Science.gov

Sample records for dynamic molecular interactions

  1. Interactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Daniel V.

    2015-03-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in html5 and javascript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  2. Theoretical Analysis of Dynamic Processes for Interacting Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-01-01

    Biological transport is supported by collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by analyzing a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes where interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. It allows us to connect explicitly microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. Theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on interactions, and correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motors transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed. PMID:25688287

  3. Studying Interactions by Molecular Dynamics Simulations at High Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Toppo, Stefano; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.; Viglino, Paolo; Ursini, Fulvio; Esposito, Gennaro

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study molecular encounters and recognition. In recent works, simulations using high concentration of interacting molecules have been performed. In this paper, we consider the practical problems for setting up the simulation and to analyse the results of the simulation. The simulation of beta 2-microglobulin association and the simulation of the binding of hydrogen peroxide by glutathione peroxidase are provided as examples. PMID:22500085

  4. Electron-phonon interaction within classical molecular dynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tamm, A.; Samolyuk, G.; Correa, A. A.; Klintenberg, M.; Aabloo, A.; Caro, A.

    2016-07-14

    Here, we present a model for nonadiabatic classical molecular dynamics simulations that captures with high accuracy the wave-vector q dependence of the phonon lifetimes, in agreement with quantum mechanics calculations. It is based on a local view of the e-ph interaction where individual atom dynamics couples to electrons via a damping term that is obtained as the low-velocity limit of the stopping power of a moving ion in a host. The model is parameter free, as its components are derived from ab initio-type calculations, is readily extended to the case of alloys, and is adequate for large-scale molecular dynamics computermore » simulations. We also show how this model removes some oversimplifications of the traditional ionic damped dynamics commonly used to describe situations beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.« less

  5. Electron-phonon interaction within classical molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamm, A.; Samolyuk, G.; Correa, A. A.; Klintenberg, M.; Aabloo, A.; Caro, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a model for nonadiabatic classical molecular dynamics simulations that captures with high accuracy the wave-vector q dependence of the phonon lifetimes, in agreement with quantum mechanics calculations. It is based on a local view of the e -ph interaction where individual atom dynamics couples to electrons via a damping term that is obtained as the low-velocity limit of the stopping power of a moving ion in a host. The model is parameter free, as its components are derived from ab initio-type calculations, is readily extended to the case of alloys, and is adequate for large-scale molecular dynamics computer simulations. We also show how this model removes some oversimplifications of the traditional ionic damped dynamics commonly used to describe situations beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

  6. Effective interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicane, Giuseppe; Sarkisov, Lev

    2014-09-01

    In this article we explore a problem of effective interactions between two rotationally restrained lysozyme molecules forming a crystal contact in aqueous solution. We perform non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in order to estimate the interaction energy as a function of the distance between the two proteins obtained from direct application of the Jarzynski equality (JE), and compare it with that calculated by means of another non-equilibrium approach (Forward-Reverse method) and constrained force methods. The performance of the JE equality when applied to solvated protein interactions is discussed. All of the equilibrium and non-equilibrium methods show clear evidence that the potentials of mean force (PMF) are short-ranged, do not exceed few kTs, and that there is an accumulation of anions in the presence of hydrophobic surfaces.

  7. Molecular Dynamics of "Fuzzy" Transcriptional Activator-Coactivator Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Natalie S.; Weinzierl, Robert O. J.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (ADs) are generally thought to be intrinsically unstructured, but capable of adopting limited secondary structure upon interaction with a coactivator surface. The indeterminate nature of this interface made it hitherto difficult to study structure/function relationships of such contacts. Here we used atomistic accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations to study the conformational changes of the GCN4 AD and variants thereof, either free in solution, or bound to the GAL11 coactivator surface. We show that the AD-coactivator interactions are highly dynamic while obeying distinct rules. The data provide insights into the constant and variable aspects of orientation of ADs relative to the coactivator, changes in secondary structure and energetic contributions stabilizing the various conformers at different time points. We also demonstrate that a prediction of α-helical propensity correlates directly with the experimentally measured transactivation potential of a large set of mutagenized ADs. The link between α-helical propensity and the stimulatory activity of ADs has fundamental practical and theoretical implications concerning the recruitment of ADs to coactivators. PMID:27175900

  8. Molecular Dynamics of Shock Wave Interaction with Nanoscale Structured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qananwah, Ahmad K.

    Typical theoretical treatments of shock wave interactions are based on a continuum approach, which cannot resolve the spatial variations in solids with nano-scale porous structure. Nano-structured materials have the potential to attenuate the strength of traveling shock waves because of their high surface-to-volume ratio. To investigate such interactions we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation model, based on Short Range Attractive interactions. A piston, modeled as a uni-directional repulsive force field translating at a prescribed velocity, impinges on a region of gas which is compressed to form a shock, which in turn is driven against an atomistic solid wall. Periodic boundary conditions are used in the directions orthogonal to the piston motion, and we have considered solids based on either embedded atom potentials (target structure) or tethered potential (rigid piston, holding wall). Velocity, temperature and stress fields are computed locally in both gas and solid regions, and displacements within the solid are interpreted in terms of its elastic constants. In this work we present results of the elastic behavior of solid structures subjected to shock wave impact and analysis of energy transport and absorption in porous materials. The results indicated that the presence of nano-porous material layers in front of a target wall reduced the stress magnitude detected inside and the energy deposited there by about 30 percent while, at the same time, its loading rate was decreased substantially.

  9. Evaluating Molecular Interactions in Polycaprolactone-Biomineralized Hydroxyapatite Nanocomposites using Steered Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anurag; Payne, Scott; Katti, Kalpana S.; Katti, Dinesh R.

    2015-04-01

    An experimental and modeling study of a complex nanoclay-based polymeric scaffold system is presented here. A representative molecular model of polymeric nanocomposite scaffold system for bone tissue engineering applications was developed. Polymeric scaffolds were synthesized using organically modified montmorillonite clay (OMMT) with biomineralized hydroxyapatite and polycaprolactone (OMMT-HAP-PCL). The OMMT-HAP-PCL representative model was constructed and validated using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and material density results. We observed strong molecular interactions between OMMT, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and polycaprolactone (PCL) in the OMMT-HAP-PCL system. Attractive and repulsive interactions between PCL and different constituents of OMMT and HAP indicate influence of OMMT-HAP on PCL. Polymeric scaffolds were found to have improved nanomechanical properties as compared to pristine PCL due to the introduction of OMMT-HAP. Stress-strain response for the representative OMMT-HAP-PCL model was evaluated using constant force steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations. Two distinct stress-strain responses observed in the system indicate a two-phase nanomechanical behavior of OMMT-HAP-PCL obtained at low and high applied stresses. The results obtained from the MD and SMD simulations provide quantitative understanding of molecular interactions between different constituents of OMMT, HAP and PCL and mechanical response in the OMMT-HAP-PCL system.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations on the interactions of low molecular weight natural organic acids with C60.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Xie, Hong-Bin; Chen, Jingwen; Li, Xuehua; Wang, Zhuang; Sheng, Lianxi

    2013-07-01

    As an important part of dissolved organic matter (DOM), low molecular weight organic acids (LOAs) may play a key role in the process for DOM stabilizing carbon nanomaterials (e.g. C60) suspensions in aquatic environment. In addition, both LOAs and C60 have been detected in the troposphere and therefore have a chance to interact with each other in the gaseous phase. However, the mechanism for LOAs-C60 interactions and their environmental implications need further investigations. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was employed to investigate the interactions between both neutral and ionic LOAs with C60 in vacuum and water. The results showed that the adsorptions of all LOAs on C60 in energy are favorable, and the aromatic acids have stronger interactions with C60 than the aliphatic acids in vacuum and water. The interaction energies (Eint) of the LOA anions with C60 were weaker than those of their corresponding neutral LOA molecules. The models were also developed to predict and interpret Eint based on the results from MD simulations. Dispersion, induction and hydrophobic interactions were found to be the dominating factor in Eint. These findings indicate that cost-efficient MD simulation can be employed as an important tool to predict the adsorption behavior of LOAs on carbon nanomaterials.

  11. Molecular dynamics modeling of a nanomaterials-water surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat Pishkenari, Hossein; Keramati, Ramtin; Abdi, Ahmad; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2016-04-01

    In this article, we study the formation of nanomeniscus around a nanoneedle using molecular dynamics simulation approach. The results reveal three distinct phases in the time-evolution of meniscus before equilibrium according to the contact angle, meniscus height, and potential energy. In addition, we investigated the correlation between the nanoneedle diameter and nanomeniscus characteristics. The results have applications in various fields such as scanning probe microscopy and rheological measurements.

  12. Structural Refinement of Proteins by Restrained Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Non-interacting Molecular Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Rong; Han, Wei; Fiorin, Giacomo; Islam, Shahidul M.; Schulten, Klaus; Roux, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of multiple conformational states is a prerequisite to understand the function of membrane transport proteins. Unfortunately, the determination of detailed atomic structures for all these functionally important conformational states with conventional high-resolution approaches is often difficult and unsuccessful. In some cases, biophysical and biochemical approaches can provide important complementary structural information that can be exploited with the help of advanced computational methods to derive structural models of specific conformational states. In particular, functional and spectroscopic measurements in combination with site-directed mutations constitute one important source of information to obtain these mixed-resolution structural models. A very common problem with this strategy, however, is the difficulty to simultaneously integrate all the information from multiple independent experiments involving different mutations or chemical labels to derive a unique structural model consistent with the data. To resolve this issue, a novel restrained molecular dynamics structural refinement method is developed to simultaneously incorporate multiple experimentally determined constraints (e.g., engineered metal bridges or spin-labels), each treated as an individual molecular fragment with all atomic details. The internal structure of each of the molecular fragments is treated realistically, while there is no interaction between different molecular fragments to avoid unphysical steric clashes. The information from all the molecular fragments is exploited simultaneously to constrain the backbone to refine a three-dimensional model of the conformational state of the protein. The method is illustrated by refining the structure of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of the Kv1.2 potassium channel in the resting state and by exploring the distance histograms between spin-labels attached to T4 lysozyme. The resulting VSD structures are in good agreement with

  13. Structural Refinement of Proteins by Restrained Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Non-interacting Molecular Fragments.

    PubMed

    Shen, Rong; Han, Wei; Fiorin, Giacomo; Islam, Shahidul M; Schulten, Klaus; Roux, Benoît

    2015-10-01

    The knowledge of multiple conformational states is a prerequisite to understand the function of membrane transport proteins. Unfortunately, the determination of detailed atomic structures for all these functionally important conformational states with conventional high-resolution approaches is often difficult and unsuccessful. In some cases, biophysical and biochemical approaches can provide important complementary structural information that can be exploited with the help of advanced computational methods to derive structural models of specific conformational states. In particular, functional and spectroscopic measurements in combination with site-directed mutations constitute one important source of information to obtain these mixed-resolution structural models. A very common problem with this strategy, however, is the difficulty to simultaneously integrate all the information from multiple independent experiments involving different mutations or chemical labels to derive a unique structural model consistent with the data. To resolve this issue, a novel restrained molecular dynamics structural refinement method is developed to simultaneously incorporate multiple experimentally determined constraints (e.g., engineered metal bridges or spin-labels), each treated as an individual molecular fragment with all atomic details. The internal structure of each of the molecular fragments is treated realistically, while there is no interaction between different molecular fragments to avoid unphysical steric clashes. The information from all the molecular fragments is exploited simultaneously to constrain the backbone to refine a three-dimensional model of the conformational state of the protein. The method is illustrated by refining the structure of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of the Kv1.2 potassium channel in the resting state and by exploring the distance histograms between spin-labels attached to T4 lysozyme. The resulting VSD structures are in good agreement with

  14. Molecular dynamics, spin dynamics study of phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Dilina; Landau, David P.; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Nicholson, Don; Eisenbach, Markus; Yin, Junqi

    2013-03-01

    By combining an atomistic many-body potential (Finnis-Sinclair) with a classical Heisenberg-like spin Hamiltonian, we perform combined molecular and spin dynamics simulations to investigate phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron. The coupling between atomic and spin degrees of freedom is established via a distance dependent exchange interaction derived from first principles electronic structure calculations. Coupled equations of motion are integrated using a second order Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of the exponential time evolution operator. To investigate the effect of lattice vibrations on spin wave spectrum, we calculate spin-spin and density-density dynamic structure factors S(q, ω), and compare that to the results obtained from pure spin dynamics simulations performed on a rigid lattice. In the presence of lattice vibrations, we observe an additional peak in the longitudinal spin-spin dynamic structure factor which coincides with the peak position in density-density dynanmic structure factor. Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, ''Center for Defect Physics,'' an Energy Frontier Research Center

  15. Ranking of Molecular Biomarker Interaction with Targeted DNA Nucleobases via Full Atomistic Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.; Cranford, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based sensors can detect disease biomarkers, including acetone and ethanol for diabetes and H2S for cardiovascular diseases. Before experimenting on thousands of potential DNA segments, we conduct full atomistic steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to screen the interactions between different DNA sequences with targeted molecules to rank the nucleobase sensing performance. We study and rank the strength of interaction between four single DNA nucleotides (Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C), and Thymine (T)) on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with acetone, ethanol, H2S and HCl. By sampling forward and reverse interaction paths, we compute the free-energy profiles of eight systems for the four targeted molecules. We find that dsDNA react differently than ssDNA to the targeted molecules, requiring more energy to move the molecule close to DNA as indicated by the potential of mean force (PMF). Comparing the PMF values of different systems, we obtain a relative ranking of DNA base for the detection of each molecule. Via the same procedure, we could generate a library of DNA sequences for the detection of a wide range of chemicals. A DNA sensor array built with selected sequences differentiating many disease biomarkers can be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:26750747

  16. Ranking of Molecular Biomarker Interaction with Targeted DNA Nucleobases via Full Atomistic Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.; Cranford, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based sensors can detect disease biomarkers, including acetone and ethanol for diabetes and H2S for cardiovascular diseases. Before experimenting on thousands of potential DNA segments, we conduct full atomistic steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to screen the interactions between different DNA sequences with targeted molecules to rank the nucleobase sensing performance. We study and rank the strength of interaction between four single DNA nucleotides (Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C), and Thymine (T)) on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with acetone, ethanol, H2S and HCl. By sampling forward and reverse interaction paths, we compute the free-energy profiles of eight systems for the four targeted molecules. We find that dsDNA react differently than ssDNA to the targeted molecules, requiring more energy to move the molecule close to DNA as indicated by the potential of mean force (PMF). Comparing the PMF values of different systems, we obtain a relative ranking of DNA base for the detection of each molecule. Via the same procedure, we could generate a library of DNA sequences for the detection of a wide range of chemicals. A DNA sensor array built with selected sequences differentiating many disease biomarkers can be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring.

  17. Molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C.

    1988-08-01

    The basic methodology of equilibrium molecular dynamics is described. Examples from the literature are used to illustrate how molecular dynamics has been used to resolve theoretical controversies, provide data to test theories, and occasionally to discover new phenomena. The emphasis is on the application of molecular dynamics to an understanding of the microscopic physics underlying the transport properties of simple fluids. 98 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Transmembrane helix structure, dynamics, and interactions: multi-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, L; Bassolino, D; Stouch, T

    1997-01-01

    To probe the fundamentals of membrane/protein interactions, all-atom multi-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations were conducted on a single transmembrane poly(32)alanine helix in a fully solvated dimyristoyphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer. The central 12 residues, which interact only with the lipid hydrocarbon chains, maintained a very stable helical structure. Helical regions extended beyond these central 12 residues, but interactions with the lipid fatty-acyl ester linkages, the lipid headgroups, and water molecules made the helix less stable in this region. The C and N termini, exposed largely to water, existed as random coils. As a whole, the helix tilted substantially, from perpendicular to the bilayer plane (0 degree) to a 30 degrees tilt. The helix experienced a bend at its middle, and the two halves of the helix at times assumed substantially different tilts. Frequent hydrogen bonding, of up to 0.7 ns in duration, occurred between peptide and lipid molecules. This resulted in correlated translational diffusion between the helix and a few lipid molecules. Because of the large variation in lipid conformation, the lipid environment of the peptide was not well defined in terms of "annular" lipids and on average consisted of 18 lipid molecules. When compared with a "neat" bilayer without peptide, no significant difference was seen in the bilayer thickness, lipid conformations or diffusion, or headgroup orientation. However, the lipid hydrocarbon chain order parameters showed a significant decrease in order, especially in those methylene groups closest to the headgroup. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 14 PMID:9199766

  19. Phase equilibrium calculations of ternary liquid mixtures with binary interaction parameters and molecular size parameters determined from molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Oh, Suk Yung; Bae, Young Chan

    2010-07-15

    The method presented in this paper was developed to predict liquid-liquid equilibria in ternary liquid mixtures by using a combination of a thermodynamic model and molecular dynamics simulations. In general, common classical thermodynamic models have many parameters which are determined by fitting a model with experimental data. This proposed method, however, provides a simple procedure for calculating liquid-liquid equilibria utilizing binary interaction parameters and molecular size parameters determined from molecular dynamics simulations. This method was applied to mixtures containing water, hydrocarbons, alcohols, chlorides, ketones, acids, and other organic liquids over various temperature ranges. The predicted results agree well with the experimental data without the use of adjustable parameters.

  20. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Interaction of an AFM Probe with the Surface of an SCN Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Adris; Kaukler, William; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations is conducted in order to estimate forces of probe-substrate interaction in the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). First a review of available molecular dynamic techniques is given. Implementation of MD simulation is based on an object-oriented code developed at the University of Delft. Modeling of the sample material - succinonitrile (SCN) - is based on the Lennard-Jones potentials. For the polystyrene probe an atomic interaction potential is used. Due to object-oriented structure of the code modification of an atomic interaction potential is straight forward. Calculation of melting temperature is used for validation of the code and of the interaction potentials. Various fitting parameters of the probe-substrate interaction potentials are considered, as potentials fitted to certain properties and temperature ranges may not be reliable for the others. This research provides theoretical foundation for an interpretation of actual measurements of an interaction forces using AFM.

  1. DyNet: visualization and analysis of dynamic molecular interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Goenawan, Ivan H.; Lynn, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The ability to experimentally determine molecular interactions on an almost proteome-wide scale under different conditions is enabling researchers to move from static to dynamic network analysis, uncovering new insights into how interaction networks are physically rewired in response to different stimuli and in disease. Dynamic interaction data presents a special challenge in network biology. Here, we present DyNet, a Cytoscape application that provides a range of functionalities for the visualization, real-time synchronization and analysis of large multi-state dynamic molecular interaction networks enabling users to quickly identify and analyze the most ‘rewired’ nodes across many network states. Availability and Implementation: DyNet is available at the Cytoscape (3.2+) App Store (http://apps.cytoscape.org/apps/dynet). Contact: david.lynn@sahmri.com. Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153624

  2. Molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaolin; Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation holds the promise of revealing the mechanisms of biological processes in their ultimate detail. It is carried out by computing the interaction forces acting on each atom and then propagating the velocities and positions of the atoms by numerical integration of Newton's equations of motion. In this review, we present an overview of how the MD simulation can be conducted to address computational toxicity problems. The study cases will cover a standard MD simulation performed to investigate the overall flexibility of a cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme and a set of more advanced MD simulations to examine the barrier to ion conduction in a human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR).

  3. Molecular Dynamics Study on the Biophysical Interactions of Seven Green Tea Catechins with Cell Membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the interactions of bioactive catechins (flavonoids) commonly found in green tea with lipid bilayers, as model for cell membranes. Previously, a number of experimental studies rationalized catechin’s anticarcinogenic, antibacterial, and other be...

  4. Multilevel summation with B-spline interpolation for pairwise interactions in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, David J.; Wolff, Matthew A.; Xia, Jianlin; Schulten, Klaus; Skeel, Robert D.

    2016-03-01

    The multilevel summation method for calculating electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations constructs an approximation to a pairwise interaction kernel and its gradient, which can be evaluated at a cost that scales linearly with the number of atoms. The method smoothly splits the kernel into a sum of partial kernels of increasing range and decreasing variability with the longer-range parts interpolated from grids of increasing coarseness. Multilevel summation is especially appropriate in the context of dynamics and minimization, because it can produce continuous gradients. This article explores the use of B-splines to increase the accuracy of the multilevel summation method (for nonperiodic boundaries) without incurring additional computation other than a preprocessing step (whose cost also scales linearly). To obtain accurate results efficiently involves technical difficulties, which are overcome by a novel preprocessing algorithm. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the resulting method offers substantial improvements in accuracy and that its performance is competitive with an implementation of the fast multipole method in general and markedly better for Hamiltonian formulations of molecular dynamics. The improvement is great enough to establish multilevel summation as a serious contender for calculating pairwise interactions in molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, the method appears to be uniquely capable for molecular dynamics in two situations, nonperiodic boundary conditions and massively parallel computation, where the fast Fourier transform employed in the particle-mesh Ewald method falls short.

  5. Three-dimensional interactive Molecular Dynamics program for the study of defect dynamics in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriarca, M.; Kuronen, A.; Robles, M.; Kaski, K.

    2007-01-01

    The study of crystal defects and the complex processes underlying their formation and time evolution has motivated the development of the program ALINE for interactive molecular dynamics experiments. This program couples a molecular dynamics code to a Graphical User Interface and runs on a UNIX-X11 Window System platform with the MOTIF library, which is contained in many standard Linux releases. ALINE is written in C, thus giving the user the possibility to modify the source code, and, at the same time, provides an effective and user-friendly framework for numerical experiments, in which the main parameters can be interactively varied and the system visualized in various ways. We illustrate the main features of the program through some examples of detection and dynamical tracking of point-defects, linear defects, and planar defects, such as stacking faults in lattice-mismatched heterostructures. Program summaryTitle of program:ALINE Catalogue identifier:ADYJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYJ_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Computers:DEC ALPHA 300, Intel i386 compatible computers, G4 Apple Computers Installations:Laboratory of Computational Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, Helsinki, Finland Operating systems under which the program has been tested:True64 UNIX, Linux-i386, Mac OS X 10.3 and 10.4 Programming language used:Standard C and MOTIF libraries Memory required to execute with typical data:6 Mbytes but may be larger depending on the system size No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:16 901 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:449 559 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of physical problem:Some phenomena involving defects take place inside three-dimensional crystals at times which can be hardly predicted. For this reason they are

  6. Exploring the Molecular Design of Protein Interaction Sites with Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Free Energy Calculations†

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shide; Li, Liwei; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Pilcher, Meaghan N.; Uversky, Vladimir; Zhou, Yaoqi; Dunker, A. Keith; Meroueh, Samy O.

    2009-01-01

    The significant work that has been invested toward understanding protein–protein interaction has not translated into significant advances in structure-based predictions. In particular redesigning protein surfaces to bind to unrelated receptors remains a challenge, partly due to receptor flexibility, which is often neglected in these efforts. In this work, we computationally graft the binding epitope of various small proteins obtained from the RCSB database to bind to barnase, lysozyme, and trypsin using a previously derived and validated algorithm. In an effort to probe the protein complexes in a realistic environment, all native and designer complexes were subjected to a total of nearly 400 ns of explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The MD data led to an unexpected observation: some of the designer complexes were highly unstable and decomposed during the trajectories. In contrast, the native and a number of designer complexes remained consistently stable. The unstable conformers provided us with a unique opportunity to define the structural and energetic factors that lead to unproductive protein–protein complexes. To that end we used free energy calculations following the MM-PBSA approach to determine the role of nonpolar effects, electrostatics and entropy in binding. Remarkably, we found that a majority of unstable complexes exhibited more favorable electrostatics than native or stable designer complexes, suggesting that favorable electrostatic interactions are not prerequisite for complex formation between proteins. However, nonpolar effects remained consistently more favorable in native and stable designer complexes reinforcing the importance of hydrophobic effects in protein–protein binding. While entropy systematically opposed binding in all cases, there was no observed trend in the entropy difference between native and designer complexes. A series of alanine scanning mutations of hot-spot residues at the interface of native and

  7. Multiscale modeling of dislocation-precipitate interactions in Fe: From molecular dynamics to discrete dislocations.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Arttu; Granberg, Fredric; Laurson, Lasse; Nordlund, Kai; Alava, Mikko J

    2016-01-01

    The stress-driven motion of dislocations in crystalline solids, and thus the ensuing plastic deformation process, is greatly influenced by the presence or absence of various pointlike defects such as precipitates or solute atoms. These defects act as obstacles for dislocation motion and hence affect the mechanical properties of the material. Here we combine molecular dynamics studies with three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to model the interaction between different kinds of precipitates and a 1/2〈111〉{110} edge dislocation in BCC iron. We have implemented immobile spherical precipitates into the ParaDis discrete dislocation dynamics code, with the dislocations interacting with the precipitates via a Gaussian potential, generating a normal force acting on the dislocation segments. The parameters used in the discrete dislocation dynamics simulations for the precipitate potential, the dislocation mobility, shear modulus, and dislocation core energy are obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. We compare the critical stresses needed to unpin the dislocation from the precipitate in molecular dynamics and discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to fit the two methods together and discuss the variety of the relevant pinning and depinning mechanisms. PMID:26871192

  8. An investigation of molecular dynamics simulation and molecular docking: interaction of citrus flavonoids and bovine β-lactoglobulin in focus.

    PubMed

    Sahihi, M; Ghayeb, Y

    2014-08-01

    Citrus flavonoids are natural compounds with important health benefits. The study of their interaction with a transport protein, such as bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG), at the atomic level could be a valuable factor to control their transport to biological sites. In the present study, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation methods were used to investigate the interaction of hesperetin, naringenin, nobiletin and tangeretin as citrus flavonoids and BLG as transport protein. The molecular docking results revealed that these flavonoids bind in the internal cavity of BLG and the BLG affinity for binding the flavonoids follows naringenin>hesperetin>tangeretin>nobiletin. The docking results also indicated that the BLG-flavonoid complexes are stabilized through hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bond interactions and π-π stacking interactions. The analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories showed that the root mean square deviation (RMSD) of various systems reaches equilibrium and fluctuates around the mean value at various times. Time evolution of the radius of gyration, total solvent accessible surface of the protein and the second structure of protein showed as well that BLG and BLG-flavonoid complexes were stable around 2500ps, and there was not any conformational change as for BLG-flavonoid complexes. Further, the profiles of atomic fluctuations indicated the rigidity of the ligand binding site during the simulation.

  9. Parallel implementation of three-dimensional molecular dynamic simulation for laser-cluster interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Holkundkar, Amol R.

    2013-11-15

    The objective of this article is to report the parallel implementation of the 3D molecular dynamic simulation code for laser-cluster interactions. The benchmarking of the code has been done by comparing the simulation results with some of the experiments reported in the literature. Scaling laws for the computational time is established by varying the number of processor cores and number of macroparticles used. The capabilities of the code are highlighted by implementing various diagnostic tools. To study the dynamics of the laser-cluster interactions, the executable version of the code is available from the author.

  10. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study on the Interactions between Carboxylate Ions and Metal Ions in Water.

    PubMed

    Mehandzhiyski, Aleksandar Y; Riccardi, Enrico; van Erp, Titus S; Trinh, Thuat T; Grimes, Brian A

    2015-08-20

    The interaction between a carboxylate anion (deprotonated propanoic acid) and the divalent Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+) metal ions is studied via ab initio molecular dynamics. The main focus of the study is the selectivity of the carboxylate-metal ion interaction in aqueous solution. The interaction is modeled by explicitly accounting for the solvent molecules on a DFT level. The hydration energies of the metal ions along with their diffusion and mobility coefficients are determined and a trend correlated with their ionic radius is found. Subsequently, a series of 16 constrained molecular dynamics simulations for every ion is performed, and the interaction free energy is obtained from thermodynamic integration of the forces between the metal ion and the carboxylate ion. The results indicate that the magnesium ion interacts most strongly with the carboxylate, followed by calcium, strontium, and barium. Because the interaction free energy is not enough to explain the selectivity of the reaction observed experimentally, more detailed analysis is performed on the simulation trajectories to understand the steric changes in the reaction complex during dissociation. The solvent dynamics appear to play an important role during the dissociation of the complex and also in the observed selectivity behavior of the divalent ions.

  11. Molecular mechanics and dynamics studies on the interaction of gallic acid with collagen-like peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhan, B.; Thanikaivelan, P.; Subramanian, V.; Raghava Rao, J.; Unni Nair, Balachandran; Ramasami, T.

    2001-10-01

    Molecular modelling approaches have been used to understand the interaction of collagen-like peptides with gallic acid, which mimic vegetable tanning processes involved in protein stabilization. Several interaction sites have been identified and the binding energies of the complexes have been calculated. The calculated binding energies for various geometries are in the range 6-13 kcal/mol. It is found that some complexes exhibit hydrogen bonding, and electrostatic interaction plays a dominant role in the stabilization of the peptide by gallic acid. The π-OH type of interaction is also observed in the peptide stabilization. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for 600 ps revealed the possibility of hydrogen bonding between the collagen-like peptide and gallic acid.

  12. Interaction sorting method for molecular dynamics on multi-core SIMD CPU architecture.

    PubMed

    Matvienko, Sergey; Alemasov, Nikolay; Fomin, Eduard

    2015-02-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) is widely used in computational biology for studying binding mechanisms of molecules, molecular transport, conformational transitions, protein folding, etc. The method is computationally expensive; thus, the demand for the development of novel, much more efficient algorithms is still high. Therefore, the new algorithm designed in 2007 and called interaction sorting (IS) clearly attracted interest, as it outperformed the most efficient MD algorithms. In this work, a new IS modification is proposed which allows the algorithm to utilize SIMD processor instructions. This paper shows that the improvement provides an additional gain in performance, 9% to 45% in comparison to the original IS method.

  13. Characterization of the Interaction between Gallic Acid and Lysozyme by Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Optical Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Minzhong; Guo, Ming; Jiang, Yanke; Wang, Xiaomeng

    2015-07-01

    The binding interaction between gallic acid (GA) and lysozyme (LYS) was investigated and compared by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and spectral techniques. The results from spectroscopy indicate that GA binds to LYS to generate a static complex. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. MD simulation revealed that the main driving forces for GA binding to LYS are hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. The root-mean-square deviation verified that GA and LYS bind to form a stable complex, while the root-mean-square fluctuation results showed that the stability of the GA-LYS complex at 298 K was higher than that at 310 K. The calculated free binding energies from the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method showed that van der Waals forces and electrostatic interactions are the predominant intermolecular forces. The MD simulation was consistent with the spectral experiments. This study provides a reference for future study of the pharmacological mechanism of GA.

  14. Interactions between Ether Phospholipids and Cholesterol as Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Heberle, Frederick A; Mostofian, Barmak; Kucerka, Norbert; Drazba, Paul; Katsaras, John

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol and ether lipids are ubiquitous in mammalian cell membranes, and their interactions are crucial in ether lipid mediated cholesterol trafficking. We report on cholesterol s molecular interactions with ether lipids as determined using a combination of small-angle neutron and Xray scattering, and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A scattering density profile model for an ether lipid bilayer was developed using MD simulations, which was then used to simultaneously fit the different experimental scattering data. From analysis of the data the various bilayer structural parameters were obtained. Surface area constrained MD simulations were also performed to reproduce the experimental data. This iterative analysis approach resulted in good agreement between the experimental and simulated form factors. The molecular interactions taking place between cholesterol and ether lipids were then determined from the validated MD simulations. We found that in ether membranes cholesterol primarily hydrogen bonds with the lipid headgroup phosphate oxygen, while in their ester membrane counterparts cholesterol hydrogen bonds with the backbone ester carbonyls. This different mode of interaction between ether lipids and cholesterol induces cholesterol to reside closer to the bilayer surface, dehydrating the headgroup s phosphate moiety. Moreover, the three-dimensional lipid chain spatial density distribution around cholesterol indicates anisotropic chain packing, causing cholesterol to tilt. These insights lend a better understanding of ether lipid-mediated cholesterol trafficking and the roles that the different lipid species have in determining the structural and dynamical properties of membrane associated biomolecules.

  15. Phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron: A combined molecular and spin dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N; Landau, David P; Nicholson, Don M; Stocks, George Malcolm; Eisenbach, Markus; Yin, Junqi; Brown, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Combining an atomistic many-body potential with a classical spin Hamiltonian pa- rameterized by first principles calculations, molecular-spin dynamics computer sim- ulations were performed to investigate phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron. Results obtained for spin-spin and density-density dynamic structure factors show that noticeable softening and damping of magnon modes occur due to the presence of lattice vibrations. Furthermore, as a result of the phonon-magnon coupling, addi- tional longitudinal spin wave excitations are observed, with the same frequencies as the longitudinal phonon modes.

  16. Phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron: A combined molecular and spin dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Dilina Landau, David P.; Nicholson, Don M.; Malcolm Stocks, G.; Eisenbach, Markus; Yin, Junqi; Brown, Gregory

    2014-05-07

    Combining an atomistic many-body potential with a classical spin Hamiltonian parameterized by first principles calculations, molecular-spin dynamics computer simulations were performed to investigate phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron. Results obtained for spin-spin and density-density dynamic structure factors show that noticeable softening and damping of magnon modes occur due to the presence of lattice vibrations. Furthermore, as a result of the phonon-magnon coupling, additional longitudinal spin wave excitations are observed, with the same frequencies as the longitudinal phonon modes.

  17. Interactions of lipids and detergents with a viral ion channel protein: molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Sarah L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-01-22

    Structural studies of membrane proteins have highlighted the likely influence of membrane mimetic environments (i.e., lipid bilayers versus detergent micelles) on the conformation and dynamics of small α-helical membrane proteins. We have used molecular dynamics simulations to compare the conformational dynamics of BM2 (a small α-helical protein from the membrane of influenza B) in a model phospholipid bilayer environment with its behavior in protein-detergent complexes with either the zwitterionic detergent dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) or the nonionic detergent dodecylmaltoside (DDM). We find that DDM more closely resembles the lipid bilayer in terms of its interaction with the protein, while the short-tailed DHPC molecule forms "nonphysiological" interactions with the protein termini. We find that the intrinsic micelle properties of each detergent are conserved upon formation of the protein-detergent complex. This implies that simulations of detergent micelles may be used to help select optimal conditions for experimental studies of membrane proteins.

  18. NMR and molecular dynamics studies of the interaction of melatonin with calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Adrián G.; Estrin, Darío A.; Rosenstein, Ruth E.; McCormick, John E.; Martin, Stephen R.; Pastore, Annalisa; Biekofsky, Rodolfo R.; Martorana, Vincenzo

    2004-01-01

    Pineal hormone melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is thought to modulate the calcium/calmodulin signaling pathway either by changing intracellular Ca2+ concentration via activation of its G-protein–coupled membrane receptors, or through a direct interaction with calmodulin (CaM). The present work studies the direct interaction of melatonin with intact calcium-saturated CaM both experimentally, by fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and theoretically, by molecular dynamics simulations. The analysis of the experimental data shows that the interaction is calcium-dependent. The affinity, as obtained from monitoring 15N and 1H chemical shift changes for a melatonin titration, is weak (in the millimolar range) and comparable for the N- and C-terminal domains. Partial replacement of diamagnetic Ca2+ by paramagnetic Tb3+ allowed the measurement of interdomain NMR pseudocontact shifts and residual dipolar couplings, indicating that each domain movement in the complex is not correlated with the other one. Molecular dynamics simulations allow us to follow the dynamics of melatonin in the binding pocket of CaM. Overall, this study provides an example of how a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches can shed light on a weakly interacting system of biological and pharmacological significance. PMID:15498938

  19. A molecular dynamics study on the interaction between epoxy and functionalized graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melro, L. S.; Pyrz, R.; Jensen, L. R.

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between graphene and epoxy resin was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The interfacial shear strength and pull out force were calculated for functionalised graphene layers (carboxyl, carbonyl, and hydroxyl) and epoxy composites interfaces. The influence of functional groups, as well as their distribution and coverage density on the graphene sheets were also analysed through the determination of the Young's modulus. Functionalisation proved to be detrimental to the mechanical properties, nonetheless according to interfacial studies the interaction between graphene and epoxy resin increases.

  20. Molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry studies of the interactions in polymer matrix nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James Sherwood

    A combination of computational chemistry and molecular dynamics (MD) approaches was used to study two polymer-nanoparticle composite (PNPC) systems, first a model bead spring polymer with spherical nanoparticles and generalized interactions, and second, a Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-silica system with accurate quantum chemistry (QC) based force fields. The following molecular processes, which are fundamental to the reinforcement of polymer-nanoparticle composites (PNPC), were studied: (1) the effect of nanoparticle-polymer interactions and polymer molecular weight on nanoparticle dispersion and distribution, (2) the free energy and conformational changes when stretching individual PDMS chains in a melt, and (3) the effect of silica fillers with different surface modifications on the properties of PDMS chains at the interface. In the model PNPC consisting of spherical nanoparticles in a bead-spring polymer melt, it was found that when the polymer-nanoparticle interactions were relatively weak the polymer matrix promoted nanoparticle aggregation. Increasingly attractive nanoparticle-polymer interactions led to strong adsorption of the polymer chains on the surface of the nanoparticles and promoted dispersion of the nanoparticles and were independent of polymer molecular weight. A classical force field for PDMS and its oligomers has been derived on the basis of intermolecular binding energies, molecular geometries, molecular electrostatic potentials, and conformational energies obtained from quantum chemistry calculations and in MD simulations and it accurately reproduces the properties of PDMS melts of various molecular weights. MD simulations using umbrella sampling methods to sample the free energy of stretching a PDMS oligomer in a melt of PDMS oligomers found that the restoring forces were mainly a result of the changes in entropy of the chain as the chain was contracted or stretched, and only at severe extensions did energetic contributions due to deformation

  1. PLUMED-GUI: An environment for the interactive development of molecular dynamics analysis and biasing scripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgino, Toni

    2014-03-01

    PLUMED-GUI is an interactive environment to develop and test complex PLUMED scripts within the Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD) environment. Computational biophysicists can take advantage of both PLUMED’s rich syntax to define collective variables (CVs) and VMD’s chemically-aware atom selection language, while working within a natural point-and-click interface. Pre-defined templates and syntax mnemonics facilitate the definition of well-known reaction coordinates. Complex CVs, e.g. involving reference snapshots used for RMSD or native contacts calculations, can be built through dialogs that provide a synoptic view of the available options. Scripts can be either exported for use in simulation programs, or evaluated on the currently loaded molecular trajectories. Script development takes place without leaving VMD, thus enabling an incremental try-see-modify development model for molecular metrics.

  2. Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Beta-Amyloid Interactions with Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liming; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kelvin

    2012-10-01

    Early events of human beta-amyloid protein interactions with cholesterol-containing membranes are critical to understanding the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to exploring new therapeutic interventions of AD. Atomistic molecular dynamics (AMD) simulations have been extensively used to study the protein-lipid interaction at high atomic resolutions. However, traditional MD simulations are not efficient in sampling the phase space of complex lipid/protein systems with rugged free energy landscapes. Meanwhile, coarse-grained MD (CGD) simulations are efficient in the phase space sampling but suffered from low spatial resolutions and from the fact that the energy landscapes are not identical to those of the AMD. Here, a multiscale approach was employed to simulate the protein-lipid interactions of beta-amyloid upon its release from proteolysis residing in the neuronal membranes. We utilized a forward (AMD to CGD) and reverse (CGD-AMD) strategy to explore new transmembrane and surface protein configuration and evaluate the stabilization mechanisms by measuring the residue-specific protein-lipid or protein conformations. The detailed molecular interactions revealed in this multiscale MD approach will provide new insights into understanding the early molecular events leading to the pathogenesis of AD.

  3. Molecular dynamics of spermine-DNA interactions: sequence specificity and DNA bending for a simple ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Feuerstein, B G; Pattabiraman, N; Marton, L J

    1989-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to model interactions between the physiologically important polyamine spermine and two B-DNA oligomers, the homopolymer (dG)10-(dC)10 and the heteropolymer (dGdC)5-(dGdC)5. Water and counterions were included in the simulation. Starting coordinates for spermine-DNA complexes were structures obtained by molecular mechanics modeling of spermine with the two oligomers; in these models, spermine binding induced a bend in the heteropolymer but not in the homopolymer. During approximately 40 psec of molecular dynamics simulation, spermine moves away from the floor of the major groove and interacts nospecifically with d(G)10-d(C)10. In contrast, a spermine-induced bend in the helix of (dGdC)5-(dGdC)5 is maintained throughout the simulation and spermine remains closely associated with the major groove. These results provide further evidence that the binding of spermine to nucleic acids can be sequence specific and that bending of alternating purine-pyrimidine sequences may be a physiologically important result of spermine binding. PMID:2780313

  4. Interaction of Tenebrio Molitor Antifreeze Protein with Ice Crystal: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Ramya, L; Ramakrishnan, Vigneshwar

    2016-07-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) observed in cold-adapting organisms bind to ice crystals and prevent further ice growth. However, the molecular mechanism of AFP-ice binding and AFP-inhibited ice growth remains unclear. Here we report the interaction of the insect antifreeze protein (Tenebrio molitor, TmAFP) with ice crystal by molecular dynamics simulation studies. Two sets of simulations were carried out at 263 K by placing the protein near the primary prism plane (PP) and basal plane (BL) of the ice crystal. To delineate the effect of temperatures, both the PP and BL simulations were carried out at 253 K as well. The analyses revealed that the protein interacts strongly with the ice crystal in BL simulation than in PP simulation both at 263 K and 253 K. Further, it was observed that the interactions are primarily mediated through the interface waters. We also observed that as the temperature decreases, the interaction between the protein and the ice increases which can be attributed to the decreased flexibility and the increased structuring of the protein at low temperature. In essence, our study has shed light on the interaction mechanism between the TmAFP antifreeze protein and the ice crystal. PMID:27492241

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation for ligand-receptor studies. Carbohydrates interactions in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Grigera, J Raul

    2002-01-01

    The review deals with the problem of the study of ligand-receptor interactions and the use of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation to approach such a problem. After a short review of the fundamentals of MD we describe the medium in which all biology takes place, water. Emphasis is put on the water models appropriate for simulation of macromolecular systems explicitly including the water molecules. We consider the quality of the water model both in terms of simplicity and performance to describe the liquid water properties. Heavy water, although not a biologically viable medium, is considered since many experiments make use of it as a solvent. Sweetness of carbohydrates is considered as an example of the procedure suitable to characterize active sites on the ligands. Consideration is given to the computation of the binding constants through molecular dynamics. The computation of the Free Energy is described and illustrated. The potentiality of MD for studies of ligand-receptor interactions is limited by the computer resources, for even with large computing facilities the need of relatively long simulation times severely restricts the study of large systems. A method is described in which several shells are treated at different levels of approximation, form mechanical response and mean electrical field to quantum mechanics, through stochastic dynamics and atomic classical MD. The review closes with a brief account of the perspectives of the method.

