defects, including four types of cation Frenkel pairs and six types of anion Frenkel pairs, are revealed by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The present findings may help to advance the fundamental understanding of the irradiation response behavior of zirconate pyrochlores.« less

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of formamide interaction with hydrocyanic acid on a catalytic surface TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artoshina, O. V.; Vorob'eva, M. Yu.; Dushanov, E. B.; Kholmurodov, Kh. T.

    2014-06-01

    The behavior of water—formamide and hydrocyanic acid—formamide solutions on an anatase surface have been studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The interaction activation energies have been estimated for the temperature range from 250 up to 400 K. The diffusion coefficients and structural radial distribution functions have been calculated for the formamide, water and hydrocyanic acid on an anatase surface. The calculated activation energies of the water—formamide—anatase and hydrocyanic acid—formamide—anatase systems were analyzed and compared. A comparative analysis of the systems under investigation was performed and a possible correlation between the obtained MD results and the molecular mechanism involving the formamide's interaction with dioxide titan adsorbing surface were discussed.

  12. Molecular-dynamics simulation of liquid water with an ab initio flexible water-water interaction potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, G. C.; Clementi, E.

    1986-04-01

    The Matsuoka-Clementi-Yoshimine (MCY) configuration interaction potential for rigid water-water interactions has been extended to include the intramolecular vibrations. The extended potential (MCYL), using no empirical parameters other than the atomic masses, electron charge, and Planck constant, is used in a molecular-dynamics simulation study of the static and dynamic properties of liquid water. Among the properties studied are internal energy, heat capacity, pressure, radial distribution functions, dielectric constant, static structure factor, velocity autocorrelation functions, self-diffusion coefficients, dipole autocorrelation function, and density and current fluctuations. Comparison with experiments is made whenever possible. Most of these properties are found to improve slightly relative to the MCY model. The simulated high-frequency sound mode seems to support the results and interpretation of a recent coherent inelastic neutron scattering experiment.

  13. Theoretical investigation of interaction of sorbitol molecules with alcohol dehydrogenase in aqueous solution using molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Homayoon; Zahedi, Mansour; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Azizian, Homa; Amanlou, Massoud

    2011-03-01

    The nature of protein-sorbitol-water interaction in solution at the molecular level, has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. In order to do this task, two molecular dynamics simulations of the protein ADH in solution at room temperature have been carried out, one in the presence (about 0.9 M) and another in the absence of sorbitol. The results show that the sorbitol molecules cluster and move toward the protein, and form hydrogen bonds with protein. Also, coating by sorbitol reduces the conformational fluctuations of the protein compared to the sorbitol-free system. Thus, it is concluded that at moderate concentration of sorbitol solution, sorbitol molecules interact with ADH via many H-bonds that prevent the protein folding. In fact, at more concentrated sorbitol solution, water and sorbitol molecules accumulate around the protein surface and form a continuous space-filling network to reduce the protein flexibility. Namely, in such solution, sorbitol molecules can stabilize a misfolded state of ADH, and prevent the protein from folding to its native structure.

  14. Deciphering β-Lactoglobulin Interactions at an Oil-Water Interface: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Zare, Davoud; McGrath, Kathryn M; Allison, Jane R

    2015-06-08

    Protein adsorption at liquid-liquid interfaces is of immense relevance to many biological processes and dairy-based functional foods. Due to experimental limitations, however, there is still a remarkable lack of understanding of the adsorption mechanism, particularly at a molecular level. In this study, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were used to elucidate the approach and adsorption mechanism of β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) at a decane-water interface. Through multiple independent simulations starting from three representative initial orientations of β-LG relative to the decane surface the rate at which β-LG approaches the oil/water interface is found to be independent of its initial orientation, and largely stochastic in nature. While the residues that first make contact with the decane and the final orientation of β-LG upon adsorption are similar in all cases, the adsorption process is driven predominantly by structural rearrangements that preserve the secondary structure but expose hydrophobic residues to the decane surface. This detailed characterization of the adsorption of β-LG at an oil/water interface should inform the design and development of novel encapsulation and delivery systems in the food and pharmaceutical sciences.

  15. Calculation of adsorption free energy for solute-surface interactions using biased replica-exchange molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Stuart, Steven J.; Latour, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of a biomolecule, such as a peptide or protein, to a functionalized surface is of fundamental importance for a broad range of applications in biotechnology. The adsorption free energy for these types of interactions can be determined from a molecular dynamics simulation using the partitioning between adsorbed and nonadsorbed states, provided that sufficient sampling of both states is obtained. However, if interactions between the solute and the surface are strong, the solute will tend to be trapped near the surface during the simulation, thus preventing the adsorption free energy from being calculated by this method. This situation occurs even when using an advanced sampling algorithm such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD). In this paper, the authors demonstrate the fundamental basis of this problem using a model system consisting of one sodium ion (Na+) as the solute positioned over a surface functionalized with one negatively charged group (COO−) in explicit water. With this simple system, the authors show that sufficient sampling in the coordinate normal to the surface cannot be obtained by conventional REMD alone. The authors then present a method to overcome this problem through the use of an adaptive windowed-umbrella sampling technique to develop a biased-energy function that is combined with REMD. This approach provides an effective method for the calculation of adsorption free energy for solute-surface interactions. PMID:19768127

  16. Effects of cholesterol concentration on the interaction of cytarabine with lipid membranes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Karami, Leila; Jalili, Seifollah

    2015-01-01

    Liposomal cytarabine, DepoCyt, is a chemotherapy agent which is used in cancer treatment. This form of cytarabine has more efficacy and fewer side effects relative to the other forms. Since DepoCyt contains the cytarabine encapsulated within phosphatidylcholine and the sterol molecules, we modeled dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC)/cholesterol bilayer membrane as a carrier for cytarabine to study drug-bilayer interactions. For this purpose, we performed a series of united-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for 25 ns to investigate the interactions between cytarabine and cholesterol-containing DOPC lipid bilayers. Only the uncharged form of cytarabine molecule was investigated. In this study, different levels of the cholesterol content (0, 20, and 40%) were used. MD simulations allowed us to determine dynamical and structural properties of the bilayer membrane and to estimate the preferred location and orientation of the cytarabine molecule inside the bilayer membrane. Properties such as membrane thickness, area per lipid, diffusion coefficient, mass density, bilayer packing, order parameters, and intermolecular interactions were examined. The results show that by increasing the cholesterol concentration in the lipid bilayers, the bilayer thickness increases and area per lipid decreases. Moreover, in accordance with the experiments, our calculations show that cholesterol molecules have ordering effect on the hydrocarbon acyl chains. Furthermore, the cytarabine molecule preferentially occupies the polar region of the lipid head groups to form specific interactions (hydrogen bonds). Our results fully support the experimental data. Our finding about drug-bilayer interaction is crucial for the liposomal drug design.

  17. Multi-Spin Interactions and Dynamics in Model Systems for Organic Molecular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Daniel M.

    This thesis presents results from the application of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques to study the spin-spin interactions of novel organic compounds possessing one or more unpaired electron spins. The first two chapters focus on the use of steady-state techniques to probe the interaction of a single unpaired electron with its surrounding environment. The second part of this thesis expands on these studies by employing transient techniques to analyze and control the spin-spin interactions and dynamics of systems which undergo photoinduced charge separation to generate multiple unpaired electrons. In Chapter 2 a series of novel trifluoromethylated perylene and naphthalene imide and diimide compounds are chemically reduced to yield their respective radical anions. EPR spectroscopy at both X-band and W-band fields allows for characterization of the hyperfine coupling constants and g-tensors which are important for studying their role as intermediates in electron transfer reactions. In Chapter 3 continuous-wave electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy is employed to study the sharing of an unpaired electron across oligomers of naphthalene-1,8:4,5-bis(dicarboximide) in several novel geometries. Transient EPR techniques are introduced in Chapter 4 to measure the spin-spin interactions in photogenerated radical pairs in a series of electron donor-acceptor systems designed to mimic the photosynthetic reaction center. Measurement of the dipolar interaction at X-band fields allows for the determination of the radical pair distance, while the enhanced spectral resolution at W-band fields allows for analysis of the anisotropy of the g-tensors thereby allowing for the determination of the geometry of the radical pair. In Chapter 5 a novel U-shaped electron donor-acceptor-radical system is introduced in which use of a xanthene spacer results in negligible magnetic exchange interactions between the acceptor radical anion and the appended stable

  18. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-12-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system.

  19. Atomic & Molecular Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic & Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  20. Translocation and interactions of L-arabinose in OmpF porin: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Malek, Kourosh

    2007-01-05

    The passage of a natural substrate, L-arabinose (L-ARA) through Escherichia coli porin embedded in an artificial bilayer, is studied by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We investigate the early stage of translocation process of L-ARA from intra-cellular to extra-cellular side (Int-to-Ext) across the bilayer. The average trajectory path over all L-ARA molecules along with quantum-mechanical configuration-optimizations at PM3 level predict the existence of at least three trapping zones. The common feature within all these zones is that L-ARA remains perpendicular to the channel axis. It is remarkable how the orientation and translational-rotational motion of L-ARA molecule play a role in its transport through OmpF channel. These simulations are important for better understanding of permeation process in OmpF channel. They also provide an insight into the chiral recognition of translocation process in protein nanochannels from substrate and protein prospects and help interpret experiments on permeation process of small dipolar molecules across biological membranes.

  1. Molecular dynamics scheme for precise estimation of electrostatic interaction via zero-dipole summation principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Yonezawa, Yasushige; Nakamura, Haruki

    2011-04-01

    We propose a novel idea, zero-dipole summation, for evaluating the electrostatic energy of a classical particle system, and have composed an algorithm for effectively utilizing the idea for molecular dynamics. It conceptually prevents the nonzero-charge and nonzero-dipole states artificially generated by a simple cutoff truncation. The resulting energy formula is nevertheless represented by a simple pairwise function sum, which enables facile application to high-performance computation. By following a heuristic approach to derive the current electrostatic energy formula, we developed an axiomatic approach to construct the method consistently. Explorations of the theoretical details of our method revealed the structure of the generated error, and we analyzed it by comparisons with other methods. A numerical simulation using liquid sodium chloride confirmed that the current method with a small damping factor yielded sufficient accuracy with a practical cutoff distance region. The current energy function also conducts stable numerical integration in a liquid MD simulation. Our method is an extension of the charge neutralized summation developed by Wolf et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 110, 8254 (1999)]. Furthermore, we found that the current method becomes a generalization of the preaveraged potential method proposed by Yakub and Ronchi [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11556 (2003)], which is based on a viewpoint different from the neutrality. The current study presents these relationships and suggests possibilities for their further applications.

  2. Isolation and characterisation of sericin antifreeze peptides and molecular dynamics modelling of their ice-binding interaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinhong; Rong, Yuzhi; Wang, Zhengwu; Zhou, Yanfu; Wang, Shaoyun; Zhao, Bo

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to isolate and characterise a novel sericin antifreeze peptide and investigate its ice-binding molecular mechanism. The thermal hysteresis activity of ice-binding sericin peptides (I-SP) was measured and their activity reached as high as 0.94 °C. A P4 fraction, with high hypothermia protective activity and inhibition activity of ice recrystallisation, was obtained from I-SP, and a purified sericin peptide, named SM-AFP, with the sequence of TTSPTNVSTT and a molecular weight of 1009.50 Da was then isolated from the P4 fraction. Treatment of Lactobacillus delbrueckii Subsp. bulgaricus LB340 LYO with 100 μg/ml synthetic SM-AFP led to 1.4-fold increased survival (p < 0.05). Finally, an SM-AFP/ice binding model was constructed and results of molecular dynamics simulation suggested that the binding of SM-AFP with ice and prevention of ice crystal growth could be attributed to hydrogen bond formation, hydrophobic interaction and non-bond interactions. Sericin peptides could be developed into beneficial cryoprotectants and used in frozen food processing.

  3. Molecular Dynamics in Mixed Solvents Reveals Protein-Ligand Interactions, Improves Docking, and Allows Accurate Binding Free Energy Predictions.

    PubMed

    Arcon, Juan Pablo; Defelipe, Lucas A; Modenutti, Carlos P; López, Elias D; Alvarez-Garcia, Daniel; Barril, Xavier; Turjanski, Adrián G; Martí, Marcelo A

    2017-03-31

    One of the most important biological processes at the molecular level is the formation of protein-ligand complexes. Therefore, determining their structure and underlying key interactions is of paramount relevance and has direct applications in drug development. Because of its low cost relative to its experimental sibling, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in the presence of different solvent probes mimicking specific types of interactions have been increasingly used to analyze protein binding sites and reveal protein-ligand interaction hot spots. However, a systematic comparison of different probes and their real predictive power from a quantitative and thermodynamic point of view is still missing. In the present work, we have performed MD simulations of 18 different proteins in pure water as well as water mixtures of ethanol, acetamide, acetonitrile and methylammonium acetate, leading to a total of 5.4 μs simulation time. For each system, we determined the corresponding solvent sites, defined as space regions adjacent to the protein surface where the probability of finding a probe atom is higher than that in the bulk solvent. Finally, we compared the identified solvent sites with 121 different protein-ligand complexes and used them to perform molecular docking and ligand binding free energy estimates. Our results show that combining solely water and ethanol sites allows sampling over 70% of all possible protein-ligand interactions, especially those that coincide with ligand-based pharmacophoric points. Most important, we also show how the solvent sites can be used to significantly improve ligand docking in terms of both accuracy and precision, and that accurate predictions of ligand binding free energies, along with relative ranking of ligand affinity, can be performed.

  4. Interactions of the SAP Domain of Human Ku70 with DNA Substrate: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Carra, Claudio; Huff, Janice; Pluth, Janice M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    NASA is developing a systems biology approach to improve the assessment of health risks associated with space radiation. The primary toxic and mutagenic lesion following radiation exposure is the DNA double strand break (DSB), thus a model incorporating proteins and pathways important in response and repair of this lesion is critical. One key protein heterodimer for systems models of radiation effects is the Ku70/80 complex. The Ku70/80 complex is important in the initial binding of DSB ends following DNA damage, and is a component of nonhomologous end joining repair, the primary pathway for DSB repair in mammalian cells. The SAP domain of Ku70 (residues 556-609), contains an a helix-extended strand-helix motif and similar motifs have been found in other nucleic acid-binding proteins critical for DNA repair. However, the exact mechanism of damage recognition and substrate specificity for the Ku heterodimer remains unclear in part due to the absence of a high-resolution structure of the SAP/DNA complex. We performed a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a system with the SAP domain of Ku70 and a 10 base pairs DNA duplex. Large-scale conformational changes were observed and some putative binding modes were suggested based on energetic analysis. These modes are consistent with previous experimental investigations. In addition, the results indicate that cooperation of SAP with other domains of Ku70/80 is necessary to explain the high affinity of binding as observed in experiments.

  5. The Molecular Mechanism of Bisphenol A (BPA) as an Endocrine Disruptor by Interacting with Nuclear Receptors: Insights from Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lanlan; Wang, Qianqian; Zhang, Yan; Niu, Yuzhen; Yao, Xiaojun; Liu, Huanxiang

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) can interact with nuclear receptors and affect the normal function of nuclear receptors in very low doses, which causes BPA to be one of the most controversial endocrine disruptors. However, the detailed molecular mechanism about how BPA interferes the normal function of nuclear receptors is still undiscovered. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the detailed interaction mechanism between BPA with three typical nuclear receptors, including hERα, hERRγ and hPPARγ. The simulation results and calculated binding free energies indicate that BPA can bind to these three nuclear receptors. The binding affinities of BPA were slightly lower than that of E2 to these three receptors. The simulation results proved that the binding process was mainly driven by direct hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions. In addition, structural analysis suggested that BPA could interact with these nuclear receptors by mimicking the action of natural hormone and keeping the nuclear receptors in active conformations. The present work provided the structural evidence to recognize BPA as an endocrine disruptor and would be important guidance for seeking safer substitutions of BPA. PMID:25799048

  6. The molecular mechanism of bisphenol A (BPA) as an endocrine disruptor by interacting with nuclear receptors: insights from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Lanlan; Wang, Qianqian; Zhang, Yan; Niu, Yuzhen; Yao, Xiaojun; Liu, Huanxiang

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) can interact with nuclear receptors and affect the normal function of nuclear receptors in very low doses, which causes BPA to be one of the most controversial endocrine disruptors. However, the detailed molecular mechanism about how BPA interferes the normal function of nuclear receptors is still undiscovered. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the detailed interaction mechanism between BPA with three typical nuclear receptors, including hERα, hERRγ and hPPARγ. The simulation results and calculated binding free energies indicate that BPA can bind to these three nuclear receptors. The binding affinities of BPA were slightly lower than that of E2 to these three receptors. The simulation results proved that the binding process was mainly driven by direct hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions. In addition, structural analysis suggested that BPA could interact with these nuclear receptors by mimicking the action of natural hormone and keeping the nuclear receptors in active conformations. The present work provided the structural evidence to recognize BPA as an endocrine disruptor and would be important guidance for seeking safer substitutions of BPA.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Structural Analysis of Giardia duodenalis 14-3-3 Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Cau, Ylenia; Fiorillo, Annarita; Mori, Mattia; Ilari, Andrea; Botta, Maurizo; Lalle, Marco

    2015-12-28

    Giardiasis is a gastrointestinal diarrheal illness caused by the protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis, which affects annually over 200 million people worldwide. The limited antigiardial drug arsenal and the emergence of clinical cases refractory to standard treatments dictate the need for new chemotherapeutics. The 14-3-3 family of regulatory proteins, extensively involved in protein-protein interactions (PPIs) with pSer/pThr clients, represents a highly promising target. Despite homology with human counterparts, the single 14-3-3 of G. duodenalis (g14-3-3) is characterized by a constitutive phosphorylation in a region critical for target binding, thus affecting the function and the conformation of g14-3-3/clients interaction. However, to approach the design of specific small molecule modulators of g14-3-3 PPIs, structural elucidations are required. Here, we present a detailed computational and crystallographic study exploring the implications of g14-3-3 phosphorylation on protein structure and target binding. Self-Guided Langevin Dynamics and classical molecular dynamics simulations show that phosphorylation affects locally and globally g14-3-3 conformation, inducing a structural rearrangement more suitable for target binding. Profitable features for g14-3-3/clients interaction were highlighted using a hydrophobicity-based descriptor to characterize g14-3-3 client peptides. Finally, the X-ray structure of g14-3-3 in complex with a mode-1 prototype phosphopeptide was solved and combined with structure-based simulations to identify molecular features relevant for clients binding to g14-3-3. The data presented herein provide a further and structural understanding of g14-3-3 features and set the basis for drug design studies.

  8. Dynamic Interactive Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabry, Khaled; Barker, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses the notions of interactivity and dynamicity of learning systems in relation to information technologies and design principles that can contribute to interactive and dynamic learning. It explores the concept of dynamic interactive learning systems based on the emerging generation of information as part of a…

  9. Binding mode of triazole derivatives as aromatase inhibitors based on docking, protein ligand interaction fingerprinting, and molecular dynamics simulation studies

    PubMed Central

    Mojaddami, Ayyub; Sakhteman, Amirhossein; Fereidoonnezhad, Masood; Faghih, Zeinab; Najdian, Atena; Khabnadideh, Soghra; Sadeghpour, Hossein; Rezaei, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) as effective candidates have been used in the treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancer. In this study, we have proposed 300 structures as potential AIs and filtered them by Lipinski's rule of five using DrugLito software. Subsequently, they were subjected to docking simulation studies to select the top 20 compounds based on their Gibbs free energy changes and also to perform more studies on the protein-ligand interaction fingerprint by AuposSOM software. In this stage, anastrozole and letrozole were used as positive control to compare their interaction fingerprint patterns with our proposed structures. Finally, based on the binding energy values, one active structure (ligand 15) was selected for molecular dynamic simulation in order to get information for the binding mode of these ligands within the enzyme cavity. The triazole of ligand 15 pointed to HEM group in aromatase active site and coordinated to Fe of HEM through its N4 atom. In addition, two π-cation interactions was also observed, one interaction between triazole and porphyrin of HEM group, and the other was 4-chloro phenyl moiety of this ligand with Arg115 residue. PMID:28255310

  10. Molecular dynamics study of nanoparticle stability at liquid interfaces: Effect of nanoparticle-solvent interaction and capillary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, David L.

    2011-08-01

    While the interaction of colloidal particles (sizes in excess of 100 nm) with liquid interfaces may be understood in terms of continuum models, which are grounded in macroscopic properties such as surface and line tensions, the behaviour of nanoparticles at liquid interfaces may be more complex. Recent simulations [D. L. Cheung and S. A. F. Bon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 066103 (2009)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.066103 of nanoparticles at an idealised liquid-liquid interface showed that the nanoparticle-interface interaction range was larger than expected due, in part, to the action of thermal capillary waves. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations of a Lennard-Jones nanoparticle in a binary Lennard-Jones mixture are used to confirm that these previous results hold for more realistic models. Furthermore by including attractive interactions between the nanoparticle and the solvent, it is found that the detachment energy decreases as the nanoparticle-solvent attraction increases. Comparison between the simulation results and recent theoretical predictions [H. Lehle and M. Oettel, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 20, 404224 (2008)], 10.1088/0953-8984/20/40/404224 shows that for small particles the incorporation of capillary waves into the predicted effective nanoparticle-interface interaction improves agreement between simulation and theory.

  11. Visualizing Protein Interactions and Dynamics: Evolving a Visual Language for Molecular Animation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkinson, Jodie; McGill, Gael

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate biology education provides students with a number of learning challenges. Subject areas that are particularly difficult to understand include protein conformational change and stability, diffusion and random molecular motion, and molecular crowding. In this study, we examined the relative effectiveness of three-dimensional…

  12. MIiSR: Molecular Interactions in Super-Resolution Imaging Enables the Analysis of Protein Interactions, Dynamics and Formation of Multi-protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Fabiana A.; Dirk, Brennan S.; Tam, Joshua H. K.; Cavanagh, P. Craig; Goiko, Maria; Ferguson, Stephen S. G.; Pasternak, Stephen H.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; de Bruyn, John R.; Heit, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms which regulate cellular processes such as vesicular trafficking has been enabled by conventional biochemical and microscopy techniques. However, these methods often obscure the heterogeneity of the cellular environment, thus precluding a quantitative assessment of the molecular interactions regulating these processes. Herein, we present Molecular Interactions in Super Resolution (MIiSR) software which provides quantitative analysis tools for use with super-resolution images. MIiSR combines multiple tools for analyzing intermolecular interactions, molecular clustering and image segmentation. These tools enable quantification, in the native environment of the cell, of molecular interactions and the formation of higher-order molecular complexes. The capabilities and limitations of these analytical tools are demonstrated using both modeled data and examples derived from the vesicular trafficking system, thereby providing an established and validated experimental workflow capable of quantitatively assessing molecular interactions and molecular complex formation within the heterogeneous environment of the cell. PMID:26657340

  13. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is described, with emphasis on massively-parallel simulations involving the motion of millions, soon to be billions, of atoms. Corresponding continuum simulations are also discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Numerical analysis on gas-surface interaction by molecular dynamics method. I - Simulation with Lennard-Jones molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Matsui, Jun; Ohashi, Hideo

    1992-07-01

    Rarefied gas flows in various situations are calculated successfully by the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. In the simulation, the Maxwell model, where a gas molecule reflects diffusely with the probability alpha and reflects specularly with the probability 1 - alpha, is widely used for boundary conditions on solid surfaces. However, the value of alpha is determined empirically and varies greatly with conditions such as degree of contamination and temperature of the surface. Rational prediction of the value and analysis of the interaction between gas and solid surface are required. In this paper, the behavior of a gas molecule with collides onto the solid surface is simulated by the molecular dynamics method. The numerical results reveal that the scattering behavior of the gas molecule is neither specular, diffuse, nor Maxwell-type reflection, and that the sticking probability is affected by the initial gas velocity and the potential well depth.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations on the interaction of the transmembrane NavAb channel with cholesterol and lipids in the membrane.

    PubMed

    Suwattanasophon, Chonticha; Wolschann, Peter; Faller, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Increased cholesterol levels are associated with multiple pathological conditions. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations were applied to observe the influence of membrane cholesterol levels on a voltage-gated sodium channel. Different lipid compositions are modeled around the channel to obtain information about the possible effects by which cholesterol influences NavAb channels. Cholesterol was normally not directly interacting with either the closed or inactivated conformation. Cholesterol increased lipid packing implying that it plays a crucial role in restricting lipid movement in the region around 1 nm of the channel in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oeleoyl phosphatidylcholine matrix. Our results provide the first computational indication of an indirect modulation of NavAb channels by membrane cholesterol.

  16. Interactions of the EGFR juxtamembrane domain with PIP2-containing lipid bilayers: Insights from multiscale molecular dynamics simulations☆

    PubMed Central

    Abd Halim, Khairul Bariyyah; Koldsø, Heidi; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2015-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is the best characterised member of the receptor tyrosine kinases, which play an important role in signalling across mammalian cell membranes. The EGFR juxtamembrane (JM) domain is involved in the mechanism of activation of the receptor, interacting with the anionic lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) in the intracellular leaflet of the cell membrane. Methods Multiscale MD simulations were used to characterize PIP2–JM interactions. Simulations of the transmembrane helix plus JM region (TM–JM) dimer (PDB:2M20) in both PIP2-containing and PIP2-depleted lipid bilayer membranes revealed the interactions of the JM with PIP2 and other lipids. Results PIP2 forms strong interactions with the basic residues in the R645–R647 motif of the JM domain resulting in clustering of PIP2 around the protein. This association of PIP2 and the JM domain aids stabilization of JM-A dimer away from the membrane. Mutation (R645N/R646N/R647N) or PIP2-depletion results in deformation of the JM-A dimer and changes in JM–membrane interactions. Conclusions These simulations support the proposal that the positively charged residues at the start of the JM-A domain stabilize the JM-A helices in an orientation away from the membrane surface through binding to PIP2, thus promoting a conformation corresponding to an asymmetric (i.e. activated) kinase. General significance This study indicates that MD simulations may be used to characterise JM/lipid interactions, thus helping to define their role in the mechanisms of receptor tyrosine kinases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Recent developments of molecular dynamics. PMID:25219456

  17. Investigation of allosteric modulation mechanism of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 by molecular dynamics simulations, free energy and weak interaction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Qifeng; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1), which belongs to class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), can be coupled with G protein to transfer extracellular signal by dimerization and allosteric regulation. Unraveling the dimer packing and allosteric mechanism can be of great help for understanding specific regulatory mechanism and designing more potential negative allosteric modulator (NAM). Here, we report molecular dynamics simulation studies of the modulation mechanism of FITM on the wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1 through weak interaction analysis and free energy calculation. The weak interaction analysis demonstrates that van der Waals (vdW) and hydrogen bonding play an important role on the dimer packing between six cholesterol molecules and mGlu1 as well as the interaction between allosteric sites T815, Y805 and FITM in wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1. Besides, the results of free energy calculations indicate that secondary binding pocket is mainly formed by the residues Thr748, Cys746, Lys811 and Ser735 except for FITM-bound pocket in crystal structure. Our results can not only reveal the dimer packing and allosteric regulation mechanism, but also can supply useful information for the design of potential NAM of mGlu1. PMID:26887338

  18. Energy and structure of bonds in the interaction of organic anions with layered double hydroxide nanosheets: A molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Tsukanov, A.A.; Psakhie, S.G.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hybrid and hierarchical nanomaterials based on layered hydroxides and oxyhydroxides of metals is a swiftly progressing field in biomedicine. Layered double hydroxides (LDH) possess a large specific surface area, significant surface electric charge and biocompatibility. Their physical and structural properties enable them to adsorb various kinds of anionic species and to transport them into cells. However, possible side effects resulting from the interaction of LDH with anions of the intercellular and intracellular medium need to be considered, since such interaction can potentially disrupt ion transport, signaling processes, apoptosis, nutrition and proliferation of living cells. In the present paper molecular dynamics is used to determine the energies of interaction of organic anions (aspartic acid, glutamic acid and bicarbonate) with a fragment of layered double hydroxide Mg/Al-LDH. The average number of hydrogen bonds between the anions and the hydroxide surface and characteristic binding configurations are determined. Possible effects of LDH on the cell resulting from binding of protein fragments and replacement of native intracellular anions with delivered anions are considered. PMID:26817816

  19. Self-assembly and interactions of short antimicrobial cationic lipopeptides with membrane lipids: ITC, FTIR and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Sikorska, Emilia; Dawgul, Małgorzata; Greber, Katarzyna; Iłowska, Emilia; Pogorzelska, Aneta; Kamysz, Wojciech

    2014-10-01

    In this work, the self-organization and the behavior of the surfactant-like peptides in the presence of biological membrane models were studied. The studies were focused on synthetic palmitic acid-containing lipopeptides, C16-KK-NH2 (I), C16-KGK-NH2 (II) and C16-KKKK-NH2 (III). The self-assembly was explored by molecular dynamics simulations using a coarse-grained force field. The critical micellar concentration was estimated by the surface tension measurements. The thermodynamics of the peptides binding to the anionic and zwitterionic lipids were established using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The influence of the peptides on the lipid acyl chain ordering was determined using FTIR spectroscopy. The compounds studied show surface-active properties with a distinct CMC over the millimolar range. An increase in the steric and electrostatic repulsion between polar head groups shifts the CMC toward higher values and reduces the aggregation number. An analysis of the peptide-membrane binding revealed a unique interplay between the initial electrostatic and the subsequent hydrophobic interactions enabling the lipopeptides to interact with the lipid bilayer. In the case of C16-KKKK-NH2 (III), compensation of the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions upon binding to the anionic membrane has been suggested and consequently no overall binding effects were noticed in ITC thermograms and FTIR spectra.

  20. Protein–Mineral Interactions: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Capture Importance of Variations in Mineral Surface Composition and Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Amity; Reardon, Patrick N.; Chacon, Stephany S.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Washton, Nancy M.; Kleber, Markus

    2016-06-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations, conventional and metadynamics, were performed to determine the interaction of model protein Gb1 over kaolinite (001), Na+-montmorillonite (001), Ca2+-montmorillonite (001), goethite (100), and Na+-birnessite (001) mineral surfaces. Gb1, a small (56 residue) protein with a well-characterized solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure and having α-helix, four-fold β-sheet, and hydrophobic core features, is used as a model protein to study protein soil mineral interactions and gain insights on structural changes and potential degradation of protein. From our simulations, we observe little change to the hydrated Gb1 structure over the kaolinite, montmorillonite, and goethite surfaces relative to its solvated structure without these mineral surfaces present. Over the Na+-birnessite basal surface, however, the Gb1 structure is highly disturbed as a result of interaction with this birnessite surface. Unraveling of the Gb1 β-sheet at specific turns and a partial unraveling of the α-helix is observed over birnessite, which suggests specific vulnerable residue sites for oxidation or hydrolysis possibly leading to fragmentation.

  1. Interaction of collagen with chlorosulphonated paraffin tanning agents: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Monti, Susanna; Bramanti, Emilia; Della Porta, Valentina; Onor, Massimo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Barone, Vincenzo

    2013-09-21

    The binding of chlorosulphonated paraffins to collagen triple helices is studied by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations and experimental spectroscopic techniques in order to disclose the principal characteristics of their interaction during the leather fattening process. Indeed, collagen is the main target to develop new leather modifying agents with specific characteristics, and an accurate design of the collagen binders, supported by predictive computational strategies, could be a successful tool to obtain new effective eco-compatible compounds able to impart to the leather the required functionalities and distinctive mechanical properties. Possible effects caused by the tanning agents on the collagen matrix have been identified from both experimental and theoretical points of view. Computational data in agreement with experiment have revealed that chlorosulphonated paraffins can interact favorably with the collagen residues having amine groups in their side chains (Arg, Lys, Asn and Gln) and reduce the tendency of the solvated collagen matrix to swell. However, the interference of chlorosulphonated paraffins with the unfolding process, which is operated mainly by the action of water, can be due both to covalent cross-linking of the collagen chains and intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions involving also the hydroxyl groups of Hyp, Ser and Thr residues.

  2. Energy and structure of bonds in the interaction of organic anions with layered double hydroxide nanosheets: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukanov, A. A.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hybrid and hierarchical nanomaterials based on layered hydroxides and oxyhydroxides of metals is a swiftly progressing field in biomedicine. Layered double hydroxides (LDH) possess a large specific surface area, significant surface electric charge and biocompatibility. Their physical and structural properties enable them to adsorb various kinds of anionic species and to transport them into cells. However, possible side effects resulting from the interaction of LDH with anions of the intercellular and intracellular medium need to be considered, since such interaction can potentially disrupt ion transport, signaling processes, apoptosis, nutrition and proliferation of living cells. In the present paper molecular dynamics is used to determine the energies of interaction of organic anions (aspartic acid, glutamic acid and bicarbonate) with a fragment of layered double hydroxide Mg/Al-LDH. The average number of hydrogen bonds between the anions and the hydroxide surface and characteristic binding configurations are determined. Possible effects of LDH on the cell resulting from binding of protein fragments and replacement of native intracellular anions with delivered anions are considered.

  3. Probing the interaction mechanism of small molecule inhibitors with matriptase based on molecular dynamics simulation and free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong-Ru; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2017-03-01

    Matriptase is a serine protease associated with a wide variety of human tumors and carcinoma progression. Up to now, many promising anti-cancer drugs have been developed. However, the detailed structure-function relationship between inhibitors and matriptase remains elusive. In this work, molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy studies were performed to investigate the biochemistry behaviors of two class inhibitors binding to matriptase. The binding free energies predicted by MM/GBSA methods are in good agreement with the experimental bioactivities, and the analysis of the individual energy terms suggests that the van der Waals interaction is the major driving force for ligand binding. The key residues responsible for achieving strong binding have been identified by the MM/GBSA free energy decomposition analysis. Especially, Trp215 and Phe99 had an important impact on active site architecture and ligand binding. The results clearly identify the two class inhibitors exist different binding modes. Through summarizing the two different modes, we have mastered some important and favorable interaction patterns between matriptase and inhibitors. Our findings would be helpful for understanding the interaction mechanism between the inhibitor and matriptase and afford important guidance for the rational design of potent matriptase inhibitors.

  4. Interaction of the Antimicrobial Peptide Polymyxin B1 with Both Membranes of E. coli: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, Damien; Sessions, Richard B.; Bond, Peter J.; Khalid, Syma

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small, cationic proteins that can induce lysis of bacterial cells through interaction with their membranes. Different mechanisms for cell lysis have been proposed, but these models tend to neglect the role of the chemical composition of the membrane, which differs between bacterial species and can be heterogeneous even within a single cell. Moreover, the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli contains two membranes with differing compositions. To this end, we report the first molecular dynamics simulation study of the interaction of the antimicrobial peptide, polymyxin B1 with complex models of both the inner and outer membranes of E. coli. The results of >16 microseconds of simulation predict that polymyxin B1 is likely to interact with the membranes via distinct mechanisms. The lipopeptides aggregate in the lipopolysaccharide headgroup region of the outer membrane with limited tendency for insertion within the lipid A tails. In contrast, the lipopeptides readily insert into the inner membrane core, and the concomitant increased hydration may be responsible for bilayer destabilization and antimicrobial function. Given the urgent need to develop novel, potent antibiotics, the results presented here reveal key mechanistic details that may be exploited for future rational drug development. PMID:25885324

  5. Investigation of allosteric modulation mechanism of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 by molecular dynamics simulations, free energy and weak interaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Qifeng; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1), which belongs to class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), can be coupled with G protein to transfer extracellular signal by dimerization and allosteric regulation. Unraveling the dimer packing and allosteric mechanism can be of great help for understanding specific regulatory mechanism and designing more potential negative allosteric modulator (NAM). Here, we report molecular dynamics simulation studies of the modulation mechanism of FITM on the wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1 through weak interaction analysis and free energy calculation. The weak interaction analysis demonstrates that van der Waals (vdW) and hydrogen bonding play an important role on the dimer packing between six cholesterol molecules and mGlu1 as well as the interaction between allosteric sites T815, Y805 and FITM in wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1. Besides, the results of free energy calculations indicate that secondary binding pocket is mainly formed by the residues Thr748, Cys746, Lys811 and Ser735 except for FITM-bound pocket in crystal structure. Our results can not only reveal the dimer packing and allosteric regulation mechanism, but also can supply useful information for the design of potential NAM of mGlu1.

  6. Probing the interactions of the solvated electron with DNA by molecular dynamics simulations: II. bromodeoxyuridine-thymidine mismatched DNA.

    PubMed

    Gantchev, Tsvetan G; Hunting, Darel J

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of solvated electrons (e(-)(aq)) with DNA results in various types of DNA lesions. The in vitro and in vivo sensitisation of DNA to (e(-)(aq))-induced damage is achieved by incorporation of the electron-affinity radiosensitiser bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) in place of thymidine. However, in DNA duplexes containing single-stranded regions (bulged BUdR-DNA), the type of lesion is different and the efficiency of damage is enhanced. In particular, DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICL) form at high efficiency in bulged DNA but are not detectable in completely duplex DNA. Knowledge about the processes and interactions leading to these differences is obscure. Previously, we addressed the problem by applying molecular modelling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to a system of normal (BUdR.A)-DNA and a hydrated electron, where the excess electron was modelled as a localised e(-)(H2O6) anionic cluster. The goal of the present study was to apply the same MD simulation to a wobble DNA-e(-)(aq) system, containing a pyrimidine-pyrimidine mismatched base pair, BUdR.T. The results show an overall dynamic pattern similar to that of the e(-)(aq) motion around normal DNA. However, the number of configuration states when e(-)(aq)) was particularly close to DNA is different. Moreover, in the (BUdR.T)-wobble DNA system, the electron frequently approaches the brominated strand, including BUdR, which was not observed with the normal (BUdR.A)-DNA. The structure and exchange of water at the sites of e(-)(aq) immobilisation near DNA were also characterised. The structural dynamics of the wobble DNA is prone to more extensive perturbations, including frequent formation of cross-strand (cs) interatomic contacts. The structural deviations correlated with e(-)(aq) approaching DNA from the major groove side, with sodium ions trapped deep in the minor groove. Altogether, the obtained results confirm and/or throw light on dynamic-structure determinants possibly responsible for the

  7. VMD: visual molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, W; Dalke, A; Schulten, K

    1996-02-01

    VMD is a molecular graphics program designed for the display and analysis of molecular assemblies, in particular biopolymers such as proteins and nucleic acids. VMD can simultaneously display any number of structures using a wide variety of rendering styles and coloring methods. Molecules are displayed as one or more "representations," in which each representation embodies a particular rendering method and coloring scheme for a selected subset of atoms. The atoms displayed in each representation are chosen using an extensive atom selection syntax, which includes Boolean operators and regular expressions. VMD provides a complete graphical user interface for program control, as well as a text interface using the Tcl embeddable parser to allow for complex scripts with variable substitution, control loops, and function calls. Full session logging is supported, which produces a VMD command script for later playback. High-resolution raster images of displayed molecules may be produced by generating input scripts for use by a number of photorealistic image-rendering applications. VMD has also been expressly designed with the ability to animate molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories, imported either from files or from a direct connection to a running MD simulation. VMD is the visualization component of MDScope, a set of tools for interactive problem solving in structural biology, which also includes the parallel MD program NAMD, and the MDCOMM software used to connect the visualization and simulation programs. VMD is written in C++, using an object-oriented design; the program, including source code and extensive documentation, is freely available via anonymous ftp and through the World Wide Web.

  8. Interaction of polar and nonpolar organic pollutants with soil organic matter: sorption experiments and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ashour A; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören; Aziz, Saadullah G; Hilal, Rifaat H; Elroby, Shaaban A; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O; Leinweber, Peter; Kühn, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    The fate of organic pollutants in the environment is influenced by several factors including the type and strength of their interactions with soil components especially SOM. However, a molecular level answer to the question "How organic pollutants interact with SOM?" is still lacking. In order to explore mechanisms of this interaction, we have developed a new SOM model and carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in parallel with sorption experiments. The new SOM model comprises free SOM functional groups (carboxylic acid and naphthalene) as well as SOM cavities (with two different sizes), simulating the soil voids, containing the same SOM functional groups. To examine the effect of the hydrophobicity on the interaction, the organic pollutants hexachlorobenzene (HCB, non-polar) and sulfanilamide (SAA, polar) were considered. The experimental and theoretical investigations explored four major points regarding sorption of SAA and HCB on soil, yielding the following results. 1--The interaction depends on the SOM chemical composition more than the SOM content. 2--The interaction causes a site-specific adsorption on the soil surfaces. 3--Sorption hysteresis occurs, which can be explained by inclusion of these pollutants inside soil voids. 4--The hydrophobic HCB is adsorbed on soil stronger than the hydrophilic SAA. Moreover, the theoretical results showed that HCB forms stable complexes with all SOM models in the aqueous solution, while most of SAA-SOM complexes are accompanied by dissociation into SAA and the free SOM models. The SOM-cavity modeling had a significant effect on binding of organic pollutants to SOM. Both HCB and SAA bind to the SOM models in the order of models with a small cavity>a large cavity>no cavity. Although HCB binds to all SOM models stronger than SAA, the latter is more affected by the presence of the cavity. Finally, HCB and SAA bind to the hydrophobic functional group (naphthalene) stronger than to the hydrophilic one (carboxylic acid

  9. Elementary processes of H2 plasma-graphene interaction: A combined molecular dynamics and density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despiau-Pujo, E.; Davydova, A.; Cunge, G.; Delfour, L.; Magaud, L.; Graves, D. B.

    2013-03-01

    Elementary interactions between H atoms and monolayer graphene are investigated using classical molecular dynamics (CMD) and density functional theory (DFT). C-H interatomic potential curves and associated energy barriers are reported depending on the H impact position (top, bridge, hollow, vacancy, or edge sites of graphene nanoribbons). Chemisorption of atomic hydrogen and formation of molecular hydrogen from chemisorbed H states on graphene are examined. The influence of graphene temperature and incident species energy on adsorption, reflection, and penetration mechanisms is also presented. Except for impacts at graphene nanoribbon (GNR) edges or at defect locations, H atoms are shown to experience a repulsive force due to delocalized π-electrons which prevents any species with less than 0.4-0.6 eV to chemisorb on the graphene surface. C-H bond formation requires a local sp2-sp3 rehybridization resulting in structural changes of the graphene sample. Chemisorption sites with deep potential wells and no activation barrier are found on GNR edges, which indicate that H thermal radicals can functionalize GNRs on edges while they cannot do it in the basal plane. The presence of one or more H adsorbates on the graphene surface strongly influences subsequent H adsorption and promotes the formation of energetically favourable H pairs at the para- and ortho-locations. Formation of H2 molecule via Eley-Rideal recombination of hot radicals [1-1.3 eV] with chemisorbed H atoms is observed.

  10. Structure-Activity Relationship in TLR4 Mutations: Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Residue Interaction Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2017-03-08

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a vital innate immune receptor present on cell surfaces, initiates a signaling cascade during danger and bacterial intrusion. TLR4 needs to form a stable hexamer complex, which is necessary to dimerize the cytoplasmic domain. However, D299G and T399I polymorphism may abrogate the stability of the complex, leading to compromised TLR4 signaling. Crystallography provides valuable insights into the structural aspects of the TLR4 ectodomain; however, the dynamic behavior of polymorphic TLR4 is still unclear. Here, we employed molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), as well as principal component and residue network analyses, to decipher the structural aspects and signaling propagation associated with mutations in TLR4. The mutated complexes were less cohesive, displayed local and global variation in the secondary structure, and anomalous decay in rotational correlation function. Principal component analysis indicated that the mutated complexes also exhibited distinct low-frequency motions, which may be correlated to the differential behaviors of these TLR4 variants. Moreover, residue interaction networks (RIN) revealed that the mutated TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor (MD) 2 complex may perpetuate abnormal signaling pathways. Cumulatively, the MDS and RIN analyses elucidated the mutant-specific conformational alterations, which may help in deciphering the mechanism of loss-of-function mutations.

  11. Mapping intermolecular interactions and active site conformations: from human MMP-1 crystal structure to molecular dynamics free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Nash, Anthony; Birch, Helen L; de Leeuw, Nora H

    2017-02-01

    The zinc-dependent Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) found within the extracellular matrix (ECM) of vertebrates are linked to pathological processes such as arthritis, skin ulceration and cancer. Although a general backbone proteolytic mechanism is understood, crystallographic data continue to suggest an active site that is too narrow to encompass the respective substrate. We present a fully parameterised Molecular Dynamics (MD) study of the structural properties of an MMP-1-collagen crystallographic structure (Protein Data Bank - 4AUO), followed by an exploration of the free energy surface of a collagen polypeptide chain entering the active site, using a combined meta-dynamics and umbrella sampling (MDUS) approach. We conclude that the interactions between MMP-1 and the collagen substrate are in good agreement with a number of experimental studies. As such, our unrestrained MD simulations and our MDUS results, which indicate an energetic barrier for a local uncoiling and insertion event, can inform future investigations of the collagen-peptide non-bonded association steps with the active site prior to proteolytic mechanisms. The elucidation of such free energy barriers provides a better understanding of the role of the enzyme in the ECM and is important in the design of future MMP inhibitors.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation and linear interaction energy study of d-Glu-based inhibitors of the MurD ligase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdih, Andrej; Wolber, Gerhard; Solmajer, Tom

    2013-08-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of the bacterial peptidoglycan, where MurD is an enzyme involved at the intracellular stage of its construction, represents a collection of highly selective macromolecular targets for novel antibacterial drug design. In this study as part of our investigation of the MurD bacterial target two recently discovered classes of the MurD ligase inhibitors were investigated resulting from the lead optimization phases of the N-sulfonamide d-Glu MurD inhibitors. Molecular dynamics simulations, based on novel structural data, in conjunction with the linear interaction energy (LIE) method suggested the transferability of our previously obtained LIE coefficients to further d-Glu based classes of MurD inhibitors. Analysis of the observed dynamical behavior of these compounds in the MurD active site was supported by static drug design techniques. These results complement the current knowledge of the MurD inhibitory mechanism and provide valuable support for the d-Glu paradigm of the inhibitor design.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation and linear interaction energy study of D-Glu-based inhibitors of the MurD ligase.