  6. Molecular dynamic and docking interaction study of Heterodera glycines serine proteinase with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Prasad, C V S Siva; Gupta, Saurabh; Gaponenko, Alex; Tiwari, Murlidhar

    2013-08-01

    Many plants do produce various defense proteins like proteinase inhibitors (PIs) to protect them against various pests. PIs function as pseudosubstrates of digestive proteinase, which inhibits proteolysis in pests and leads to amino acid deficiency-based mortality. This work reports the structural interaction studies of serine proteinase of Heterodera glycines (SPHG) with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor (VMPI). 3D protein structure modeling, validation of SPHG and VMPI, and their putative protein-protein binding sites were predicted. Protein-protein docking followed by molecular dynamic simulation was performed to find the reliable confirmation of SPHG-VMPI complex. Trajectory analysis of each successive conformation concludes better interaction of first loop in comparison with second loop. Lysine residues of first loop were actively participating in complex formation. Overall, this study discloses the structural aspects and interaction mechanisms of VMPI with SPHG, and it would be helpful in the development of pest-resistant genetically modified crops.

  7. Building KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel models and probing their interactions by molecular-dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu; Wang, Yuhong; Meng, Xuan-Yu; Zhang, Mei; Jiang, Min; Cui, Meng; Tseng, Gea-Ny

    2013-12-01

    The slow delayed rectifier (I(KS)) channel is composed of KCNQ1 (pore-forming) and KCNE1 (auxiliary) subunits, and functions as a repolarization reserve in the human heart. Design of I(KS)-targeting anti-arrhythmic drugs requires detailed three-dimensional structures of the KCNQ1/KCNE1 complex, a task made possible by Kv channel crystal structures (templates for KCNQ1 homology-modeling) and KCNE1 NMR structures. Our goal was to build KCNQ1/KCNE1 models and extract mechanistic information about their interactions by molecular-dynamics simulations in an explicit lipid/solvent environment. We validated our models by confirming two sets of model-generated predictions that were independent from the spatial restraints used in model-building. Detailed analysis of the molecular-dynamics trajectories revealed previously unrecognized KCNQ1/KCNE1 interactions, whose relevance in I(KS) channel function was confirmed by voltage-clamp experiments. Our models and analyses suggest three mechanisms by which KCNE1 slows KCNQ1 activation: by promoting S6 bending at the Pro hinge that closes the activation gate; by promoting a downward movement of gating charge on S4; and by establishing a network of electrostatic interactions with KCNQ1 on the extracellular surface that stabilizes the channel in a pre-open activated state. Our data also suggest how KCNE1 may affect the KCNQ1 pore conductance.

  8. Molecular dynamics study of biodegradation of azo dyes via their interactions with AzrC azoreductase.

    PubMed

    Haghshenas, Hamed; Kay, Maryam; Dehghanian, Fariba; Tavakol, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Azo dyes are one of the most important class of dyes, which have been widely used in industries. Because of the environmental pollution of azo dyes, many studies have been performed to study their biodegradation using bacterial systems. In present work, the AzrC of mesophilic gram-positive Bacillus sp. B29 has been considered to study its interaction with five common azo dyes (orange G, acid red 88, Sudan I, orange I, and methyl red). The molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to study the interaction between AzrC and azo dyes. The trajectory was confirmed using root mean square deviation and the root mean square fluctuation analyses. Then, the hydrogen bond and alanine scanning analyses were performed to reveal active site residues. Phe105 (A), Phe125 (B), Phe172 (B), and Pro132 (B) have been found as the most important hydrophobic residues whereas Asn104 (A), Tyr127 (B), and Asn187 (A) have key role in making hydrogen bond. The results of molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area and molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area calculations proved that the hydrophobic azo dyes like Acid red 88 binds more tightly to the AzrC protein. The calculated data suggested MR A 121 (B) I as a potential candidate for improving the AzrC-MR interactions.

  9. How does the molecular linker in dynamic force spectroscopy affect probing molecular interactions at the single-molecule level?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taninaka, Atsushi; Aizawa, Kota; Hanyu, Tatsuya; Hirano, Yuuichi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) based on atomic force microscopy, which enables us to obtain information on the interaction potential between molecules such as antigen-antibody complexes at the single-molecule level, is a key technique for advancing molecular science and technology. However, to ensure the reliability of DFS measurement, its basic mechanism must be well understood. We examined the effect of the molecular linker used to fix the target molecule to the atomic force microscope cantilever, i.e., the force direction during measurement, for the first time, which has not been discussed until now despite its importance. The effect on the lifetime and barrier position, which can be obtained by DFS, was found to be ˜10 and ˜50%, respectively, confirming the high potential of DFS.

  10. How does the molecular linker in dynamic force spectroscopy affect probing molecular interactions at the single-molecule level?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taninaka, Atsushi; Aizawa, Kota; Hanyu, Tatsuya; Hirano, Yuuichi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) based on atomic force microscopy, which enables us to obtain information on the interaction potential between molecules such as antigen–antibody complexes at the single-molecule level, is a key technique for advancing molecular science and technology. However, to ensure the reliability of DFS measurement, its basic mechanism must be well understood. We examined the effect of the molecular linker used to fix the target molecule to the atomic force microscope cantilever, i.e., the force direction during measurement, for the first time, which has not been discussed until now despite its importance. The effect on the lifetime and barrier position, which can be obtained by DFS, was found to be ∼10 and ∼50%, respectively, confirming the high potential of DFS.

  11. Exploring the inter-molecular interactions in amyloid-β protofibril with molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area free energy calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Liu, Zhen; Bai, Shu; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2012-04-01

    Aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides correlates with the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. However, the inter-molecular interactions between Aβ protofibril remain elusive. Herein, molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area analysis based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations was performed to study the inter-molecular interactions in Aβ17-42 protofibril. It is found that the nonpolar interactions are the important forces to stabilize the Aβ17-42 protofibril, while electrostatic interactions play a minor role. Through free energy decomposition, 18 residues of the Aβ17-42 are identified to provide interaction energy lower than -2.5 kcal/mol. The nonpolar interactions are mainly provided by the main chain of the peptide and the side chains of nine hydrophobic residues (Leu17, Phe19, Phe20, Leu32, Leu34, Met35, Val36, Val40, and Ile41). However, the electrostatic interactions are mainly supplied by the main chains of six hydrophobic residues (Phe19, Phe20, Val24, Met35, Val36, and Val40) and the side chains of the charged residues (Glu22, Asp23, and Lys28). In the electrostatic interactions, the overwhelming majority of hydrogen bonds involve the main chains of Aβ as well as the guanidinium group of the charged side chain of Lys28. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of the inter-molecular interactions between Aβ monomers in Aβ17-42 protofibril, and the findings are considered critical for exploring effective agents for the inhibition of Aβ aggregation.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of the interactions between EHD1 EH domain and multiple peptides* #

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hua; Wang, Mao-Jun; Xuan, Nan-Xia; Shang, Zhi-Cai; Wu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To provide essential information for peptide inhibitor design, the interactions of Eps15 homology domain of Eps15 homology domain-containing protein 1 (EHD1 EH domain) with three peptides containing NPF (asparagine-proline-phenylalanine), DPF (aspartic acid-proline-phenylalanine), and GPF (glycine-proline-phenylalanine) motifs were deciphered at the atomic level. The binding affinities and the underlying structure basis were investigated. Methods: Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on EHD1 EH domain/peptide complexes for 60 ns using the GROMACS package. The binding free energies were calculated and decomposed by molecular mechanics/generalized Born surface area (MM/GBSA) method using the AMBER package. The alanine scanning was performed to evaluate the binding hot spot residues using FoldX software. Results: The different binding affinities for the three peptides were affected dominantly by van der Waals interactions. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds provide the structural basis of contributions of van der Waals interactions of the flanking residues to the binding. Conclusions: van der Waals interactions should be the main consideration when we design peptide inhibitors of EHD1 EH domain with high affinities. The ability to form intermolecular hydrogen bonds with protein residues can be used as the factor for choosing the flanking residues. PMID:26465136

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of a Pulmonary Surfactant Film Interacting with a Carbonaceous Nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Seungho; Chang, Rakwoo; Jeon, Jonggu; Violi, Angela

    2008-01-01

    This article reports an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation to study a model pulmonary surfactant film interacting with a carbonaceous nanoparticle. The pulmonary surfactant is modeled as a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayer with a peptide consisting of the first 25 residues from surfactant protein B. The nanoparticle model with a chemical formula C188H53 was generated using a computational code for combustion conditions. The nanoparticle has a carbon cage structure reminiscent of the buckyballs with open ends. A series of molecular-scale structural and dynamical properties of the surfactant film in the absence and presence of nanoparticle are analyzed, including radial distribution functions, mean-square displacements of lipids and nanoparticle, chain tilt angle, and the surfactant protein B peptide helix tilt angle. The results show that the nanoparticle affects the structure and packing of the lipids and peptide in the film, and it appears that the nanoparticle and peptide repel each other. The ability of the nanoparticle to translocate the surfactant film is one of the most important predictions of this study. The potential of mean force for dragging the particle through the film provides such information. The reported potential of mean force suggests that the nanoparticle can easily penetrate the monolayer but further translocation to the water phase is energetically prohibitive. The implication is that nanoparticles can interact with the lung surfactant, as supported by recent experimental data by Bakshi et al. PMID:18923102

  14. Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Study of Dimerization in Prion Protein: Multiple Modes of Interaction and Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Chamachi, Neharika G; Chakrabarty, Suman

    2016-08-01

    The pathological forms of prions are known to be a result of misfolding, oligomerization, and aggregation of the cellular prion. While the mechanism of misfolding and aggregation in prions has been widely studied using both experimental and computational tools, the structural and energetic characterization of the dimer form have not garnered as much attention. On one hand dimerization can be the first step toward a nucleation-like pathway to aggregation, whereas on the other hand it may also increase the conformational stability preventing self-aggregation. In this work, we have used extensive all-atom replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of both monomer and dimer forms of a mouse prion protein to understand the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic stability of dimeric prion as compared to the monomeric form. We show that prion proteins can dimerize spontaneously being stabilized by hydrophobic interactions as well as intermolecular hydrogen bonding and salt bridge formation. We have computed the conformational free energy landscapes for both monomer and dimer forms to compare the thermodynamic stability and misfolding pathways. We observe large conformational heterogeneity among the various modes of interactions between the monomers and the strong intermolecular interactions may lead to as high as 20% β-content. The hydrophobic regions in helix-2, surrounding coil regions, terminal regions along with the natively present β-sheet region appear to actively participate in prion-prion intermolecular interactions. Dimerization seems to considerably suppress the inherent dynamic instability observed in monomeric prions, particularly because the regions of structural frustration constitute the dimer interface. Further, we demonstrate an interesting reversible coupling between the Q160-G131 interaction (which leads to inhibition of β-sheet extension) and the G131-V161 H-bond formation. PMID:27390876

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation for interlayer interactions of graphene nanoribbons with multiple layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazemnezhad, Reza; Zare, Mojtaba; Hosseini-Hashemi, Shahrokh; Shokrollahi, Hassan

    2016-10-01

    A new study is conducted with the aid of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to investigate the effect of shear modulus value of the interlayer van der Waals (vdWs) interactions on free vibration of cantilever multi-layer graphene nanoribbons (MLGNRs). The corresponding calibrated nonlocal parameters of the nonlocal model are obtained accordingly. The vdWs interactions are treated as the cores between every two adjacent graphene layers and their equivalent shear modulus is calculated using MD simulation. The obtained resonant frequencies via the nonlocal sandwich model are compared to the MD simulation results to calibrate the nonlocal parameter. Results reveal a strong conclusion that the calibrated nonlocal parameter is dependent on the values of interlayer shear modulus.

  16. Heme prevents amyloid beta peptide aggregation through hydrophobic interaction based on molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li Na; Mu, Yuguang; Chew, Lock Yue

    2013-09-01

    Heme, which is abundant in hemoglobin and many other hemoproteins, is known to play an important role in electron transfer, oxygen transport, regulation of gene expression, and many other biological functions. With the belief that the aggregation of Aβ peptides forming higher order oligomers is one of the central pathological pathways in Alzheimer's disease, the formation of the Aβ-heme complex is essential as it inhibits Aβ aggregation and protects the neurons from degradation. In our studies, conventional molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the 1 Aβ + 1 heme and 2 Aβ + 4 hemes system, respectively, with the identification of several dominant binding motifs. We found that hydrophobic residues of the Aβ peptide have a high affinity to interact with heme instead of the histidine residue. We conclude that hydrophobic interaction plays a dominant role in the Aβ-heme complex formation which indirectly serves to physically prevent Aβ aggregation.

  17. Prediction of drug-packaging interactions via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, Peter; Brunsteiner, Michael; Khinast, Johannes

    2012-07-15

    The interaction between packaging materials and drug products is an important issue for the pharmaceutical industry, since during manufacturing, processing and storage a drug product is continuously exposed to various packaging materials. The experimental investigation of a great variety of different packaging material-drug product combinations in terms of efficacy and safety can be a costly and time-consuming task. In our work we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in order to evaluate the applicability of such methods to pre-screening of the packaging material-solute compatibility. The solvation free energy and the free energy of adsorption of diverse solute/solvent/solid systems were estimated. The results of our simulations agree with experimental values previously published in the literature, which indicates that the methods in question can be used to semi-quantitatively reproduce the solid-liquid interactions of the investigated systems.

  18. Interactions of Borneol with DPPC Phospholipid Membranes: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Qianqian; Shi, Xinyuan; Ding, Haiou; Dai, Xingxing; Wan, Guang; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2014-01-01

    Borneol, known as a “guide” drug in traditional Chinese medicine, is widely used as a natural penetration enhancer in modern clinical applications. Despite a large number of experimental studies on borneol’s penetration enhancing effect, the molecular basis of its action on bio-membranes is still unclear. We carried out a series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the borneol concentration ranging from 3.31% to 54.59% (v/v, lipid-free basis) to study the interactions of borneol with aDPPC(1,2-dipalmitoylsn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) bilayer membrane, and the temperature effects were also considered. At concentrations below 21.89%, borneol’s presence only caused DPPC bilayer thinning and an increase in fluidity; A rise in temperature could promote the diffusing progress of borneol. When the concentration was 21.89% or above, inverted micelle-like structures were formed within the bilayer interior, which led to increased bilayer thickness, and an optimum temperature was found for the interaction of borneol with the DPPC bilayer membrane. These findings revealed that the choice of optimal concentration and temperature is critical for a given application in which borneol is used as a penetration enhancer. Our results not only clarify some molecular basis for borneol’s penetration enhancing effects, but also provide some guidance for the development and applications of new preparations containing borneol. PMID:25383679

  19. Interactions of borneol with DPPC phospholipid membranes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qianqian; Shi, Xinyuan; Ding, Haiou; Dai, Xingxing; Wan, Guang; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2014-11-06

    Borneol, known as a "guide" drug in traditional Chinese medicine, is widely used as a natural penetration enhancer in modern clinical applications. Despite a large number of experimental studies on borneol's penetration enhancing effect, the molecular basis of its action on bio-membranes is still unclear. We carried out a series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the borneol concentration ranging from 3.31% to 54.59% (v/v, lipid-free basis) to study the interactions of borneol with aDPPC(1,2-dipalmitoylsn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) bilayer membrane, and the temperature effects were also considered. At concentrations below 21.89%, borneol's presence only caused DPPC bilayer thinning and an increase in fluidity; A rise in temperature could promote the diffusing progress of borneol. When the concentration was 21.89% or above, inverted micelle-like structures were formed within the bilayer interior, which led to increased bilayer thickness, and an optimum temperature was found for the interaction of borneol with the DPPC bilayer membrane. These findings revealed that the choice of optimal concentration and temperature is critical for a given application in which borneol is used as a penetration enhancer. Our results not only clarify some molecular basis for borneol's penetration enhancing effects, but also provide some guidance for the development and applications of new preparations containing borneol.

  20. Sodium ion interactions with aqueous glucose: insights from quantum mechanics, molecular dynamics, and experiment.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Heather B; Tian, Jianhui; Nolte, Michael W; Shanks, Brent H; Beckham, Gregg T; Gnanakaran, S; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2014-02-27

    In the last several decades, significant efforts have been conducted to understand the fundamental reactivity of glucose derived from plant biomass in various chemical environments for conversion to renewable fuels and chemicals. For reactions of glucose in water, it is known that inorganic salts naturally present in biomass alter the product distribution in various deconstruction processes. However, the molecular-level interactions of alkali metal ions and glucose are unknown. These interactions are of physiological interest as well, for example, as they relate to cation-glucose cotransport. Here, we employ quantum mechanics (QM) to understand the interaction of a prevalent alkali metal, sodium, with glucose from a structural and thermodynamic perspective. The effect on β-glucose is subtle: a sodium ion perturbs bond lengths and atomic partial charges less than rotating a hydroxymethyl group. In contrast, the presence of a sodium ion significantly perturbs the partial charges of α-glucose anomeric and ring oxygens. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide dynamic sampling in explicit water, and both the QM and the MD results show that sodium ions associate at many positions with respect to glucose with reasonably equivalent propensity. This promiscuous binding nature of Na(+) suggests that computational studies of glucose reactions in the presence of inorganic salts need to ensure thorough sampling of the cation positions, in addition to sampling glucose rotamers. The effect of NaCl on the relative populations of the anomers is experimentally quantified with light polarimetry. These results support the computational findings that Na(+) interacts similarly with α- and β-glucose. PMID:24308866

  1. Interaction between brush layers of bottle-brush polyelectrolytes: molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Russano, Daniel; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y; Dobrynin, Andrey V

    2011-09-01

    Interactions between tethered layers composed of aggrecan (charged bottle-brush) macromolecules are responsible for the molecular origin of cartilage biomechanical behavior. To elucidate the role of the electrostatic forces in interaction between bottle-brush layers, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of charged and neutral bottle-brush macromolecules tethered to substrates. In the case of charged bottle-brush layers, the disjoining pressure P between two brush layers in salt-free solutions increases with decreasing distance D between substrates as P ∝ D(-1.8). A stronger dependence of the disjoining pressure P on the surface separation D was observed for neutral bottle-brushes, P ∝ D(-4.6), in the same interval of disjoining pressures. These scaling laws for dependence of disjoining pressure P on distance D are due to bending energy of the bottle-brush macromolecules within compressed brush layers. The weaker distance dependence observed in polyelectrolyte bottle-brushes is due to interaction between counterion clouds surrounding the bottle-brush macromolecules preventing strong brush overlap.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of interfacial interactions between small nanoparticles during diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jing; Liu, Dongmei; Yang, Xiaonan; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Haixing; Tang, Huan; Cui, Fuyi

    2015-12-01

    Due to the limitations of experimental methods at the atomic level, research on the aggregation of small nanoparticles (D < 5 nm) in aqueous solutions is quite rare. The aggregation of small nanoparticles in aqueous solutions is very different than that of normal sized nanoparticles. The interfacial interactions play a dominant role in the aggregation of small nanoparticles. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations, which can explore the microscopic behavior of nanoparticles during the diffusion-limited aggregation at an atomic level, were employed to reveal the aggregation mechanism of small nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. First, the aggregation processes and aggregate structure were depicted. Second, the particle-particle interaction and surface diffusion of nanoparticles during aggregation were investigated. Third, the water-mediated interactions during aggregation were ascertained. The results indicate that the aggregation of nanoparticle in aqueous solutions is affected by particle size. The strong particle-particle interaction and high surface diffusion result in the formation of particle-particle bonds of 2 nm TiO2 nanoparticles, and the water-mediated interaction plays an important role in the aggregation process of 3 and 4 nm TiO2 nanoparticles.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of amorphous indomethacin-poly(vinylpyrrolidone) glasses: solubility and hydrogen bonding interactions.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tian-Xiang; Anderson, Bradley D

    2013-03-01

    Amorphous drug dispersions are frequently employed to enhance solubility and dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs and thereby increase their oral bioavailability. Because these systems are metastable, phase separation of the amorphous components and subsequent drug crystallization may occur during storage. Computational methods to determine the likelihood of these events would be very valuable, if their reliability could be validated. This study investigates amorphous systems of indomethacin (IMC) in poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and their molecular interactions by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. IMC and PVP molecules were constructed using X-ray diffraction data, and force-field parameters were assigned by analogy with similar groups in Amber-ff03. Five assemblies varying in PVP and IMC composition were equilibrated in their molten states then cooled at a rate of 0.03 K/ps to generate amorphous glasses. Prolonged aging dynamic runs (100 ns) at 298 K and 1 bar were then carried out, from which solubility parameters, the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter, and associated hydrogen bonding properties were obtained. Calculated glass transition temperature (T(g)) values were higher than experimental results because of the faster cooling rates in MD simulations. Molecular mobility as characterized by atomic fluctuations was substantially reduced below the T(g) with IMC-PVP systems exhibiting lower mobilities than that found in amorphous IMC, consistent with the antiplasticizing effect of PVP. The number of IMC-IMC hydrogen bonds (HBs) formed per IMC molecule was substantially lower in IMC-PVP mixtures, particularly the fractions of IMC molecules involved in two or three HBs with other IMC molecules that may be potential precursors for crystal growth. The loss of HBs between IMC molecules in the presence of PVP was largely compensated for by the formation of IMC-PVP HBs. The difference (6.5 MPa(1/2)) between the solubility parameters in amorphous IMC

  4. Deciphering the GPER/GPR30-agonist and antagonists interactions using molecular modeling studies, molecular dynamics, and docking simulations.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Luna, D; Martínez-Archundia, M; Maroun, Rachid C; Ceballos-Reyes, G; Fragoso-Vázquez, M J; González-Juárez, D E; Correa-Basurto, J

    2015-01-01

    The G-protein coupled estrogen receptor 1 GPER/GPR30 is a transmembrane seven-helix (7TM) receptor involved in the growth and proliferation of breast cancer. Due to the absence of a crystal structure of GPER/GPR30, in this work, molecular modeling studies have been carried out to build a three-dimensional structure, which was subsequently refined by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (up to 120 ns). Furthermore, we explored GPER/GPR30's molecular recognition properties by using reported agonist ligands (G1, estradiol (E2), tamoxifen, and fulvestrant) and the antagonist ligands (G15 and G36) in subsequent docking studies. Our results identified the E2 binding site on GPER/GPR30, as well as other receptor cavities for accepting large volume ligands, through GPER/GPR30 π-π, hydrophobic, and hydrogen bond interactions. Snapshots of the MD trajectory at 14 and 70 ns showed almost identical binding motifs for G1 and G15. It was also observed that C107 interacts with the acetyl oxygen of G1 (at 14 ns) and that at 70 ns the residue E275 interacts with the acetyl group and with the oxygen from the other agonist whereas the isopropyl group of G36 is oriented toward Met141, suggesting that both C107 and E275 could be involved in the protein activation. This contribution suggest that GPER1 has great structural changes which explain its great capacity to accept diverse ligands, and also, the same ligand could be recognized in different binding pose according to GPER structural conformations.

  5. Capsaicin interaction with TRPV1 channels in a lipid bilayer: molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sonya M; Newstead, Simon; Swartz, Kenton J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-03-24

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a heat-sensitive ion channel also involved in pain sensation, and is the receptor for capsaicin, the active ingredient of hot chili peppers. The recent structures of TRPV1 revealed putative ligand density within the S1 to S4 voltage-sensor-like domain of the protein. However, questions remain regarding the dynamic role of the lipid bilayer in ligand binding to TRPV1. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore behavior of capsaicin in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer and with the target S1-S4 transmembrane helices of TRPV1. Equilibrium simulations reveal a preferred interfacial localization for capsaicin. We also observed a capsaicin molecule flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular leaflet, and subsequently able to access the intracellular TRPV1 binding site. Calculation of the potential of mean force (i.e., free energy profile) of capsaicin along the bilayer normal confirms that it prefers an interfacial localization. The free energy profile indicates that there is a nontrivial but surmountable barrier to the flipping of capsaicin between opposing leaflets of the bilayer. Molecular dynamics of the S1-S4 transmembrane helices of the TRPV1 in a lipid bilayer confirm that Y511, known to be crucial to capsaicin binding, has a distribution along the bilayer normal similar to that of the aromatic group of capsaicin. Simulations were conducted of the TRPV1 S1-S4 transmembrane helices in the presence of capsaicin placed in the aqueous phase, in the lipid, or docked to the protein. No stable interaction between ligand and protein was seen for simulations initiated with capsaicin in the bilayer. However, interactions were seen between TRPV1 and capsaicin starting from the cytosolic aqueous phase, and capsaicin remained stable in the majority of simulations from the docked pose. We discuss the significance of capsaicin flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular

  6. Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Membrane-Trehalose Interactions.

    PubMed

    Kapla, Jon; Stevensson, Baltzar; Maliniak, Arnold

    2016-09-15

    It is well established that trehalose (TRH) affects the physical properties of lipid bilayers and stabilizes biological membranes. We present molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations to investigate the interactions between lipid membranes formed by 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and TRH. Both atomistic and coarse-grained (CG) interaction models were employed, and the coarse graining of DMPC leads to a reduction in the acyl chain length corresponding to a 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine lipid (DLPC). Several modifications of the Martini interaction model, used for CG simulations, were implemented, resulting in different potentials of mean force (PMFs) for DMPC bilayer-TRH interactions. These PMFs were subsequently used in a simple two-site analytical model for the description of sugar binding at the membrane interface. In contrast to that in atomistic MD simulations, the binding in the CG model was not in agreement with the two-site model. Our interpretation is that the interaction balance, involving water, TRH, and lipids, in the CG systems needs further tuning of the force-field parameters. The area per lipid is only weakly affected by TRH concentration, whereas the compressibility modulus related to the fluctuations of the membrane increases with an increase in TRH content. In agreement with experimental findings, the bending modulus is not affected by the inclusion of TRH. The important aspects of lipid bilayer interactions with biomolecules are membrane curvature generation and sensing. In the present investigation, membrane curvature is generated by artificial buckling of the bilayer in one dimension. It turns out that TRH prefers the regions with the highest curvature, which enables the most favorable situation for lipid-sugar interactions. PMID:27530142

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of a DMPC Bilayer Using Nonadditive Interaction Models

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joseph E.; Rahaman, Obaidur; Patel, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We present a polarizable force field based on the charge-equilibration formalism for molecular dynamics simulations of phospholipid bilayers. We discuss refinement of headgroup dihedral potential parameters to reproduce ab initio conformational energies of dimethylphosphate calculated at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. We also address the refinement of electrostatic and Lennard-Jones (van der Waals) parameters to reproduce ab initio polarizabilities and water interaction energies of dimethylphosphate and tetramethylammonium. We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of a solvated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer using this polarizable force field as well as the nonpolarizable, fixed-charge CHARMM27 and CHARMM27r force fields for comparison. Calculated atomic and electron-density profiles, deuterium order parameters, and headgroup orientations are found to be consistent with previous simulations and with experiment. Polarizable interaction models for solvent and lipid exhibit greater water penetration into the lipid interior; this is due to the variation of water molecular dipole moment from a bulk value of 2.6 Debye to a value of 1.9 Debye in the membrane interior. The reduction in the electrostatic component of the desolvation free-energy penalty allows for greater water density. The surface dipole potential predicted by the polarizable model is 0.95 V compared to the value of 0.8 V based on nonpolarizable force-field calculations. Effects of inclusion of explicit polarization are discussed in relation to water dipole moment and varying charge distributions. Dielectric permittivity profiles for polarizable and nonpolarizable interactions exhibit subtle differences arising from the nature of the individual component parameterizations; for the polarizable force field, we obtain a bulk dielectric permittivity of 79, whereas the nonpolarizable force field plateaus at 97 (the value for pure TIP3P water). In the membrane interior, both models

  8. Interactions between polymers and single-walled boron nitride nanotubes: a molecular dynamics simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Nasrabadi, Amir Taghavi; Foroutan, Masumeh

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we used a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approach to investigate the interfacial binding of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) with poly[m-phenylenevinylene-co-(2,5-dioctyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene)] (PmPV), polystyrene (PS), and polythiophene (PT). Quantum partial charges of BNNT-polymer composites were determined by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and then included in MD simulations. The interaction energy between nanotubes and polymer molecules was computed, and the morphology of polymers stacked onto the surface of the nanotubes was investigated based on the dihedral angle (θ). Our results confirm that the interaction energy is strongly influenced by the specific monomer structure of polymer and nanotube radius, but the influence of temperature is likely negligible. Among the investigated polymers, PT possesses the strongest adhesion to the BNNTs, followed by PmPV and PS. Moreover, the comparison of our results for BNNT-polymer composities with those of the similar carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites reveals that the BNNT-polymer interactions are much stronger, which is the most important result of this work. This finding is also in good agreement with recent experimental observations. The higher values of interaction energy of BNNT-polymer composites suggest that the BNNTs could be more efficient nanofillers than the CNTs for nanocomposite reinforcement applications.

  9. Structure and Dynamics of Antifreeze Protein--Model Membrane Interactions: A Combined Spectroscopic and Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Kar, Rajiv K; Mroue, Kamal H; Kumar, Dinesh; Tejo, Bimo A; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-02-11

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are the key biomolecules that enable species to survive under subzero temperature conditions. The physiologically relevant activities of AFPs are based on the adsorption to ice crystals, followed by the inhibition of subsequent crystal layer growth of ice, routed with depression in freezing point in a noncolligative manner. The functional attributes governing the mechanism by which AFPs inhibit freezing of body fluids in bacteria, fungi, plants, and fishes are mainly attributed to their adsorption onto the surface of ice within the physiological system. Importantly, AFPs are also known for their application in cryopreservation of biological samples that might be related to membrane interaction. To date, there is a paucity of information detailing the interaction of AFPs with membrane structures. Here, we focus on elucidating the biophysical properties of the interactions between AFPs and micelle models that mimic the membrane system. Micelle model systems of zwitterionic DPC and negatively charged SDS were utilized in this study, against which a significant interaction is experienced by two AFP molecules, namely, Peptide 1m and wfAFP (the popular AFP sourced from winter flounder). Using low- and high-resolution biophysical characterization techniques, such as circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy, a strong evidence for the interactions of these AFPs with the membrane models is revealed in detail and is corroborated by in-depth residue-specific information derived from molecular dynamics simulation. Altogether, these results not only strengthen the fact that AFPs interact actively with membrane systems, but also demonstrate that membrane-associated AFPs are dynamic and capable of adopting a number of conformations rendering fluidity to the system. PMID:26785292

  10. Interaction of C60 fullerenes with asymmetric and curved lipid membranes: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Cherniavskyi, Yevhen K; Ramseyer, Christophe; Yesylevskyy, Semen O

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of fullerenes with asymmetric and curved DOPC/DOPS bicelles is studied by means of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. The effects caused by asymmetric lipid composition of the membrane leaflets and the curvature of the membrane are analyzed. It is shown that the aggregates of fullerenes prefer to penetrate into the membrane in the regions of the moderately positive mean curvature. Upon penetration into the hydrophobic core of the membrane fullerenes avoid the regions of the extreme positive or the negative curvature. Fullerenes increase the ordering of lipid tails, which are in direct contact with them, but do not influence other lipids significantly. Our data suggest that the effects of the membrane curvature should be taken into account in the studies concerning permeability of the membranes to fullerenes and fullerene-based drug delivery systems.

  11. Shock wave interactions with nano-structured materials: a molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qananwah, A. K.; Koplik, J.; Andreopoulos, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Porous materials have long been known to be effective in blast mitigation strategies. Nano-structured materials appear to have an even greater potential for blast mitigation because of their high surface-to-volume ratio, a geometric factor which substantially attenuates shock wave propagation. A molecular dynamics approach was used to explore the effects of this remarkable property on the behavior of traveling shocks impacting on solid materials. The computational setup included a moving piston, a gas region, and a target solid wall with and without a porous structure. The materials involved were represented by realistic interaction potentials. The results indicate that the presence of a nano-porous material layer in front of the target wall reduced the stress magnitude and the energy deposited inside the solid by about 30 %, while at the same time substantially decreasing the loading rate.

  12. Helium defects interactions and mechanism of helium bubble growth in tungsten: A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Chun; Liu, Yi-Nan; Yu, Yi; Luo, Guang-Nan; Shu, Xiaolin; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2014-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the interactions between helium (He) and defects in tungsten (W). The binding energy between He and He cluster is shown to be positive, which increases with increasing He cluster size. Both the W self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and the vacancy can promote the He cluster formation. The binding energies of a He, a vacancy and an SIA W to a He-vacancy cluster (HenVm) in W are also investigated, which depend on the n/m ratio. According to these results, we propose the formation and growth mechanism of He bubbles, which involves the procedures of He-vacancy cluster formation, the capturing of vacancies, then He atoms, and vacancies again. The mechanism provides a good reference to understand the initial stage of the He bubble formation and growth in W.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Shock Waves Interacting with Nano-structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqananwah, Ahmad; Koplik, Joel; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2009-11-01

    Typical theoretical treatments of shock wave interactions are based on a continuum approach, which cannot resolve the spatial variations in solids with nano-scale porous structure. To investigate such interactions we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation model, based on Lennard-Jones interactions. A piston, modeled as a uni-directional repulsive force field translating at a prescribed velocity, impinges on a region of gas which is compressed to form a shock, which in turn is driven against an atomistic solid wall. Periodic boundary conditions are used in the directions orthogonal to the piston motion, and we have considered solids based on either atoms tethered to lattice sites by stiff springs, or on embedded atom potentials. Velocity, temperature and stress fields are computed locally in both gas and solid regions, and displacements within the solid are interpreted in terms of its elastic constants. In this talk we present preliminary results, and the longer-term goal of this work is to understand energy transport and absorption in porous materials.

  14. A GPU-accelerated immersive audio-visual framework for interaction with molecular dynamics using consumer depth sensors.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, David R; O'Connor, Michael; Calabró, Gaetano; Price, James; Tew, Philip; Mitchell, Thomas; Hyde, Joseph; Tew, David P; Coughtrie, David J; McIntosh-Smith, Simon

    2014-01-01

    With advances in computational power, the rapidly growing role of computational/simulation methodologies in the physical sciences, and the development of new human-computer interaction technologies, the field of interactive molecular dynamics seems destined to expand. In this paper, we describe and benchmark the software algorithms and hardware setup for carrying out interactive molecular dynamics utilizing an array of consumer depth sensors. The system works by interpreting the human form as an energy landscape, and superimposing this landscape on a molecular dynamics simulation to chaperone the motion of the simulated atoms, affecting both graphics and sonified simulation data. GPU acceleration has been key to achieving our target of 60 frames per second (FPS), giving an extremely fluid interactive experience. GPU acceleration has also allowed us to scale the system for use in immersive 360° spaces with an array of up to ten depth sensors, allowing several users to simultaneously chaperone the dynamics. The flexibility of our platform for carrying out molecular dynamics simulations has been considerably enhanced by wrappers that facilitate fast communication with a portable selection of GPU-accelerated molecular force evaluation routines. In this paper, we describe a 360° atmospheric molecular dynamics simulation we have run in a chemistry/physics education context. We also describe initial tests in which users have been able to chaperone the dynamics of 10-alanine peptide embedded in an explicit water solvent. Using this system, both expert and novice users have been able to accelerate peptide rare event dynamics by 3-4 orders of magnitude.

  15. A GPU-accelerated immersive audio-visual framework for interaction with molecular dynamics using consumer depth sensors.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, David R; O'Connor, Michael; Calabró, Gaetano; Price, James; Tew, Philip; Mitchell, Thomas; Hyde, Joseph; Tew, David P; Coughtrie, David J; McIntosh-Smith, Simon

    2014-01-01

    With advances in computational power, the rapidly growing role of computational/simulation methodologies in the physical sciences, and the development of new human-computer interaction technologies, the field of interactive molecular dynamics seems destined to expand. In this paper, we describe and benchmark the software algorithms and hardware setup for carrying out interactive molecular dynamics utilizing an array of consumer depth sensors. The system works by interpreting the human form as an energy landscape, and superimposing this landscape on a molecular dynamics simulation to chaperone the motion of the simulated atoms, affecting both graphics and sonified simulation data. GPU acceleration has been key to achieving our target of 60 frames per second (FPS), giving an extremely fluid interactive experience. GPU acceleration has also allowed us to scale the system for use in immersive 360° spaces with an array of up to ten depth sensors, allowing several users to simultaneously chaperone the dynamics. The flexibility of our platform for carrying out molecular dynamics simulations has been considerably enhanced by wrappers that facilitate fast communication with a portable selection of GPU-accelerated molecular force evaluation routines. In this paper, we describe a 360° atmospheric molecular dynamics simulation we have run in a chemistry/physics education context. We also describe initial tests in which users have been able to chaperone the dynamics of 10-alanine peptide embedded in an explicit water solvent. Using this system, both expert and novice users have been able to accelerate peptide rare event dynamics by 3-4 orders of magnitude. PMID:25340458

  16. Insights into molecular interactions between CaM and its inhibitors from molecular dynamics simulations and experimental data.

    PubMed

    González-Andrade, Martin; Rodríguez-Sotres, Rogelio; Madariaga-Mazón, Abraham; Rivera-Chávez, José; Mata, Rachel; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro; Del Pozo-Yauner, Luis; Arias-Olguín, Imilla I

    2016-01-01

    In order to contribute to the structural basis for rational design of calmodulin (CaM) inhibitors, we analyzed the interaction of CaM with 14 classic antagonists and two compounds that do not affect CaM, using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and the data were compared to available experimental data. The Ca(2+)-CaM-Ligands complexes were simulated 20 ns, with CaM starting in the "open" and "closed" conformations. The analysis of the MD simulations provided insight into the conformational changes undergone by CaM during its interaction with these ligands. These simulations were used to predict the binding free energies (ΔG) from contributions ΔH and ΔS, giving useful information about CaM ligand binding thermodynamics. The ΔG predicted for the CaM's inhibitors correlated well with available experimental data as the r(2) obtained was 0.76 and 0.82 for the group of xanthones. Additionally, valuable information is presented here: I) CaM has two preferred ligand binding sites in the open conformation known as site 1 and 4, II) CaM can bind ligands of diverse structural nature, III) the flexibility of CaM is reduced by the union of its ligands, leading to a reduction in the Ca(2+)-CaM entropy, IV) enthalpy dominates the molecular recognition process in the system Ca(2+)-CaM-Ligand, and V) the ligands making more extensive contact with the protein have higher affinity for Ca(2+)-CaM. Despite their limitations, docking and MD simulations in combination with experimental data continue to be excellent tools for research in pharmacology, toward a rational design of new drugs.

  17. Capsaicin Interaction with TRPV1 Channels in a Lipid Bilayer: Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Sonya M.; Newstead, Simon; Swartz, Kenton J.; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a heat-sensitive ion channel also involved in pain sensation, and is the receptor for capsaicin, the active ingredient of hot chili peppers. The recent structures of TRPV1 revealed putative ligand density within the S1 to S4 voltage-sensor-like domain of the protein. However, questions remain regarding the dynamic role of the lipid bilayer in ligand binding to TRPV1. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore behavior of capsaicin in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer and with the target S1–S4 transmembrane helices of TRPV1. Equilibrium simulations reveal a preferred interfacial localization for capsaicin. We also observed a capsaicin molecule flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular leaflet, and subsequently able to access the intracellular TRPV1 binding site. Calculation of the potential of mean force (i.e., free energy profile) of capsaicin along the bilayer normal confirms that it prefers an interfacial localization. The free energy profile indicates that there is a nontrivial but surmountable barrier to the flipping of capsaicin between opposing leaflets of the bilayer. Molecular dynamics of the S1–S4 transmembrane helices of the TRPV1 in a lipid bilayer confirm that Y511, known to be crucial to capsaicin binding, has a distribution along the bilayer normal similar to that of the aromatic group of capsaicin. Simulations were conducted of the TRPV1 S1–S4 transmembrane helices in the presence of capsaicin placed in the aqueous phase, in the lipid, or docked to the protein. No stable interaction between ligand and protein was seen for simulations initiated with capsaicin in the bilayer. However, interactions were seen between TRPV1 and capsaicin starting from the cytosolic aqueous phase, and capsaicin remained stable in the majority of simulations from the docked pose. We discuss the significance of capsaicin flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular

  18. Capsaicin interaction with TRPV1 channels in a lipid bilayer: molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sonya M; Newstead, Simon; Swartz, Kenton J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-03-24

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a heat-sensitive ion channel also involved in pain sensation, and is the receptor for capsaicin, the active ingredient of hot chili peppers. The recent structures of TRPV1 revealed putative ligand density within the S1 to S4 voltage-sensor-like domain of the protein. However, questions remain regarding the dynamic role of the lipid bilayer in ligand binding to TRPV1. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore behavior of capsaicin in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer and with the target S1-S4 transmembrane helices of TRPV1. Equilibrium simulations reveal a preferred interfacial localization for capsaicin. We also observed a capsaicin molecule flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular leaflet, and subsequently able to access the intracellular TRPV1 binding site. Calculation of the potential of mean force (i.e., free energy profile) of capsaicin along the bilayer normal confirms that it prefers an interfacial localization. The free energy profile indicates that there is a nontrivial but surmountable barrier to the flipping of capsaicin between opposing leaflets of the bilayer. Molecular dynamics of the S1-S4 transmembrane helices of the TRPV1 in a lipid bilayer confirm that Y511, known to be crucial to capsaicin binding, has a distribution along the bilayer normal similar to that of the aromatic group of capsaicin. Simulations were conducted of the TRPV1 S1-S4 transmembrane helices in the presence of capsaicin placed in the aqueous phase, in the lipid, or docked to the protein. No stable interaction between ligand and protein was seen for simulations initiated with capsaicin in the bilayer. However, interactions were seen between TRPV1 and capsaicin starting from the cytosolic aqueous phase, and capsaicin remained stable in the majority of simulations from the docked pose. We discuss the significance of capsaicin flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular

  19. Generalized image charge solvation model for electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shaozhong; Xue, Changfeng; Baumketner, Andriy; Jacobs, Donald; Cai, Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the image charge solvation model (ICSM) [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 154103 (2009)], a hybrid explicit/implicit method to treat electrostatic interactions in computer simulations of biomolecules formulated for spherical cavities, to prolate spheroidal and triaxial ellipsoidal cavities, designed to better accommodate non-spherical solutes in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In addition to the utilization of a general truncated octahedron as the MD simulation box, central to the proposed extension is an image approximation method to compute the reaction field for a point charge placed inside such a non-spherical cavity by using a single image charge located outside the cavity. The resulting generalized image charge solvation model (GICSM) is tested in simulations of liquid water, and the results are analyzed in comparison with those obtained from the ICSM simulations as a reference. We find that, for improved computational efficiency due to smaller simulation cells and consequently a less number of explicit solvent molecules, the generalized model can still faithfully reproduce known static and dynamic properties of liquid water at least for systems considered in the present paper, indicating its great potential to become an accurate but more efficient alternative to the ICSM when bio-macromolecules of irregular shapes are to be simulated. PMID:23913979

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Amyloid β-Peptide (1-42): Tetramer Formation and Membrane Interactions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anne M; Bevan, David R

    2016-09-01

    The aggregation cascade and peptide-membrane interactions of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) have been implicated as toxic events in the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ42 forms oligomers and ultimately plaques, and it has been hypothesized that these oligomeric species are the main toxic species contributing to neuronal cell death. To better understand oligomerization events and subsequent oligomer-membrane interactions of Aβ42, we performed atomistic molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize both interpeptide interactions and perturbation of model membranes by the peptides. MD simulations were utilized to first show the formation of a tetramer unit by four separate Aβ42 peptides. Aβ42 tetramers adopted an oblate ellipsoid shape and showed a significant increase in β-strand formation in the final tetramer unit relative to the monomers, indicative of on-pathway events for fibril formation. The Aβ42 tetramer unit that formed in the initial simulations was used in subsequent MD simulations in the presence of a pure POPC or cholesterol-rich raft model membrane. Tetramer-membrane simulations resulted in elongation of the tetramer in the presence of both model membranes, with tetramer-raft interactions giving rise to the rearrangement of key hydrophobic regions in the tetramer and the formation of a more rod-like structure indicative of a fibril-seeding aggregate. Membrane perturbation by the tetramer was manifested in the form of more ordered, rigid membranes, with the pure POPC being affected to a greater extent than the raft membrane. These results provide critical atomistic insight into the aggregation pathway of Aβ42 and a putative toxic mechanism in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27602722

  1. Interaction of the Disaccharide Trehalose with a Phospholipid Bilayer: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Cristina S.; Lins, Roberto D.; Chandrasekhar, Indira; Freitas, Luiz Carlos G.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2004-01-01

    The disaccharide trehalose is well known for its bioprotective properties. Produced in large amounts during stress periods in the life of organisms able to survive potentially damaging conditions, trehalose plays its protective role by stabilizing biostructures such as proteins and lipid membranes. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the interaction of trehalose with a phospholipid bilayer at atomistic resolution. Simulations of the bilayer in the absence and in the presence of trehalose at two different concentrations (1 or 2 molal) are carried out at 325 K and 475 K. The results show that trehalose is able to minimize the disruptive effect of the elevated temperature and stabilize the bilayer structure. At both temperature, trehalose is found to interact directly with the bilayer through hydrogen bonds. However, the water molecules at the bilayer surface are not completely replaced. At high temperature, the protective effect of trehalose is correlated with a significant increase in the number of trehalose-bilayer hydrogen bonds, predominantly through an increase in the number of trehalose molecules bridging three or more lipid molecules. PMID:15041666

  2. Molecular Dynamics Study of Interaction between Acrylamide Copolymers and Alumina Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng-he; Wang, Feng-yun; Gong, Xue-dong

    2012-10-01

    Four acrylamide polymer flocculants, anionic polyacrylamide P(AA-co-AM), cationic polyacrylamide P(DMB-co-AM), nonionic polyacrylamide P(AM), and hydrophobical polyacrylamide P(OA-co-AM) have been prepared by copolymerizing with acrylic acid, cationic monomer dimethylethyl (acryloxyethyl) ammonium bromide (DMB) and hydrophobical monomer octadecyl acrylate with acrylamide. The interactions between the flocculants with the (012) surface of alumina crystal (Al2O3) have been simulated by molecular dynamics method. All the polymers can bind tightly with Al2O3 crystal, the interaction between the O of polymers and Al of the (012) surface of Al2O3 is significantly strong. The order of binding energy is as follows: P(DMB-co-AM)>P(OA-co-AM)>P(AA-co-AM)>P(AM), implying a better flocculation performance of P(DMB-co-AM) than the others. Analysis indicates that binding energy is mainly determined by Coulomb interaction. Bonds are found between the O atoms of the polymers and the Al atoms of Al2O3. The polymers' structures deform when they combine with Al2O3 crystal, but the deformation energies are low and far less than non-bonding energies. Flocculation experiments in suspension medium of 1%Kaolin show a transmittancy of 90.8% for 6 mg/L P(DMB-co-AM) and 73.0% for P(AM). The sequence of flocculation performance of four polymers is P(DMB-co-AM)>P(OA-co-AM)>P(AA-co-AM)>P(AM), which is in excellent agreement with the simulation results of binding energy.

  3. Electrostatic Unfolding and Interactions of Albumin Driven by pH Changes: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of protein aggregation is bound to translate into critical advances in several areas, including the treatment of misfolded protein disorders and the development of self-assembling biomaterials for novel commercial applications. Because of its ubiquity and clinical potential, albumin is one of the best-characterized models in protein aggregation research; but its properties in different conditions are not completely understood. Here, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of albumin to understand how electrostatics can affect the conformation of a single albumin molecule just prior to self-assembly. We then analyzed the tertiary structure and solvent accessible surface area of albumin after electrostatically triggered partial denaturation. The data obtained from these single protein simulations allowed us to investigate the effect of electrostatic interactions between two proteins. The results of these simulations suggested that hydrophobic attractions and counterion binding may be strong enough to effectively overcome the electrostatic repulsions between the highly charged monomers. This work contributes to our general understanding of protein aggregation mechanisms, the importance of explicit consideration of free ions in protein solutions, provides critical new insights about the equilibrium conformation of albumin in its partially denatured state at low pH, and may spur significant progress in our efforts to develop biocompatible protein hydrogels driven by electrostatic partial denaturation. PMID:24393011

  4. Interaction of Curcumin with PEO-PPO-PEO block copolymers: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Susruta; Roccatano, Danilo

    2013-03-21

    Curcumin, a naturally occurring drug molecule, has been extensively investigated for its various potential usages in medicine. Its water insolubility and high metabolism rate require the use of drug delivery systems to make it effective in the human body. Among various types of nanocarriers, block copolymer based ones are the most effective. These polymers are broadly used as drug-delivery systems, but the nature of this process is poorly understood. In this paper, we propose a molecular dynamics simulation study of the interaction of Curcumin with block copolymer based on polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polypropylene oxide (PPO). The study has been conducted considering the smallest PEO and PPO oligomers and multiple chains of the block copolymer Pluronic P85. Our study shows that the more hydrophobic 1,2-dimethoxypropane (DMP) molecules and PPO block preferentially coat the Curcumin molecule. In the case of the Pluronic P85, simulation shows formation of a drug-polymer aggregate within 50 ns. This process leaves exposed the PEO part of the polymers, resulting in better solvation and stability of the drug in water.

  5. Electrostatic unfolding and interactions of albumin driven by pH changes: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Baler, K; Martin, O A; Carignano, M A; Ameer, G A; Vila, J A; Szleifer, I

    2014-01-30

    A better understanding of protein aggregation is bound to translate into critical advances in several areas, including the treatment of misfolded protein disorders and the development of self-assembling biomaterials for novel commercial applications. Because of its ubiquity and clinical potential, albumin is one of the best-characterized models in protein aggregation research; but its properties in different conditions are not completely understood. Here, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of albumin to understand how electrostatics can affect the conformation of a single albumin molecule just prior to self-assembly. We then analyzed the tertiary structure and solvent accessible surface area of albumin after electrostatically triggered partial denaturation. The data obtained from these single protein simulations allowed us to investigate the effect of electrostatic interactions between two proteins. The results of these simulations suggested that hydrophobic attractions and counterion binding may be strong enough to effectively overcome the electrostatic repulsions between the highly charged monomers. This work contributes to our general understanding of protein aggregation mechanisms, the importance of explicit consideration of free ions in protein solutions, provides critical new insights about the equilibrium conformation of albumin in its partially denatured state at low pH, and may spur significant progress in our efforts to develop biocompatible protein hydrogels driven by electrostatic partial denaturation. PMID:24393011

  6. Interactions of sarin with polyelectrolyte membranes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Gor, Gennady Yu; Neimark, Alexander V

    2013-01-10

    Nanostructured polyelectrolyte membranes (PEMs), which are widely used as permselective diffusion barriers in fuel cell technologies and electrochemical processing, are considered as protective membranes suitable for blocking warfare toxins, including water-soluble nerve agents such as sarin. In this article, we examine the mechanisms of sorption and diffusion of sarin in hydrated PEMs by means of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Three PEMs are considered: Nafion, sulfonated polystyrene (sPS) that forms the hydrophilic subphase of segregated sPS-polyolefin block copolymers, and random sPS-polyethylene copolymer. We found that sarin concentrates at the interface between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic subphases of hydrated Nafion acting as a surfactant. In hydrated sPS, where the scale of water-polymer segregation is much smaller (1-2 nm), sarin also interacts favorably with hydrophobic and hydrophilic components. Water diffusion slows as the sarin content increases despite the overall increase in solvent content, which suggests that sarin and water have somewhat different pathways through the segregated membrane. Upon replacement of counterions of monovalent potassium with those of divalent calcium, sarin diffusion slows but remains substantial in all ionomers considered, especially at high sarin concentrations. The behavior of sarin is similar to that of its common simulant, dimethyl methylphosphonate. PMID:23205740

  7. Molecular dynamics investigation of the interaction of dislocations with carbides in BCC Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granberg, F.; Terentyev, D.; Nordlund, K.

    2015-06-01

    Different types of carbides are present in many steels used as structural materials. To safely use steel in demanding environments, like nuclear power plants, it is important to know how defects will affect the mechanical properties of the material. In this study, the effect of carbide precipitates on the edge dislocation movement is investigated. Three different types of carbides were investigated by means of molecular dynamics, with a Tersoff-like bond order interatomic potential by Henriksson et al. The obstacles were 4 nm in diameter and were of Fe3C- (cementite-), Fe23C6- and Cr23C6-type. The critical unpinning stress was calculated for each type at different temperatures, to get the temperature-dependent obstacle strength. The results showed a decreasing critical stress with increasing temperature, consistent with previous studies. The critical unpinning stress was seen to be dependent on the type of carbide, but the differences were small. A difference was also observed between the obstacles with the same structure, but with different composition. This study shows the relation between the existing Cr23C6 carbide and the experimentally non-existing Fe23C6 carbide, which needs to be used as a model system for investigations with interatomic potentials not able to describe the interaction of Cr in the Fe-C-system. We found the difference to be a between 7% and 10% higher critical unpinning stress for the chromium carbide, than for the iron carbide of the same type.

  8. Visualization for Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Gas and Metal Surface Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzyrkov, D.; Polyakov, S.; Podryga, V.

    2016-02-01

    The development of methods, algorithms and applications for visualization of molecular dynamics simulation outputs is discussed. The visual analysis of the results of such calculations is a complex and actual problem especially in case of the large scale simulations. To solve this challenging task it is necessary to decide on: 1) what data parameters to render, 2) what type of visualization to choose, 3) what development tools to use. In the present work an attempt to answer these questions was made. For visualization it was offered to draw particles in the corresponding 3D coordinates and also their velocity vectors, trajectories and volume density in the form of isosurfaces or fog. We tested the way of post-processing and visualization based on the Python language with use of additional libraries. Also parallel software was developed that allows processing large volumes of data in the 3D regions of the examined system. This software gives the opportunity to achieve desired results that are obtained in parallel with the calculations, and at the end to collect discrete received frames into a video file. The software package "Enthought Mayavi2" was used as the tool for visualization. This visualization application gave us the opportunity to study the interaction of a gas with a metal surface and to closely observe the adsorption effect.

  9. A spectroscopic and molecular dynamic approach on the interaction between ionic liquid type gemini surfactant and human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Jitendra Kumar; Mir, Muzaffar Ul Hassan; Maurya, Neha; Dohare, Neeraj; Ali, Anwar; Patel, Rajan

    2016-10-01

    The interactions of imidazolium bashed ionic liquid-type cationic gemini surfactant ([C12-4-C12im]Br2) with HSA were studied by fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, UV-visible, circular dichroism, molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulation methods. The results showed that the [C12-4-C12im]Br2 quenched the fluorescence of HSA through dynamic quenching mechanism as confirmed by time-resolved spectroscopy. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant (Ksv) and relevant thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy change (ΔH), Gibbs free energy change (ΔG) and entropy change (ΔS) for interaction system were calculated at different temperatures. The results revealed that hydrophobic forces played a major role in the interactions process. The results of synchronous fluorescence, UV-visible and CD spectra demonstrated that the binding of [C12-4-C12im]Br2 with HSA induces conformational changes in HSA. Inquisitively, the molecular dynamics study contribute towards understanding the effect of binding of [C12-4-C12im]Br2 on HSA to interpret the conformational change in HSA upon binding in aqueous solution. Moreover, the molecular modelling results show the possible binding sites in the interaction system.

  10. Crowding in extremophiles: linkage between solvation and weak protein-protein interactions, stability and dynamics, provides insight into molecular adaptation.

    PubMed

    Ebel, Christine; Zaccai, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    The study of the molecular adaptation of microorganisms to extreme environments (solvent, temperature, etc.) has provided tools to investigate the complex relationships between protein-solvent and protein-protein interactions, protein stability and protein dynamics, and how they are modulated by the crowded environment of the cell. We have evaluated protein-solvent and protein-protein interactions by solution experiments (analytical ultracentrifugation, small angle neutron and X-ray scattering, density) and crystallography, and protein dynamics by energy resolved neutron scattering. This review concerns work from our laboratory on (i) proteins from extreme halophilic Archaea, and (ii) psychrophile, mesophile, thermophile and hyperthermophile bacterial cells.

  11. Comparison between Free and Immobilized Ion Effects on Hydrophobic Interactions: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Gast, Sebastian; Ma, C Derek; Abbott, Nicholas L; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2015-10-15

    Fundamental studies of the effect of specific ions on hydrophobic interactions are driven by the need to understand phenomena such as hydrophobically driven self-assembly or protein folding. Using β-peptide-inspired nanorods, we investigate the effects of both free ions (dissolved salts) and proximally immobilized ions on hydrophobic interactions. We find that the free ion effect is correlated with the water density fluctuation near a nonpolar molecular surface, showing that such fluctuation can be an indicator of hydrophobic interactions in the case of solution additives. In the case of immobilized ion, our results demonstrate that hydrophobic interactions can be switched on and off by choosing different spatial arrangements of proximal ions on a nanorod. For globally amphiphilic nanorods, we find that the magnitude of the interaction can be further tuned using proximal ions with varying ionic sizes. In general, univalent proximal anions are found to weaken hydrophobic interactions. This is in contrast to the effect of free ions, which according to our simulations strengthen hydrophobic interactions. In addition, immobilized anions of increasing ionic size do not follow the same ordering (Hofmeister-like ranking) as free ions when it comes to their impact on hydrophobic interactions. The immobilized ion effect is not simply correlated with the water density fluctuation near the nonpolar side of the amphiphilic nanorod. We propose a molecular picture that explains the contrasting effects of immobilized versus free ions.

  12. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of depletion-induced interactions for soft matter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shendruk, Tyler N.; Bertrand, Martin; Harden, James L.; Slater, Gary W.; Haan, Hendrick W. de

    2014-12-28

    Given the ubiquity of depletion effects in biological and other soft matter systems, it is desirable to have coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation approaches appropriate for the study of complex systems. This paper examines the use of two common truncated Lennard-Jones (Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA)) potentials to describe a pair of colloidal particles in a thermal bath of depletants. The shifted-WCA model is the steeper of the two repulsive potentials considered, while the combinatorial-WCA model is the softer. It is found that the depletion-induced well depth for the combinatorial-WCA model is significantly deeper than the shifted-WCA model because the resulting overlap of the colloids yields extra accessible volume for depletants. For both shifted- and combinatorial-WCA simulations, the second virial coefficients and pair potentials between colloids are demonstrated to be well approximated by the Morphometric Thermodynamics (MT) model. This agreement suggests that the presence of depletants can be accurately modelled in MD simulations by implicitly including them through simple, analytical MT forms for depletion-induced interactions. Although both WCA potentials are found to be effective generic coarse-grained simulation approaches for studying depletion effects in complicated soft matter systems, combinatorial-WCA is the more efficient approach as depletion effects are enhanced at lower depletant densities. The findings indicate that for soft matter systems that are better modelled by potentials with some compressibility, predictions from hard-sphere systems could greatly underestimate the magnitude of depletion effects at a given depletant density.

  13. Importance of Three-Body Interactions in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Demonstrated with the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Spencer R; Nakata, Hiroya; Nagata, Takeshi; Mayes, Maricris; Alexeev, Yuri; Fletcher, Graham; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Gordon, Mark S

    2016-04-12

    The analytic first derivative with respect to nuclear coordinates is formulated and implemented in the framework of the three-body fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. The gradient has been derived and implemented for restricted second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, as well as for both restricted and unrestricted Hartree-Fock and density functional theory. The importance of the three-body fully analytic gradient is illustrated through the failure of the two-body FMO method during molecular dynamics simulations of a small water cluster. The parallel implementation of the fragment molecular orbital method, its parallel efficiency, and its scalability on the Blue Gene/Q architecture up to 262,144 CPU cores are also discussed.

  14. Interaction of monovalent ions with the water liquid-vapor interface - A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    Results of molecular dynamics calculations are presented for a series of ions at infinite dilution near the water liquid-vapor interface. The free energies of ion transfer from the bulk to the interface are discussed, as are the accompanying changes of water structure at the surface and ion mobilities as a function of their proximity to the interface. It is shown that simple dielectric models do not provide an accurate description of ions at the water surface. The results of the study should be useful in the development of better models incorporating the shape and molecular structure of the interface.

  15. Dynamics and recognition within a protein–DNA complex: a molecular dynamics study of the SKN-1/DNA interaction

    PubMed Central

    Etheve, Loïc; Martin, Juliette; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the Caenorhabditis elegans transcription factor SKN-1 bound to its cognate DNA site show that the protein–DNA interface undergoes significant dynamics on the microsecond timescale. A detailed analysis of the simulation shows that movements of two key arginine side chains between the major groove and the backbone of DNA generate distinct conformational sub-states that each recognize only part of the consensus binding sequence of SKN-1, while the experimentally observed binding specificity results from a time-averaged view of the dynamic recognition occurring within this complex. PMID:26721385

  16. Visualizing protein interactions and dynamics: evolving a visual language for molecular animation.

    PubMed

    Jenkinson, Jodie; McGill, Gaël

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate biology education provides students with a number of learning challenges. Subject areas that are particularly difficult to understand include protein conformational change and stability, diffusion and random molecular motion, and molecular crowding. In this study, we examined the relative effectiveness of three-dimensional visualization techniques for learning about protein conformation and molecular motion in association with a ligand-receptor binding event. Increasingly complex versions of the same binding event were depicted in each of four animated treatments. Students (n = 131) were recruited from the undergraduate biology program at University of Toronto, Mississauga. Visualization media were developed in the Center for Molecular and Cellular Dynamics at Harvard Medical School. Stem cell factor ligand and cKit receptor tyrosine kinase were used as a classical example of a ligand-induced receptor dimerization and activation event. Each group completed a pretest, viewed one of four variants of the animation, and completed a posttest and, at 2 wk following the assessment, a delayed posttest. Overall, the most complex animation was the most effective at fostering students' understanding of the events depicted. These results suggest that, in select learning contexts, increasingly complex representations may be more desirable for conveying the dynamic nature of cell binding events.

  17. Visualizing Protein Interactions and Dynamics: Evolving a Visual Language for Molecular Animation

    PubMed Central

    Jenkinson, Jodie; McGill, Gaël

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate biology education provides students with a number of learning challenges. Subject areas that are particularly difficult to understand include protein conformational change and stability, diffusion and random molecular motion, and molecular crowding. In this study, we examined the relative effectiveness of three-dimensional visualization techniques for learning about protein conformation and molecular motion in association with a ligand–receptor binding event. Increasingly complex versions of the same binding event were depicted in each of four animated treatments. Students (n = 131) were recruited from the undergraduate biology program at University of Toronto, Mississauga. Visualization media were developed in the Center for Molecular and Cellular Dynamics at Harvard Medical School. Stem cell factor ligand and cKit receptor tyrosine kinase were used as a classical example of a ligand-induced receptor dimerization and activation event. Each group completed a pretest, viewed one of four variants of the animation, and completed a posttest and, at 2 wk following the assessment, a delayed posttest. Overall, the most complex animation was the most effective at fostering students' understanding of the events depicted. These results suggest that, in select learning contexts, increasingly complex representations may be more desirable for conveying the dynamic nature of cell binding events. PMID:22383622

  18. Cyto•IQ: an adaptive cytometer for extracting the noisy dynamics of molecular interactions in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, David A.; Moody, Stephen E.; Peccoud, Jean

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a fundamentally new type of cytometer to track the statistics of dynamic molecular interactions in hundreds of individual live cells within a single experiment. This entirely new high-throughput experimental system, which we have named Cyto•IQ, reports statistical, rather than image-based data for a large cellular population. Like a flow cytometer, Cyto•IQ rapidly measures several fluorescent probes in a large population of cells to yield a reduced statistical model that is matched to the experimental goals set by the user. However, Cyto•IQ moves beyond flow cytometry by tracking multiple probes in individual cells over time. Using adaptive learning algorithms, we process data in real time to maximize the convergence of the statistical model parameter estimators. Software controlling Cyto•IQ integrates existing open source applications to interface hardware components, process images, and adapt the data acquisition strategy based on previously acquired data. These innovations allow the study of larger populations of cells, and molecular interactions with more complex dynamics, than is possible with traditional microscope-based approaches. Cyto•IQ supports research to characterize the noisy dynamics of molecular interactions controlling biological processes.

  19. Structural and dynamic effects of cholesterol at preferred sites of interaction with rhodopsin identified from microsecond length molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Khelashvili, George; Grossfield, Alan; Feller, Scott E.; Pitman, Michael C.; Weinstein, Harel

    2014-01-01

    An unresolved question about GPCR function is the role of membrane components in receptor stability and activation. In particular, cholesterol is known to affect the function of membrane proteins, but the details of its effect on GPCRs are still elusive. Here, we describe how cholesterol modulates the behavior of the TM1-TM2-TM7-helix 8(H8) functional network that comprises the highly conserved NPxxY(x)5,6F motif, through specific interactions with the receptor. The inferences are based on the analysis of microsecond length molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of rhodopsin in an explicit membrane environment. Three regions on the rhodopsin exhibit the highest cholesterol density throughout the trajectory: the extracellular end of TM7, a location resembling the high-density sterol area from the electron microscopy data; the intracellular parts of TM1, TM2, and TM4, a region suggested as the cholesterol binding site in the recent X-ray crystallography data on β2-adrenergic GPCR; and the intracellular ends of TM2-TM3, a location that was categorized as the high cholesterol density area in multiple independent 100 ns MD simulations of the same system. We found that cholesterol primarily affects specific local perturbations of the helical TM domains such as the kinks in TM1, TM2, and TM7. These local distortions, in turn, relate to rigid-body motions of the TMs in the TM1-TM2-TM7-H8 bundle. The specificity of the effects stems from the nonuniform distribution of cholesterol around the protein. Through correlation analysis we connect local effects of cholesterol on structural perturbations with a regulatory role of cholesterol in the structural rearrangements involved in GPCR function. PMID:19173312

  20. Small molecule interactions with lipid bilayers: a molecular dynamics study of chlorhexidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oosten, Brad; Marquardt, Drew; Sternin, Edward; Harroun, Thad

    2013-03-01

    Chlorhexidine presents an interesting modelling challenge with a hydrophobic hexane connecting two biguanides (arginine analogues) and two aromatic rings. We conducted molecular dynamic simulations using the GROMACS simulation software to reproduce the experimental environment of chlorhexidine in a 1,2-Dimyristoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DMPC) bilayer to produce atomic-level information. We constructed an all-atom force field of chlorhexidine from the CHARMM36 force field using well established parameters of certain amino acids. Partial charges were treated differently, which were calculated using GAUSSIAN software. We will compare and contrast the results of our model to that of our neutron scattering experiments previously done in our lab.

  1. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2011-01-04

    The molecular dynamics method, although extremely powerful for materials simulations, is limited to times scales of roughly one microsecond or less. On longer time scales, dynamical evolution typically consists of infrequent events, which are usually activated processes. This course is focused on understanding infrequent-event dynamics, on methods for characterizing infrequent-event mechanisms and rate constants, and on methods for simulating long time scales in infrequent-event systems, emphasizing the recently developed accelerated molecular dynamics methods (hyperdynamics, parallel replica dynamics, and temperature accelerated dynamics). Some familiarity with basic statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics methods will be assumed.

  2. Molecular docking and dynamics simulations on the interaction of cationic porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids with DNA G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Arba, Muhammad; Kartasasmita, Rahmana E; Tjahjono, Daryono H

    2016-01-01

    A series of cationic porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids bearing either pyridine, imidazole, or pyrazole rings at the meso-positions have been investigated for their interaction with DNA G-quadruplexes by employing molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Three types of DNA G-quadruplexes were utilized, which comprise parallel, antiparallel, and mixed hybrid topologies. The porphyrin hybrids have a preference to bind with parallel and mixed hybrid structures compared to the antiparallel structure. This preference arises from the end stacking of porphyrin moiety following G-stem and loop binding of anthraquinone tail, which is not found in the antiparallel due to the presence of diagonal and lateral loops that crowd the G-quartet. The binding to the antiparallel, instead, occurred with poorer affinity through both the loop and wide groove. All sites of porphyrin binding were confirmed by 6 ns molecular dynamics simulation, as well as by the negative value of the total binding free energies that were calculated using the MMPBSA method. Free energy analysis shows that the favorable contribution came from the electrostatic term, which supposedly originated from the interaction of either cationic pyridinium, pyrazole, or imidazole groups and the anionic phosphate backbone, and also from the van der Waals energy, which primarily contributed through end stacking interaction.

  3. Key Structures and Interactions for Binding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protein Kinase B Inhibitors from Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Punkvang, Auradee; Kamsri, Pharit; Saparpakorn, Patchreenart; Hannongbua, Supa; Wolschann, Peter; Irle, Stephan; Pungpo, Pornpan

    2015-07-01

    Substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors have recently been introduced as antituberculosis agents. These inhibitors show impressive activity against protein kinase B, a Ser/Thr protein kinase that is essential for cell growth of M. tuberculosis. However, up to now, X-ray structures of the protein kinase B enzyme complexes with the substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors are currently unavailable. Consequently, structural details of their binding modes are questionable, prohibiting the structural-based design of more potent protein kinase B inhibitors in the future. Here, molecular dynamics simulations, in conjunction with molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area binding free-energy analysis, were employed to gain insight into the complex structures of the protein kinase B inhibitors and their binding energetics. The complex structures obtained by the molecular dynamics simulations show binding free energies in good agreement with experiment. The detailed analysis of molecular dynamics results shows that Glu93, Val95, and Leu17 are key residues responsible to the binding of the protein kinase B inhibitors. The aminopyrazole group and the pyrimidine core are the crucial moieties of substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors for interaction with the key residues. Our results provide a structural concept that can be used as a guide for the future design of protein kinase B inhibitors with highly increased antagonistic activity.

  4. Capturing a Dynamic Chaperone-Substrate Interaction Using NMR-Informed Molecular Modeling.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Loïc; Ahlstrom, Logan S; Horowitz, Scott; Dickson, Alex; Brooks, Charles L; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-08-10

    Chaperones maintain a healthy proteome by preventing aggregation and by aiding in protein folding. Precisely how chaperones influence the conformational properties of their substrates, however, remains unclear. To achieve a detailed description of dynamic chaperone-substrate interactions, we fused site-specific NMR information with coarse-grained simulations. Our model system is the binding and folding of a chaperone substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), with the chaperone Spy. We first used an automated procedure in which NMR chemical shifts inform the construction of system-specific force fields that describe each partner individually. The models of the two binding partners are then combined to perform simulations on the chaperone-substrate complex. The binding simulations show excellent agreement with experimental data from multiple biophysical measurements. Upon binding, Im7 interacts with a mixture of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues on Spy's surface, causing conformational exchange within Im7 to slow down as Im7 folds. Meanwhile, the motion of Spy's flexible loop region increases, allowing for better interaction with different substrate conformations, and helping offset losses in Im7 conformational dynamics that occur upon binding and folding. Spy then preferentially releases Im7 into a well-folded state. Our strategy has enabled a residue-level description of a dynamic chaperone-substrate interaction, improving our understanding of how chaperones facilitate substrate folding. More broadly, we validate our approach using two other binding partners, showing that this approach provides a general platform from which to investigate other flexible biomolecular complexes through the integration of NMR data with efficient computational models.

  5. Capturing a Dynamic Chaperone-Substrate Interaction Using NMR-Informed Molecular Modeling.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Loïc; Ahlstrom, Logan S; Horowitz, Scott; Dickson, Alex; Brooks, Charles L; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-08-10

    Chaperones maintain a healthy proteome by preventing aggregation and by aiding in protein folding. Precisely how chaperones influence the conformational properties of their substrates, however, remains unclear. To achieve a detailed description of dynamic chaperone-substrate interactions, we fused site-specific NMR information with coarse-grained simulations. Our model system is the binding and folding of a chaperone substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), with the chaperone Spy. We first used an automated procedure in which NMR chemical shifts inform the construction of system-specific force fields that describe each partner individually. The models of the two binding partners are then combined to perform simulations on the chaperone-substrate complex. The binding simulations show excellent agreement with experimental data from multiple biophysical measurements. Upon binding, Im7 interacts with a mixture of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues on Spy's surface, causing conformational exchange within Im7 to slow down as Im7 folds. Meanwhile, the motion of Spy's flexible loop region increases, allowing for better interaction with different substrate conformations, and helping offset losses in Im7 conformational dynamics that occur upon binding and folding. Spy then preferentially releases Im7 into a well-folded state. Our strategy has enabled a residue-level description of a dynamic chaperone-substrate interaction, improving our understanding of how chaperones facilitate substrate folding. More broadly, we validate our approach using two other binding partners, showing that this approach provides a general platform from which to investigate other flexible biomolecular complexes through the integration of NMR data with efficient computational models. PMID:27415450

  6. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of ion-solid interactions in zirconate pyrochlores

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen; Zu, X. T.

    2015-01-31

    In this paper, an ab initio molecular dynamics method is employed to study low energy recoil events in zirconate pyrochlores (A2Zr2O7, A = La, Nd and Sm). It shows that both cations and anions in Nd2Zr2O7 and Sm2Zr2O7 are generally more likely to be displaced than those in La2Zr2O7. The damage end states mainly consist of Frenkel pair defects, and the Frenkel pair formation energies in Nd2Zr2O7 and Sm2Zr2O7 are lower than those in La2Zr2O7. These results suggest that the order–disorder structural transition more easily occurs in Nd2Zr2O7 and Sm2Zr2O7 resulting in a defect-fluorite structure, which agrees well with experimentalmore » observations. Our calculations indicate that oxygen migration from 48f and 8b to 8a sites is dominant under low energy irradiation. A number of new defects, including four types of cation Frenkel pairs and six types of anion Frenkel pairs, are revealed by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The present findings may help to advance the fundamental understanding of the irradiation response behavior of zirconate pyrochlores.« less

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of formamide interaction with hydrocyanic acid on a catalytic surface TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artoshina, O. V.; Vorob'eva, M. Yu.; Dushanov, E. B.; Kholmurodov, Kh. T.

    2014-06-01

    The behavior of water—formamide and hydrocyanic acid—formamide solutions on an anatase surface have been studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The interaction activation energies have been estimated for the temperature range from 250 up to 400 K. The diffusion coefficients and structural radial distribution functions have been calculated for the formamide, water and hydrocyanic acid on an anatase surface. The calculated activation energies of the water—formamide—anatase and hydrocyanic acid—formamide—anatase systems were analyzed and compared. A comparative analysis of the systems under investigation was performed and a possible correlation between the obtained MD results and the molecular mechanism involving the formamide's interaction with dioxide titan adsorbing surface were discussed.

  8. Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Determination of the Interaction Potential in Liquid CD{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Guarini, E.; Barocchi, F.

    2007-10-19

    Anisotropic interactions of liquid CD{sub 4} are studied in detail by comparison of inelastic neutron Brillouin scattering data with molecular dynamics simulations using up to four different models of the methane site-site potential. We demonstrate that the experimental dynamic structure factor S(Q,{omega}) acts as a highly discriminating quantity for possible interaction schemes. In particular, the Q evolution of the spectra enables a selective probing of the short- and medium-range features of the anisotropic potentials. We show that the preferential configuration of methane dimers at liquid densities can thus be discerned by analyzing the orientation-dependent model potential curves, in light of the experimental and simulation results.

  9. Unveiling the complex network of interactions in Ionic Liquids: a combined EXAFS and Molecular Dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serva, A.; Migliorati, V.; Lapi, A.; D'Angelo, P.

    2016-05-01

    The structural properties of geminal dicationic ionic liquids ([Cn (mim)2]Br2)/water mixtures have been investigated by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. This synergic approach allowed us to assess the reliability of the MD results and to provide accurate structural information about the first coordination shell of the Br- ion. We found that the local environment around the anion changes as a function of the water concentration, while it is the same independently from the length of the bridge-alkyl chain. Moreover, as regards the long-range structural organization, no tail-tail aggregation occurs with increasing alkyl chain length.

  10. Docking and molecular dynamics simulations of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors interacting with pan agonist sodelglitazar.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu-Yuan; Wang, Run-Ling; Xu, Wei-Ren; Tang, Li-Da; Wang, Shu-Qing; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2011-10-01

    PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor) pan agonists play a critical role in treating metabolic diseases, especially the Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). GlaxoSmithKline's sodelglitazar (GW677954) is one of the potent PPAR pan agonists, which is currently being investigated in Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of T2DM and its complications. The present study was aimed at investigation into the effect of sodelglitazar at the binding pockets of PPARs. The Schrodinger Suite program (2009) was used for the molecular docking, while the GROMACS program used for the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results thus obtained showed that sodelglitazar being docked well in the active site of PPARs. It was revealed by the MD simulations that the structures of the receptors remained quite stable during the simulations and that the important AF-2 helix showed less flexibility after binding with sodelglitazar. Also, it was observed that sodelglitazar could periodically form hydrogen bonds with the AF-2 helix of PPARs to stabilize the AF-2 helix in an active conformation. Our findings have confirmed that GlaxoSmithKline's sodelglitazar can activate the PPARs, which is quite consistent with the previous biological studies. PMID:21592078

  11. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system. PMID:23249062

  12. Molecular dynamics-based ion-surface interaction models for ionized physical vapor deposition feature scale simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Coronell, D.G.; Hansen, D.E.; Voter, A.F.; Liu, C.; Liu, X.; Kress, J.D.

    1998-12-01

    A procedure is presented for incorporating the results of atomistic simulations of ion{endash}surface interactions into integrated circuit topographic simulations of ionized physical vapor deposition (PVD). Energy and angular dependent sticking probabilities for energetic Cu atoms impacting a {l_brace}111{r_brace} Cu surface, obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, were implemented in a simple Monte Carlo flux model. The resulting flux-averaged Cu sticking probability was found to vary significantly with position within submicron features and with the feature geometry. This illustrates the shortcomings of a constant (energy and angle independent) sticking probability model for ionized PVD. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Exploring Ion-Ion Interactions in Aqueous Solutions by a Combination of Molecular Dynamics and Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Kohagen, Miriam; Pluhařová, Eva; Mason, Philip E; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in computational and experimental techniques have allowed for accurate description of ion pairing in aqueous solutions. Free energy methods based on ab initio molecular dynamics, as well as on force fields accounting effectively for electronic polarization, can provide quantitative information about the structures and occurrences of individual types of ion pairs. When properly benchmarked against electronic structure calculations for model systems and against structural experiments, in particular neutron scattering, such force field simulations represent a powerful tool for elucidating interactions of salt ions in complex biological aqueous environments. PMID:26263314

  14. Exploring Ion-Ion Interactions in Aqueous Solutions by a Combination of Molecular Dynamics and Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Kohagen, Miriam; Pluhařová, Eva; Mason, Philip E; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in computational and experimental techniques have allowed for accurate description of ion pairing in aqueous solutions. Free energy methods based on ab initio molecular dynamics, as well as on force fields accounting effectively for electronic polarization, can provide quantitative information about the structures and occurrences of individual types of ion pairs. When properly benchmarked against electronic structure calculations for model systems and against structural experiments, in particular neutron scattering, such force field simulations represent a powerful tool for elucidating interactions of salt ions in complex biological aqueous environments.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of crystalline UF6 using the pair interaction potentials of the uranium and fluorine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekunov, G. S.; Nekrasov, K. A.; Boyarchenkov, A. S.; Kupryazhkin, A. Ya.

    2016-09-01

    A model of uranium hexafluoride is suggested that is based on the empirical pair potentials of U-U, F-F, U-F used for both intra- and intermolecular interactions. The potentials for this model are obtained from the lattice parameters and the thermal expansion coefficient of UF6 crystal using the molecular dynamics simulation under the periodic boundary conditions with constant volume and temperature. Within the framework of the model, the thermal expansion and sublimation of crystalline UF6 are investigated. A set of potential parameters is identified that provides satisfactory simulation of both UF6 crystal and the dependence of the UF6 saturated vapor pressure on temperature.

  16. Homology modeling, molecular dynamics and atomic level interaction study of snake venom 5' nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Arafat, A Syed Yasir; Arun, A; Ilamathi, M; Asha, J; Sivashankari, P R; D'Souza, Cletus J M; Sivaramakrishnan, V; Dhananjaya, B L

    2014-03-01

    5' Nucleotidase (5' NUC) is a ubiquitously distributed enzyme known to be present in snake venoms (SV) that is responsible primarily for causing dysregulation of physiological homeostasis in humans by inducing anticoagulant effects and by inhibiting platelet aggregation. It is also known to act synergistically with other toxins to exert a more pronounced anti-coagulant effect during envenomation. Its structural and functional role is not yet ascertained clearly. The 3D structure of snake venom 5' nucleotidase (SV-5' NUC) is not yet known and was predicted by us for the first time using a comparative homology modeling approach using Demansia vestigiata protein sequence. The accuracy and stability of the predicted SV-5' NUC structure were validated using several computational approaches. Key interactions of SV-5' NUC were studied using experimental studies/molecular docking analysis of the inhibitors vanillin, vanillic acid and maltol. All these inhibitors were found to dock favorably following pharmacologically relevant absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) profiles. Further, atomic level docking interaction studies using inhibitors of the SV-5' NUC active site revealed amino acid residues Y65 and T72 as important for inhibitor-(SV-5' NUC) interactions. Our in silico analysis is in good agreement with experimental inhibition results of SV-5' NUC with vanillin, vanillic acid and maltol. The present study should therefore play a guiding role in the experimental design of new SV-5' NUC inhibitors for snake bite management. We also identified a few pharmacophoric features essential for SV-5' NUC inhibitory activity that can be utilized further for the discovery of putative anti-venom agents of therapeutic value for snake bite management.

  17. Translocation and interactions of L-arabinose in OmpF porin: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Malek, Kourosh

    2007-01-05

    The passage of a natural substrate, L-arabinose (L-ARA) through Escherichia coli porin embedded in an artificial bilayer, is studied by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We investigate the early stage of translocation process of L-ARA from intra-cellular to extra-cellular side (Int-to-Ext) across the bilayer. The average trajectory path over all L-ARA molecules along with quantum-mechanical configuration-optimizations at PM3 level predict the existence of at least three trapping zones. The common feature within all these zones is that L-ARA remains perpendicular to the channel axis. It is remarkable how the orientation and translational-rotational motion of L-ARA molecule play a role in its transport through OmpF channel. These simulations are important for better understanding of permeation process in OmpF channel. They also provide an insight into the chiral recognition of translocation process in protein nanochannels from substrate and protein prospects and help interpret experiments on permeation process of small dipolar molecules across biological membranes.