    PubMed

    Perdih, Andrej; Wolber, Gerhard; Solmajer, Tom

    2013-08-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of the bacterial peptidoglycan, where MurD is an enzyme involved at the intracellular stage of its construction, represents a collection of highly selective macromolecular targets for novel antibacterial drug design. In this study as part of our investigation of the MurD bacterial target two recently discovered classes of the MurD ligase inhibitors were investigated resulting from the lead optimization phases of the N-sulfonamide D-Glu MurD inhibitors. Molecular dynamics simulations, based on novel structural data, in conjunction with the linear interaction energy (LIE) method suggested the transferability of our previously obtained LIE coefficients to further D-Glu based classes of MurD inhibitors. Analysis of the observed dynamical behavior of these compounds in the MurD active site was supported by static drug design techniques. These results complement the current knowledge of the MurD inhibitory mechanism and provide valuable support for the D-Glu paradigm of the inhibitor design.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Adsorption of Methane and Chloromethane on Molybdenum via Hybrid EAM/OPLS Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuty, Gary; Tsige, Mesfin

    2012-02-01

    The question of liquid adsorption on the surface of a solid substrate has been of major interest to computational science even from its inception. Accurate depictions of adsorption phenomena require accurate modeling of both phases of the simulated system. In cases in which accuracy of the models leads to the adoption of potentially inconvenient or incompatible force fields, questions arise as to whether joint systems can perform as well as needed to gather optimal data. The current investigation uses molecular dynamics (MD) tools to focus, in part, on how well-developed models for liquid simulation (OPLS, built on a Lennard-Jones foundation) can combine with tested models for metals (based on functionals of electron density) to describe the adsorption of methane and chloromethane on the surface of molybdenum. Comparisons have been made between the differences in effect of a hybrid EAM/OPLS system and systems focusing solely on Lennard-Jones-based interactions, as well as the effect of large asymmetry and polarity differences in adsorbate species, on the structure and dynamics of layers adsorbed directly at the surface of the metal substrate. Preliminary results suggest that the surface landscape and corrugation play a significant role in choice of surface binding sites.

  15. Structure-Activity Relationship in TLR4 Mutations: Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Residue Interaction Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a vital innate immune receptor present on cell surfaces, initiates a signaling cascade during danger and bacterial intrusion. TLR4 needs to form a stable hexamer complex, which is necessary to dimerize the cytoplasmic domain. However, D299G and T399I polymorphism may abrogate the stability of the complex, leading to compromised TLR4 signaling. Crystallography provides valuable insights into the structural aspects of the TLR4 ectodomain; however, the dynamic behavior of polymorphic TLR4 is still unclear. Here, we employed molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), as well as principal component and residue network analyses, to decipher the structural aspects and signaling propagation associated with mutations in TLR4. The mutated complexes were less cohesive, displayed local and global variation in the secondary structure, and anomalous decay in rotational correlation function. Principal component analysis indicated that the mutated complexes also exhibited distinct low-frequency motions, which may be correlated to the differential behaviors of these TLR4 variants. Moreover, residue interaction networks (RIN) revealed that the mutated TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor (MD) 2 complex may perpetuate abnormal signaling pathways. Cumulatively, the MDS and RIN analyses elucidated the mutant-specific conformational alterations, which may help in deciphering the mechanism of loss-of-function mutations. PMID:28272553

  16. Structure-Activity Relationship in TLR4 Mutations: Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Residue Interaction Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2017-03-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a vital innate immune receptor present on cell surfaces, initiates a signaling cascade during danger and bacterial intrusion. TLR4 needs to form a stable hexamer complex, which is necessary to dimerize the cytoplasmic domain. However, D299G and T399I polymorphism may abrogate the stability of the complex, leading to compromised TLR4 signaling. Crystallography provides valuable insights into the structural aspects of the TLR4 ectodomain; however, the dynamic behavior of polymorphic TLR4 is still unclear. Here, we employed molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), as well as principal component and residue network analyses, to decipher the structural aspects and signaling propagation associated with mutations in TLR4. The mutated complexes were less cohesive, displayed local and global variation in the secondary structure, and anomalous decay in rotational correlation function. Principal component analysis indicated that the mutated complexes also exhibited distinct low-frequency motions, which may be correlated to the differential behaviors of these TLR4 variants. Moreover, residue interaction networks (RIN) revealed that the mutated TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor (MD) 2 complex may perpetuate abnormal signaling pathways. Cumulatively, the MDS and RIN analyses elucidated the mutant-specific conformational alterations, which may help in deciphering the mechanism of loss-of-function mutations.

  17. Factors affecting the interactions between beta-lactoglobulin and fatty acids as revealed in molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yi, Changhong; Wambo, Thierry O

    2015-09-21

    Beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a bovine dairy protein, is a promiscuously interacting protein that can bind multiple hydrophobic ligands. Fatty acids (FAs), common hydrophobic molecules bound to BLG, are important sources of fuel for life because they yield large quantities of ATP when metabolized. The binding affinity increases with the length of the ligands, indicating the importance of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions between the hydrocarbon tail and the hydrophobic calyx of BLG. An exception to this rule is caprylic acid (OCA) which is two-carbon shorter but has a stronger binding affinity than capric acid. Theoretical calculations in the current literature are not accurate enough to shed light on the underlying physics of this exception. The computed affinity values are greater for longer fatty acids without respect for the caprylic exception and those values are generally several orders of magnitude away from the experimental data. In this work, we used hybrid steered molecular dynamics to accurately compute the binding free energies between BLG and the five saturated FAs of 8 to 16 carbon atoms. The computed binding free energies agree well with experimental data not only in rank but also in absolute values. We gained insights into the exceptional behavior of caprylic acid in the computed values of entropy and electrostatic interactions. We found that the electrostatic interaction between the carboxyl group of caprylic acid and the two amino groups of K60/69 in BLG is much stronger than the vdW force between the OCA's hydrophobic tail and the BLG calyx. This pulls OCA to the top of the beta barrel where it is easier to fluctuate, giving rise to greater entropy of OCA at the binding site.

  18. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant’s functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies. PMID:26657745

  19. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant's functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies.

  20. Molecular dynamics of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its metabolite interacting with lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Chavarría, Helmut I; Guizado, Teobaldo R C; Pimentel, Andre S

    2015-08-28

    The interaction of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its ultimate carcinogenic 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide with lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers was successfully performed using molecular dynamics. The DPPC/DPPG/cholesterol bilayer (64 : 64 : 2) was used as the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayer model and compared with the DPPC bilayer as a reference. Dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide were inserted in water and lipid phases in order to investigate their interactions with the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers. The radial distribution function between two P atoms in polar heads shows that the 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide affects the order between the P atoms in the DPPC/DPPG/cholesterol model more than dibenz[a,h]anthracene, which is a consequence of its preference for the polar heads and dibenz[a,h]anthracene prefers to be located in the hydrocarbon chain of the phospholipid bilayers. Dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide may form aggregates in water and lipid phases, and in the water-lipid interface. The implications for the possible effect of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide in the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers are discussed.

  1. Fe/C interactions during SWNT growth with C2 feedstock molecules: A quantum chemical molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guishan; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2006-05-01

    We are presenting the first quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) model simulations for iron catalyzed single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) growth based on the density functional tight binding (DFTB) quantum chemical potential. As model systems, open-ended (10,10) armchair tube fragments were selected with 0, 10, and 20 Fe atoms attached in 1,4-positions on the open rims, and ensembles of randomly oriented C2 molecules were included to simulate carbon plasma feedstock molecules. Isokinetic trajectories at 1500 K to 3000 K show that divalent Fe increases the number of coordination partners with carbon and/or Fe, depending on the Fe concentration. Fe/C interactions weaken the tube sidewall due to electron transfer from Fe into antibonding carbon orbitals, and C2 addition occurs mainly in an Fe-C2-Fe bridge addition mechanism, while growth of polyyne chains characteristic for high-temperature carbon systems is suppressed in the presence of Fe on the rims of the growing SWNT. Our findings are the first quantum chemical evidence for the importance of intermetallic interactions during SWNT growth.

  2. Similarities and differences of serotonin and its precursors in their interactions with model membranes studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Irene; Martini, M. Florencia; Pickholz, Mónica

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we report a molecular dynamics (MD) simulations study of relevant biological molecules as serotonin (neutral and protonated) and its precursors, tryptophan and 5-hydroxy-tryptophan, in a fully hydrated bilayer of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-choline (POPC). The simulations were carried out at the fluid lamellar phase of POPC at constant pressure and temperature conditions. Two guest molecules of each type were initially placed at the water phase. We have analyzed, the main localization, preferential orientation and specific interactions of the guest molecules within the bilayer. During the simulation run, the four molecules were preferentially found at the water-lipid interphase. We found that the interactions that stabilized the systems are essentially hydrogen bonds, salt bridges and cation-π. None of the guest molecules have access to the hydrophobic region of the bilayer. Besides, zwitterionic molecules have access to the water phase, while protonated serotonin is anchored in the interphase. Even taking into account that these simulations were done using a model membrane, our results suggest that the studied molecules could not cross the blood brain barrier by diffusion. These results are in good agreement with works that show that serotonin and Trp do not cross the BBB by simple diffusion.

  3. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  4. Reparameterization of Protein Force Field Nonbonded Interactions Guided by Osmotic Coefficient Measurements from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark S; Lay, Wesley Kayser; Li, Shuxiang; Hacker, William Charles; An, Jiadi; Ren, Jianlan; Elcock, Adrian Hamilton

    2017-03-15

    There is a small, but growing, body of literature describing the use of osmotic coefficient measurements to validate and reparameterize simulation force fields. Here we have investigated the ability of five very commonly used force field and water model combinations to reproduce the osmotic coefficients of seven neutral amino acids and five small molecules. The force fields tested include AMBER ff99SB-ILDN, CHARMM36, GROMOS54a7, and OPLS-AA, with the first of these tested in conjunction with the TIP3P and TIP4P-Ew water models. In general, for both the amino acids and the small molecules, the tested force fields produce computed osmotic coefficients that are lower than experiment; this is indicative of excessively favorable solute-solute interactions. The sole exception to this general trend is provided by GROMOS54a7 when applied to amino acids: in this case, the computed osmotic coefficients are consistently too high. Importantly, we show that all of the force fields tested can be made to accurately reproduce the experimental osmotic coefficients of the amino acids when minor modifications - some previously reported by others and some that are new to this study - are made to the van der Waals interactions of the charged terminal groups. Special care is required, however, when simulating Proline with a number of the force fields, and a hydroxyl-group specific modification is required in order to correct Serine and Threonine when simulated with AMBER ff99SB-ILDN. Interestingly, an alternative parameterization of the van der Waals interactions in the latter force field, proposed by the Nerenberg and Head-Gordon groups, is shown to immediately produce osmotic coefficients that are in excellent agreement with experiment. Overall, this study reinforces the idea that osmotic coefficient measurements can be used to identify general shortcomings in commonly used force fields' descriptions of solute-solute interactions, and further demonstrates that modifications to van der

  5. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of correlated electrons in solution. 1. Full configuration interaction (CI) excited-state relaxation dynamics of hydrated dielectrons.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ross E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2006-05-18

    The hydrated dielectron is composed of two excess electrons dissolved in liquid water that occupy a single cavity; in both its singlet and triplet spin states there is a significant exchange interaction so the two electrons cannot be considered to be independent. In this paper and the following paper,we present the results of mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations of the nonadiabatic relaxation dynamics of photoexcited hydrated dielectrons, where we use full configuration interaction (CI) to solve for the two-electron wave function at every simulation time step. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first systematic treatment of excited-state solvation dynamics where the multiple-electron problem is solved exactly. The simulations show that the effects of exchange and correlation contribute significantly to the relaxation dynamics. For example, spin-singlet dielectrons relax to the ground state on a time scale similar to that of single electrons excited at the same energy, but spin-triplet dielectrons relax much faster. The difference in relaxation dynamics is caused by exchange and correlation: The Pauli exclusion principle imposes very different electronic structure when the electrons' spins are singlet paired than when they are triplet paired, altering the available nonadiabatic relaxation pathways. In addition, we monitor how electronic correlation changes dynamically during nonadiabatic relaxation and show that solvent dynamics cause electron correlation to evolve quite differently for singlet and triplet dielectrons. Despite such differences, our calculations show that both spin states are stable to excited-state dissociation, but that the excited-state stability has different origins for the two spin states. For singlet dielectrons, the stability depends on whether the solvent structure can rearrange to create a second cavity before the ground state is reached. For triplet dielectrons, in contrast, electronic correlation ensures

  6. Allosteric pathway identification through network analysis: from molecular dynamics simulations to interactive 2D and 3D graphs.

    PubMed

    Allain, Ariane; Chauvot de Beauchêne, Isaure; Langenfeld, Florent; Guarracino, Yann; Laine, Elodie; Tchertanov, Luba

    2014-01-01

    Allostery is a universal phenomenon that couples the information induced by a local perturbation (effector) in a protein to spatially distant regulated sites. Such an event can be described in terms of a large scale transmission of information (communication) through a dynamic coupling between structurally rigid (minimally frustrated) and plastic (locally frustrated) clusters of residues. To elaborate a rational description of allosteric coupling, we propose an original approach - MOdular NETwork Analysis (MONETA) - based on the analysis of inter-residue dynamical correlations to localize the propagation of both structural and dynamical effects of a perturbation throughout a protein structure. MONETA uses inter-residue cross-correlations and commute times computed from molecular dynamics simulations and a topological description of a protein to build a modular network representation composed of clusters of residues (dynamic segments) linked together by chains of residues (communication pathways). MONETA provides a brand new direct and simple visualization of protein allosteric communication. A GEPHI module implemented in the MONETA package allows the generation of 2D graphs of the communication network. An interactive PyMOL plugin permits drawing of the communication pathways between chosen protein fragments or residues on a 3D representation. MONETA is a powerful tool for on-the-fly display of communication networks in proteins. We applied MONETA for the analysis of communication pathways (i) between the main regulatory fragments of receptors tyrosine kinases (RTKs), KIT and CSF-1R, in the native and mutated states and (ii) in proteins STAT5 (STAT5a and STAT5b) in the phosphorylated and the unphosphorylated forms. The description of the physical support for allosteric coupling by MONETA allowed a comparison of the mechanisms of (a) constitutive activation induced by equivalent mutations in two RTKs and (b) allosteric regulation in the activated and non

  7. Interaction between a Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube and the YAP65WW Protein Domain: a Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Quan-Tao; Zuo, Guang-Hong; Fang, Hai-Ping

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between a functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (f-SWCNT) and the YAP65WW protein domain is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the f-SWCNT binds onto the active site of the YAP65WW domain and leads to a substantial conformational change of the protein domain, which may securely affect the original function of protein. Both the hydrophobic interaction and the long lifetime hydrogen bonds play important roles in the binding.

  8. Exploring the Interaction of SV2A with Racetams Using Homology Modelling, Molecular Dynamics and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joanna; Daniels, Veronique; Sands, Zara A.; Lebon, Florence; Shi, Jiye; Biggin, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    The putative Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) transporter, SV2A, is the target for levetiracetam (LEV), which is a successful anti-epileptic drug. Furthermore, SV2A knock out mice display a severe seizure phenotype and die after a few weeks. Despite this, the mode of action of LEV is not known at the molecular level. It would be extremely desirable to understand this more fully in order to aid the design of improved anti-epileptic compounds. Since there is no structure for SV2A, homology modelling can provide insight into the ligand-binding site. However, it is not a trivial process to build such models, since SV2A has low sequence identity to those MFS transporters whose structures are known. A further level of complexity is added by the fact that it is not known which conformational state of the receptor LEV binds to, as multiple conformational states have been inferred by tomography and ligand binding assays or indeed, if binding is exclusive to a single state. Here, we explore models of both the inward and outward facing conformational states of SV2A (according to the alternating access mechanism for MFS transporters). We use a sequence conservation analysis to help guide the homology modelling process and generate the models, which we assess further with Molecular Dynamics (MD). By comparing the MD results in conjunction with docking and simulation of a LEV-analogue used in radioligand binding assays, we were able to suggest further residues that line the binding pocket. These were confirmed experimentally. In particular, mutation of D670 leads to a complete loss of binding. The results shed light on the way LEV analogues may interact with SV2A and may help with the on-going design of improved anti-epileptic compounds. PMID:25692762

  9. A Molecular Dynamics Approach to Ligand-Receptor Interaction in the Aspirin-Human Serum Albumin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, H. Ariel; McCarthy, Andrés N.; Grigera, J. Raúl

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present a study of the interaction between human serum albumin (HSA) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, C9H8O4) by molecular dynamics simulations (MD). Starting from an experimentally resolved structure of the complex, we performed the extraction of the ligand by means of the application of an external force. After stabilization of the system, we quantified the force used to remove the ASA from its specific site of binding to HSA and calculated the mechanical nonequilibrium external work done during this process. We obtain a reasonable value for the upper boundary of the Gibbs free energy difference (an equilibrium thermodynamic potential) between the complexed and noncomplexed states. To achieve this goal, we used the finite sampling estimator of the average work, calculated from the Jarzynski Equality. To evaluate the effect of the solvent, we calculated the so-called “viscous work,” that is, the work done to move the aspirin in the same trajectory through the solvent in absence of the protein, so as to assess the relevance of its contribution to the total work. The results are in good agreement with the available experimental data for the albumin affinity constant for aspirin, obtained through quenching fluorescence methods. PMID:23251150

  10. dsRNA-protein interactions studied by molecular dynamics techniques. Unravelling dsRNA recognition by DCL1.

    PubMed

    Drusin, Salvador I; Suarez, Irina P; Gauto, Diego F; Rasia, Rodolfo M; Moreno, Diego M

    2016-04-15

    Double stranded RNA (dsRNA) participates in several biological processes, where RNA molecules acquire secondary structure inside the cell through base complementarity. The double stranded RNA binding domain (dsRBD) is one of the main protein folds that is able to recognize and bind to dsRNA regions. The N-terminal dsRBD of DCL1 in Arabidopsis thaliana (DCL1-1), in contrast to other studied dsRBDs, lacks a stable structure, behaving as an intrinsically disordered protein. DCL1-1 does however recognize dsRNA by acquiring a canonical fold in the presence of its substrate. Here we present a detailed modeling and molecular dynamics study of dsRNA recognition by DCL1-1. We found that DCL1-1 forms stable complexes with different RNAs and we characterized the residues involved in binding. Although the domain shows a binding loop substantially shorter than other homologs, it can still interact with the dsRNA and results in bending of the dsRNA A-type helix. Furthermore, we found that R8, a non-conserved residue located in the first dsRNA binding region, recognizes preferentially mismatched base pairs. We discuss our findings in the context of the function of DCL1-1 within the microRNA processing complex.

  11. Study on the interaction of uranyl with sulfated beta-cyclodextrin by affinity capillary electrophoresis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Linnan; Zhang, Yiding; Li, Xianjiang; Shen, Sensen; Huang, Hexiang; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2016-10-01

    The study on sulfated beta-cyclodextrin binding to uranyl ion helps to get a better understanding of uranyl compounds' intermolecular interaction mechanism and facilitates the structure-based design of uranyl binding molecules. Here we investigated the electromigration of the inclusion complex by using affinity capillary electrophoresis in acidic solution. The binding constant was determined to be logK = 2.96 ± 0.02 (R(2) = 0.996) through nonlinear regression approach. The possible configurations and structural features of the inclusion complex were further studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The results suggest the distinctions of coordination environment and hydration compared with bare uranyl ion in aqueous solution. Thus, two water oxygen atoms coordinated with uranyl in the first hydration shell at 2.55 angstrom instead of five in the same distance range. The binding free energy was calculated as -12.10 ± 1.46 kcal/mol by means of thermodynamic perturbation method. The negative value indicates that the process of S-β-CD capture uranyl ion in the aqueous media is spontaneous.

  12. Interaction of PEGylated anti-hypertensive drugs, amlodipine, atenolol and lisinopril with lipid bilayer membrane: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Yousefpour, Abbas; Modarress, Hamid; Goharpey, Fatemeh; Amjad-Iranagh, Sepideh

    2015-08-01

    The interaction of PEGylated anti-hypertensive drugs, amlodipine, atenolol and lisinopril with lipid bilayer membrane dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) has been studied in nine different simulation systems consisting of 128 lipid molecules and appropriate number of water molecules by molecular dynamics method and by utilizing GROMACS software. The influences of PEGylation on the mentioned drugs and the differences in application of two types of spacer molecules on the performance of drugs and DMPC membrane have been evaluated and mass density of the components in the simulation box, mean square displacement (MSD), electrostatic potential, hydrogen bonding, radial distribution function (RDF), area per lipid, order parameter, and angle distribution of the component molecules including drug, DMPC and PEG has been investigated. Furthermore, umbrella sampling analysis indicated that, PEGylation of the drugs made amlodipine to behave more hydrophilic, whereas in case of lisinopril and atenolol, PEGylation made these drugs to behave more hydrophobic. In almost all of the simulated systems, PEGylation increased the diffusion coefficient of the drugs.

  13. Multiprotein Interactions during Surface Adsorption: a Molecular Dynamics Study of Lysozyme Aggregation at a Charged Solid Surface

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Multiprotein adsorption of hen egg white lysozyme at a model charged ionic surface is studied using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations with two, three, and five proteins, in various orientations with respect the surface, are performed over a 100 ns time scale. Mutated proteins with point mutations at the major (Arg128 and Arg125) and minor (Arg68) surface adsorption sites are also studied. The 100 ns time scale used is sufficient to observe protein translations, rotations, adsorption, and aggregation. Two competing processes of particular interest are observed, namely surface adsorption and protein–protein aggregation. At low protein concentration, the proteins first adsorb in isolation and can then reorientate on the surface to aggregate. At high concentration, the proteins aggregate in the solution and then adsorb in nonspecific ways. This work demonstrates the role of protein concentration in adsorption, indicates the residues involved in both types of interaction (protein–protein and protein–surface), and gives an insight into processes to be considered in the development of new functionalized material systems. PMID:21671567

  14. A molecular dynamics approach to ligand-receptor interaction in the aspirin-human serum albumin complex.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, H Ariel; McCarthy, Andrés N; Grigera, J Raúl

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present a study of the interaction between human serum albumin (HSA) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, C(9)H(8)O(4)) by molecular dynamics simulations (MD). Starting from an experimentally resolved structure of the complex, we performed the extraction of the ligand by means of the application of an external force. After stabilization of the system, we quantified the force used to remove the ASA from its specific site of binding to HSA and calculated the mechanical nonequilibrium external work done during this process. We obtain a reasonable value for the upper boundary of the Gibbs free energy difference (an equilibrium thermodynamic potential) between the complexed and noncomplexed states. To achieve this goal, we used the finite sampling estimator of the average work, calculated from the Jarzynski Equality. To evaluate the effect of the solvent, we calculated the so-called "viscous work," that is, the work done to move the aspirin in the same trajectory through the solvent in absence of the protein, so as to assess the relevance of its contribution to the total work. The results are in good agreement with the available experimental data for the albumin affinity constant for aspirin, obtained through quenching fluorescence methods.

  15. Interactions of aqueous amino acids and proteins with the (110) surface of ZnS in molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocki, Grzegorz; Cieplak, Marek

    2014-03-07

    The growing usage of nanoparticles of zinc sulfide as quantum dots and biosensors calls for a theoretical assessment of interactions of ZnS with biomolecules. We employ the molecular-dynamics-based umbrella sampling method to determine potentials of mean force for 20 single amino acids near the ZnS (110) surface in aqueous solutions. We find that five amino acids do not bind at all and the binding energy of the remaining amino acids does not exceed 4.3 kJ/mol. Such energies are comparable to those found for ZnO (and to hydrogen bonds in proteins) but the nature of the specificity is different. Cysteine can bind with ZnS in a covalent way, e.g., by forming the disulfide bond with S in the solid. If this effect is included within a model incorporating the Morse potential, then the potential well becomes much deeper—the binding energy is close to 98 kJ/mol. We then consider tryptophan cage, a protein of 20 residues, and characterize its events of adsorption to ZnS. We demonstrate the relevance of interactions between the amino acids in the selection of optimal adsorbed conformations and recognize the key role of cysteine in generation of lasting adsorption. We show that ZnS is more hydrophobic than ZnO and that the density profile of water is quite different than that forming near ZnO—it has only a minor articulation into layers. Furthermore, the first layer of water is disordered and mobile.

  16. Protein-protein interaction and molecular dynamics analysis for identification of novel inhibitors in Burkholderia cepacia GG4.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Money; Chauhan, Rashi; Prasad, Yamuna; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Jain, Chakresh Kumar

    2016-12-01

    The lack of complete treatments and appearance of multiple drug-resistance strains of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are causing an increased risk of lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Bcc infection is a big risk to human health and demands an urgent need to identify new therapeutics against these bacteria. Network biology has emerged as one of the prospective hope in identifying novel drug targets and hits. We have applied protein-protein interaction methodology to identify new drug-target candidates (orthologs) in Burkhloderia cepacia GG4, which is an important strain for studying the quorum-sensing phenomena. An evolutionary based ortholog mapping approach has been applied for generating the large scale protein-protein interactions in B. Cepacia. As a case study, one of the identified drug targets; GEM_3202, a NH (3)-dependent NAD synthetase protein has been studied and the potential ligand molecules were screened using the ZINC database. The three dimensional structure (NH (3)-dependent NAD synthetase protein) has been predicted from MODELLERv9.11 tool using multiple PDB templates such as 3DPI, 2PZ8 and 1NSY with sequence identity of 76%, 50% and 50% respectively. The structure has been validated with Ramachandaran plot having 100% residues of NadE in allowed region and overall quality factor of 81.75 using ERRAT tool. High throughput screening and Vina resulted in two potential hits against NadE such as ZINC83103551 and ZINC38008121. These molecules showed lowest binding energy of -5.7kcalmol(-1) and high stability in the binding pockets during molecular dynamics simulation analysis. The similar approach for target identification could be applied for clinical strains of other pathogenic microbes.

  17. Interactions of hydrogen with the iron and iron carbide interfaces: a ReaxFF molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Mahbubul; Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C T; Raman, Sumathy

    2016-01-14

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a well-known material phenomenon that causes significant loss in the mechanical strength of structural iron and often leads to catastrophic failures. In order to provide a detailed atomistic description of HE we have used a reactive bond order potential to adequately describe the diffusion of hydrogen as well as its chemical interaction with other hydrogen atoms, defects, and the host metal. The currently published ReaxFF force field for Fe/C/H systems was originally developed to describe Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysis [C. Zou, A. C. T. van Duin and D. C. Sorescu, Top. Catal., 2012, 55, 391-401], and especially had been trained for surface formation energies, binding energies of small hydrocarbon radicals on different surfaces of iron and the barrier heights of surface reactions. We merged this force field with the latest ReaxFF carbon parameters [S. Goverapet Srinivasan, A. C. T. van Duin and P. Ganesh, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2015, 119, 1089-5639] and used the same training data set to refit the Fe/C interaction parameters. The present work is focused on evaluating the applicability of this reactive force field to describe material characteristics and study the role of defects and impurities in the bulk and at the precipitator interfaces. We study the interactions of hydrogen with pure and defective α-iron (ferrite), Fe3C (cementite), and ferrite-cementite interfaces with a vacancy cluster. We also investigate the growth of nanovoids in α-iron using a grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) scheme. The calculated hydrogen diffusion coefficients for both ferrite and cementite phases predict a decrease in the work of separation with increasing hydrogen concentration at the ferrite-cementite interface, suggesting a hydrogen-induced decohesion behavior. Hydrogen accumulation at the interface was observed during molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which is consistent with experimental findings. These results demonstrate the ability of the Reax

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of water/BHDC cationic reverse micelles. structural characterization, dynamical properties, and influence of solvent on intermicellar interactions.

    PubMed

    Agazzi, Federico M; Correa, N Mariano; Rodriguez, Javier

    2014-08-19

    We report results obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) experiments of benzylhexadecyldimethylammonium chloride (BHDC) cationic reverse micelles (RMs). In particular we analyzed equilibrium and dynamical characteristics of water/BHDC RMs in pure benzene, at two different water/BHDC ratios (W0 = 5 and W0 = 10). The RMs appear as elliptical aggregates with eccentricities close to ∼0.9. Analysis of the different spatial correlations reveals three different spatial domains in the RMs: a water inner pool, the surfactant interface, and the external solvent. The calculated accessible surface areas for the aqueous inner cores suggest a strong penetration of solvent molecules within the micellar interface domains. Comparison between the density profiles of both RMs shows an increment of the broadness in the distributions of all species at the interface, along with an increasing overlap between the tail segments of the surfactant and benzene molecules as one considers larger micelles. For the dynamical side, the rotational characteristic time scale for the confined water was found to be 1 order of magnitude larger than that of the bulk water. A similar effect was also observed for hydrogen bond dynamics. Both retardation effects diminish with the size of the aggregate. To the estimate the influence of the external solvent on the intermicellar interactions, free energy profiles for the coalescence process between RMs of similar size in pure benzene and in a n-heptane/benzene mixture were also investigated. The results indicate that the association process is facilitated by the presence of n-heptane in the external nonpolar phase. Comparison with previous theoretical and experimental results is also carried out.

  19. Cholesterol-Ceramide Interactions in Phospholipid and Sphingolipid Bilayers As Observed by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    García-Arribas, Aritz B; Axpe, Eneko; Mujika, Jon Iñaki; Mérida, David; Busto, Jon V; Sot, Jesús; Alonso, Alicia; Lopez, Xabier; García, Jose Ángel; Ugalde, Jesus M; Plazaola, Fernando; Goñi, Félix M

    2016-05-31

    Free volume voids in lipid bilayers can be measured by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). This technique has been applied, together with differential scanning calorimetry and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to study the effects of cholesterol (Chol) and ceramide (Cer) on free volume voids in sphingomyelin (SM) or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. Binary lipid samples with Chol were studied (DPPC:Chol 60:40, SM:Chol 60:40 mol ratio), and no phase transition was detected in the 20-60 °C range, in agreement with calorimetric data. Chol-driven liquid-ordered phase showed an intermediate free volume void size as compared to gel and fluid phases. For SM and SM:Cer (85:15 mol:mol) model membranes measured in the 20-60 °C range the gel-to-fluid phase transition could be observed with a related increase in free volume, which was more pronounced for the SM:Cer sample. MD simulations suggest a hitherto unsuspected lipid tilting in SM:Cer bilayers but not in pure SM. Ternary samples of DPPC:Cer:Chol (54:23:23) and SM:Cer:Chol (54:23:23) were measured, and a clear pattern of free volume increase was observed in the 20-60 °C because of the gel-to-fluid transition. Interestingly, MD simulations showed a tendency of Cer to change its distribution along the membrane to make room for Chol in ternary mixtures. The results suggest that the gel phase formed in these ternary mixtures is stabilized by Chol-Cer interactions.

  20. Interactions of the C-terminal Domain of Human Ku70 with DNA Substrate: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Huff, Janice; Pluth, Janice M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    NASA is developing a systems biology approach to improve the assessment of health risks associated with space radiation. The primary toxic and mutagenic lesion following radiation exposure is the DNA double strand break (DSB), thus a model incorporating proteins and pathways important in response and repair of this lesion is critical. One key protein heterodimer for systems models of radiation effects is the Ku(sub 70/80) complex. The Ku70/80 complex is important in the initial binding of DSB ends following DNA damage, and is a component of nonhomologous end joining repair, the primary pathway for DSB repair in mammalian cells. The C-terminal domain of Ku70 (Ku70c, residues 559-609), contains an helix-extended strand-helix motif and similar motifs have been found in other nucleic acid-binding proteins critical for DNA repair. However, the exact mechanism of damage recognition and substrate specificity for the Ku heterodimer remains unclear in part due to the absence of a high-resolution structure of the Ku70c/DNA complex. We performed a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a system with the subunit Ku70c and a 14 base pairs DNA duplex, whose starting structures are designed to be variable so as to mimic their different binding modes. By analyzing conformational changes and energetic properties of the complex during MD simulations, we found that interactions are preferred at DNA ends, and within the major groove, which is consistent with previous experimental investigations. In addition, the results indicate that cooperation of Ku70c with other subunits of Ku(sub 70/80) is necessary to explain the high affinity of binding as observed in experiments.

  1. Interaction mechanism exploration of R-bicalutamide/S-1 with WT/W741L AR using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongli; An, Xiaoli; Li, Shuyan; Wang, Yuwei; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang

    2015-12-01

    R-Bicalutamide is a first generation antiandrogen used to treat prostate cancer, which inhibits androgen action by competitively binding to the androgen receptor (AR). However, R-bicalutamide was discovered to exhibit some agonistic properties in clinical application. According to reports, the W741L AR mutation may lead to resistance towards R-bicalutamide. But the mechanism of the R-bicalutamide switch from an antagonist to an agonist due to the mutation of AR W741L is still not so clear. Another molecule, S-1, owing to a very similar structure to R-bicalutamide, is always agonistic to both the wild type and W741L AR. The main difference between these two chemicals is that S-1 has an ether linkage while R-bicalutamide has a sulfonyl group. To study the drug-resistant mechanism caused by W741L mutation and the opposite effects arising from subtle structure differences, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) calculations were employed to explore the interaction mechanisms between R-bicalutamide/S-1 and WT/W741L AR. The calculated binding free energies are in accordance with the reported experimental values. The obtained results indicate that M895 and W741 are vital amino acids in the antagonism of R-bicalutamide. The bulkier substitution of sulfonyl and tryptophan push aside M895, together with helix 12 (H12), to expose the ligand-binding domain resulting in the antagonistic conformation of the AR. If W741 is mutated to L741, the B-ring of these two chemicals would shift toward L741. At the same time, M895 dragging helix H12, would also move closer to L741. So H12 tends to cover the AR ligand-binding domain to a certain degree, changing the androgen receptor from an antagonistic to an agonistic conformation, which may explain the agonism of R-bicalutamide to the mutant W741L AR.

  2. The Application of Ligand-Mapping Molecular Dynamics Simulations to the Rational Design of Peptidic Modulators of Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yaw Sing; Spring, David R; Abell, Chris; Verma, Chandra S

    2015-07-14

    A computational ligand-mapping approach to detect protein surface pockets that interact with hydrophobic moieties is presented. In this method, we incorporated benzene molecules into explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of various protein targets. The benzene molecules successfully identified the binding locations of hydrophobic hot-spot residues and all-hydrocarbon cross-links from known peptidic ligands. They also unveiled cryptic binding sites that are occluded by side chains and the protein backbone. Our results demonstrate that ligand-mapping molecular dynamics simulations hold immense promise to guide the rational design of peptidic modulators of protein-protein interactions, including that of stapled peptides, which show promise as an exciting new class of cell-penetrating therapeutic molecules.

  3. Simulating molecular mechanisms of the MDM2-mediated regulatory interactions: a conformational selection model of the MDM2 lid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2012-01-01

    Diversity and complexity of MDM2 mechanisms govern its principal function as the cellular antagonist of the p53 tumor suppressor. Structural and biophysical studies have demonstrated that MDM2 binding could be regulated by the dynamics of a pseudo-substrate lid motif. However, these experiments and subsequent computational studies have produced conflicting mechanistic models of MDM2 function and dynamics. We propose a unifying conformational selection model that can reconcile experimental findings and reveal a fundamental role of the lid as a dynamic regulator of MDM2-mediated binding. In this work, structure, dynamics and energetics of apo-MDM2 are studied as a function of posttranslational modifications and length of the lid. We found that the dynamic equilibrium between "closed" and "semi-closed" lid forms may be a fundamental characteristic of MDM2 regulatory interactions, which can be modulated by phosphorylation, phosphomimetic mutation as well as by the lid size. Our results revealed that these factors may regulate p53-MDM2 binding by fine-tuning the thermodynamic equilibrium between preexisting conformational states of apo-MDM2. In agreement with NMR studies, the effect of phosphorylation on MDM2 interactions was more pronounced with the truncated lid variant that favored the thermodynamically dominant closed form. The phosphomimetic mutation S17D may alter the lid dynamics by shifting the thermodynamic equilibrium towards the ensemble of "semi-closed" conformations. The dominant "semi-closed" lid form and weakened dependence on the phosphorylation seen in simulations with the complete lid can provide a rationale for binding of small p53-based mimetics and inhibitors without a direct competition with the lid dynamics. The results suggested that a conformational selection model of preexisting MDM2 states may provide a robust theoretical framework for understanding MDM2 dynamics. Probing biological functions and mechanisms of MDM2 regulation would require

  4. Interaction between Wine Phenolic Acids and Salivary Proteins by Saturation-Transfer Difference Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (STD-NMR) and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Gallego, Raúl; Hernández-Hierro, José Miguel; Brás, Natércia F; Vale, Nuno; Gomes, Paula; Mateus, Nuno; de Freitas, Victor; Heredia, Francisco J; Escribano-Bailón, María Teresa

    2017-03-10

    The interaction between phenolic compounds and salivary proteins is highly related to the astringency perception. Recently, it has been proven the existence of synergisms on the perceived astringency when phenolic acids were tested as mixtures in comparison to individual compounds, maintaining constant the total amount of the stimulus. The interactions between wine phenolic acids and the peptide fragment IB712 have been studied by saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy. This technique provided the dissociation constants and the percentage of interaction between both individual and mixtures of hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids and the model peptide. It is noteworthy that hydroxybenzoic acids showed higher affinity for the peptide than hydroxycinnamic acids. To obtain further insights into the mechanisms of interaction, molecular dynamics simulations have been performed. Results obtained not only showed the ability of these compounds to interact with salivary proteins but also may justify the synergistic effect observed in previous sensory studies.

  5. Ab initio molecular orbital-configuration interaction based quantum master equation (MOQME) approach to the dynamic first hyperpolarizabilities of asymmetric π-conjugated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Ryohei; Fujii, Hiroaki; Minami, Takuya; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Nakano, Masayoshi

    2015-01-22

    In this study, we apply the ab initio molecular orbital - configuration interaction based quantum master equation (MOQME) approach to the calculation and analysis of the dynamic first hyperpolarizabilities (β) of asymmetric π-conjugated molecules. In this approach, we construct the excited state models by the ab initio configuration interaction singles method. Then, time evolutions of system reduced density matrix ρ(t) and system polarization p(t) are calculated by the QME approach. Dynamic β in the second harmonic generation is calculated based on the nonperturbative definition of nonlinear optical susceptibility, using the frequency domain system polarization p(ω). Spatial contributions of electrons to β are analyzed based on the dynamic hyperpolarizability density map, which visualizes the second-order response of charge density oscillating with a frequency of 2ω. We apply the present method to the calculation of the dynamic β of a series of donor/acceptor substituted polyene oligomers, and then discuss the applicability of the MOQME method to the calculation and analysis of dynamic NLO properties of molecular systems.

  6. Electrostatic interactions in molecular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painelli, Anna; Terenziani, Francesca

    2004-03-01

    Non-additive collective behavior appears in molecular materials as a result of intermolecular interactions. We present a model for interacting polar and polarizable molecules that applies to different supramolecular architectures of donor-π-acceptor molecules. We follow a bottom-up modeling strategy: the detailed analysis of spectroscopic data of solvated molecules leads to the definition of a simple two-state model for the molecular units. Classical electrostatic interactions are then introduced to model molecular clusters. The molecular properties are strickingly affected by supramolecular interactions, as demonstrated by spectroscopic studies. Brand new phenomena, like phase transitions and multielectron transfer, with no counterpart at the molecular level are observed as direct consequences of electrostatic intermolecular interactions.

  7. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jungen, Ch.

    2015-01-22

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering.

  8. Introduction to Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2012-07-10

    Molecular Dynamics is the numerical solution of the equations of motion of a set of atoms, given an interatomic potential V and some boundary and initial conditions. Molecular Dynamics is the largest scale model that gives unbiased dynamics [x(t),p(t)] in full atomistic detail. Molecular Dynamics: is simple; is 'exact' for classical dynamics (with respect to a given V); can be used to compute any (atomistic) thermodynamical or dynamical properties; naturally handles complexity -- the system does the right thing at the right time. The physics derives only from the interatomic potential.

  9. A molecular dynamics study of model SI clathrate hydrates: the effect of guest size and guest-water interaction on decomposition kinetics.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhadip; Baghel, Vikesh Singh; Roy, Sudip; Kumar, Rajnish

    2015-04-14

    One of the options suggested for methane recovery from natural gas hydrates is molecular replacement of methane by suitable guests like CO2 and N2. This approach has been found to be feasible through many experimental and molecular dynamics simulation studies. However, the long term stability of the resultant hydrate needs to be evaluated; the decomposition rate of these hydrates is expected to depend on the interaction between these guest and water molecules. In this work, molecular dynamics simulation has been performed to illustrate the effect of guest molecules with different sizes and interaction strengths with water on structure I (SI) hydrate decomposition and hence the stability. The van der Waals interaction between water of hydrate cages and guest molecules is defined by Lennard Jones potential parameters. A wide range of parameter spaces has been scanned by changing the guest molecules in the SI hydrate, which acts as a model gas for occupying the small and large cages of the SI hydrate. All atomistic simulation results show that the stability of the hydrate is sensitive to the size and interaction of the guest molecules with hydrate water. The increase in the interaction of guest molecules with water stabilizes the hydrate, which in turn shows a slower rate of hydrate decomposition. Similarly guest molecules with a reasonably small (similar to Helium) or large size increase the decomposition rate. The results were also analyzed by calculating the structural order parameter to understand the dynamics of crystal structure and correlated with the release rate of guest molecules from the solid hydrate phase. The results have been explained based on the calculation of potential energies felt by guest molecules in amorphous water, hydrate bulk and hydrate-water interface regions.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The development of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics is very important in the history of physics, and it underlines the difficulty in dealing with systems involving many bodies, even if those bodies are identical. Macroscopic systems of atoms typically contain so many particles that it would be virtually impossible to follow the behavior of all of the particles involved. Therefore, the behavior of a complete system can only be described or predicted in statistical ways. Under a grant to the NASA Lewis Research Center, scientists at the Case Western Reserve University have been examining the use of modern computing techniques that may be able to investigate and find the behavior of complete systems that have a large number of particles by tracking each particle individually. This is the study of molecular dynamics. In contrast to Monte Carlo techniques, which incorporate uncertainty from the outset, molecular dynamics calculations are fully deterministic. Although it is still impossible to track, even on high-speed computers, each particle in a system of a trillion trillion particles, it has been found that such systems can be well simulated by calculating the trajectories of a few thousand particles. Modern computers and efficient computing strategies have been used to calculate the behavior of a few physical systems and are now being employed to study important problems such as supersonic flows in the laboratory and in space. In particular, an animated video (available in mpeg format--4.4 MB) was produced by Dr. M.J. Woo, now a National Research Council fellow at Lewis, and the G-VIS laboratory at Lewis. This video shows the behavior of supersonic shocks produced by pistons in enclosed cylinders by following exactly the behavior of thousands of particles. The major assumptions made were that the particles involved were hard spheres and that all collisions with the walls and with other particles were fully elastic. The animated video was voted one of two

  11. Effect of interaction with coesite silica on the conformation of Cecropin P1 using explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Chang, Hector; Mello, Charlene; Nagarajan, Ramanathan; Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2013-01-01

    Explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was carried out for the antimicrobial peptides (i) Cecropin P1 and C-terminus cysteine modified Cecropin P1 (Cecropin P1 C) in solution, (ii) Cecropin P1 and Cecropin P1 C adsorbed onto coesite -Si - O - and Si - O - H surfaces, and (iii) Cecropin P1 C tethered to coesite -Si - O - surface with either (PEO)3 or (PEO)6 linker. Low energy structures for Cecropin P1 and Cecropin P1 C in solution consists of two regions of high α helix probability with a sharp bend, consistent with the available structures of other antimicrobial peptides. The structure of Cecropin P1 C at low ionic strength of 0.02 M exhibits two regions of high α helix probability (residues AKKLEN and EGI) whereas at higher ionic strength of 0.12 M, the molecule was more compact and had three regions of higher α helix probability (residues TAKKLENSA, ISE, and AIQG) with an increase in α helical content from 15.6% to 18.7% as a result of shielding of electrostatic interactions. In the presence of Cecropin P1 C in the vicinity of -Si - O - surface, there is a shift in the location of two peaks in H - O - H density profile to larger distances (2.95 Å and 7.38 Å compared to 2.82 Å and 4.88 Å in the absence of peptide) with attenuated peak intensity. This attenuation is found to be more pronounced for the first peak. H-bond density profile in the vicinity of -Si - O - surface exhibited a single peak in the presence of Cecropin P1 C (at 2.9 Å) which was only slightly different from the profile in the absence of polypeptide (2.82 Å) thus indicating that Cecropin P1 C is not able to break the H-bond formed by the silica surface. The α helix probability for different residues of adsorbed Cecropin P1 C on -Si - O - surface is not significantly different from that of Cecropin P1 C in solution at low ionic strength of 0.02 M whereas there is a decrease in the probability in the second (residues ISE) and third (residues AIQG) α helical regions at

  12. Selective IR multiphoton dissociation of molecules in a pulsed gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface as an alternative to low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, G. N.; Petin, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of studies on the isotope-selective infrared multiphoton dissociation (IR MFD) of SF6 and CF3I molecules in a pulsed, gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface. The productivity of this method in the conditions of a specific experiment (by the example of SF6 molecules) is evaluated. A number of low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation based on the use of infrared lasers for selective excitation of molecules are analysed and their productivity is estimated. The methods are compared with those of selective dissociation of molecules in the flow interacting with a surface. The advantages of this method compared to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation and the IR MPD method in the unperturbed jets and flows are shown. It is concluded that this method could be a promising alternative to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation.

  13. Molecular dynamics study of force acting on a model nano particle immersed in fluid with temperature gradient: Effect of interaction potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Tetsuro; Iseki, Hirotaka; Hanasaki, Itsuo; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2016-11-01

    Thermophoresis of a nano particle in a fluid is investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. In order to elucidate effective factors on the characteristics of thermophoresis, simple models for both the fluid and the nano particle are considered, namely, the surrounding fluid consists of Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles and the model nano particle is a cluster consisting of several tens of LJ particles. Interaction between the fluid particle and the model nano particle is described by the LJ interaction potential or repulsive interaction potential with the Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rule. As a preliminary result, the effect of mass on thermophoretic force acting on the model nano particle is investigated for both interaction potentials.

  14. Investigation into the interaction of losartan with human serum albumin and glycated human serum albumin by spectroscopic and molecular dynamics simulation techniques: A comparison study.

    PubMed

    Moeinpour, Farid; Mohseni-Shahri, Fatemeh S; Malaekeh-Nikouei, Bizhan; Nassirli, Hooriyeh

    2016-09-25

    The interaction between losartan and human serum albumin (HSA), as well as its glycated form (gHSA) was studied by multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular dynamics simulation under physiological conditions. The binding information, including the binding constants, effective quenching constant and number of binding sites showed that the binding partiality of losartan to HSA was higher than to gHSA. The findings of three-dimensional fluorescence spectra demonstrated that the binding of losartan to HSA and gHSA would alter the protein conformation. The distances between Trp residue and the binding sites of the drug were evaluated on the basis of the Förster theory, and it was indicated that non-radiative energy transfer from HSA and gHSA to the losartan happened with a high possibility. According to molecular dynamics simulation, the protein secondary and tertiary structure changes were compared in HSA and gHSA for clarifying the obtained results.

  15. H2O and CO2 confined in cement based materials: an ab initio molecular dynamics study with van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, James; Miranda, Caetano; Fazzio, Adalberto

    2013-03-01

    Although the cement has been widely used for a long time, very little is known regarding the atomistic mechanism behind its functionality. Particularly, the dynamics of molecular systems at confined nanoporous and water hydration is largely unknown. Here, we study the dynamical and structural properties of H2O and CO2 confined between Tobermorite 9Å(T9) surfaces with Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics with and without van der Waals (vdW) interactions, at room temperature. For H2O confined, we have observed a broadening in the intra and intermolecular bond angle distribution. A shift from an ice-like to a liquid-like infrared spectrum with the inclusion of vdW interactions was observed. The bond distance for the confined CO2 was increased, followed with the appearance of shorter (larger) intramolecular (intermolecular) angles. These structural modifications result in variations on the CO2 symmetric stretching Raman active vibration modes. The diffusion coefficient obtained for both confined H2O and CO2 were found to be lower than their bulk counterparts. Interestingly, during the water dynamics, a proton exchange between H2O and the T9 surface was observed. However, for confined CO2, no chemical reactions or bond breaking were observed.

  16. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of ion-solid interactions in zirconate pyrochlores

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen; Zu, X. T.

    2015-01-31

    In this paper, an ab initio molecular dynamics method is employed to study low energy recoil events in zirconate pyrochlores (A2Zr2O7, A = La, Nd and Sm). It shows that both cations and anions in Nd2Zr2O7 and Sm2Zr2O7 are generally more likely to be displaced than those in La2Zr2O7. The damage end states mainly consist of Frenkel pair defects, and the Frenkel pair formation energies in Nd2Zr2O7 and Sm2Zr2O7 are lower than those in La2Zr2O7. These results suggest that the order–disorder structural transition more easily occurs in Nd2Zr2O7 and Sm2Zr2O7 resulting in a defect-fluorite structure, which agrees well with experimental observations. Our calculations indicate that oxygen migration from 48f and 8b to 8a sites is dominant under low energy irradiation. A number of new defects, including four types of cation Frenkel pairs and six types of anion Frenkel pairs, are revealed by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The present findings may help to advance the fundamental understanding of the irradiation response behavior of zirconate pyrochlores.

  17. NOD1CARD Might Be Using Multiple Interfaces for RIP2-Mediated CARD-CARD Interaction: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; De, Sachinandan

    2017-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-containing protein 1 (NOD1) plays the pivotal role in host-pathogen interface of innate immunity and triggers immune signalling pathways for the maturation and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Upon the recognition of iE-DAP, NOD1 self-oligomerizes in an ATP-dependent fashion and interacts with adaptor molecule receptor-interacting protein 2 (RIP2) for the propagation of innate immune signalling and initiation of pro-inflammatory immune responses. This interaction (mediated by NOD1 and RIP2) helps in transmitting the downstream signals for the activation of NF-κB signalling pathway, and has been arbitrated by respective caspase-recruitment domains (CARDs). The so-called CARD-CARD interaction still remained contradictory due to inconsistent results. Henceforth, to understand the mode and the nature of the interaction, structural bioinformatics approaches were employed. MD simulation of modelled 1:1 heterodimeric complexes revealed that the type-Ia interface of NOD1CARD and the type-Ib interface of RIP2CARD might be the suitable interfaces for the said interaction. Moreover, we perceived three dynamically stable heterotrimeric complexes with an NOD1:RIP2 ratio of 1:2 (two numbers) and 2:1. Out of which, in the first trimeric complex, a type-I NOD1-RIP2 heterodimer was found interacting with an RIP2CARD using their type-IIa and IIIa interfaces. However, in the second and third heterotrimer, we observed type-I homodimers of NOD1 and RIP2 CARDs were interacting individually with RIP2CARD and NOD1CARD (in type-II and type-III interface), respectively. Overall, this study provides structural and dynamic insights into the NOD1-RIP2 oligomer formation, which will be crucial in understanding the molecular basis of NOD1-mediated CARD-CARD interaction in higher and lower eukaryotes. PMID:28114344

  18. Floating orbital molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Perlt, Eva; Brüssel, Marc; Kirchner, Barbara

    2014-04-21

    We introduce an alternative ab initio molecular dynamics simulation as a unification of Hartree-Fock molecular dynamics and the floating orbital approach. The general scheme of the floating orbital molecular dynamics method is presented. Moreover, a simple but sophisticated guess for the orbital centers is provided to reduce the number of electronic structure optimization steps at each molecular dynamics step. The conservation of total energy and angular momentum is investigated in order to validate the floating orbital molecular dynamics approach with and without application of the initial guess. Finally, a water monomer and a water dimer are simulated, and the influence of the orbital floating on certain properties like the dipole moment is investigated.

  19. Theoretical studies of molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, W.A. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This research program is directed at extending fundamental knowledge of atoms and molecules including their electronic structure, mutual interaction, collision dynamics, and interaction with radiation. The approach combines the use of ab initio methods--Hartree-Fock (HF) multiconfiguration HF, configuration interaction, and the recently developed quantum Monte Carlo (MC)--to describe electronic structure, intermolecular interactions, and other properties, with various methods of characterizing inelastic and reaction collision processes, and photodissociation dynamics. Present activity is focused on the development and application of the QMC method, surface catalyzed reactions, and reorientation cross sections.

  20. New basis set superposition error free ab initio MO-VB interaction potential: Molecular-dynamics simulation of water at critical and supercritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Famulari, Antonino; Specchio, Roberto; Sironi, Maurizio; Raimondi, Mario

    1998-02-01

    Recently, a controversy has come to light in literature regarding the structure of water in nonambient conditions. Disagreement is evident between the site-site pair correlation functions of water derived from neutron diffraction and those obtained by computer simulations which employ effective pairwise potentials to express the intermolecular interactions. In this paper the SCFMI method (self-consistent field for molecular interaction) followed by nonorthogonal CI (configuration interaction) calculations was used to determine a new water-water interaction potential, which is BSSE (basis set superposition error) free in an a priori fashion. Extensive calculations were performed on water dimer and trimer and a new parametrization of a NCC-like (Niesar-Corongiu-Clementi) potential was accomplished. This was employed in the molecular-dynamics simulation of water. The effect of temperature and density variations was examined. Acceptable agreement between site-site correlation functions derived from neutron diffraction data and from computer simulation was reached. In particular, a weakening of the hydrogen bonded structure was observed on approaching the critical point, which reproduces the experimental behavior. The simulations were performed using the MOTECC (modern techniques in computational chemistry) suite of programs. The present results show the importance of BSSE-free nonorthogonal orbitals in an accurate description of the intermolecular potential of water.

  1. Detection of molecular interactions

    DOEpatents

    Groves, John T [Berkeley, CA; Baksh, Michael M [Fremont, CA; Jaros, Michal [Brno, CH

    2012-02-14

    A method and assay are described for measuring the interaction between a ligand and an analyte. The assay can include a suspension of colloidal particles that are associated with a ligand of interest. The colloidal particles are maintained in the suspension at or near a phase transition state from a condensed phase to a dispersed phase. An analyte to be tested is then added to the suspension. If the analyte binds to the ligand, a phase change occurs to indicate that the binding was successful.

  2. Probing Lewis Acid-Base Interactions with Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics: The Electronic Absorption Spectrum of p-Nitroaniline in Supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Benedito J Costa; Rivelino, Roberto; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2015-07-02

    The structure and dynamics of p-nitroaniline (PNA) in supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at T = 315 K and ρ = 0.81 g cm(-3) are investigated by carrying out Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, and the electronic absorption spectrum in scCO2 is determined by time dependent density functional theory. The structure of the PNA-scCO2 solution illustrates the role played by Lewis acid-base (LA-LB) interactions. In comparison with isolated PNA, the ν(N-O) symmetric and asymmetric stretching modes of PNA in scCO2 are red-shifted by -17 and -29 cm(-1), respectively. The maximum of the charge transfer (CT) absorption band of PNA in scSCO2 is at 3.9 eV, and the predicted red-shift of the π → π* electronic transition relative to the isolated gas-phase PNA molecule reproduces the experimental value of -0.35 eV. An analysis of the relationship between geometry distortions and excitation energies of PNA in scCO2 shows that the π → π* CT transition is very sensitive to changes of the N-O bond distance, strongly indicating a correlation between vibrational and electronic solvatochromism driven by LA-LB interactions. Despite the importance of LA-LB interactions to explain the solvation of PNA in scCO2, the red-shift of the CT band is mainly determined by electrostatic interactions.

  3. An image-based reaction field method for electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuchun; Baumketner, Andrij; Deng, Shaozhong; Xu, Zhenli; Jacobs, Donald; Cai, Wei

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, a new solvation model is proposed for simulations of biomolecules in aqueous solutions that combines the strengths of explicit and implicit solvent representations. Solute molecules are placed in a spherical cavity filled with explicit water, thus providing microscopic detail where it is most needed. Solvent outside of the cavity is modeled as a dielectric continuum whose effect on the solute is treated through the reaction field corrections. With this explicit/implicit model, the electrostatic potential represents a solute molecule in an infinite bath of solvent, thus avoiding unphysical interactions between periodic images of the solute commonly used in the lattice-sum explicit solvent simulations. For improved computational efficiency, our model employs an accurate and efficient multiple-image charge method to compute reaction fields together with the fast multipole method for the direct Coulomb interactions. To minimize the surface effects, periodic boundary conditions are employed for nonelectrostatic interactions. The proposed model is applied to study liquid water. The effect of model parameters, which include the size of the cavity, the number of image charges used to compute reaction field, and the thickness of the buffer layer, is investigated in comparison with the particle-mesh Ewald simulations as a reference. An optimal set of parameters is obtained that allows for a faithful representation of many structural, dielectric, and dynamic properties of the simulated water, while maintaining manageable computational cost. With controlled and adjustable accuracy of the multiple-image charge representation of the reaction field, it is concluded that the employed model achieves convergence with only one image charge in the case of pure water. Future applications to pKa calculations, conformational sampling of solvated biomolecules and electrolyte solutions are briefly discussed.

  4. Statistical Estimation of the Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy Based On Direct Protein-Ligand Interaction Obtained by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a method for estimating protein-ligand binding free energy (ΔG) based on the direct protein-ligand interaction obtained by a molecular dynamics simulation. Using this method, we estimated the ΔG value statistically by the average values of the van der Waals and electrostatic interactions between each amino acid of the target protein and the ligand molecule. In addition, we introduced fluctuations in the accessible surface area (ASA) and dihedral angles of the protein-ligand complex system as the entropy terms of the ΔG estimation. The present method included the fluctuation term of structural change of the protein and the effective dielectric constant. We applied this method to 34 protein-ligand complex structures. As a result, the correlation coefficient between the experimental and calculated ΔG values was 0.81, and the average error of ΔG was 1.2 kcal/mol with the use of the fixed parameters. These results were obtained from a 2 nsec molecular dynamics simulation. PMID:24281257

  5. Molecular Dynamic Simulation to Explore the Molecular Basis of Btk-PH Domain Interaction with Ins(1,3,4,5)P4

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dan; Jiang, Junfeng; Liang, Zhongjie; Sun, Maomin; Luo, Cheng; Shen, Bairong

    2013-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase contains a pleckstrin homology domain, and it specifically binds inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (Ins(1,3,4,5)P4), which is involved in the maturation of B cells. In this paper, we studied 12 systems including the wild type and 11 mutants, K12R, S14F, K19E, R28C/H, E41K, L11P, F25S, Y40N, and K12R-R28C/H, to investigate any change in the ligand binding site of each mutant. Molecular dynamics simulations combined with the method of molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann solvent-accessible surface area have been applied to the twelve systems, and reasonable mutant structures and their binding free energies have been obtained as criteria in the final classification. As a result, five structures, K12R, K19E, R28C/H, and E41K mutants, were classified as “functional mutations,” whereas L11P, S14F, F25S, and Y40N were grouped into “folding mutations.” This rigorous study of the binding affinity of each of the mutants and their classification provides some new insights into the biological function of the Btk-PH domain and related mutation-causing diseases. PMID:24307874

  6. Structure enhancement methodology using theory and experiment: gas-phase molecular structures using a dynamic interaction between electron diffraction, molecular mechanics, and ab initio data.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Graeme R; Masters, Sarah L; Rankin, David W H

    2007-07-05

    A new method of incorporating ab initio theoretical data dynamically into the gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) refinement process has been developed to aid the structure determination of large, sterically crowded molecules. This process involves calculating a set of differences between parameters that define the positions of peripheral atoms (usually hydrogen), as determined using molecular mechanics (MM), and those which use ab initio methods. The peripheral-atom positions are then updated continually during the GED refinement process, using MM, and the returned positions are modified using this set of differences to account for the differences between ab initio and MM methods, before being scaled back to the average parameters used to define them, as refined from experimental data. This allows the molecule to adopt a completely asymmetric structure if required, without being constrained by the MM parametrization, whereas the calculations can be performed on a practical time scale. The molecular structures of tri-tert-butylphosphine oxide and tri-tert-butylphosphine imide have been re-examined using this new technique, which we call SEMTEX (Structure Enhancement Methodology using Theory and EXperiment).

  7. Interaction of PLGA and trimethyl chitosan modified PLGA nanoparticles with mixed anionic/zwitterionic phospholipid bilayers studied using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Brian; Astete, Carlos; Sabliov, Cristina; Moldovan, Dorel

    2012-02-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is a biodegradable polymer. Nanoparticles of PLGA are commonly used for drug delivery applications. The interaction of the nanoparticles with the cell membrane may influence the rate of their uptake by cells. Both PLGA and cell membranes are negatively charged, so adding positively charged polymers such as trimethyl chitosan (TMC) which adheres to the PLGA particles improves their cellular uptake. The interaction of 3 nm PLGA and TMC-modified-PLGA nanoparticles with lipid bilayers composed of mixtures of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine lipids was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The free energy profiles as function of nanoparticles position along the normal direction to the bilayers were calculated, the distribution of phosphatidylserine lipids as a function of distance of the particle from the bilayer was calculated, and the time scale for particle motion in the directions parallel to the bilayer surface was estimated.

  8. Computationally Efficient Multiconfigurational Reactive Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Takefumi; Peng, Yuxing; Knight, Chris; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    It is a computationally demanding task to explicitly simulate the electronic degrees of freedom in a system to observe the chemical transformations of interest, while at the same time sampling the time and length scales required to converge statistical properties and thus reduce artifacts due to initial conditions, finite-size effects, and limited sampling. One solution that significantly reduces the computational expense consists of molecular models in which effective interactions between particles govern the dynamics of the system. If the interaction potentials in these models are developed to reproduce calculated properties from electronic structure calculations and/or ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, then one can calculate accurate properties at a fraction of the computational cost. Multiconfigurational algorithms model the system as a linear combination of several chemical bonding topologies to simulate chemical reactions, also sometimes referred to as “multistate”. These algorithms typically utilize energy and force calculations already found in popular molecular dynamics software packages, thus facilitating their implementation without significant changes to the structure of the code. However, the evaluation of energies and forces for several bonding topologies per simulation step can lead to poor computational efficiency if redundancy is not efficiently removed, particularly with respect to the calculation of long-ranged Coulombic interactions. This paper presents accurate approximations (effective long-range interaction and resulting hybrid methods) and multiple-program parallelization strategies for the efficient calculation of electrostatic interactions in reactive molecular simulations. PMID:25100924

  9. 2010 Atomic & Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Martinez

    2010-07-23

    The Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Conferences is justifiably recognized for its broad scope, touching on areas ranging from fundamental gas phase and gas-condensed matter collision dynamics, to laser-molecule interactions, photophysics, and unimolecular decay processes. The meeting has traditionally involved scientists engaged in fundamental research in gas and condensed phases and those who apply these concepts to systems of practical chemical and physical interest. A key tradition in this meeting is the strong mixing of theory and experiment throughout. The program for 2010 conference continues these traditions. At the 2010 AMI GRC, there will be talks in 5 broadly defined and partially overlapping areas of intermolecular interactions and chemical dynamics: (1) Photoionization and Photoelectron Dynamics; (2) Quantum Control and Molecules in Strong Fields; (3) Photochemical Dynamics; (4) Complex Molecules and Condensed Phases; and (5) Clusters and Reaction Dynamics. These areas encompass many of the most productive and exciting areas of chemical physics, including both reactive and nonreactive processes, intermolecular and intramolecular energy transfer, and photodissociation and unimolecular processes. Gas phase dynamics, van der Waals and cluster studies, laser-matter interactions and multiple potential energy surface phenomena will all be discussed.

  10. Molecular dynamics of membrane proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Woolf, Thomas B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the membrane protein rhodopsin will have broad implications for other membrane proteins and cellular signaling processes. Rhodopsin (Rho) is a light activated G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). When activated by ligands, GPCRs bind and activate G-proteins residing within the cell and begin a signaling cascade that results in the cell's response to external stimuli. More than 50% of all current drugs are targeted toward G-proteins. Rho is the prototypical member of the class A GPCR superfamily. Understanding the activation of Rho and its interaction with its Gprotein can therefore lead to a wider understanding of the mechanisms of GPCR activation and G-protein activation. Understanding the dark to light transition of Rho is fully analogous to the general ligand binding and activation problem for GPCRs. This transition is dependent on the lipid environment. The effect of lipids on membrane protein activity in general has had little attention, but evidence is beginning to show a significant role for lipids in membrane protein activity. Using the LAMMPS program and simulation methods benchmarked under the IBIG program, we perform a variety of allatom molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins.

  11. Carboxyl Group Footprinting Mass Spectrometry and Molecular Dynamics Identify Key Interactions in the HER2-HER3 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Interface* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Timothy S.; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Monsey, John; Shen, Wei; Sept, David; Bose, Ron

    2013-01-01

    The HER2 receptor tyrosine kinase is a driver oncogene in many human cancers, including breast and gastric cancer. Under physiologic levels of expression, HER2 heterodimerizes with other members of the EGF receptor/HER/ErbB family, and the HER2-HER3 dimer forms one of the most potent oncogenic receptor pairs. Previous structural biology studies have individually crystallized the kinase domains of HER2 and HER3, but the HER2-HER3 kinase domain heterodimer structure has yet to be solved. Using a reconstituted membrane system to form HER2-HER3 kinase domain heterodimers and carboxyl group footprinting mass spectrometry, we observed that HER2 and HER3 kinase domains preferentially form asymmetric heterodimers with HER3 and HER2 monomers occupying the donor and acceptor kinase positions, respectively. Conformational changes in the HER2 activation loop, as measured by changes in carboxyl group labeling, required both dimerization and nucleotide binding but did not require activation loop phosphorylation at Tyr-877. Molecular dynamics simulations on HER2-HER3 kinase dimers identify specific inter- and intramolecular interactions and were in good agreement with MS measurements. Specifically, several intermolecular ionic interactions between HER2 Lys-716-HER3 Glu-909, HER2 Glu-717-HER3 Lys-907, and HER2 Asp-871-HER3 Arg-948 were identified by molecular dynamics. We also evaluated the effect of the cancer-associated mutations HER2 D769H/D769Y, HER3 E909G, and HER3 R948K (also numbered HER3 E928G and R967K) on kinase activity in the context of this new structural model. This study provides valuable insights into the EGF receptor/HER/ErbB kinase structure and interactions, which can guide the design of future therapies. PMID:23843458

  12. Molecular dynamics of silicon indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, J. S.; Hoover, W. G.; Hoover, C. G.; de Groot, A. J.; Lee, S. M.; Wooten, F.

    1993-04-01

    We use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics to simulate the elastic-plastic deformation of silicon under tetrahedral nanometer-sized indentors. The results are described in terms of a rate-dependent and temperature-dependent phenomenological yield strength. We follow the structural change during indentation with a computer technique that allows us to model the dynamic simulation of diffraction patterns.

  13. Effect of the R119G mutation on human P5CR structure and its interactions with NAD: Insights derived from molecular dynamics simulation and free energy analysis.

    PubMed

    Sang, Peng; Xie, Yue-Hui; Li, Lin-Hua; Ye, Yu-Jia; Hu, Wei; Wang, Jing; Wan, Wen; Li, Rui; Li, Long-Jun; Ma, Lin-Ling; Li, Zhi; Liu, Shu-Qun; Meng, Zhao-Hui

    2017-04-01

    Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR), an enzyme with conserved housekeeping roles, is involved in the etiology of cutis laxa. While previous work has shown that the R119G point mutation in the P5CR protein is involved, the structural mechanism behind the pathology remains to be elucidated. In order to probe the role of the R119G mutation in cutis laxa, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, essential dynamics (ED) analysis, and Molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) binding free energy calculations on wild type (WT) and mutant P5CR-NAD complex. These MD simulations and ED analyses suggest that the R119G mutation decreases the flexibility of P5CR, specifically in the substrate binding pocket, which could decrease the kinetics of the cofactor entrance and egress. Furthermore, the MM-PBSA calculations suggest the R119G mutant has a lower cofactor binding affinity for NAD than WT. Our study provides insight into the possible role of the R119G mutation during interactions between P5CR and NAD, thus bettering our understanding of how the mutation promotes cutis laxa.

  14. Molecular modelling and molecular dynamics of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Callebaut, Isabelle; Hoffmann, Brice; Lehn, Pierre; Mornon, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as an ATP-gated channel. Considerable progress has been made over the last years in the understanding of the molecular basis of the CFTR functions, as well as dysfunctions causing the common genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). This review provides a global overview of the theoretical studies that have been performed so far, especially molecular modelling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A special emphasis is placed on the CFTR-specific evolution of an ABC transporter framework towards a channel function, as well as on the understanding of the effects of disease-causing mutations and their specific modulation. This in silico work should help structure-based drug discovery and design, with a view to develop CFTR-specific pharmacotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of CF in the context of precision medicine.

  15. Thermodynamic, dynamic and solvational properties of PDEδ binding to farnesylated cystein: a model study for uncovering the molecular mechanism of PDEδ interaction with prenylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Suladze, S; Ismail, S; Winter, R

    2014-01-30

    The protein PDEδ is an important solubilizing factor for several prenylated proteins including the Ras subfamily members. The binding occurs mainly through the farnesyl anchor of Ras proteins, which is recognized by a hydrophobic pocket of PDEδ. In this study, we carried out a detailed study of the thermodynamic and solvational properties of PDEδ binding to farnesyl-cystein, which serves as a model for PDEδ association to prenylated proteins. Using various biophysical approaches in conjunction with theoretical considerations, we show here that binding of the largely hydrophobic ligand surprisingly has enthalpy-driven signature, and the entropy change is largely controlled by the fine balance between the hydrational and conformational terms. Moreover, binding of PDEδ to farnesyl-cystein is accompanied by an increase in thermal stability, the release of about 150 water molecules from the interacting species, a decrease in solvent accessible surface area, and a marked decrease of the volume fluctuations and hence dynamics of the protein. Altogether, our results shed more light on the molecular mechanism of PDEδ interaction with prenylated Ras proteins, which is also prerequisite for an optimization of the structure-based molecular design of drugs against Ras related diseases and for understanding the multitude of biological functions of PDEδ.

  16. Predicting polymer nanofiber interactions via molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Buell, Sezen; Rutledge, Gregory C; Vliet, Krystyn J Van

    2010-04-01

    Physical and functional properties of nonwoven textiles and other fiberlike materials depend strongly on the number and type of fiber-fiber interactions. For nanoscale polymeric fibers in particular, these interactions are governed by the surfaces of and contacts between fibers. We employ both molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at a temperature below the glass transition temperature T(g) of the polymer bulk, and molecular statics (MS), or energy minimization, to study the interfiber interactions between prototypical polymeric fibers of 4.6 nm diameter, comprising multiple macromolecular chains each of 100 carbon atoms per chain (C100). Our MD simulations show that fibers aligned parallel and within 9 nm of one another experience a significant force of attraction. These fibers tend toward coalescence on a very short time scale, even below T(g). In contrast, our MS calculations suggest an interfiber interaction that transitions from an attractive to a repulsive force at a separation distance of 6 nm. The results of either approach can be used to obtain a quantitative, closed-form relation describing fiber-fiber interaction energies U(s). However, the predicted form of interaction is quite different for the two approaches, and can be understood in terms of differences in the extent of molecular mobility within and between fibers for these different modeling perspectives. The results of these molecular-scale calculations of U(s) are used to interpret experimental observations for electrospun polymer nanofiber mats. These findings highlight the role of temperature and kinetically accessible molecular configurations in predicting interface-dominated interactions at polymer fiber surfaces, and prompt further experiments and simulations to confirm these effects in the properties of nonwoven mats comprising such nanoscale fibers.

  17. Correlation between inter-spin interaction and molecular dynamics of organic radicals in organic 1D nanochannels

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu

    2015-12-31

    One-dimensional (1D) molecular chains of 4-substituted-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl (4-X-TEMPO) radicals were constructed in the crystalline 1D nanochannels of 2,4,6-tris(4-chlorophenoxy)-1,3,5-triazine (CLPOT) used as a template. The ESR spectra of CLPOT inclusion compounds (ICs) using 4-X-TEMPO were examined on the basis of spectral simulation using EasySpin program package for simulating and fitting ESR spectra. The ESR spectra of [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC were isotropic in the total range of temperatures. The peak-to-peak line width (ΔB{sub pp}) became monotonically narrower from 2.8 to 1.3 mT with increase in temperature in the range of 4.2–298 K. The effect of the rotational diffusion motion of TEMPO radicals in the CLPOT nanochannels for the inter-spin interaction of the [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC was found to be smaller than the case of [(TPP){sub 2}−(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC (TPP = tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene) reported in our previous study. The ΔB{sub pp} of the [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC in the whole range of temperatures was much narrower than the estimation to be based on the Van Vleck’s formula for the second moment of the rigid lattice model where the electron spin can be considered as fixed; 11 mT of Gaussian line-width component. This suggests the possibility of exchange narrowing in the 1D organic-radical chains of the [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC. On the other hand, the ESR spectra of [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(MeO-TEMPO){sub 0.41}] IC (MeO-TEMPO = 4-methoxy-TEMPO) were reproduced by a superposition of major broad isotropic adsorption line and minor temperature-dependent modulated triplet component. This suggests that the IC has the part of 1D organic-radical chains and MeO-TEMPO molecules isolated in the CLPOT nanochannels.

  18. Structural insights into the MDP binding and CARD-CARD interaction in zebrafish (Danio rerio) NOD2: a molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Maharana, Jitendra; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; De, Bidhan Chandra; Sahoo, Bikash Ranjan; Behera, Bijay Kumar; De, Sachinandan; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD2) is a key component of innate immunity that is highly specific for muramyl dipeptide (MDP)-a peptidoglycan component of bacterial cell wall. MDP recognition by NOD2-leucine rich repeat (LRR) domain activates NF-κB signaling through a protein-protein interaction between caspase activating and recruitment domains (CARDs) of NOD2 and downstream receptor interacting and activating protein kinase 2 (RIP2). Due to the lack of crystal/NMR structures, MDP recognition and CARD-CARD interaction are poorly understood. Herein, we have predicted the probable MDP and CARD-CARD binding surfaces in zebrafish NOD2 (zNOD2) using various in silico methodologies. The results show that the conserved residues Phe819, Phe871, Trp875, Trp929, Trp899, and Arg845 located at the concave face of zNOD2-LRR confer MDP recognition by hydrophobic and hydrogen bond (H-bond) interactions. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal a stable association between the electropositive surface on zNOD2-CARDa and the electronegative surface on zRIP2-CARD reinforced mostly by H-bonds and electrostatic interactions. Importantly, a 3.5 Å salt bridge is observed between Arg60 of zNOD2-CARDa and Asp494 of zRIP2-CARD. Arg11 and Lys53 of zNOD2-CARDa and Ser498 and Glu508 of zRIP2-CARD are critical residues for CARD-CARD interaction and NOD2 signaling. The 2.7 Å H-bond between Lys104 of the linker and Glu508 of zRIP2-CARD suggests a possible role of the linker for shaping CARD-CARD interaction. These findings are consistent with existing mutagenesis data. We provide first insight into MDP recognition and CARD-CARD interaction in the zebrafish that will be useful to understand the molecular basis of NOD signaling in a broader perspective.

  19. Understanding Modularity in Molecular Networks Requires Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Roger P.; Kim, Philip M.; Emonet, Thierry; Gerstein, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    The era of genome sequencing has produced long lists of the molecular parts from which cellular machines are constructed. A fundamental goal in systems biology is to understand how cellular behavior emerges from the interaction in time and space of genetically encoded molecular parts, as well as non-genetically encoded small molecules. Networks provide a natural framework for the organization and quantitative representation of all the available data about molecular interactions. The structural and dynamic properties of molecular networks have been the subject of intense research. Despite major advances, bridging network structure to dynamics – and therefore to behavior – remains challenging. A key concept of modern engineering that recurs in the functional analysis of biological networks is modularity. Most approaches to molecular network analysis rely to some extent on the assumption that molecular networks are modular – that is, they are separable and can be studied to some degree in isolation. We describe recent advances in the analysis of modularity in biological networks, focusing on the increasing realization that a dynamic perspective is essential to grouping molecules into modules and determining their collective function. PMID:19638611

  20. Excited State Quantum-Classical Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Predrag

    2005-05-01

    The development of a new theoretical, algorithmic, and computational framework is reported describing the corresponding excited state many-body dynamics by applying multiphysics described by classical equations of motion for nuclei and Hartree-Fock/Multi-Configuration Hartree-Fock and multiresolution techniques for solving the quantum part of the problem (i.e. the motion of the electrons). We primarily have in mind reactive and electron-transition dynamics which involves molecular clusters, containing hundreds of atoms, perturbed by a slow ionic/atomic/molecular projectile, with possible applications in plasma-surface interactions, cluster physics, chemistry and biotechnology. The validation of the developed technique is performed at three-body systems. Application to the transition dynamics in small carbon clusters and hydrocarbons perturbed by slow carbon ions resolves some long-standing issues in the ion-surface interactions in fusion tokamaks.

  1. Selective IR multiphoton dissociation of molecules in a pulsed gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface as an alternative to low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, G N; Petin, A N

    2016-03-31

    We report the results of studies on the isotope-selective infrared multiphoton dissociation (IR MFD) of SF{sub 6} and CF{sub 3}I molecules in a pulsed, gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface. The productivity of this method in the conditions of a specific experiment (by the example of SF{sub 6} molecules) is evaluated. A number of low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation based on the use of infrared lasers for selective excitation of molecules are analysed and their productivity is estimated. The methods are compared with those of selective dissociation of molecules in the flow interacting with a surface. The advantages of this method compared to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation and the IR MPD method in the unperturbed jets and flows are shown. It is concluded that this method could be a promising alternative to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation. (laser separation of isotopes)

  2. Interaction of O and OH radicals with a simple model system for lipids in the skin barrier: a reactive molecular dynamics investigation for plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Paal, Jonas; Aernouts, Stefaan; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Neyts, Erik C.; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2013-10-01

    Plasma medicine has been claimed to provide a novel route to heal wounds and regenerate skin, although very little is currently known about the elementary processes taking place. We carried out a series of ReaxFF-based reactive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interaction of O and OH radicals with lipids, more specifically with α-linolenic acid as a model for the free fatty acids present in the upper skin layer. Our calculations predict that the O and OH radicals most typically abstract a H atom from the fatty acids, which can lead to the formation of a conjugated double bond, but also to the incorporation of alcohol or aldehyde groups, thereby increasing the hydrophilic character of the fatty acids and changing the general lipid composition of the skin. Within the limitations of the investigated model, no formation of possibly toxic products was observed.

  3. Interactions of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) proteins with phosphatidylinositol phosphates: insights from molecular dynamics simulations of PTEN and voltage sensitive phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kalli, Antreas C; Devaney, Isabel; Sansom, Mark S P

    2014-03-25

    The phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP) are both phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) phosphatases that contain a C2 domain. PTEN is a tumor suppressor protein that acts as a phosphatase on PIP3 in mammalian cell membranes. It contains two principal domains: a phosphatase domain (PD) and a C2 domain. Despite detailed structural and functional characterization, less is known about its mechanism of interaction with PIP-containing lipid bilayers. Ci-VSP consists of an N-terminal transmembrane voltage sensor domain and a C-terminal PTEN domain, which in turn contains a PD and a C2 domain. The nature of the interaction of the PTEN domain of Ci-VSP with membranes has not been well established. We have used multiscale molecular dynamics simulations to define the interaction mechanisms of PTEN and of the Ci-VSP PTEN domains with PIP-containing lipid bilayers. Our results suggest a novel mechanism of association of the PTEN with such bilayers, in which an initial electrostatics-driven encounter of the protein and bilayer is followed by reorientation of the protein to optimize its interactions with PIP molecules in the membrane. Although a PIP3 molecule binds close to the active site of PTEN, our simulations suggest a further conformational change of the protein may be required for catalytically productive binding to occur. Ci-VSP interacted with membranes in an orientation comparable to that of PTEN but bound directly to PIP-containing membranes without a subsequent reorientation step. Again, PIP3 bound close to the active site of the Ci-VSP PD, but not in a catalytically productive manner. Interactions of Ci-VSP with the bilayer induced clustering of PIP molecules around the protein.

  4. Towards Temperature-Dependent Coarse-Grained Potentials of Side-Chain Interactions for Protein Folding Simulations. II. Molecular Dynamics Study of Pairs of Different Types of Interactions in Water at Various Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Sobolewski, Emil; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Wiśniewska, Marta; Liwo, Adam; Makowski, Mariusz

    2012-01-01

    By means of molecular dynamics simulations of 15 pairs of molecules selected to model the interactions of nonpolar, nonpolar and polar, nonpolar and charged, polar, and polar and charged side chains in water, we determined the potentials of mean force (PMFs) of pairs of interacting molecules in water as functions of distance between the interacting particles or their distance and orientations at three temperatures: 283 K, 323 K and 373 K, respectively. The systems were found to fall into the following four categories as far as the temperature dependence of the potential of mean force is concerned: (i) pairs, for which association is entropy-driven (ii) pairs, for which association is energy-driven, (iii), pairs of positively-charged solute molecules, for which association is energy-driven with unfavorable entropy change, and (iv) the remaining systems for which temperature dependence is weak. For each pair of PMFs entropic and energetic contributions have been discussed. PMID:22475198

  5. Terahertz Technology and Molecular Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-16

    fingerprint, as the concentration of the target gas is increased from zero at some concentration the identification statistics rapidly change from ran...REPORT THz Technology and Molecular Interactions 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The purpose of this project was to explore opportunities...development of compact solid state point sensors for chemical identification with ‘absolute’ specificity, (2) studies of the phenomenology that underlies

  6. Transcript Dynamics at Early Stages of Molecular Interactions of MYMIV with Resistant and Susceptible Genotypes of the Leguminous Host, Vigna mungo

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Anirban; Patel, Anju; Paul, Sujay; Pal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Initial phases of the MYMIV- Vigna mungo interaction is crucial in determining the infection phenotype upon challenging with the virus. During incompatible interaction, the plant deploys multiple stratagems that include extensive transcriptional alterations defying the virulence factors of the pathogen. Such molecular events are not frequently addressed by genomic tools. In order to obtain a critical insight to unravel how V. mungo respond to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), we have employed the PCR based suppression subtractive hybridization technique to identify genes that exhibit altered expressions. Dynamics of 345 candidate genes are illustrated that differentially expressed either in compatible or incompatible reactions and their possible biological and cellular functions are predicted. The MYMIV-induced physiological aspects of the resistant host include reactive oxygen species generation, induction of Ca2+ mediated signaling, enhanced expression of transcripts involved in phenylpropanoid and ubiquitin-proteasomal pathways; all these together confer resistance against the invader. Elicitation of genes implicated in salicylic acid (SA) pathway suggests that immune response is under the regulation of SA signaling. A significant fraction of modulated transcripts are of unknown function indicating participation of novel candidate genes in restricting this viral pathogen. Susceptibility on the other hand, as exhibited by V. mungo Cv. T9 is perhaps due to the poor execution of these transcript modulation exhibiting remarkable repression of photosynthesis related genes resulting in chlorosis of leaves followed by penalty in crop yield. Thus, the present findings revealed an insight on the molecular warfare during host-virus interaction suggesting plausible signaling mechanisms and key biochemical pathways overriding MYMIV invasion in resistant genotype of V. mungo. In addition to inflate the existing knowledge base, the genomic resources identified in

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of pyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumpakaj, Zygmunt; Linde, Bogumił

    2015-04-01

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used for the investigation of molecular motions in pyridine in the temperature range 20-480 K under normal pressure. The results obtained are analyzed within the frame of the Mori Zwanzig memory function formalism. An analytical approximation of the first memory function K(t) is applied to predict some dependences on temperature. Experimental results of the Rayleigh scattering of depolarized light from liquid pyridine are used as the main base for the comparison.

  8. Development of hardware accelerator for molecular dynamics simulations: a computation board that calculates nonbonded interactions in cooperation with fast multipole method.

    PubMed

    Amisaki, Takashi; Toyoda, Shinjiro; Miyagawa, Hiroh; Kitamura, Kunihiro

    2003-04-15

    Evaluation of long-range Coulombic interactions still represents a bottleneck in the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of biological macromolecules. Despite the advent of sophisticated fast algorithms, such as the fast multipole method (FMM), accurate simulations still demand a great amount of computation time due to the accuracy/speed trade-off inherently involved in these algorithms. Unless higher order multipole expansions, which are extremely expensive to evaluate, are employed, a large amount of the execution time is still spent in directly calculating particle-particle interactions within the nearby region of each particle. To reduce this execution time for pair interactions, we developed a computation unit (board), called MD-Engine II, that calculates nonbonded pairwise interactions using a specially designed hardware. Four custom arithmetic-processors and a processor for memory manipulation ("particle processor") are mounted on the computation board. The arithmetic processors are responsible for calculation of the pair interactions. The particle processor plays a central role in realizing efficient cooperation with the FMM. The results of a series of 50-ps MD simulations of a protein-water system (50,764 atoms) indicated that a more stringent setting of accuracy in FMM computation, compared with those previously reported, was required for accurate simulations over long time periods. Such a level of accuracy was efficiently achieved using the cooperative calculations of the FMM and MD-Engine II. On an Alpha 21264 PC, the FMM computation at a moderate but tolerable level of accuracy was accelerated by a factor of 16.0 using three boards. At a high level of accuracy, the cooperative calculation achieved a 22.7-fold acceleration over the corresponding conventional FMM calculation. In the cooperative calculations of the FMM and MD-Engine II, it was possible to achieve more accurate computation at a comparable execution time by incorporating larger nearby

  9. GAS PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    SEARS,T.J.; HALL,G.E.; PRESES,J.M.; WESTON,R.E.,JR.

    1999-06-09

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions involving short-lived chemical intermediates and their properties. High-resolution, high-sensitivity, laser absorption methods are augmented by high temperature flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass-spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular free radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical and computational work using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations that provide insights into energy flow between the vibrational modes of the molecule. The work of group members Fockenberg and Muckerman is described in separate abstracts of this volume.

  10. Molecular recognition in a diverse set of protein-ligand interactions studied with molecular dynamics simulations and end-point free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Li, Liwei; Hurley, Thomas D; Meroueh, Samy O

    2013-10-28

    End-point free energy calculations using MM-GBSA and MM-PBSA provide a detailed understanding of molecular recognition in protein-ligand interactions. The binding free energy can be used to rank-order protein-ligand structures in virtual screening for compound or target identification. Here, we carry out free energy calculations for a diverse set of 11 proteins bound to 14 small molecules using extensive explicit-solvent MD simulations. The structure of these complexes was previously solved by crystallography and their binding studied with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data enabling direct comparison to the MM-GBSA and MM-PBSA calculations. Four MM-GBSA and three MM-PBSA calculations reproduced the ITC free energy within 1 kcal·mol(-1) highlighting the challenges in reproducing the absolute free energy from end-point free energy calculations. MM-GBSA exhibited better rank-ordering with a Spearman ρ of 0.68 compared to 0.40 for MM-PBSA with dielectric constant (ε = 1). An increase in ε resulted in significantly better rank-ordering for MM-PBSA (ρ = 0.91 for ε = 10), but larger ε significantly reduced the contributions of electrostatics, suggesting that the improvement is due to the nonpolar and entropy components, rather than a better representation of the electrostatics. The SVRKB scoring function applied to MD snapshots resulted in excellent rank-ordering (ρ = 0.81). Calculations of the configurational entropy using normal-mode analysis led to free energies that correlated significantly better to the ITC free energy than the MD-based quasi-harmonic approach, but the computed entropies showed no correlation with the ITC entropy. When the adaptation energy is taken into consideration by running separate simulations for complex, apo, and ligand (MM-PBSAADAPT), there is less agreement with the ITC data for the individual free energies, but remarkably good rank-ordering is observed (ρ = 0.89). Interestingly, filtering MD snapshots by prescoring

  11. Dynamic and coordinated single-molecular interactions at TM4SF5-enriched microdomains guide invasive behaviors in 2- and 3-dimensional environments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Kwon, Sojung; Nam, Seo Hee; Jung, Jae Woo; Kang, Minkyung; Ryu, Jihye; Kim, Ji Eon; Cheong, Jin-Gyu; Cho, Chang Yun; Kim, Somi; Song, Dae-Geun; Kim, Yong-Nyun; Kim, Tai Young; Jung, Min-Kyo; Lee, Kyung-Min; Pack, Chan-Gi; Lee, Jung Weon

    2017-04-01

    Membrane proteins sense extracellular cues and transduce intracellular signaling to coordinate directionality and speed during cellular migration. They are often localized to specific regions, as with lipid rafts or tetraspanin-enriched microdomains; however, the dynamic interactions of tetraspanins with diverse receptors within tetraspanin-enriched microdomains on cellular surfaces remain largely unexplored. Here, we investigated effects of tetraspan(in) TM4SF5 (transmembrane 4 L6 family member 5)-enriched microdomains (T5ERMs) on the directionality of cell migration. Physical association of TM4SF5 with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and integrin α5 was visualized by live fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy and higher-resolution microscopy at the leading edge of migratory cells, presumably forming TM4SF5-enriched microdomains. Whereas TM4SF5 and EGFR colocalized at the migrating leading region more than at the rear, TM4SF5 and integrin α5 colocalized evenly throughout cells. Cholesterol depletion and disruption in TM4SF5 post-translational modifications, including N-glycosylation and palmitoylation, altered TM4SF5 interactions and cellular localization, which led to less cellular migration speed and directionality in 2- or 3-dimensional conditions. TM4SF5 controlled directional cell migration and invasion, and importantly, these TM4SF5 functions were dependent on cholesterol, TM4SF5 post-translational modifications, and EGFR and integrin α5 activity. Altogether, we showed that TM4SF5 dynamically interacted with EGFR and integrin α5 in migratory cells to control directionality and invasion.-Kim, H.-J., Kwon, S., Nam, S. H., Jung, J. W., Kang, M., Ryu, J., Kim, J. E., Cheong, J.-G., Cho, C. Y., Kim, S., Song, D.-G., Kim, Y.-N., Kim, T. Y., Jung, M.-K., Lee, K.-M., Pack, C.-G., Lee, J. W. Dynamic and coordinated single-molecular interactions at TM4SF5-enriched microdomains guide invasive behaviors in 2- and 3-dimensional environments.

  12. Dynamic molecular graphs: "hopping" structures.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Rocha-Rinza, Tomas; Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Cuevas, Gabriel; Gómez, Rosa María

    2014-05-05

    This work aims to contribute to the discussion about the suitability of bond paths and bond-critical points as indicators of chemical bonding defined within the theoretical framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. For this purpose, we consider the temporal evolution of the molecular structure of [Fe{C(CH2 )3 }(CO)3 ] throughout Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD), which illustrates the changing behaviour of the molecular graph (MG) of an electronic system. Several MGs with significant lifespans are observed across the BOMD simulations. The bond paths between the trimethylenemethane and the metallic core are uninterruptedly formed and broken. This situation is reminiscent of a "hopping" ligand over the iron atom. The molecular graph wherein the bonding between trimethylenemethane and the iron atom takes place only by means of the tertiary carbon atom has the longest lifespan of all the considered structures, which is consistent with the MG found by X-ray diffraction experiments and quantum chemical calculations. In contrast, the η(4) complex predicted by molecular-orbital theory has an extremely brief lifetime. The lifespan of different molecular structures is related to bond descriptors on the basis of the topology of the electron density such as the ellipticities at the FeCH2 bond-critical points and electron delocalisation indices. This work also proposes the concept of a dynamic molecular graph composed of the different structures found throughout the BOMD trajectories in analogy to a resonance hybrid of Lewis structures. It is our hope that the notion of dynamic molecular graphs will prove useful in the discussion of electronic systems, in particular for those in which analysis on the basis of static structures leads to controversial conclusions.