  18. Small-molecule G-quadruplex interactions: Systematic exploration of conformational space using multiple molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Husby, Jarmila; Todd, Alan K; Platts, James A; Neidle, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    G-quadruplexes are higher-order four-stranded structures formed from repetitive guanine-containing tracts in nucleic acids. They comprise a core of stacked guanine-quartets linked by loops of length and sequence that vary with the context in which the quadruplex sequence occurs. Such sequences can be found in a number of genomic environments; at the telomeric ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, in promoter regions, in untranslated sequences and in open reading frames. Quadruplex formation can inhibit telomere maintenance, transcription and translation, especially when enhanced by quadruplex-binding small molecules, and quadruplex targeting is currently of considerable interest. The available experimental structural data shows that quadruplexes can have high conformational flexibility, especially in loop regions, which has hampered attempts to use high-throughput docking to find quadruplex-binding small-molecules with new scaffolds or to optimize existing ones with structure-based design methods. An approach to overcome the challenge of quadruplex conformational flexibility is presented here, which uses a combined multiple molecular dynamics and sampling approach. Two test small molecules have been used, RHPS4 and pyridostatin, which themselves have contrasting degrees of conformational flexibility.

  19. Isolation and characterisation of sericin antifreeze peptides and molecular dynamics modelling of their ice-binding interaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinhong; Rong, Yuzhi; Wang, Zhengwu; Zhou, Yanfu; Wang, Shaoyun; Zhao, Bo

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to isolate and characterise a novel sericin antifreeze peptide and investigate its ice-binding molecular mechanism. The thermal hysteresis activity of ice-binding sericin peptides (I-SP) was measured and their activity reached as high as 0.94 °C. A P4 fraction, with high hypothermia protective activity and inhibition activity of ice recrystallisation, was obtained from I-SP, and a purified sericin peptide, named SM-AFP, with the sequence of TTSPTNVSTT and a molecular weight of 1009.50 Da was then isolated from the P4 fraction. Treatment of Lactobacillus delbrueckii Subsp. bulgaricus LB340 LYO with 100 μg/ml synthetic SM-AFP led to 1.4-fold increased survival (p < 0.05). Finally, an SM-AFP/ice binding model was constructed and results of molecular dynamics simulation suggested that the binding of SM-AFP with ice and prevention of ice crystal growth could be attributed to hydrogen bond formation, hydrophobic interaction and non-bond interactions. Sericin peptides could be developed into beneficial cryoprotectants and used in frozen food processing.

  20. Exploring the interaction between human focal adhesion kinase and inhibitors: a molecular dynamic simulation and free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jiu-Yu; Zhang, Ji-Long; Wang, Yan; Li, Ye; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Zheng, Qing-Chuan

    2016-11-01

    Focal adhesion kinase is an important target for the treatment of many kinds of cancers. Inhibitors of FAK are proposed to be the anticancer agents for multiple tumors. The interaction characteristic between FAK and its inhibitors is crucial to develop new inhibitors. In the present article, we used Molecular Dynamic (MD) simulation method to explore the characteristic of interaction between FAK and three inhibitors (PHM16, TAE226, and ligand3). The MD simulation results together with MM-GB/SA calculations show that the combinations are enthalpy-driven process. Cys502 and Asp564 are both essential residues due to the hydrogen bond interactions with inhibitors, which was in good agreement with experimental data. Glu500 can form a non-classical hydrogen bond with each inhibitor. Arg426 can form electrostatic interactions with PHM16 and ligand3, while weaker with TAE226. The electronic static potential was employed, and we found that the ortho-position methoxy of TAE226 has a weaker negative charge than the meta-position one in PHM16 or ligand3. Ile428, Val436, Ala452, Val484, Leu501, Glu505, Glu506, Leu553, Gly563 Leu567, Ser568 are all crucial residues in hydrophobic interactions. The key residues in this work will be available for further inhibitor design of FAK and also give assistance to further research of cancer.

  1. The Molecular Mechanism of Bisphenol A (BPA) as an Endocrine Disruptor by Interacting with Nuclear Receptors: Insights from Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lanlan; Wang, Qianqian; Zhang, Yan; Niu, Yuzhen; Yao, Xiaojun; Liu, Huanxiang

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) can interact with nuclear receptors and affect the normal function of nuclear receptors in very low doses, which causes BPA to be one of the most controversial endocrine disruptors. However, the detailed molecular mechanism about how BPA interferes the normal function of nuclear receptors is still undiscovered. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the detailed interaction mechanism between BPA with three typical nuclear receptors, including hERα, hERRγ and hPPARγ. The simulation results and calculated binding free energies indicate that BPA can bind to these three nuclear receptors. The binding affinities of BPA were slightly lower than that of E2 to these three receptors. The simulation results proved that the binding process was mainly driven by direct hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions. In addition, structural analysis suggested that BPA could interact with these nuclear receptors by mimicking the action of natural hormone and keeping the nuclear receptors in active conformations. The present work provided the structural evidence to recognize BPA as an endocrine disruptor and would be important guidance for seeking safer substitutions of BPA. PMID:25799048

  2. The molecular mechanism of bisphenol A (BPA) as an endocrine disruptor by interacting with nuclear receptors: insights from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Lanlan; Wang, Qianqian; Zhang, Yan; Niu, Yuzhen; Yao, Xiaojun; Liu, Huanxiang

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) can interact with nuclear receptors and affect the normal function of nuclear receptors in very low doses, which causes BPA to be one of the most controversial endocrine disruptors. However, the detailed molecular mechanism about how BPA interferes the normal function of nuclear receptors is still undiscovered. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the detailed interaction mechanism between BPA with three typical nuclear receptors, including hERα, hERRγ and hPPARγ. The simulation results and calculated binding free energies indicate that BPA can bind to these three nuclear receptors. The binding affinities of BPA were slightly lower than that of E2 to these three receptors. The simulation results proved that the binding process was mainly driven by direct hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions. In addition, structural analysis suggested that BPA could interact with these nuclear receptors by mimicking the action of natural hormone and keeping the nuclear receptors in active conformations. The present work provided the structural evidence to recognize BPA as an endocrine disruptor and would be important guidance for seeking safer substitutions of BPA.

  3. Interactions of the SAP Domain of Human Ku70 with DNA Substrate: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Carra, Claudio; Huff, Janice; Pluth, Janice M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    NASA is developing a systems biology approach to improve the assessment of health risks associated with space radiation. The primary toxic and mutagenic lesion following radiation exposure is the DNA double strand break (DSB), thus a model incorporating proteins and pathways important in response and repair of this lesion is critical. One key protein heterodimer for systems models of radiation effects is the Ku70/80 complex. The Ku70/80 complex is important in the initial binding of DSB ends following DNA damage, and is a component of nonhomologous end joining repair, the primary pathway for DSB repair in mammalian cells. The SAP domain of Ku70 (residues 556-609), contains an a helix-extended strand-helix motif and similar motifs have been found in other nucleic acid-binding proteins critical for DNA repair. However, the exact mechanism of damage recognition and substrate specificity for the Ku heterodimer remains unclear in part due to the absence of a high-resolution structure of the SAP/DNA complex. We performed a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a system with the SAP domain of Ku70 and a 10 base pairs DNA duplex. Large-scale conformational changes were observed and some putative binding modes were suggested based on energetic analysis. These modes are consistent with previous experimental investigations. In addition, the results indicate that cooperation of SAP with other domains of Ku70/80 is necessary to explain the high affinity of binding as observed in experiments.

  4. Interactions of benzotriazole UV stabilizers with human serum albumin: Atomic insights revealed by biosensors, spectroscopies and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Shulin; Wang, Haifei; Ding, Keke; Wang, Jiaying; Pan, Liumeng; Lu, Yanli; Liu, Qingjun; Zhang, Chunlong

    2016-02-01

    Benzotriazole UV stabilizers (BZTs) belong to one prominent group of ultraviolet (UV) stabilizers and are widely used in various plastics materials. Their large production volumes, frequent detections in the environment and potential toxicities have raised increasing public concern. BZTs can be transported in vivo by transport proteins in plasma and the binding association to transport proteins may serve as a significant parameter to evaluate the bioaccumulative potential. We utilized a novel HSA biosensor, circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy to detect the dynamic interactions of six BZTs (UV-326, UV-327, UV-328, UV-329, UV-P, and BZT) with human serum albumin (HSA), and characterized the corresponding structure-activity relationships (SAR) by molecular dynamics simulations. All test BZTs potently bind at Sudlow site I of HSA with a binding constant of 10(4) L/mol at 298 K. Minor changes in the moieties of BZTs affect their interactions with HSA and differently induce conformations of HSA. Their binding reduced electrochemical impedance spectra and α-helix content of HSA, caused slight red-shifted emission, and changed fluorescence lifetime components of HSA in a concentration-dependent mode. UV-327 and UV-329 form hydrogen bonds with HSA, while UV-329, UV-P and BZT bind HSA with more favorable electrostatic interactions. Our in vitro and in silico study offered a significant framework toward the understanding of risk assessment of BZTs and provides guide for future design of environmental benign BZTs-related materials.

  5. Interactions of benzotriazole UV stabilizers with human serum albumin: Atomic insights revealed by biosensors, spectroscopies and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Shulin; Wang, Haifei; Ding, Keke; Wang, Jiaying; Pan, Liumeng; Lu, Yanli; Liu, Qingjun; Zhang, Chunlong

    2016-02-01

    Benzotriazole UV stabilizers (BZTs) belong to one prominent group of ultraviolet (UV) stabilizers and are widely used in various plastics materials. Their large production volumes, frequent detections in the environment and potential toxicities have raised increasing public concern. BZTs can be transported in vivo by transport proteins in plasma and the binding association to transport proteins may serve as a significant parameter to evaluate the bioaccumulative potential. We utilized a novel HSA biosensor, circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy to detect the dynamic interactions of six BZTs (UV-326, UV-327, UV-328, UV-329, UV-P, and BZT) with human serum albumin (HSA), and characterized the corresponding structure-activity relationships (SAR) by molecular dynamics simulations. All test BZTs potently bind at Sudlow site I of HSA with a binding constant of 10(4) L/mol at 298 K. Minor changes in the moieties of BZTs affect their interactions with HSA and differently induce conformations of HSA. Their binding reduced electrochemical impedance spectra and α-helix content of HSA, caused slight red-shifted emission, and changed fluorescence lifetime components of HSA in a concentration-dependent mode. UV-327 and UV-329 form hydrogen bonds with HSA, while UV-329, UV-P and BZT bind HSA with more favorable electrostatic interactions. Our in vitro and in silico study offered a significant framework toward the understanding of risk assessment of BZTs and provides guide for future design of environmental benign BZTs-related materials. PMID:26454115

  6. Insight into the binding interactions of CYP450 aromatase inhibitors with their target enzyme: a combined molecular docking and molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Galeazzi, Roberta; Massaccesi, Luca

    2012-03-01

    CYP450 aromatase catalyzes the terminal and rate-determining step in estrogen synthesis, the aromatization of androgens, and its inhibition is an efficient approach to treating estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Insight into the molecular basis of the interaction at the catalytic site between CYP450 aromatase inhibitors and the enzyme itself is required in order to design new and more active compounds. Hence, a combined molecular docking-molecular dynamics study was carried out to obtain the structure of the lowest energy association complexes of aromatase with some third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs) and with other novel synthesized letrozole-derived compounds which showed high in vitro activity. The results obtained clearly demonstrate the role of the pharmacophore groups present in the azaheterocyclic inhibitors (NSAIs)-namely the triazolic ring and highly functionalized aromatic moieties carrying H-bond donor or acceptor groups. In particular, it was pointed out that all of them can contribute to inhibition activity by interacting with residues of the catalytic cleft, but the amino acids involved are different for each compound, even if they belong to the same class. Furthermore, the azaheterocyclic group strongly coordinates with the Fe(II) of heme cysteinate in the most active NSAI complexes, while it prefers to adopt another orientation in less active ones.

  7. Visualizing Protein Interactions and Dynamics: Evolving a Visual Language for Molecular Animation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkinson, Jodie; McGill, Gael

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate biology education provides students with a number of learning challenges. Subject areas that are particularly difficult to understand include protein conformational change and stability, diffusion and random molecular motion, and molecular crowding. In this study, we examined the relative effectiveness of three-dimensional…

  8. Comprehensive molecular dynamics simulations of the stacking fault tetrahedron interacting with a mixed dislocation at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Haidong; Wang, Qingyuan; Ouyang, Chaojun

    2015-10-01

    The defect-free channels were frequently observed in irradiated materials, i.e. copper, as a result of the stacking fault tetrahedron (SFT) interactions with dislocations. However, the underlying mechanisms for this process are still unclear to date. To address them, a comprehensive study on the interactions between SFTs and mixed dislocations was performed using molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, eight interaction geometries were considered, in terms of the dislocation Burgers vector directions, dislocation gliding directions and intersection positions on SFT. Various interaction outcomes were revealed after dislocation detachment. (1) SFT is fully absorbed through the transformation into Lomer dislocations, and subsequently moves out of free surfaces along the dislocation. (2) SFT is partially absorbed with the absorbed SFT base moving out of free surfaces along the dislocation. (3) SFT is not absorbed but sheared with ledges left on the SFT faces. (4) SFT is unaffected by the mixed dislocation. The current simulations, especially the full SFT absorption, provide important insights into the forming mechanisms of defect-free channels in irradiated materials.

  9. Molecular dynamics study of the interactions of incident N or Ti atoms with the TiN(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenhai; Zeng, Quanren; Yuan, Lin; Qin, Yi; Chen, Mingjun; Shan, Debin

    2016-01-01

    The interaction processes between incident N or Ti atoms and the TiN(001) surface are simulated by classical molecular dynamics based on the second nearest-neighbor modified embedded-atom method potentials. The simulations are carried out for substrate temperatures between 300 and 700 K and kinetic energies of the incident atoms within the range of 0.5-10 eV. When N atoms impact against the surface, adsorption, resputtering and reflection of particles are observed; several unique atomic mechanisms are identified to account for these interactions, in which the adsorption could occur due to the atomic exchange process while the resputtering and reflection may simultaneously occur. The impact position of incident N atoms on the surface plays an important role in determining the interaction modes. Their occurrence probabilities are dependent on the kinetic energy of incident N atoms but independent on the substrate temperature. When Ti atoms are the incident particles, adsorption is the predominant interaction mode between particles and the surface. This results in the much smaller initial sticking coefficient of N atoms on the TiN(001) surface compared with that of Ti atoms. Stoichiometric TiN is promoted by N/Ti flux ratios larger than one.

  10. Interaction of OH- with xylan and its hydrated complexes: structures and molecular dynamics study using elongation method.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lin; Liu, Kai; Aoki, Yuriko

    2015-05-01

    The interaction of OH(-) group with (xylan)12 and its hydrated complexes were theoretically studied using elongation optimization (ELG-OPT) method and elongation ab initio molecular dynamics simulation (ELG-MD) method. OH(-) group could abstract a H-atom from the terminal xylan ring to form a complex (xylan)12(-)-H2O without any energy barrier. One and two extra water molecules were also added to the same terminal xylan ring. All the geometry optimization results obtained using elongation method were compared with conventional calculation results, and it suggested that ELG-OPT method worked well for (xylan)12, (xylan)12-OH(-), and its hydrated complexes. Moreover 10 ps ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were performed for complexes (xylan)12(-)-H2O, (xylan)12(-)-2H2O, and (xylan)12(-)-3H2O at 300 K, 500 K, and 700 K. (xylan)12(-)-H2O complex was stable at room temperature. However H2O molecule which was formed by OH(-) group could move at 500 K. At 700 K the H-abstract reaction reversed. Adding an extra water molecule only accelerated the water transfer reaction, but no more chemical reactions occurred, and the transfer time decreased when the temperature increased. The complex (xylan)12(-)-H2O became very stable when adding two extra water molecules even at high temperature, and it indicated that two extra water molecules stabilized the complex (xylan)12(-)-H2O.

  11. Ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Laasonen, Kari

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, an introduction to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) has been given. Many of the basic concepts, like the Hellman-Feynman forces, the difference between the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and AIMD, have been explained. Also a very versatile AIMD code, the CP2K, has been introduced. On the application, the emphasis was on the aqueous systems and chemical reactions. The biochemical applications have not been discussed in depth.

  12. MIiSR: Molecular Interactions in Super-Resolution Imaging Enables the Analysis of Protein Interactions, Dynamics and Formation of Multi-protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Fabiana A; Dirk, Brennan S; Tam, Joshua H K; Cavanagh, P Craig; Goiko, Maria; Ferguson, Stephen S G; Pasternak, Stephen H; Dikeakos, Jimmy D; de Bruyn, John R; Heit, Bryan

    2015-12-01

    Our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms which regulate cellular processes such as vesicular trafficking has been enabled by conventional biochemical and microscopy techniques. However, these methods often obscure the heterogeneity of the cellular environment, thus precluding a quantitative assessment of the molecular interactions regulating these processes. Herein, we present Molecular Interactions in Super Resolution (MIiSR) software which provides quantitative analysis tools for use with super-resolution images. MIiSR combines multiple tools for analyzing intermolecular interactions, molecular clustering and image segmentation. These tools enable quantification, in the native environment of the cell, of molecular interactions and the formation of higher-order molecular complexes. The capabilities and limitations of these analytical tools are demonstrated using both modeled data and examples derived from the vesicular trafficking system, thereby providing an established and validated experimental workflow capable of quantitatively assessing molecular interactions and molecular complex formation within the heterogeneous environment of the cell.

  13. MIiSR: Molecular Interactions in Super-Resolution Imaging Enables the Analysis of Protein Interactions, Dynamics and Formation of Multi-protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Fabiana A.; Dirk, Brennan S.; Tam, Joshua H. K.; Cavanagh, P. Craig; Goiko, Maria; Ferguson, Stephen S. G.; Pasternak, Stephen H.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; de Bruyn, John R.; Heit, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms which regulate cellular processes such as vesicular trafficking has been enabled by conventional biochemical and microscopy techniques. However, these methods often obscure the heterogeneity of the cellular environment, thus precluding a quantitative assessment of the molecular interactions regulating these processes. Herein, we present Molecular Interactions in Super Resolution (MIiSR) software which provides quantitative analysis tools for use with super-resolution images. MIiSR combines multiple tools for analyzing intermolecular interactions, molecular clustering and image segmentation. These tools enable quantification, in the native environment of the cell, of molecular interactions and the formation of higher-order molecular complexes. The capabilities and limitations of these analytical tools are demonstrated using both modeled data and examples derived from the vesicular trafficking system, thereby providing an established and validated experimental workflow capable of quantitatively assessing molecular interactions and molecular complex formation within the heterogeneous environment of the cell. PMID:26657340

  14. A molecular dynamics study of the interaction of oleate and dodecylammonium chloride surfactants with complex aluminosilicate minerals.

    PubMed

    Rai, Beena; Sathish, P; Tanwar, Jyotsna; Pradip; Moon, K S; Fuerstenau, D W

    2011-10-15

    Surface characteristics of complex aluminosilicate minerals like spodumene [LiAl(SiO(3))(2)], jadeite [NaAl(SiO(3))(2)], feldspar [KAlSi(3)O(8)], and muscovite [K(2)Al(4)(Al(2)Si(6)O(20))(OH)(4)]) are modeled. Surface energies are computed for the cleavage planes of these minerals. Adsorption mechanisms of anionic chemisorbing type oleate and cationic physisorbing type dodecylammonium chloride molecules on two different crystal planes, that is (110) and (001), of spodumene and jadeite are studied in terms of the surface-surfactant interaction energies computed using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The conclusions drawn from purely theoretical computations match remarkably well with our experimental results.

  15. Glycosylation Effects on FSH-FSHR Interaction Dynamics: A Case Study of Different FSH Glycoforms by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Dixit, Anshuman; Bousfield, George R.; Lushington, Gerald H.

    2015-01-01

    The gonadotropin known as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) plays a key role in regulating reproductive processes. Physiologically active FSH is a glycoprotein that can accommodate glycans on up to four asparagine residues, including two sites in the FSHα subunit that are critical for biochemical function, plus two sites in the β subunit, whose differential glycosylation states appear to correspond to physiologically distinct functions. Some degree of FSHβ hypo-glycosylation seems to confer advantages toward reproductive fertility of child-bearing females. In order to identify possible mechanistic underpinnings for this physiological difference we have pursued computationally intensive molecular dynamics simulations on complexes between the high affinity site of the gonadal FSH receptor (FSHR) and several FSH glycoforms including fully-glycosylated (FSH24), hypo-glycosylated (e.g., FSH15), and completely deglycosylated FSH (dgFSH). These simulations suggest that deviations in FSH/FSHR binding profile as a function of glycosylation state are modest when FSH is adorned with only small glycans, such as single N-acetylglucosamine residues. However, substantial qualitative differences emerge between FSH15 and FSH24 when FSH is decorated with a much larger, tetra-antennary glycan. Specifically, the FSHR complex with hypo-glycosylated FSH15 is observed to undergo a significant conformational shift after 5–10 ns of simulation, indicating that FSH15 has greater conformational flexibility than FSH24 which may explain the more favorable FSH15 kinetic profile. FSH15 also exhibits a stronger binding free energy, due in large part to formation of closer and more persistent salt-bridges with FSHR. PMID:26402790

  16. Interaction Dynamics in Inhibiting the Aggregation of Aβ Peptides by SWCNTs: A Combined Experimental and Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamic Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dongdong; Qi, Ruxi; Li, Shujie; He, Ruoyu; Li, Pei; Wei, Guanghong; Yang, Xinju

    2016-09-21

    The aggregation of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) is considered as the main possible cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD). How to suppress the formation of toxic Aβ aggregates has been an intensive concern over the past several decades. Increasing evidence shows that whether carbon nanomaterials can suppress or promote the aggregation depends on their physicochemical properties. However, their interaction dynamics remains elusive as amyloid fibrillation is a complex multistep process. In this paper, we utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), ThT/fluorescence spectroscopy, and cell viability measurements, combined with coarse-grained molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to study the dynamic interaction of full length Aβ with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). At the single SWCNTs scale, it is found that the presence of SWCNTs would result in rapid and spontaneous adsorption of Aβ1-40 peptides on their surface and stacking into nonfibrillar aggregates with reduced toxicity, which plays an important role in inhibiting the formation of toxic oligomers and mature fibrils. Our results provide new clues for studying the interaction in amyloid/SWCNTs system as well as for seeking amyloidosis inhibitors with carbon nanomaterials. PMID:27441457

  17. Energy and structure of bonds in the interaction of organic anions with layered double hydroxide nanosheets: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukanov, A. A.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hybrid and hierarchical nanomaterials based on layered hydroxides and oxyhydroxides of metals is a swiftly progressing field in biomedicine. Layered double hydroxides (LDH) possess a large specific surface area, significant surface electric charge and biocompatibility. Their physical and structural properties enable them to adsorb various kinds of anionic species and to transport them into cells. However, possible side effects resulting from the interaction of LDH with anions of the intercellular and intracellular medium need to be considered, since such interaction can potentially disrupt ion transport, signaling processes, apoptosis, nutrition and proliferation of living cells. In the present paper molecular dynamics is used to determine the energies of interaction of organic anions (aspartic acid, glutamic acid and bicarbonate) with a fragment of layered double hydroxide Mg/Al-LDH. The average number of hydrogen bonds between the anions and the hydroxide surface and characteristic binding configurations are determined. Possible effects of LDH on the cell resulting from binding of protein fragments and replacement of native intracellular anions with delivered anions are considered.

  18. Interaction of collagen with chlorosulphonated paraffin tanning agents: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Monti, Susanna; Bramanti, Emilia; Della Porta, Valentina; Onor, Massimo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Barone, Vincenzo

    2013-09-21

    The binding of chlorosulphonated paraffins to collagen triple helices is studied by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations and experimental spectroscopic techniques in order to disclose the principal characteristics of their interaction during the leather fattening process. Indeed, collagen is the main target to develop new leather modifying agents with specific characteristics, and an accurate design of the collagen binders, supported by predictive computational strategies, could be a successful tool to obtain new effective eco-compatible compounds able to impart to the leather the required functionalities and distinctive mechanical properties. Possible effects caused by the tanning agents on the collagen matrix have been identified from both experimental and theoretical points of view. Computational data in agreement with experiment have revealed that chlorosulphonated paraffins can interact favorably with the collagen residues having amine groups in their side chains (Arg, Lys, Asn and Gln) and reduce the tendency of the solvated collagen matrix to swell. However, the interference of chlorosulphonated paraffins with the unfolding process, which is operated mainly by the action of water, can be due both to covalent cross-linking of the collagen chains and intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions involving also the hydroxyl groups of Hyp, Ser and Thr residues.

  19. Interaction of the Antimicrobial Peptide Polymyxin B1 with Both Membranes of E. coli: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, Damien; Sessions, Richard B.; Bond, Peter J.; Khalid, Syma

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small, cationic proteins that can induce lysis of bacterial cells through interaction with their membranes. Different mechanisms for cell lysis have been proposed, but these models tend to neglect the role of the chemical composition of the membrane, which differs between bacterial species and can be heterogeneous even within a single cell. Moreover, the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli contains two membranes with differing compositions. To this end, we report the first molecular dynamics simulation study of the interaction of the antimicrobial peptide, polymyxin B1 with complex models of both the inner and outer membranes of E. coli. The results of >16 microseconds of simulation predict that polymyxin B1 is likely to interact with the membranes via distinct mechanisms. The lipopeptides aggregate in the lipopolysaccharide headgroup region of the outer membrane with limited tendency for insertion within the lipid A tails. In contrast, the lipopeptides readily insert into the inner membrane core, and the concomitant increased hydration may be responsible for bilayer destabilization and antimicrobial function. Given the urgent need to develop novel, potent antibiotics, the results presented here reveal key mechanistic details that may be exploited for future rational drug development. PMID:25885324

  20. Investigation of allosteric modulation mechanism of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 by molecular dynamics simulations, free energy and weak interaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Qifeng; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1), which belongs to class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), can be coupled with G protein to transfer extracellular signal by dimerization and allosteric regulation. Unraveling the dimer packing and allosteric mechanism can be of great help for understanding specific regulatory mechanism and designing more potential negative allosteric modulator (NAM). Here, we report molecular dynamics simulation studies of the modulation mechanism of FITM on the wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1 through weak interaction analysis and free energy calculation. The weak interaction analysis demonstrates that van der Waals (vdW) and hydrogen bonding play an important role on the dimer packing between six cholesterol molecules and mGlu1 as well as the interaction between allosteric sites T815, Y805 and FITM in wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1. Besides, the results of free energy calculations indicate that secondary binding pocket is mainly formed by the residues Thr748, Cys746, Lys811 and Ser735 except for FITM-bound pocket in crystal structure. Our results can not only reveal the dimer packing and allosteric regulation mechanism, but also can supply useful information for the design of potential NAM of mGlu1.

  1. Energy and structure of bonds in the interaction of organic anions with layered double hydroxide nanosheets: A molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Tsukanov, A.A.; Psakhie, S.G.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hybrid and hierarchical nanomaterials based on layered hydroxides and oxyhydroxides of metals is a swiftly progressing field in biomedicine. Layered double hydroxides (LDH) possess a large specific surface area, significant surface electric charge and biocompatibility. Their physical and structural properties enable them to adsorb various kinds of anionic species and to transport them into cells. However, possible side effects resulting from the interaction of LDH with anions of the intercellular and intracellular medium need to be considered, since such interaction can potentially disrupt ion transport, signaling processes, apoptosis, nutrition and proliferation of living cells. In the present paper molecular dynamics is used to determine the energies of interaction of organic anions (aspartic acid, glutamic acid and bicarbonate) with a fragment of layered double hydroxide Mg/Al-LDH. The average number of hydrogen bonds between the anions and the hydroxide surface and characteristic binding configurations are determined. Possible effects of LDH on the cell resulting from binding of protein fragments and replacement of native intracellular anions with delivered anions are considered. PMID:26817816

  2. Interaction of polar and nonpolar organic pollutants with soil organic matter: sorption experiments and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ashour A; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören; Aziz, Saadullah G; Hilal, Rifaat H; Elroby, Shaaban A; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O; Leinweber, Peter; Kühn, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    The fate of organic pollutants in the environment is influenced by several factors including the type and strength of their interactions with soil components especially SOM. However, a molecular level answer to the question "How organic pollutants interact with SOM?" is still lacking. In order to explore mechanisms of this interaction, we have developed a new SOM model and carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in parallel with sorption experiments. The new SOM model comprises free SOM functional groups (carboxylic acid and naphthalene) as well as SOM cavities (with two different sizes), simulating the soil voids, containing the same SOM functional groups. To examine the effect of the hydrophobicity on the interaction, the organic pollutants hexachlorobenzene (HCB, non-polar) and sulfanilamide (SAA, polar) were considered. The experimental and theoretical investigations explored four major points regarding sorption of SAA and HCB on soil, yielding the following results. 1--The interaction depends on the SOM chemical composition more than the SOM content. 2--The interaction causes a site-specific adsorption on the soil surfaces. 3--Sorption hysteresis occurs, which can be explained by inclusion of these pollutants inside soil voids. 4--The hydrophobic HCB is adsorbed on soil stronger than the hydrophilic SAA. Moreover, the theoretical results showed that HCB forms stable complexes with all SOM models in the aqueous solution, while most of SAA-SOM complexes are accompanied by dissociation into SAA and the free SOM models. The SOM-cavity modeling had a significant effect on binding of organic pollutants to SOM. Both HCB and SAA bind to the SOM models in the order of models with a small cavity>a large cavity>no cavity. Although HCB binds to all SOM models stronger than SAA, the latter is more affected by the presence of the cavity. Finally, HCB and SAA bind to the hydrophobic functional group (naphthalene) stronger than to the hydrophilic one (carboxylic acid

  3. State-dependent molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ciann-Dong; Weng, Hung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new mixed quantum mechanics (QM)-molecular mechanics (MM) approach, where MM is replaced by quantum Hamilton mechanics (QHM), which inherits the modeling capability of MM, while preserving the state-dependent nature of QM. QHM, a single mechanics playing the roles of QM and MM simultaneously, will be employed here to derive the three-dimensional quantum dynamics of diatomic molecules. The resulting state-dependent molecular dynamics including vibration, rotation and spin are shown to completely agree with the QM description and well match the experimental vibration-rotation spectrum. QHM can be incorporated into the framework of a mixed quantum-classical Bohmian method to enable a trajectory interpretation of orbital-spin interaction and spin entanglement in molecular dynamics.

  4. A microfluidic chamber to study the dynamics of muscle-contraction-specific molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Roman, Horia Nicolae; Juncker, David; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2015-03-01

    In vitro motility and laser trap assays are commonly used for molecular mechanics measurements. However, chemicals cannot be added during these measurements, because they create flows that alter the molecular mechanics. Thus, we designed a microfluidic device that allows the addition of chemicals without creating bulk flows. Biocompatibility of the components of this device was tested. A microchannel chamber was created by photolithography with the patterns transferred to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The PDMS chamber was bound to a polycarbonate membrane, which itself was bound to a molecular mechanics chamber. The microchannels ensured rapid distribution of the chemicals over the membrane, whereas the membrane ensured efficient delivery to the mechanics chamber while preventing bulk flow. The biocompatibility of the materials was tested by comparing the velocity (ν(max)) of propulsion by myosin of fluorescently labeled actin filaments to that of the conventional assay; no difference in ν(max) was observed. To estimate total chemical delivery time, labeled bovine serum albumin was injected in the channel chamber and TIRF was used to determine the time to reach the assay surface (2.7 ± 0.1 s). Furthermore, the standard distance of a trapped microsphere calculated during buffer diffusion using the microfluidic device (14.9 ± 3.2 nm) was not different from that calculated using the conventional assay (15.6 ± 5.3 nm, p = 0.922). Finally, ν(max) obtained by injecting adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the microchannel chamber (2.37 ± 0.48 μm/s) was not different from that obtained when ATP was delivered directly to the mechanics chamber (2.52 ± 0.42 μm/s, p = 0.822). This microfluidic prototype validates the design for molecular mechanics measurements. PMID:25629255

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation and linear interaction energy study of D-Glu-based inhibitors of the MurD ligase.

    PubMed

    Perdih, Andrej; Wolber, Gerhard; Solmajer, Tom

    2013-08-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of the bacterial peptidoglycan, where MurD is an enzyme involved at the intracellular stage of its construction, represents a collection of highly selective macromolecular targets for novel antibacterial drug design. In this study as part of our investigation of the MurD bacterial target two recently discovered classes of the MurD ligase inhibitors were investigated resulting from the lead optimization phases of the N-sulfonamide D-Glu MurD inhibitors. Molecular dynamics simulations, based on novel structural data, in conjunction with the linear interaction energy (LIE) method suggested the transferability of our previously obtained LIE coefficients to further D-Glu based classes of MurD inhibitors. Analysis of the observed dynamical behavior of these compounds in the MurD active site was supported by static drug design techniques. These results complement the current knowledge of the MurD inhibitory mechanism and provide valuable support for the D-Glu paradigm of the inhibitor design.

  6. Factors affecting the interactions between beta-lactoglobulin and fatty acids as revealed in molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yi, Changhong; Wambo, Thierry O

    2015-09-21

    Beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a bovine dairy protein, is a promiscuously interacting protein that can bind multiple hydrophobic ligands. Fatty acids (FAs), common hydrophobic molecules bound to BLG, are important sources of fuel for life because they yield large quantities of ATP when metabolized. The binding affinity increases with the length of the ligands, indicating the importance of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions between the hydrocarbon tail and the hydrophobic calyx of BLG. An exception to this rule is caprylic acid (OCA) which is two-carbon shorter but has a stronger binding affinity than capric acid. Theoretical calculations in the current literature are not accurate enough to shed light on the underlying physics of this exception. The computed affinity values are greater for longer fatty acids without respect for the caprylic exception and those values are generally several orders of magnitude away from the experimental data. In this work, we used hybrid steered molecular dynamics to accurately compute the binding free energies between BLG and the five saturated FAs of 8 to 16 carbon atoms. The computed binding free energies agree well with experimental data not only in rank but also in absolute values. We gained insights into the exceptional behavior of caprylic acid in the computed values of entropy and electrostatic interactions. We found that the electrostatic interaction between the carboxyl group of caprylic acid and the two amino groups of K60/69 in BLG is much stronger than the vdW force between the OCA's hydrophobic tail and the BLG calyx. This pulls OCA to the top of the beta barrel where it is easier to fluctuate, giving rise to greater entropy of OCA at the binding site. PMID:26272099

  7. Factors affecting the interactions between beta-lactoglobulin and fatty acids as revealed in molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Changhong; Wambo, Thierry O.

    2015-01-01

    Beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a bovine dairy protein, is a promiscuously interacting protein that can bind multiple hydrophobic ligands. Fatty acids (FAs), common hydrophobic molecules bound to BLG, are important sources of fuel for life because they yield large quantities of ATP when metabolized. The binding affinity increases with the length of the ligands, indicating the importance of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions between the hydrocarbon tail and the hydrophobic calyx of BLG. An exception to this rule is caprylic acid (OCA) which is two-carbon shorter but has a stronger binding affinity than capric acid. Theoretical calculations in the current literature are not accurate enough to shed light on the underlying physics of this exception. The computed affinity values are greater for longer fatty acids without respect for the caprylic exception and those values are generally several orders of magnitude away from the experimental data. In this work, we used hybrid steered molecular dynamics to accurately compute the binding free energies between BLG and the five saturated FAs of 8 to 16 carbon atoms. The computed binding free energies agree well with experimental data not only in rank but also in absolute values. We gained insights into the exceptional behavior of caprylic acid in the computed values of entropy and electrostatic interactions. We found that the electrostatic interaction between the carboxyl group of caprylic acid and the two amino groups of K60/69 in BLG is much stronger than the vdW force between OCA’s hydrophobic tail and the BLG calyx. This pulls OCA to the top of the beta barrel where it is easier to fluctuate, giving rise to greater entropy of OCA at the binding site. PMID:26272099

  8. Molecular dynamics of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its metabolite interacting with lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Chavarría, Helmut I; Guizado, Teobaldo R C; Pimentel, Andre S

    2015-08-28

    The interaction of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its ultimate carcinogenic 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide with lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers was successfully performed using molecular dynamics. The DPPC/DPPG/cholesterol bilayer (64 : 64 : 2) was used as the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayer model and compared with the DPPC bilayer as a reference. Dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide were inserted in water and lipid phases in order to investigate their interactions with the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers. The radial distribution function between two P atoms in polar heads shows that the 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide affects the order between the P atoms in the DPPC/DPPG/cholesterol model more than dibenz[a,h]anthracene, which is a consequence of its preference for the polar heads and dibenz[a,h]anthracene prefers to be located in the hydrocarbon chain of the phospholipid bilayers. Dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide may form aggregates in water and lipid phases, and in the water-lipid interface. The implications for the possible effect of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide in the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers are discussed.

  9. Similarities and differences of serotonin and its precursors in their interactions with model membranes studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Irene; Martini, M. Florencia; Pickholz, Mónica

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we report a molecular dynamics (MD) simulations study of relevant biological molecules as serotonin (neutral and protonated) and its precursors, tryptophan and 5-hydroxy-tryptophan, in a fully hydrated bilayer of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-choline (POPC). The simulations were carried out at the fluid lamellar phase of POPC at constant pressure and temperature conditions. Two guest molecules of each type were initially placed at the water phase. We have analyzed, the main localization, preferential orientation and specific interactions of the guest molecules within the bilayer. During the simulation run, the four molecules were preferentially found at the water-lipid interphase. We found that the interactions that stabilized the systems are essentially hydrogen bonds, salt bridges and cation-π. None of the guest molecules have access to the hydrophobic region of the bilayer. Besides, zwitterionic molecules have access to the water phase, while protonated serotonin is anchored in the interphase. Even taking into account that these simulations were done using a model membrane, our results suggest that the studied molecules could not cross the blood brain barrier by diffusion. These results are in good agreement with works that show that serotonin and Trp do not cross the BBB by simple diffusion.

  10. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant's functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies. PMID:26657745

  11. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant's functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies.

  12. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant’s functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies. PMID:26657745

  13. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  14. Environmental Changes in MoTe2 Excitonic Dynamics by Defects-Activated Molecular Interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Sahin, Hasan; Suslu, Aslihan; Ding, Laura; Bertoni, Mariana I; Peeters, F M; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2015-05-26

    Monolayers of group VI transition metal dichalcogenides possess direct gaps in the visible spectrum with the exception of MoTe2, where its gap is suitably located in the infrared region but its stability is of particular interest, as tellurium compounds are acutely sensitive to oxygen exposure. Here, our environmental (time-dependent) measurements reveal two distinct effects on MoTe2 monolayers: For weakly luminescent monolayers, photoluminescence signal and optical contrast disappear, as if they are decomposed, but yet remain intact as evidenced by AFM and Raman measurements. In contrast, strongly luminescent monolayers retain their optical contrast for a prolonged amount of time, while their PL peak blue-shifts and PL intensity saturates to slightly lower values. Our X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and DFT calculations suggest that the presence of defects and functionalization of these defect sites with O2 molecules strongly dictate their material properties and aging response by changing the excitonic dynamics due to deep or shallow states that are created within the optical band gap. Presented results not only shed light on environmental effects on fundamental material properties and excitonic dynamics of MoTe2 monolayers but also highlight striking material transformation for metastable 2D systems such as WTe2, silicone, and phosphorene. PMID:25868985

  15. Polarizable interaction potential for molecular dynamics simulations of actinoids(III) in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Duvail, Magali; Martelli, Fausto; Vitorge, Pierre; Spezia, Riccardo

    2011-07-28

    In this work, we have developed a polarizable classical interaction potential to study actinoids(III) in liquid water. This potential has the same analytical form as was recently used for lanthanoid(III) hydration [M. Duvail, P. Vitorge, and R. Spezia, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 104501 (2009)]. The hydration structure obtained with this potential is in good agreement with the experimentally measured ion-water distances and coordination numbers for the first half of the actinoid series. In particular, the almost linearly decreasing water-ion distance found experimentally is replicated within the calculations, in agreement with the actinoid contraction behavior. We also studied the hydration of the last part of the series, for which no structural experimental data are available, which allows us to provide some predictive insights on these ions. In particular we found that the ion-water distance decreases almost linearly across the series with a smooth decrease of coordination number from nine to eight at the end.

  16. Allosteric pathway identification through network analysis: from molecular dynamics simulations to interactive 2D and 3D graphs.