  13. Structure, dynamics, and interaction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) DprE1 and DprE2 examined by molecular modeling, simulation, and electrostatic studies.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Isha; Loharch, Saurabh; Gupta, Pawan; Madathil, Rethi; Parkesh, Raman

    2015-01-01

    The enzymes decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-ribose oxidase (DprE1) and decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-ribose-2-epimerase (DprE2) catalyze epimerization of decaprenylphosporyl ribose (DPR) todecaprenylphosporyl arabinose (DPA) and are critical for the survival of Mtb. Crystal structures of DprE1 so far reported display significant disordered regions and no structural information is known for DprE2. We used homology modeling, protein threading, molecular docking and dynamics studies to investigate the structural and dynamic features of Mtb DprE1 and DprE2 and DprE1-DprE2 complex. A three-dimensional model for DprE2 was generated using the threading approach coupled with ab initio modeling. A 50 ns simulation of DprE1 and DprE2 revealed the overall stability of the structures. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) demonstrated the convergence of sampling in both DprE1 and DprE2. In DprE1, residues in the 269-330 area showed considerable fluctuation in agreement with the regions of disorder observed in the reported crystal structures. In DprE2, large fluctuations were detected in residues 95-113, 146-157, and 197-226. The study combined docking and MD simulation studies to map and characterize the key residues involved in DprE1-DprE2 interaction. A 60 ns MD simulation for DprE1-DprE2 complex was also performed. Analysis of data revealed that the docked complex is stabilized by H-bonding, hydrophobic and ionic interactions. The key residues of DprE1 involved in DprE1-DprE2 interactions belong to the disordered region. We also examined the docked complex of DprE1-BTZ043 to investigate the binding pocket of DprE1 and its interactions with the inhibitor BTZ043. In summary, we hypothesize that DprE1-DprE2 interaction is crucial for the synthesis of DPA and DprE1-DprE2 complex may be a new therapeutic target amenable to pharmacological validation. The findings have important implications in tuberculosis (TB) drug discovery and will facilitate drug development efforts against TB.

  14. Solubilization Behavior of Polyene Antibiotics in Nanomicellar System: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Amphotericin B and Nystatin Interactions with Polysorbate 80.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Meysam; Attar, Hossein; Rezayat Sorkhabadi, Seyed Mehdi; Khamesipour, Ali; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-12-24

    Amphotericin B (AmB) and Nystatin (Nys) are the drugs of choice for treatment of systemic and superficial mycotic infections, respectively, with their full clinical potential unrealized due to the lack of high therapeutic index formulations for their solubilized delivery. In the present study, using a coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approach, we investigated the interaction of AmB and Nys with Polysorbate 80 (P80) to gain insight into the behavior of these polyene antibiotics (PAs) in nanomicellar solution and derive potential implications for their formulation development. While the encapsulation process was predominantly governed by hydrophobic forces, the dynamics, hydration, localization, orientation, and solvation of PAs in the micelle were largely controlled by hydrophilic interactions. Simulation results rationalized the experimentally observed capability of P80 in solubilizing PAs by indicating (i) the dominant kinetics of drugs encapsulation over self-association; (ii) significantly lower hydration of the drugs at encapsulated state compared with aggregated state; (iii) monomeric solubilization of the drugs; (iv) contribution of drug-micelle interactions to the solubilization; (v) suppressed diffusivity of the encapsulated drugs; (vi) high loading capacity of the micelle; and (vii) the structural robustness of the micelle against drug loading. Supported from the experimental data, our simulations determined the preferred location of PAs to be the core-shell interface at the relatively shallow depth of 75% of micelle radius. Deeper penetration of PAs was impeded by the synergistic effects of (i) limited diffusion of water; and (ii) perpendicular orientation of these drug molecules with respect to the micelle radius. PAs were solvated almost exclusively in the aqueous poly-oxyethylene (POE) medium due to the distance-related lack of interaction with the core, explaining the documented insensitivity of Nys solubilization to drug

  15. The dopamine D2 receptor dimer and its interaction with homobivalent antagonists: homology modeling, docking and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Jörg, Manuela; Capuano, Ben

    2016-09-01

    In order to apply structure-based drug design techniques to G protein-coupled receptor complexes, it is essential to model their 3D structure and to identify regions that are suitable for selective drug binding. For this purpose, we have developed and tested a multi-component protocol to model the inactive conformation of the dopamine D2 receptor dimer, suitable for interaction with homobivalent antagonists. Our approach was based on protein-protein docking, applying the Rosetta software to obtain populations of dimers as present in membranes with all the main possible interfaces. Consensus scoring based on the values and frequencies of best interfaces regarding four scoring parameters, Rosetta interface score, interface area, free energy of binding and energy of hydrogen bond interactions indicated that the best scored dimer model possesses a TM4-TM5-TM7-TM1 interface, which is in agreement with experimental data. This model was used to study interactions of the previously published dopamine D2 receptor homobivalent antagonists based on clozapine,1,4-disubstituted aromatic piperidines/piperazines and arylamidoalkyl substituted phenylpiperazine pharmacophores. It was found that the homobivalent antagonists stabilize the receptor-inactive conformation by maintaining the ionic lock interaction, and change the dimer interface by disrupting a set of hydrogen bonds and maintaining water- and ligand-mediated hydrogen bonds in the extracellular and intracellular part of the interface. Graphical Abstract Structure of the final model of the dopamine D2 receptor homodimer, indicating the distancebetween Tyr37 and Tyr 5.42 in the apo form (left) and in the complex with the ligand (right).

  16. Molecular dynamics modeling the synthetic and biological polymers interactions pre-studied via docking: anchors modified polyanions interference with the HIV-1 fusion mediator.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Vladimir B; Serbin, Alexander V

    2014-06-01

    In previous works we reported the design, synthesis and in vitro evaluations of synthetic anionic polymers modified by alicyclic pendant groups (hydrophobic anchors), as a novel class of inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry into human cells. Recently, these synthetic polymers interactions with key mediator of HIV-1 entry-fusion, the tri-helix core of the first heptad repeat regions [HR1]3 of viral envelope protein gp41, were pre-studied via docking in terms of newly formulated algorithm for stepwise approximation from fragments of polymeric backbone and side-group models toward real polymeric chains. In the present article the docking results were verified under molecular dynamics (MD) modeling. In contrast with limited capabilities of the docking, the MD allowed of using much more large models of the polymeric ligands, considering flexibility of both ligand and target simultaneously. Among the synthesized polymers the dinorbornen anchors containing alternating copolymers of maleic acid were selected as the most representative ligands (possessing the top anti-HIV activity in vitro in correlation with the highest binding energy in the docking). To verify the probability of binding of the polymers with the [HR1]3 in the sites defined via docking, various starting positions of polymer chains were tried. The MD simulations confirmed the main docking-predicted priority for binding sites, and possibilities for axial and belting modes of the ligands-target interactions. Some newly MD-discovered aspects of the ligand's backbone and anchor units dynamic cooperation in binding the viral target clarify mechanisms of the synthetic polymers anti-HIV activity and drug resistance prevention.

  17. Exploring PHD fingers and H3K4me0 interactions with molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy calculations: AIRE-PHD1, a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Spiliotopoulos, Dimitrios; Spitaleri, Andrea; Musco, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    PHD fingers represent one of the largest families of epigenetic readers capable of decoding post-translationally modified or unmodified histone H3 tails. Because of their direct involvement in human pathologies they are increasingly considered as a potential therapeutic target. Several PHD/histone-peptide structures have been determined, however relatively little information is available on their dynamics. Studies aiming to characterize the dynamic and energetic determinants driving histone peptide recognition by epigenetic readers would strongly benefit from computational studies. Herein we focus on the dynamic and energetic characterization of the PHD finger subclass specialized in the recognition of histone H3 peptides unmodified in position K4 (H3K4me0). As a case study we focused on the first PHD finger of autoimmune regulator protein (AIRE-PHD1) in complex with H3K4me0. PCA analysis of the covariance matrix of free AIRE-PHD1 highlights the presence of a "flapping" movement, which is blocked in an open conformation upon binding to H3K4me0. Moreover, binding free energy calculations obtained through Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM/PBSA) methodology are in good qualitative agreement with experiments and allow dissection of the energetic terms associated with native and alanine mutants of AIRE-PHD1/H3K4me0 complexes. MM/PBSA calculations have also been applied to the energetic analysis of other PHD fingers recognizing H3K4me0. In this case we observe excellent correlation between computed and experimental binding free energies. Overall calculations show that H3K4me0 recognition by PHD fingers relies on compensation of the electrostatic and polar solvation energy terms and is stabilized by non-polar interactions.

  18. Molecular Biodynamers: Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2017-02-21

    Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and stimuli-responsiveness, CDC has been widely utilized as a powerful tool for the screening of bioactive compounds, the exploitation of receptors or substrates driven by molecular recognition, and the fabrication of constitutionally dynamic materials. Implementation of CDC in biopolymer science leads to the generation of constitutionally dynamic analogues of biopolymers, biodynamers, at the molecular level (molecular biodynamers) through DCC or at the supramolecular level (supramolecular biodynamers) via DNCC. Therefore, biodynamers are prepared by reversible covalent polymerization or noncovalent polyassociation of biorelevant monomers. In particular, molecular biodynamers, biodynamers of the covalent type whose monomeric units are connected by reversible covalent bonds, are generated by reversible polymerization of bio-based monomers and can be seen as a combination of biopolymers with DCC. Owing to the reversible covalent bonds used in DCC, molecular biodynamers can undergo continuous and spontaneous constitutional modifications via incorporation/decorporation and exchange of biorelevant monomers in response to internal or external stimuli. As a result, they behave as adaptive materials with novel properties, such as self-healing, stimuli-responsiveness, and tunable mechanical and optical character. More specifically, molecular biodynamers combine the biorelevant characters (e.g., biocompatibility, biodegradability, biofunctionality) of bioactive monomers with the dynamic features of reversible covalent bonds (e.g., changeable, tunable, controllable, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive capacities), to realize synergistic properties in one system. In addition, molecular

  19. Molecular Biodynamers: Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Conspectus Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and stimuli-responsiveness, CDC has been widely utilized as a powerful tool for the screening of bioactive compounds, the exploitation of receptors or substrates driven by molecular recognition, and the fabrication of constitutionally dynamic materials. Implementation of CDC in biopolymer science leads to the generation of constitutionally dynamic analogues of biopolymers, biodynamers, at the molecular level (molecular biodynamers) through DCC or at the supramolecular level (supramolecular biodynamers) via DNCC. Therefore, biodynamers are prepared by reversible covalent polymerization or noncovalent polyassociation of biorelevant monomers. In particular, molecular biodynamers, biodynamers of the covalent type whose monomeric units are connected by reversible covalent bonds, are generated by reversible polymerization of bio-based monomers and can be seen as a combination of biopolymers with DCC. Owing to the reversible covalent bonds used in DCC, molecular biodynamers can undergo continuous and spontaneous constitutional modifications via incorporation/decorporation and exchange of biorelevant monomers in response to internal or external stimuli. As a result, they behave as adaptive materials with novel properties, such as self-healing, stimuli-responsiveness, and tunable mechanical and optical character. More specifically, molecular biodynamers combine the biorelevant characters (e.g., biocompatibility, biodegradability, biofunctionality) of bioactive monomers with the dynamic features of reversible covalent bonds (e.g., changeable, tunable, controllable, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive capacities), to realize synergistic properties in one system. In addition

  20. Dynamic interactions in neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Arbib, M.A. ); Amari, S. )

    1989-01-01

    The study of neural networks is enjoying a great renaissance, both in computational neuroscience, the development of information processing models of living brains, and in neural computing, the use of neurally inspired concepts in the construction of intelligent machines. This volume presents models and data on the dynamic interactions occurring in the brain, and exhibits the dynamic interactions between research in computational neuroscience and in neural computing. The authors present current research, future trends and open problems.

  1. Available Instruments for Analyzing Molecular Dynamics Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Likhachev, I. V.; Balabaev, N. K.; Galzitskaya, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories are the result of molecular dynamics simulations. Trajectories are sequential snapshots of simulated molecular system which represents atomic coordinates at specific time periods. Based on the definition, in a text format trajectory files are characterized by their simplicity and uselessness. To obtain information from such files, special programs and information processing techniques are applied: from molecular dynamics animation to finding characteristics along the trajectory (versus time). In this review, we describe different programs for processing molecular dynamics trajectories. The performance of these programs, usefulness for analyses of molecular dynamics trajectories, strong and weak aspects are discussed. PMID:27053964

  2. Molecular Simulations of Shear-Induced Dynamics in Nitromethane

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    the shear response of single-crystal and bicrystal nitromethane (NM) are simulated using molecular dynamics simulations. The atomic interactions are...compressed to 28 GPa and then sheared, Raman studies show that the decomposition is sudden and explosive.5 In addition, structural modifications are...Molecular dynamics simulations are performed using the LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic /Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator) simulation package.9 The

  3. Probing molecular dynamics in chromatographic systems using high-resolution 1H magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy: interaction between p-Xylene and C18-bonded silica.

    PubMed

    Coen, Muireann; Wilson, Ian D; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Tang, Huiru; Lindon, John C

    2004-06-01

    The exact nature of the interaction between small molecules and chromatographic solid phases has been the subject of much research, but detailed understanding of the molecular dynamics in such systems remains elusive. High-resolution (1)H magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been applied to the investigation of C18-bonded silica material as used in chromatographic separation techniques together with an adsorbed model analyte, p-xylene. Two distinct p-xylene and water environments were identified within the C18-bonded silica through the measurement of (1)H NMR chemical shifts, T(1) and T(2) relaxation times and diffusion coefficients, including their temperature dependence. The results have been analyzed in terms of two environments, p-xylene within the C18 chains, in slow exchange on the NMR time scale with p-xylene in a more mobile state adsorbed as a layer in close proximity to the C18 particles, but which is distinct from free liquid p-xylene. The techniques used here could have more general applications, including the study of drug molecules bound into phospholipid membranes in micelles or vesicles.

  4. Influence of specific intermolecular interactions on the thermal and dielectric properties of bulk polymers: atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of Nylon 6.

    PubMed

    Lukasheva, N V; Tolmachev, D A; Nazarychev, V M; Kenny, J M; Lyulin, S V

    2017-01-04

    Specific intermolecular interactions, in particular H-bonding, have a strong influence on the structural, thermal and relaxation characteristics of polymers. We report here the results of molecular dynamics simulations of Nylon 6 which provides an excellent example for the investigation of such an influence. To demonstrate the effect of proper accounting for H-bonding on bulk polymer properties, the AMBER99sb force field is used with two different parametrization approaches leading to two different sets of partial atomic charges. The simulations allowed the study of the thermal and dielectric properties in a wide range of temperatures and cooling rates. The feasibility of the use of the three methods for the estimation of the glass transition temperature not only from the temperature dependence of structural characteristics such as density, but also by using the electrostatic energy and dielectric constant is demonstrated. The values of glass transition temperatures obtained at different cooling rates are practically the same for the three methods. By proper accounting for partial charges in the simulations, a reasonable agreement between the results of our simulations and experimental data for the density, thermal expansion coefficient, static dielectric constant and activation energy of γ and β relaxations is obtained demonstrating the validity of the modeling approach reported.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Study of the Lung Surfactant Peptide SP-B1–25 with DPPC Monolayers: Insights into Interactions and Peptide Position and Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Senthil K.; Larson, Ronald G.

    2005-01-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of the interactions of the peptide SP-B1–25, which is a truncated version of the full pulmonary surfactant protein SP-B, with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayers, which are the major lipid components of lung surfactant. Simulations of durations of 10–20 ns show that persistent hydrogen bonds form between the donor atoms of the protein and the acceptors of the lipid headgroup and that these bonds determine the position, orientation, and secondary structure of the peptide in the membrane environment. From an ensemble of initial conditions, the most probable equilibrium orientation of the α-helix of the peptide is predicted to be parallel to the interface, matching recent experimental results on model lipid mixtures. Simulations of a few mutated analogs of SP-B1–25 also suggest that the charged amino acids are important in determining the position of the peptide in the interface. The first eight amino acids of the peptide, also known as the insertion sequence, are found to be essential in reducing the fluctuations and anchoring the peptide in the lipid/water interface. PMID:15738465

  6. Novel methods for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Elber, R

    1996-04-01

    In the past year, significant progress was made in the development of molecular dynamics methods for the liquid phase and for biological macromolecules. Specifically, faster algorithms to pursue molecular dynamics simulations were introduced and advances were made in the design of new optimization algorithms guided by molecular dynamics protocols. A technique to calculate the quantum spectra of protein vibrations was introduced.

  7. Molecular dynamics studies of polyurethane nanocomposite hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strankowska, J.; Piszczyk, Ł.; Strankowski, M.; Danowska, M.; Szutkowski, K.; Jurga, S.; Kwela, J.

    2013-10-01

    Polyurethane PEO-based hydrogels have a broad range of biomedical applicability. They are attractive for drug-controlled delivery systems, surgical implants and wound healing dressings. In this study, a PEO based polyurethane hydrogels containing Cloisite® 30B, an organically modified clay mineral, was synthesized. Structure of nanocomposite hydrogels was determined using XRD technique. Its molecular dynamics was studied by means of NMR spectroscopy, DMA and DSC analysis. The mechanical properties and thermal stability of the systems were improved by incorporation of clay and controlled by varying the clay content in polymeric matrix. Molecular dynamics of polymer chains depends on interaction of Cloisite® 30B nanoparticles with soft segments of polyurethanes. The characteristic nanosize effect is observed.

  8. Re-evaluation of low-resolution crystal structures via interactive molecular-dynamics flexible fitting (iMDFF): a case study in complement C4.

    PubMed

    Croll, Tristan Ian; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2016-09-01

    While the rapid proliferation of high-resolution structures in the Protein Data Bank provides a rich set of templates for starting models, it remains the case that a great many structures both past and present are built at least in part by hand-threading through low-resolution and/or weak electron density. With current model-building tools this task can be challenging, and the de facto standard for acceptable error rates (in the form of atomic clashes and unfavourable backbone and side-chain conformations) in structures based on data with dmax not exceeding 3.5 Å reflects this. When combined with other factors such as model bias, these residual errors can conspire to make more serious errors in the protein fold difficult or impossible to detect. The three recently published 3.6-4.2 Å resolution structures of complement C4 (PDB entries 4fxg, 4fxk and 4xam) rank in the top quartile of structures of comparable resolution both in terms of Rfree and MolProbity score, yet, as shown here, contain register errors in six β-strands. By applying a molecular-dynamics force field that explicitly models interatomic forces and hence excludes most physically impossible conformations, the recently developed interactive molecular-dynamics flexible fitting (iMDFF) approach significantly reduces the complexity of the conformational space to be searched during manual rebuilding. This substantially improves the rate of detection and correction of register errors, and allows user-guided model building in maps with a resolution lower than 3.5 Å to converge to solutions with a stereochemical quality comparable to atomic resolution structures. Here, iMDFF has been used to individually correct and re-refine these three structures to MolProbity scores of <1.7, and strategies for working with such challenging data sets are suggested. Notably, the improved model allowed the resolution for complement C4b to be extended from 4.2 to 3.5 Å as demonstrated by paired refinement.

  9. Molecular crowding and protein enzymatic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2012-05-21

    The effects of molecular crowding on the enzymatic conformational dynamics and transport properties of adenylate kinase are investigated. This tridomain protein undergoes large scale hinge motions in the course of its enzymatic cycle and serves as prototype for the study of crowding effects on the cyclic conformational dynamics of proteins. The study is carried out at a mesoscopic level where both the protein and the solvent in which it is dissolved are treated in a coarse grained fashion. The amino acid residues in the protein are represented by a network of beads and the solvent dynamics is described by multiparticle collision dynamics that includes effects due to hydrodynamic interactions. The system is crowded by a stationary random array of hard spherical objects. Protein enzymatic dynamics is investigated as a function of the obstacle volume fraction and size. In addition, for comparison, results are presented for a modification of the dynamics that suppresses hydrodynamic interactions. Consistent with expectations, simulations of the dynamics show that the protein prefers a closed conformation for high volume fractions. This effect becomes more pronounced as the obstacle radius decreases for a given volume fraction since the average void size in the obstacle array is smaller for smaller radii. At high volume fractions for small obstacle radii, the average enzymatic cycle time and characteristic times of internal conformational motions of the protein deviate substantially from their values in solution or in systems with small density of obstacles. The transport properties of the protein are strongly affected by molecular crowding. Diffusive motion adopts a subdiffusive character and the effective diffusion coefficients can change by more than an order of magnitude. The orientational relaxation time of the protein is also significantly altered by crowding.

  10. Scalable Molecular Dynamics with NAMD

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, James C.; Braun, Rosemary; Wang, Wei; Gumbart, James; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Villa, Elizabeth; Chipot, Christophe; Skeel, Robert D.; Kalé, Laxmikant; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    NAMD is a parallel molecular dynamics code designed for high-performance simulation of large biomolecular systems. NAMD scales to hundreds of processors on high-end parallel platforms, as well as tens of processors on low-cost commodity clusters, and also runs on individual desktop and laptop computers. NAMD works with AMBER and CHARMM potential functions, parameters, and file formats. This paper, directed to novices as well as experts, first introduces concepts and methods used in the NAMD program, describing the classical molecular dynamics force field, equations of motion, and integration methods along with the efficient electrostatics evaluation algorithms employed and temperature and pressure controls used. Features for steering the simulation across barriers and for calculating both alchemical and conformational free energy differences are presented. The motivations for and a roadmap to the internal design of NAMD, implemented in C++ and based on Charm++ parallel objects, are outlined. The factors affecting the serial and parallel performance of a simulation are discussed. Next, typical NAMD use is illustrated with representative applications to a small, a medium, and a large biomolecular system, highlighting particular features of NAMD, e.g., the Tcl scripting language. Finally, the paper provides a list of the key features of NAMD and discusses the benefits of combining NAMD with the molecular graphics/sequence analysis software VMD and the grid computing/collaboratory software BioCoRE. NAMD is distributed free of charge with source code at www.ks.uiuc.edu. PMID:16222654

  11. Molecular dynamics and information on possible sites of interaction of intramyocellular metabolites in vivo from resolved dipolar couplings in localized 1H NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Leif; Schmitz, Christian; Bachert, Peter

    2004-12-01

    Proton NMR resonances of the endogenous metabolites creatine and phosphocreatine ((P)Cr), taurine (Tau), and carnosine (Cs, β-alanyl- L-histidine) were studied with regard to residual dipolar couplings and molecular mobility. We present an analysis of the direct 1H- 1H interaction that provides information on motional reorientation of subgroups in these molecules in vivo. For this purpose, localized 1H NMR experiments were performed on m. gastrocnemius of healthy volunteers using a 1.5-T clinical whole-body MR scanner. We evaluated the observable dipolar coupling strength SD0 ( S = order parameter) of the (P)Cr-methyl triplet and the Tau-methylene doublet by means of the apparent line splitting. These were compared to the dipolar coupling strength of the (P)Cr-methylene doublet. In contrast to the aliphatic protons of (P)Cr and Tau, the aromatic H2 ( δ = 8 ppm) and H4 ( δ = 7 ppm) protons of the imidazole ring of Cs exhibit second-order spectra at 1.5 T. This effect is the consequence of incomplete transition from Zeeman to Paschen-Back regime and allows a determination of SD0 from H2 and H4 of Cs as an alternative to evaluating the multiplet splitting which can be measured directly in high-resolution 1H NMR spectra. Experimental data showed striking differences in the mobility of the metabolites when the dipolar coupling constant D0 (calculated with the internuclear distance known from molecular geometry in the case of complete absence of molecular dynamics and motion) is used for comparison. The aliphatic signals involve very small order parameters S ≈ (1.4 - 3) × 10 -4 indicating rapid reorientation of the corresponding subgroups in these metabolites. In contrast, analysis of the Cs resonances yielded S ≈ (113 - 137) × 10 -4. Thus, the immobilization of the Cs imidazole ring owing to an anisotropic cellular substructure in human m. gastrocnemius is much more effective than for (P)Cr and Tau subgroups. Furthermore, 1H NMR experiments on aqueous model

  12. Better, Cheaper, Faster Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent, revolutionary progress in genomics and structural, molecular and cellular biology has created new opportunities for molecular-level computer simulations of biological systems by providing vast amounts of data that require interpretation. These opportunities are further enhanced by the increasing availability of massively parallel computers. For many problems, the method of choice is classical molecular dynamics (iterative solving of Newton's equations of motion). It focuses on two main objectives. One is to calculate the relative stability of different states of the system. A typical problem that has' such an objective is computer-aided drug design. Another common objective is to describe evolution of the system towards a low energy (possibly the global minimum energy), "native" state. Perhaps the best example of such a problem is protein folding. Both types of problems share the same difficulty. Often, different states of the system are separated by high energy barriers, which implies that transitions between these states are rare events. This, in turn, can greatly impede exploration of phase space. In some instances this can lead to "quasi non-ergodicity", whereby a part of phase space is inaccessible on time scales of the simulation. To overcome this difficulty and to extend molecular dynamics to "biological" time scales (millisecond or longer) new physical formulations and new algorithmic developments are required. To be efficient they should account for natural limitations of multi-processor computer architecture. I will present work along these lines done in my group. In particular, I will focus on a new approach to calculating the free energies (stability) of different states and to overcoming "the curse of rare events". I will also discuss algorithmic improvements to multiple time step methods and to the treatment of slowly decaying, log-ranged, electrostatic effects.

  13. Application of optimal prediction to molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, IV, John Letherman

    2004-12-01

    Optimal prediction is a general system reduction technique for large sets of differential equations. In this method, which was devised by Chorin, Hald, Kast, Kupferman, and Levy, a projection operator formalism is used to construct a smaller system of equations governing the dynamics of a subset of the original degrees of freedom. This reduced system consists of an effective Hamiltonian dynamics, augmented by an integral memory term and a random noise term. Molecular dynamics is a method for simulating large systems of interacting fluid particles. In this thesis, I construct a formalism for applying optimal prediction to molecular dynamics, producing reduced systems from which the properties of the original system can be recovered. These reduced systems require significantly less computational time than the original system. I initially consider first-order optimal prediction, in which the memory and noise terms are neglected. I construct a pair approximation to the renormalized potential, and ignore three-particle and higher interactions. This produces a reduced system that correctly reproduces static properties of the original system, such as energy and pressure, at low-to-moderate densities. However, it fails to capture dynamical quantities, such as autocorrelation functions. I next derive a short-memory approximation, in which the memory term is represented as a linear frictional force with configuration-dependent coefficients. This allows the use of a Fokker-Planck equation to show that, in this regime, the noise is δ-correlated in time. This linear friction model reproduces not only the static properties of the original system, but also the autocorrelation functions of dynamical variables.

  14. Wavelet Analysis for Molecular Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    simulation (and the computational work performed in the process). Slower processes, such as torsions and translations, are usually the more relevant ones. The...is no longer as simple as for H2O, nor are the eigenvalues except 0 simple; for the generalized Amber force field (GAFF), they are 14.7 and...short-range molecular dynamics. J Comput Phys. 1995;117(1):1–19. 9. Sun H, Mumby SJ, Maple JR, Hagler AT. An ab initio CFF93 all-atom force field for

  15. Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccotti, Giovanni; Kapral, Raymond; Sergi, Alessandro

    Statistical mechanics provides a well-established link between microscopic equilibrium states and thermodynamics. If one considers systems out of equilibrium, the link between microscopic dynamical properties and non-equilibrium macroscopic states is more difficult to establish [1,2]. For systems lying near equilibrium, linear response theory provides a route to derive linear macroscopic laws and the microscopic expressions for the transport properties that enter the constitutive relations. If the system is displaced far from equilibrium, no fully general theory exists to treat such systems. By restricting consideration to a class of non-equilibrium states which arise from perturbations (linear or non-linear) of an equilibrium state, methods can be developed to treat non-equilibrium states. Furthermore, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulation methods can be devised to provide estimates for the transport properties of these systems.

  16. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics embedded cluster density functional theory: single-excitation configuration interaction study.

    PubMed

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Glover, William J; Larsen, Ross E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2007-06-21

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the hydrated electron were extracted from the MQC MD simulations and embedded in a roughly 18 Ax18 Ax18 A matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory (DFT) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid DFT(CIS)/MQC MD calculations is significant transfer (approximately 18%) of the excess electron's charge density into the 2p orbitals of oxygen atoms in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the singly occupied and the lower unoccupied molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfcc) tensors, and the infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of these embedded water cluster anions. The calculated hfcc tensors were used to compute electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra for the hydrated electron that compared favorably to the experimental spectra of trapped electrons in alkaline ice. The calculated vibrational spectra of the hydrated electron are consistent with the red-shifted bending and stretching frequencies observed in resonance Raman experiments. In addition to reproducing the visible/near IR absorption spectrum, the hybrid DFT model also accounts for the hydrated electron's 190-nm absorption band in the ultraviolet. Thus, our study suggests that to explain several important experimentally observed properties of the hydrated electron, many-electron effects must be accounted for: one-electron models that do not allow for mixing of the excess

  17. Molecular dynamics of interface rupture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1993-01-01

    Several situations have been studied in which a fluid-vapor or fluid-fluid interface ruptures, using molecular dynamics simulations of 3000 to 20,000 Lennard-Jones molecules in three dimensions. The cases studied are the Rayleigh instability of a liquid thread, the burst of a liquid drop immersed in a second liquid undergoing shear, and the rupture of a liquid sheet in an extensional flow. The late stages of the rupture process involve the gradual withdrawal of molecules from a thinning neck, or the appearance and growth of holes in a sheet. In all cases, it is found that despite the small size of the systems studied, tens of angstroms, the dynamics is in at least qualitative accord with the behavior expected from continuum calculations, and in some cases the agreement is to within tens of percent. Remarkably, this agreement occurs even though the Eulerian velocity and stress fields are essentially unmeasurable - dominated by thermal noise. The limitations and prospects for such molecular simulation techniques are assessed.

  18. Molecular gas in interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ming

    2001-10-01

    A systematic study of the molecular gas properties in strongly interacting galaxies (SIGs) has been undertaken, which includes two parts: (1)a statistical study of a large, optically-selected, complete sample of SIGs; (2)a case study of the nearest colliding pair NGC 4038/9 (``the Antennae'') with multi-transition data of both 12CO and 13CO. Consisting of 126 galaxies in 92 systems, our complete sample of SIGs includes all the SIGs in the northern sky with optical magnitude BT < 14.5. CO data have been collected for 95 SIGs (59 of which were observed by us) as well as for comparison samples of 59 weakly interacting and 69 isolated spiral galaxies. The statistical analysis of the samples shows that the SIGs, especially the colliding and merging systems, have a higher CO luminosity than isolated spiral galaxies. However, there is no significant difference in the atomic gas contents between the samples. This indicates that the excess CO emission is not due to the conversion of atomic gas to molecular gas, but may be more plausibly accounted for by a lower CO-to- H2 conversion factor X. For the Antennae galaxies, we have obtained high quality, fully sampled, single dish maps at 12CO J = 1-0 and 32 transitions with an angular resolution of 15' (1.5 kpc), together with 12CO J = 2-1, 13CO J = 2-1 and 3-2 data at selected regions with similar resolutions. Our Nobeyama 45m map recovers twice as much 12CO J = 1-0 flux as was reported by Wilson et al. (2000). The 12CO J = 1-0, 2-1 and 3-2 emission all peak in an off-nucleus region adjacent to where the two disks overlap. The 12CO/13 CO J = 2-1 and 3-2 integrated intensity ratios are remarkably high in the overlap region. Detailed LVG modeling indicates that the 12 CO and 13CO emission come from different spatial components. The 12CO emission originates from a nonvirialized low density gas component with a large velocity gradient. Such a large velocity gradient can produce ``over luminous'' CO emission, and the derived X

  19. Molecular-dynamics simulation of liquid water with an ab initio flexible water-water interaction potential. II. The effect of internal vibrations on the time correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. W.; Refson, K.; Swamy, K. N.; Lie, G. C.; Clementi, E.

    1987-10-01

    A computer simulation of liquid water using the ab initio Matsuoka-Clementi-Yoshimine-Lie (MCYL) potential has been analyzed in comprehensive detail with use of pertinent auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions of the water molecule's vibrational, rotational, and translational dynamics. The autocorrelation functions (ACF's) of dynamical quantities such as atom velocity, center-of-mass velocity, molecular angular momentum, molecular angular velocity, molecular dipole moment, and molecular rotational velocity vectors have been computed with 3400 configurations generated in a simulation with 343 molecules in the laboratory frame and in the frame of the principal molecular moments of inertia. Furthermore, cross-correlation functions (CCF's) of many different kinds have been computed in both frames in order to study in detail the mutual effects of vibration, rotation, and translation at the single-molecule level. In some respects the inclusion of vibrational effects in the MCYL potential does not significantly change the pattern of dynamical information summarized in these time correlation functions. The rotation-translation CCF's which were obtained recently by Evans et al. from a rigid empirical model for the intermolecular pair potential energy in liquid water appear once more from the ab initio MCYL potential with the same symmetry and time dependence. This is a strong corroborative evidence for the correctness of the methods used in both cases. However, the inclusion of vibrational effects by Lie and Clementi in their MCYL potential leads in this work to considerable further insight obtained by a detailed study of cross-correlation functions between vibration and rotation and between vibration and center-of-mass translation.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zaoshi

    This dissertation is focused on multimillion-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale materials. In the past decade, nanoscale materials have made significant commercial impacts, which will potentially lead to the next industrial revolution. The interest lies in the novel and promising features nanoscale materials exhibit due to their confined sizes. However, not all novel behaviors are understood or controllable. Many uncontrollable parameters, e.g. defects and dangling bonds, are known to hinder the performance of nanodevices. Solutions to these problems rely on our understanding of fundamental elements in nanoscience: isolated individual nanostructures and their assemblies. In this dissertation, we will address atomistic foundations of several problems of technological importance in nanoscience. Specifically, three basic problems are discussed: (1) embrittlement of nanocrystalline metal; (2) novel thermo-mechanical behaviors of nanowires (NWs); and (3) planar defect generation in NWs. With a scalable algorithm implemented on massively parallel computing platforms and various data mining methods, MD simulations can provide valuable insights into these problems. An essential role of sulfur segregation-induced amorphization of crystalline nickel was recently discovered experimentally, but the atomistic mechanism of the amorphization remains unexplained. Our MD simulations reveal that the large steric size of sulfur impurity causes strong sulfur-sulfur interaction mediated by lattice distortion, which leads to amorphization near the percolation threshold at the sulfur-sulfur network in nickel crystal. The generality of the mechanism due to the percolation of an impurity network is further confirmed by a model binary system. In our study of novel behaviors of semiconductor NWs, MD simulations construct a rich size-temperature `phase diagram' for the mechanical response of a zinc-oxide NW under tension. For smaller diameters and higher temperatures, novel

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation in virus research

    PubMed Central

    Ode, Hirotaka; Nakashima, Masaaki; Kitamura, Shingo; Sugiura, Wataru; Sato, Hironori

    2012-01-01

    Virus replication in the host proceeds by chains of interactions between viral and host proteins. The interactions are deeply influenced by host immune molecules and anti-viral compounds, as well as by mutations in viral proteins. To understand how these interactions proceed mechanically and how they are influenced by mutations, one needs to know the structures and dynamics of the proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a powerful computational method for delineating motions of proteins at an atomic-scale via theoretical and empirical principles in physical chemistry. Recent advances in the hardware and software for biomolecular simulation have rapidly improved the precision and performance of this technique. Consequently, MD simulation is quickly extending the range of applications in biology, helping to reveal unique features of protein structures that would be hard to obtain by experimental methods alone. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in MD simulations in the study of virus–host interactions and evolution, and present future perspectives on this technique. PMID:22833741

  2. Differential Interactions of Cytochrome P450 3A5 and 3A4 with Chemotherapeutic Agent-Vincristine: A Comparative Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Saba, Nikhat; Bhuyan, Rajabrata; Nandy, Suman Kumar; Seal, Alpana

    2015-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent vincristine, used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia is metabolized preferentially by polymorphic cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) with higher clearance rate than cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4). As a result, CYP3A5 expressers have a reduced amount of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy than non-expressers. We modeled the structure of CYP3A5 and its interaction with vincristine, compared with CYP3A4-vincristine complex using molecular docking and simulation studies. This relative study helped us to understand the molecular mechanisms behind the interaction at the atomic level through interaction energy, binding free energy, hydrogen bond and solvent accessible surface area analysis - giving an insight into the binding mode and the main residues involved in this particular interaction. Our results show that the interacting groups get closer in CYP3A5-vincristine complex due to different orientation of vincristine. This leads to higher binding affinity of vincristine towards CYP3A5 compared to CYP3A4 and explains the preferential metabolism of vincristine by CYP3A5. We believe that, the results of the current study will be helpful for future studies on structure-based drug design in this area.

  3. Nonadiabatic Molecular Dynamics with Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2012-02-01

    In the mixed quantum-classical description of molecular systems, only the quantum character of the electronic degrees of freedom is considered while the nuclear motion is treated at a classical level. In the adiabatic case, this picture corresponds to the Born-Oppenheimer limit where the nuclei move as point charges on the potential energy surface (PES) associated with a given electronic state. Despite the success of this approximation, many physical and chemical processes do not fall in the regime where nuclei and electrons can be considered decoupled. In particular, most photoreactions pass through regions of the PES in which electron-nuclear quantum interference effects are sizeable and often crucial for a correct description of the phenomena. Recently, we have developed a trajectory-based nonadiabatic molecular dynamics scheme that describes the nuclear wavepacket as an ensemble of particles following classical trajectories on PESs derived from time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) [1]. The method is based on Tully's fewest switches trajectories surface hopping (TSH) where the nonadiabatic coupling elements between the different potential energy surfaces are computed on-the-fly as functionals of the ground state electron density or, equivalently, of the corresponding Kohn-Sham orbitals [2]. Here, we present the theoretical fundamentals of our approach together with an extension that allows for the direct coupling of the dynamics to an external electromagnetic field [3] as well as to the external potential generated by the environment (solvent effects) [4]. The method is applied to the study of the photodissociation dynamics of simple molecules in gas phase and to the description of the fast excited state dynamics of molecules in solution (in particular Ruthenium (II) tris(bipyridine) in water). [4pt] [1] E. Tapavicza, I. Tavernelli, U. Rothlisberger, Phys. Rev. Lett., 98, (2007) 023001. [0pt] [2] Tavernelli I.; Tapavicza E.; Rothlisberger U., J. Chem

  4. Understanding polycaroboxylate interactions with counterions: A molecular modeling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzwater, S.; Freeman, M.B.

    1993-12-31

    Low molecular weight polycarboyxlates, such as poly(acrylic acid), have utility as dispersants in a variety of commercial applications including home laundry detergents, mineral processing and water treatment. In general, counterions (Ca, Mg, Fe, etc.) are unavoidable in these applications and often dictate the polymer composition and molecular weight necessary for successful performance. The authors have been investigating the interaction of polycarboxylates with counterions in order to better understand how that interaction impacts on the dispersant properties of a polymer. Using computer modeling, it can be seen how molecular geometry, molecular dynamics, and the shape/polarity of the molecular surface are affected by counterion binding and polymer composition. The authors can then combine information from the modeling with experimental information and literature concepts to provide a direction toward the synthesis of improved low molecular weight polycarboxylate dispersants.

  5. Uncertainty quantification in molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Francesco

    This dissertation focuses on uncertainty quantification (UQ) in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The application of UQ to molecular dynamics is motivated by the broad uncertainty characterizing MD potential functions and by the complexity of the MD setting, where even small uncertainties can be amplified to yield large uncertainties in the model predictions. Two fundamental, distinct sources of uncertainty are investigated in this work, namely parametric uncertainty and intrinsic noise. Intrinsic noise is inherently present in the MD setting, due to fluctuations originating from thermal effects. Averaging methods can be exploited to reduce the fluctuations, but due to finite sampling, this effect cannot be completely filtered, thus yielding a residual uncertainty in the MD predictions. Parametric uncertainty, on the contrary, is introduced in the form of uncertain potential parameters, geometry, and/or boundary conditions. We address the UQ problem in both its main components, namely the forward propagation, which aims at characterizing how uncertainty in model parameters affects selected observables, and the inverse problem, which involves the estimation of target model parameters based on a set of observations. The dissertation highlights the challenges arising when parametric uncertainty and intrinsic noise combine to yield non-deterministic, noisy MD predictions of target macroscale observables. Two key probabilistic UQ methods, namely Polynomial Chaos (PC) expansions and Bayesian inference, are exploited to develop a framework that enables one to isolate the impact of parametric uncertainty on the MD predictions and, at the same time, properly quantify the effect of the intrinsic noise. Systematic applications to a suite of problems of increasing complexity lead to the observation that an uncertain PC representation built via Bayesian regression is the most suitable model for the representation of uncertain MD predictions of target observables in the

  6. Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Krack, Matthias; Bertolus, Marjorie

    2015-10-10

    Molecular dynamics simulation is well suited to study primary damage production by irradiation, defect interactions with fission gas atoms, gas bubble nucleation, grain boundary effects on defect and gas bubble evolution in nuclear fuel, and the resulting changes in thermo-mechanical properties. In these simulations, the forces on the ions are dictated by interaction potentials generated by fitting properties of interest to experimental data. The results obtained from the present generation of potentials are qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different. There is a need to refine existing potentials to provide a better representation of the performance of polycrystalline fuel under a variety of operating conditions, and to develop models that are equipped to handle deviations from stoichiometry. In addition to providing insights into fundamental mechanisms governing the behaviour of nuclear fuel, MD simulations can also provide parameters that can be used as inputs for mesoscale models.

  7. Fiber lubrication: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyi

    Molecular and mesoscopic level description of friction and lubrication remains a challenge because of difficulties in the phenomenological understanding of to the behaviors of solid-liquid interfaces during sliding. Fortunately, there is the computational simulation approach opens an opportunity to predict and analyze interfacial phenomena, which were studied with molecular dynamics (MD) and mesoscopic dynamics (MesoDyn) simulations. Polypropylene (PP) and cellulose are two of most common polymers in textile fibers. Confined amorphous surface layers of PP and cellulose were built successfully with xenon crystals which were used to compact the polymers. The physical and surface properties of the PP and cellulose surface layers were investigated by MD simulations, including the density, cohesive energy, volumetric thermal expansion, and contact angle with water. The topology method was employed to predict the properties of poly(alkylene glycol) (PAG) diblock copolymers and Pluronic triblock copolymers used as lubricants on surfaces. Density, zero shear viscosity, shear module, cohesive energy and solubility parameter were predicted with each block copolymer. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the interaction energy per unit contact area of block copolymer melts with PP and cellulose surfaces. The interaction energy is defined as the ratio of interfacial interaction energy to the contact area. Both poly(proplene oxide) (PPO) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) segments provided a lipophilic character to both PP and cellulose surfaces. The PPO/PEO ratio and the molecular weight were found to impact the interaction energy on both PP and cellulose surfaces. In aqueous solutions, the interaction energy is complicated due to the presence of water and the cross interactions between the multiple molecular components. The polymer-water-surface (PWS) calculation method was proposed to calculate such complex systems. In a contrast with a vacuum condition, the presence

  8. Gas-surface interactions using accommodation coefficients for a dilute and a dense gas in a micro- or nanochannel: heat flux predictions using combined molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Nedea, S V; van Steenhoven, A A; Markvoort, A J; Spijker, P; Giordano, D

    2014-05-01

    The influence of gas-surface interactions of a dilute gas confined between two parallel walls on the heat flux predictions is investigated using a combined Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) approach. The accommodation coefficients are computed from the temperature of incident and reflected molecules in molecular dynamics and used as effective coefficients in Maxwell-like boundary conditions in Monte Carlo simulations. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic wall interactions are studied, and the effect of the gas-surface interaction potential on the heat flux and other characteristic parameters like density and temperature is shown. The heat flux dependence on the accommodation coefficient is shown for different fluid-wall mass ratios. We find that the accommodation coefficient is increasing considerably when the mass ratio is decreased. An effective map of the heat flux depending on the accommodation coefficient is given and we show that MC heat flux predictions using Maxwell boundary conditions based on the accommodation coefficient give good results when compared to pure molecular dynamics heat predictions. The accommodation coefficients computed for a dilute gas for different gas-wall interaction parameters and mass ratios are transferred to compute the heat flux predictions for a dense gas. Comparison of the heat fluxes derived using explicit MD, MC with Maxwell-like boundary conditions based on the accommodation coefficients, and pure Maxwell boundary conditions are discussed. A map of the heat flux dependence on the accommodation coefficients for a dense gas, and the effective accommodation coefficients for different gas-wall interactions are given. In the end, this approach is applied to study the gas-surface interactions of argon and xenon molecules on a platinum surface. The derived accommodation coefficients are compared with values of experimental results.

  9. Molecular Handshake: Recognition through Weak Noncovalent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murthy, Parvathi S.

    2006-01-01

    The weak noncovalent interactions between substances, the handshake in the form of electrostatic interactions, van der Waals' interactions or hydrogen bonding is universal to all living and nonliving matter. They significantly influence the molecular and bulk properties and behavior of matter. Their transient nature affects chemical reactions and…

  10. Dynamics of convective scale interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, James F. W.; Sinclair, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Several of the mesoscale dynamic and thermodynamic aspects of convective scale interaction are examined. An explanation of how sounding data can be coupled with satellite observed cumulus development in the warm sector and the arc cloud line's time evolution to develop a short range forecast of expected convective intensity along an arc cloud line. The formative, mature and dissipating stages of the arc cloud line life cycle are discussed. Specific properties of convective scale interaction are presented and the relationship between arc cloud lines and tornado producing thunderstorms is considered.