    PubMed

    Allain, Ariane; Chauvot de Beauchêne, Isaure; Langenfeld, Florent; Guarracino, Yann; Laine, Elodie; Tchertanov, Luba

    2014-01-01

    Allostery is a universal phenomenon that couples the information induced by a local perturbation (effector) in a protein to spatially distant regulated sites. Such an event can be described in terms of a large scale transmission of information (communication) through a dynamic coupling between structurally rigid (minimally frustrated) and plastic (locally frustrated) clusters of residues. To elaborate a rational description of allosteric coupling, we propose an original approach - MOdular NETwork Analysis (MONETA) - based on the analysis of inter-residue dynamical correlations to localize the propagation of both structural and dynamical effects of a perturbation throughout a protein structure. MONETA uses inter-residue cross-correlations and commute times computed from molecular dynamics simulations and a topological description of a protein to build a modular network representation composed of clusters of residues (dynamic segments) linked together by chains of residues (communication pathways). MONETA provides a brand new direct and simple visualization of protein allosteric communication. A GEPHI module implemented in the MONETA package allows the generation of 2D graphs of the communication network. An interactive PyMOL plugin permits drawing of the communication pathways between chosen protein fragments or residues on a 3D representation. MONETA is a powerful tool for on-the-fly display of communication networks in proteins. We applied MONETA for the analysis of communication pathways (i) between the main regulatory fragments of receptors tyrosine kinases (RTKs), KIT and CSF-1R, in the native and mutated states and (ii) in proteins STAT5 (STAT5a and STAT5b) in the phosphorylated and the unphosphorylated forms. The description of the physical support for allosteric coupling by MONETA allowed a comparison of the mechanisms of (a) constitutive activation induced by equivalent mutations in two RTKs and (b) allosteric regulation in the activated and non

  17. Exploring the Interaction of SV2A with Racetams Using Homology Modelling, Molecular Dynamics and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joanna; Daniels, Veronique; Sands, Zara A.; Lebon, Florence; Shi, Jiye; Biggin, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    The putative Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) transporter, SV2A, is the target for levetiracetam (LEV), which is a successful anti-epileptic drug. Furthermore, SV2A knock out mice display a severe seizure phenotype and die after a few weeks. Despite this, the mode of action of LEV is not known at the molecular level. It would be extremely desirable to understand this more fully in order to aid the design of improved anti-epileptic compounds. Since there is no structure for SV2A, homology modelling can provide insight into the ligand-binding site. However, it is not a trivial process to build such models, since SV2A has low sequence identity to those MFS transporters whose structures are known. A further level of complexity is added by the fact that it is not known which conformational state of the receptor LEV binds to, as multiple conformational states have been inferred by tomography and ligand binding assays or indeed, if binding is exclusive to a single state. Here, we explore models of both the inward and outward facing conformational states of SV2A (according to the alternating access mechanism for MFS transporters). We use a sequence conservation analysis to help guide the homology modelling process and generate the models, which we assess further with Molecular Dynamics (MD). By comparing the MD results in conjunction with docking and simulation of a LEV-analogue used in radioligand binding assays, we were able to suggest further residues that line the binding pocket. These were confirmed experimentally. In particular, mutation of D670 leads to a complete loss of binding. The results shed light on the way LEV analogues may interact with SV2A and may help with the on-going design of improved anti-epileptic compounds. PMID:25692762

  18. dsRNA-protein interactions studied by molecular dynamics techniques. Unravelling dsRNA recognition by DCL1.

    PubMed

    Drusin, Salvador I; Suarez, Irina P; Gauto, Diego F; Rasia, Rodolfo M; Moreno, Diego M

    2016-04-15

    Double stranded RNA (dsRNA) participates in several biological processes, where RNA molecules acquire secondary structure inside the cell through base complementarity. The double stranded RNA binding domain (dsRBD) is one of the main protein folds that is able to recognize and bind to dsRNA regions. The N-terminal dsRBD of DCL1 in Arabidopsis thaliana (DCL1-1), in contrast to other studied dsRBDs, lacks a stable structure, behaving as an intrinsically disordered protein. DCL1-1 does however recognize dsRNA by acquiring a canonical fold in the presence of its substrate. Here we present a detailed modeling and molecular dynamics study of dsRNA recognition by DCL1-1. We found that DCL1-1 forms stable complexes with different RNAs and we characterized the residues involved in binding. Although the domain shows a binding loop substantially shorter than other homologs, it can still interact with the dsRNA and results in bending of the dsRNA A-type helix. Furthermore, we found that R8, a non-conserved residue located in the first dsRNA binding region, recognizes preferentially mismatched base pairs. We discuss our findings in the context of the function of DCL1-1 within the microRNA processing complex.

  19. Interaction of run-in edge dislocations with twist grain boundaries in Al-a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, S.; Naveen Kumar, N.; Samal, M. K.; Chavan, V. M.; Patel, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    Grain boundaries play an important role in outlining the mechanical properties of crystalline materials. They act as sites for absorption/nucleation of dislocations, which are the main carriers of plastic deformation. In view of this, the interactions between edge dislocations and twist grain boundaries-dislocation pileup, dislocation absorption and dislocation emission were explored by performing molecular dynamics simulations in face-centered cubic Al using embedded atom method. The ?1 1 0? twist grain boundaries with various misorientation angles were selected for this purpose. It was found that the misorientation angle of boundary and stress anomalies arising from repeated dislocation absorption at the grain boundaries are the important parameters in determining the ability of the boundary to emit dislocations. Complex network of dislocations results in later stages of deformation, which may have a significant effect on the mechanical properties of the material. The peculiarities of dislocation nucleation, their emission from twist grain boundaries and the ramifications of this study towards development of higher length scale material models are discussed.

  20. A molecular dynamics approach to ligand-receptor interaction in the aspirin-human serum albumin complex.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, H Ariel; McCarthy, Andrés N; Grigera, J Raúl

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present a study of the interaction between human serum albumin (HSA) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, C(9)H(8)O(4)) by molecular dynamics simulations (MD). Starting from an experimentally resolved structure of the complex, we performed the extraction of the ligand by means of the application of an external force. After stabilization of the system, we quantified the force used to remove the ASA from its specific site of binding to HSA and calculated the mechanical nonequilibrium external work done during this process. We obtain a reasonable value for the upper boundary of the Gibbs free energy difference (an equilibrium thermodynamic potential) between the complexed and noncomplexed states. To achieve this goal, we used the finite sampling estimator of the average work, calculated from the Jarzynski Equality. To evaluate the effect of the solvent, we calculated the so-called "viscous work," that is, the work done to move the aspirin in the same trajectory through the solvent in absence of the protein, so as to assess the relevance of its contribution to the total work. The results are in good agreement with the available experimental data for the albumin affinity constant for aspirin, obtained through quenching fluorescence methods.

  1. A Molecular Dynamics Approach to Ligand-Receptor Interaction in the Aspirin-Human Serum Albumin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, H. Ariel; McCarthy, Andrés N.; Grigera, J. Raúl

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present a study of the interaction between human serum albumin (HSA) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, C9H8O4) by molecular dynamics simulations (MD). Starting from an experimentally resolved structure of the complex, we performed the extraction of the ligand by means of the application of an external force. After stabilization of the system, we quantified the force used to remove the ASA from its specific site of binding to HSA and calculated the mechanical nonequilibrium external work done during this process. We obtain a reasonable value for the upper boundary of the Gibbs free energy difference (an equilibrium thermodynamic potential) between the complexed and noncomplexed states. To achieve this goal, we used the finite sampling estimator of the average work, calculated from the Jarzynski Equality. To evaluate the effect of the solvent, we calculated the so-called “viscous work,” that is, the work done to move the aspirin in the same trajectory through the solvent in absence of the protein, so as to assess the relevance of its contribution to the total work. The results are in good agreement with the available experimental data for the albumin affinity constant for aspirin, obtained through quenching fluorescence methods. PMID:23251150

  2. Open boundary molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Buscalioni, R.; Sablić, J.; Praprotnik, M.

    2015-09-01

    This contribution analyzes several strategies and combination of methodologies to perform molecular dynamic simulations in open systems. Here, the term open indicates that the total system has boundaries where transfer of mass, momentum and energy can take place. This formalism, which we call Open Boundary Molecular Dynamics (OBMD), can act as interface of different schemes, such as Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS) and Hybrid continuum-particle dynamics to link atomistic, coarse-grained (CG) and continuum (Eulerian) fluid dynamics in the general framework of fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations. The core domain of the simulation box is solved using all-atom descriptions. The CG layer introduced using AdResS is located at the outer part of the open box to make feasible the insertion of large molecules into the system. Communications between the molecular system and the outer world are carried out in the outer layers, called buffers. These coupling preserve momentum and mass conservation laws and can thus be linked with Eulerian hydro- dynamic solvers. In its simpler form, OBMD allows, however, to impose a local pressure tensor and a heat flux across the system's boundaries. For a one component molecular system, the external normal pressure and temperature determine the external chemical potential and thus the independent parameters of a grand-canonical ensemble simulation. Extended ensembles under non-equilibrium stationary states can also be simulated as well as time dependent forcings (e.g. oscillatory rheology). To illustrate the robustness of the combined OBMD-AdResS method, we present simulations of star-polymer melts at equilibrium and in sheared flow.

  3. Intramolecular interactions stabilizing compact conformations of the intrinsically disordered kinase-inhibitor domain of Sic1: a molecular dynamics investigation

    PubMed Central

    Lambrughi, Matteo; Papaleo, Elena; Testa, Lorenzo; Brocca, Stefania; De Gioia, Luca; Grandori, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs) are key regulatory proteins of the eukaryotic cell cycle, which modulate cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activity. CKIs perform their inhibitory effect by the formation of ternary complexes with a target kinase and its cognate cyclin. These regulators generally belong to the class of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which lack a well-defined and organized three-dimensional (3D) structure in their free state, undergoing folding upon binding to specific partners. Unbound IDPs are not merely random-coil structures, but can present intrinsically folded structural units (IFSUs) and collapsed conformations. These structural features can be relevant to protein function in vivo. The yeast CKI Sic1 is a 284-amino acid IDP that binds to Cdk1 in complex with the Clb5,6 cyclins, preventing phosphorylation of G1 substrates and, therefore, entrance to the S phase. Sic1 degradation, triggered by multiple phosphorylation events, promotes cell-cycle progression. Previous experimental studies pointed out a propensity of Sic1 and its isolated domains to populate both extended and compact conformations. The present contribution provides models for compact conformations of the Sic1 kinase-inhibitory domain (KID) by all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent and in the absence of interactors. The results are integrated by spectroscopic and spectrometric data. Helical IFSUs are identified, along with networks of intramolecular interactions. The results identify a group of putative hub residues and networks of electrostatic interactions, which are likely to be involved in the stabilization of the globular states. PMID:23189058

  4. Interactions of aqueous amino acids and proteins with the (110) surface of ZnS in molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Nawrocki, Grzegorz; Cieplak, Marek

    2014-03-01

    The growing usage of nanoparticles of zinc sulfide as quantum dots and biosensors calls for a theoretical assessment of interactions of ZnS with biomolecules. We employ the molecular-dynamics-based umbrella sampling method to determine potentials of mean force for 20 single amino acids near the ZnS (110) surface in aqueous solutions. We find that five amino acids do not bind at all and the binding energy of the remaining amino acids does not exceed 4.3 kJ/mol. Such energies are comparable to those found for ZnO (and to hydrogen bonds in proteins) but the nature of the specificity is different. Cysteine can bind with ZnS in a covalent way, e.g., by forming the disulfide bond with S in the solid. If this effect is included within a model incorporating the Morse potential, then the potential well becomes much deeper--the binding energy is close to 98 kJ/mol. We then consider tryptophan cage, a protein of 20 residues, and characterize its events of adsorption to ZnS. We demonstrate the relevance of interactions between the amino acids in the selection of optimal adsorbed conformations and recognize the key role of cysteine in generation of lasting adsorption. We show that ZnS is more hydrophobic than ZnO and that the density profile of water is quite different than that forming near ZnO--it has only a minor articulation into layers. Furthermore, the first layer of water is disordered and mobile. PMID:24606380

  5. Interactions of aqueous amino acids and proteins with the (110) surface of ZnS in molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocki, Grzegorz; Cieplak, Marek

    2014-03-07

    The growing usage of nanoparticles of zinc sulfide as quantum dots and biosensors calls for a theoretical assessment of interactions of ZnS with biomolecules. We employ the molecular-dynamics-based umbrella sampling method to determine potentials of mean force for 20 single amino acids near the ZnS (110) surface in aqueous solutions. We find that five amino acids do not bind at all and the binding energy of the remaining amino acids does not exceed 4.3 kJ/mol. Such energies are comparable to those found for ZnO (and to hydrogen bonds in proteins) but the nature of the specificity is different. Cysteine can bind with ZnS in a covalent way, e.g., by forming the disulfide bond with S in the solid. If this effect is included within a model incorporating the Morse potential, then the potential well becomes much deeper—the binding energy is close to 98 kJ/mol. We then consider tryptophan cage, a protein of 20 residues, and characterize its events of adsorption to ZnS. We demonstrate the relevance of interactions between the amino acids in the selection of optimal adsorbed conformations and recognize the key role of cysteine in generation of lasting adsorption. We show that ZnS is more hydrophobic than ZnO and that the density profile of water is quite different than that forming near ZnO—it has only a minor articulation into layers. Furthermore, the first layer of water is disordered and mobile.

  6. Interactions of hydrogen with the iron and iron carbide interfaces: a ReaxFF molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Mahbubul; Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C T; Raman, Sumathy

    2016-01-14

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a well-known material phenomenon that causes significant loss in the mechanical strength of structural iron and often leads to catastrophic failures. In order to provide a detailed atomistic description of HE we have used a reactive bond order potential to adequately describe the diffusion of hydrogen as well as its chemical interaction with other hydrogen atoms, defects, and the host metal. The currently published ReaxFF force field for Fe/C/H systems was originally developed to describe Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysis [C. Zou, A. C. T. van Duin and D. C. Sorescu, Top. Catal., 2012, 55, 391-401], and especially had been trained for surface formation energies, binding energies of small hydrocarbon radicals on different surfaces of iron and the barrier heights of surface reactions. We merged this force field with the latest ReaxFF carbon parameters [S. Goverapet Srinivasan, A. C. T. van Duin and P. Ganesh, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2015, 119, 1089-5639] and used the same training data set to refit the Fe/C interaction parameters. The present work is focused on evaluating the applicability of this reactive force field to describe material characteristics and study the role of defects and impurities in the bulk and at the precipitator interfaces. We study the interactions of hydrogen with pure and defective α-iron (ferrite), Fe3C (cementite), and ferrite-cementite interfaces with a vacancy cluster. We also investigate the growth of nanovoids in α-iron using a grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) scheme. The calculated hydrogen diffusion coefficients for both ferrite and cementite phases predict a decrease in the work of separation with increasing hydrogen concentration at the ferrite-cementite interface, suggesting a hydrogen-induced decohesion behavior. Hydrogen accumulation at the interface was observed during molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which is consistent with experimental findings. These results demonstrate the ability of the Reax

  7. NMR investigations of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for characterizing protein conformational dynamics on multiple time scales. The insights obtained from NMR studies are complemented and by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide full atomistic details of protein dynamics. Homologous mesophilic (E. coli) and thermophilic (T. thermophilus) ribonuclease H (RNase H) enzymes serve to illustrate how changes in protein sequence and structure that affect conformational dynamic processes can be monitored and characterized by joint analysis of NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations. A Gly residue inserted within a putative hinge between helices B and C is conserved among thermophilic RNases H, but absent in mesophilic RNases H. Experimental spin relaxation measurements show that the dynamic properties of T. thermophilus RNase H are recapitulated in E. coli RNase H by insertion of a Gly residue between helices B and C. Additional specific intramolecular interactions that modulate backbone and sidechain dynamical properties of the Gly-rich loop and of the conserved Trp residue flanking the Gly insertion site have been identified using MD simulations and subsequently confirmed by NMR spin relaxation measurements. These results emphasize the importance of hydrogen bonds and local steric interactions in restricting conformational fluctuations, and the absence of such interactions in allowing conformational adaptation to substrate binding.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics has evolved from a niche method mainly applicable to model systems into a cornerstone in molecular biology. It provides us with a powerful toolbox that enables us to follow and understand structure and dynamics with extreme detail-literally on scales where individual atoms can be tracked. However, with great power comes great responsibility: Simulations will not magically provide valid results, but it requires a skilled researcher. This chapter introduces you to this, and makes you aware of some potential pitfalls. We focus on the two basic and most used methods; optimizing a structure with energy minimization and simulating motion with molecular dynamics. The statistical mechanics theory is covered briefly as well as limitations, for instance the lack of quantum effects and short timescales. As a practical example, we show each step of a simulation of a small protein, including examples of hardware and software, how to obtain a starting structure, immersing it in water, and choosing good simulation parameters. You will learn how to analyze simulations in terms of structure, fluctuations, geometrical features, and how to create ray-traced movies for presentations. With modern GPU acceleration, a desktop can perform μs-scale simulations of small proteins in a day-only 15 years ago this took months on the largest supercomputer in the world. As a final exercise, we show you how to set up, perform, and interpret such a folding simulation.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Erik R

    2008-01-01

    Molecular simulation is a very powerful toolbox in modern molecular modeling, and enables us to follow and understand structure and dynamics with extreme detail--literally on scales where motion of individual atoms can be tracked. This chapter focuses on the two most commonly used methods, namely, energy minimization and molecular dynamics, that, respectively, optimize structure and simulate the natural motion of biological macromolecules. The common theoretical framework based on statistical mechanics is covered briefly as well as limitations of the computational approach, for instance, the lack of quantum effects and limited timescales accessible. As a practical example, a full simulation of the protein lysozyme in water is described step by step, including examples of necessary hardware and software, how to obtain suitable starting molecular structures, immersing it in a solvent, choosing good simulation parameters, and energy minimization. The chapter also describes how to analyze the simulation in terms of potential energies, structural fluctuations, coordinate stability, geometrical features, and, finally, how to create beautiful ray-traced movies that can be used in presentations.

  10. Parallel Molecular Dynamics Program for Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Plimpton, Steve

    1995-03-07

    ParBond is a parallel classical molecular dynamics code that models bonded molecular systems, typically of an organic nature. It uses classical force fields for both non-bonded Coulombic and Van der Waals interactions and for 2-, 3-, and 4-body bonded (bond, angle, dihedral, and improper) interactions. It integrates Newton''s equation of motion for the molecular system and evaluates various thermodynamical properties of the system as it progresses.

  11. Interactions of the C-terminal Domain of Human Ku70 with DNA Substrate: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Huff, Janice; Pluth, Janice M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    NASA is developing a systems biology approach to improve the assessment of health risks associated with space radiation. The primary toxic and mutagenic lesion following radiation exposure is the DNA double strand break (DSB), thus a model incorporating proteins and pathways important in response and repair of this lesion is critical. One key protein heterodimer for systems models of radiation effects is the Ku(sub 70/80) complex. The Ku70/80 complex is important in the initial binding of DSB ends following DNA damage, and is a component of nonhomologous end joining repair, the primary pathway for DSB repair in mammalian cells. The C-terminal domain of Ku70 (Ku70c, residues 559-609), contains an helix-extended strand-helix motif and similar motifs have been found in other nucleic acid-binding proteins critical for DNA repair. However, the exact mechanism of damage recognition and substrate specificity for the Ku heterodimer remains unclear in part due to the absence of a high-resolution structure of the Ku70c/DNA complex. We performed a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a system with the subunit Ku70c and a 14 base pairs DNA duplex, whose starting structures are designed to be variable so as to mimic their different binding modes. By analyzing conformational changes and energetic properties of the complex during MD simulations, we found that interactions are preferred at DNA ends, and within the major groove, which is consistent with previous experimental investigations. In addition, the results indicate that cooperation of Ku70c with other subunits of Ku(sub 70/80) is necessary to explain the high affinity of binding as observed in experiments.

  12. Interaction mechanism exploration of R-bicalutamide/S-1 with WT/W741L AR using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongli; An, Xiaoli; Li, Shuyan; Wang, Yuwei; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang

    2015-12-01

    R-Bicalutamide is a first generation antiandrogen used to treat prostate cancer, which inhibits androgen action by competitively binding to the androgen receptor (AR). However, R-bicalutamide was discovered to exhibit some agonistic properties in clinical application. According to reports, the W741L AR mutation may lead to resistance towards R-bicalutamide. But the mechanism of the R-bicalutamide switch from an antagonist to an agonist due to the mutation of AR W741L is still not so clear. Another molecule, S-1, owing to a very similar structure to R-bicalutamide, is always agonistic to both the wild type and W741L AR. The main difference between these two chemicals is that S-1 has an ether linkage while R-bicalutamide has a sulfonyl group. To study the drug-resistant mechanism caused by W741L mutation and the opposite effects arising from subtle structure differences, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) calculations were employed to explore the interaction mechanisms between R-bicalutamide/S-1 and WT/W741L AR. The calculated binding free energies are in accordance with the reported experimental values. The obtained results indicate that M895 and W741 are vital amino acids in the antagonism of R-bicalutamide. The bulkier substitution of sulfonyl and tryptophan push aside M895, together with helix 12 (H12), to expose the ligand-binding domain resulting in the antagonistic conformation of the AR. If W741 is mutated to L741, the B-ring of these two chemicals would shift toward L741. At the same time, M895 dragging helix H12, would also move closer to L741. So H12 tends to cover the AR ligand-binding domain to a certain degree, changing the androgen receptor from an antagonistic to an agonistic conformation, which may explain the agonism of R-bicalutamide to the mutant W741L AR.

  13. Interactive Modelling of Molecular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, J. R.; Kreylos, O.; Hamann, B.

    2004-12-01

    The "Nanotech Construction Kit" (NCK) [1] is a new project aimed at improving the understanding of molecular structures at a nanometer-scale level by visualization and interactive manipulation. Our very first prototype is a virtual-reality program allowing the construction of silica and carbon structures from scratch by assembling them one atom at a time. In silica crystals or glasses, the basic building block is an SiO4 unit, with the four oxygen atoms arranged around the central silicon atom in the shape of a regular tetrahedron. Two silicate units can connect to each other by their silicon atoms covalently bonding to one shared oxygen atom. Geometrically, this means that two tetrahedra can link at their vertices. Our program is based on geometric representations and uses simple force fields to simulate the interaction of building blocks, such as forming/breaking of bonds and repulsion. Together with stereoscopic visualization and direct manipulation of building blocks using wands or data gloves, this enables users to create realistic and complex molecular models in short amounts of time. The NCK can either be used as a standalone tool, to analyze or experiment with molecular structures, or it can be used in combination with "traditional" molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In a first step, the NCK can create initial configurations for subsequent MD simulation. In a more evolved setup, the NCK can serve as a visual front-end for an ongoing MD simulation, visualizing changes in simulation state in real time. Additionally, the NCK can be used to change simulation state on-the-fly, to experiment with different simulation conditions, or force certain events, e.g., the forming of a bond, and observe the simulation's reaction. [1] http://graphics.cs.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/NanoTech

  14. Electrostatic interactions in molecular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painelli, Anna; Terenziani, Francesca

    2004-03-01

    Non-additive collective behavior appears in molecular materials as a result of intermolecular interactions. We present a model for interacting polar and polarizable molecules that applies to different supramolecular architectures of donor-π-acceptor molecules. We follow a bottom-up modeling strategy: the detailed analysis of spectroscopic data of solvated molecules leads to the definition of a simple two-state model for the molecular units. Classical electrostatic interactions are then introduced to model molecular clusters. The molecular properties are strickingly affected by supramolecular interactions, as demonstrated by spectroscopic studies. Brand new phenomena, like phase transitions and multielectron transfer, with no counterpart at the molecular level are observed as direct consequences of electrostatic intermolecular interactions.

  15. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jungen, Ch.

    2015-01-22

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering.

  16. Ab initio molecular orbital-configuration interaction based quantum master equation (MOQME) approach to the dynamic first hyperpolarizabilities of asymmetric π-conjugated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Ryohei; Fujii, Hiroaki; Minami, Takuya; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Nakano, Masayoshi

    2015-01-22

    In this study, we apply the ab initio molecular orbital - configuration interaction based quantum master equation (MOQME) approach to the calculation and analysis of the dynamic first hyperpolarizabilities (β) of asymmetric π-conjugated molecules. In this approach, we construct the excited state models by the ab initio configuration interaction singles method. Then, time evolutions of system reduced density matrix ρ(t) and system polarization p(t) are calculated by the QME approach. Dynamic β in the second harmonic generation is calculated based on the nonperturbative definition of nonlinear optical susceptibility, using the frequency domain system polarization p(ω). Spatial contributions of electrons to β are analyzed based on the dynamic hyperpolarizability density map, which visualizes the second-order response of charge density oscillating with a frequency of 2ω. We apply the present method to the calculation of the dynamic β of a series of donor/acceptor substituted polyene oligomers, and then discuss the applicability of the MOQME method to the calculation and analysis of dynamic NLO properties of molecular systems.

  17. Introduction to Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2012-07-10

    Molecular Dynamics is the numerical solution of the equations of motion of a set of atoms, given an interatomic potential V and some boundary and initial conditions. Molecular Dynamics is the largest scale model that gives unbiased dynamics [x(t),p(t)] in full atomistic detail. Molecular Dynamics: is simple; is 'exact' for classical dynamics (with respect to a given V); can be used to compute any (atomistic) thermodynamical or dynamical properties; naturally handles complexity -- the system does the right thing at the right time. The physics derives only from the interatomic potential.

  18. Integration of structural dynamics and molecular evolution via protein interaction networks: a new era in genomic medicine.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Avishek; Butler, Brandon M; Kumar, Sudhir; Ozkan, S Banu

    2015-12-01

    Sequencing technologies are revealing many new non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs) in each personal exome. To assess their functional impacts, comparative genomics is frequently employed to predict if they are benign or not. However, evolutionary analysis alone is insufficient, because it misdiagnoses many disease-associated nsSNVs, such as those at positions involved in protein interfaces, and because evolutionary predictions do not provide mechanistic insights into functional change or loss. Structural analyses can aid in overcoming both of these problems by incorporating conformational dynamics and allostery in nSNV diagnosis. Finally, protein-protein interaction networks using systems-level methodologies shed light onto disease etiology and pathogenesis. Bridging these network approaches with structurally resolved protein interactions and dynamics will advance genomic medicine.

  19. Interactions of Pleckstrin Homology Domains with Membranes: Adding Back the Bilayer via High-Throughput Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Eiji; Kalli, Antreas C; Yasuoka, Kenji; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-08-01

    A molecular simulation pipeline for determining the mode of interaction of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains with phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP)-containing lipid bilayers is presented. We evaluate our methodology for the GRP1 PH domain via comparison with structural and biophysical data. Coarse-grained simulations yield a 2D density landscape for PH/membrane interactions alongside residue contact profiles. Predictions of the membrane localization and interactions of 13 PH domains reveal canonical, non-canonical, and dual PIP-binding sites on the proteins. Thus, the PH domains associate with the PIP molecules in the membrane via a highly positively charged loop. Some PH domains exhibit modes of interaction with PIP-containing membranes additional to this canonical binding mode. All 13 PH domains cause a degree of local clustering of PIP molecules upon binding to the membrane. This provides a global picture of PH domain interactions with membranes. The high-throughput approach could be extended to other families of peripheral membrane proteins. PMID:27427480

  20. Investigation into the interaction of losartan with human serum albumin and glycated human serum albumin by spectroscopic and molecular dynamics simulation techniques: A comparison study.

    PubMed

    Moeinpour, Farid; Mohseni-Shahri, Fatemeh S; Malaekeh-Nikouei, Bizhan; Nassirli, Hooriyeh

    2016-09-25

    The interaction between losartan and human serum albumin (HSA), as well as its glycated form (gHSA) was studied by multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular dynamics simulation under physiological conditions. The binding information, including the binding constants, effective quenching constant and number of binding sites showed that the binding partiality of losartan to HSA was higher than to gHSA. The findings of three-dimensional fluorescence spectra demonstrated that the binding of losartan to HSA and gHSA would alter the protein conformation. The distances between Trp residue and the binding sites of the drug were evaluated on the basis of the Förster theory, and it was indicated that non-radiative energy transfer from HSA and gHSA to the losartan happened with a high possibility. According to molecular dynamics simulation, the protein secondary and tertiary structure changes were compared in HSA and gHSA for clarifying the obtained results.

  1. H2O and CO2 confined in cement based materials: an ab initio molecular dynamics study with van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, James; Miranda, Caetano; Fazzio, Adalberto

    2013-03-01

    Although the cement has been widely used for a long time, very little is known regarding the atomistic mechanism behind its functionality. Particularly, the dynamics of molecular systems at confined nanoporous and water hydration is largely unknown. Here, we study the dynamical and structural properties of H2O and CO2 confined between Tobermorite 9Å(T9) surfaces with Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics with and without van der Waals (vdW) interactions, at room temperature. For H2O confined, we have observed a broadening in the intra and intermolecular bond angle distribution. A shift from an ice-like to a liquid-like infrared spectrum with the inclusion of vdW interactions was observed. The bond distance for the confined CO2 was increased, followed with the appearance of shorter (larger) intramolecular (intermolecular) angles. These structural modifications result in variations on the CO2 symmetric stretching Raman active vibration modes. The diffusion coefficient obtained for both confined H2O and CO2 were found to be lower than their bulk counterparts. Interestingly, during the water dynamics, a proton exchange between H2O and the T9 surface was observed. However, for confined CO2, no chemical reactions or bond breaking were observed.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations and structure-based network analysis reveal structural and functional aspects of G-protein coupled receptor dimer interactions.

    PubMed

    Baltoumas, Fotis A; Theodoropoulou, Margarita C; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2016-06-01

    A significant amount of experimental evidence suggests that G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) do not act exclusively as monomers but also form biologically relevant dimers and oligomers. However, the structural determinants, stoichiometry and functional importance of GPCR oligomerization remain topics of intense speculation. In this study we attempted to evaluate the nature and dynamics of GPCR oligomeric interactions. A representative set of GPCR homodimers were studied through Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics simulations, combined with interface analysis and concepts from network theory for the construction and analysis of dynamic structural networks. Our results highlight important structural determinants that seem to govern receptor dimer interactions. A conserved dynamic behavior was observed among different GPCRs, including receptors belonging in different GPCR classes. Specific GPCR regions were highlighted as the core of the interfaces. Finally, correlations of motion were observed between parts of the dimer interface and GPCR segments participating in ligand binding and receptor activation, suggesting the existence of mechanisms through which dimer formation may affect GPCR function. The results of this study can be used to drive experiments aimed at exploring GPCR oligomerization, as well as in the study of transmembrane protein-protein interactions in general.

  3. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of ion-solid interactions in zirconate pyrochlores

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen; Zu, X. T.

    2015-01-31

    In this paper, an ab initio molecular dynamics method is employed to study low energy recoil events in zirconate pyrochlores (A2Zr2O7, A = La, Nd and Sm). It shows that both cations and anions in Nd2Zr2O7 and Sm2Zr2O7 are generally more likely to be displaced than those in La2Zr2O7. The damage end states mainly consist of Frenkel pair defects, and the Frenkel pair formation energies in Nd2Zr2O7 and Sm2Zr2O7 are lower than those in La2Zr2O7. These results suggest that the order–disorder structural transition more easily occurs in Nd2Zr2O7 and Sm2Zr2O7 resulting in a defect-fluorite structure, which agrees well with experimental observations. Our calculations indicate that oxygen migration from 48f and 8b to 8a sites is dominant under low energy irradiation. A number of new defects, including four types of cation Frenkel pairs and six types of anion Frenkel pairs, are revealed by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The present findings may help to advance the fundamental understanding of the irradiation response behavior of zirconate pyrochlores.

  4. Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

    2008-10-13

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

  5. Molecular dynamics of protein A and a WW domain with a united-residue model including hydrodynamic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipska, Agnieszka G.; Seidman, Steven R.; Sieradzan, Adam K.; Giełdoń, Artur; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2016-05-01

    The folding of the N-terminal part of the B-domain of staphylococcal protein A (PDB ID: 1BDD, a 46-residue three-α-helix bundle) and the formin-binding protein 28 WW domain (PDB ID: 1E0L, a 37-residue three-stranded anti-parallel β protein) was studied by means of Langevin dynamics with the coarse-grained UNRES force field to assess the influence of hydrodynamic interactions on protein-folding pathways and kinetics. The unfolded, intermediate, and native-like structures were identified by cluster analysis, and multi-exponential functions were fitted to the time dependence of the fractions of native and intermediate structures, respectively, to determine bulk kinetics. It was found that introducing hydrodynamic interactions slows down both the formation of an intermediate state and the transition from the collapsed structures to the final native-like structures by creating multiple kinetic traps. Therefore, introducing hydrodynamic interactions considerably slows the folding, as opposed to the results obtained from earlier studies with the use of Gō-like models.

  6. Molecular dynamics of protein A and a WW domain with a united-residue model including hydrodynamic interaction.

    PubMed

    Lipska, Agnieszka G; Seidman, Steven R; Sieradzan, Adam K; Giełdoń, Artur; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2016-05-14

    The folding of the N-terminal part of the B-domain of staphylococcal protein A (PDB ID: 1BDD, a 46-residue three-α-helix bundle) and the formin-binding protein 28 WW domain (PDB ID: 1E0L, a 37-residue three-stranded anti-parallel β protein) was studied by means of Langevin dynamics with the coarse-grained UNRES force field to assess the influence of hydrodynamic interactions on protein-folding pathways and kinetics. The unfolded, intermediate, and native-like structures were identified by cluster analysis, and multi-exponential functions were fitted to the time dependence of the fractions of native and intermediate structures, respectively, to determine bulk kinetics. It was found that introducing hydrodynamic interactions slows down both the formation of an intermediate state and the transition from the collapsed structures to the final native-like structures by creating multiple kinetic traps. Therefore, introducing hydrodynamic interactions considerably slows the folding, as opposed to the results obtained from earlier studies with the use of Gō-like models. PMID:27179474

  7. Theoretical studies of molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, W.A. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This research program is directed at extending fundamental knowledge of atoms and molecules including their electronic structure, mutual interaction, collision dynamics, and interaction with radiation. The approach combines the use of ab initio methods--Hartree-Fock (HF) multiconfiguration HF, configuration interaction, and the recently developed quantum Monte Carlo (MC)--to describe electronic structure, intermolecular interactions, and other properties, with various methods of characterizing inelastic and reaction collision processes, and photodissociation dynamics. Present activity is focused on the development and application of the QMC method, surface catalyzed reactions, and reorientation cross sections.

  8. Nanofiber near-field light-matter interactions for enhanced detection of molecular level displacements and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ilsun; Baker, Sarah E; Kim, Kanguk; Fischer, Nicholas O; Heineck, Daniel; Wang, Yinmin; Esener, Sadik C; Sirbuly, Donald J

    2013-04-10

    We experimentally demonstrate that plasmonic nanoparticles embedded in the evanescent field of subwavelength optical waveguides (WGs) are highly sensitive to distances normal to the propagation of light, showing an ~10× increase in spatial resolution compared to the optical field decay of the WG. The scattering cross-section of the Au nanoparticle is increased by the plasmon-dielectric coupling interaction when the nanoparticle is placed near the dielectric surface of the WG, and the decay of the scattering signal is enhanced, showing angstrom level distance sensitivity within 10 nm from the WG. Numerical studies with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method correlate well with the experimental results. To demonstrate real-time monitoring of a single molecule stretching in the evanescent field, we linked individual single-stranded DNA molecules between the WG and plasmonic nanoparticles and pushed on the nanoparticles with fluidic forces. The simple design and ease of obtaining optical feedback on molecular displacements makes our approach ideal for new in situ force sensing devices, imaging technologies, and high-throughput molecular analysis.

  9. Detection of molecular interactions

    DOEpatents

    Groves, John T.; Baksh, Michael M.; Jaros, Michal

    2012-02-14

    A method and assay are described for measuring the interaction between a ligand and an analyte. The assay can include a suspension of colloidal particles that are associated with a ligand of interest. The colloidal particles are maintained in the suspension at or near a phase transition state from a condensed phase to a dispersed phase. An analyte to be tested is then added to the suspension. If the analyte binds to the ligand, a phase change occurs to indicate that the binding was successful.

  10. Functional roles of a structural element involving Na+-pi interactions in the catalytic site of T1 lipase revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yohsuke; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Tateno, Masaru

    2009-11-25

    Interactions between metal ions and pi systems (metal-pi interactions) are known to confer significant stabilization energy. However, in biological systems, few structures with metal-pi coordination have been determined; thus, its roles must still be elucidated. The cation-pi interactions are not correctly described by current molecular mechanics even when using a polarizable force field, and thus they require quantum mechanical calculations for accurate estimation. However, the huge computational costs of the latter methodologies prohibit long-time molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Accordingly, we developed a novel scheme to obtain an effective potential for calculating the interaction energy with an accuracy comparable to that of advanced ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T) levels, and with computational costs comparable to those of conventional MM calculations. Then, to elucidate the functional roles of the Na(+)-phenylalanine (Phe) complex in the catalytic site of T1 lipase, we performed MD simulations in the presence/absence of the accurate Na(+)-pi interaction energy. A comparison of these MD simulations revealed that a significantly large enthalpy gain in Na(+)-Phe16 substantially stabilizes the catalytic site, whereas a water molecule could not be substituted for Na(+) for sufficient stabilization energy. Thus, the cation-pi interaction in the lipase establishes a remarkably stable core structure by combining a hydrophobic aromatic ring and hydrophilic residues, of which the latter form the catalytic triad, thereby contributing to large structural changes from the complex with ligands to the free form of the lipase. This is the first report to elucidate the detailed functional mechanisms of Na(+)-pi interactions.

  11. Molecular recognition force spectroscopy study of the dynamic interaction between aptamer GBI-10 and extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C on human glioblastoma cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjun; Qiao, Haiyan; Yan, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Xing, Chunyan; Wang, Hongda; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular recognition force spectroscopy (MR-FS) was applied to investigate the dynamic interaction between aptamer GBI-10 and tenascin-C (TN-C) on human glioblastoma cell surface at single-molecule level. The unbinding force between aptamer GBI-10 and TN-C was 39 pN at the loading rate of 0.3 nN sec⁻¹. A series of kinetic parameters concerning interaction process such as the unbinding force f(u) , the association rate constant k(on) , dissociation rate constant at zero force k(off) , and dissociation constant K(D) for aptamer GBI-10/TN-C complexes were acquired. In addition, the interaction of aptamer GBI-10 with TN-C depended on the presence of Mg²⁺. This work demonstrates that MR-FS can be used as an attractive tool for exploring the interaction forces and dynamic process of aptamer and ligand at the single-molecule level. As a future perspective, MR-FS may be used as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic tool by combining with other techniques.

  12. Dynamics of Interacting Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Joaquín; Xia, Cheng-Yi; Meloni, Sandro; Moreno, Yamir

    2014-10-01

    Current modeling of infectious diseases allows for the study of complex and realistic scenarios that go from the population to the individual level of description. However, most epidemic models assume that the spreading process takes place on a single level (be it a single population, a metapopulation system, or a network of contacts). In particular, interdependent contagion phenomena can be addressed only if we go beyond the scheme-one pathogen-one network. In this paper, we propose a framework that allows us to describe the spreading dynamics of two concurrent diseases. Specifically, we characterize analytically the epidemic thresholds of the two diseases for different scenarios and compute the temporal evolution characterizing the unfolding dynamics. Results show that there are regions of the parameter space in which the onset of a disease's outbreak is conditioned to the prevalence levels of the other disease. Moreover, we show, for the susceptible-infected-susceptible scheme, that under certain circumstances, finite and not vanishing epidemic thresholds are found even at the limit for scale-free networks. For the susceptible-infected-removed scenario, the phenomenology is richer and additional interdependencies show up. We also find that the secondary thresholds for the susceptible-infected-susceptible and susceptible-infected-removed models are different, which results directly from the interaction between both diseases. Our work thus solves an important problem and paves the way toward a more comprehensive description of the dynamics of interacting diseases.

  13. Structure enhancement methodology using theory and experiment: gas-phase molecular structures using a dynamic interaction between electron diffraction, molecular mechanics, and ab initio data.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Graeme R; Masters, Sarah L; Rankin, David W H

    2007-07-01

    A new method of incorporating ab initio theoretical data dynamically into the gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) refinement process has been developed to aid the structure determination of large, sterically crowded molecules. This process involves calculating a set of differences between parameters that define the positions of peripheral atoms (usually hydrogen), as determined using molecular mechanics (MM), and those which use ab initio methods. The peripheral-atom positions are then updated continually during the GED refinement process, using MM, and the returned positions are modified using this set of differences to account for the differences between ab initio and MM methods, before being scaled back to the average parameters used to define them, as refined from experimental data. This allows the molecule to adopt a completely asymmetric structure if required, without being constrained by the MM parametrization, whereas the calculations can be performed on a practical time scale. The molecular structures of tri-tert-butylphosphine oxide and tri-tert-butylphosphine imide have been re-examined using this new technique, which we call SEMTEX (Structure Enhancement Methodology using Theory and EXperiment).

  14. Structural insights into the interaction between molluscan hemocyanins and phenolic substrates: An in silico study using docking and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Naresh, K N; Sreekumar, Arun; Rajan, S S

    2015-09-01

    Hemocyanin is a multimeric type-3 copper containing oxygen carrier protein that exhibits phenoloxidase-like activity and is found in selected species of arthropoda and mollusca. The phenoloxidase activity in the molluscan hemocyanins can be triggered by the proteolytic removal of the C-terminal β-rich sandwich domain of the protein or by the treatment with chemical agents like SDS, both of which enable active site access to the phenolic substrates. The mechanism by which SDS treatment enhances active site access to the substrates is however not well understood in molluscan hemocyanins. Here, using a combination of in silico molecular dynamics (MD) and docking studies on the crystal structure of Octopus dofleini hemocyanin (PDB code:1JS8), we demonstrate that the C-terminal β-domain of the protein plays a crucial role in regulating active site access to bulky phenolic substrates. Furthermore, MD simulation of hemocyanin in SDS revealed displacement of β-domain, enhanced active site access and a resulting increase in binding affinity for substrates. These observations were further validated by enzyme kinetics experiments.