  11. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of cobra cytotoxin A3 interactions with a lipid bilayer: penetration of loops into membranes.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Yeng-Tseng

    2011-02-10

    Cobra cytotoxins, which are small three-looped proteins composed of approximately 60 amino acid residues, primarily act by destroying the bilayer membranes of cells and artificial vesicles. However, the molecular mechanism governing this process is not yet completely understood. We used coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations to study the mechanism underlying the penetration of cardiotoxin A3 (CTX A3), the major toxic component of Naja atra (Chinese cobra) venom, into a hydrated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-1-sn-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) lipid bilayer. We performed CGMD simulations for three different conformations of the cobra cytotoxin-the tail, lying, and harrow conformations. The results of our simulations indicate that two of these, the tail and lying conformations, did not penetrate the bilayer system. Further, for the harrow conformation, loops 2 and 3 played important roles in penetration of CTX A3 into the bilayer system.

  12. Molecular interactions of agonist and inverse agonist ligands at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: computational ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies validated by experimental mutagenesis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Liu, Yue; Booth, Raymond G.

    2015-02-01

    To understand molecular determinants for ligand activation of the serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), a drug target for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders, a 5-HT2C homology model was built according to an adrenergic β2 GPCR (β2AR) structure and validated using a 5-HT2B GPCR crystal structure. The models were equilibrated in a simulated phosphatidyl choline membrane for ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies. Ligands included (2S, 4R)-(-)-trans-4-(3'-bromo- and trifluoro-phenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-amine (3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT), a 5-HT2C agonist and inverse agonist, respectively. Distinct interactions of 3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT at the wild-type (WT) 5-HT2C receptor model were observed and experimental 5-HT2C receptor mutagenesis studies were undertaken to validate the modelling results. For example, the inverse agonist 3'-CF3-PAT docked deeper in the WT 5-HT2C binding pocket and altered the orientation of transmembrane helices (TM) 6 in comparison to the agonist 3'-Br-PAT, suggesting that changes in TM orientation that result from ligand binding impact function. For both PATs, mutation of 5-HT2C residues S3.36, T3.37, and F5.47 to alanine resulted in significantly decreased affinity, as predicted from modelling results. It was concluded that upon PAT binding, 5-HT2C residues T3.37 and F5.47 in TMs 3 and 5, respectively, engage in inter-helical interactions with TMs 4 and 6, respectively. The movement of TMs 5 and 6 upon agonist and inverse agonist ligand binding observed in the 5-HT2C receptor modelling studies was similar to movements reported for the activation and deactivation of the β2AR, suggesting common mechanisms among aminergic neurotransmitter GPCRs.

  13. Complex molecular assemblies at hand via interactive simulations.

    PubMed

    Delalande, Olivier; Férey, Nicolas; Grasseau, Gilles; Baaden, Marc

    2009-11-30

    Studying complex molecular assemblies interactively is becoming an increasingly appealing approach to molecular modeling. Here we focus on interactive molecular dynamics (IMD) as a textbook example for interactive simulation methods. Such simulations can be useful in exploring and generating hypotheses about the structural and mechanical aspects of biomolecular interactions. For the first time, we carry out low-resolution coarse-grain IMD simulations. Such simplified modeling methods currently appear to be more suitable for interactive experiments and represent a well-balanced compromise between an important gain in computational speed versus a moderate loss in modeling accuracy compared to higher resolution all-atom simulations. This is particularly useful for initial exploration and hypothesis development for rare molecular interaction events. We evaluate which applications are currently feasible using molecular assemblies from 1900 to over 300,000 particles. Three biochemical systems are discussed: the guanylate kinase (GK) enzyme, the outer membrane protease T and the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors complex involved in membrane fusion. We induce large conformational changes, carry out interactive docking experiments, probe lipid-protein interactions and are able to sense the mechanical properties of a molecular model. Furthermore, such interactive simulations facilitate exploration of modeling parameters for method improvement. For the purpose of these simulations, we have developed a freely available software library called MDDriver. It uses the IMD protocol from NAMD and facilitates the implementation and application of interactive simulations. With MDDriver it becomes very easy to render any particle-based molecular simulation engine interactive. Here we use its implementation in the Gromacs software as an example.

  14. Development of the Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (HMD) model: A first-principles, relativistic description of nucleus-nucleus interactions at medium energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapp, Edward Neal

    Simulation of energetic, colliding nuclear systems at energies between 100 AMeV and 5 AGeV has utility in fields as diverse as the design and construction of fundamental particle physics experiments, patient treatment by radiation exposure, and in the protection of astronaut crews from the risks of exposure to natural radiation sources during spaceflight. Descriptions of these colliding systems which are derived from theoretical principles are necessary in order to provide confidence in describing systems outside the scope of existing data, which is sparse. The system size and velocity dictate descriptions which include both special relativistic and quantum effects, and the currently incomplete state of understanding with respect to the basic processes at work within nuclear matter dictate that any description will exist at some level of approximation. Models commonly found in the literature employ approximations to theory which lead to simulation results which demonstrate departure from fundamental physical principles, most notably conservation of system energy. The HMD (Hamiltonian Molecular Dynamics) mode is developed as a phase-space description of colliding nuclear system on the level of hadrons, inclusive of the necessary quantum and relativistic elements. Evaluation of model simulations shows that the HMD model shows the necessary conservations throughout system simulation. HMD model predictions are compared to both the RQMD (Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics) and JQMD (Jaeri-Quantum Molecular Dynamics) codes, both commonly employed for the purpose of simulating nucleus-nucleus collisions. Comparison is also provided between all three codes and measurement. The HMD model is shown to perform well in light of both measurement and model calculation, while providing for a physically self-consistent description of the system throughout.

  15. A coarse-graining approach for molecular simulation that retains the dynamics of the all-atom reference system by implementing hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markutsya, Sergiy; Lamm, Monica H.

    2014-11-01

    We report on a new approach for deriving coarse-grained intermolecular forces that retains the frictional contribution that is often discarded by conventional coarse-graining methods. The approach is tested for water and an aqueous glucose solution, and the results from the new implementation for coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation show remarkable agreement with the dynamics obtained from reference all-atom simulations. The agreement between the structural properties observed in the coarse-grained and all-atom simulations is also preserved. We discuss how this approach may be applied broadly to any existing coarse-graining method where the coarse-grained models are rigorously derived from all-atom reference systems.

  16. A coarse-graining approach for molecular simulation that retains the dynamics of the all-atom reference system by implementing hydrodynamic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Markutsya, Sergiy; Lamm, Monica H.

    2014-11-07

    We report on a new approach for deriving coarse-grained intermolecular forces that retains the frictional contribution that is often discarded by conventional coarse-graining methods. The approach is tested for water and an aqueous glucose solution, and the results from the new implementation for coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation show remarkable agreement with the dynamics obtained from reference all-atom simulations. The agreement between the structural properties observed in the coarse-grained and all-atom simulations is also preserved. We discuss how this approach may be applied broadly to any existing coarse-graining method where the coarse-grained models are rigorously derived from all-atom reference systems.

  17. Modeling Nanocomposites for Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Maximum 200 Words) The minimum energy configuration for Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations is found for a carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer...Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs), Molecular Dynamics Simulations 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 18 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT...fiber composites have shown success in improving mechanical properties. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based nanocomposites have been studied for

  18. Molecular Dynamics: New Frontier in Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sneha, P; Doss, C George Priya

    2016-01-01

    The field of drug discovery has witnessed infinite development over the last decade with the demand for discovery of novel efficient lead compounds. Although the development of novel compounds in this field has seen large failure, a breakthrough in this area might be the establishment of personalized medicine. The trend of personalized medicine has shown stupendous growth being a hot topic after the successful completion of Human Genome Project and 1000 genomes pilot project. Genomic variant such as SNPs play a vital role with respect to inter individual's disease susceptibility and drug response. Hence, identification of such genetic variants has to be performed before administration of a drug. This process requires high-end techniques to understand the complexity of the molecules which might bring an insight to understand the compounds at their molecular level. To sustenance this, field of bioinformatics plays a crucial role in revealing the molecular mechanism of the mutation and thereby designing a drug for an individual in fast and affordable manner. High-end computational methods, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has proved to be a constitutive approach to detecting the minor changes associated with an SNP for better understanding of the structural and functional relationship. The parameters used in molecular dynamic simulation elucidate different properties of a macromolecule, such as protein stability and flexibility. MD along with docking analysis can reveal the synergetic effect of an SNP in protein-ligand interaction and provides a foundation for designing a particular drug molecule for an individual. This compelling application of computational power and the advent of other technologies have paved a promising way toward personalized medicine. In this in-depth review, we tried to highlight the different wings of MD toward personalized medicine.

  19. DockingShop: A Tool for Interactive Molecular Docking

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ting-Cheng; Max, Nelson L.; Ding, Jinhui; Bethel, E. Wes; Crivelli, Silvia N.

    2005-04-24

    Given two independently determined molecular structures, the molecular docking problem predicts the bound association, or best fit between them, while allowing for conformational changes of the individual molecules during construction of a molecular complex. Docking Shop is an integrated environment that permits interactive molecular docking by navigating a ligand or protein to an estimated binding site of a receptor with real-time graphical feedback of scoring factors as visual guides. Our program can be used to create initial configurations for a protein docking prediction process. Its output--the structure of aprotein-ligand or protein-protein complex--may serve as an input for aprotein docking algorithm, or an optimization process. This tool provides molecular graphics interfaces for structure modeling, interactive manipulation, navigation, optimization, and dynamic visualization to aid users steer the prediction process using their biological knowledge.

  20. Dynamical Localization in Molecular Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xidi

    In the first four chapters of this thesis we concentrate on the Davydov model which describes the vibrational energy quanta of Amide I bonds (C=O bonds on the alpha -helix) coupled to the acoustic phonon modes of the alpha-helix backbone in the form of a Frohlich Hamiltonian. Following a brief introduction in chapter one, in chapter two we formulate the dynamics of vibrational quanta at finite temperature by using coherent state products. The fluctuation-dissipation relation is derived. At zero temperature, in the continuum limit, we recover the original results of Davydov. We also achieve good agreement with numerical simulations. In chapter three, the net contraction of the lattice is calculated exactly at any temperature, and its relation to the so -call "topological stability" of the Davydov soliton is discussed. In the second section of the chapter three we calculate the overtone spectra of crystalline acetanilide (according to some opinions ACN provides experimental evidence for the existence of Davydov solitons). Good agreement with experimental data has been obtained. In chapter four we study the self-trapped vibrational excitations by the Quantum Monte Carlo technique. For a single excitation, the temperature dependence of different physical observables is calculated. The quasi-particle which resembles the Davydov soliton has been found to be fairly narrow using the most commonly used data for the alpha -helix; at temperatures above a few Kelvin, the quasi-particle reaches its smallest limit (extends over three sites), which implies diffusive motion of the small polaron-like quasi-particle at high temperatures. For the multi-excitation case, bound pairs and clusters of excitations are found at low temperatures; they gradually dissociate when the temperature of the system is increased as calculated from the density-density correlation function. In the last chapter of this thesis, we study a more general model of dynamical local modes in molecular systems

  1. 2004 Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Paul J. Dagdigian

    2004-10-25

    The 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Atomic and Molecular Interactions was held July 11-16 at Colby-Sawyer College, New London, New Hampshire. This latest edition in a long-standing conference series featured invited talks and contributed poster papers on dynamics and intermolecular interactions in a variety of environments, ranging from the gas phase through surfaces and condensed media. A total of 90 conferees participated in the conference.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Supercritical Spray Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-26

    Dynamics of the Rheological and Structural Properties of Linear and Branched Molecules. Simple Shear and Poiseuille Flows ; Instabilities and Slip...Michael Barrucco Publications: "Comparison of Wall Models for the Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Micro flows ," R. D. Branam and M. M...Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Dec. 2003 - 31 May 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Supercritical

  3. Molecular modelling of protein-protein/protein-solvent interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchko, Tyler

    The inner workings of individual cells are based on intricate networks of protein-protein interactions. However, each of these individual protein interactions requires a complex physical interaction between proteins and their aqueous environment at the atomic scale. In this thesis, molecular dynamics simulations are used in three theoretical studies to gain insight at the atomic scale about protein hydration, protein structure and tubulin-tubulin (protein-protein) interactions, as found in microtubules. Also presented, in a fourth project, is a molecular model of solvation coupled with the Amber molecular modelling package, to facilitate further studies without the need of explicitly modelled water. Basic properties of a minimally solvated protein were calculated through an extended study of myoglobin hydration with explicit solvent, directly investigating water and protein polarization. Results indicate a close correlation between polarization of both water and protein and the onset of protein function. The methodology of explicit solvent molecular dynamics was further used to study tubulin and microtubules. Extensive conformational sampling of the carboxy-terminal tails of 8-tubulin was performed via replica exchange molecular dynamics, allowing the characterisation of the flexibility, secondary structure and binding domains of the C-terminal tails through statistical analysis methods. Mechanical properties of tubulin and microtubules were calculated with adaptive biasing force molecular dynamics. The function of the M-loop in microtubule stability was demonstrated in these simulations. The flexibility of this loop allowed constant contacts between the protofilaments to be maintained during simulations while the smooth deformation provided a spring-like restoring force. Additionally, calculating the free energy profile between the straight and bent tubulin configurations was used to test the proposed conformational change in tubulin, thought to cause microtubule

  4. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    T, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2014-12-09

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  5. The zero-multipole summation method for estimating electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics: analysis of the accuracy and application to liquid systems.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Kamiya, Narutoshi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2014-05-21

    In the preceding paper [I. Fukuda, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174107 (2013)], the zero-multipole (ZM) summation method was proposed for efficiently evaluating the electrostatic Coulombic interactions of a classical point charge system. The summation takes a simple pairwise form, but prevents the electrically non-neutral multipole states that may artificially be generated by a simple cutoff truncation, which often causes large energetic noises and significant artifacts. The purpose of this paper is to judge the ability of the ZM method by investigating the accuracy, parameter dependencies, and stability in applications to liquid systems. To conduct this, first, the energy-functional error was divided into three terms and each term was analyzed by a theoretical error-bound estimation. This estimation gave us a clear basis of the discussions on the numerical investigations. It also gave a new viewpoint between the excess energy error and the damping effect by the damping parameter. Second, with the aid of these analyses, the ZM method was evaluated based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of two fundamental liquid systems, a molten sodium-chlorine ion system and a pure water molecule system. In the ion system, the energy accuracy, compared with the Ewald summation, was better for a larger value of multipole moment l currently induced until l ≲ 3 on average. This accuracy improvement with increasing l is due to the enhancement of the excess-energy accuracy. However, this improvement is wholly effective in the total accuracy if the theoretical moment l is smaller than or equal to a system intrinsic moment L. The simulation results thus indicate L ∼ 3 in this system, and we observed less accuracy in l = 4. We demonstrated the origins of parameter dependencies appearing in the crossing behavior and the oscillations of the energy error curves. With raising the moment l we observed, smaller values of the damping parameter provided more accurate results and smoother

  6. Molecular interactions between desmosomal cadherins.

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Shabih-e-Hassnain; Trinnaman, Brian; Martin, Stephen; Major, Sarah; Hutchinson, Jon; Magee, Anthony I

    2002-01-01

    Desmocollins (Dscs) and desmogleins (Dsgs) are cell-adhesion molecules involved in the formation of desmosome cell-cell junctions and share structural similarities to classical cadherins such as E-cadherin. In order to identify and provide quantitative information on the types of protein-protein interactions displayed by the type 2 isoforms and investigate the role of Ca(2+) in this process, we have developed an Escherichia coli expression system to generate recombinant proteins containing the first two extracellular domains, namely Dsg2(1-2) and Dsc2(1-2). Analytical ultracentrifugation, chemical cross-linking, CD, fluorescence and BIAcore have been used to provide the first direct evidence of Ca(2+) binding to desmosomal cadherins. These studies suggest that Dsc2(1-2) not only exhibits homophilic interactions in solution, but can also form heterophilic interactions with Dsg2(1-2). The latter, on the other hand, shows much weaker homophilic association. Our results further demonstrate that heterophilic interactions are Ca(2+)-dependent, whereas the Ca(2+)-dependence of homophilic association is less clear. Our data indicate that the functional properties of Dsc2(1-2) are more similar to those of classical cadherins, consistent with the observation that Dsc shares a higher level of sequence homology with classical cadherins than does Dsg. In addition to corroborating the conclusions of previously reported transfection studies which suggest the formation of lateral heterodimers and homodimers, our results also provide direct quantitative information on the strength of these interactions which are essential for understanding the adhesion mechanism. PMID:11853539

  7. Combined molecular dynamics-spin dynamics simulations of bcc iron

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N; Yin, Junqi; Landau, David P; Nicholson, Don M; Stocks, George Malcolm; Eisenbach, Markus; Brown, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Using a classical model that treats translational and spin degrees of freedom on an equal footing, we study phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron with combined molecular and spin dynamics methods. The atomic interactions are modeled via an empirical many-body potential while spin dependent interactions are established through a Hamiltonian of the Heisenberg form with a distance dependent magnetic exchange interaction obtained from first principles electronic structure calculations. The temporal evolution of translational and spin degrees of freedom was determined by numerically solving the coupled equations of motion, using an algorithm based on the second order Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of the exponential operators. By calculating Fourier transforms of space- and time-displaced correlation functions, we demonstrate that the the presence of lattice vibrations leads to noticeable softening and damping of spin wave modes. As a result of the interplay between lattice and spin subsystems, we also observe additional longitudinal spin wave excitations, with frequencies which coincide with that of the longitudinal lattice vibrations.

  8. Capillary dynamics driven by molecular self-layering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pingkeng; Nikolov, Alex; Wasan, Darsh

    2017-02-10

    Capillary dynamics is a ubiquitous everyday phenomenon. It has practical applications in diverse fields, including ink-jet printing, lab-on-a-chip, biotechnology, and coating. Understanding capillary dynamics requires essential knowledge on the molecular level of how fluid molecules interact with a solid substrate (the wall). Recent studies conducted with the surface force apparatus (SFA), atomic force microscope (AFM), and statistical mechanics simulation revealed that molecules/nanoparticles confined into the film/wall surfaces tend to self-layer into 2D layer/s and even 2D in-layer with increased confinement and fluid volume fraction. Here, the capillary rise dynamics of simple molecular fluids in cylindrical capillary is explained by the molecular self-layering model. The proposed model considers the role of the molecular shape on self-layering and its effect on the molecularly thin film viscosity in regards to the advancing (dynamic) contact angle. The model was tested to explain the capillary rise dynamics of fluids of spherical, cylindrical, and disk shape molecules in borosilicate glass capillaries. The good agreement between the capillary rise data and SFA data from the literature for simple fluid self-layering shows the validity of the present model. The present model provides new insights into the design of many applications where dynamic wetting is important because it reveals the significant impact of molecular self-layering close to the wall on dynamic wetting.

  9. A computational perspective of molecular interactions through virtual screening, pharmacokinetic and dynamic prediction on ribosome toxin A chain and inhibitors of Ricinus communis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R. Barani; Suresh, M. Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ricin is considered to be one of the most deadly toxins and gained its favor as a bioweapon that has a serious social and biological impact, due to its widespread nature and abundant availability. The hazardous effects of this toxin in human being are seen in almost all parts of the organ system. The severe consequences of the toxin necessitate the need for developing potential inhibitors that can effectively block its interaction with the host system. Materials and Methods: In order to identify potential inhibitors that can effectively block ricin, we employed various computational approaches. In this work, we computationally screened and analyzed 66 analogs and further tested their ADME/T profiles. From the kinetic and toxicity studies we selected six analogs that possessed appropriate pharmacokinetic and dynamic property. We have also performed a computational docking of these analogs with the target. Results: On the basis of the dock scores and hydrogen bond interactions we have identified analog 64 to be the best interacting molecule. Molecule 64 seems to have stable interaction with the residues Tyr80, Arg180, and Val81. The pharmacophore feature that describes the key functional features of a molecule was also studied and presented. Conclusion: The pharmacophore features of the drugs provided suggests the key functional groups that can aid in the design and synthesis of more potential inhibitors. PMID:22224054

  10. Cell list algorithms for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Matthew; Fox, Ian; Saracino, Alexandra

    2016-06-01

    We present two modifications of the standard cell list algorithm that handle molecular dynamics simulations with deforming periodic geometry. Such geometry naturally arises in the simulation of homogeneous, linear nonequilibrium flow modeled with periodic boundary conditions, and recent progress has been made developing boundary conditions suitable for general 3D flows of this type. Previous works focused on the planar flows handled by Lees-Edwards or Kraynik-Reinelt boundary conditions, while the new versions of the cell list algorithm presented here are formulated to handle the general 3D deforming simulation geometry. As in the case of equilibrium, for short-ranged pairwise interactions, the cell list algorithm reduces the computational complexity of the force computation from O(N2) to O(N), where N is the total number of particles in the simulation box. We include a comparison of the complexity and efficiency of the two proposed modifications of the standard algorithm.

  11. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  12. Uranyl ion interaction at the water/NiO(100) interface: A predictive investigation by first-principles molecular dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sebbari, Karim; Roques, Jerome; Simoni, Eric; Domain, Christophe

    2012-10-28

    The behavior of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} uranyl ion at the water/NiO(100) interface was investigated for the first time using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamic simulations with the spin polarized DFT +U extension. A water/NiO(100) interface model was first optimized on a defect-free five layers slab thickness, proposed as a reliable surface model, with an explicit treatment of the solvent. Water molecules are adsorbed with a well-defined structure in a thickness of about 4 A above the surface. The first layer, adsorbed on nickel atoms, remains mainly in molecular form but can partly dissociate at 293 K. Considering low acidic conditions, a bidentate uranyl ion complex was characterized on two surface oxygen species (arising from water molecules adsorption on nickel atoms) with d{sub U-O{sub a{sub d{sub s{sub o{sub r{sub p{sub t{sub i{sub o{sub n}}}}}}}}}}}=2.39 A. This complex is stable at 293 K due to iono-covalent bonds with an estimated charge transfer of 0.58 electron from the surface to the uranyl ion.

  13. Effect of initial ion positions on the interactions of monovalent and divalent ions with a DNA duplex as revealed with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Timothy J; Wang, Yongmei

    2013-01-01

    Monovalent (Na(+)) and divalent (Mg(2+)) ion distributions around the Dickerson-Drew dodecamer were studied by atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with AMBER molecular modeling software. Different initial placements of ions were tried and the resulting effects on the ion distributions around DNA were investigated. For monovalent ions, results were found to be nearly independent of initial cation coordinates. However, Mg(2+) ions demonstrated a strong initial coordinate dependent behavior. While some divalent ions initially placed near the DNA formed essentially permanent direct coordination complexes with electronegative DNA atoms, Mg(2+) ions initially placed further away from the duplex formed a full, nonexchanging, octahedral first solvation shell. These fully solvated cations were still capable of binding with DNA with events lasting up to 20 ns, and in comparison were bound much longer than Na(+) ions. Force field parameters were also investigated with modest and little differences arising from ion (ions94 and ions08) and nucleic acid description (ff99, ff99bsc0, and ff10), respectively. Based on known Mg(2+) ion solvation structure, we conclude that in most cases Mg(2+) ions retain their first solvation shell, making only solvent-mediated contacts with DNA duplex. The proper way to simulate Mg(2+) ions around DNA duplex, therefore, should begin with ions placed in the bulk water.

  14. Uranyl ion interaction at the water/NiO(100) interface: A predictive investigation by first-principles molecular dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebbari, Karim; Roques, Jérôme; Domain, Christophe; Simoni, Eric

    2012-10-01

    The behavior of the UO22+ uranyl ion at the water/NiO(100) interface was investigated for the first time using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamic simulations with the spin polarized DFT + U extension. A water/NiO(100) interface model was first optimized on a defect-free five layers slab thickness, proposed as a reliable surface model, with an explicit treatment of the solvent. Water molecules are adsorbed with a well-defined structure in a thickness of about 4 Å above the surface. The first layer, adsorbed on nickel atoms, remains mainly in molecular form but can partly dissociate at 293 K. Considering low acidic conditions, a bidentate uranyl ion complex was characterized on two surface oxygen species (arising from water molecules adsorption on nickel atoms) with d_{U{-O}_{adsorption}}= 2.39 Å. This complex is stable at 293 K due to iono-covalent bonds with an estimated charge transfer of 0.58 electron from the surface to the uranyl ion.

  15. Diffusion and interactions of carbon dioxide and oxygen in the vicinity of the active site of Rubisco: Molecular dynamics and quantum chemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hendawy, Morad M.; Garate, José-Antonio; English, Niall J.; O'Reilly, Stephen; Mooney, Damian A.

    2012-10-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) at the molecular mechanical level and geometry optimisation at the quantum mechanical level have been performed to investigate the transport and fixation of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the cavity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, or Rubisco. Multiple MD simulations have been carried out to study the diffusive behaviour of O2 and CO2 molecules from the Mg2+ cation in Rubisco at 298 K and 1 bar, being one step in the overall process of carboxylation/oxygenation in Rubisco. In addition to this work, in order to gain additional perspective on the role of chemical reaction rates and thermodynamics, oxygen, and carbon dioxide uptake mechanisms have also been investigated by the aid of quantum chemical calculations. The results indicate that the activation barrier for carboxylation is slightly lower than that of oxygenation. This agrees qualitatively with experimental findings, and rationalises the observed competition between both catalytic processes in nature. Finally, the longer-lived persistence of CO2 in the vicinity of the active centre (i.e., slower self-diffusion) may serve to explain, in part, why carboxylation is the more kinetically favoured on an overall basis compared to oxygenation.

  16. Docking and molecular dynamics simulations of the Fyn-SH3 domain with free and phospholipid bilayer-associated 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein (MBP) - Insights into a non-canonical and fuzzy interaction.

    PubMed

    Bessonov, Kyrylo; Vassall, Kenrick A; Harauz, George

    2017-04-05

    The molecular details of the association between the human Fyn-SH3 domain, and the fragment of 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein (MBP) spanning residues S38-S107 (denoted as xα2-peptide, murine sequence numbering), were studied in silico via docking and molecular dynamics over 50-ns trajectories. The results show that interaction between the two proteins is energetically favorable and heavily-dependent on the MBP proline-rich region (P93-P98) in both aqueous and membrane environments. In aqueous conditions, the xα2-peptide/Fyn-SH3 complex adopts a "sandwich"-like structure. In the membrane context, the xα2-peptide interacts with the Fyn-SH3 domain via the proline-rich region and the β-sheets of Fyn-SH3, with the latter wrapping around the proline-rich region in a form of a clip. Moreover, the simulations corroborate prior experimental evidence of the importance of upstream segments beyond the canonical SH3-ligand. This study thus provides a more-detailed glimpse into the context-dependent interaction dynamics and importance of the β-sheets in Fyn-SH3 and proline-rich region of MBP. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Communication: Relation of centroid molecular dynamics and ring-polymer molecular dynamics to exact quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hele, Timothy J. H.; Willatt, Michael J.; Muolo, Andrea; Althorpe, Stuart C.

    2015-05-21

    We recently obtained a quantum-Boltzmann-conserving classical dynamics by making a single change to the derivation of the “Classical Wigner” approximation. Here, we show that the further approximation of this “Matsubara dynamics” gives rise to two popular heuristic methods for treating quantum Boltzmann time-correlation functions: centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). We show that CMD is a mean-field approximation to Matsubara dynamics, obtained by discarding (classical) fluctuations around the centroid, and that RPMD is the result of discarding a term in the Matsubara Liouvillian which shifts the frequencies of these fluctuations. These findings are consistent with previous numerical results and give explicit formulae for the terms that CMD and RPMD leave out.

  18. Vehicle systems: coupled and interactive dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantsevich, Vladimir V.

    2014-11-01

    This article formulates a new direction in vehicle dynamics, described as coupled and interactive vehicle system dynamics. Formalised procedures and analysis of case studies are presented. An analytical consideration, which explains the physics of coupled system dynamics and its consequences for dynamics of a vehicle, is given for several sets of systems including: (i) driveline and suspension of a 6×6 truck, (ii) a brake mechanism and a limited slip differential of a drive axle and (iii) a 4×4 vehicle steering system and driveline system. The article introduces a formal procedure to turn coupled system dynamics into interactive dynamics of systems. A new research direction in interactive dynamics of an active steering and a hybrid-electric power transmitting unit is presented and analysed to control power distribution between the drive axles of a 4×4 vehicle. A control strategy integrates energy efficiency and lateral dynamics by decoupling dynamics of the two systems thus forming their interactive dynamics.

  19. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  20. Molecular rheology of perfluoropolyether lubricant via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qian; Chung, Pil Seung; Chen, Haigang; Jhon, Myung S.

    2006-04-01

    Molecular rheology of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) systems is particularly important in designing effective lubricants that control the friction and wear in tribological applications. Using the coarse-grained, bead-spring model, equilibrium molecular dynamics based on the Langevin equation in a quiescent flow was first employed to examine the nanostructure of PFPE. Further, by integrating the modified Langevin equation and imposing the Lees-Edwards boundary condition, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics of steady shear was investigated. We observe that the shear viscosity of PFPE system depends strongly on molecular architecture (e.g., molecular weight and endgroup functionality) and external conditions (e.g., temperature and shear rate). Our study of the flow activation energy/entropy and their correlations with nanostructure visualization showed that the PFPE structure was substantially modified.

  1. Quantum Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Nanotube Tip Assisted Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    In this report we detail the development and application of an efficient quantum molecular dynamics computational algorithm and its application to the nanotube-tip assisted reactions on silicon and diamond surfaces. The calculations shed interesting insights into the microscopic picture of tip surface interactions.

  2. Molecular dynamics on hypercube parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W.

    1991-03-01

    The implementation of molecular dynamics on parallel computers is described, with particular reference to hypercube computers. Three particular algorithms are described: replicated data (RD); systolic loop (SLS-G), and parallelised link-cells (PLC), all of which have good load balancing. The performance characteristics of each algorithm and the factors affecting their scaling properties are discussed. The article is pedagogic in intent, to introduce a novice to the main aspects of parallel computing in molecular dynamics.

  3. How to Predict Molecular Interactions between Species?

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Sylvie; Schleicher, Jana; Guthke, Reinhard; Linde, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Organisms constantly interact with other species through physical contact which leads to changes on the molecular level, for example the transcriptome. These changes can be monitored for all genes, with the help of high-throughput experiments such as RNA-seq or microarrays. The adaptation of the gene expression to environmental changes within cells is mediated through complex gene regulatory networks. Often, our knowledge of these networks is incomplete. Network inference predicts gene regulatory interactions based on transcriptome data. An emerging application of high-throughput transcriptome studies are dual transcriptomics experiments. Here, the transcriptome of two or more interacting species is measured simultaneously. Based on a dual RNA-seq data set of murine dendritic cells infected with the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the software tool NetGenerator was applied to predict an inter-species gene regulatory network. To promote further investigations of molecular inter-species interactions, we recently discussed dual RNA-seq experiments for host-pathogen interactions and extended the applied tool NetGenerator (Schulze et al., 2015). The updated version of NetGenerator makes use of measurement variances in the algorithmic procedure and accepts gene expression time series data with missing values. Additionally, we tested multiple modeling scenarios regarding the stimuli functions of the gene regulatory network. Here, we summarize the work by Schulze et al. (2015) and put it into a broader context. We review various studies making use of the dual transcriptomics approach to investigate the molecular basis of interacting species. Besides the application to host-pathogen interactions, dual transcriptomics data are also utilized to study mutualistic and commensalistic interactions. Furthermore, we give a short introduction into additional approaches for the prediction of gene regulatory networks and discuss their application to dual transcriptomics data. We

  4. Microbial interactions: ecology in a molecular perspective.

    PubMed

    Braga, Raíssa Mesquita; Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2016-12-01

    The microorganism-microorganism or microorganism-host interactions are the key strategy to colonize and establish in a variety of different environments. These interactions involve all ecological aspects, including physiochemical changes, metabolite exchange, metabolite conversion, signaling, chemotaxis and genetic exchange resulting in genotype selection. In addition, the establishment in the environment depends on the species diversity, since high functional redundancy in the microbial community increases the competitive ability of the community, decreasing the possibility of an invader to establish in this environment. Therefore, these associations are the result of a co-evolution process that leads to the adaptation and specialization, allowing the occupation of different niches, by reducing biotic and abiotic stress or exchanging growth factors and signaling. Microbial interactions occur by the transference of molecular and genetic information, and many mechanisms can be involved in this exchange, such as secondary metabolites, siderophores, quorum sensing system, biofilm formation, and cellular transduction signaling, among others. The ultimate unit of interaction is the gene expression of each organism in response to an environmental (biotic or abiotic) stimulus, which is responsible for the production of molecules involved in these interactions. Therefore, in the present review, we focused on some molecular mechanisms involved in the microbial interaction, not only in microbial-host interaction, which has been exploited by other reviews, but also in the molecular strategy used by different microorganisms in the environment that can modulate the establishment and structuration of the microbial community.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of microscale fluid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Lopez, A.R.; Stevens, M.J.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    Recent advances in micro-science and technology, like Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), have generated a group of unique liquid flow problems that involve characteristic length scales of a Micron. Also, in manufacturing processes such as coatings, current continuum models are unable to predict microscale physical phenomena that appear in these non-equilibrium systems. It is suspected that in these systems, molecular-level processes can control the interfacial energy and viscoelastic properties at the liquid/solid boundary. A massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code has been developed to better understand microscale transport mechanisms, fluid-structure interactions, and scale effects in micro-domains. Specifically, this MD code has been used to analyze liquid channel flow problems for a variety of channel widths, e.g. 0.005-0.05 microns. This report presents results from MD simulations of Poiseuille flow and Couette flow problems and addresses both scaling and modeling issues. For Poiseuille flow, the numerical predictions are compared with existing data to investigate the variation of the friction factor with channel width. For Couette flow, the numerical predictions are used to determine the degree of slip at the liquid/solid boundary. Finally, the results also indicate that shear direction with respect to the wall lattice orientation can be very important. Simulation results of microscale Couette flow and microscale Poiseuille flow for two different surface structures and two different shear directions will be presented.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a RNA Aptasensor.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Min; Seydou, Mahamadou; Noel, Vincent; Piro, Benoit; Maurel, François; Barbault, Florent

    2017-04-14

    Single-stranded RNA aptamers have emerged as novel biosensor tools. However, the immobilization procedure of the aptamer onto a surface generally induces a loss of affinity. To understand this molecular process, we conducted a complete simulation study for the Flavin mononucleotide aptamer for which experimental data are available. Several molecular dynamics simulations (MD) of the Flavin in complex with its RNA aptamer were conducted in solution, linked with six thymidines (T6) and, finally, immobilized on an hexanol-thiol-functionalized gold surface. First, we demonstrated that our MD computations were able to reproduce the experimental solution structure and to provide a meaningful estimation of the Flavin free energy of binding. We also demonstrated that the T6 linkage, by itself, does not generate a perturbation of the Flavin recognition process. From the simulation of the complete biosensor system, we observed that the aptamer stays oriented parallel to the surface at a distance around 36 Å avoiding, this way, interaction with the surface. We evidenced a structural reorganization of the Flavin aptamer binding mode related to the loss of affinity and induced by an anisotropic distribution of sodium cationic densities. This means that ionic diffusion is different between the surface and the aptamer than above this last one. We suggest that these findings might be extrapolated to other nucleic acids systems for the future design of biosensors with higher efficiency and selectivity.

  7. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  8. Protein dynamics: Moore's law in molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M

    2011-01-25

    The millisecond barrier has been broken in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins. Such simulations are increasingly revealing the inner workings of biological systems by generating atomic-level descriptions of their behaviour that make testable predictions about key molecular processes.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Owner F.; Wengerter, Brian C.; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, in which students were given the opportunity to perform molecular dynamics simulations on a series of molecular liquids using the Amber suite of programs, is presented. They were introduced to both physical theories underlying classical mechanics simulations and to the atom-atom pair distribution function.

  10. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus.

  11. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor

  12. AceCloud: Molecular Dynamics Simulations in the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Harvey, M J; De Fabritiis, G

    2015-05-26

    We present AceCloud, an on-demand service for molecular dynamics simulations. AceCloud is designed to facilitate the secure execution of large ensembles of simulations on an external cloud computing service (currently Amazon Web Services). The AceCloud client, integrated into the ACEMD molecular dynamics package, provides an easy-to-use interface that abstracts all aspects of interaction with the cloud services. This gives the user the experience that all simulations are running on their local machine, minimizing the learning curve typically associated with the transition to using high performance computing services.

  13. Insights into the mechanism of interaction between trehalose-conjugated beta-sheet breaker peptides and Aβ(1-42) fibrils by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Autiero, Ida; Langella, Emma; Saviano, Michele

    2013-11-01

    An attractive strategy to contrast the Alzheimer disease (AD) is represented by the development of β-sheet breaker peptides (BSB). β-sheet breakers constitute a class of compounds which have shown a good efficacy in preventing the Aβ fibrillogenesis; however, their mechanism of action has not been precisely understood. In this context, we have studied the structural basis underlying the inhibitory effect of Aβ(1-42) fibrillogenesis explicated by two promising trehalose-conjugated BSB peptides using an all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) approach. Our simulations suggest that the binding on the two protofibril ends occurs through different binding modes. In particular, binding on the odd edge (chain A) is guided by a well defined hydrophobic cleft, which is common to both ligands. Moreover, targeting chain A entails a significant structure destabilization leading to a partial loss of β structure and is an energetically favoured process. A significant contribution of the trehalose moiety to the stability of the complexes emerged from our results. The energetically favoured hydrophobic cleft detected on chain A could represent a good starting point for the design of new molecules with improved anti-aggregating features.

  14. Modeling hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattoni, Alessandro; Filippetti, Alessio; Caddeo, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    The topical review describes the recent progress in the modeling of hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics simulations. Hybrid perovskites and in particular methylammonium lead halide (MAPI) have a tremendous technological relevance representing the fastest-advancing solar material to date. They also represent the paradigm of an organic-inorganic crystalline material with some conceptual peculiarities: an inorganic semiconductor for what concerns the electronic and absorption properties with a hybrid and solution processable organic-inorganic body. After briefly explaining the basic concepts of ab initio and classical molecular dynamics, the model potential recently developed for hybrid perovskites is described together with its physical motivation as a simple ionic model able to reproduce the main dynamical properties of the material. Advantages and limits of the two strategies (either ab initio or classical) are discussed in comparison with the time and length scales (from pico to microsecond scale) necessary to comprehensively study the relevant properties of hybrid perovskites from molecular reorientations to electrocaloric effects. The state-of-the-art of the molecular dynamics modeling of hybrid perovskites is reviewed by focusing on a selection of showcase applications of methylammonium lead halide: molecular cations disorder; temperature evolution of vibrations; thermally activated defects diffusion; thermal transport. We finally discuss the perspectives in the modeling of hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics.

  15. Modeling hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mattoni, Alessandro; Filippetti, Alessio; Caddeo, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    The topical review describes the recent progress in the modeling of hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics simulations. Hybrid perovskites and in particular methylammonium lead halide (MAPI) have a tremendous technological relevance representing the fastest-advancing solar material to date. They also represent the paradigm of an organic-inorganic crystalline material with some conceptual peculiarities: an inorganic semiconductor for what concerns the electronic and absorption properties with a hybrid and solution processable organic-inorganic body. After briefly explaining the basic concepts of ab initio and classical molecular dynamics, the model potential recently developed for hybrid perovskites is described together with its physical motivation as a simple ionic model able to reproduce the main dynamical properties of the material. Advantages and limits of the two strategies (either ab initio or classical) are discussed in comparison with the time and length scales (from pico to microsecond scale) necessary to comprehensively study the relevant properties of hybrid perovskites from molecular reorientations to electrocaloric effects. The state-of-the-art of the molecular dynamics modeling of hybrid perovskites is reviewed by focusing on a selection of showcase applications of methylammonium lead halide: molecular cations disorder; temperature evolution of vibrations; thermally activated defects diffusion; thermal transport. We finally discuss the perspectives in the modeling of hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed. PMID:26604800

  17. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottwald, Fabian; Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D.; Kühn, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into a few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation, which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection technique. Within this framework, a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here, we discuss that this task is more naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importantly, we show that the rigid bond approach leads to a systematic overestimation of relaxation times, unless the system under study consists of a harmonic bath bi-linearly coupled to the relevant degrees of freedom.

  18. Dynamic and interacting complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickison, Mark E.

    This thesis employs methods of statistical mechanics and numerical simulations to study some aspects of dynamic and interacting complex networks. The mapping of various social and physical phenomena to complex networks has been a rich field in the past few decades. Subjects as broad as petroleum engineering, scientific collaborations, and the structure of the internet have all been analyzed in a network physics context, with useful and universal results. In the first chapter we introduce basic concepts in networks, including the two types of network configurations that are studied and the statistical physics and epidemiological models that form the framework of the network research, as well as covering various previously-derived results in network theory that are used in the work in the following chapters. In the second chapter we introduce a model for dynamic networks, where the links or the strengths of the links change over time. We solve the model by mapping dynamic networks to the problem of directed percolation, where the direction corresponds to the time evolution of the network. We show that the dynamic network undergoes a percolation phase transition at a critical concentration pc, that decreases with the rate r at which the network links are changed. The behavior near criticality is universal and independent of r. We find that for dynamic random networks fundamental laws are changed: i) The size of the giant component at criticality scales with the network size N for all values of r, rather than as N2/3 in static network, ii) In the presence of a broad distribution of disorder, the optimal path length between two nodes in a dynamic network scales as N1/2, compared to N1/3 in a static network. The third chapter consists of a study of the effect of quarantine on the propagation of epidemics on an adaptive network of social contacts. For this purpose, we analyze the susceptible-infected-recovered model in the presence of quarantine, where susceptible

  19. Molecular Dynamic Screening Sesquiterpenoid Pogostemon Herba as Suggested Cyclooxygenase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Raharjo, Sentot Joko; Kikuchi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Virtual molecular dynamic sesquiterpenoid Pogostemon Herba (CID56928117, CID94275, CID107152, and CID519743) have screening as cyclooxygenase (COX-1/COX-2) selective inhibitor. Methods: Molecular interaction studies sesquiterpenoid compounds with COX-1 and COX-2 were using the molecular docking tools by Hex 8.0 and interactions were further visualized using by Discovery Studio Client 3.5 software tool and Virtual Molecular Dynamic 1.9.1 software. The binding energy calculation of molecular dynamic interaction was calculated by AMBER12 software. Result: The analysis of the sesquiterpenoid compounds showed that CID56928117, CID94275, CID107152, and CID519743 have suggested as inhibitor of COX-1 and COX-2. Conclusion: Collectively, the scoring binding energy calculation (with PBSA Model Solvent) sesquiterpenoid compounds: CID519743 had suggested as candidate for non-selective inhibitor; CID56928117 and CID94275 had suggested as candidate for a selective COX-1 inhibitor; and CID107152 had suggested as candidate for a selective COX-2 inhibitor. PMID:28077888

  20. Concise NMR approach for molecular dynamics characterizations in organic solids.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E; Courtier-Murias, Denis

    2013-08-22

    Molecular dynamics characterisations in solids can be carried out selectively using dipolar-dephasing experiments. Here we show that the introduction of a sum of Lorentzian and Gaussian functions greatly improve fittings of the "intensity versus time" data for protonated carbons in dipolar-dephasing experiments. The Lorentzian term accounts for remote intra- and intermolecular (1)H-(13)C dipole-dipole interactions, which vary from one molecule to another or for different carbons within the same molecule. Thus, by separating contributions from weak remote interactions, more accurate Gaussian decay constants, T(dd), can be extracted for directly bonded (1)H-(13)C dipole-dipole interactions. Reorientations of the (1)H-(13)C bonds lead to the increase of T(dd), and by measuring dipolar-dephasing constants, insight can be gained into dynamics in solids. We have demonstrated advantages of the method using comparative dynamics studies in the α and γ polymorphs of glycine, cyclic amino acids L-proline, DL-proline and trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline, the Ala residue in different dipeptides, as well as adamantane and hexamethylenetetramine. It was possible to distinguish subtle differences in dynamics of different carbon sites within a molecule in polymorphs and in L- and DL-forms. The presence of overall molecular motions is shown to lead to particularly large differences in dipolar-dephasing experiments. The differences in dynamics can be attributed to differences in noncovalent interactions. In the case of hexamethylenetetramine, for example, the presence of C-H···N interactions leads to nearly rigid molecules. Overall, the method allows one to gain insight into the role of noncovalent interactions in solids and their influence on the molecular dynamics.

  1. Random Matrix Theory in molecular dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Palese, Luigi Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that, in some situations, principal component analysis (PCA) carried out on molecular dynamics data results in the appearance of cosine-shaped low index projections. Because this is reminiscent of the results obtained by performing PCA on a multidimensional Brownian dynamics, it has been suggested that short-time protein dynamics is essentially nothing more than a noisy signal. Here we use Random Matrix Theory to analyze a series of short-time molecular dynamics experiments which are specifically designed to be simulations with high cosine content. We use as a model system the protein apoCox17, a mitochondrial copper chaperone. Spectral analysis on correlation matrices allows to easily differentiate random correlations, simply deriving from the finite length of the process, from non-random signals reflecting the intrinsic system properties. Our results clearly show that protein dynamics is not really Brownian also in presence of the cosine-shaped low index projections on principal axes.

  2. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of model C36 fullerite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramo, Maria C.; Caccamo, C.

    2008-02-01

    We report atomistic molecular dynamics investigations of a model C36 fullerite in which the fullerene molecules are modeled as rigid cages over which the carbon atoms occupy fixed interaction sites, distributed in space according to the experimentally known atomic positions in the molecule. Carbon sites belonging to different molecules are assumed to interact via a 12-6 Lennard-Jones-type potential; the parameters of the latter are employed in the framework of a molecular dynamics fitting procedure, through which the ambient condition physical quantities characterizing the hcp structure of solid C36 are eventually reproduced. We discuss applications of the adopted modelization to the C36 phases in a temperature range spanning from 300to1500K, and compare the obtained results to the available data for C36 and other fullerenes, and to the predictions of the well known Girifalco central potential modelization of interactions in fullerenes, as applied to the C36 case.

  3. Interacting molecular motors: Efficiency and work fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanina, František

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the model of “reversible ratchet” with interacting particles, presented by us earlier [F. Slanina, EPL 84, 50009 (2008)]. We further clarify the effect of efficiency enhancement due to interaction and show that it is of energetic origin, rather than a consequence of reduced fluctuations. We also show complicated structures emerging in the interaction and density dependence of the current and response function. The fluctuation properties of the work and input energy indicate in detail the far-from-equilibrium nature of the dynamics.

  4. Homology modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics simulation of the receptor GALR2 and its interactions with galanin and a positive allosteric modulator.

    PubMed

    Hui, Wen-Qi; Cheng, Qi; Liu, Tian-Yu; Ouyang, Qin

    2016-04-01

    Galanin receptor type 2 (GALR2) is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), and it has been reported that orthosteric ligands and positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of GALR2 could potentially be used to treat epilepsy. So far, the X-ray structure of this receptor has not been resolved, and knowledge of the 3D structure of GALR2 may prove informative in attempts to design novel ligands and to explore the mechanism for the allosteric modulation of this receptor. In this study, homology modeling was used to obtain several GALR2 models using known templates. ProSA-web Z-scores and Ramachandran plots as well as pre-screening against a test dataset of known compounds were all utilized to select the best model of GALR2. Molecular dockings of galanin (a peptide) and a nonpeptide ligand were carried out to choose the (GALR2 model)-galanin complex that showed the closest agreement with the corresponding experimental data. Finally, a 50-ns MD simulation was performed to study the interactions between the GALR2 model and the synthetic and endogenous ligands. The results from docking and MD simulation showed that, besides the reported residues, Tyr160(4.60), Ile105(3.32), Ala274(7.35), and Tyr163(ECL2) also appear to play important roles in the binding of galanin. The potential allosteric binding pockets in the GALR2 model were then investigated via MD simulation. The results indicated that the mechanism for the allosteric modulation caused by PAMs is the binding of the PAM at pocket III, which is formed by galanin, ECL2, TM2, TM3, and ECL1; this results in the disruption of the Na(+)-binding site and/or the Na(+) ion pathway, leading to GALR2 agonism.

  5. Liouville-von Neumann molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakowski, Jacek; Morokuma, Keiji

    2009-06-01

    We present a novel first principles molecular dynamics scheme, called Liouville-von Neumann molecular dynamics, based on Liouville-von Neumann equation for density matrices propagation and Magnus expansion of the time-evolution operator. The scheme combines formally accurate quantum propagation of electrons represented via density matrices and a classical propagation of nuclei. The method requires a few iterations per each time step where the Fock operator is formed and von Neumann equation is integrated. The algorithm (a) is free of constraint and fictitious parameters, (b) avoids diagonalization of the Fock operator, and (c) can be used in the case of fractional occupation as in metallic systems. The algorithm is very stable, and has a very good conservation of energy even in cases when a good quality conventional Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories is difficult to obtain. Test simulations include initial phase of fullerene formation from gaseous C2 and retinal system.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of substitutional diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaowang; Jones, Reese E.; Gruber, Jacob

    2016-12-18

    In atomistic simulations, diffusion energy barriers are usually calculated for each atomic jump path using a nudged elastic band method. Practical materials often involve thousands of distinct atomic jump paths that are not known a priori. Hence, it is often preferred to determine an overall diffusion energy barrier and an overall pre-exponential factor from the Arrhenius equation constructed through molecular dynamics simulations of mean square displacement of the diffusion species at different temperatures. This approach has been well established for interstitial diffusion, but not for substitutional diffusion at the same confidence. Using In 0.1 Ga 0.9 N as an example, we have identified conditions where molecular dynamics simulations can be used to calculate highly converged Arrhenius plots for substitutional alloys. As a result, this may enable many complex diffusion problems to be easily and reliably studied in the future using molecular dynamics, provided that moderate computing resources are available.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of substitutional diffusion

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Xiaowang; Jones, Reese E.; Gruber, Jacob

    2016-12-18

    In atomistic simulations, diffusion energy barriers are usually calculated for each atomic jump path using a nudged elastic band method. Practical materials often involve thousands of distinct atomic jump paths that are not known a priori. Hence, it is often preferred to determine an overall diffusion energy barrier and an overall pre-exponential factor from the Arrhenius equation constructed through molecular dynamics simulations of mean square displacement of the diffusion species at different temperatures. This approach has been well established for interstitial diffusion, but not for substitutional diffusion at the same confidence. Using In 0.1 Ga 0.9 N as an example,more » we have identified conditions where molecular dynamics simulations can be used to calculate highly converged Arrhenius plots for substitutional alloys. As a result, this may enable many complex diffusion problems to be easily and reliably studied in the future using molecular dynamics, provided that moderate computing resources are available.« less

  8. Launcher-payload dynamic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morand, H. J. P.; Chemoul, B.; Bodagala, P. R.

    1986-04-01

    Dynamic calculation methods and tools developed for the Ariane program are described. Two methods to reduce to a minimum the calculation of the dynamic load transmitted to the satellite are summarized: an equivalent load method compatible with the usual transient response algorithms, and a transfer function coupling method, used in a dynamic coupling analysis program.

  9. A Dynamic Interactive Theory of Person Construal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Jonathan B.; Ambady, Nalini

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic interactive theory of person construal is proposed. It assumes that the perception of other people is accomplished by a dynamical system involving continuous interaction between social categories, stereotypes, high-level cognitive states, and the low-level processing of facial, vocal, and bodily cues. This system permits lower-level…

  10. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I.

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  11. Molecular dynamic simulations of ocular tablet dissolution.

    PubMed

    Ru, Qian; Fadda, Hala M; Li, Chung; Paul, Daniel; Khaw, Peng T; Brocchini, Steve; Zloh, Mire

    2013-11-25

    Small tablets for implantation into the subconjunctival space in the eye are being developed to inhibit scarring after glaucoma filtration surgery (GFS). There is a need to evaluate drug dissolution at the molecular level to determine how the chemical structure of the active may correlate with dissolution in the nonsink conditions of the conjunctival space. We conducted molecular dynamics simulations to study the dissolution process of tablets derived from two drugs that can inhibit fibrosis after GFS, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and the matrix metalloprotease inhibitor (MMPi), ilomastat. The dissolution was simulated in the presence of simple point charge (SPC) water molecules, and the liquid turnover of the aqueous humor in the subconjunctival space was simulated by removal of the dissolved drug molecules at regular intervals and replacement by new water molecules. At the end of the simulation, the total molecular solvent accessible surface area of 5-FU tablets increased by 60 times more than that of ilomastat as a result of tablet swelling and release of molecules into solution. The tablet dissolution pattern shown in our molecular dynamic simulations tends to correlate with experimental release profiles. This work indicates that a series of molecular dynamic simulations can be used to predict the influence of the molecular properties of a drug on its dissolution profile and could be useful during preformulation where sufficient amounts of the drug are not always available to perform dissolution studies.

  12. Molecular scale dynamics of large ring polymers.

    PubMed

    Gooßen, S; Brás, A R; Krutyeva, M; Sharp, M; Falus, P; Feoktystov, A; Gasser, U; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W; Wischnewski, A; Richter, D

    2014-10-17

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture.

  13. Molecular Scale Dynamics of Large Ring Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooßen, S.; Brás, A. R.; Krutyeva, M.; Sharp, M.; Falus, P.; Feoktystov, A.; Gasser, U.; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W.; Wischnewski, A.; Richter, D.

    2014-10-01

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture.

  14. Molecular Mediators Governing Iron-Copper Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Sukru; Collins, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Given their similar physiochemical properties, it is a logical postulate that iron and copper metabolism are intertwined. Indeed, iron-copper interactions were first documented over a century ago, but the homeostatic effects of one on the other has not been elucidated at a molecular level to date. Recent experimental work has, however, begun to provide mechanistic insight into how copper influences iron metabolism. During iron deficiency, elevated copper levels are observed in the intestinal mucosa, liver, and blood. Copper accumulation and/or redistribution within enterocytes may influence iron transport, and high hepatic copper may enhance biosynthesis of a circulating ferroxidase, which potentiates iron release from stores. Moreover, emerging evidence has documented direct effects of copper on the expression and activity of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. This review summarizes current experimental work in this field, with a focus on molecular aspects of iron-copper interplay and how these interactions relate to various disease states. PMID:24995690

  15. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando; Dressel, Martin; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2016-02-01

    Controlling the dynamics of spins on surfaces is pivotal to the design of spintronic and quantum computing devices. Proposed schemes involve the interaction of spins with graphene to enable surface-state spintronics and electrical spin manipulation. However, the influence of the graphene environment on the spin systems has yet to be unravelled. Here we explore the spin-graphene interaction by studying the classical and quantum dynamics of molecular magnets on graphene. Whereas the static spin response remains unaltered, the quantum spin dynamics and associated selection rules are profoundly modulated. The couplings to graphene phonons, to other spins, and to Dirac fermions are quantified using a newly developed model. Coupling to Dirac electrons introduces a dominant quantum relaxation channel that, by driving the spins over Villain’s threshold, gives rise to fully coherent, resonant spin tunnelling. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the interaction between spins and graphene, establishing the basis for electrical spin manipulation in graphene nanodevices.

  16. Ab initio Path Integral Molecular Dynamics Based on Fragment Molecular Orbital Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2009-10-01

    We have developed an ab initio path integral molecular dynamics method based on the fragment molecular orbital method. This “FMO-PIMD” method can treat both nuclei and electrons quantum mechanically, and is useful to simulate large hydrogen-bonded systems with high accuracy. After a benchmark calculation for water monomer, water trimer and glycine pentamer have been studied using the FMO-PIMD method to investigate nuclear quantum effects on structure and molecular interactions. The applicability of the present approach is demonstrated through a number of test calculations.

  17. Molecular dynamics of liquid lead near its melting point

    SciTech Connect

    Khusnutdinov, R. M.; Mokshin, A. V. Yul'met'ev, R. M.

    2009-03-15

    The molecular dynamics of liquid lead is simulated at T = 613 K using the following three models of an interparticle interaction potential: the Dzugutov pair potential and two multiparticle potentials (the 'glue' potential and the Gupta potential). One of the purposes of this work is to determine the optimal model potential of the interatomic interaction in liquid lead. The calculated structural static and dynamic characteristics are compared with the experimental data on X-ray and neutron scattering. On the whole, all three model potentials adequately reproduce the experimental data. The calculations using the Dzugutov pair potential are found to reproduce the structural properties and dynamics of liquid lead on the nanoscale best of all. The role of a multiparticle contribution to the glue and Gupta potentials is studied, and its effect on the dynamic properties of liquid lead in nanoregions is revealed. In particular, the neglect of this contribution is shown to noticeably decrease the acoustic-mode frequency.

  18. Semiclassical guided optimal control of molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kondorskiy, A.; Mil'nikov, G.; Nakamura, H.

    2005-10-15

    An efficient semiclassical optimal control theory applicable to multidimensional systems is formulated for controlling wave packet dynamics on a single adiabatic potential energy surface. The approach combines advantages of different formulations of optimal control theory: quantum and classical on one hand and global and local on the other. Numerical applications to the control of HCN-CNH isomerization demonstrate that this theory can provide an efficient tool to manipulate molecular dynamics of many degrees of freedom by laser pulses.

  19. Multiple time step integrators in ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Luehr, Nathan; Martínez, Todd J.; Markland, Thomas E.

    2014-02-28

    Multiple time-scale algorithms exploit the natural separation of time-scales in chemical systems to greatly accelerate the efficiency of molecular dynamics simulations. Although the utility of these methods in systems where the interactions are described by empirical potentials is now well established, their application to ab initio molecular dynamics calculations has been limited by difficulties associated with splitting the ab initio potential into fast and slowly varying components. Here we present two schemes that enable efficient time-scale separation in ab initio calculations: one based on fragment decomposition and the other on range separation of the Coulomb operator in the electronic Hamiltonian. We demonstrate for both water clusters and a solvated hydroxide ion that multiple time-scale molecular dynamics allows for outer time steps of 2.5 fs, which are as large as those obtained when such schemes are applied to empirical potentials, while still allowing for bonds to be broken and reformed throughout the dynamics. This permits computational speedups of up to 4.4x, compared to standard Born-Oppenheimer ab initio molecular dynamics with a 0.5 fs time step, while maintaining the same energy conservation and accuracy.

  20. Reaction dynamics in polyatomic molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is the development of theoretical methods and models for describing the dynamics of chemical reactions, with specific interest for application to polyatomic molecular systems of special interest and relevance. There is interest in developing the most rigorous possible theoretical approaches and also in more approximate treatments that are more readily applicable to complex systems.

  1. Solution structures and molecular interactions of selective melanocortin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Yun, Ji-Hye; Lim, Sung-Kil; Lee, Weontae

    2010-12-01

    The solution structures and inter-molecular interaction of the cyclic melanocortin antagonists SHU9119, JKC363, HS014, and HS024 with receptor molecules have been determined by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. While SHU9119 is known as a nonselective antagonist, JKC363, HS014, and HS024 are selective for the melanocortin subtype-4 receptor (MC4R) involved in modulation of food intake. Data from NMR and molecular dynamics suggest that the conformation of the Trp9 sidechain in the three MC4R-selective antagonists is quite different from that of SHU9119. This result strongly supports the concept that the spatial orientation of the hydrophobic aromatic residue is more important for determining selectivity than the presence of a basic, "arginine-like" moiety responsible for biological activity. We propose that the conformation of hydrophobic residues of MCR antagonists is critical for receptor-specific selectivity.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of carbon disulphide with a Gaussian correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumpakaj, Zygmunt; Linde, Bogumił B. J.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid carbon disulphide (CS2) in the temperature range 164-318 K under normal pressure and at experimental density were performed using an expa-6 potential with a Gaussian correction plus electrostatic interactions. This correction allowed to modify the curvature of the potential. The results of the MD simulation are compared with available experimental data. The agreement is good.

  3. How Mg(2+) ion and water network affect the stability and structure of non-Watson-Crick base pairs in E. coli loop E of 5S rRNA: a molecular dynamics and reference interaction site model (RISM) study.

    PubMed

    Shanker, Sudhanshu; Bandyopadhyay, Pradipta

    2016-08-02

    The non-Watson-Crick (non-WC) base pairs of Escherichia coli loop E of 5S rRNA are stabilized by Mg(2+) ions through water-mediated interaction. It is important to know the synergic role of Mg(2+) and the water network surrounding Mg(2+) in stabilizing the non-WC base pairs of RNA. For this purpose, free energy change of the system is calculated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation as Mg(2+) is pulled from RNA, which causes disturbance of the water network. It was found that Mg(2+) remains hexahydrated unless it is close to or far from RNA. In the pentahydrated form, Mg(2+) interacts directly with RNA. Water network has been identified by two complimentary methods; MD followed by a density-based clustering algorithm and three-dimensional-reference interaction site model. These two methods gave similar results. Identification of water network around Mg(2+) and non-WC base pairs gives a clue to the strong effect of water network on the stability of this RNA. Based on sequence analysis of all Eubacteria 5s rRNA, we propose that hexahydrated Mg(2+) is an integral part of this RNA and geometry of base pairs surrounding it adjust to accommodate the [Formula: see text]. Overall the findings from this work can help in understanding the basis of the complex structure and stability of RNA with non-WC base pairs.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction at implantation.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lien M; Coward, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Successful pregnancy is dependent upon the implantation of a competent embryo into a receptive endometrium. Despite major advancement in our understanding of reproductive medicine over the last few decades, implantation failure still occurs in both normal pregnancies and those created artificially by assisted reproductive technology (ART). Consequently, there is significant interest in elucidating the etiology of implantation failure. The complex multistep process of implantation begins when the developing embryo first makes contact with the plasma membrane of epithelial cells within the uterine environment. However, although this biological interaction marks the beginning of a fundamental developmental process, our knowledge of the intricate physiological and molecular processes involved remains sparse. In this synopsis, we aim to provide an overview of our current understanding of the morphological changes which occur to the plasma membrane of the uterine endothelium, and the molecular mechanisms that control communication between the early embryo and the endometrium during implantation. A multitude of molecular factors have been implicated in this complex process, including endometrial integrins, extracellular matrix molecules, adhesion molecules, growth factors, and ion channels. We also explore the development of in vitro models for embryo implantation to help researchers investigate mechanisms which may underlie implantation failure. Understanding the precise molecular pathways associated with implantation failure could help us to generate new prognostic/diagnostic biomarkers, and may identify novel therapeutic targets.

  5. Clustering Molecular Dynamics Trajectories for Optimizing Docking Experiments

    PubMed Central

    De Paris, Renata; Quevedo, Christian V.; Ruiz, Duncan D.; Norberto de Souza, Osmar; Barros, Rodrigo C.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein receptors have become an attractive tool for rational drug discovery. However, the high computational cost of employing molecular dynamics trajectories in virtual screening of large repositories threats the feasibility of this task. Computational intelligence techniques have been applied in this context, with the ultimate goal of reducing the overall computational cost so the task can become feasible. Particularly, clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce the dimensionality of molecular dynamics trajectories. In this paper, we develop a novel methodology for clustering entire trajectories using structural features from the substrate-binding cavity of the receptor in order to optimize docking experiments on a cloud-based environment. The resulting partition was selected based on three clustering validity criteria, and it was further validated by analyzing the interactions between 20 ligands and a fully flexible receptor (FFR) model containing a 20 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectory. Our proposed methodology shows that taking into account features of the substrate-binding cavity as input for the k-means algorithm is a promising technique for accurately selecting ensembles of representative structures tailored to a specific ligand. PMID:25873944

  6. Clustering molecular dynamics trajectories for optimizing docking experiments.

    PubMed

    De Paris, Renata; Quevedo, Christian V; Ruiz, Duncan D; Norberto de Souza, Osmar; Barros, Rodrigo C

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein receptors have become an attractive tool for rational drug discovery. However, the high computational cost of employing molecular dynamics trajectories in virtual screening of large repositories threats the feasibility of this task. Computational intelligence techniques have been applied in this context, with the ultimate goal of reducing the overall computational cost so the task can become feasible. Particularly, clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce the dimensionality of molecular dynamics trajectories. In this paper, we develop a novel methodology for clustering entire trajectories using structural features from the substrate-binding cavity of the receptor in order to optimize docking experiments on a cloud-based environment. The resulting partition was selected based on three clustering validity criteria, and it was further validated by analyzing the interactions between 20 ligands and a fully flexible receptor (FFR) model containing a 20 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectory. Our proposed methodology shows that taking into account features of the substrate-binding cavity as input for the k-means algorithm is a promising technique for accurately selecting ensembles of representative structures tailored to a specific ligand.

  7. Spin–orbit interaction mediated molecular dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkonen, E. Jänkälä, K.; Kettunen, J. A.; Heinäsmäki, S.; Karpenko, A.; Huttula, M.; Löytynoja, T.

    2014-05-14

    The effect of the spin–orbit interaction to photofragmentation is investigated in the mercury(II) bromide (HgBr{sub 2}) molecule. Changes in the fragmentation between the two spin–orbit components of Hg 5d photoionization, as well as within the molecular-field-splitted levels of these components are observed. Dissociation subsequent to photoionization is studied with synchrotron radiation and photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy. The experimental results are accompanied by relativistic ab initio analysis of the photoelectron spectrum.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of interfacial adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Yarovsky, I.; Chaffee, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Chromium salts are often used in the pretreatment stages of steel painting processes in order to improve adhesion at the metal oxide/primer interface. Although well established empirically, the chemical basis for the improved adhesion conferred by chromia is not well understood. A molecular level understanding of this behaviour should provide a foundation for the design of materials offering improved adhesion control. Molecular modelling of adhesion involves simulation and analysis of molecular behaviour at the interface between two interacting phases. The present study concerns behaviour at the boundary between the metal coated steel surface (with or without chromium pretreatment) and an organic primer based on a solid epoxide resin produced from bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin. An epoxy resin oligomer of molecular weight 3750 was used as the model for the primer.

  9. Dynamically Coupled Oscillators: Cooperative Behavior via Dynamical Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aonishi, Toru; Okada, Masato

    2003-06-01

    We propose a theoretical framework for studying the cooperative behavior of dynamically coupled oscillators (DCOs) that possess dynamical interactions. Then, to clarify synchronization phenomena in networks of interneurons which possess inhibitory interactions, we propose a DCO model with dynamics of interactions that tend to cause 180^\\circ phase lags. Employing the approach developed here, we demonstrate that although our model displays synchronization at high frequencies, it does not exhibit synchronization at low frequencies because this dynamical interaction does not cause a phase lag sufficiently large to cancel the effect of the inhibition. We interpret the disappearance of synchronization in our model with decreasing frequency as describing the breakdown of synchronization in the interneuron network of the CA1 area below the critical frequency of 20 Hz.

  10. Molecular insights on analogs of HIV PR inhibitors toward HTLV-1 PR through QM/MM interactions and molecular dynamics studies: comparative structure analysis of wild and mutant HTLV-1 PR.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Chandrabose; Singh, Poonam; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Retroviruses HTLV-1 and HIV-1 are the primary causative agents of fatal adult T-cell leukemia and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) disease. Both retroviruses are similar in characteristics mechanism, and it encodes for protease that mainly involved in the viral replication process. On the basis of the therapeutic success of HIV-1 PR inhibitors, the protease of HTLV-1 is mainly considered as a potential target for chemotherapy. At the same time, structural similarities in both enzymes that originate HIV PR inhibitors can also be an HTLV-1 PR inhibitor. But the expectations failed because of rejection of HIV PR inhibitors from the HTLV-1 PR binding pocket. In this present study, the reason for the HIV PR inhibitor rejection from the HTLV-1 binding site was identified through sequence analysis and molecular dynamics simulation method. Functional analysis of M37A mutation in HTLV PR clearly shows that the MET37 specificity and screening of potential inhibitors targeting MET37 is performed by using approved 90% similar HIV PR inhibitor compounds. From this approach, we report few compounds with a tendency to accept/donate electron specifically to an important site residue MET37 in HTLV-1 PR binding pocket.

  11. Molecular interaction studies using microscale thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Wienken, Chistoph J; Braun, Dieter; Baaske, Philipp; Duhr, Stefan

    2011-08-01

    Abstract The use of infrared laser sources for creation of localized temperature fields has opened new possibilities for basic research and drug discovery. A recently developed technology, Microscale Thermophoresis (MST), uses this temperature field to perform biomolecular interaction studies. Thermophoresis, the motion of molecules in temperature fields, is very sensitive to changes in size, charge, and solvation shell of a molecule and thus suited for bioanalytics. This review focuses on the theoretical background of MST and gives a detailed overview on various applications to demonstrate the broad applicability. Experiments range from the quantification of the affinity of low-molecular-weight binders using fluorescently labeled proteins, to interactions between macromolecules and multi-component complexes like receptor containing liposomes. Information regarding experiment and experimental setup is based on the Monolith NT.115 instrument (NanoTemper Technologies GmbH).

  12. Exciton dynamics in perturbed vibronic molecular aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, C.; Wehner, J.; Hausner, J.; Wenzel, M.; Engel, V.

    2015-01-01

    A site specific perturbation of a photo-excited molecular aggregate can lead to a localization of excitonic energy. We investigate this localization dynamics for laser-prepared excited states. Changing the parameters of the electric field significantly influences the exciton localization which offers the possibility for a selective control of this process. This is demonstrated for aggregates possessing a single vibrational degree of freedom per monomer unit. It is shown that the effects identified for the molecular dimer can be generalized to larger aggregates with a high density of vibronic states. PMID:26798840

  13. Interactive visualization of vegetation dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, B.C.; Swets, D.; Bard, L.; Brown, J.; Rowland, J.

    2001-01-01

    Satellite imagery provides a mechanism for observing seasonal dynamics of the landscape that have implications for near real-time monitoring of agriculture, forest, and range resources. This study illustrates a technique for visualizing timely information on key events during the growing season (e.g., onset, peak, duration, and end of growing season), as well as the status of the current growing season with respect to the recent historical average. Using time-series analysis of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) satellite sensor, seasonal dynamics can be derived. We have developed a set of Java-based visualization and analysis tools to make comparisons between the seasonal dynamics of the current year with those from the past twelve years. In addition, the visualization tools allow the user to query underlying databases such as land cover or administrative boundaries to analyze the seasonal dynamics of areas of their own interest. The Java-based tools (data exploration and visualization analysis or DEVA) use a Web-based client-server model for processing the data. The resulting visualization and analysis, available via the Internet, is of value to those responsible for land management decisions, resource allocation, and at-risk population targeting.

  14. Aromatic interactions impact ligand binding and function at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics results validated by experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania; Villa, Nancy; Fang, Lijuan; Booth, Raymond G.

    2014-02-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5-HT2 G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family consists of types 2A, 2B, and 2C that share ∼75% transmembrane (TM) sequence identity. Agonists for 5-HT2C receptors are under development for psychoses; whereas, at 5-HT2A receptors, antipsychotic effects are associated with antagonists - in fact, 5-HT2A agonists can cause hallucinations and 5-HT2B agonists cause cardiotoxicity. It is known that 5-HT2A TM6 residues W6.48, F6.51, and F6.52 impact ligand binding and function; however, ligand interactions with these residues at the 5-HT2C receptor have not been reported. To predict and validate molecular determinants for 5-HT2C-specific activation, results from receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics simulation studies were compared with experimental results for ligand binding and function at wild type and W6.48A, F6.51A, and F6.52A point-mutated 5-HT2C receptors.

  15. Combined Molecular Dynamics-Spin Dynamics Simulation of α-Iron in an External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudrick, Mark; Perera, Dilina; Landau, David P.

    Using an atomistic model that treats both translational and spin degrees of freedom, combined molecular and spin dynamics simulations have been performed to study dynamic properties of α-iron. Atomic interactions are described by an empirical many-body potential while spin-spin interactions are handled with a Heisenberg-like Hamiltonian with a coordinate dependent exchange interaction. Each of these interactions are parameterized by first-principles calculations. These simulations numerically solve equations of motion using an algorithm based on the second-order Suzuki-Trotter decomposition for the time evolution operator. Through calculation of the Fourier transform of space-displaced time-displaced correlation functions, vibrational and magnetic excitations have been studied. The application of an external magnetic field up to 10-T has now been included and has been shown to increase the characteristic frequencies of the single-spin-wave excitations. Two-spin-wave interactions have also been investigated.

  16. Choice of timestep in molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincham, David

    1986-06-01

    In molecular dynamics computer simulation of liquids it is important to use as large a timestep as possible in order to sample phase space rapidly and save on computer expense. The effect of the resulting algorithm errors in the trajectories of the molecules is not well understood. An empirical investigation into this question is reported. Several simulations differing only in the timestep used are compared. It is found that much larger timesteps than usual can be employed without producing significant errors in observed thermodynamic, structural or dynamic properties.

  17. Efficient Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Multiple Radical Center Systems Based on the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Hiroya; Schmidt, Michael W; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-10-16

    The fully analytic energy gradient has been developed and implemented for the restricted open-shell Hartree–Fock (ROHF) method based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) theory for systems that have multiple open-shell molecules. The accuracy of the analytic ROHF energy gradient is compared with the corresponding numerical gradient, illustrating the accuracy of the analytic gradient. The ROHF analytic gradient is used to perform molecular dynamics simulations of an unusual open-shell system, liquid oxygen, and mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen. These molecular dynamics simulations provide some insight about how triplet oxygen molecules interact with each other. Timings reveal that the method can calculate the energy gradient for a system containing 4000 atoms in only 6 h. Therefore, it is concluded that the FMO-ROHF method will be useful for investigating systems with multiple open shells.

  18. Efficient molecular dynamics simulations of multiple radical center systems based on the fragment molecular orbital method.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroya; Schmidt, Michael W; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-10-16

    The fully analytic energy gradient has been developed and implemented for the restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF) method based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) theory for systems that have multiple open-shell molecules. The accuracy of the analytic ROHF energy gradient is compared with the corresponding numerical gradient, illustrating the accuracy of the analytic gradient. The ROHF analytic gradient is used to perform molecular dynamics simulations of an unusual open-shell system, liquid oxygen, and mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen. These molecular dynamics simulations provide some insight about how triplet oxygen molecules interact with each other. Timings reveal that the method can calculate the energy gradient for a system containing 4000 atoms in only 6 h. Therefore, it is concluded that the FMO-ROHF method will be useful for investigating systems with multiple open shells.

  19. Molecular dynamics at constant Cauchy stress.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ronald E; Tadmor, Ellad B; Gibson, Joshua S; Bernstein, Noam; Pavia, Fabio

    2016-05-14

    The Parrinello-Rahman algorithm for imposing a general state of stress in periodic molecular dynamics simulations is widely used in the literature and has been implemented in many readily available molecular dynamics codes. However, what is often overlooked is that this algorithm controls the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress as opposed to the true (Cauchy) stress. This can lead to misinterpretation of simulation results because (1) the true stress that is imposed during the simulation depends on the deformation of the periodic cell, (2) the true stress is potentially very different from the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff stress, and (3) the true stress can vary significantly during the simulation even if the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff is constant. We propose a simple modification to the algorithm that allows the true Cauchy stress to be controlled directly. We then demonstrate the efficacy of the new algorithm with the example of martensitic phase transformations under applied stress.

  20. Experimental, computational and chemometrics studies of BSA-vitamin B6 interaction by UV-Vis, FT-IR, fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulation and hard-soft modeling methods.

    PubMed

    Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Izadmanesh, Yahya; Aghaee, Elham; Ghasemi, Jahan B

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of pyridoxine (Vitamin B6) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) is investigated under pseudo-physiological conditions by UV-Vis, fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy. The intrinsic fluorescence of BSA was quenched by VB6, which was rationalized in terms of the static quenching mechanism. According to fluorescence quenching calculations, the bimolecular quenching constant (kq), dynamic quenching (KSV) and static quenching (KLB) at 310K were obtained. The efficiency of energy transfer and the distance between the donor (BSA) and the acceptor (VB6) were calculated by Foster's non-radiative energy transfer theory and were equal to 41.1% and 2.11nm. The collected UV-Vis and fluorescence spectra were combined into a row-and column-wise augmented matrix and resolved by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). MCR-ALS helped to estimate the stoichiometry of interactions, concentration profiles and pure spectra for three species (BSA, VB6 and VB6-BSA complex) existed in the interaction procedure. Based on the MCR-ALS results, using mass balance equations, a model was developed and binding constant of complex was calculated using non-linear least squares curve fitting. FT-IR spectra showed that the conformation of proteins was altered in presence of VB6. Finally, the combined docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to estimate the binding affinity of VB6 to BSA. Five-nanosecond MD simulations were performed on bovine serum albumin (BSA) to study the conformational features of its ligand binding site. From MD results, eleven BSA snapshots were extracted, at every 0.5ns, to explore the binding affinity (GOLD score) of VB6 using a docking procedure. MD simulations indicated that there is a considerable flexibility in the structure of protein that affected ligand recognition. Structural analyses and docking simulations indicated that VB6 binds to site I and GOLD score values depend on the conformations of both BSA and ligand

  1. A prototype molecular interactive collaborative environment (MICE).

    PubMed

    Bourne, P; Gribskov, M; Johnson, G; Moreland, J; Wavra, S; Weissig, H

    1998-01-01

    Illustrations of macromolecular structure in the scientific literature contain a high level of semantic content through which the authors convey, among other features, the biological function of that macromolecule. We refer to these illustrations as molecular scenes. Such scenes, if available electronically, are not readily accessible for further interactive interrogation. The basic PDB format does not retain features of the scene; formats like PostScript retain the scene but are not interactive; and the many formats used by individual graphics programs, while capable of reproducing the scene, are neither interchangeable nor can they be stored in a database and queried for features of the scene. MICE defines a Molecular Scene Description Language (MSDL) which allows scenes to be stored in a relational database (a molecular scene gallery) and queried. Scenes retrieved from the gallery are rendered in Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) and currently displayed in WebView, a VRML browser modified to support the Virtual Reality Behavior System (VRBS) protocol. VRBS provides communication between multiple client browsers, each capable of manipulating the scene. This level of collaboration works well over standard Internet connections and holds promise for collaborative research at a distance and distance learning. Further, via VRBS, the VRML world can be used as a visual cue to trigger an application such as a remote MEME search. MICE is very much work in progress. Current work seeks to replace WebView with Netscape, Cosmoplayer, a standard VRML plug-in, and a Java-based console. The console consists of a generic kernel suitable for multiple collaborative applications and additional application-specific controls. Further details of the MICE project are available at http:/(/)mice.sdsc.edu.

  2. Electronically coarse-grained molecular dynamics using quantum Drude oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. P.; Crain, J.; Cipcigan, F. S.; Sokhan, V. P.; Modani, M.; Martyna, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    Standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations generally make use of a basic description of intermolecular forces which consists of fixed, pairwise, atom-centred Coulomb, van der Waals and short-range repulsive terms. Important interactions such as many-body polarisation and many-body dispersion which are sensitive to changes in the environment are usually neglected, and their effects treated effectively within mean-field approximations to reproduce a single thermodynamic state point or physical environment. This leads to difficulties in modelling the complex interfaces of interest today where the behaviour may be quite different from the regime of parameterisation. Here, we describe the construction and properties of a Gaussian coarse-grained electronic structure, which naturally generates many-body polarisation and dispersion interactions. The electronic structure arises from a fully quantum mechanical treatment of a set of distributed quantum Drude oscillators (QDOs), harmonic atoms which interact with each other and other moieties via electrostatic (Coulomb) interactions; this coarse-grained approach is capable of describing many-body polarisation and dispersion but not short-range interactions which must be parametrised. We describe how on-the-fly forces due to this exchange-free Gaussian model may be generated with linear scale in the number of atoms in the system using an adiabatic path integral molecular dynamics for quantum Drude oscillators technique (APIMD-QDO). We demonstrate the applicability of the QDO approach to realistic systems via a study of the liquid-vapour interface of water.

  3. Force fields for classical molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Monticelli, Luca; Tieleman, D Peter

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we review the basic features and the principles underlying molecular mechanics force fields commonly used in molecular modeling of biological macromolecules. We start by summarizing the historical background and then describe classical pairwise additive potential energy functions. We introduce the problem of the calculation of nonbonded interactions, of particular importance for charged macromolecules. Different parameterization philosophies are then presented, followed by a section on force field validation. We conclude with a brief overview on future perspectives for the development of classical force fields.

  4. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J.

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  5. Equipartition Principle for Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jain, Abhinandan; Park, In-Hee; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2012-08-14

    The principle of equipartition of (kinetic) energy for all-atom Cartesian molecular dynamics states that each momentum phase space coordinate on the average has ½kT of kinetic energy in a canonical ensemble. This principle is used in molecular dynamics simulations to initialize velocities, and to calculate statistical properties such as entropy. Internal coordinate molecular dynamics (ICMD) models differ from Cartesian models in that the overall kinetic energy depends on the generalized coordinates and includes cross-terms. Due to this coupled structure, no such equipartition principle holds for ICMD models. In this paper we introduce non-canonical modal coordinates to recover some of the structural simplicity of Cartesian models and develop a new equipartition principle for ICMD models. We derive low-order recursive computational algorithms for transforming between the modal and physical coordinates. The equipartition principle in modal coordinates provides a rigorous method for initializing velocities in ICMD simulations thus replacing the ad hoc methods used until now. It also sets the basis for calculating conformational entropy using internal coordinates.

  6. Monoamine transporters: insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Grouleff, Julie; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Koldsø, Heidi; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The human monoamine transporters (MATs) facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the MATs is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The MATs are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS) family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the MATs, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors. PMID:26528185

  7. Bead-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Sergei D.; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2003-06-01

    Molecular dynamics formulation of Bead-Fourier path integral method for simulation of quantum systems at finite temperatures is presented. Within this scheme, both the bead coordinates and Fourier coefficients, defining the path representing the quantum particle, are treated as generalized coordinates with corresponding generalized momenta and masses. Introduction of the Fourier harmonics together with the center-of-mass thermostating scheme is shown to remove the ergodicity problem, known to pose serious difficulties in standard path integral molecular dynamics simulations. The method is tested for quantum harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom (Coulombic potential). The simulation results are compared with the exact analytical solutions available for both these systems. Convergence of the results with respect to the number of beads and Fourier harmonics is analyzed. It was shown that addition of a few Fourier harmonics already improves the simulation results substantially, even for a relatively small number of beads. The proposed Bead-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics is a reliable and efficient alternative to simulations of quantum systems.

  8. Structure and Dynamics of Interacting Nanoparticles in Semidilute Polymer Solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Pollng-Skutvik, Ryan; Mongcopa, Katrina Irene S.; Faraone, Antonio; ...

    2016-08-17

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of silica nanoparticles and polymer chains in semidilute solutions of high molecular weight polystyrene in 2-butanone to determine the effect of long-range interparticle interactions on the coupling between particle and polymer dynamics. Particles at concentrations of 1–10 wt % are well dispersed in the semidilute polymer solutions and exhibit long-range electrostatic repulsions between particles. Because the particles are comparably sized to the radius of gyration of the polymer, the particle dynamics is predicted to couple to that of the polymer. We verify that the polymer structure and dynamics are not significantly affected by themore » particles, indicating that the particle–polymer coupling does not change with increasing particle loading. We find that the coupling between the dynamics of comparably sized particles and polymer results in subdiffusive particle dynamics, as expected. Over the interparticle distance, however, the particle dynamics is hindered and not fully described by the relaxation of the surrounding polymer chains. Instead, the particle dynamics is inversely related to the structure factor, suggesting that physical particle–polymer coupling on short length scales and interparticle interactions on long length scales both present energetic barriers to particle motion that lead to subdiffusive dynamics and de Gennes narrowing, respectively.« less

  9. Structure and Dynamics of Interacting Nanoparticles in Semidilute Polymer Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pollng-Skutvik, Ryan; Mongcopa, Katrina Irene S.; Faraone, Antonio; Narayanan, Suresh; Conrad, Jacinta C.; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2016-08-17

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of silica nanoparticles and polymer chains in semidilute solutions of high molecular weight polystyrene in 2-butanone to determine the effect of long-range interparticle interactions on the coupling between particle and polymer dynamics. Particles at concentrations of 1–10 wt % are well dispersed in the semidilute polymer solutions and exhibit long-range electrostatic repulsions between particles. Because the particles are comparably sized to the radius of gyration of the polymer, the particle dynamics is predicted to couple to that of the polymer. We verify that the polymer structure and dynamics are not significantly affected by the particles, indicating that the particle–polymer coupling does not change with increasing particle loading. We find that the coupling between the dynamics of comparably sized particles and polymer results in subdiffusive particle dynamics, as expected. Over the interparticle distance, however, the particle dynamics is hindered and not fully described by the relaxation of the surrounding polymer chains. Instead, the particle dynamics is inversely related to the structure factor, suggesting that physical particle–polymer coupling on short length scales and interparticle interactions on long length scales both present energetic barriers to particle motion that lead to subdiffusive dynamics and de Gennes narrowing, respectively.

  10. Learning generative models of molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We introduce three algorithms for learning generative models of molecular structures from molecular dynamics simulations. The first algorithm learns a Bayesian-optimal undirected probabilistic model over user-specified covariates (e.g., fluctuations, distances, angles, etc). L1 reg-ularization is used to ensure sparse models and thus reduce the risk of over-fitting the data. The topology of the resulting model reveals important couplings between different parts of the protein, thus aiding in the analysis of molecular motions. The generative nature of the model makes it well-suited to making predictions about the global effects of local structural changes (e.g., the binding of an allosteric regulator). Additionally, the model can be used to sample new conformations. The second algorithm learns a time-varying graphical model where the topology and parameters change smoothly along the trajectory, revealing the conformational sub-states. The last algorithm learns a Markov Chain over undirected graphical models which can be used to study and simulate kinetics. We demonstrate our algorithms on multiple molecular dynamics trajectories. PMID:22369071

  11. Fragment Molecular Orbital Nonadiabatic Molecular Dynamics for Condensed Phase Systems.

    PubMed

    Nebgen, Ben; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2016-09-15

    A method for efficiently simulating nonadiabatic molecular dynamics (NAMD) of nanoscale and condensed phase systems is developed and tested. The electronic structure, including force and nonadiabatic coupling, are obtained with the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) approximation, which provides significant computational savings by splitting the system into fragments and computing electronic properties of each fragment subject to the external field due to other all other fragments. The efficiency of the developed technique is demonstrated by studying the effect of explicit solvent molecules on excited state relaxation in the Fe(CO)4 complex. The relaxation in the gas phase occurs on a 50 fs time scale, which is in excellent agreement with previously recorded femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Adding a solvation shell of ethanol molecules to the simulation results in an increase in the excited state lifetime to 100 fs, in agreement with recent femtosecond X-ray spectroscopy measurements.

  12. Communication: Polymer entanglement dynamics: Role of attractive interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grest, Gary S.

    2016-10-01

    The coupled dynamics of entangled polymers, which span broad time and length scales, govern their unique viscoelastic properties. To follow chain mobility by numerical simulations from the intermediate Rouse and reptation regimes to the late time diffusive regime, highly coarse grained models with purely repulsive interactions between monomers are widely used since they are computationally the most efficient. Here using large scale molecular dynamics simulations, the effect of including the attractive interaction between monomers on the dynamics of entangled polymer melts is explored for the first time over a wide temperature range. Attractive interactions have little effect on the local packing for all temperatures T and on the chain mobility for T higher than about twice the glass transition Tg. These results, across a broad range of molecular weight, show that to study the dynamics of entangled polymer melts, the interactions can be treated as pure repulsive, confirming a posteriori the validity of previous studies and opening the way to new large scale numerical simulations.

  13. Communication: Polymer entanglement dynamics: Role of attractive interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Grest, Gary S.

    2016-10-10

    The coupled dynamics of entangled polymers, which span broad time and length scales, govern their unique viscoelastic properties. To follow chain mobility by numerical simulations from the intermediate Rouse and reptation regimes to the late time diffusive regime, highly coarse grained models with purely repulsive interactions between monomers are widely used since they are computationally the most efficient. In this paper, using large scale molecular dynamics simulations, the effect of including the attractive interaction between monomers on the dynamics of entangled polymer melts is explored for the first time over a wide temperature range. Attractive interactions have little effect onmore » the local packing for all temperatures T and on the chain mobility for T higher than about twice the glass transition Tg. Finally, these results, across a broad range of molecular weight, show that to study the dynamics of entangled polymer melts, the interactions can be treated as pure repulsive, confirming a posteriori the validity of previous studies and opening the way to new large scale numerical simulations.« less

  14. Communication: Polymer entanglement dynamics: Role of attractive interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary S.

    2016-10-10

    The coupled dynamics of entangled polymers, which span broad time and length scales, govern their unique viscoelastic properties. To follow chain mobility by numerical simulations from the intermediate Rouse and reptation regimes to the late time diffusive regime, highly coarse grained models with purely repulsive interactions between monomers are widely used since they are computationally the most efficient. In this paper, using large scale molecular dynamics simulations, the effect of including the attractive interaction between monomers on the dynamics of entangled polymer melts is explored for the first time over a wide temperature range. Attractive interactions have little effect on the local packing for all temperatures T and on the chain mobility for T higher than about twice the glass transition Tg. Finally, these results, across a broad range of molecular weight, show that to study the dynamics of entangled polymer melts, the interactions can be treated as pure repulsive, confirming a posteriori the validity of previous studies and opening the way to new large scale numerical simulations.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of magnetized dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, Alexander; Reichstein, Torben; Wilms, Jochen

    2012-10-01

    The combination of the electric field that confines a dust cloud with a static magnetic field generally leads to a rotation of the dust cloud. In weak magnetic fields, the Hall component of the ion flow exerts a drag force that sets the dust in rotation. We have performed detailed molecular-dynamics simulations of the dynamics of torus-shaped dust clouds in anodic plasmas. The stationary flow [1] is characterized by a shell structure in the laminar dust flow and by the spontaneous formation of a shear-flow around a stationary vortex. Here we present new results on dynamic phenomena, among them fluctuations due to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear-flow. The simulations are compared with experimental results. [4pt] [1] T. Reichstein, A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 18, 083705 (2011)

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation: A tool for exploration and discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaport, Dennis C.

    2009-03-01

    The exploratory and didactic aspects of science both benefit from the ever-growing role played by computer simulation. One particularly important simulational approach is the molecular dynamics method, used for studying the nature of matter from the molecular to much larger scales. The effectiveness of molecular dynamics can be enhanced considerably by employing visualization and interactivity during the course of the computation and afterwards, allowing the modeler not only to observe the detailed behavior of the systems simulated in different ways, but also to steer the computations in alternative directions by manipulating parameters that govern the actual behavior. This facilitates the creation of potentially rich simulational environments for examining a multitude of complex phenomena, as well as offering an opportunity for enriching the learning process. A series of relatively advanced examples involving molecular dynamics will be used to demonstrate the value of this approach, in particular, atomistic simulations of spontaneously emergent structured fluid flows (the classic Rayleigh--B'enard and Taylor--Couette problems), supramolecular self-assembly of highly symmetric shell structures (involved in the formation of viral capsids), and that most counterintuitive of phenomena, granular segregation (e.g., axial and radial separation in a rotating cylinder).