  15. Structural insights into the interaction between molluscan hemocyanins and phenolic substrates: An in silico study using docking and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Naresh, K N; Sreekumar, Arun; Rajan, S S

    2015-09-01

    Hemocyanin is a multimeric type-3 copper containing oxygen carrier protein that exhibits phenoloxidase-like activity and is found in selected species of arthropoda and mollusca. The phenoloxidase activity in the molluscan hemocyanins can be triggered by the proteolytic removal of the C-terminal β-rich sandwich domain of the protein or by the treatment with chemical agents like SDS, both of which enable active site access to the phenolic substrates. The mechanism by which SDS treatment enhances active site access to the substrates is however not well understood in molluscan hemocyanins. Here, using a combination of in silico molecular dynamics (MD) and docking studies on the crystal structure of Octopus dofleini hemocyanin (PDB code:1JS8), we demonstrate that the C-terminal β-domain of the protein plays a crucial role in regulating active site access to bulky phenolic substrates. Furthermore, MD simulation of hemocyanin in SDS revealed displacement of β-domain, enhanced active site access and a resulting increase in binding affinity for substrates. These observations were further validated by enzyme kinetics experiments. PMID:26300244

  16. Simple pair-wise interactions for hybrid Monte Carlo-molecular dynamics simulations of titania/yttria-doped iron.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Karl D; Voigt, Hyon-Jee Lee; Marus, Lauren A; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D

    2013-02-01

    We present pair-wise, charge-neutral model potentials for an iron-titanium-yttrium-oxygen system. These simple models are designed to provide a tractable method of simulating nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) using off-lattice Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques without deviating significantly from the formalism employed in existing Monte Carlo simulations. The model is fitted to diamagnetic density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the various species over a range of densities and concentrations. The resulting model potentials provide reasonable and in some cases even excellent mechanical and thermodynamic properties for the pure metals. The model replicates the qualitative trends in formation energy predicted by DFT, though the energies of formation do not agree as well for dilute systems as they do for more concentrated systems. We find that on-lattice models will consistently favor tetrahedral oxygen interstitial sites over octahedral interstitial sites, while relaxed systems typically favor octahedral sites. This emphasizes the need for the off-lattice simulations for which this potential was designed. PMID:23288578

  17. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of actin-myosin interactions: a comparative study of cardiac α myosin, β myosin, and fast skeletal muscle myosin.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Zheng, Wenjun

    2013-11-26

    Myosins are a superfamily of actin-binding motor proteins with significant variations in kinetic properties (such as actin binding affinity) between different isoforms. It remains unknown how such kinetic variations arise from the structural and dynamic tuning of the actin-myosin interface at the amino acid residue level. To address this key issue, we have employed molecular modeling and simulations to investigate, with atomistic details, the isoform dependence of actin-myosin interactions in the rigor state. By combining electron microscopy-based docking with homology modeling, we have constructed three all-atom models for human cardiac α and β and rabbit fast skeletal muscle myosin in complex with three actin subunits in the rigor state. Starting from these models, we have performed extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (total of 100 ns per system) and then used the MD trajectories to calculate actin-myosin binding free energies with contributions from both electrostatic and nonpolar forces. Our binding calculations are in good agreement with the experimental finding of isoform-dependent differences in actin binding affinity between these myosin isoforms. Such differences are traced to changes in actin-myosin electrostatic interactions (i.e., hydrogen bonds and salt bridges) that are highly dynamic and involve several flexible actin-binding loops. By partitioning the actin-myosin binding free energy to individual myosin residues, we have also identified key myosin residues involved in the actin-myosin interactions, some of which were previously validated experimentally or implicated in cardiomyopathy mutations, and the rest make promising targets for future mutational experiments. PMID:24224850

  18. Dynamic molecular crystals with switchable physical properties.

    PubMed

    Sato, Osamu

    2016-06-21

    The development of molecular materials whose physical properties can be controlled by external stimuli - such as light, electric field, temperature, and pressure - has recently attracted much attention owing to their potential applications in molecular devices. There are a number of ways to alter the physical properties of crystalline materials. These include the modulation of the spin and redox states of the crystal's components, or the incorporation within the crystalline lattice of tunable molecules that exhibit stimuli-induced changes in their molecular structure. A switching behaviour can also be induced by changing the molecular orientation of the crystal's components, even in cases where the overall molecular structure is not affected. Controlling intermolecular interactions within a molecular material is also an effective tool to modulate its physical properties. This Review discusses recent advances in the development of such stimuli-responsive, switchable crystalline compounds - referred to here as dynamic molecular crystals - and suggests how different approaches can serve to prepare functional materials. PMID:27325090

  19. Methyl Radical in Clathrate Silica Voids. The Peculiar Physisorption Features of the Guest-Host Molecular Dynamics Interaction.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Yurij A; Buscarino, Gianpiero; Benetis, Nikolas P

    2016-08-11

    EPR line shape simulations of CH3/SiO2 clathrates and comparison to CH3/N2O and CH3/SiO2 experiments reveal the motional conditions of the CH3 radical up to the unusual regime of its stability, the high-temperature diffusional regime, at 300 K. In the low-temperature region, the CH3 in clathrates is found to rotate around the in-plane axes even at as low temperatures as 3.8 K. However, nonrotating methyls performing only libration about the C2-axes as well as around the C3-axis are also found, proving the existence of special sites in the clathrate voids that begin to accumulate a significant fraction of methyl radicals at temperatures below approximately 7 K. A distinctive feature in the spectrum anisotropy and line width temperature profiles is found nearby 25 K, which is interpreted as the radical physisorption inside the voids that occurs with the sample temperature lowering. The unusual increase of the CH3/SiO2 clathrate EPR spectral width with temperature over approximately 120 K has its origin in repeated angular momentum vector alterations due to frequent collisions with the clathrate void walls between periodical free rotation periods. This relaxation mechanism resembles to spin-rotation interaction known only for small molecular species in nonviscous fluids but unknown earlier for methyl hosted in solids. PMID:27405003

  20. Molecular photoionization dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Joseph L.

    1982-05-01

    This program seeks to develop both physical insight and quantitative characterization of molecular photoionization processes. Progress is briefly described, and some publications resulting from the research are listed. (WHK)

  1. Molecular dynamics of membrane proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Woolf, Thomas B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the membrane protein rhodopsin will have broad implications for other membrane proteins and cellular signaling processes. Rhodopsin (Rho) is a light activated G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). When activated by ligands, GPCRs bind and activate G-proteins residing within the cell and begin a signaling cascade that results in the cell's response to external stimuli. More than 50% of all current drugs are targeted toward G-proteins. Rho is the prototypical member of the class A GPCR superfamily. Understanding the activation of Rho and its interaction with its Gprotein can therefore lead to a wider understanding of the mechanisms of GPCR activation and G-protein activation. Understanding the dark to light transition of Rho is fully analogous to the general ligand binding and activation problem for GPCRs. This transition is dependent on the lipid environment. The effect of lipids on membrane protein activity in general has had little attention, but evidence is beginning to show a significant role for lipids in membrane protein activity. Using the LAMMPS program and simulation methods benchmarked under the IBIG program, we perform a variety of allatom molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins.

  2. 2010 Atomic & Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Martinez

    2010-07-23

    The Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Conferences is justifiably recognized for its broad scope, touching on areas ranging from fundamental gas phase and gas-condensed matter collision dynamics, to laser-molecule interactions, photophysics, and unimolecular decay processes. The meeting has traditionally involved scientists engaged in fundamental research in gas and condensed phases and those who apply these concepts to systems of practical chemical and physical interest. A key tradition in this meeting is the strong mixing of theory and experiment throughout. The program for 2010 conference continues these traditions. At the 2010 AMI GRC, there will be talks in 5 broadly defined and partially overlapping areas of intermolecular interactions and chemical dynamics: (1) Photoionization and Photoelectron Dynamics; (2) Quantum Control and Molecules in Strong Fields; (3) Photochemical Dynamics; (4) Complex Molecules and Condensed Phases; and (5) Clusters and Reaction Dynamics. These areas encompass many of the most productive and exciting areas of chemical physics, including both reactive and nonreactive processes, intermolecular and intramolecular energy transfer, and photodissociation and unimolecular processes. Gas phase dynamics, van der Waals and cluster studies, laser-matter interactions and multiple potential energy surface phenomena will all be discussed.

  3. Molecular dynamics of the Bacillus subtilis expansin EXLX1: interaction with substrates and structural basis of the lack of activity of mutants.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Rodrigo L; Skaf, Munir S

    2016-02-01

    Expansins are disruptive proteins that loosen growing plant cell walls and can enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. The canonical expansin structure consists of one domain responsible for substrate binding (D2) and another domain (D1) of unknown function, but essential for activity. Although the effects of expansins on cell walls and cellulose fibrils are known, the molecular mechanism underlying their biophysical function is poorly understood. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to gain insights into the mechanism of action of the Bacillus subtilis expansin BsEXLX1. We show that BsEXLX1 can slide on the hydrophobic surface of crystalline cellulose via the flat aromatic surface of its binding domain D2, comprised mainly of residues Trp125 and Trp126. Also, we observe that BsEXLX1 can hydrogen bond a free glucan chain in a twisted conformation and that the twisting is chiefly induced by means of residue Asp82 located on D1, which has been shown to be essential for expansin activity. These results suggest that BsEXLX1 could move on the surface of cellulose and disrupt hydrogen bonds by twisting glucan chains. Simulations of the inactive BsEXLX1 mutants Asp82Asn and Tyr73Ala indicate structural alterations around the twisting center in the domain D1, which suggest a molecular basis for the lack of activity of these mutants and corroborate the idea that BsEXLX1 works by inducing twists on glucan chains. Moreover, simulations of the double mutant Asp82Asn/Tyr73Leu predict the recovery of the lost activity of BsEXLX1-Asp82Asn. Our results provide a dynamical view of the expansin-substrate interactions at the molecular scale and help shed light on the expansin mechanism.

  4. An investigation on the interaction modes of a single-strand DNA aptamer and RBP4 protein: a molecular dynamic simulations approach.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Raheleh; Bagherzadeh, Kowsar; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Amanlou, Massoud

    2016-09-14

    Type two diabetes is one of the primary health issues threatening public well-being worldwide. One of the pre-diagnosis biomarkers of this disease, retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), has been demonstrated to be detected with a 76-mer ssDNA aptamer instead of conventional antibodies. However, there is no structural information on the RBP4 binding aptamer (RBA) and the mechanism of its binding to RBP4 still remains unexplored. The objective of the present study is to achieve a better understanding of specific binding interactions of the target protein (RBP4) and RBA, employing Molecular Dynamics simulations (MDs) to provide detailed information on fluctuations, conformational changes, critical bases and effective forces to develop regulated aptamers to be employed in designing new aptamers for many useful recognition applications. RBA was designed according to its reported base pair sequence and secondary structure. The HADDOCK on line docking program was used to predict a suitable RBP4-RBA mode of interaction to start MDs with. MDs methodology was used to analyze the final complex stability and detect interacting residues. Eventually, we conclude that single strand located bases are the key components that conduct the intercalation phenomenon with big targets rather than those involving loops and folded motifs, to encompass targets and probably inhibit their activity. Also, UV-visible, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements confirmed the interactions between RBA and RBP4 and RBP4-RBA complex formation.

  5. Structural analysis of Pla protein from the biological warfare agent Yersinia pestis: docking and molecular dynamics of interactions with the mammalian plasminogen system.

    PubMed

    Ruback, Eduardo; Lobo, Leandro Araujo; França, Tanos Celmar Costa; Pascutti, Pedro Geraldo

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia pestis protein Pla is a plasmid-coded outer membrane protein with aspartic-protease activity. Pla exhibits a plasminogen (Plg) activator activity (PAA) that promotes the cleavage of Plg to the active serine-protease form called plasmin. Exactly how Pla activates Plg into plasmin remains unclear. To investigate this event, we performed the interactions between the predicted Plg and Pla protein structures by rigid-body docking with the HEX program and evaluated the complex stability by molecular dynamics (MD) using the GROMACS package programs. The predicted docked complex of Plg-Pla shows the same interaction site predicted by experimental site-direct mutagenesis in other studies. After a total of 8 ns of MD simulation, we observed the relaxation of the beta-barrel structure of Pla and the progressive approximation and stabilization between the cleavage site of Plg into the extracellular loops of Pla, followed by the increase in the number of H bonds. We also report here the aminoacids that participate in the active site and the sub sites of interaction. The total understanding of these interactions can be an important tool for drug design against bacterial proteases.

  6. Structural role of RKS motifs in chromatin interactions: a molecular dynamics study of HP1 bound to a variably modified histone tail.

    PubMed

    Papamokos, George V; Tziatzos, George; Papageorgiou, Dimitrios G; Georgatos, Spyros D; Politou, Anastasia S; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-04-18

    The current understanding of epigenetic signaling assigns a central role to post-translational modifications that occur in the histone tails. In this context, it has been proposed that methylation of K9 and phosphorylation of S10 in the tail of histone H3 represent a binary switch that controls its reversible association to heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). To test this hypothesis, we performed a comprehensive molecular dynamics study in which we analyzed a crystallographically defined complex that involves the HP1 chromodomain and an H3 tail peptide. Microsecond-long simulations show that the binding of the trimethylated K9 H3 peptide in the aromatic cage of HP1 is only slightly affected by S10 phosphorylation, because the modified K9 and S10 do not interact directly with one another. Instead, the phosphate group of S10 seems to form a persistent intramolecular salt bridge with R8, an interaction that can provoke a major structural change and alter the hydrogen-bonding regime in the H3-HP1 complex. These observations suggest that interactions between adjacent methyl-lysine and phosphoserine side chains do not by themselves provide a binary switch in the H3-HP1 system, but arginine-phosphoserine interactions, which occur in both histones and nonhistone proteins in the context of a conserved RKS motif, are likely to serve a key regulatory function.

  7. An investigation on the interaction modes of a single-strand DNA aptamer and RBP4 protein: a molecular dynamic simulations approach.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Raheleh; Bagherzadeh, Kowsar; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Amanlou, Massoud

    2016-09-14

    Type two diabetes is one of the primary health issues threatening public well-being worldwide. One of the pre-diagnosis biomarkers of this disease, retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), has been demonstrated to be detected with a 76-mer ssDNA aptamer instead of conventional antibodies. However, there is no structural information on the RBP4 binding aptamer (RBA) and the mechanism of its binding to RBP4 still remains unexplored. The objective of the present study is to achieve a better understanding of specific binding interactions of the target protein (RBP4) and RBA, employing Molecular Dynamics simulations (MDs) to provide detailed information on fluctuations, conformational changes, critical bases and effective forces to develop regulated aptamers to be employed in designing new aptamers for many useful recognition applications. RBA was designed according to its reported base pair sequence and secondary structure. The HADDOCK on line docking program was used to predict a suitable RBP4-RBA mode of interaction to start MDs with. MDs methodology was used to analyze the final complex stability and detect interacting residues. Eventually, we conclude that single strand located bases are the key components that conduct the intercalation phenomenon with big targets rather than those involving loops and folded motifs, to encompass targets and probably inhibit their activity. Also, UV-visible, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements confirmed the interactions between RBA and RBP4 and RBP4-RBA complex formation. PMID:27511589

  8. Comparison of DNA hydration patterns obtained using two distinct computational methods, molecular dynamics simulation and three-dimensional reference interaction site model theory.

    PubMed

    Yonetani, Yoshiteru; Maruyama, Yutaka; Hirata, Fumio; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2008-05-14

    Because proteins and DNA interact with each other and with various small molecules in the presence of water molecules, we cannot ignore their hydration when discussing their structural and energetic properties. Although high-resolution crystal structure analyses have given us a view of tightly bound water molecules on their surface, the structural data are still insufficient to capture the detailed configurations of water molecules around the surface of these biomolecules. Thanks to the invention of various computational algorithms, computer simulations can now provide an atomic view of hydration. Here, we describe the apparent patterns of DNA hydration calculated by using two different computational methods: Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory. Both methods are promising for obtaining hydration properties, but until now there have been no thorough comparisons of the calculated three-dimensional distributions of hydrating water. This rigorous comparison showed that MD and 3D-RISM provide essentially similar hydration patterns when there is sufficient sampling time for MD and a sufficient number of conformations to describe molecular flexibility for 3D-RISM. This suggests that these two computational methods can be used to complement one another when evaluating the reliability of the calculated hydration patterns. PMID:18532849

  9. Comparison of DNA hydration patterns obtained using two distinct computational methods, molecular dynamics simulation and three-dimensional reference interaction site model theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetani, Yoshiteru; Maruyama, Yutaka; Hirata, Fumio; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2008-05-01

    Because proteins and DNA interact with each other and with various small molecules in the presence of water molecules, we cannot ignore their hydration when discussing their structural and energetic properties. Although high-resolution crystal structure analyses have given us a view of tightly bound water molecules on their surface, the structural data are still insufficient to capture the detailed configurations of water molecules around the surface of these biomolecules. Thanks to the invention of various computational algorithms, computer simulations can now provide an atomic view of hydration. Here, we describe the apparent patterns of DNA hydration calculated by using two different computational methods: Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory. Both methods are promising for obtaining hydration properties, but until now there have been no thorough comparisons of the calculated three-dimensional distributions of hydrating water. This rigorous comparison showed that MD and 3D-RISM provide essentially similar hydration patterns when there is sufficient sampling time for MD and a sufficient number of conformations to describe molecular flexibility for 3D-RISM. This suggests that these two computational methods can be used to complement one another when evaluating the reliability of the calculated hydration patterns.

  10. Intermolecular interactions of liquid dichloromethane and equilibrium properties of liquid{endash}vapor and liquid{endash}liquid interfaces: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, L.X.

    1999-05-01

    Extensive molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to study the molecular interactions, liquid states, and liquid/vapor properties of dichloromethane. The study is also extended to the equilibrium properties of the liquid/liquid interface of water-dichloromethane. The intermolecular interactions among water, dichloromethane, and water-dichloromethane are described using our polarizable potential models. The equilibrium properties of liquid dichloromethane, including the radial distribution functions, the intermolecular structural factor, the self-diffusion coefficient, and the dielectric constant, are evaluated. The dielectric constant is computed using Ewald summation techniques and the computed result compared reasonably well with the available experimental data. Properties such as surface tensions and density profiles of liquid/vapor dichloromethane are evaluated. We found that the computed surface tensions for several temperatures are in excellent agreement with experimental data. The computed density profile of the liquid/liquid interface of water-dichloromethane is averaged over 1 ns and we found the computed profile to be quite smooth and stable. The effect of polarization on the liquid/liquid interfacial equilibrium properties is evaluated by computing the dipole moments of water and dichloromethane molecules as a function of the distance normal to the interface. We found that these values deviated significantly from the simulations that are based on nonpolarizable potential models. We attribute these observations to the changes in the electric fields around the water and dichloromethane molecules near the interface. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Correlation between inter-spin interaction and molecular dynamics of organic radicals in organic 1D nanochannels

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu

    2015-12-31

    One-dimensional (1D) molecular chains of 4-substituted-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl (4-X-TEMPO) radicals were constructed in the crystalline 1D nanochannels of 2,4,6-tris(4-chlorophenoxy)-1,3,5-triazine (CLPOT) used as a template. The ESR spectra of CLPOT inclusion compounds (ICs) using 4-X-TEMPO were examined on the basis of spectral simulation using EasySpin program package for simulating and fitting ESR spectra. The ESR spectra of [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC were isotropic in the total range of temperatures. The peak-to-peak line width (ΔB{sub pp}) became monotonically narrower from 2.8 to 1.3 mT with increase in temperature in the range of 4.2–298 K. The effect of the rotational diffusion motion of TEMPO radicals in the CLPOT nanochannels for the inter-spin interaction of the [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC was found to be smaller than the case of [(TPP){sub 2}−(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC (TPP = tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene) reported in our previous study. The ΔB{sub pp} of the [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC in the whole range of temperatures was much narrower than the estimation to be based on the Van Vleck’s formula for the second moment of the rigid lattice model where the electron spin can be considered as fixed; 11 mT of Gaussian line-width component. This suggests the possibility of exchange narrowing in the 1D organic-radical chains of the [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC. On the other hand, the ESR spectra of [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(MeO-TEMPO){sub 0.41}] IC (MeO-TEMPO = 4-methoxy-TEMPO) were reproduced by a superposition of major broad isotropic adsorption line and minor temperature-dependent modulated triplet component. This suggests that the IC has the part of 1D organic-radical chains and MeO-TEMPO molecules isolated in the CLPOT nanochannels.

  12. Correlation between inter-spin interaction and molecular dynamics of organic radicals in organic 1D nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu

    2015-12-01

    One-dimensional (1D) molecular chains of 4-substituted-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl (4-X-TEMPO) radicals were constructed in the crystalline 1D nanochannels of 2,4,6-tris(4-chlorophenoxy)-1,3,5-triazine (CLPOT) used as a template. The ESR spectra of CLPOT inclusion compounds (ICs) using 4-X-TEMPO were examined on the basis of spectral simulation using EasySpin program package for simulating and fitting ESR spectra. The ESR spectra of [(CLPOT)2-(TEMPO)1.0] IC were isotropic in the total range of temperatures. The peak-to-peak line width (ΔBpp) became monotonically narrower from 2.8 to 1.3 mT with increase in temperature in the range of 4.2-298 K. The effect of the rotational diffusion motion of TEMPO radicals in the CLPOT nanochannels for the inter-spin interaction of the [(CLPOT)2-(TEMPO)1.0] IC was found to be smaller than the case of [(TPP)2-(TEMPO)1.0] IC (TPP = tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene) reported in our previous study. The ΔBpp of the [(CLPOT)2-(TEMPO)1.0] IC in the whole range of temperatures was much narrower than the estimation to be based on the Van Vleck's formula for the second moment of the rigid lattice model where the electron spin can be considered as fixed; 11 mT of Gaussian line-width component. This suggests the possibility of exchange narrowing in the 1D organic-radical chains of the [(CLPOT)2-(TEMPO)1.0] IC. On the other hand, the ESR spectra of [(CLPOT)2-(MeO-TEMPO)0.41] IC (MeO-TEMPO = 4-methoxy-TEMPO) were reproduced by a superposition of major broad isotropic adsorption line and minor temperature-dependent modulated triplet component. This suggests that the IC has the part of 1D organic-radical chains and MeO-TEMPO molecules isolated in the CLPOT nanochannels.

  13. Structural insights into the MDP binding and CARD-CARD interaction in zebrafish (Danio rerio) NOD2: a molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Maharana, Jitendra; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; De, Bidhan Chandra; Sahoo, Bikash Ranjan; Behera, Bijay Kumar; De, Sachinandan; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD2) is a key component of innate immunity that is highly specific for muramyl dipeptide (MDP)-a peptidoglycan component of bacterial cell wall. MDP recognition by NOD2-leucine rich repeat (LRR) domain activates NF-κB signaling through a protein-protein interaction between caspase activating and recruitment domains (CARDs) of NOD2 and downstream receptor interacting and activating protein kinase 2 (RIP2). Due to the lack of crystal/NMR structures, MDP recognition and CARD-CARD interaction are poorly understood. Herein, we have predicted the probable MDP and CARD-CARD binding surfaces in zebrafish NOD2 (zNOD2) using various in silico methodologies. The results show that the conserved residues Phe819, Phe871, Trp875, Trp929, Trp899, and Arg845 located at the concave face of zNOD2-LRR confer MDP recognition by hydrophobic and hydrogen bond (H-bond) interactions. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal a stable association between the electropositive surface on zNOD2-CARDa and the electronegative surface on zRIP2-CARD reinforced mostly by H-bonds and electrostatic interactions. Importantly, a 3.5 Å salt bridge is observed between Arg60 of zNOD2-CARDa and Asp494 of zRIP2-CARD. Arg11 and Lys53 of zNOD2-CARDa and Ser498 and Glu508 of zRIP2-CARD are critical residues for CARD-CARD interaction and NOD2 signaling. The 2.7 Å H-bond between Lys104 of the linker and Glu508 of zRIP2-CARD suggests a possible role of the linker for shaping CARD-CARD interaction. These findings are consistent with existing mutagenesis data. We provide first insight into MDP recognition and CARD-CARD interaction in the zebrafish that will be useful to understand the molecular basis of NOD signaling in a broader perspective.

  14. Interaction of O and OH radicals with a simple model system for lipids in the skin barrier: a reactive molecular dynamics investigation for plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Paal, Jonas; Aernouts, Stefaan; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Neyts, Erik C.; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2013-10-01

    Plasma medicine has been claimed to provide a novel route to heal wounds and regenerate skin, although very little is currently known about the elementary processes taking place. We carried out a series of ReaxFF-based reactive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interaction of O and OH radicals with lipids, more specifically with α-linolenic acid as a model for the free fatty acids present in the upper skin layer. Our calculations predict that the O and OH radicals most typically abstract a H atom from the fatty acids, which can lead to the formation of a conjugated double bond, but also to the incorporation of alcohol or aldehyde groups, thereby increasing the hydrophilic character of the fatty acids and changing the general lipid composition of the skin. Within the limitations of the investigated model, no formation of possibly toxic products was observed.

  15. A sampling of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindhikara, Daniel Jon

    The sheer vastness of the number of computations required to simulate a biological molecule puts incredible pressure on algorithms to be efficient while maintaining sufficient accuracy. This dissertation summarizes various projects whose purposes address the large span of types of problems in molecular dynamics simulations of biological systems including: increasing efficiency, measuring convergence, avoiding pitfalls, and an application and analysis of a biological system. Chapters 3 and 4 deal with an enhanced sampling algorithm called "replica exchange molecular dynamics" which is designed to speed-up molecular dynamics simulations. The optimization of a key parameter of these simulations is analyzed. In these successive projects, it was found conclusively that maximizing "exchange attempt frequency" is the most efficient way to run a replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation. Chapter 5 describes an enhanced metric for convergence in parallel simulations called the normalized ergodic measure. The metric is applied to several properties for several replica exchange simulations. Advantages of this metric over other methods are described. Chapter 6 describes the implementation and optimization of an enhanced sampling algorithm similar to replica exchange molecular dynamics called multicanonical algorithm replica exchange molecular dynamics. The algorithm was implemented into a biomolecular simulation suite called AMBER. Additionally several parameters were analyzed and optimized. In Chapter 7, a pitfall in molecular dynamics is observed in biological systems that is caused by negligent use of a simulation's "thermostat". It was found that if the same pseudorandom number seed were used for multiple systems, they eventually synchronize. In this project, synchronization was observed in biological molecules. Various negative effects including corruption of data are pointed out. Chapter 8 describes molecular dynamics simulation of NikR, a homotetrameric nickel

  16. Dynamical interactions of galaxy pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athanassoula, E.

    1990-01-01

    Here the author briefly reviews the dynamics of sinking satellites and the effect of companions on elliptical galaxies. The author then discusses recent work on interacting disk systems, and finally focuses on a favorite interacting pair, NGC 5194/5195.

  17. Transcript Dynamics at Early Stages of Molecular Interactions of MYMIV with Resistant and Susceptible Genotypes of the Leguminous Host, Vigna mungo

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Anirban; Patel, Anju; Paul, Sujay; Pal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Initial phases of the MYMIV- Vigna mungo interaction is crucial in determining the infection phenotype upon challenging with the virus. During incompatible interaction, the plant deploys multiple stratagems that include extensive transcriptional alterations defying the virulence factors of the pathogen. Such molecular events are not frequently addressed by genomic tools. In order to obtain a critical insight to unravel how V. mungo respond to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), we have employed the PCR based suppression subtractive hybridization technique to identify genes that exhibit altered expressions. Dynamics of 345 candidate genes are illustrated that differentially expressed either in compatible or incompatible reactions and their possible biological and cellular functions are predicted. The MYMIV-induced physiological aspects of the resistant host include reactive oxygen species generation, induction of Ca2+ mediated signaling, enhanced expression of transcripts involved in phenylpropanoid and ubiquitin-proteasomal pathways; all these together confer resistance against the invader. Elicitation of genes implicated in salicylic acid (SA) pathway suggests that immune response is under the regulation of SA signaling. A significant fraction of modulated transcripts are of unknown function indicating participation of novel candidate genes in restricting this viral pathogen. Susceptibility on the other hand, as exhibited by V. mungo Cv. T9 is perhaps due to the poor execution of these transcript modulation exhibiting remarkable repression of photosynthesis related genes resulting in chlorosis of leaves followed by penalty in crop yield. Thus, the present findings revealed an insight on the molecular warfare during host-virus interaction suggesting plausible signaling mechanisms and key biochemical pathways overriding MYMIV invasion in resistant genotype of V. mungo. In addition to inflate the existing knowledge base, the genomic resources identified in

  18. Transcript dynamics at early stages of molecular interactions of MYMIV with resistant and susceptible genotypes of the leguminous host, Vigna mungo.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Anirban; Patel, Anju; Paul, Sujay; Pal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Initial phases of the MYMIV-Vigna mungo interaction is crucial in determining the infection phenotype upon challenging with the virus. During incompatible interaction, the plant deploys multiple stratagems that include extensive transcriptional alterations defying the virulence factors of the pathogen. Such molecular events are not frequently addressed by genomic tools. In order to obtain a critical insight to unravel how V. mungo respond to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), we have employed the PCR based suppression subtractive hybridization technique to identify genes that exhibit altered expressions. Dynamics of 345 candidate genes are illustrated that differentially expressed either in compatible or incompatible reactions and their possible biological and cellular functions are predicted. The MYMIV-induced physiological aspects of the resistant host include reactive oxygen species generation, induction of Ca2+ mediated signaling, enhanced expression of transcripts involved in phenylpropanoid and ubiquitin-proteasomal pathways; all these together confer resistance against the invader. Elicitation of genes implicated in salicylic acid (SA) pathway suggests that immune response is under the regulation of SA signaling. A significant fraction of modulated transcripts are of unknown function indicating participation of novel candidate genes in restricting this viral pathogen. Susceptibility on the other hand, as exhibited by V. mungo Cv. T9 is perhaps due to the poor execution of these transcript modulation exhibiting remarkable repression of photosynthesis related genes resulting in chlorosis of leaves followed by penalty in crop yield. Thus, the present findings revealed an insight on the molecular warfare during host-virus interaction suggesting plausible signaling mechanisms and key biochemical pathways overriding MYMIV invasion in resistant genotype of V. mungo. In addition to inflate the existing knowledge base, the genomic resources identified in

  19. Polar solvation dynamics of lysozyme from molecular dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2012-05-01

    The solvation dynamics of a protein are believed to be sensitive to its secondary structures. We have explored such sensitivity in this article by performing room temperature molecular dynamics simulation of an aqueous solution of lysozyme. Nonuniform long-time relaxation patterns of the solvation time correlation function for different segments of the protein have been observed. It is found that relatively slower long-time solvation components of the α-helices and β-sheets of the protein are correlated with lower exposure of their polar probe residues to bulk solvent and hence stronger interactions with the dynamically restricted surface water molecules. These findings can be verified by appropriate experimental studies.

  20. Development of hardware accelerator for molecular dynamics simulations: a computation board that calculates nonbonded interactions in cooperation with fast multipole method.

    PubMed

    Amisaki, Takashi; Toyoda, Shinjiro; Miyagawa, Hiroh; Kitamura, Kunihiro

    2003-04-15

    Evaluation of long-range Coulombic interactions still represents a bottleneck in the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of biological macromolecules. Despite the advent of sophisticated fast algorithms, such as the fast multipole method (FMM), accurate simulations still demand a great amount of computation time due to the accuracy/speed trade-off inherently involved in these algorithms. Unless higher order multipole expansions, which are extremely expensive to evaluate, are employed, a large amount of the execution time is still spent in directly calculating particle-particle interactions within the nearby region of each particle. To reduce this execution time for pair interactions, we developed a computation unit (board), called MD-Engine II, that calculates nonbonded pairwise interactions using a specially designed hardware. Four custom arithmetic-processors and a processor for memory manipulation ("particle processor") are mounted on the computation board. The arithmetic processors are responsible for calculation of the pair interactions. The particle processor plays a central role in realizing efficient cooperation with the FMM. The results of a series of 50-ps MD simulations of a protein-water system (50,764 atoms) indicated that a more stringent setting of accuracy in FMM computation, compared with those previously reported, was required for accurate simulations over long time periods. Such a level of accuracy was efficiently achieved using the cooperative calculations of the FMM and MD-Engine II. On an Alpha 21264 PC, the FMM computation at a moderate but tolerable level of accuracy was accelerated by a factor of 16.0 using three boards. At a high level of accuracy, the cooperative calculation achieved a 22.7-fold acceleration over the corresponding conventional FMM calculation. In the cooperative calculations of the FMM and MD-Engine II, it was possible to achieve more accurate computation at a comparable execution time by incorporating larger nearby

  1. Molecular Soybean-Pathogen Interactions.

    PubMed

    Whitham, Steven A; Qi, Mingsheng; Innes, Roger W; Ma, Wenbo; Lopes-Caitar, Valéria; Hewezi, Tarek

    2016-08-01

    Soybean hosts a wide variety of pathogens that cause significant yield losses. The importance of soybean as a major oilseed crop has led to research focused on its interactions with pathogens, such as Soybean mosaic virus, Pseudomonas syringae, Phytophthora sojae, Phakopsora pachyrhizi, and Heterodera glycines. Pioneering work on soybean's interactions with these organisms, which represent the five major pathogen groups (viruses, bacteria, oomycetes, fungi, and nematodes), has contributed to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying virulence and immunity. These mechanisms involve conserved and unique features that validate the need for research in both soybean and homologous model systems. In this review, we discuss identification of effectors and their functions as well as resistance gene-mediated recognition and signaling. We also point out areas in which model systems and recent advances in resources and tools have provided opportunities to gain deeper insights into soybean-pathogen interactions. PMID:27359370

  2. Molecular recognition in a diverse set of protein-ligand interactions studied with molecular dynamics simulations and end-point free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Li, Liwei; Hurley, Thomas D; Meroueh, Samy O

    2013-10-28

    End-point free energy calculations using MM-GBSA and MM-PBSA provide a detailed understanding of molecular recognition in protein-ligand interactions. The binding free energy can be used to rank-order protein-ligand structures in virtual screening for compound or target identification. Here, we carry out free energy calculations for a diverse set of 11 proteins bound to 14 small molecules using extensive explicit-solvent MD simulations. The structure of these complexes was previously solved by crystallography and their binding studied with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data enabling direct comparison to the MM-GBSA and MM-PBSA calculations. Four MM-GBSA and three MM-PBSA calculations reproduced the ITC free energy within 1 kcal·mol(-1) highlighting the challenges in reproducing the absolute free energy from end-point free energy calculations. MM-GBSA exhibited better rank-ordering with a Spearman ρ of 0.68 compared to 0.40 for MM-PBSA with dielectric constant (ε = 1). An increase in ε resulted in significantly better rank-ordering for MM-PBSA (ρ = 0.91 for ε = 10), but larger ε significantly reduced the contributions of electrostatics, suggesting that the improvement is due to the nonpolar and entropy components, rather than a better representation of the electrostatics. The SVRKB scoring function applied to MD snapshots resulted in excellent rank-ordering (ρ = 0.81). Calculations of the configurational entropy using normal-mode analysis led to free energies that correlated significantly better to the ITC free energy than the MD-based quasi-harmonic approach, but the computed entropies showed no correlation with the ITC entropy. When the adaptation energy is taken into consideration by running separate simulations for complex, apo, and ligand (MM-PBSAADAPT), there is less agreement with the ITC data for the individual free energies, but remarkably good rank-ordering is observed (ρ = 0.89). Interestingly, filtering MD snapshots by prescoring

  3. Atomistic mechanism of polyphenol amyloid aggregation inhibitors: molecular dynamics study of Curcumin, Exifone, and Myricetin interaction with the segment of tau peptide oligomer.

    PubMed

    Berhanu, Workalemahu M; Masunov, Artëm E

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are highly ordered protein aggregates associated with many diseases affecting millions of people worldwide. Polyphenols such as Curcumin, Exifone, and Myricetin exhibit modest inhibition toward fibril formation of tau peptide which is associated with Alzheimer's disease. However, the molecular mechanisms of this inhibition remain elusive. We investigated the binding of three polyphenol molecules to the protofibrils of an amyloidogenic fragment VQIVYK of tau peptide by molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent. We find that polyphenols induce conformational changes in the oligomer aggregate. These changes disrupt the amyloid H bonding, perturbing the aggregate. While the structural evolution of the control oligomer with no ligand is limited to the twisting of the β-sheets without their disassembly, the presence of polyphenol molecule pushes the β-sheets apart, and leads to a loosely packed structure where two of four β-sheets dissociate in each of the three cases considered here. The H-bonding capacity of polyphenols is responsible for the observed behavior. The calculated binding free energies and its individual components enabled better understanding of the binding. Results indicated that the contribution from Van der Waals interactions is more significant than electrostatic contribution to the binding. The findings from this study are expected to assist in the development of aggregation inhibitors. Significant binding between polyphenols and aggregate oligomer identified in our simulations confirms the previous experimental observations in which polyphenols refold the tau peptide without forming covalent bonds. PMID:25093402

  4. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of ion–solid interactions in Gd2Zr2O7 and Gd2Ti2O7

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. J.; Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Zu, Xiaotao; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2012-12-21

    The development of the ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method has made it a powerful tool in describing ion–solid interactions in materials, with the determination of threshold displacement energies with ab initio accuracy, and prediction of a new mechanism for defect generation and new defective states that are different from classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In the present work, this method is employed to study the low energy recoil events in Gd2Zr2O7 and Gd2Ti2O7. The weighted average threshold displacement energies in Gd2Zr2O7 are determined to be 38.8 eV for Gd, 41.4 eV for Zr, 18.6 eV for O48f, and 15.6 eV for O8b, which are smaller than the respective values of 41.8, >53.8, 22.6 and 16.2 eV in Gd2Ti2O7. It reveals that all the ions in Gd2Zr2O7 are more easily displaced than those in Gd2Ti2O7, and anion order–disorder is more likely to be involved in the displacement events than cation disordering. The average charge transfer from the primary knock-on atom to its neighbors is estimated to be [similar]0.15, [similar]0.11 to 0.27 and [similar]0.1 to 0.13 |e| for Gd, Zr (or Ti), and O, respectively. Neglecting the charge transfer in the interatomic potentials may result in the larger threshold displacement energies in classical MD.

  5. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of ion–solid interactions in Gd2Zr2O7 and Gd2Ti2O7

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. J.; Xiao, H. Y.; Zu, X. T.; Zhang, Y.; Weber, W. J.

    2013-01-01

    The development of ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method has made it a powerful tool in describing ion-solid interactions in materials, with identification determination of threshold displacement energies with ab initio accuracy, and prediction of new mechanism for defect generation and new defective states that are different from classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In the present work, this method is employed to study the low energy recoil events in Gd2Zr2O7 and Gd2Ti2O7. The weighted average threshold displacement energies in Gd2Zr2O7 are determined to be 38.8 eV for Gd, 41.4 eV for Zr, 18.6 eV for O48f, and 15.6 eV for O8b, which are smaller than the respective values of 41.8, >53.8, 22.6 and 16.2 eV in Gd2Ti2O7. It reveals that all the ions in Gd2Zr2O7 are more easily displaced than those in Gd2Ti2O7, and anion order-disorder are more likely to be involved in the displacement events than cation disordering. The average charge transfer from the primary knock-on atom to its neighbors is estimated to be ~0.15, ~0.11-0.27 and ~0.1-0.13 |e| for Gd, Zr (or Ti), and O, respectively. Negligence of the charge transfer in the interatomic potentials may result in the larger threshold displacement energies in classical MD.

  6. Free energy calculation using molecular dynamics simulation combined with the three-dimensional reference interaction site model theory. II. Thermodynamic integration along a spatial reaction coordinate.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Tatsuhiko; Ikuta, Yasuhiro; Hirata, Fumio

    2011-01-28

    We propose the thermodynamic integration along a spatial reaction coordinate using the molecular dynamics simulation combined with the three-dimensional reference interaction site model theory. This method provides a free energy calculation in solution along the reaction coordinate defined by the Cartesian coordinates of the solute atoms. The proposed method is based on the blue moon algorithm which can, in principle, handle any reaction coordinate as far as it is defined by the solute atom positions. In this article, we apply the present method to the complex formation process of the crown ether 18-Crown-6 (18C6) with the potassium ion in an aqueous solution. The separation between the geometric centers of these two molecules is taken to be the reaction coordinate for this system. The potential of mean force (PMF) becomes the maximum at the separation between the molecular centers being ∼4 Å, which can be identified as the free energy barrier in the process of the molecular recognition. In a separation further than the free energy barrier, the PMF is slightly reduced to exhibit a plateau. In the region closer than the free energy barrier, approach of the potassium ion to the center of 18C6 also decreases the PMF. When the potassium ion is accommodated at the center of 18C6, the free energy is lower by -5.7 ± 0.7 kcal/mol than that at the above mentioned plateau or converged state. By comparing the results with those from the free energy calculation along the coupling parameters obtained in our previous paper [T. Miyata, Y. Ikuta, and F. Hirata, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 044114 (2010)], it is found that the effective interaction in water between 18C6 and the potassium ion vanishes beyond the molecular-center-separation of 10 Å. Furthermore, the conformation of 18C6 is found to be significantly changed depending upon the 18C6-K(+) distance. A proper conformational sampling and an accurate solvent treatment are crucial for realizing the accurate PMF, and we believe

  7. Structure, Dynamics, and Interaction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) DprE1 and DprE2 Examined by Molecular Modeling, Simulation, and Electrostatic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Isha; Loharch, Saurabh; Gupta, Pawan; Madathil, Rethi; Parkesh, Raman

    2015-01-01

    The enzymes decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-ribose oxidase (DprE1) and decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-ribose-2-epimerase (DprE2) catalyze epimerization of decaprenylphosporyl ribose (DPR) todecaprenylphosporyl arabinose (DPA) and are critical for the survival of Mtb. Crystal structures of DprE1 so far reported display significant disordered regions and no structural information is known for DprE2. We used homology modeling, protein threading, molecular docking and dynamics studies to investigate the structural and dynamic features of Mtb DprE1 and DprE2 and DprE1-DprE2 complex. A three-dimensional model for DprE2 was generated using the threading approach coupled with ab initio modeling. A 50 ns simulation of DprE1 and DprE2 revealed the overall stability of the structures. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) demonstrated the convergence of sampling in both DprE1 and DprE2. In DprE1, residues in the 269–330 area showed considerable fluctuation in agreement with the regions of disorder observed in the reported crystal structures. In DprE2, large fluctuations were detected in residues 95–113, 146–157, and 197–226. The study combined docking and MD simulation studies to map and characterize the key residues involved in DprE1-DprE2 interaction. A 60 ns MD simulation for DprE1-DprE2 complex was also performed. Analysis of data revealed that the docked complex is stabilized by H-bonding, hydrophobic and ionic interactions. The key residues of DprE1 involved in DprE1-DprE2 interactions belong to the disordered region. We also examined the docked complex of DprE1-BTZ043 to investigate the binding pocket of DprE1 and its interactions with the inhibitor BTZ043. In summary, we hypothesize that DprE1-DprE2 interaction is crucial for the synthesis of DPA and DprE1-DprE2 complex may be a new therapeutic target amenable to pharmacological validation. The findings have important implications in tuberculosis (TB) drug discovery and will facilitate drug development efforts against TB

  8. Rich spectroscopic and molecular dynamic studies on the interaction of cytotoxic Pt(II) and Pd(II) complexes of glycine derivatives with calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Eslami Moghadam, Mahboube; Saidifar, Maryam; Divsalar, Adeleh; Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Farhangian, Hossein; Ghadamgahi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Some amino acid derivatives, such as R-glycine, have been synthesized together with their full spectroscopic characterization. The sodium salts of these bidentate amino acid ligands have been interacted with [M(bpy)(H2O)2](NO3)2 giving the corresponding some new complexes with formula [M(bpy)(R-gly)]NO3 (where M is Pt(II) or Pd(II), bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine and R-gly is butyl-, hexyl- and octyl-glycine). Due to less solubility of octyl derivatives, the biological activities of butyl and hexyl derivatives have been tested against chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line, K562. The interaction of these complexes with highly polymerized calf thymus DNA has been extensively studied by means of electronic absorption, fluorescence and other measurements. The experimental results suggest that these complexes positive cooperatively bind to DNA presumably via groove binding. Molecular dynamic results show that the DNA structure is largely maintained its native structure in hexylglycine derivative-water mixtures and at lower temperatures. The simulation data indicates that the more destabilizing effect of butylglycine is induced by preferential accumulation of these molecules around the DNA and due to their more negative free energy of binding via groove binding.