  17. Spectroscopy and molecular dynamics in nonpolar fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, Karl Frederick

    This thesis considers the mechanisms by which molecular dynamics in nonpolar liquids influences solvation dynamics and vibrational energy relaxation. We use semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations to calculate photon echo signals for two simple fluids. We demonstrate that two new observables are directly related to the relevant molecular quantity, the frequency- frequency time correlation function (TCF), in contrast to the commonly measured 3PEPS, which cannot be simply related to this TCF at short times. We also present a semianalytic photon echo theory, based on an ansatz which determines the full time dependence from the short time expansion coefficients of the TCF. We demonstrate that this theory accurately predicts most photon echo observables, even when the theory's gaussian approximation is not accurate. We also consider vibrational energy relaxation (VER) in liquid oxygen. Using semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations and an intermolecular potential from the literature, we evaluate the required quantity (the spectral density of a certain force-force TCF) using the same ansatz described above. We demonstrate numerically that this procedure is accurate. Approximately relating this semiclassical rate to the fully quantum mechanical VER rate, using one of the more accurate ``quantum corrections'' available in the literature, yields a result which is in order-of-magnitude agreement with the experimental VER rate. We also calculate the VER rate for liquid oxygen/argon mixtures. The rotations of the solvent near a vibrationally excited molecule, and of that molecule itself, have important consequences for the short-time dynamics of the force-force TCF. We propose a simple statistical model which quantitatively explains the mole- fraction dependence of the observed VER rate. Next, we demonstrate that a newly-developed model for oxygen very accurately describes the liquid, by comparing to experimental measures of microscopic structure and dynamics. We also

  18. Polymer Fluid Dynamics: Continuum and Molecular Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bird, R B; Giacomin, A J

    2016-06-07

    To solve problems in polymer fluid dynamics, one needs the equations of continuity, motion, and energy. The last two equations contain the stress tensor and the heat-flux vector for the material. There are two ways to formulate the stress tensor: (a) One can write a continuum expression for the stress tensor in terms of kinematic tensors, or (b) one can select a molecular model that represents the polymer molecule and then develop an expression for the stress tensor from kinetic theory. The advantage of the kinetic theory approach is that one gets information about the relation between the molecular structure of the polymers and the rheological properties. We restrict the discussion primarily to the simplest stress tensor expressions or constitutive equations containing from two to four adjustable parameters, although we do indicate how these formulations may be extended to give more complicated expressions. We also explore how these simplest expressions are recovered as special cases of a more general framework, the Oldroyd 8-constant model. Studying the simplest models allows us to discover which types of empiricisms or molecular models seem to be worth investigating further. We also explore equivalences between continuum and molecular approaches. We restrict the discussion to several types of simple flows, such as shearing flows and extensional flows, which are of greatest importance in industrial operations. Furthermore, if these simple flows cannot be well described by continuum or molecular models, then it is not necessary to lavish time and energy to apply them to more complex flow problems.

  19. Interactive computer code for dynamic and soil structure interaction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mulliken, J.S.

    1995-12-01

    A new interactive computer code is presented in this paper for dynamic and soil-structure interaction (SSI) analyses. The computer program FETA (Finite Element Transient Analysis) is a self contained interactive graphics environment for IBM-PC`s that is used for the development of structural and soil models as well as post-processing dynamic analysis output. Full 3-D isometric views of the soil-structure system, animation of displacements, frequency and time domain responses at nodes, and response spectra are all graphically available simply by pointing and clicking with a mouse. FETA`s finite element solver performs 2-D and 3-D frequency and time domain soil-structure interaction analyses. The solver can be directly accessed from the graphical interface on a PC, or run on a number of other computer platforms.

  20. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Ronny P; Liu, Kang K L; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  1. Insights from molecular dynamics simulations for computational protein design.

    PubMed

    Childers, Matthew Carter; Daggett, Valerie

    2017-02-01

    A grand challenge in the field of structural biology is to design and engineer proteins that exhibit targeted functions. Although much success on this front has been achieved, design success rates remain low, an ever-present reminder of our limited understanding of the relationship between amino acid sequences and the structures they adopt. In addition to experimental techniques and rational design strategies, computational methods have been employed to aid in the design and engineering of proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) is one such method that simulates the motions of proteins according to classical dynamics. Here, we review how insights into protein dynamics derived from MD simulations have influenced the design of proteins. One of the greatest strengths of MD is its capacity to reveal information beyond what is available in the static structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. In this regard simulations can be used to directly guide protein design by providing atomistic details of the dynamic molecular interactions contributing to protein stability and function. MD simulations can also be used as a virtual screening tool to rank, select, identify, and assess potential designs. MD is uniquely poised to inform protein design efforts where the application requires realistic models of protein dynamics and atomic level descriptions of the relationship between dynamics and function. Here, we review cases where MD simulations was used to modulate protein stability and protein function by providing information regarding the conformation(s), conformational transitions, interactions, and dynamics that govern stability and function. In addition, we discuss cases where conformations from protein folding/unfolding simulations have been exploited for protein design, yielding novel outcomes that could not be obtained from static structures.

  2. VUV studies of molecular photofragmentation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.G.

    1993-12-01

    State-resolved, photoion and photoelectron methods are used to study the neutral fragmentation and ionization dynamics of small molecules relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. Photodissociation and ionization are initiated by coherent VUV radiation and the fragmentation dynamics are extracted from measurements of product rovibronic state distributions, kinetic energies and angular distributions. The general aim of these studies is to investigate the multichannel interactions between the electronic and nuclear motions which determine the evolution of the photoexcited {open_quotes}complex{close_quotes} into the observed asymptotic channels.

  3. Hydrophobic Interactions Are a Key to MDM2 Inhibition by Polyphenols as Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and MM/PBSA Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sharad; Grover, Sonam; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Singh, Aditi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    p53, a tumor suppressor protein, has been proven to regulate the cell cycle, apoptosis, and DNA repair to prevent malignant transformation. MDM2 regulates activity of p53 and inhibits its binding to DNA. In the present study, we elucidated the MDM2 inhibition potential of polyphenols (Apigenin, Fisetin, Galangin and Luteolin) by MD simulation and MM/PBSA free energy calculations. All polyphenols bind to hydrophobic groove of MDM2 and the binding was found to be stable throughout MD simulation. Luteolin showed the highest negative binding free energy value of -173.80 kJ/mol followed by Fisetin with value of -172.25 kJ/mol. It was found by free energy calculations, that hydrophobic interactions (vdW energy) have major contribution in binding free energy. PMID:26863418

  4. Molecular energetics in the capsomere of virus-like particle revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Tang, Ronghong; Bai, Shu; Connors, Natalie K; Lua, Linda H L; Chuan, Yap P; Middelberg, Anton P J; Sun, Yan

    2013-05-09

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are highly organized nanoparticles that have great potential in vaccinology, gene therapy, drug delivery, and materials science. However, the application of VLPs is hindered by obstacles in their design and production due to low efficiency of self-assembly. In the present study, all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method are utilized to examine the molecular interactions in the capsomere of a murine polyomavirus (MPV) VLP. It is found that both low ionic strength and the intracapsomere disulfide bonds are favorable for maintaining a stable capsomere. Simulation results examining the effects of solution conditions on the stabilization of a capsomere were verified by calorimetry experiments. Simulation results of free energy decomposition indicate that hydrophobic interaction is favorable for the formation of a capsomere, whereas electrostatic interaction is unfavorable. With increasing ionic strength, the dominant interaction for the stabilization of a capsomere changes from hydrophobic to electrostatic. By comprehensive analyses, the key amino acid residues (hot spots) in VP1 protein aiding formation of a capsomere in different solution conditions have been identified. These results provide molecular insights into the stabilization of building blocks for VLP and are expected to have implications in their partitioning between the correct and off-pathway reactions in VLP assembly.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nitrobenzene Dioxygenase Using AMBER Force Field

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of the oxygenase component of nitrobenzene dioxygenase (NBDO) system, a member of the naphthalene family of Rieske nonheme iron dioxygenases, has been carried out using the AMBER force field combined with a new set of parameters for the description of the mononuclear nonheme iron center and iron–sulfur Rieske cluster. Simulation results provide information on the structure and dynamics of nitrobenzene dioxygenase in an aqueous environment and shed light on specific interactions that occur in its catalytic center. The results suggest that the architecture of the active site is stabilized by key hydrogen bonds, and Asn258 positions the substrate for oxidation. Analysis of protein–water interactions reveal the presence of a network of solvent molecules at the entrance to the active site, which could be of potential catalytic importance. PMID:24955078

  6. Clustering effects in ionic polymers: Molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Anupriya; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-08-18

    Ionic clusters control the structure, dynamics, and transport in soft matter. Incorporating a small fraction of ionizable groups in polymers substantially reduces the mobility of the macromolecules in melts. Furthermore, these ionic groups often associate into random clusters in melts, where the distribution and morphology of the clusters impact the transport in these materials. Here, using molecular dynamic simulations we demonstrate a clear correlation between cluster size and morphology with the polymer mobility in melts of sulfonated polystyrene. We show that in low dielectric media ladderlike clusters that are lower in energy compared with spherical assemblies are formed. Reducing the electrostatic interactions by enhancing the dielectric constant leads to morphological transformation from ladderlike clusters to globular assemblies. Finally, decrease in electrostatic interaction significantly enhances the mobility of the polymer.

  7. Clustering effects in ionic polymers: Molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Agrawal, Anupriya; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-08-18

    Ionic clusters control the structure, dynamics, and transport in soft matter. Incorporating a small fraction of ionizable groups in polymers substantially reduces the mobility of the macromolecules in melts. Furthermore, these ionic groups often associate into random clusters in melts, where the distribution and morphology of the clusters impact the transport in these materials. Here, using molecular dynamic simulations we demonstrate a clear correlation between cluster size and morphology with the polymer mobility in melts of sulfonated polystyrene. We show that in low dielectric media ladderlike clusters that are lower in energy compared with spherical assemblies are formed. Reducing themore » electrostatic interactions by enhancing the dielectric constant leads to morphological transformation from ladderlike clusters to globular assemblies. Finally, decrease in electrostatic interaction significantly enhances the mobility of the polymer.« less

  8. Multiscale simulations of anisotropic particles combining molecular dynamics and Green's function reaction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2017-03-01

    The modeling of complex reaction-diffusion processes in, for instance, cellular biochemical networks or self-assembling soft matter can be tremendously sped up by employing a multiscale algorithm which combines the mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method with explicit stochastic Brownian, Langevin, or deterministic molecular dynamics to treat reactants at the microscopic scale [A. Vijaykumar, P. G. Bolhuis, and P. R. ten Wolde, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 214102 (2015)]. Here we extend this multiscale MD-GFRD approach to include the orientational dynamics that is crucial to describe the anisotropic interactions often prevalent in biomolecular systems. We present the novel algorithm focusing on Brownian dynamics only, although the methodology is generic. We illustrate the novel algorithm using a simple patchy particle model. After validation of the algorithm, we discuss its performance. The rotational Brownian dynamics MD-GFRD multiscale method will open up the possibility for large scale simulations of protein signalling networks.

  9. Hepatitis A virus: host interactions, molecular epidemiology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Gilberto; Goncalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Forbi, Joseph C; de Paula, Vanessa S; Purdy, Michael A; Xia, Guoliang; Khudyakov, Yury E

    2014-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the commonest viral cause of liver disease and presents an important public health problem worldwide. Several unique HAV properties and molecular mechanisms of its interaction with host were recently discovered and should aid in clarifying the pathogenesis of hepatitis A. Genetic characterization of HAV strains have resulted in the identification of different genotypes and subtypes, which exhibit a characteristic worldwide distribution. Shifts in HAV endemicity occurring in different parts of the world, introduction of genetically diverse strains from geographically distant regions, genotype displacement observed in some countries and population expansion detected in the last decades of the 20th century using phylogenetic analysis are important factors contributing to the complex dynamics of HAV infections worldwide. Strong selection pressures, some of which, like usage of deoptimized codons, are unique to HAV, limit genetic variability of the virus. Analysis of subgenomic regions has been proven useful for outbreak investigations. However, sharing short sequences among epidemiologically unrelated strains indicates that specific identification of HAV strains for molecular surveillance can be achieved only using whole-genome sequences. Here, we present up-to-date information on the HAV molecular epidemiology and evolution, and highlight the most relevant features of the HAV-host interactions.

  10. Ab initio centroid path integral molecular dynamics: Application to vibrational dynamics of diatomic molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Yasuhito; Ohta, Koji; Kinugawa, Kenichi

    2004-01-01

    An ab initio centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) method is developed by combining the CMD method with the ab initio molecular orbital method. The ab initio CMD method is applied to vibrational dynamics of diatomic molecules, H2 and HF. For the H2 molecule, the temperature dependence of the peak frequency of the vibrational spectral density is investigated. The results are compared with those obtained by the ab initio classical molecular dynamics method and exact quantum mechanical treatment. It is shown that the vibrational frequency obtained from the ab initio CMD approaches the exact first excitation frequency as the temperature lowers. For the HF molecule, the position autocorrelation function is also analyzed in detail. The present CMD method is shown to well reproduce the exact quantum result for the information on the vibrational properties of the system.

  11. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation and NMR investigation of the association of the β-blockers atenolol and propranolol with a chiral molecular micelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Kevin F.; Billiot, Eugene J.; Billiot, Fereshteh H.; Hoffman, Charlene B.; Gladis, Ashley A.; Lipkowitz, Kenny B.; Southerland, William M.; Fang, Yayin

    2015-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy were used to compare the binding of two β-blocker drugs to the chiral molecular micelle poly-(sodium undecyl-(L)-leucine-valine). The molecular micelle is used as a chiral selector in capillary electrophoresis. This study is part of a larger effort to understand the mechanism of chiral recognition in capillary electrophoresis by characterizing the molecular micelle binding of chiral compounds with different geometries and charges. Propranolol and atenolol were chosen because their structures are similar, but their chiral interactions with the molecular micelle are different. Molecular dynamics simulations showed both propranolol enantiomers inserted their aromatic rings into the molecular micelle core and that (S)-propranolol associated more strongly with the molecular micelle than (R)-propranolol. This difference was attributed to stronger molecular micelle hydrogen bonding interactions experienced by (S)-propranolol. Atenolol enantiomers were found to bind near the molecular micelle surface and to have similar molecular micelle binding free energies.

  13. Self-Assembly and Dynamics of Organic 2D Molecular Sieves: Ab Initio and Molecular Dynamics Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. John, Alexander; Wexler, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous molecular self-assembly is a promising route for bottom-up manufacturing of two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures with specific topologies on atomically flat surfaces. Of particular interest is the possibility of selective lock-and-key interaction of guest molecules inside cavities formed by complex self-assembled host structures. Our host structure is a monolayer consisting of interdigitated 1,3,5-tristyrylbenzene substituted by alkoxy peripheral chains containing n = 6, 8, 10, 12, or 14 carbon atoms (TSB3,5-C n) deposited on a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface. Using ab initio methods from quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations, we construct and analyze the structure and functionality of the TSB3,5-C n monolayer as a molecular sieve. Supported by ACS-PRF 52696-ND5.

  14. Visual verification and analysis of cluster detection for molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Grottel, Sebastian; Reina, Guido; Vrabec, Jadran; Ertl, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    A current research topic in molecular thermodynamics is the condensation of vapor to liquid and the investigation of this process at the molecular level. Condensation is found in many physical phenomena, e.g. the formation of atmospheric clouds or the processes inside steam turbines, where a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of condensation processes will help to optimize energy efficiency and avoid problems with droplets of macroscopic size. The key properties of these processes are the nucleation rate and the critical cluster size. For the calculation of these properties it is essential to make use of a meaningful definition of molecular clusters, which currently is a not completely resolved issue. In this paper a framework capable of interactively visualizing molecular datasets of such nucleation simulations is presented, with an emphasis on the detected molecular clusters. To check the quality of the results of the cluster detection, our framework introduces the concept of flow groups to highlight potential cluster evolution over time which is not detected by the employed algorithm. To confirm the findings of the visual analysis, we coupled the rendering view with a schematic view of the clusters' evolution. This allows to rapidly assess the quality of the molecular cluster detection algorithm and to identify locations in the simulation data in space as well as in time where the cluster detection fails. Thus, thermodynamics researchers can eliminate weaknesses in their cluster detection algorithms. Several examples for the effective and efficient usage of our tool are presented.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Interface Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Cao, Deng; Leonard, Robert H.; Owens, Eli T.; Swan, Wm. Trevor, III; Ducatman, Samuel C.

    2007-03-01

    The mechanical integrity of silicon/silicon nitride interfaces is of great importance in their applications in micro electronics and solar cells. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are an excellent tool to study mechanical and structural failure of interfaces subjected to externally applied stresses and strains. When pulling the system parallel to the interface, cracks in silicon nitride and slip and pit formation in silicon are typical failure mechanisms. Hypervelocity impact perpendicular to the interface plane leads to structural transformation and delamination at the interface. Influence of system temperature, strain rate, impact velocity, and system size on type and characteristics of failure will be discussed.

  16. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1987-03-01

    Purpose of this research project is two-fold: (1) to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions which are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photo chemical processes which play an important role in many macroscopic processes and (2) to determine the energetics of polyatomic free radicals using microscopic experimental methods. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment translational energy and angular distributions using unique molecular beam apparati designed for these purposes.

  17. Exchange frequency in replica exchange molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindhikara, Daniel; Meng, Yilin; Roitberg, Adrian E.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the exchange-attempt frequency on sampling efficiency is studied in replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD). We show that sampling efficiency increases with increasing exchange-attempt frequency. This conclusion is contrary to a commonly expressed view in REMD. Five peptides (1-21 residues long) are studied with a spectrum of exchange-attempt rates. Convergence rates are gauged by comparing ensemble properties between fixed length test REMD simulations and longer reference simulations. To show the fundamental correlation between exchange frequency and convergence time, a simple model is designed and studied, displaying the same basic behavior of much more complex systems.

  18. Exploring Hamiltonian dielectric solvent molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Tavan, Paul; Mathias, Gerald

    2014-09-01

    Hamiltonian dielectric solvent (HADES) is a recent method [7,25], which enables Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric continua. Sample simulations of an α-helical decapeptide with and without explicit solvent demonstrate the high efficiency of HADES-MD. Addressing the folding of this peptide by replica exchange MD we study the properties of HADES by comparing melting curves, secondary structure motifs and salt bridges with explicit solvent results. Despite the unoptimized ad hoc parametrization of HADES, calculated reaction field energies correlate well with numerical grid solutions of the dielectric Poisson equation.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.A.; Kress, J.D.; Kwon, I.; Lynch, D.L.; Troullier, N.

    1993-12-31

    We have performed quantum molecular dynamics simulations of hot, dense plasmas of hydrogen over a range of temperatures(0.1-5eV) and densities(0.0625-5g/cc). We determine the forces quantum mechanically from density functional, extended Huckel, and tight binding techniques and move the nuclei according to the classical equations of motion. We determine pair-correlation functions, diffusion coefficients, and electrical conductivities. We find that many-body effects predominate in this regime. We begin to obtain agreement with the OCP and Thomas-Fermi models only at the higher temperatures and densities.

  20. Dynamic Map: Representation of interactions between robots

    SciTech Connect

    Zanardi, C.

    1996-12-31

    As robotics applications become more complex, the need for tools to analyze and explain interactions between robots has become more acute. We introduce the concept of Dynamic Map (DM), which can serve as a generic tool to analyze interactions between robots or with their environment. We show that this concept can be applied to different kinds of applications, like a predator-prey situation, or collision avoidance.

  1. Charge transport network dynamics in molecular aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Nicholas E.; Chen, Lin X.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2016-07-20

    Due to the nonperiodic nature of charge transport in disordered systems, generating insight into static charge transport networks, as well as analyzing the network dynamics, can be challenging. Here, we apply time-dependent network analysis to scrutinize the charge transport networks of two representative molecular semiconductors: a rigid n-type molecule, perylenediimide, and a flexible p-type molecule, bBDT(TDPP)2. Simulations reveal the relevant timescale for local transfer integral decorrelation to be ~100 fs, which is shown to be faster than that of a crystalline morphology of the same molecule. Using a simple graph metric, global network changes are observed over timescales competitive with charge carrier lifetimes. These insights demonstrate that static charge transport networks are qualitatively inadequate, whereas average networks often overestimate network connectivity. Finally, a simple methodology for tracking dynamic charge transport properties is proposed.

  2. Charge transport network dynamics in molecular aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Nicholas E.; Chen, Lin X.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the nonperiodic nature of charge transport in disordered systems, generating insight into static charge transport networks, as well as analyzing the network dynamics, can be challenging. Here, we apply time-dependent network analysis to scrutinize the charge transport networks of two representative molecular semiconductors: a rigid n-type molecule, perylenediimide, and a flexible p-type molecule, bBDT(TDPP)2. Simulations reveal the relevant timescale for local transfer integral decorrelation to be ∼100 fs, which is shown to be faster than that of a crystalline morphology of the same molecule. Using a simple graph metric, global network changes are observed over timescales competitive with charge carrier lifetimes. These insights demonstrate that static charge transport networks are qualitatively inadequate, whereas average networks often overestimate network connectivity. Finally, a simple methodology for tracking dynamic charge transport properties is proposed. PMID:27439871

  3. MDVRY: a polarizable classical molecular dynamics package for biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souaille, M.; Loirat, H.; Borgis, D.; Gaigeot, M. P.

    2009-02-01

    The MDVRY classical molecular dynamics package is presented for the study of biomolecules in the gas and liquid phase. Electrostatic polarization has been implemented in the formalism of point induced dipoles following the model of Thole. Two schemes have been implemented for the calculation of induced dipoles, i.e. resolution of the self-consistent equations and a 'Car-Parrinello' dynamical approach. In this latter, the induced dipoles are calculated at each time step of the dynamics through the dynamics of additional degrees of freedom associated with the dipoles. This method saves computer time and allows to study polarized solvated proteins at a very low CPU cost. The program is written in C-language and runs on LINUX machines. A detailed manual of the code is given. The main features of the package are illustrated taking on examples of proteins in the gas phase or immersed in liquid water. Program summaryProgram title: MDVRY Catalogue identifier: AEBY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 39 156 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 277 197 Distribution format: tar.bz2 Programming language: C Computer: Linux machines with FFTW Fourier Transform package installed Operating system: Linux machines, SUSE & RedHat distributions Classification: 3, 16.13, 23 External routines: FFTW ( http://www.fftw.org/) Nature of problem: Molecular Dynamics Software package. Solution method: Velocity Verlet algorithm. The implemented force field is composed of intra-molecular interactions and inter-molecular interactions (electrostatics, polarization, van der Waals). Polarization is accounted through induced point dipoles at each atomic site. Supplementary degrees of freedom are

  4. Structural modifications of 4-aryl-4-oxo-2-aminylbutanamides and their acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. Investigation of AChE-ligand interactions by docking calculations and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Vitorović-Todorović, Maja D; Koukoulitsa, Catherine; Juranić, Ivan O; Mandić, Ljuba M; Drakulić, Branko J

    2014-06-23

    Congeneric set of thirty-eight 4-aryl-4-oxo-2-(N-aryl/cycloalkyl)butanamides has been designed, synthesized and evaluated for acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. Structural variations included cycloalkylamino group attached to C2 position of butanoyl moiety, and variation of amido moiety of molecules. Twelve compounds, mostly piperidino and imidazolo derivatives, inhibited AChE in low micromolar range, and were inactive toward BChE. Several N-methylpiperazino derivatives showed inhibition of BChE in low micromolar or submicromolar concentrations, and were inactive toward AChE. Therefore, the nature of the cycloalkylamino moiety governs the AChE/BChE selectivity profile of compounds. The most active AChE inhibitor showed mixed-type inhibition modality, indicating its binding to free enzyme and to enzyme-substrate complex. Thorough docking calculations of the seven most potent AChE inhibitors from the set, showed that the hydrogen bond can be formed between amide -NH- moiety of compounds and -OH group of Tyr 124. The 10 ns unconstrained molecular dynamic simulation of the AChE-compound 18 complex shows that this interaction is the most persistent. This is, probably, the major anchoring point for the binding.

  5. Molecular interactions with ice: Molecular embedding, adsorption, detection, and release

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, K. D.; Langlois, Grant G.; Li, Wenxin; Sibener, S. J.; Killelea, Daniel R.

    2014-11-14

    The interaction of atomic and molecular species with water and ice is of fundamental importance for chemistry. In a previous series of publications, we demonstrated that translational energy activates the embedding of Xe and Kr atoms in the near surface region of ice surfaces. In this paper, we show that inert molecular species may be absorbed in a similar fashion. We also revisit Xe embedding, and further probe the nature of the absorption into the selvedge. CF{sub 4} molecules with high translational energies (≥3 eV) were observed to embed in amorphous solid water. Just as with Xe, the initial adsorption rate is strongly activated by translational energy, but the CF{sub 4} embedding probability is much less than for Xe. In addition, a larger molecule, SF{sub 6}, did not embed at the same translational energies that both CF{sub 4} and Xe embedded. The embedding rate for a given energy thus goes in the order Xe > CF{sub 4} > SF{sub 6}. We do not have as much data for Kr, but it appears to have a rate that is between that of Xe and CF{sub 4}. Tentatively, this order suggests that for Xe and CF{sub 4}, which have similar van der Waals radii, the momentum is the key factor in determining whether the incident atom or molecule can penetrate deeply enough below the surface to embed. The more massive SF{sub 6} molecule also has a larger van der Waals radius, which appears to prevent it from stably embedding in the selvedge. We also determined that the maximum depth of embedding is less than the equivalent of four layers of hexagonal ice, while some of the atoms just below the ice surface can escape before ice desorption begins. These results show that energetic ballistic embedding in ice is a general phenomenon, and represents a significant new channel by which incident species can be trapped under conditions where they would otherwise not be bound stably as surface adsorbates. These findings have implications for many fields including environmental science, trace gas

  6. Molecular interactions with ice: molecular embedding, adsorption, detection, and release.

    PubMed

    Gibson, K D; Langlois, Grant G; Li, Wenxin; Killelea, Daniel R; Sibener, S J

    2014-11-14

    The interaction of atomic and molecular species with water and ice is of fundamental importance for chemistry. In a previous series of publications, we demonstrated that translational energy activates the embedding of Xe and Kr atoms in the near surface region of ice surfaces. In this paper, we show that inert molecular species may be absorbed in a similar fashion. We also revisit Xe embedding, and further probe the nature of the absorption into the selvedge. CF4 molecules with high translational energies (≥3 eV) were observed to embed in amorphous solid water. Just as with Xe, the initial adsorption rate is strongly activated by translational energy, but the CF4 embedding probability is much less than for Xe. In addition, a larger molecule, SF6, did not embed at the same translational energies that both CF4 and Xe embedded. The embedding rate for a given energy thus goes in the order Xe > CF4 > SF6. We do not have as much data for Kr, but it appears to have a rate that is between that of Xe and CF4. Tentatively, this order suggests that for Xe and CF4, which have similar van der Waals radii, the momentum is the key factor in determining whether the incident atom or molecule can penetrate deeply enough below the surface to embed. The more massive SF6 molecule also has a larger van der Waals radius, which appears to prevent it from stably embedding in the selvedge. We also determined that the maximum depth of embedding is less than the equivalent of four layers of hexagonal ice, while some of the atoms just below the ice surface can escape before ice desorption begins. These results show that energetic ballistic embedding in ice is a general phenomenon, and represents a significant new channel by which incident species can be trapped under conditions where they would otherwise not be bound stably as surface adsorbates. These findings have implications for many fields including environmental science, trace gas collection and release, and the chemical composition of

  7. Dynamics simulations for engineering macromolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson-Mosher, Avi; Shinar, Tamar; Silver, Pamela A.; Way, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    The predictable engineering of well-behaved transcriptional circuits is a central goal of synthetic biology. The artificial attachment of promoters to transcription factor genes usually results in noisy or chaotic behaviors, and such systems are unlikely to be useful in practical applications. Natural transcriptional regulation relies extensively on protein-protein interactions to insure tightly controlled behavior, but such tight control has been elusive in engineered systems. To help engineer protein-protein interactions, we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation framework that simplifies features of proteins moving by constrained Brownian motion, with the goal of performing long simulations. The behavior of a simulated protein system is determined by summation of forces that include a Brownian force, a drag force, excluded volume constraints, relative position constraints, and binding constraints that relate to experimentally determined on-rates and off-rates for chosen protein elements in a system. Proteins are abstracted as spheres. Binding surfaces are defined radially within a protein. Peptide linkers are abstracted as small protein-like spheres with rigid connections. To address whether our framework could generate useful predictions, we simulated the behavior of an engineered fusion protein consisting of two 20 000 Da proteins attached by flexible glycine/serine-type linkers. The two protein elements remained closely associated, as if constrained by a random walk in three dimensions of the peptide linker, as opposed to showing a distribution of distances expected if movement were dominated by Brownian motion of the protein domains only. We also simulated the behavior of fluorescent proteins tethered by a linker of varying length, compared the predicted Förster resonance energy transfer with previous experimental observations, and obtained a good correspondence. Finally, we simulated the binding behavior of a fusion of two ligands that could

  8. Dynamics simulations for engineering macromolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Robinson-Mosher, Avi; Shinar, Tamar; Silver, Pamela A; Way, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    The predictable engineering of well-behaved transcriptional circuits is a central goal of synthetic biology. The artificial attachment of promoters to transcription factor genes usually results in noisy or chaotic behaviors, and such systems are unlikely to be useful in practical applications. Natural transcriptional regulation relies extensively on protein-protein interactions to insure tightly controlled behavior, but such tight control has been elusive in engineered systems. To help engineer protein-protein interactions, we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation framework that simplifies features of proteins moving by constrained Brownian motion, with the goal of performing long simulations. The behavior of a simulated protein system is determined by summation of forces that include a Brownian force, a drag force, excluded volume constraints, relative position constraints, and binding constraints that relate to experimentally determined on-rates and off-rates for chosen protein elements in a system. Proteins are abstracted as spheres. Binding surfaces are defined radially within a protein. Peptide linkers are abstracted as small protein-like spheres with rigid connections. To address whether our framework could generate useful predictions, we simulated the behavior of an engineered fusion protein consisting of two 20,000 Da proteins attached by flexible glycine/serine-type linkers. The two protein elements remained closely associated, as if constrained by a random walk in three dimensions of the peptide linker, as opposed to showing a distribution of distances expected if movement were dominated by Brownian motion of the protein domains only. We also simulated the behavior of fluorescent proteins tethered by a linker of varying length, compared the predicted Förster resonance energy transfer with previous experimental observations, and obtained a good correspondence. Finally, we simulated the binding behavior of a fusion of two ligands that could

  9. Dynamical interactions between two uniformly magnetized spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Boyd F.; Edwards, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Studies of the two-dimensional motion of a magnet sphere in the presence of a second, fixed sphere provide a convenient venue for exploring magnet-magnet interactions, inertia, friction, and rich nonlinear dynamical behavior. These studies exploit the equivalence of these magnetic interactions to the interactions between two equivalent point dipoles. We show that magnet-magnet friction plays a role when magnet spheres are in contact, table friction plays a role at large sphere separations, and eddy currents are always negligible. Web-based simulation and visualization software, called MagPhyx, is provided for education, exploration, and discovery.

  10. A molecular dynamics study of freezing in a confined geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Wen-Jong; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls is studied by computer simulation. The time development of ordering is quantified and a novel freezing mechanism is observed. The liquid forms layers and subsequent in-plane ordering within a layer is accompanied by a sharpening of the layer in the transverse direction. The effects of channel size, the methods of quench, the liquid-wall interaction and the roughness of walls on the freezing mechanism are elucidated. Comparison with recent experiments on freezing in confined geometries is presented.

  11. Role of molecular dynamics on descriptions of shock front processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karo, A. M.

    1981-07-01

    A computational approach, based on classical molecular dynamics, is used to form a realistic picture of shock induced processes occurring at the shock front and resulting from the detailed, violent motion associated with shock motion on an atomic scale. Prototype studies of phase transitions are discussed. The interaction of the shock front with defects, surfaces, voids, and inclusions, and across grain boundaries are summarized. The critical question of how mechanical energy imparted to a condensed material by shock loading is converted to the activation energy required to overcome some initial energy barrier in an initiation process, is addressed.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Telomere and TRF1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaburagi, Masaaki; Fukuda, Masaki; Yamada, Hironao; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Morikawa, Ryota; Takasu, Masako; Kato, Takamitsu A.; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    Telomeres play a central role in determining longevity of a cell. Our study focuses on the interaction between telomeric guanines and TRF1 as a means to observe the telomeric based mechanism of the genome protection. In this research, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of a telomeric DNA and TRF1. Our results show a stable structure with a high affinity for the specific protein. Additionally, we calculated the distance between guanines and the protein in their complex state. From this comparison, we found the calculated values of distance to be very similar, and the angle of guanines in their complex states was larger than that in their single state.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations studies of laser ablation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Johannes; Sonntag, Steffen; Karlin, Johannes; Paredes, Carolina Trichet; Sartison, Marc; Krauss, Armin; Trebin, Hans-Rainer

    2012-07-30

    An overview of several aspects of our recent molecular dynamics simulations of femtosecond laser ablation is presented. This includes the study of phase diagrams for suitable interactions, analysis of ablated material and bubble formation below threshold, study of two-pulse ablation and the classification of materials with respect to electron properties and electron-phonon coupling in the two-temperature model. A treatment of boundary conditions and of an extended twotemperature model is also included. Most of the results apply to aluminum, others also to copper and iron, and to metals in general.

  14. Molecular basis for polyol-induced protein stability revealed by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Ji, Luo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 in different polyols (glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, trehalose, and sucrose) at 363 K were performed to probe the molecular basis of the stabilizing effect, and the data in water, ethanol, and glycol were compared. It is found that protein protection by polyols is positively correlated with both the molecular volume and the fractional polar surface area, and the former contributes more significantly to the protein's stability. Polyol molecules have only a few direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, and the number of hydrogen bonds between a polyol and the protein is similar for different polyols. Thus, it is concluded that the direct interactions contribute little to the stabilizing effect. It is clarified that the preferential exclusion of the polyols is the origin of their protective effects, and it increases with increasing polyol size. Namely, there is preferential hydration on the protein surface (2 Å), and polyol molecules cluster around the protein at a distance of about 4 Å. The preferential exclusion of polyols leads to indirect interactions that prevent the protein from thermal unfolding. The water structure becomes more ordered with increasing the polyol size. So, the entropy of water in the first hydration shell decreases, and a larger extent of decrease is observed with increasing polyol size, leading to larger transfer free energy. The findings suggest that polyols protect the protein from thermal unfolding via indirect interactions. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of structural stability of the protein in polyol solutions.

  15. Molecular basis for polyol-induced protein stability revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Ji, Luo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 in different polyols (glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, trehalose, and sucrose) at 363 K were performed to probe the molecular basis of the stabilizing effect, and the data in water, ethanol, and glycol were compared. It is found that protein protection by polyols is positively correlated with both the molecular volume and the fractional polar surface area, and the former contributes more significantly to the protein's stability. Polyol molecules have only a few direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, and the number of hydrogen bonds between a polyol and the protein is similar for different polyols. Thus, it is concluded that the direct interactions contribute little to the stabilizing effect. It is clarified that the preferential exclusion of the polyols is the origin of their protective effects, and it increases with increasing polyol size. Namely, there is preferential hydration on the protein surface (2 A), and polyol molecules cluster around the protein at a distance of about 4 A. The preferential exclusion of polyols leads to indirect interactions that prevent the protein from thermal unfolding. The water structure becomes more ordered with increasing the polyol size. So, the entropy of water in the first hydration shell decreases, and a larger extent of decrease is observed with increasing polyol size, leading to larger transfer free energy. The findings suggest that polyols protect the protein from thermal unfolding via indirect interactions. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of structural stability of the protein in polyol solutions.

  16. Allosteric dynamics of SAMHD1 studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, K. K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-10-01

    SAMHD1 is a human cellular enzyme that blocks HIV-1 infection in myeloid cells and non-cycling CD4+T cells. The enzyme is an allosterically regulated triphosphohydrolase that modulates the level of cellular dNTP. The virus restriction is attributed to the lowering of the pool of dNTP in the cell to a point where reverse-transcription is impaired. Mutations in SAMHD1 are also implicated in Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome. A mechanistic understanding of the allosteric activation of the enzyme is still elusive. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations to examine the allosteric site dynamics of the protein and to examine the connection between the stability of the tetrameric complex and the Allosite occupancy.

  17. Brownian dynamics simulation of electrostatically interacting proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, E.; Krushelnitsky, A. G.; Fedotov, V. D.

    Brownian dynamics simulation software has been developed to study the dynamics of proteins as a whole in solution. The proteins were modelled as spheres with point dipoles embedded in the centre of sphere. A set of Brownian dynamics simulations at different values of the dipole moments, protein concentration and translational diffusion coefficient was performed to investigate the influence of interprotein electrostatic interactions on dynamic protein behaviour in solution. It was shown that these interactions led to the slowing down of protein rotation and a complex non-exponential shape of the rotational correlation function. Analysis of the correlation functions was performed within the frame of the model of electrostatic interprotein interactions advanced earlier on the basis of NMR and dielectric spectroscopy data. This model assumes that, due to electrostatic interactions, protein Brownian rotation becomes anisotropic. The lifetime of this anisotropy is controlled mainly by translational diffusion of proteins. Thus, the correlation function can be decomposed into two components corresponding to anisotropic Brownian rotation and an isotropic motion of an external electric field vector produced by the surrounding proteins.

  18. Interactions Dominate the Dynamics of Visual Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephen, Damian G.; Mirman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Many cognitive theories have described behavior as the summation of independent contributions from separate components. Contrasting views have emphasized the importance of multiplicative interactions and emergent structure. We describe a statistical approach to distinguishing additive and multiplicative processes and apply it to the dynamics of…

  19. Coarse-grained protein molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Derreumaux, Philippe; Mousseau, Normand

    2007-01-14

    A limiting factor in biological science is the time-scale gap between experimental and computational trajectories. At this point, all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) are clearly too expensive to explore long-range protein motions and extract accurate thermodynamics of proteins in isolated or multimeric forms. To reach the appropriate time scale, we must then resort to coarse graining. Here we couple the coarse-grained OPEP model, which has already been used with activated methods, to MD simulations. Two test cases are studied: the stability of three proteins around their experimental structures and the aggregation mechanisms of the Alzheimer's Abeta16-22 peptides. We find that coarse-grained isolated proteins are stable at room temperature within 50 ns time scale. Based on two 220 ns trajectories starting from disordered chains, we find that four Abeta16-22 peptides can form a three-stranded beta sheet. We also demonstrate that the reptation move of one chain over the others, first observed using the activation-relaxation technique, is a kinetically important mechanism during aggregation. These results show that MD-OPEP is a particularly appropriate tool to study qualitatively the dynamics of long biological processes and the thermodynamics of molecular assemblies.

  20. Coarse-grained protein molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derreumaux, Philippe; Mousseau, Normand

    2007-01-01

    A limiting factor in biological science is the time-scale gap between experimental and computational trajectories. At this point, all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) are clearly too expensive to explore long-range protein motions and extract accurate thermodynamics of proteins in isolated or multimeric forms. To reach the appropriate time scale, we must then resort to coarse graining. Here we couple the coarse-grained OPEP model, which has already been used with activated methods, to MD simulations. Two test cases are studied: the stability of three proteins around their experimental structures and the aggregation mechanisms of the Alzheimer's Aβ16-22 peptides. We find that coarse-grained isolated proteins are stable at room temperature within 50ns time scale. Based on two 220ns trajectories starting from disordered chains, we find that four Aβ16-22 peptides can form a three-stranded β sheet. We also demonstrate that the reptation move of one chain over the others, first observed using the activation-relaxation technique, is a kinetically important mechanism during aggregation. These results show that MD-OPEP is a particularly appropriate tool to study qualitatively the dynamics of long biological processes and the thermodynamics of molecular assemblies.

  1. MDLab: a molecular dynamics simulation prototyping environment.

    PubMed

    Cickovski, Trevor; Chatterjee, Santanu; Wenger, Jacob; Sweet, Christopher R; Izaguirre, Jesús A

    2010-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation involves solving Newton's equations of motion for a system of atoms, by calculating forces and updating atomic positions and velocities over a timestep Deltat. Despite the large amount of computing power currently available, the timescale of MD simulations is limited by both the small timestep required for propagation, and the expensive algorithm for computing pairwise forces. These issues are currently addressed through the development of efficient simulation methods, some of which make acceptable approximations and as a result can afford larger timesteps. We present MDLab, a development environment for MD simulations built with Python which facilitates prototyping, testing, and debugging of these methods. MDLab provides constructs which allow the development of propagators, force calculators, and high level sampling protocols that run several instances of molecular dynamics. For computationally demanding sampling protocols which require testing on large biomolecules, MDL includes an interface to the OpenMM libraries of Friedrichs et al. which execute on graphical processing units (GPUs) and achieve considerable speedup over execution on the CPU. As an example of an interesting high level method developed in MDLab, we present a parallel implementation of the On-The-Fly string method of Maragliano and Vanden-Eijnden. MDLab is available at http://mdlab.sourceforge.net.

  2. Structure and Dynamics of Cellulose Molecular Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Howard; Zhang, Xin; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert

    Molecular dissolution of microcrystalline cellulose has been achieved through mixing with ionic liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc), and organic solvent dimethylformamide (DMF). The mechanism of cellulose dissolution in tertiary mixtures has been investigated by combining quasielastic and small angle neutron scattering (QENS and SANS). As SANS data show that cellulose chains take Gaussian-like conformations in homogenous solutions, which exhibit characteristics of having an upper critical solution temperature, the dynamic signals predominantly from EMIMAc molecules indicate strong association with cellulose in the dissolution state. The mean square displacement quantities support the observation of the stoichiometric 3:1 EMIMAc to cellulose unit molar ratio, which is a necessary criterion for the molecular dissolution of cellulose. Analyses of dynamics structure factors reveal the temperature dependence of a slow and a fast process for EMIMAc's bound to cellulose and in DMF, respectively, as well as a very fast process due possibly to the rotational motion of methyl groups, which persisted to near the absolute zero.

  3. Dynamic transitions in molecular dynamics simulations of supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xiaojun; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Two dynamic transitions or crossovers, one at a low temperature (T* ≈ 1006 K) and the other at a high temperature (T0 ≈ 1384 K), are shown to emerge in supercooled liquid silicon using molecular dynamics simulations. The high-temperature transition (T0) marks the decoupling of stress, density, and energy relaxation mechanisms. At the low-temperature transition (T*), depending on the cooling rate, supercooled silicon can either undergo a high-density-liquid to low-density-liquid (HDL-LDL) phase transition or experience an HDL-HDL crossover. Dynamically heterogeneous domains that emerge with supercooling become prominent across the HDL-HDL transition at 1006 K, with well-separated mobile and immobile regions. Interestingly, across the HDL-LDL transition, the most mobile atoms form large prominent aggregates while the least mobile atoms get spatially dispersed akin to that in a crystalline state. The attendant partial return to spatial uniformity with the HDL-LDL phase transition indicates a dynamic mechanism for relieving the frustration in supercooled states.

  4. Dynamic Wetting on Graphene-Coated Surface: Molecular Dynamics Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Shih-Wei; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-11-01

    Wettability of graphene-coated surface gained significant attention recently due to discussion on the ``transparency'' (whether the wetting characteristics follow that of graphene or the underlying surface) and practical applications of graphene. In terms of static contact angle, the wettability of graphene-coated surfaces have been widely studied by experiments, simulations, and theory in recent years. However, the studies of dynamic wetting on graphene-coated surfaces are limited. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study the dynamic wetting of water droplet on graphene-coated surfaces from a microscopic point of view. The results show that the degree of similarity between the spreading behavior on graphene-coated surface and that on pure graphene (or that on the underlying surface) depends on time, i.e. how nonequilibrium the interface dynamics is. We also found that this feature can be altered by introducing defects into graphene. The work is partially supported by Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows 26-04364 and JST CREST.

  5. Molecular Recognition and Specific Interactions for Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Chung; Kang, Dae Joon

    2008-01-01

    Molecular recognition and specific interactions are reliable and versatile routes for site-specific and well-oriented immobilization of functional biomolecules on surfaces. The control of surface properties via the molecular recognition and specific interactions at the nanoscale is a key element for the nanofabrication of biosensors with high sensitivity and specificity. This review intends to provide a comprehensive understanding of the molecular recognition- and specific interaction-mediated biosensor fabrication routes that leads to biosensors with well-ordered and controlled structures on both nanopatterned surfaces and nanomaterials. Herein self-assembly of the biomolecules via the molecular recognition and specific interactions on nanoscaled surfaces as well as nanofabrication techniques of the biomolecules for biosensor architecture are discussed. We also describe the detection of molecular recognition- and specific interaction-mediated molecular binding as well as advantages of nanoscale detection. PMID:27873889

  6. Molecular Basis of Laminin-Integrin Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masashi; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2015-01-01

    Laminins are composed of three polypeptide chains, designated as α, β, and γ. The C-terminal region of laminin heterotrimers, containing coiled-coil regions, short tails, and laminin globular (LG) domains, is necessary and sufficient for binding to integrins, which are the major laminin receptor class. Laminin recognition by integrins critically requires the α chain LG domains and a glutamic acid residue of the γ chain at the third position from the C-terminus. Furthermore, the C-terminal region of the β chain contains a short amino acid sequence that modulates laminin affinity for integrins. Thus, all three of the laminin chains act cooperatively to facilitate integrin binding. Mammals possess 5 α (α1-5), 3 β (β1-3), and 3 γ (γ1-3) chains, combinations of which give rise to 16 distinct laminin isoforms. Each isoform is expressed in a tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific manner, exerting its functions through binding of integrins. In this review, we detail the current knowledge surrounding the molecular basis and physiological relevance of specific interactions between laminins and integrins, and describe the mechanisms underlying laminin action through integrins.