  9. The role of side-chain interactions in the early steps of aggregation: Molecular dynamics simulations of an amyloid-forming peptide from the yeast prion Sup35

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gsponer, Jörg; Haberthür, Urs; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2003-04-01

    Understanding the early steps of aggregation at atomic detail might be crucial for the rational design of therapeutics preventing diseases associated with amyloid deposits. In this paper, aggregation of the heptapeptide GNNQQNY, from the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35, was studied by 20 molecular dynamics runs for a total simulation time of 20 μs. The simulations generate in-register parallel packing of GNNQQNY -strands that is consistent with x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared data. The statistically preferred aggregation pathway does not correspond to a purely downhill profile of the energy surface because of the presence of enthalpic barriers that originate from out-of-register interactions. The parallel -sheet arrangement is favored over the antiparallel because of side-chain contacts; in particular, stacking interactions of the tyrosine rings and hydrogen bonds between amide groups. No ordered aggregation was found in control simulations with the mutant sequence SQNGNQQRG in accord with experimental data and the strong sequence dependence of aggregation.

  10. The dopamine D2 receptor dimer and its interaction with homobivalent antagonists: homology modeling, docking and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Jörg, Manuela; Capuano, Ben

    2016-09-01

    In order to apply structure-based drug design techniques to G protein-coupled receptor complexes, it is essential to model their 3D structure and to identify regions that are suitable for selective drug binding. For this purpose, we have developed and tested a multi-component protocol to model the inactive conformation of the dopamine D2 receptor dimer, suitable for interaction with homobivalent antagonists. Our approach was based on protein-protein docking, applying the Rosetta software to obtain populations of dimers as present in membranes with all the main possible interfaces. Consensus scoring based on the values and frequencies of best interfaces regarding four scoring parameters, Rosetta interface score, interface area, free energy of binding and energy of hydrogen bond interactions indicated that the best scored dimer model possesses a TM4-TM5-TM7-TM1 interface, which is in agreement with experimental data. This model was used to study interactions of the previously published dopamine D2 receptor homobivalent antagonists based on clozapine,1,4-disubstituted aromatic piperidines/piperazines and arylamidoalkyl substituted phenylpiperazine pharmacophores. It was found that the homobivalent antagonists stabilize the receptor-inactive conformation by maintaining the ionic lock interaction, and change the dimer interface by disrupting a set of hydrogen bonds and maintaining water- and ligand-mediated hydrogen bonds in the extracellular and intracellular part of the interface. Graphical Abstract Structure of the final model of the dopamine D2 receptor homodimer, indicating the distancebetween Tyr37 and Tyr 5.42 in the apo form (left) and in the complex with the ligand (right).

  11. The dopamine D2 receptor dimer and its interaction with homobivalent antagonists: homology modeling, docking and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Jörg, Manuela; Capuano, Ben

    2016-09-01

    In order to apply structure-based drug design techniques to G protein-coupled receptor complexes, it is essential to model their 3D structure and to identify regions that are suitable for selective drug binding. For this purpose, we have developed and tested a multi-component protocol to model the inactive conformation of the dopamine D2 receptor dimer, suitable for interaction with homobivalent antagonists. Our approach was based on protein-protein docking, applying the Rosetta software to obtain populations of dimers as present in membranes with all the main possible interfaces. Consensus scoring based on the values and frequencies of best interfaces regarding four scoring parameters, Rosetta interface score, interface area, free energy of binding and energy of hydrogen bond interactions indicated that the best scored dimer model possesses a TM4-TM5-TM7-TM1 interface, which is in agreement with experimental data. This model was used to study interactions of the previously published dopamine D2 receptor homobivalent antagonists based on clozapine,1,4-disubstituted aromatic piperidines/piperazines and arylamidoalkyl substituted phenylpiperazine pharmacophores. It was found that the homobivalent antagonists stabilize the receptor-inactive conformation by maintaining the ionic lock interaction, and change the dimer interface by disrupting a set of hydrogen bonds and maintaining water- and ligand-mediated hydrogen bonds in the extracellular and intracellular part of the interface. Graphical Abstract Structure of the final model of the dopamine D2 receptor homodimer, indicating the distancebetween Tyr37 and Tyr 5.42 in the apo form (left) and in the complex with the ligand (right). PMID:27491852

  12. Molecular dynamics modeling the synthetic and biological polymers interactions pre-studied via docking: anchors modified polyanions interference with the HIV-1 fusion mediator.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Vladimir B; Serbin, Alexander V

    2014-06-01

    In previous works we reported the design, synthesis and in vitro evaluations of synthetic anionic polymers modified by alicyclic pendant groups (hydrophobic anchors), as a novel class of inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry into human cells. Recently, these synthetic polymers interactions with key mediator of HIV-1 entry-fusion, the tri-helix core of the first heptad repeat regions [HR1]3 of viral envelope protein gp41, were pre-studied via docking in terms of newly formulated algorithm for stepwise approximation from fragments of polymeric backbone and side-group models toward real polymeric chains. In the present article the docking results were verified under molecular dynamics (MD) modeling. In contrast with limited capabilities of the docking, the MD allowed of using much more large models of the polymeric ligands, considering flexibility of both ligand and target simultaneously. Among the synthesized polymers the dinorbornen anchors containing alternating copolymers of maleic acid were selected as the most representative ligands (possessing the top anti-HIV activity in vitro in correlation with the highest binding energy in the docking). To verify the probability of binding of the polymers with the [HR1]3 in the sites defined via docking, various starting positions of polymer chains were tried. The MD simulations confirmed the main docking-predicted priority for binding sites, and possibilities for axial and belting modes of the ligands-target interactions. Some newly MD-discovered aspects of the ligand's backbone and anchor units dynamic cooperation in binding the viral target clarify mechanisms of the synthetic polymers anti-HIV activity and drug resistance prevention.

  13. Dynamic fracture toughness determined using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Swadener, J. G.; Baskes, M. I.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

    2004-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of fracture in crystalline silicon are conducted in order to determine the dynamic fracture toughness. The MD simulations show how the potential energy released during fracture is partitioned into surface energy, energy stored in defects and kinetic energy. First, the MD fracture simulations are shown to produce brittle fracture and be in reasonable agreement with experimental results. Then dynamic hcture toughness is calculated as the sum of the surface energy and the energy stored as defects directly from the MD models. Models oriented to produce fracture on either (111) or (101) planes are used. For the (101) fracture orientation, equilibrium crack speeds of greater than 80% of the Rayleigh wave speed are obtained. Crack speeds initially show a steep increase with increasing energy release rate followed by a much more gradual increase. No plateau in crack speed is observed for static energy release rates up to 20 J/m{sup 2}. At the point where the change in crack speed behavior occur, the dynamic fracture toughness (J{sub d}) is still within 10% of two times the surface energy (2{gamma}{sub 0}) and changing very slowly. From these MD simulations, it appears that the change in crack speed behavior is due to a change in the kinetic energy generation during dynamic fracture. In addition, MD simulations of facture in silicon with defects were conducted. The addition of defects increases the inelastic dissipation and the energy stored in defects.

  14. Stochastic Event-Driven Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, Aleksandar Garcia, Alejandro L.; Alder, Berni J.

    2008-02-01

    A novel Stochastic Event-Driven Molecular Dynamics (SEDMD) algorithm is developed for the simulation of polymer chains suspended in a solvent. SEDMD combines event-driven molecular dynamics (EDMD) with the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The polymers are represented as chains of hard-spheres tethered by square wells and interact with the solvent particles with hard-core potentials. The algorithm uses EDMD for the simulation of the polymer chain and the interactions between the chain beads and the surrounding solvent particles. The interactions between the solvent particles themselves are not treated deterministically as in EDMD, rather, the momentum and energy exchange in the solvent is determined stochastically using DSMC. The coupling between the solvent and the solute is consistently represented at the particle level retaining hydrodynamic interactions and thermodynamic fluctuations. However, unlike full MD simulations of both the solvent and the solute, in SEDMD the spatial structure of the solvent is ignored. The SEDMD algorithm is described in detail and applied to the study of the dynamics of a polymer chain tethered to a hard-wall subjected to uniform shear. SEDMD closely reproduces results obtained using traditional EDMD simulations with two orders of magnitude greater efficiency. Results question the existence of periodic (cycling) motion of the polymer chain.

  15. Thomas-Fermi molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Clerouin, J.; Pollock, E.L. ); Zerah, G. )

    1992-10-15

    A three-dimensional density-functional molecular-dynamics code is developed for the Thomas-Fermi density functional as a prototype for density functionals using only the density. Following Car and Parrinello (Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2471 (1985)), the electronic density is treated as a dynamical variable. The electronic densities are verified against a multi-ion Thomas-Fermi algorithm due to Parker (Phys. Rev. A 38, 2205 (1988)). As an initial application, the effect of electronic polarization in enhancing ionic diffusion in strongly coupled plasmas is demonstrated.

  16. Available Instruments for Analyzing Molecular Dynamics Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Likhachev, I V; Balabaev, N K; Galzitskaya, O V

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories are the result of molecular dynamics simulations. Trajectories are sequential snapshots of simulated molecular system which represents atomic coordinates at specific time periods. Based on the definition, in a text format trajectory files are characterized by their simplicity and uselessness. To obtain information from such files, special programs and information processing techniques are applied: from molecular dynamics animation to finding characteristics along the trajectory (versus time). In this review, we describe different programs for processing molecular dynamics trajectories. The performance of these programs, usefulness for analyses of molecular dynamics trajectories, strong and weak aspects are discussed. PMID:27053964

  17. Available Instruments for Analyzing Molecular Dynamics Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Likhachev, I. V.; Balabaev, N. K.; Galzitskaya, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories are the result of molecular dynamics simulations. Trajectories are sequential snapshots of simulated molecular system which represents atomic coordinates at specific time periods. Based on the definition, in a text format trajectory files are characterized by their simplicity and uselessness. To obtain information from such files, special programs and information processing techniques are applied: from molecular dynamics animation to finding characteristics along the trajectory (versus time). In this review, we describe different programs for processing molecular dynamics trajectories. The performance of these programs, usefulness for analyses of molecular dynamics trajectories, strong and weak aspects are discussed. PMID:27053964

  18. From molecular dynamics to Brownian dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Erban, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Three coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) models are investigated with the aim of developing and analysing multi-scale methods which use MD simulations in parts of the computational domain and (less detailed) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations in the remainder of the domain. The first MD model is formulated in one spatial dimension. It is based on elastic collisions of heavy molecules (e.g. proteins) with light point particles (e.g. water molecules). Two three-dimensional MD models are then investigated. The obtained results are applied to a simplified model of protein binding to receptors on the cellular membrane. It is shown that modern BD simulators of intracellular processes can be used in the bulk and accurately coupled with a (more detailed) MD model of protein binding which is used close to the membrane. PMID:25002825

  19. Interactions of water with the nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene glycol alkyl ethers studied by phase-sensitive sum frequency generation and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafi, Amirhossein; Hu, Dan; Chou, Keng C.

    2016-06-01

    Phase-sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were used to study the interactions between water molecules and the surfactant polyoxyethylene glycol alkyl ether (C12E4) at its critical micelle concentration. The surfactant enhanced the positive peak of water's SFG spectrum suggesting that C12E4 was more anionic-like, even though the surfactant was overall neutral. MD simulations showed that the surfactant increased the depth of the surface anisotropic layer from 0.31 to 1.82 nm and the average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule from 2.7 to 3.1. For water molecules near the surfactant, their H and O atoms are confined in well-separated shells. Both the O and C atoms in the head group of the surfactant are surrounded by the H atoms, instead of the O atoms, of water indicating that the negatively charged O atoms of the surfactant play a more important role than the C atoms in determining the orientation of water. The simulation also showed that the orientation of surface water molecules was flipped in the presence of the surfactant, which was consistent with the observed SFG spectra.

  20. Dynamic interactions in neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Arbib, M.A. ); Amari, S. )

    1989-01-01

    The study of neural networks is enjoying a great renaissance, both in computational neuroscience, the development of information processing models of living brains, and in neural computing, the use of neurally inspired concepts in the construction of intelligent machines. This volume presents models and data on the dynamic interactions occurring in the brain, and exhibits the dynamic interactions between research in computational neuroscience and in neural computing. The authors present current research, future trends and open problems.

  1. Molecular crowding and protein enzymatic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2012-05-21

    The effects of molecular crowding on the enzymatic conformational dynamics and transport properties of adenylate kinase are investigated. This tridomain protein undergoes large scale hinge motions in the course of its enzymatic cycle and serves as prototype for the study of crowding effects on the cyclic conformational dynamics of proteins. The study is carried out at a mesoscopic level where both the protein and the solvent in which it is dissolved are treated in a coarse grained fashion. The amino acid residues in the protein are represented by a network of beads and the solvent dynamics is described by multiparticle collision dynamics that includes effects due to hydrodynamic interactions. The system is crowded by a stationary random array of hard spherical objects. Protein enzymatic dynamics is investigated as a function of the obstacle volume fraction and size. In addition, for comparison, results are presented for a modification of the dynamics that suppresses hydrodynamic interactions. Consistent with expectations, simulations of the dynamics show that the protein prefers a closed conformation for high volume fractions. This effect becomes more pronounced as the obstacle radius decreases for a given volume fraction since the average void size in the obstacle array is smaller for smaller radii. At high volume fractions for small obstacle radii, the average enzymatic cycle time and characteristic times of internal conformational motions of the protein deviate substantially from their values in solution or in systems with small density of obstacles. The transport properties of the protein are strongly affected by molecular crowding. Diffusive motion adopts a subdiffusive character and the effective diffusion coefficients can change by more than an order of magnitude. The orientational relaxation time of the protein is also significantly altered by crowding. PMID:22476233

  2. Re-evaluation of low-resolution crystal structures via interactive molecular-dynamics flexible fitting (iMDFF): a case study in complement C4.

    PubMed

    Croll, Tristan Ian; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2016-09-01

    While the rapid proliferation of high-resolution structures in the Protein Data Bank provides a rich set of templates for starting models, it remains the case that a great many structures both past and present are built at least in part by hand-threading through low-resolution and/or weak electron density. With current model-building tools this task can be challenging, and the de facto standard for acceptable error rates (in the form of atomic clashes and unfavourable backbone and side-chain conformations) in structures based on data with dmax not exceeding 3.5 Å reflects this. When combined with other factors such as model bias, these residual errors can conspire to make more serious errors in the protein fold difficult or impossible to detect. The three recently published 3.6-4.2 Å resolution structures of complement C4 (PDB entries 4fxg, 4fxk and 4xam) rank in the top quartile of structures of comparable resolution both in terms of Rfree and MolProbity score, yet, as shown here, contain register errors in six β-strands. By applying a molecular-dynamics force field that explicitly models interatomic forces and hence excludes most physically impossible conformations, the recently developed interactive molecular-dynamics flexible fitting (iMDFF) approach significantly reduces the complexity of the conformational space to be searched during manual rebuilding. This substantially improves the rate of detection and correction of register errors, and allows user-guided model building in maps with a resolution lower than 3.5 Å to converge to solutions with a stereochemical quality comparable to atomic resolution structures. Here, iMDFF has been used to individually correct and re-refine these three structures to MolProbity scores of <1.7, and strategies for working with such challenging data sets are suggested. Notably, the improved model allowed the resolution for complement C4b to be extended from 4.2 to 3.5 Å as demonstrated by paired refinement.

  3. Re-evaluation of low-resolution crystal structures via interactive molecular-dynamics flexible fitting (iMDFF): a case study in complement C4.

    PubMed

    Croll, Tristan Ian; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2016-09-01

    While the rapid proliferation of high-resolution structures in the Protein Data Bank provides a rich set of templates for starting models, it remains the case that a great many structures both past and present are built at least in part by hand-threading through low-resolution and/or weak electron density. With current model-building tools this task can be challenging, and the de facto standard for acceptable error rates (in the form of atomic clashes and unfavourable backbone and side-chain conformations) in structures based on data with dmax not exceeding 3.5 Å reflects this. When combined with other factors such as model bias, these residual errors can conspire to make more serious errors in the protein fold difficult or impossible to detect. The three recently published 3.6-4.2 Å resolution structures of complement C4 (PDB entries 4fxg, 4fxk and 4xam) rank in the top quartile of structures of comparable resolution both in terms of Rfree and MolProbity score, yet, as shown here, contain register errors in six β-strands. By applying a molecular-dynamics force field that explicitly models interatomic forces and hence excludes most physically impossible conformations, the recently developed interactive molecular-dynamics flexible fitting (iMDFF) approach significantly reduces the complexity of the conformational space to be searched during manual rebuilding. This substantially improves the rate of detection and correction of register errors, and allows user-guided model building in maps with a resolution lower than 3.5 Å to converge to solutions with a stereochemical quality comparable to atomic resolution structures. Here, iMDFF has been used to individually correct and re-refine these three structures to MolProbity scores of <1.7, and strategies for working with such challenging data sets are suggested. Notably, the improved model allowed the resolution for complement C4b to be extended from 4.2 to 3.5 Å as demonstrated by paired refinement. PMID

  4. Scalable Molecular Dynamics with NAMD

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, James C.; Braun, Rosemary; Wang, Wei; Gumbart, James; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Villa, Elizabeth; Chipot, Christophe; Skeel, Robert D.; Kalé, Laxmikant; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    NAMD is a parallel molecular dynamics code designed for high-performance simulation of large biomolecular systems. NAMD scales to hundreds of processors on high-end parallel platforms, as well as tens of processors on low-cost commodity clusters, and also runs on individual desktop and laptop computers. NAMD works with AMBER and CHARMM potential functions, parameters, and file formats. This paper, directed to novices as well as experts, first introduces concepts and methods used in the NAMD program, describing the classical molecular dynamics force field, equations of motion, and integration methods along with the efficient electrostatics evaluation algorithms employed and temperature and pressure controls used. Features for steering the simulation across barriers and for calculating both alchemical and conformational free energy differences are presented. The motivations for and a roadmap to the internal design of NAMD, implemented in C++ and based on Charm++ parallel objects, are outlined. The factors affecting the serial and parallel performance of a simulation are discussed. Next, typical NAMD use is illustrated with representative applications to a small, a medium, and a large biomolecular system, highlighting particular features of NAMD, e.g., the Tcl scripting language. Finally, the paper provides a list of the key features of NAMD and discusses the benefits of combining NAMD with the molecular graphics/sequence analysis software VMD and the grid computing/collaboratory software BioCoRE. NAMD is distributed free of charge with source code at www.ks.uiuc.edu. PMID:16222654

  5. Molecular dynamics and information on possible sites of interaction of intramyocellular metabolites in vivo from resolved dipolar couplings in localized 1H NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Leif; Schmitz, Christian; Bachert, Peter

    2004-12-01

    Proton NMR resonances of the endogenous metabolites creatine and phosphocreatine ((P)Cr), taurine (Tau), and carnosine (Cs, β-alanyl- L-histidine) were studied with regard to residual dipolar couplings and molecular mobility. We present an analysis of the direct 1H- 1H interaction that provides information on motional reorientation of subgroups in these molecules in vivo. For this purpose, localized 1H NMR experiments were performed on m. gastrocnemius of healthy volunteers using a 1.5-T clinical whole-body MR scanner. We evaluated the observable dipolar coupling strength SD0 ( S = order parameter) of the (P)Cr-methyl triplet and the Tau-methylene doublet by means of the apparent line splitting. These were compared to the dipolar coupling strength of the (P)Cr-methylene doublet. In contrast to the aliphatic protons of (P)Cr and Tau, the aromatic H2 ( δ = 8 ppm) and H4 ( δ = 7 ppm) protons of the imidazole ring of Cs exhibit second-order spectra at 1.5 T. This effect is the consequence of incomplete transition from Zeeman to Paschen-Back regime and allows a determination of SD0 from H2 and H4 of Cs as an alternative to evaluating the multiplet splitting which can be measured directly in high-resolution 1H NMR spectra. Experimental data showed striking differences in the mobility of the metabolites when the dipolar coupling constant D0 (calculated with the internuclear distance known from molecular geometry in the case of complete absence of molecular dynamics and motion) is used for comparison. The aliphatic signals involve very small order parameters S ≈ (1.4 - 3) × 10 -4 indicating rapid reorientation of the corresponding subgroups in these metabolites. In contrast, analysis of the Cs resonances yielded S ≈ (113 - 137) × 10 -4. Thus, the immobilization of the Cs imidazole ring owing to an anisotropic cellular substructure in human m. gastrocnemius is much more effective than for (P)Cr and Tau subgroups. Furthermore, 1H NMR experiments on aqueous model

  6. Better, Cheaper, Faster Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent, revolutionary progress in genomics and structural, molecular and cellular biology has created new opportunities for molecular-level computer simulations of biological systems by providing vast amounts of data that require interpretation. These opportunities are further enhanced by the increasing availability of massively parallel computers. For many problems, the method of choice is classical molecular dynamics (iterative solving of Newton's equations of motion). It focuses on two main objectives. One is to calculate the relative stability of different states of the system. A typical problem that has' such an objective is computer-aided drug design. Another common objective is to describe evolution of the system towards a low energy (possibly the global minimum energy), "native" state. Perhaps the best example of such a problem is protein folding. Both types of problems share the same difficulty. Often, different states of the system are separated by high energy barriers, which implies that transitions between these states are rare events. This, in turn, can greatly impede exploration of phase space. In some instances this can lead to "quasi non-ergodicity", whereby a part of phase space is inaccessible on time scales of the simulation. To overcome this difficulty and to extend molecular dynamics to "biological" time scales (millisecond or longer) new physical formulations and new algorithmic developments are required. To be efficient they should account for natural limitations of multi-processor computer architecture. I will present work along these lines done in my group. In particular, I will focus on a new approach to calculating the free energies (stability) of different states and to overcoming "the curse of rare events". I will also discuss algorithmic improvements to multiple time step methods and to the treatment of slowly decaying, log-ranged, electrostatic effects.

  7. Molecular dynamics of polymer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkermans, Reinier L. C.; Toxvaerd, Søren; Briels, W. J.

    1998-08-01

    The irreversible polymerization of a monomer liquid has been studied by molecular-dynamics simulation in two and three dimensions. The growth process is studied under good solvent conditions in the dilute regime and up to semidilute and concentrated regimes. In the dilute regime we observe a reaction limitation due to trapping of the growing centers, which is more pronounced in the lower dimension. At higher concentrations the presence of other chains decreases the monomer mobility and reaction rate. Conformational properties are studied by scaling analysis of end-to-end and gyration radii. A crossover from swollen conformations towards screened conformations is observed as growth proceeds.

  8. Application of optimal prediction to molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, IV, John Letherman

    2004-12-01

    Optimal prediction is a general system reduction technique for large sets of differential equations. In this method, which was devised by Chorin, Hald, Kast, Kupferman, and Levy, a projection operator formalism is used to construct a smaller system of equations governing the dynamics of a subset of the original degrees of freedom. This reduced system consists of an effective Hamiltonian dynamics, augmented by an integral memory term and a random noise term. Molecular dynamics is a method for simulating large systems of interacting fluid particles. In this thesis, I construct a formalism for applying optimal prediction to molecular dynamics, producing reduced systems from which the properties of the original system can be recovered. These reduced systems require significantly less computational time than the original system. I initially consider first-order optimal prediction, in which the memory and noise terms are neglected. I construct a pair approximation to the renormalized potential, and ignore three-particle and higher interactions. This produces a reduced system that correctly reproduces static properties of the original system, such as energy and pressure, at low-to-moderate densities. However, it fails to capture dynamical quantities, such as autocorrelation functions. I next derive a short-memory approximation, in which the memory term is represented as a linear frictional force with configuration-dependent coefficients. This allows the use of a Fokker-Planck equation to show that, in this regime, the noise is δ-correlated in time. This linear friction model reproduces not only the static properties of the original system, but also the autocorrelation functions of dynamical variables.

  9. Characterization of an inhibitory dynamic pharmacophore for the ERCC1-XPA interaction using a combined molecular dynamics and virtual screening approach.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Khaled H; Torin Huzil, J; Luchko, Tyler; Jordheim, Lars; Dumontet, Charles; Tuszynski, Jack

    2009-09-01

    Combination chemotherapy involving Cisplatin is a standard treatment for many cancers. However, following an initial positive response, patients will often relapse, presenting with Cisplatin-resistant disease. One possible mechanism for the acquired resistance to Cisplatin is an increase in DNA repair through the up-regulation of ERCC1, an essential component of the nucleotide excision repair complex. Recruitment of ERCC1 to the site of DNA damage is coordinated through its interaction with a protein known as XPA. As there are currently no effective inhibitors of this interaction, inhibition of the ERCC1/XPA interaction may provide an effective strategy for overcoming the development of Cisplatin-resistant cancers. To discover small molecule inhibitors of this interaction, we have screened both the NCI diversity set of ligands and DrugBank-small molecules against the XPA binding site in ERCC1. These compounds were screened using two different techniques in AUTODOCK to account for receptor flexibility. First, using a set of flexible residues, as determined from MD simulations of the XPA/ERCC1 complex and second, using the relaxed complex scheme implemented by performing independent docking experiments against an ensemble of target conformations that were generated from MD simulations. Lowest energy poses from the two different methods were then used to construct a pharmacophore model, which was then validated by comparison to UCN-01, a weak inhibitor of ERCC1 mediated nucleotide excision.

  10. Dynamic strength of molecular adhesion bonds.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, E; Ritchie, K

    1997-01-01

    In biology, molecular linkages at, within, and beneath cell interfaces arise mainly from weak noncovalent interactions. These bonds will fail under any level of pulling force if held for sufficient time. Thus, when tested with ultrasensitive force probes, we expect cohesive material strength and strength of adhesion at interfaces to be time- and loading rate-dependent properties. To examine what can be learned from measurements of bond strength, we have extended Kramers' theory for reaction kinetics in liquids to bond dissociation under force and tested the predictions by smart Monte Carlo (Brownian dynamics) simulations of bond rupture. By definition, bond strength is the force that produces the most frequent failure in repeated tests of breakage, i.e., the peak in the distribution of rupture forces. As verified by the simulations, theory shows that bond strength progresses through three dynamic regimes of loading rate. First, bond strength emerges at a critical rate of loading (> or = 0) at which spontaneous dissociation is just frequent enough to keep the distribution peak at zero force. In the slow-loading regime immediately above the critical rate, strength grows as a weak power of loading rate and reflects initial coupling of force to the bonding potential. At higher rates, there is crossover to a fast regime in which strength continues to increase as the logarithm of the loading rate over many decades independent of the type of attraction. Finally, at ultrafast loading rates approaching the domain of molecular dynamics simulations, the bonding potential is quickly overwhelmed by the rapidly increasing force, so that only naked frictional drag on the structure remains to retard separation. Hence, to expose the energy landscape that governs bond strength, molecular adhesion forces must be examined over an enormous span of time scales. However, a significant gap exists between the time domain of force measurements in the laboratory and the extremely fast scale

  11. Molecular dynamics of interface rupture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1993-01-01

    Several situations have been studied in which a fluid-vapor or fluid-fluid interface ruptures, using molecular dynamics simulations of 3000 to 20,000 Lennard-Jones molecules in three dimensions. The cases studied are the Rayleigh instability of a liquid thread, the burst of a liquid drop immersed in a second liquid undergoing shear, and the rupture of a liquid sheet in an extensional flow. The late stages of the rupture process involve the gradual withdrawal of molecules from a thinning neck, or the appearance and growth of holes in a sheet. In all cases, it is found that despite the small size of the systems studied, tens of angstroms, the dynamics is in at least qualitative accord with the behavior expected from continuum calculations, and in some cases the agreement is to within tens of percent. Remarkably, this agreement occurs even though the Eulerian velocity and stress fields are essentially unmeasurable - dominated by thermal noise. The limitations and prospects for such molecular simulation techniques are assessed.

  12. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics embedded cluster density functional theory: single-excitation configuration interaction study.

    PubMed

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Glover, William J; Larsen, Ross E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2007-06-21

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the hydrated electron were extracted from the MQC MD simulations and embedded in a roughly 18 Ax18 Ax18 A matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory (DFT) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid DFT(CIS)/MQC MD calculations is significant transfer (approximately 18%) of the excess electron's charge density into the 2p orbitals of oxygen atoms in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the singly occupied and the lower unoccupied molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfcc) tensors, and the infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of these embedded water cluster anions. The calculated hfcc tensors were used to compute electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra for the hydrated electron that compared favorably to the experimental spectra of trapped electrons in alkaline ice. The calculated vibrational spectra of the hydrated electron are consistent with the red-shifted bending and stretching frequencies observed in resonance Raman experiments. In addition to reproducing the visible/near IR absorption spectrum, the hybrid DFT model also accounts for the hydrated electron's 190-nm absorption band in the ultraviolet. Thus, our study suggests that to explain several important experimentally observed properties of the hydrated electron, many-electron effects must be accounted for: one-electron models that do not allow for mixing of the excess

  13. A concurrent multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaofan Tong, Qi

    2015-04-21

    In this work, we have derived a multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD) from first principle to extend the (Andersen)-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics to mesoscale and continuum scale. The multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics is a con-current three-scale dynamics that couples a fine scale molecular dynamics, a mesoscale micromorphic dynamics, and a macroscale nonlocal particle dynamics together. By choosing proper statistical closure conditions, we have shown that the original Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics is the homogeneous and equilibrium case of the proposed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics. In specific, we have shown that the Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics can be rigorously formulated and justified from first principle, and its general inhomogeneous case, i.e., the three scale con-current multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics can take into account of macroscale continuum mechanics boundary condition without the limitation of atomistic boundary condition or periodic boundary conditions. The discovered multiscale scale structure and the corresponding multiscale dynamics reveal a seamless transition from atomistic scale to continuum scale and the intrinsic coupling mechanism among them based on first principle formulation.

  14. Shear flow by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.

    1985-08-01

    A detailed comparison is made between a number of methods for generating shear flow in Molecular Dynamics computer simulation. Algorithms which closely mimic most experimental methods for producing shear flow are those by Trozzi and Ciccotti, and Ashurst and Hoover. They employ hard wall boundaries and fluid walls respectively (with sheared cell periodicity being only in two dimensions). The sheared fluid properties are therefore inextricably linked with interfacial effects. These problems are largely eliminated by the Lees and Edwards scheme which creates a pseudo-infinite sheared material. There are a number of derivatives of this model including one favoured by the author for investigating non-linear viscoelastic phenomena. A number of results from this scheme pertaining to the Lennard-Jones liquid are presented.

  15. Buckybomb: Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Fileti, Eudes Eterno; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-03-01

    Energetic materials, such as explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, are widely used in civilian and military applications. Nanoscale explosives represent a special group because of the high density of energetic covalent bonds. The reactive molecular dynamics (ReaxFF) study of nitrofullerene decomposition reported here provides a detailed chemical mechanism of explosion of a nanoscale carbon material. Upon initial heating, C60(NO2)12 disintegrates, increasing temperature and pressure by thousands of Kelvins and bars within tens of picoseconds. The explosion starts with NO2 group isomerization into C-O-N-O, followed by emission of NO molecules and formation of CO groups on the buckyball surface. NO oxidizes into NO2, and C60 falls apart, liberating CO2. At the highest temperatures, CO2 gives rise to diatomic carbon. The study shows that the initiation temperature and released energy depend strongly on the chemical composition and density of the material. PMID:26262672

  16. Emergent Phenomena via Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaport, D. C.

    Emergent phenomena are unusual because they are not obvious consequences of the design of the systems in which they appear, a feature no less relevant when they are being simulated. Several systems that exhibit surprisingly rich emergent behavior, each studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, are described: (i) Modeling self-assembly processes associated with virus growth reveals the ability to achieve error-free assembly, where paradoxically, near-maximum yields are due to reversible bond formation. (ii) In fluids studied at the atomistic level, complex hydrodynamic phenomena in rotating and convecting fluids - the Taylor- Couette and Rayleigh-Bénard instabilities - can be reproduced, despite the limited length and time scales accessible by MD. (iii) Segregation studies of granular mixtures in a rotating drum reproduce the expected, but counterintuitive, axial and radial segregation, while for the case of a vertically vibrated layer a novel form of horizontal segregation is revealed.

  17. Buckybomb: Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Fileti, Eudes Eterno; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-03-01

    Energetic materials, such as explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, are widely used in civilian and military applications. Nanoscale explosives represent a special group because of the high density of energetic covalent bonds. The reactive molecular dynamics (ReaxFF) study of nitrofullerene decomposition reported here provides a detailed chemical mechanism of explosion of a nanoscale carbon material. Upon initial heating, C60(NO2)12 disintegrates, increasing temperature and pressure by thousands of Kelvins and bars within tens of picoseconds. The explosion starts with NO2 group isomerization into C-O-N-O, followed by emission of NO molecules and formation of CO groups on the buckyball surface. NO oxidizes into NO2, and C60 falls apart, liberating CO2. At the highest temperatures, CO2 gives rise to diatomic carbon. The study shows that the initiation temperature and released energy depend strongly on the chemical composition and density of the material.

  18. Assessment of Classroom Interaction Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvermann, Donna E.; And Others

    To help teachers develop an awareness of how they structure a discussion, an instrument was constructed called the Assessment of Classroom Interaction Dynamics (ACID). Two expert judges and 26 trainees then participated in a study (1) to estimate interrater reliability between expert judges in the use of the ACID, (2) to assess the validity of the…

  19. Understanding polycaroboxylate interactions with counterions: A molecular modeling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzwater, S.; Freeman, M.B.

    1993-12-31

    Low molecular weight polycarboyxlates, such as poly(acrylic acid), have utility as dispersants in a variety of commercial applications including home laundry detergents, mineral processing and water treatment. In general, counterions (Ca, Mg, Fe, etc.) are unavoidable in these applications and often dictate the polymer composition and molecular weight necessary for successful performance. The authors have been investigating the interaction of polycarboxylates with counterions in order to better understand how that interaction impacts on the dispersant properties of a polymer. Using computer modeling, it can be seen how molecular geometry, molecular dynamics, and the shape/polarity of the molecular surface are affected by counterion binding and polymer composition. The authors can then combine information from the modeling with experimental information and literature concepts to provide a direction toward the synthesis of improved low molecular weight polycarboxylate dispersants.

  20. Differential Interactions of Cytochrome P450 3A5 and 3A4 with Chemotherapeutic Agent-Vincristine: A Comparative Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Saba, Nikhat; Bhuyan, Rajabrata; Nandy, Suman Kumar; Seal, Alpana

    2015-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent vincristine, used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia is metabolized preferentially by polymorphic cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) with higher clearance rate than cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4). As a result, CYP3A5 expressers have a reduced amount of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy than non-expressers. We modeled the structure of CYP3A5 and its interaction with vincristine, compared with CYP3A4-vincristine complex using molecular docking and simulation studies. This relative study helped us to understand the molecular mechanisms behind the interaction at the atomic level through interaction energy, binding free energy, hydrogen bond and solvent accessible surface area analysis - giving an insight into the binding mode and the main residues involved in this particular interaction. Our results show that the interacting groups get closer in CYP3A5-vincristine complex due to different orientation of vincristine. This leads to higher binding affinity of vincristine towards CYP3A5 compared to CYP3A4 and explains the preferential metabolism of vincristine by CYP3A5. We believe that, the results of the current study will be helpful for future studies on structure-based drug design in this area.

  1. MINT: a Molecular INTeraction database.

    PubMed

    Zanzoni, Andreas; Montecchi-Palazzi, Luisa; Quondam, Michele; Ausiello, Gabriele; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Cesareni, Gianni

    2002-02-20

    Protein interaction databases represent unique tools to store, in a computer readable form, the protein interaction information disseminated in the scientific literature. Well organized and easily accessible databases permit the easy retrieval and analysis of large interaction data sets. Here we present MINT, a database (http://cbm.bio.uniroma2.it/mint/index.html) designed to store data on functional interactions between proteins. Beyond cataloguing binary complexes, MINT was conceived to store other types of functional interactions, including enzymatic modifications of one of the partners. Release 1.0 of MINT focuses on experimentally verified protein-protein interactions. Both direct and indirect relationships are considered. Furthermore, MINT aims at being exhaustive in the description of the interaction and, whenever available, information about kinetic and binding constants and about the domains participating in the interaction is included in the entry. MINT consists of entries extracted from the scientific literature by expert curators assisted by 'MINT Assistant', a software that targets abstracts containing interaction information and presents them to the curator in a user-friendly format. The interaction data can be easily extracted and viewed graphically through 'MINT Viewer'. Presently MINT contains 4568 interactions, 782 of which are indirect or genetic interactions.

  2. Fiber lubrication: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyi

    Molecular and mesoscopic level description of friction and lubrication remains a challenge because of difficulties in the phenomenological understanding of to the behaviors of solid-liquid interfaces during sliding. Fortunately, there is the computational simulation approach opens an opportunity to predict and analyze interfacial phenomena, which were studied with molecular dynamics (MD) and mesoscopic dynamics (MesoDyn) simulations. Polypropylene (PP) and cellulose are two of most common polymers in textile fibers. Confined amorphous surface layers of PP and cellulose were built successfully with xenon crystals which were used to compact the polymers. The physical and surface properties of the PP and cellulose surface layers were investigated by MD simulations, including the density, cohesive energy, volumetric thermal expansion, and contact angle with water. The topology method was employed to predict the properties of poly(alkylene glycol) (PAG) diblock copolymers and Pluronic triblock copolymers used as lubricants on surfaces. Density, zero shear viscosity, shear module, cohesive energy and solubility parameter were predicted with each block copolymer. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the interaction energy per unit contact area of block copolymer melts with PP and cellulose surfaces. The interaction energy is defined as the ratio of interfacial interaction energy to the contact area. Both poly(proplene oxide) (PPO) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) segments provided a lipophilic character to both PP and cellulose surfaces. The PPO/PEO ratio and the molecular weight were found to impact the interaction energy on both PP and cellulose surfaces. In aqueous solutions, the interaction energy is complicated due to the presence of water and the cross interactions between the multiple molecular components. The polymer-water-surface (PWS) calculation method was proposed to calculate such complex systems. In a contrast with a vacuum condition, the presence

  3. Molecular assembly of superquenchers in signaling molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chaoyong James; Lin, Hui; Tan, Weihong

    2005-09-21

    We have designed a novel molecular assembly of quencher molecules to form superquenchers with excellent quenching efficiency. The superquencher can be engineered as desired by assembling different types and different numbers of quencher molecules. By labeling a superquencher to a molecular beacon, a 320-fold enhancement of fluorescent signal was achieved, compared to about 14-fold from a molecular beacon prepared with the same monomer quencher. Our molecular assembly approach can effectively improve the sensitivity of a variety of fluorescent assays and can be widely useful for molecular interaction studies.

  4. Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Krack, Matthias; Bertolus, Marjorie

    2015-10-10

    Molecular dynamics simulation is well suited to study primary damage production by irradiation, defect interactions with fission gas atoms, gas bubble nucleation, grain boundary effects on defect and gas bubble evolution in nuclear fuel, and the resulting changes in thermo-mechanical properties. In these simulations, the forces on the ions are dictated by interaction potentials generated by fitting properties of interest to experimental data. The results obtained from the present generation of potentials are qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different. There is a need to refine existing potentials to provide a better representation of the performance of polycrystalline fuel under a variety of operating conditions, and to develop models that are equipped to handle deviations from stoichiometry. In addition to providing insights into fundamental mechanisms governing the behaviour of nuclear fuel, MD simulations can also provide parameters that can be used as inputs for mesoscale models.