  7. Kinetic theory molecular dynamics and hot dense matter: theoretical foundations.

    PubMed

    Graziani, F R; Bauer, J D; Murillo, M S

    2014-09-01

    Electrons are weakly coupled in hot, dense matter that is created in high-energy-density experiments. They are also mildly quantum mechanical and the ions associated with them are classical and may be strongly coupled. In addition, the dynamical evolution of plasmas under these hot, dense matter conditions involve a variety of transport and energy exchange processes. Quantum kinetic theory is an ideal tool for treating the electrons but it is not adequate for treating the ions. Molecular dynamics is perfectly suited to describe the classical, strongly coupled ions but not the electrons. We develop a method that combines a Wigner kinetic treatment of the electrons with classical molecular dynamics for the ions. We refer to this hybrid method as "kinetic theory molecular dynamics," or KTMD. The purpose of this paper is to derive KTMD from first principles and place it on a firm theoretical foundation. The framework that KTMD provides for simulating plasmas in the hot, dense regime is particularly useful since current computational methods are generally limited by their inability to treat the dynamical quantum evolution of the electronic component. Using the N-body von Neumann equation for the electron-proton plasma, three variations of KTMD are obtained. Each variant is determined by the physical state of the plasma (e.g., collisional versus collisionless). The first variant of KTMD yields a closed set of equations consisting of a mean-field quantum kinetic equation for the electron one-particle distribution function coupled to a classical Liouville equation for the protons. The latter equation includes both proton-proton Coulombic interactions and an effective electron-proton interaction that involves the convolution of the electron density with the electron-proton Coulomb potential. The mean-field approach is then extended to incorporate equilibrium electron-proton correlations through the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander (STLS) ansatz. This is the second variant of KTMD

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of triclinic lysozyme in a crystal lattice.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Pawel A; Liu, Chunmei; Deckman, Jason; Case, David A

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of crystals can enlighten interpretation of experimental X-ray crystallography data and elucidate structural dynamics and heterogeneity in biomolecular crystals. Furthermore, because of the direct comparison against experimental data, they can inform assessment of molecular dynamics methods and force fields. We present microsecond scale results for triclinic hen egg-white lysozyme in a supercell consisting of 12 independent unit cells using four contemporary force fields (Amber ff99SB, ff14ipq, ff14SB, and CHARMM 36) in crystalline and solvated states (for ff14SB only). We find the crystal simulations consistent across multiple runs of the same force field and robust to various solvent equilibration schemes. However, convergence is slow compared with solvent simulations. All the tested force fields reproduce experimental structural and dynamic properties well, but Amber ff14SB maintains structure and reproduces fluctuations closest to the experimental model: its average backbone structure differs from the deposited structure by 0.37Å; by contrast, the average backbone structure in solution differs from the deposited by 0.65Å. All the simulations are affected by a small progressive deterioration of the crystal lattice, presumably due to imperfect modeling of hydrogen bonding and other crystal contact interactions; this artifact is smallest in ff14SB, with average lattice positions deviating by 0.20Å from ideal. Side-chain disorder is surprisingly low with fewer than 30% of the nonglycine or alanine residues exhibiting significantly populated alternate rotamers. Our results provide helpful insight into the methodology of biomolecular crystal simulations and indicate directions for future work to obtain more accurate energy models for molecular dynamics.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Network Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabold, David A.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction and Background * History and use of MD * The role of the potential * Scope of the method * Use of a priori information * Appraising a model * MD Method * Equations of motion * Energy minimization and equilibration * Deeper or global minima * Simulated annealing * Genetic algorithms * Activation-relaxation technique * Alternate dynamics * Modeling infinite systems: Periodic boundary conditions * The Interatomic Interactions * Overview * Empirical classical potentials * Potentials from electronic structure * The tight-binding method * Approximate methods based on tight-binding * First principles * Local basis: "ab initio tight binding" * Plane-waves: Car-Parrinello methods * Efficient ab initio methods for large systems * The need for locality of electron states in real space * Avoiding explicit orthogonalization * Connecting Simulation to Experiment * Structure * Network dynamics * Computing the harmonic modes * Dynamical autocorrelation functions * Dynamical structure factor * Electronic structure * Density of states * Thermal modulation of the electron states * Transport * Applications * g-GeSe2 * g-GexSe1-x glasses * Amorphous carbon surface * Where to Get Codes to Get Started * Acknowledgments * References

  10. Studies on molecular interactions between nalidixic acid and liposomes.

    PubMed

    Budai, M; Szabó, Zs; Zimmer, A; Szögyi, M; Gróf, P

    2004-07-26

    The interaction between nalidixic acid sodium salt (NANa) and liposomes prepared from alpha-L-dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or from its binary mixture with dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) was studied with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. We evaluated the role of broadband ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation on the molecular interactions between the lipids and the NANa, and determined the decay-kinetics of the incorporated spin labeled fatty-acid free radicals. Multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles were prepared by sonication and extrusion. The entrapment efficiencies were determined spectrophotometrically. The size-distribution of the liposomes and its change in time was checked by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Our results indicate that NANa mainly interacts with lipid head groups. However, its effect and presumably the formation of the free radicals, induced by broadband ultraviolet-B, is not localized only to the head group region of the lipid molecules. Depending on DOPC content, interaction between the NANa and the lipids modifies the phase-transition parameters of the liposome dispersions.

  11. Simulation of carbohydrates, from molecular docking to dynamics in water.

    PubMed

    Sapay, Nicolas; Nurisso, Alessandra; Imberty, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of carbohydrates is particularly challenging because of the variety of structures resulting for the high number of monosaccharides and possible linkages and also because of their intrinsic flexibility. The development of carbohydrate parameters for molecular modeling is still an active field. Nowadays, main carbohydrates force fields are GLYCAM06, CHARMM36, and GROMOS 45A4. GLYCAM06 includes the largest choice of compounds and is compatible with the AMBER force fields and associated. Furthermore, AMBER includes tools for the implementation of new parameters. When looking at protein-carbohydrate interaction, the choice of the starting structure is of importance. Such complex can be sometimes obtained from the Protein Data Bank-although the stereochemistry of sugars may require some corrections. When no experimental data is available, molecular docking simulation is generally used to the obtain protein-carbohydrate complex coordinates. As molecular docking parameters are not specifically dedicated to carbohydrates, inaccuracies should be expected, especially for the docking of polysaccharides. This issue can be addressed at least partially by combining molecular docking with molecular dynamics simulation in water.

  12. Molecular structures and intramolecular dynamics of pentahalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ischenko, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews advances of modern gas electron diffraction (GED) method combined with high-resolution spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations in studies of the impact of intramolecular dynamics in free molecules of pentahalides. Some recently developed approaches to the electron diffraction data interpretation, based on direct incorporation of the adiabatic potential energy surface parameters to the diffraction intensity are described. In this way, complementary data of different experimental and computational methods can be directly combined for solving problems of the molecular structure and its dynamics. The possibility to evaluate some important parameters of the adiabatic potential energy surface - barriers to pseudorotation and saddle point of intermediate configuration from diffraction intensities in solving the inverse GED problem is demonstrated on several examples. With increasing accuracy of the electron diffraction intensities and the development of the theoretical background of electron scattering and data interpretation, it has become possible to investigate complex nuclear dynamics in fluxional systems by the GED method. Results of other research groups are also included in the discussion.

  13. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene

    PubMed Central

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando; Dressel, Martin; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the dynamics of spins on surfaces is pivotal to the design of spintronic1 and quantum computing2 devices. Proposed schemes involve the interaction of spins with graphene to enable surface-state spintronics3,4, and electrical spin-manipulation4-11. However, the influence of the graphene environment on the spin systems has yet to be unraveled12. Here we explore the spin-graphene interaction by studying the classical and quantum dynamics of molecular magnets13 on graphene. While the static spin response remains unaltered, the quantum spin dynamics and associated selection rules are profoundly modulated. The couplings to graphene phonons, to other spins, and to Dirac fermions are quantified using a newly-developed model. Coupling to Dirac electrons introduces a dominant quantum-relaxation channel that, by driving the spins over Villain’s threshold, gives rise to fully-coherent, resonant spin tunneling. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the interaction between spins and graphene, establishing the basis for electrical spin-manipulation in graphene nanodevices. PMID:26641019

  14. Dynamic covalent chemistry approaches toward macrocycles, molecular cages, and polymers.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yinghua; Wang, Qi; Taynton, Philip; Zhang, Wei

    2014-05-20

    The current research in the field of dynamic covalent chemistry includes the study of dynamic covalent reactions, catalysts, and their applications. Unlike noncovalent interactions utilized in supramolecular chemistry, the formation/breakage of covalent bonding has slower kinetics and usually requires the aid of a catalyst. Catalytic systems that enable efficient thermodynamic equilibrium are thus essential. In this Account, we describe the development of efficient catalysts for alkyne metathesis, and discuss the application of dynamic covalent reactions (mainly imine, olefin, and alkyne metathesis) in the development of organic functional materials. Alkyne metathesis is an emerging dynamic covalent reaction that offers robust and linear acetylene linkages. By introducing a podand motif into the catalyst ligand design, we have developed a series of highly active and robust alkyne metathesis catalysts, which, for the first time, enabled the one-step covalent assembly of ethynylene-linked functional molecular cages. Imine chemistry and olefin metathesis are among the most well-established reversible reactions, and have also been our main synthetic tools. Various shape-persistent macrocycles and covalent organic polyhedrons have been efficiently constructed in one-step through dynamic imine chemistry and olefin metathesis. The geometrical features and solubilizing groups of the building blocks as well as the reaction kinetics have significant effect on the outcome of a covalent assembly process. More recently, we explored the orthogonality of imine and olefin metatheses, and successfully synthesized heterosequenced macrocycles and molecular cages through one-pot orthogonal dynamic covalent chemistry. In addition to discrete molecular architectures, functional polymeric materials can also be accessed through dynamic covalent reactions. Defect-free solution-processable conjugated polyaryleneethynylenes and polydiacetylenes have been prepared through alkyne metathesis

  15. NMR and computational methods in the structural and dynamic characterization of ligand-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Ghitti, Michela; Musco, Giovanna; Spitaleri, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The recurrent failures in drug discovery campaigns, the asymmetry between the enormous financial investments and the relatively scarce results have fostered the development of strategies based on complementary methods. In this context in recent years the rigid lock-and-key binding concept had to be revisited in favour of a dynamic model of molecular recognition accounting for conformational changes of both the ligand and the receptor. The high level of complexity required by a dynamic description of the processes underlying molecular recognition requires a multidisciplinary investigation approach. In this perspective, the combination of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with molecular docking, conformational searches along with molecular dynamics simulations has given new insights into the dynamic mechanisms governing ligand receptor interactions, thus giving an enormous contribution to the identification and design of new and effective drugs. Herein a succinct overview on the applications of both NMR and computational methods to the structural and dynamic characterization of ligand-receptor interactions will be presented.

  16. Osmosis : a molecular dynamics computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Thomas

    Osmosis is a phenomenon of critical importance in a variety of processes ranging from the transport of ions across cell membranes and the regulation of blood salt levels by the kidneys to the desalination of water and the production of clean energy using potential osmotic power plants. However, despite its importance and over one hundred years of study, there is an ongoing confusion concerning the nature of the microscopic dynamics of the solvent particles in their transfer across the membrane. In this thesis the microscopic dynamical processes underlying osmotic pressure and concentration gradients are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. I first present a new derivation for the local pressure that can be used for determining osmotic pressure gradients. Using this result, the steady-state osmotic pressure is studied in a minimal model for an osmotic system and the steady-state density gradients are explained using a simple mechanistic hopping model for the solvent particles. The simulation setup is then modified, allowing us to explore the timescales involved in the relaxation dynamics of the system in the period preceding the steady state. Further consideration is also given to the relative roles of diffusive and non-diffusive solvent transport in this period. Finally, in a novel modification to the classic osmosis experiment, the solute particles are driven out-of-equilibrium by the input of energy. The effect of this modification on the osmotic pressure and the osmotic ow is studied and we find that active solute particles can cause reverse osmosis to occur. The possibility of defining a new "osmotic effective temperature" is also considered and compared to the results of diffusive and kinetic temperatures..

  17. Multipole Algorithms for Molecular Dynamics Simulation on High Performance Computers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, William Dewey

    1995-01-01

    A fundamental problem in modeling large molecular systems with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is the underlying N-body problem of computing the interactions between all pairs of N atoms. The simplest algorithm to compute pair-wise atomic interactions scales in runtime {cal O}(N^2), making it impractical for interesting biomolecular systems, which can contain millions of atoms. Recently, several algorithms have become available that solve the N-body problem by computing the effects of all pair-wise interactions while scaling in runtime less than {cal O}(N^2). One algorithm, which scales {cal O}(N) for a uniform distribution of particles, is called the Greengard-Rokhlin Fast Multipole Algorithm (FMA). This work describes an FMA-like algorithm called the Molecular Dynamics Multipole Algorithm (MDMA). The algorithm contains several features that are new to N-body algorithms. MDMA uses new, efficient series expansion equations to compute general 1/r^{n } potentials to arbitrary accuracy. In particular, the 1/r Coulomb potential and the 1/r^6 portion of the Lennard-Jones potential are implemented. The new equations are based on multivariate Taylor series expansions. In addition, MDMA uses a cell-to-cell interaction region of cells that is closely tied to worst case error bounds. The worst case error bounds for MDMA are derived in this work also. These bounds apply to other multipole algorithms as well. Several implementation enhancements are described which apply to MDMA as well as other N-body algorithms such as FMA and tree codes. The mathematics of the cell -to-cell interactions are converted to the Fourier domain for reduced operation count and faster computation. A relative indexing scheme was devised to locate cells in the interaction region which allows efficient pre-computation of redundant information and prestorage of much of the cell-to-cell interaction. Also, MDMA was integrated into the MD program SIgMA to demonstrate the performance of the program over

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation damage cascades in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Buchan, J. T.; Robinson, M.; Christie, H. J.; Roach, D. L.; Ross, D. K.; Marks, N. A.

    2015-06-28

    Radiation damage cascades in diamond are studied by molecular dynamics simulations employing the Environment Dependent Interaction Potential for carbon. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies up to 2.5 keV are considered and a uniformly distributed set of 25 initial PKA directions provide robust statistics. The simulations reveal the atomistic origins of radiation-resistance in diamond and provide a comprehensive computational analysis of cascade evolution and dynamics. As for the case of graphite, the atomic trajectories are found to have a fractal-like character, thermal spikes are absent and only isolated point defects are generated. Quantitative analysis shows that the instantaneous maximum kinetic energy decays exponentially with time, and that the timescale of the ballistic phase has a power-law dependence on PKA energy. Defect recombination is efficient and independent of PKA energy, with only 50% of displacements resulting in defects, superior to graphite where the same quantity is nearly 75%.

  19. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: The first 25 years

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. |

    1992-08-01

    Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics has been generalized to simulate Nonequilibrium systems by adding sources of thermodynamic heat and work. This generalization incorporates microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress, and augments atomistic forces with special boundary, constraint, and driving forces capable of doing work on, and exchanging heat with, an otherwise Newtonian system. The underlying Lyapunov instability of these nonequilibrium equations of motion links microscopic time-reversible deterministic trajectories to macroscopic time-irreversible hydrodynamic behavior as described by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Green-Kubo linear-response theory has been checked. Nonlinear plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, shockwave propagation, and nonequilibrium phase transformation have all been simulated. The nonequilibrium techniques, coupled with qualitative improvements in parallel computer hardware, are enabling simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Eli T.; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2007-03-01

    Outer space silicon solar cells are exposed to impacts with micro meteors that can destroy the surface leading to device failure. A protective coating of silicon nitride will protect against such failure. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are used to study how silicon/silicon nitride fails due to hypervelocity impacts. Three impactors made of silicon nitride are studied. Their cross-sectional areas, relative to the target, are as follows: the same as the target, half of the target, and a quarter of the target. Impactor speeds from 5 to 11 km/second yield several modes of failure, such as deformation of the target by the impactor and delimitation of the silicon nitride from the silicon at the interface. These simulations will give a much clearer picture of how solar cells composed of a silicon/silicon nitride interface will respond to impacts in outer space. This will ultimately lead to improved devices with longer life spans.

  1. Molecular-dynamics simulations of lead clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, S. C.; Hall, B. D.

    2001-08-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of nanometer-sized lead clusters have been performed using the Lim-Ong-Ercolessi glue potential [Surf. Sci. 269/270, 1109 (1992)]. The binding energies of clusters forming crystalline (fcc), decahedron and icosahedron structures are compared, showing that fcc cuboctahedra are the most energetically favored of these polyhedral model structures. However, simulations of the freezing of liquid droplets produced a characteristic form of surface-reconstructed ``shaved'' icosahedron, in which atoms are absent at the edges and apexes of the polyhedron. This arrangement is energetically favored for 600-4000 atom clusters. Larger clusters favor crystalline structures. Indeed, simulated freezing of a 6525-atom liquid droplet produced an imperfect fcc Wulff particle, containing a number of parallel stacking faults. The effects of temperature on the preferred structure of crystalline clusters below the melting point have been considered. The implications of these results for the interpretation of experimental data is discussed.

  2. Cluster production within antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Clusters are quite important at various situations in heavy-ion collisions. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics was improved to take into account the correlations to form light clusters, such as deuterons and α particles, and light nuclei composed of several clusters. The momentum fluctuations of emitted particles are also taken into account by a simple method. Formation of fragments and light clusters in a wide range of heavy-ion collisions was well described with a single set of model parameters. Fragmentation in a proton induced reaction was also well reproduced by introducing cluster correlations. Calculated results demonstrate strong impacts of clusters in various observables including those usually regarded as probes of the density dependence of symmetry energy.

  3. On the parallelization of molecular dynamics codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabado, G. P.; Plata, O.; Zapata, E. L.

    2002-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) codes present a high degree of spatial data locality and a significant amount of independent computations. However, most of the parallelization strategies are usually based on the manual transformation of sequential programs either by completely rewriting the code with message passing routines or using specific libraries intended for writing new MD programs. In this paper we propose a new library-based approach (DDLY) which supports parallelization of existing short-range MD sequential codes. The novelty of this approach is that it can directly handle the distribution of common data structures used in MD codes to represent data (arrays, Verlet lists, link cells), using domain decomposition. Thus, the insertion of run-time support for distribution and communication in a MD program does not imply significant changes to its structure. The method is simple, efficient and portable. It may be also used to extend existing parallel programming languages, such as HPF.

  4. Nanodrop contact angles from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravipati, Srikanth; Aymard, Benjamin; Yatsyshin, Petr; Galindo, Amparo; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    The contact angle between three phases being in thermodynamic equilibrium is highly sensitive to the nature of the intermolecular forces as well as to various fluctuation effects. Determining the Young contact angle of a sessile drop sitting on a substrate from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is a highly non-trivial task. Most commonly employed methods for finding droplet contact angles from MD simulation data either require large numbers of particles or are system-dependent. We propose a systematic geometry based methodology for extracting the contact angle from simulated sessile droplets by analysing an appropriately coarse-grained density field. To demonstrate the method, we consider Lennard-Jones (LJ) and SPC/E water nanodroplets of different sizes sitting on planar LJ walls. Our results are in good agreement with Young contact angle values computed employing test-area perturbation method.

  5. Ion mobility analysis of molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wyttenbach, Thomas; Pierson, Nicholas A; Clemmer, David E; Bowers, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    The combination of mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) employing a temperature-variable drift cell or a drift tube divided into sections to make IMS-IMS experiments possible allows information to be obtained about the molecular dynamics of polyatomic ions in the absence of a solvent. The experiments allow the investigation of structural changes of both activated and native ion populations on a timescale of 1-100 ms. Five different systems representing small and large, polar and nonpolar molecules, as well as noncovalent assemblies, are discussed in detail: a dinucleotide, a sodiated polyethylene glycol chain, the peptide bradykinin, the protein ubiquitin, and two types of peptide oligomers. Barriers to conformational interconversion can be obtained in favorable cases. In other cases, solution-like native structures can be observed, but care must be taken in the experimental protocols. The power of theoretical modeling is demonstrated.

  6. Ice formation on kaolinite: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosso, Gabriele C.; Tribello, Gareth A.; Zen, Andrea; Pedevilla, Philipp; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-12-01

    The formation of ice affects many aspects of our everyday life as well as important technologies such as cryotherapy and cryopreservation. Foreign substances almost always aid water freezing through heterogeneous ice nucleation, but the molecular details of this process remain largely unknown. In fact, insight into the microscopic mechanism of ice formation on different substrates is difficult to obtain even if state-of-the-art experimental techniques are used. At the same time, atomistic simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation frequently face extraordinary challenges due to the complexity of the water-substrate interaction and the long time scales that characterize nucleation events. Here, we have investigated several aspects of molecular dynamics simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation considering as a prototypical ice nucleating material the clay mineral kaolinite, which is of relevance in atmospheric science. We show via seeded molecular dynamics simulations that ice nucleation on the hydroxylated (001) face of kaolinite proceeds exclusively via the formation of the hexagonal ice polytype. The critical nucleus size is two times smaller than that obtained for homogeneous nucleation at the same supercooling. Previous findings suggested that the flexibility of the kaolinite surface can alter the time scale for ice nucleation within molecular dynamics simulations. However, we here demonstrate that equally flexible (or non flexible) kaolinite surfaces can lead to very different outcomes in terms of ice formation, according to whether or not the surface relaxation of the clay is taken into account. We show that very small structural changes upon relaxation dramatically alter the ability of kaolinite to provide a template for the formation of a hexagonal overlayer of water molecules at the water-kaolinite interface, and that this relaxation therefore determines the nucleation ability of this mineral.

  7. GPU-enabled molecular dynamics simulations of ankyrin kinase complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Vertika; Chong, Wei Lim; Wisitponchai, Tanchanok; Nimmanpipug, Piyarat; Zain, Sharifuddin M.; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd.; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2014-10-01

    The ankyrin repeat (AR) protein can be used as a versatile scaffold for protein-protein interactions. It has been found that the heterotrimeric complex between integrin-linked kinase (ILK), PINCH, and parvin is an essential signaling platform, serving as a convergence point for integrin and growth-factor signaling and regulating cell adhesion, spreading, and migration. Using ILK-AR with high affinity for the PINCH1 as our model system, we explored a structure-based computational protocol to probe and characterize binding affinity hot spots at protein-protein interfaces. In this study, the long time scale dynamics simulations with GPU accelerated molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in AMBER12 have been performed to locate the hot spots of protein-protein interaction by the analysis of the Molecular Mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area/Generalized Born Solvent Area (MM-PBSA/GBSA) of the MD trajectories. Our calculations suggest good binding affinity of the complex and also the residues critical in the binding.

  8. Parallel molecular dynamics: Communication requirements for massively parallel machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Valerie E.; Stevens, Rick L.; Arnold, Kathryn E.

    1995-05-01

    Molecular mechanics and dynamics are becoming widely used to perform simulations of molecular systems from large-scale computations of materials to the design and modeling of drug compounds. In this paper we address two major issues: a good decomposition method that can take advantage of future massively parallel processing systems for modest-sized problems in the range of 50,000 atoms and the communication requirements needed to achieve 30 to 40% efficiency on MPPs. We analyzed a scalable benchmark molecular dynamics program executing on the Intel Touchstone Deleta parallelized with an interaction decomposition method. Using a validated analytical performance model of the code, we determined that for an MPP with a four-dimensional mesh topology and 400 MHz processors the communication startup time must be at most 30 clock cycles and the network bandwidth must be at least 2.3 GB/s. This configuration results in 30 to 40% efficiency of the MPP for a problem with 50,000 atoms executing on 50,000 processors.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of TCDD adsorption on organo-montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Runliang; Hu, Wenhao; You, Zhimin; Ge, Fei; Tian, Kaixun

    2012-07-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulation was applied to investigate the adsorption of Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin (TCDD) on tetramethylammonium (TMA) and tetrapropylammonium (TPA) modified montmorillonite, with the aim of providing novel information for understanding the adsorptive characteristics of organo-montmorillonite toward organic contaminants. The simulation results showed that on both outer surface and interlayer space of TPA modified montmorillonite (TPA-mont), TCDD was adsorbed between the TPA cations with the molecular edge facing siloxane surface. Similar result was observed for the adsorption on the outer surface of TMA modified montmorillonite (TMA-mont). These results indicated that TCDD had stronger interaction with organic cation than with siloxane surface. While in the interlayer space of TMA-mont, TCDD showed a coplanar orientation with the siloxane surfaces, which could be ascribed to the limited gallery height within TMA-mont interlayer. Comparing with TMA-mont, TPA-mont had larger adsorption energy toward TCDD but smaller interlayer space to accommodate TCDD. Our results indicated that molecular dynamics simulation can be a powerful tool in characterizing the adsorptive characteristics of organoclays and provided additional proof that for the organo-montmorillonite synthesized with small organic cations, the available interlayer space rather than the attractive force plays the dominant role for their adsorption capacity toward HOCs.

  10. Molecular dynamics of individual alpha-helices of bacteriorhodopsin in dimyristol phosphatidylocholine. I. Structure and dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, T B

    1997-01-01

    Understanding the role of the lipid bilayer in membrane protein structure and dynamics is needed for tertiary structure determination methods. However, the molecular details are not well understood. Molecular dynamics computer calculations can provide insight into these molecular details of protein:lipid interactions. This paper reports on 10 simulations of individual alpha-helices in explicit lipid bilayers. The 10 helices were selected from the bacteriorhodopsin structure as representative alpha-helical membrane folding components. The bilayer is constructed of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine molecules. The only major difference between simulations is the primary sequence of the alpha-helix. The results show dramatic differences in motional behavior between alpha-helices. For example, helix A has much smaller root-mean-squared deviations than does helix D. This can be understood in terms of the presence of aromatic residues at the interface for helix A that are not present in helix D. Additional motions are possible for the helices that contain proline side chains relative to other amino acids. The results thus provide insight into the types of motion and the average structures possible for helices within the bilayer setting and demonstrate the strength of molecular simulations in providing molecular details that are not directly visualized in experiments. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 Figure 6 PMID:9370432

  11. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Monticelli, Luca; Heberle, Frederick A; Kucerka, Norbert; Tieleman, D. Peter; Katsaras, John

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  12. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yajiang; Inhester, Ludger; Hanasaki, Kota; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2015-01-01

    We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging. PMID:26798806

  13. Molecular dynamics study of tethered polymers in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Gratton, Y; Slater, G W

    2005-08-01

    Single macromolecules can now be isolated and characterized experimentally using techniques such as optical tweezers and videomicroscopy. An interesting and important single-molecule problem is that of the dynamics of a polymer chain tethered to a solid surface and subjected to a shear flow. An experimental study of such a system was reported by Doyle et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4769 (2000)), and their results showed a surprising recirculating motion of the DNA chain. We explore this problem using molecular dynamics computer simulations with explicit hydrodynamic interactions. The dynamical properties of a Freely Jointed Chain (FJC) with Finitely Extensible Nonlinear Elastic (FENE) links are examined in similar conditions (i.e., confined between two surfaces and in the presence of a Poiseuille flow). We see the remarkable cyclic polymer motion observed experimentally, and we show that a simple cross-correlation function can be used to measure the corresponding period of motion. We also propose a new empirical equation relating the magnitude of the shear flow to the amount of chain deformation, an equation that appears to apply for both weak and strong flows. Finally, we report on packing effects near the molecularly flat wall, an associated chain-sticking phenomenon, and the impact of the chain hydrodynamic drag on the local fluid flow.

  14. Thermophoresis in liquids: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Han, Minsub

    2005-04-01

    Thermophoresis in liquids is studied by molecular dynamics simulation (MD). A theory is developed that divides the problem in the way consistent with the characteristic scales. MD is then conducted to obtain the solution of each problem, which is to be all combined for macroscopic predictions. It is shown that when the temperature gradient is applied to the nonconducting liquid bath that contains neutral particles, there occurs a pressure gradient tangential to the particle surface at the particle-liquid interface. This may induce the flow in the interfacial region and eventually the particle to move. This applies to the material system that interacts through van der Waals forces and may be a general source of the thermophoresis phenomenon in liquids. The particle velocity is linearly proportional to the temperature gradient. And, in a large part of the given temperature range, the particle motion is in the direction toward the cold end and decreases with respect to the temperature. It is also shown that the particle velocity decreases or even reverses its sign in the lowest limit of the temperature range or with a particle of relatively weak molecular interactions with the liquid. The characteristics of the phenomenon are analyzed in molecular details.

  15. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  16. Molecular-dynamic study of liquid ethylenediamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabaev, N. K.; Kraevskii, S. V.; Rodnikova, M. N.; Solonina, I. A.

    2016-10-01

    Models of liquid ethylenediamine (ED) are built using the molecular dynamics approach at temperatures of 293-363 K and a size of 1000 molecules in a basic cell as a cuboid. The structural and dynamic characteristics of liquid ED versus temperature are derived. The gauche conformation of the ED molecule that is characteristic of the gas phase is shown to transition easily into the trans conformation of the molecules in the liquid. NH···N hydrogen bonds are analyzed in liquid ED. The number of H-bonds per ED molecule is found to vary from 5.02 at 293 K to 3.86 at 363 K. The lifetimes in the range of the temperatures and dissociation activation energy for several H-bonds in liquid ED are found to range from 0.574 to 4.524 ps at 293 K; the activation energies are 8.8 kJ/mol for 50% of the H-bonds and 16.3 kJ/mol for 6.25% of them. A weaker and more mobile spatial grid of H-bonds in liquid ED is observed, compared to data calculated earlier for monoethanolamine.

  17. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yuan T.

    1991-03-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  18. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Y.; Murakawa, T.; Shimamura, K.; Oishi, M.; Ohyama, T.; Kurita, N.

    2015-02-01

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA.

  19. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Y. Murakawa, T. Shimamura, K. Oishi, M. Ohyama, T. Kurita, N.

    2015-02-27

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA.

  20. GAS-PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS: VIBRATIONAL DYNAMICS OF POLYATOMIC MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    MUCKERMAN,J.T.

    1999-06-09

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions and properties of short-lived chemical intermediates. High-resolution, high-sensitivity, laser absorption methods are augmented by high-temperature, flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass-spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular free radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in radicals involved in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical studies using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations, which provide insight into energy flow among the vibrational modes of polyatomic molecules and interference effects in multiple-surface dynamics.

  1. Structure and dynamics of DNA loops on nucleosomes studied with atomistic, microsecond-scale molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pasi, Marco; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    DNA loop formation on nucleosomes is strongly implicated in chromatin remodeling and occurs spontaneously in nucleosomes subjected to superhelical stress. The nature of such loops depends crucially on the balance between DNA deformation and DNA interaction with the nucleosome core. Currently, no high-resolution structural data on these loops exist. Although uniform rod models have been used to study loop size and shape, these models make assumptions concerning DNA mechanics and DNA–core binding. We present here atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations for two different loop sizes. The results point to the key role of localized DNA kinking within the loops. Kinks enable the relaxation of DNA bending strain to be coupled with improved DNA–core interactions. Kinks lead to small, irregularly shaped loops that are asymmetrically positioned with respect to the nucleosome core. We also find that loop position can influence the dynamics of the DNA segments at the extremities of the nucleosome. PMID:27098037

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of ss-DNA translocation between copper nanoelectrodes incorporating electrode charge dynamics.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christina M; Zhao, Xiongce; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter T

    2008-02-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the translocation of single-stranded (ss)-DNA through the nanoscale gap between the nanoscale electrodes of a proposed genomic sequencing device. Using a fixed gap width between the electrodes and a small sample segment of ss-DNA as initial starting points in this project, the effect of applied electric fields on translocation velocity was studied. To describe the electrostatic interactions of the water, ions, and ss-DNA with the nanoscale electrodes, we applied the electrode charge dynamics (ECD) method. Through the density profile and comparison of translocation velocities to extrapolated experimental data, we found the ECD potential to be a better descriptor of the metal/nonmetal electrostatic interactions compared to the commonly used universal force field (UFF). Translocation velocities obtained using the ECD potential were consistent with simulated bulk data.

  3. Internal coordinate molecular dynamics: a foundation for multiscale dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Jain, Abhinandan

    2015-01-29

    Internal coordinates such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles (BAT) are natural coordinates for describing a bonded molecular system. However, the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods that are widely used for proteins, DNA, and polymers are based on Cartesian coordinates owing to the mathematical simplicity of the equations of motion. However, constraints are often needed with Cartesian MD simulations to enhance the conformational sampling. This makes the equations of motion in the Cartesian coordinates differential-algebraic, which adversely impacts the complexity and the robustness of the simulations. On the other hand, constraints can be easily placed in BAT coordinates by removing the degrees of freedom that need to be constrained. Thus, the internal coordinate MD (ICMD) offers an attractive alternative to Cartesian coordinate MD for developing multiscale MD method. The torsional MD method is a special adaptation of the ICMD method, where all the bond lengths and bond angles are kept rigid. The advantages of ICMD simulation methods are the longer time step size afforded by freezing high frequency degrees of freedom and performing a conformational search in the more important low frequency torsional degrees of freedom. However, the advancements in the ICMD simulations have been slow and stifled by long-standing mathematical bottlenecks. In this review, we summarize the recent mathematical advancements we have made based on spatial operator algebra, in developing a robust long time scale ICMD simulation toolkit useful for various applications. We also present the applications of ICMD simulations to study conformational changes in proteins and protein structure refinement. We review the advantages of the ICMD simulations over the Cartesian simulations when used with enhanced sampling methods and project the future use of ICMD simulations in protein dynamics.

  4. Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics: A Foundation for Multiscale Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Internal coordinates such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles (BAT) are natural coordinates for describing a bonded molecular system. However, the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods that are widely used for proteins, DNA, and polymers are based on Cartesian coordinates owing to the mathematical simplicity of the equations of motion. However, constraints are often needed with Cartesian MD simulations to enhance the conformational sampling. This makes the equations of motion in the Cartesian coordinates differential-algebraic, which adversely impacts the complexity and the robustness of the simulations. On the other hand, constraints can be easily placed in BAT coordinates by removing the degrees of freedom that need to be constrained. Thus, the internal coordinate MD (ICMD) offers an attractive alternative to Cartesian coordinate MD for developing multiscale MD method. The torsional MD method is a special adaptation of the ICMD method, where all the bond lengths and bond angles are kept rigid. The advantages of ICMD simulation methods are the longer time step size afforded by freezing high frequency degrees of freedom and performing a conformational search in the more important low frequency torsional degrees of freedom. However, the advancements in the ICMD simulations have been slow and stifled by long-standing mathematical bottlenecks. In this review, we summarize the recent mathematical advancements we have made based on spatial operator algebra, in developing a robust long time scale ICMD simulation toolkit useful for various applications. We also present the applications of ICMD simulations to study conformational changes in proteins and protein structure refinement. We review the advantages of the ICMD simulations over the Cartesian simulations when used with enhanced sampling methods and project the future use of ICMD simulations in protein dynamics. PMID:25517406

  5. Investigation of Chiral Molecular Micelles by NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kevin F.; Billiot, Eugene J.; Billiot, Fereshteh H.; Lipkowitz, Kenny B.; Southerland, William M.; Fang, Yayin

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analyses of the chiral molecular micelles poly-(sodium undecyl-(L,L)-leucine-valine) (poly-SULV) and poly-(sodium undecyl-(L,L)- valine-leucine) (poly-(SUVL)) are reported. Both molecular micelles are used as chiral selectors in electrokinetic chromatography and each consists of covalently linked surfactant chains with chiral dipeptide headgroups. To provide experimental support for the structures from MD simulations, NOESY spectra were used to identify protons in close spatial proximity. Results from the NOESY analyses were then compared to radial distribution functions from MD simulations. In addition, the hydrodynamic radii of both molecular micelles were calculated from NMR-derived diffusion coefficients. Corresponding radii from the MD simulations were found to be in agreement with these experimental results. NMR diffusion experiments were also used to measure association constants for polar and non-polar binaphthyl analytes binding to both molecular micelles. Poly(SUVL) was found to bind the non-polar analyte enantiomers more strongly, while the more polar analyte enantiomers interacted more strongly with poly(SULV). MD simulations in tum showed that poly(SUL V) had a more open structure that gave greater access for water molecules to the dipeptide headgroup region. PMID:23991355

  6. Dynamics of deceptive interactions in social networks.

    PubMed

    Barrio, Rafael A; Govezensky, Tzipe; Dunbar, Robin; Iñiguez, Gerardo; Kaski, Kimmo

    2015-11-06

    In this paper, we examine the role of lies in human social relations by implementing some salient characteristics of deceptive interactions into an opinion formation model, so as to describe the dynamical behaviour of a social network more realistically. In this model, we take into account such basic properties of social networks as the dynamics of the intensity of interactions, the influence of public opinion and the fact that in every human interaction it might be convenient to deceive or withhold information depending on the instantaneous situation of each individual in the network. We find that lies shape the topology of social networks, especially the formation of tightly linked, small communities with loose connections between them. We also find that agents with a larger proportion of deceptive interactions are the ones that connect communities of different opinion, and, in this sense, they have substantial centrality in the network. We then discuss the consequences of these results for the social behaviour of humans and predict the changes that could arise due to a varying tolerance for lies in society.

  7. Dynamics of two interacting active Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayati, Parvin; Najafi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Starting from a microscopic model for a spherically symmetric active Janus particle, we study the interactions between two such active motors. The ambient fluid mediates a long range hydrodynamic interaction between two motors. This interaction has both direct and indirect hydrodynamic contributions. The direct contribution is due to the propagation of fluid flow that originated from a moving motor and affects the motion of the other motor. The indirect contribution emerges from the re-distribution of the ionic concentrations in the presence of both motors. Electric force exerted on the fluid from this ionic solution enhances the flow pattern and subsequently changes the motion of both motors. By formulating a perturbation method for very far separated motors, we derive analytic results for the translation and rotational dynamics of the motors. We show that the overall interaction at the leading order modifies the translational and rotational speeds of motors which scale as O (" separators=" [ 1 / D ] 3 ) and O (" separators=" [ 1 / D ] 4 ) with their separation, respectively. Our findings open up the way for studying the collective dynamics of synthetic micro-motors.

  8. A Method for Molecular Dynamics on Curved Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Paquay, Stefan; Kusters, Remy

    2016-01-01

    Dynamics simulations of constrained particles can greatly aid in understanding the temporal and spatial evolution of biological processes such as lateral transport along membranes and self-assembly of viruses. Most theoretical efforts in the field of diffusive transport have focused on solving the diffusion equation on curved surfaces, for which it is not tractable to incorporate particle interactions even though these play a crucial role in crowded systems. We show here that it is possible to take such interactions into account by combining standard constraint algorithms with the classical velocity Verlet scheme to perform molecular dynamics simulations of particles constrained to an arbitrarily curved surface. Furthermore, unlike Brownian dynamics schemes in local coordinates, our method is based on Cartesian coordinates, allowing for the reuse of many other standard tools without modifications, including parallelization through domain decomposition. We show that by applying the schemes to the Langevin equation for various surfaces, we obtain confined Brownian motion, which has direct applications to many biological and physical problems. Finally we present two practical examples that highlight the applicability of the method: 1) the influence of crowding and shape on the lateral diffusion of proteins in curved membranes; and 2) the self-assembly of a coarse-grained virus capsid protein model. PMID:27028633

  9. Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo Simulations, and Langevin Dynamics: A Computational Review

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Eric; Viktor, Herna L.

    2015-01-01

    Macromolecular structures, such as neuraminidases, hemagglutinins, and monoclonal antibodies, are not rigid entities. Rather, they are characterised by their flexibility, which is the result of the interaction and collective motion of their constituent atoms. This conformational diversity has a significant impact on their physicochemical and biological properties. Among these are their structural stability, the transport of ions through the M2 channel, drug resistance, macromolecular docking, binding energy, and rational epitope design. To assess these properties and to calculate the associated thermodynamical observables, the conformational space must be efficiently sampled and the dynamic of the constituent atoms must be simulated. This paper presents algorithms and techniques that address the abovementioned issues. To this end, a computational review of molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulations, Langevin dynamics, and free energy calculation is presented. The exposition is made from first principles to promote a better understanding of the potentialities, limitations, applications, and interrelations of these computational methods. PMID:25785262

  10. Effect of temperature on structural and dynamic properties of liquid silver - A study in molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banuelos, E. U.; Amarillas, A. P.

    2004-02-01

    In this work we studied the temperature-induced changes in the structural and dynamical properties of liquid Ag using molecular dynamics (DM) computer simulation. The atomic interactions are modeled through a semiempirical potential function which incorporates n-body effects and is based on the second moments approximation of the density of states of a tight-binding Hamiltonian. The caloric curve was used to calculate the latent heat of fusion and the pair distribution function, g(r), was calculated from a set of atomic configurations collected at several time-steps. The dynamical properties are studied through the velocity autocorrelation function and the mean-square displacement. The self-diffusion coefficient and its behavior with the temperature, obtained from our simulations, shows the typical behavior of the simple liquids. Our results are compared to available experimental data.

  11. Structure and dynamics of layered molecular assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Jennifer Conrad

    This dissertation focuses on the goal of understanding and controlling layered material properties from a molecular perspective. With this understanding, materials can be synthetically tailored to exhibit predetermined bulk properties. This investigation describes the optical response of a family of metal-phosphonate (MP) monolayers and multilayers, materials that are potentially useful because the films are easy to synthesize and are chemically and thermally stable. MP films have shown potential in a variety of chemical sensing and optical applications, and in this dissertation, the suitability of MP films for optical information storage is explored For this application, the extent of photonic energy transport within and between optically active layers is an important factor in determining the stability and specificity of optical modifications made to a material. Intralayer and interlayer energy transport processes can be studied selectively in MP films because the composition, and thus the properties, of each layer are controlled synthetically. It was determined by fluorescence relaxation dynamics in conjunction with atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the substrate and layer morphologies are key factors in determining the layer optical and physical properties. The initial MP layers in a multilayer are structurally heterogeneous, characterized by randomly distributed islands that are ~50 A in diameter. The population dynamics measured for these layers are non-exponential, chromophore concentration-independent, and identical for two different chromophores. The data is explained in the context of an excitation hopping model in a system where the surface is characterized by islands of aggregated chromophores as well as non-aggregated monomers. Within a MP monolayer, the dynamics are dominated by intra-island excitation hopping. Forster (dipolar) energy transfer between the energetically overlapped chromophores does not play a significant role in determining the

  12. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-30

    properties of key hydrated cement constituent calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) at the molecular, nanometer scale level. Due to complexity, still unknown...public release; distribution is unlimited. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate- Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure The views... Cement Molecular Structure Report Title Multi-scale modeling of complex material systems requires starting from fundamental building blocks to

  13. Emergence of hydrogen bonds from molecular dynamics simulation of substituted N-phenylthiourea-catechol oxidase complex.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Lae

    2017-01-01

    A series of N-phenylthiourea derivatives was built starting from the X-ray structure in the molecular mechanics framework and the interaction profile in the complex with the catechol oxidase was traced using molecular dynamics simulation. The results showed that the geometry and interactions between ligand and receptor were highly related to the position of the substituted side chains of phenyl moiety. At the end of molecular dynamics run, a concentrated multicenter hydrogen bond was created between the substituted ligand and receptor. The conformation of the ligand itself were also restricted in the receptor pocket. Furthermore, the simulation time of 50 ns were found to be long enough to explore the relevant conformational space and the stationary behavior of the molecular dynamic could be observed.

  14. Molecular dynamics and spectra. II. Diatomic Raman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berens, Peter H.; White, Steven R.; Wilson, Kent R.

    1981-07-01

    This paper and paper I in this series [P.H. Berens and K.R. Wilison, J. Chem. Phys. 74, 4872 (1981)] indicate that infrared and Raman rotational and fundamental vibrational-rotational spectra of dense systems (high pressure gases, liquids, and solids) are essentially classical, in that they can be computed and understood from a basically classical mechanical viewpoint, with some caveats for features in which anharmonicity is important, such as the detailed shape of Q branches. It is demonstrated here, using the diatomic case as an example, that ordinary, i.e., nonresonant, Raman band contours can be computed from classical mechanics plus simple quantum corrections. Classical versions of molecular dynamics, linear response theory, and ensemble averaging, followed by straightforward quantum corrections, are used to compute the pure rotational and fundamental vibration-rotational Raman band contours of N2 for the gas phase and for solutions of N2 in different densities of gas phase Ar and in liquid Ar. The evolution is seen from multiple peaked line shapes characteristic of free rotation in the gas phase to single peaks characteristic of hindered rotation in the liquid phase. Comparison is made with quantum and correspondence principle classical gas phase spectral calculations and with experimental measurements for pure N2 and N2 in liquid Ar. Three advantages are pointed out for a classical approach to infrared and Raman spectra. First, a classical approach can be used to compute the spectra of complex molecular systems, e.g., of large molecules, clusters, liquids, solutions, and solids. Second, this classical approach can be extended to compute the spectra of nonequilibrium and time-dependent systems, e.g., infrared and Raman spectra during the course of chemical reactions. Third, a classical viewpoint allows experimental infrared and Raman spectra to be understood and interpreted in terms of atomic motions with the considerable aid of classical models and of our

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of a membrane protein/amphipol complex.

    PubMed

    Perlmutter, Jason D; Popot, Jean-Luc; Sachs, Jonathan N

    2014-10-01

    Amphipathic polymers known as "amphipols" provide a highly stabilizing environment for handling membrane proteins in aqueous solutions. A8-35, an amphipol with a polyacrylate backbone and hydrophobic grafts, has been extensively characterized and widely employed for structural and functional studies of membrane proteins using biochemical and biophysical approaches. Given the sensitivity of membrane proteins to their environment, it is important to examine what effects amphipols may have on the structure and dynamics of the proteins they complex. Here we present the first molecular dynamics study of an amphipol-stabilized membrane protein, using Escherichia coli OmpX as a model. We begin by describing the structure of the complexes formed by supplementing OmpX with increasing amounts of A8-35, in order to determine how the amphipol interacts with the transmembrane and extramembrane surfaces of the protein. We then compare the dynamics of the protein in either A8-35, a detergent, or a lipid bilayer. We find that pro