  5. Gas-surface interactions using accommodation coefficients for a dilute and a dense gas in a micro- or nanochannel: heat flux predictions using combined molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Nedea, S V; van Steenhoven, A A; Markvoort, A J; Spijker, P; Giordano, D

    2014-05-01

    The influence of gas-surface interactions of a dilute gas confined between two parallel walls on the heat flux predictions is investigated using a combined Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) approach. The accommodation coefficients are computed from the temperature of incident and reflected molecules in molecular dynamics and used as effective coefficients in Maxwell-like boundary conditions in Monte Carlo simulations. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic wall interactions are studied, and the effect of the gas-surface interaction potential on the heat flux and other characteristic parameters like density and temperature is shown. The heat flux dependence on the accommodation coefficient is shown for different fluid-wall mass ratios. We find that the accommodation coefficient is increasing considerably when the mass ratio is decreased. An effective map of the heat flux depending on the accommodation coefficient is given and we show that MC heat flux predictions using Maxwell boundary conditions based on the accommodation coefficient give good results when compared to pure molecular dynamics heat predictions. The accommodation coefficients computed for a dilute gas for different gas-wall interaction parameters and mass ratios are transferred to compute the heat flux predictions for a dense gas. Comparison of the heat fluxes derived using explicit MD, MC with Maxwell-like boundary conditions based on the accommodation coefficients, and pure Maxwell boundary conditions are discussed. A map of the heat flux dependence on the accommodation coefficients for a dense gas, and the effective accommodation coefficients for different gas-wall interactions are given. In the end, this approach is applied to study the gas-surface interactions of argon and xenon molecules on a platinum surface. The derived accommodation coefficients are compared with values of experimental results. PMID:25353885

  6. Gas-surface interactions using accommodation coefficients for a dilute and a dense gas in a micro- or nanochannel: heat flux predictions using combined molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Nedea, S V; van Steenhoven, A A; Markvoort, A J; Spijker, P; Giordano, D

    2014-05-01

    The influence of gas-surface interactions of a dilute gas confined between two parallel walls on the heat flux predictions is investigated using a combined Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) approach. The accommodation coefficients are computed from the temperature of incident and reflected molecules in molecular dynamics and used as effective coefficients in Maxwell-like boundary conditions in Monte Carlo simulations. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic wall interactions are studied, and the effect of the gas-surface interaction potential on the heat flux and other characteristic parameters like density and temperature is shown. The heat flux dependence on the accommodation coefficient is shown for different fluid-wall mass ratios. We find that the accommodation coefficient is increasing considerably when the mass ratio is decreased. An effective map of the heat flux depending on the accommodation coefficient is given and we show that MC heat flux predictions using Maxwell boundary conditions based on the accommodation coefficient give good results when compared to pure molecular dynamics heat predictions. The accommodation coefficients computed for a dilute gas for different gas-wall interaction parameters and mass ratios are transferred to compute the heat flux predictions for a dense gas. Comparison of the heat fluxes derived using explicit MD, MC with Maxwell-like boundary conditions based on the accommodation coefficients, and pure Maxwell boundary conditions are discussed. A map of the heat flux dependence on the accommodation coefficients for a dense gas, and the effective accommodation coefficients for different gas-wall interactions are given. In the end, this approach is applied to study the gas-surface interactions of argon and xenon molecules on a platinum surface. The derived accommodation coefficients are compared with values of experimental results.

  7. Molecular dynamics in high electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, M.; Cune, L. C.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular rotation spectra, generated by the coupling of the molecular electric-dipole moments to an external time-dependent electric field, are discussed in a few particular conditions which can be of some experimental interest. First, the spherical-pendulum molecular model is reviewed, with the aim of introducing an approximate method which consists in the separation of the azimuthal and zenithal motions. Second, rotation spectra are considered in the presence of a static electric field. Two particular cases are analyzed, corresponding to strong and weak fields. In both cases the classical motion of the dipoles consists of rotations and vibrations about equilibrium positions; this motion may exhibit parametric resonances. For strong fields a large macroscopic electric polarization may appear. This situation may be relevant for polar matter (like pyroelectrics, ferroelectrics), or for heavy impurities embedded in a polar solid. The dipolar interaction is analyzed in polar condensed matter, where it is shown that new polarization modes appear for a spontaneous macroscopic electric polarization (these modes are tentatively called "dipolons"); one of the polarization modes is related to parametric resonances. The extension of these considerations to magnetic dipoles is briefly discussed. The treatment is extended to strong electric fields which oscillate with a high frequency, as those provided by high-power lasers. It is shown that the effect of such fields on molecular dynamics is governed by a much weaker, effective, renormalized, static electric field.

  8. Molecular Handshake: Recognition through Weak Noncovalent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murthy, Parvathi S.

    2006-01-01

    The weak noncovalent interactions between substances, the handshake in the form of electrostatic interactions, van der Waals' interactions or hydrogen bonding is universal to all living and nonliving matter. They significantly influence the molecular and bulk properties and behavior of matter. Their transient nature affects chemical reactions and…

  9. Molecular interactions of agonist and inverse agonist ligands at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: computational ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies validated by experimental mutagenesis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Liu, Yue; Booth, Raymond G.

    2015-02-01

    To understand molecular determinants for ligand activation of the serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), a drug target for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders, a 5-HT2C homology model was built according to an adrenergic β2 GPCR (β2AR) structure and validated using a 5-HT2B GPCR crystal structure. The models were equilibrated in a simulated phosphatidyl choline membrane for ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies. Ligands included (2S, 4R)-(-)-trans-4-(3'-bromo- and trifluoro-phenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-amine (3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT), a 5-HT2C agonist and inverse agonist, respectively. Distinct interactions of 3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT at the wild-type (WT) 5-HT2C receptor model were observed and experimental 5-HT2C receptor mutagenesis studies were undertaken to validate the modelling results. For example, the inverse agonist 3'-CF3-PAT docked deeper in the WT 5-HT2C binding pocket and altered the orientation of transmembrane helices (TM) 6 in comparison to the agonist 3'-Br-PAT, suggesting that changes in TM orientation that result from ligand binding impact function. For both PATs, mutation of 5-HT2C residues S3.36, T3.37, and F5.47 to alanine resulted in significantly decreased affinity, as predicted from modelling results. It was concluded that upon PAT binding, 5-HT2C residues T3.37 and F5.47 in TMs 3 and 5, respectively, engage in inter-helical interactions with TMs 4 and 6, respectively. The movement of TMs 5 and 6 upon agonist and inverse agonist ligand binding observed in the 5-HT2C receptor modelling studies was similar to movements reported for the activation and deactivation of the β2AR, suggesting common mechanisms among aminergic neurotransmitter GPCRs.

  10. Molecular Dynamics: New Frontier in Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sneha, P; Doss, C George Priya

    2016-01-01

    The field of drug discovery has witnessed infinite development over the last decade with the demand for discovery of novel efficient lead compounds. Although the development of novel compounds in this field has seen large failure, a breakthrough in this area might be the establishment of personalized medicine. The trend of personalized medicine has shown stupendous growth being a hot topic after the successful completion of Human Genome Project and 1000 genomes pilot project. Genomic variant such as SNPs play a vital role with respect to inter individual's disease susceptibility and drug response. Hence, identification of such genetic variants has to be performed before administration of a drug. This process requires high-end techniques to understand the complexity of the molecules which might bring an insight to understand the compounds at their molecular level. To sustenance this, field of bioinformatics plays a crucial role in revealing the molecular mechanism of the mutation and thereby designing a drug for an individual in fast and affordable manner. High-end computational methods, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has proved to be a constitutive approach to detecting the minor changes associated with an SNP for better understanding of the structural and functional relationship. The parameters used in molecular dynamic simulation elucidate different properties of a macromolecule, such as protein stability and flexibility. MD along with docking analysis can reveal the synergetic effect of an SNP in protein-ligand interaction and provides a foundation for designing a particular drug molecule for an individual. This compelling application of computational power and the advent of other technologies have paved a promising way toward personalized medicine. In this in-depth review, we tried to highlight the different wings of MD toward personalized medicine. PMID:26827606

  11. Molecular Dynamics: New Frontier in Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sneha, P; Doss, C George Priya

    2016-01-01

    The field of drug discovery has witnessed infinite development over the last decade with the demand for discovery of novel efficient lead compounds. Although the development of novel compounds in this field has seen large failure, a breakthrough in this area might be the establishment of personalized medicine. The trend of personalized medicine has shown stupendous growth being a hot topic after the successful completion of Human Genome Project and 1000 genomes pilot project. Genomic variant such as SNPs play a vital role with respect to inter individual's disease susceptibility and drug response. Hence, identification of such genetic variants has to be performed before administration of a drug. This process requires high-end techniques to understand the complexity of the molecules which might bring an insight to understand the compounds at their molecular level. To sustenance this, field of bioinformatics plays a crucial role in revealing the molecular mechanism of the mutation and thereby designing a drug for an individual in fast and affordable manner. High-end computational methods, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has proved to be a constitutive approach to detecting the minor changes associated with an SNP for better understanding of the structural and functional relationship. The parameters used in molecular dynamic simulation elucidate different properties of a macromolecule, such as protein stability and flexibility. MD along with docking analysis can reveal the synergetic effect of an SNP in protein-ligand interaction and provides a foundation for designing a particular drug molecule for an individual. This compelling application of computational power and the advent of other technologies have paved a promising way toward personalized medicine. In this in-depth review, we tried to highlight the different wings of MD toward personalized medicine.

  12. A coarse-graining approach for molecular simulation that retains the dynamics of the all-atom reference system by implementing hydrodynamic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Markutsya, Sergiy; Lamm, Monica H

    2014-11-07

    We report on a new approach for deriving coarse-grained intermolecular forces that retains the frictional contribution that is often discarded by conventional coarse-graining methods. The approach is tested for water and an aqueous glucose solution, and the results from the new implementation for coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation show remarkable agreement with the dynamics obtained from reference all-atom simulations. The agreement between the structural properties observed in the coarse-grained and all-atom simulations is also preserved. We discuss how this approach may be applied broadly to any existing coarse-graining method where the coarse-grained models are rigorously derived from all-atom reference systems.

  13. Dynamics of molecular superrotors in an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Valery

    2015-08-01

    We excite diatomic oxygen and nitrogen to high rotational states with an optical centrifuge and study their dynamics in an external magnetic field. Ion imaging is employed to directly visualize, and follow in time, the rotation plane of the molecular superrotors. The two different mechanisms of interaction between the magnetic field and the molecular angular momentum in paramagnetic oxygen and non-magnetic nitrogen lead to qualitatively different behaviour. In nitrogen, we observe the precession of the molecular angular momentum around the field vector. In oxygen, strong spin-rotation coupling results in faster and richer dynamics, encompassing the splitting of the rotation plane into three separate components. As the centrifuged molecules evolve with no significant dispersion of the molecular wave function, the observed magnetic interaction presents an efficient mechanism for controlling the plane of molecular rotation.

  14. DockingShop: A Tool for Interactive Molecular Docking

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ting-Cheng; Max, Nelson L.; Ding, Jinhui; Bethel, E. Wes; Crivelli, Silvia N.

    2005-04-24

    Given two independently determined molecular structures, the molecular docking problem predicts the bound association, or best fit between them, while allowing for conformational changes of the individual molecules during construction of a molecular complex. Docking Shop is an integrated environment that permits interactive molecular docking by navigating a ligand or protein to an estimated binding site of a receptor with real-time graphical feedback of scoring factors as visual guides. Our program can be used to create initial configurations for a protein docking prediction process. Its output--the structure of aprotein-ligand or protein-protein complex--may serve as an input for aprotein docking algorithm, or an optimization process. This tool provides molecular graphics interfaces for structure modeling, interactive manipulation, navigation, optimization, and dynamic visualization to aid users steer the prediction process using their biological knowledge.

  15. Dynamical Localization in Molecular Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xidi

    In the first four chapters of this thesis we concentrate on the Davydov model which describes the vibrational energy quanta of Amide I bonds (C=O bonds on the alpha -helix) coupled to the acoustic phonon modes of the alpha-helix backbone in the form of a Frohlich Hamiltonian. Following a brief introduction in chapter one, in chapter two we formulate the dynamics of vibrational quanta at finite temperature by using coherent state products. The fluctuation-dissipation relation is derived. At zero temperature, in the continuum limit, we recover the original results of Davydov. We also achieve good agreement with numerical simulations. In chapter three, the net contraction of the lattice is calculated exactly at any temperature, and its relation to the so -call "topological stability" of the Davydov soliton is discussed. In the second section of the chapter three we calculate the overtone spectra of crystalline acetanilide (according to some opinions ACN provides experimental evidence for the existence of Davydov solitons). Good agreement with experimental data has been obtained. In chapter four we study the self-trapped vibrational excitations by the Quantum Monte Carlo technique. For a single excitation, the temperature dependence of different physical observables is calculated. The quasi-particle which resembles the Davydov soliton has been found to be fairly narrow using the most commonly used data for the alpha -helix; at temperatures above a few Kelvin, the quasi-particle reaches its smallest limit (extends over three sites), which implies diffusive motion of the small polaron-like quasi-particle at high temperatures. For the multi-excitation case, bound pairs and clusters of excitations are found at low temperatures; they gradually dissociate when the temperature of the system is increased as calculated from the density-density correlation function. In the last chapter of this thesis, we study a more general model of dynamical local modes in molecular systems

  16. Molecular dynamics on APE100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Luciano Maria; Simonazzi, Riccardo; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    1995-09-01

    We have studied portability, efficiency and accuracy of a standard Molecular Dynamics simulation on the SIMD parallel computer APE100. Computing speed performance and physical system size range have been analyzed and compared with those of a conventional computer. Short range and long range potentials have been considered, and the comparative advantage of different simulation approaches has been assessed. For long range potentials, APE turns out to be faster than a conventional computer; large systems can be conveniently simulated using either the cloning approach (up to ˜ 10 5 particles) or a domain decomposition with the systolic method. In the case of short range potentials and systems with diffusion (like a liquid), APE is convenient only when using a large number of processors. In a special case (a crystal without diffusion), a specific domain decomposition technique with frames makes APE advantageous for intermediate and large systems. Using the latter technique we have studied in detail the effect of different numerical error sources, and compared the accuracy of APE with that of a conventional computer.

  17. Molecular dynamics of the excitatory synapse.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Shigeo

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics of synapses are one of the most important factors that control the remodeling of synaptic connection and efficacy of transmission. This chapter focuses on the dynamics of postsynaptic molecular machinery and describes the imaging technologies important for quantitative analyses of synapses, their application to the postsynaptic molecules, and the insights obtained from these analyses. New visualization techniques, such as super-resolution microscopy, will become an indispensable approach to reveal submicron changes of synaptic molecules. New methods of monitoring protein interactions will also be integrated with experimental paradigms of synaptic plasticity. Cell biological analyses, together with cutting-edge imaging technologies, have been applied to the studies of nascent synapse formation, synapse maintenance, and activity-dependent synapse remodeling. From these studies, a variety of new concepts emerged, such as local assembly of postsynaptic scaffolds, presence of "transport packets" of postsynaptic receptors, heterogeneity of actin movement within spines, and activity-free fluctuation of PSD/spine sizes. These new concepts are useful in understanding specific properties of postsynaptic functions and should be integrated in future to build a realistic model of the postsynaptic organization that can explain its remarkable stability and tunability. PMID:22351054

  18. 2004 Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Paul J. Dagdigian

    2004-10-25

    The 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Atomic and Molecular Interactions was held July 11-16 at Colby-Sawyer College, New London, New Hampshire. This latest edition in a long-standing conference series featured invited talks and contributed poster papers on dynamics and intermolecular interactions in a variety of environments, ranging from the gas phase through surfaces and condensed media. A total of 90 conferees participated in the conference.

  19. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  20. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    T, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2014-12-09

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  1. Single Molecule Spectroscopy Illuminating the Molecular Dynamics of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Watt W.

    This chapter summarizes a series of new single-molecule spectroscopy investigations in the life sciences at Cornell University that began with our invention of Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) about 1970. Our invention of FCS became my first focus on the "Molecular Dynamics of Life." It motivated my transition from research on quantum fluctuations and transport in condensed matter physics including superconductivity and in the molecular dynamics of coherent fluctuations and nano-transport in inanimate physical and chemical systems subject to the nonlinear dynamics of continuous phase transitions. These interdisciplinary transitions exemplify the productivity of such interdisciplinary interactions in science.

  2. Communication: Relation of centroid molecular dynamics and ring-polymer molecular dynamics to exact quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hele, Timothy J H; Willatt, Michael J; Muolo, Andrea; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2015-05-21

    We recently obtained a quantum-Boltzmann-conserving classical dynamics by making a single change to the derivation of the "Classical Wigner" approximation. Here, we show that the further approximation of this "Matsubara dynamics" gives rise to two popular heuristic methods for treating quantum Boltzmann time-correlation functions: centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). We show that CMD is a mean-field approximation to Matsubara dynamics, obtained by discarding (classical) fluctuations around the centroid, and that RPMD is the result of discarding a term in the Matsubara Liouvillian which shifts the frequencies of these fluctuations. These findings are consistent with previous numerical results and give explicit formulae for the terms that CMD and RPMD leave out.

  3. Combined molecular dynamics-spin dynamics simulations of bcc iron

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N; Yin, Junqi; Landau, David P; Nicholson, Don M; Stocks, George Malcolm; Eisenbach, Markus; Brown, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Using a classical model that treats translational and spin degrees of freedom on an equal footing, we study phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron with combined molecular and spin dynamics methods. The atomic interactions are modeled via an empirical many-body potential while spin dependent interactions are established through a Hamiltonian of the Heisenberg form with a distance dependent magnetic exchange interaction obtained from first principles electronic structure calculations. The temporal evolution of translational and spin degrees of freedom was determined by numerically solving the coupled equations of motion, using an algorithm based on the second order Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of the exponential operators. By calculating Fourier transforms of space- and time-displaced correlation functions, we demonstrate that the the presence of lattice vibrations leads to noticeable softening and damping of spin wave modes. As a result of the interplay between lattice and spin subsystems, we also observe additional longitudinal spin wave excitations, with frequencies which coincide with that of the longitudinal lattice vibrations.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Gold Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercolessi, F.; Bartolini, A.; Garofalo, M.; Parrinello, M.; Tosatti, E.

    1987-01-01

    In the glue model the total cohesion of a metal is determined by a pairwise atom-atom effective interaction plus a many-body force (the "glue") which is introduced to ensure optimal coordination. Using parameters optimized for gold, we have studied the structural behaviour of the low index surfaces Au(100), Au(110) and Au(111). We have used a simulated annealing strategy based on molecular dynamics to search the lowest surface energy configuration. In all cases the optimal structures are found to be reconstructed, and remarkably similar to some experimentally suggested reconstruction models. The main driving mechanism is the formation of close-packed triangular surface layers favoured by the glue term.

  5. The zero-multipole summation method for estimating electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics: analysis of the accuracy and application to liquid systems.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Kamiya, Narutoshi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2014-05-21

    In the preceding paper [I. Fukuda, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174107 (2013)], the zero-multipole (ZM) summation method was proposed for efficiently evaluating the electrostatic Coulombic interactions of a classical point charge system. The summation takes a simple pairwise form, but prevents the electrically non-neutral multipole states that may artificially be generated by a simple cutoff truncation, which often causes large energetic noises and significant artifacts. The purpose of this paper is to judge the ability of the ZM method by investigating the accuracy, parameter dependencies, and stability in applications to liquid systems. To conduct this, first, the energy-functional error was divided into three terms and each term was analyzed by a theoretical error-bound estimation. This estimation gave us a clear basis of the discussions on the numerical investigations. It also gave a new viewpoint between the excess energy error and the damping effect by the damping parameter. Second, with the aid of these analyses, the ZM method was evaluated based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of two fundamental liquid systems, a molten sodium-chlorine ion system and a pure water molecule system. In the ion system, the energy accuracy, compared with the Ewald summation, was better for a larger value of multipole moment l currently induced until l ≲ 3 on average. This accuracy improvement with increasing l is due to the enhancement of the excess-energy accuracy. However, this improvement is wholly effective in the total accuracy if the theoretical moment l is smaller than or equal to a system intrinsic moment L. The simulation results thus indicate L ∼ 3 in this system, and we observed less accuracy in l = 4. We demonstrated the origins of parameter dependencies appearing in the crossing behavior and the oscillations of the energy error curves. With raising the moment l we observed, smaller values of the damping parameter provided more accurate results and smoother

  6. Molecular dynamics studies of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyon-Jee

    The thermodynamic, structural, and mechanical properties of metallic glasses are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Molecular dynamics provides a computational framework to simulate the movement of interacting atoms in response to external perturbations, such as changes in temperature or pressure. In this thesis, a Sutton-Chen potential was chosen to describe the many-body interactions in metals and alloys. Our first application for this approach is to develop a simple model to derive the thermodynamic properties of metallic alloys (Chapter 2). Based on this model, we demonstrate that the glass transition is thermodynamically sensitive to differences between atomic radii and that there is an optimal difference for glass formation. Next, we extend these simulations to elucidate the details of structural organization in the glass (Chapter 3). We find that the liquid phase is characterized by a local five-fold symmetry, which becomes more prominent as the glass phase forms. This five-fold symmetry is related to the formation of icosahedral structures. The mechanical properties of glasses are also investigated and it is found that shear localization, which accompanies a sharp drop in the stress-strain curve, occurs at 45 degree with respect to the loading axis (Chapter 4). The generation of free volume is found to be the dominant mechanism that leads to shear localization, rather than adiabatic heating. Finally, generic first principle potentials are constructed to guide the experimental development of AlTiNi based metallic glasses (Chapter 5). Together, the results from these simulations improve our understanding of the thermodynamic, structural, and mechanical properties of metallic glasses and will aid computer-driven materials design.

  7. A computational perspective of molecular interactions through virtual screening, pharmacokinetic and dynamic prediction on ribosome toxin A chain and inhibitors of Ricinus communis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R. Barani; Suresh, M. Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ricin is considered to be one of the most deadly toxins and gained its favor as a bioweapon that has a serious social and biological impact, due to its widespread nature and abundant availability. The hazardous effects of this toxin in human being are seen in almost all parts of the organ system. The severe consequences of the toxin necessitate the need for developing potential inhibitors that can effectively block its interaction with the host system. Materials and Methods: In order to identify potential inhibitors that can effectively block ricin, we employed various computational approaches. In this work, we computationally screened and analyzed 66 analogs and further tested their ADME/T profiles. From the kinetic and toxicity studies we selected six analogs that possessed appropriate pharmacokinetic and dynamic property. We have also performed a computational docking of these analogs with the target. Results: On the basis of the dock scores and hydrogen bond interactions we have identified analog 64 to be the best interacting molecule. Molecule 64 seems to have stable interaction with the residues Tyr80, Arg180, and Val81. The pharmacophore feature that describes the key functional features of a molecule was also studied and presented. Conclusion: The pharmacophore features of the drugs provided suggests the key functional groups that can aid in the design and synthesis of more potential inhibitors. PMID:22224054

  8. Time-Dependent Molecular Reaction Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öhrn, Yngve

    2007-11-01

    This paper is a brief review of a time-dependent, direct, nonadiabatic theory of molecular processes called Electron Nuclear Dynamics (END). This approach to the study of molecular reaction dynamics is a hierarchical theory that can be applied at various levels of approximation. The simplest level of END uses classical nuclei and represents all electrons by a single, complex, determinantal wave function. The wave function parameters such as average nuclear positions and momenta, and molecular orbital coefcients carry the time dependence and serve as dynamical variables. Examples of application are given of the simplest level of END to ion-atom and ion-molecule reactions.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of wear processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hualiang

    Wear has been recognized as a vital problem in many industries. It results in a loss of durability, reliability, and efficiency and costs tens of billions of dollars annually. Significant effort has been devoted in both experimental and theoretical studies. However, the mechanisms of wear are still poorly understood and therefore wear control is far behind its demand. One way to study wear process is via computer simulation, which has become more powerful with the rapid development in computer facilities and efficient algorithms. It allows observation of atomic scale deformation and therefore it is a very good tool to study wear mechanisms at the nano-scale. This study presents a series of molecular dynamic simulation of some nano-scale wear processes, such as indentation and plowing, with the goal of exploring the factors that affect wear and predicting wear for different conditions. Molecular Dynamics simulations were carried out on a system that includes an aluminum substrate and a hard tip. Embedded atom method (EAM) and Lennard-Jones potentials were used to describe interactions between atoms. For nano-indentation simulations, both constant indent force and constant loading speed were applied to study the wear mechanisms as well as material properties. Some phenomenon, such as jump-to-contact, local melting, and dislocation nucleation were observed. More importantly, the effects of system temperature, indent force, substrate orientation, tip-substrate bond, indenter shape, boundary condition, and defect concentrations of the substrate were systematically investigated during indentation. The results are in qualitative agreement with limited experimental data. Similar simulations were carried out for plowing. The effects of plowing force, substrate orientation, the tip-substrate bond, and alloy elements are discussed based on the simulation results. In addition, a simple analytic model of plowing behavior is provided. The model reveals two parameters, static

  10. Hybrid QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Study of Benzocaine in a Membrane Environment: How Does a Quantum Mechanical Treatment of Both Anesthetic and Lipids Affect Their Interaction.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Rafael C; Pascutti, Pedro G

    2012-07-10

    Biomolecular dynamics studies using a QM/MM approach have been largely used especially to study enzymatic reactions. However, to the best of our knowledge, the very same approach has not been used to study the water/membrane interface using a quantum mechanical treatment for the lipids. Since a plethora of biochemical processes take place in this region, we believe that it is of primary importance to understand, at the level of molecular orbitals, the behavior of a drug in such an odd environment. In this work, we take advantage of an integration of the CPMD and the GROMACS code, using the Car-Parrinello method, to treat the benzocaine local anesthetic as well as two of the membrane lipids and the GROMOS force field to treat the remaining lipids and the water molecules. PMID:26588952

  11. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  12. Effect of initial ion positions on the interactions of monovalent and divalent ions with a DNA duplex as revealed with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Timothy J; Wang, Yongmei

    2013-01-01

    Monovalent (Na(+)) and divalent (Mg(2+)) ion distributions around the Dickerson-Drew dodecamer were studied by atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with AMBER molecular modeling software. Different initial placements of ions were tried and the resulting effects on the ion distributions around DNA were investigated. For monovalent ions, results were found to be nearly independent of initial cation coordinates. However, Mg(2+) ions demonstrated a strong initial coordinate dependent behavior. While some divalent ions initially placed near the DNA formed essentially permanent direct coordination complexes with electronegative DNA atoms, Mg(2+) ions initially placed further away from the duplex formed a full, nonexchanging, octahedral first solvation shell. These fully solvated cations were still capable of binding with DNA with events lasting up to 20 ns, and in comparison were bound much longer than Na(+) ions. Force field parameters were also investigated with modest and little differences arising from ion (ions94 and ions08) and nucleic acid description (ff99, ff99bsc0, and ff10), respectively. Based on known Mg(2+) ion solvation structure, we conclude that in most cases Mg(2+) ions retain their first solvation shell, making only solvent-mediated contacts with DNA duplex. The proper way to simulate Mg(2+) ions around DNA duplex, therefore, should begin with ions placed in the bulk water.

  13. Uranyl ion interaction at the water/NiO(100) interface: A predictive investigation by first-principles molecular dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebbari, Karim; Roques, Jérôme; Domain, Christophe; Simoni, Eric

    2012-10-01

    The behavior of the UO22+ uranyl ion at the water/NiO(100) interface was investigated for the first time using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamic simulations with the spin polarized DFT + U extension. A water/NiO(100) interface model was first optimized on a defect-free five layers slab thickness, proposed as a reliable surface model, with an explicit treatment of the solvent. Water molecules are adsorbed with a well-defined structure in a thickness of about 4 Å above the surface. The first layer, adsorbed on nickel atoms, remains mainly in molecular form but can partly dissociate at 293 K. Considering low acidic conditions, a bidentate uranyl ion complex was characterized on two surface oxygen species (arising from water molecules adsorption on nickel atoms) with d_{U{-O}_{adsorption}}= 2.39 Å. This complex is stable at 293 K due to iono-covalent bonds with an estimated charge transfer of 0.58 electron from the surface to the uranyl ion.

  14. Uranyl ion interaction at the water/NiO(100) interface: A predictive investigation by first-principles molecular dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sebbari, Karim; Roques, Jerome; Simoni, Eric; Domain, Christophe

    2012-10-28

    The behavior of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} uranyl ion at the water/NiO(100) interface was investigated for the first time using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamic simulations with the spin polarized DFT +U extension. A water/NiO(100) interface model was first optimized on a defect-free five layers slab thickness, proposed as a reliable surface model, with an explicit treatment of the solvent. Water molecules are adsorbed with a well-defined structure in a thickness of about 4 A above the surface. The first layer, adsorbed on nickel atoms, remains mainly in molecular form but can partly dissociate at 293 K. Considering low acidic conditions, a bidentate uranyl ion complex was characterized on two surface oxygen species (arising from water molecules adsorption on nickel atoms) with d{sub U-O{sub a{sub d{sub s{sub o{sub r{sub p{sub t{sub i{sub o{sub n}}}}}}}}}}}=2.39 A. This complex is stable at 293 K due to iono-covalent bonds with an estimated charge transfer of 0.58 electron from the surface to the uranyl ion.

  15. Communication: Relation of centroid molecular dynamics and ring-polymer molecular dynamics to exact quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hele, Timothy J. H.; Willatt, Michael J.; Muolo, Andrea; Althorpe, Stuart C.

    2015-05-21

    We recently obtained a quantum-Boltzmann-conserving classical dynamics by making a single change to the derivation of the “Classical Wigner” approximation. Here, we show that the further approximation of this “Matsubara dynamics” gives rise to two popular heuristic methods for treating quantum Boltzmann time-correlation functions: centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). We show that CMD is a mean-field approximation to Matsubara dynamics, obtained by discarding (classical) fluctuations around the centroid, and that RPMD is the result of discarding a term in the Matsubara Liouvillian which shifts the frequencies of these fluctuations. These findings are consistent with previous numerical results and give explicit formulae for the terms that CMD and RPMD leave out.

  16. Conservation of molecular interactions stabilizing bovine and mouse rhodopsin †

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Shiho; Colozo, Alejandro T.; Müller, Daniel J.; Park, Paul S.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the light receptor that initiates phototransduction in rod photoreceptor cells. The structure and function of rhodopsin is tightly linked to molecular interactions that stabilize and determine the receptor's functional state. Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used to localize and quantify molecular interactions that structurally stabilize bovine and mouse rhodopsin from native disc membranes of rod photoreceptor cells. The mechanical unfolding of bovine and mouse rhodopsin revealed nine major unfolding intermediates, each intermediate defining a structurally stable segment in the receptor. These stable structural segments had similar localization and occurrence in both bovine and mouse samples. For each structural segment, parameters describing their unfolding energy barrier were determined by dynamic SMFS. No major differences were observed between bovine and mouse rhodopsin thereby implying that the structures of both rhodopsins are largely stabilized by similar molecular interactions. PMID:21038881

  17. Quantum Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Nanotube Tip Assisted Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    In this report we detail the development and application of an efficient quantum molecular dynamics computational algorithm and its application to the nanotube-tip assisted reactions on silicon and diamond surfaces. The calculations shed interesting insights into the microscopic picture of tip surface interactions.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of microscale fluid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Lopez, A.R.; Stevens, M.J.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    Recent advances in micro-science and technology, like Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), have generated a group of unique liquid flow problems that involve characteristic length scales of a Micron. Also, in manufacturing processes such as coatings, current continuum models are unable to predict microscale physical phenomena that appear in these non-equilibrium systems. It is suspected that in these systems, molecular-level processes can control the interfacial energy and viscoelastic properties at the liquid/solid boundary. A massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code has been developed to better understand microscale transport mechanisms, fluid-structure interactions, and scale effects in micro-domains. Specifically, this MD code has been used to analyze liquid channel flow problems for a variety of channel widths, e.g. 0.005-0.05 microns. This report presents results from MD simulations of Poiseuille flow and Couette flow problems and addresses both scaling and modeling issues. For Poiseuille flow, the numerical predictions are compared with existing data to investigate the variation of the friction factor with channel width. For Couette flow, the numerical predictions are used to determine the degree of slip at the liquid/solid boundary. Finally, the results also indicate that shear direction with respect to the wall lattice orientation can be very important. Simulation results of microscale Couette flow and microscale Poiseuille flow for two different surface structures and two different shear directions will be presented.

  19. Plastic dislocation motion via nonequilibrium molecular and continuum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G.; Ladd, A.J.C.; Hoover, N.E.

    1980-09-29

    The classical two-dimensional close-packed triangular lattice, with nearest-neighbor spring forces, is a convenient standard material for the investigation of dislocation motion and plastic flow. Two kinds of calculations, based on this standard material, are described here: (1) Molecular Dynamics simulations, incorporating adiabatic strains described with the help of Doll's Tensor, and (2) Continuum Dynamics simulations, incorporating periodic boundaries and dislocation interaction through stress-field superposition.

  20. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  1. Protein dynamics: Moore's law in molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M

    2011-01-25

    The millisecond barrier has been broken in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins. Such simulations are increasingly revealing the inner workings of biological systems by generating atomic-level descriptions of their behaviour that make testable predictions about key molecular processes.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Owner F.; Wengerter, Brian C.; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, in which students were given the opportunity to perform molecular dynamics simulations on a series of molecular liquids using the Amber suite of programs, is presented. They were introduced to both physical theories underlying classical mechanics simulations and to the atom-atom pair distribution function.

  3. How to Predict Molecular Interactions between Species?

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Sylvie; Schleicher, Jana; Guthke, Reinhard; Linde, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Organisms constantly interact with other species through physical contact which leads to changes on the molecular level, for example the transcriptome. These changes can be monitored for all genes, with the help of high-throughput experiments such as RNA-seq or microarrays. The adaptation of the gene expression to environmental changes within cells is mediated through complex gene regulatory networks. Often, our knowledge of these networks is incomplete. Network inference predicts gene regulatory interactions based on transcriptome data. An emerging application of high-throughput transcriptome studies are dual transcriptomics experiments. Here, the transcriptome of two or more interacting species is measured simultaneously. Based on a dual RNA-seq data set of murine dendritic cells infected with the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the software tool NetGenerator was applied to predict an inter-species gene regulatory network. To promote further investigations of molecular inter-species interactions, we recently discussed dual RNA-seq experiments for host-pathogen interactions and extended the applied tool NetGenerator (Schulze et al., 2015). The updated version of NetGenerator makes use of measurement variances in the algorithmic procedure and accepts gene expression time series data with missing values. Additionally, we tested multiple modeling scenarios regarding the stimuli functions of the gene regulatory network. Here, we summarize the work by Schulze et al. (2015) and put it into a broader context. We review various studies making use of the dual transcriptomics approach to investigate the molecular basis of interacting species. Besides the application to host-pathogen interactions, dual transcriptomics data are also utilized to study mutualistic and commensalistic interactions. Furthermore, we give a short introduction into additional approaches for the prediction of gene regulatory networks and discuss their application to dual transcriptomics data. We

  4. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  5. Vehicle systems: coupled and interactive dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantsevich, Vladimir V.

    2014-11-01

    This article formulates a new direction in vehicle dynamics, described as coupled and interactive vehicle system dynamics. Formalised procedures and analysis of case studies are presented. An analytical consideration, which explains the physics of coupled system dynamics and its consequences for dynamics of a vehicle, is given for several sets of systems including: (i) driveline and suspension of a 6×6 truck, (ii) a brake mechanism and a limited slip differential of a drive axle and (iii) a 4×4 vehicle steering system and driveline system. The article introduces a formal procedure to turn coupled system dynamics into interactive dynamics of systems. A new research direction in interactive dynamics of an active steering and a hybrid-electric power transmitting unit is presented and analysed to control power distribution between the drive axles of a 4×4 vehicle. A control strategy integrates energy efficiency and lateral dynamics by decoupling dynamics of the two systems thus forming their interactive dynamics.

  6. Modeling and Bio molecular Self-assembly via Molecular Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakesh, L.

    2009-09-01

    Surfactants like materials can be used to increase the solubility of poorly soluble drugs in water and to increase drug bioavailability. A typical case study will be demonstrated using DPD simulation to model the distribution of anti-inflammatory drug molecules. Computer simulation is a convenient approach to understand drug distribution and solubility concepts without much wastage and costly experiments in the laboratory. Often in molecular dynamics (MD) the atoms are represented explicitly and the equation of motion as described by Newtonian dynamics is integrated explicitly. MD has been used to study spontaneous formation of micelles by hydrophobic molecules with amphiphilic head groups in bulk water, as well as stability of pre-configured micelles and membranes. DPD is a state-of the- art mesoscale simulation, it is a more recent molecular dynamics technique, originally developed for simulating complex fluids but lately also applied to membrane dynamics, hemodynamic in biomedical applications. Such fluids pervade industrial research from paints to pharmaceuticals and from cosmetics to the controlled release of drugs. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) can provide structural and dynamic properties of fluids in equilibrium, under shear or confined to narrow cavities, at length- and time-scales beyond the scope of traditional atomistic molecular dynamics simulation methods. Mesoscopic particles are used to represent clusters of molecules. The interaction conserves mass and momentum and as a consequence the dynamics is consistent with Navier-Stokes equations. In addition to the conservative forces, stochastic drive and dissipation is introduced to represent internal degrees of freedom in the mesoscopic particles. In this research, an initial study is being conducted using the aqueous solubilization of the nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug is studied theoretically in micellar solution of nonionic (dodecyl hexa(ethylene oxide), C12E6) surfactants possessing the

  7. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus. PMID:24694369

  8. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus.

  9. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed. PMID:26604800

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed.

  12. AceCloud: Molecular Dynamics Simulations in the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Harvey, M J; De Fabritiis, G

    2015-05-26

    We present AceCloud, an on-demand service for molecular dynamics simulations. AceCloud is designed to facilitate the secure execution of large ensembles of simulations on an external cloud computing service (currently Amazon Web Services). The AceCloud client, integrated into the ACEMD molecular dynamics package, provides an easy-to-use interface that abstracts all aspects of interaction with the cloud services. This gives the user the experience that all simulations are running on their local machine, minimizing the learning curve typically associated with the transition to using high performance computing services.

  13. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gottwald, Fabian; Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D. Kühn, Oliver

    2015-06-28

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into a few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation, which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection technique. Within this framework, a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here, we discuss that this task is more naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importantly, we show that the rigid bond approach leads to a systematic overestimation of relaxation times, unless the system under study consists of a harmonic bath bi-linearly coupled to the relevant degrees of freedom.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of large macromolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Perilla, Juan R.; Goh, Boon Chong; Cassidy, C. Keith; Liu, Bo; Bernardi, Rafael C.; Rudack, Till; Yu, Hang; Wu, Zhe; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Connecting dynamics to structural data from diverse experimental sources, molecular dynamics simulations permit the exploration of biological phenomena in unparalleled detail. Advances in simulations are moving the atomic resolution descriptions of biological systems into the million-to-billion atom regime, in which numerous cell functions reside. In this opinion, we review the progress, driven by large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, in the study of viruses, ribosomes, bioenergetic systems, and other diverse applications. These examples highlight the utility of molecular dynamics simulations in the critical task of relating atomic detail to the function of supramolecular complexes, a task that cannot be achieved by smaller-scale simulations or existing experimental approaches alone. PMID:25845770

  15. Molecular dynamics studies on nanoscale gas transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisik, Murat

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale gas flows are studied to reveal surface effects. A smart wall model that drastically reduces the memory requirements of MD simulations for gas flows is introduced. The smart wall molecular dynamics (SWMD) represents three-dimensional FCC walls using only 74 wall Molecules. This structure is kept in the memory and utilized for each gas molecule surface collision. Using SWMD, fluid behavior within nano-scale confinements is studied for argon in dilute gas, dense gas, and liquid states. Equilibrium MD method is employed to resolve the density and stress variations within the static fluid. Normal stress calculations are based on the Irving-Kirkwood method, which divides the stress tensor into its kinetic and virial parts. The kinetic component recovers pressure based on the ideal gas law. The particle-particle virial increases with increased density, while the surface-particle virial develops due to the surface force field effects. Normal stresses within nano-scale confinements show anisotropy induced primarily by the surface force-field and local variations in the fluid density near the surfaces. For dilute and dense gas cases, surface-force field that extends typically 1nm from each wall induces anisotropic normal stress. For liquid case, this effect is further amplified by the density fluctuations that extend beyond the three field penetration region. Outside the wall force-field penetration and density fluctuation regions the normal stress becomes isotropic and recovers the thermodynamic pressure, provided that sufficiently large force cut-off distances are utilized in the computations. Next, non-equilibrium SWMD is utilized to investigate the surface-gas interaction effects on nanoscale shear-driven gas flows in the transition and free molecular flow regimes. For the specified surface properties and gas-surface pair interactions, density and stress profiles exhibit a universal behavior inside the

  16. How Dynamic Visualization Technology can Support Molecular Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Dalit

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports the results of a study aimed at exploring the advantages of dynamic visualization for the development of better understanding of molecular processes. We designed a technology-enhanced curriculum module in which high school chemistry students conduct virtual experiments with dynamic molecular visualizations of solid, liquid, and gas. They interact with the visualizations and carry out inquiry activities to make and refine connections between observable phenomena and atomic level processes related to phase change. The explanations proposed by 300 pairs of students in response to pre/post-assessment items have been analyzed using a scale for measuring the level of molecular reasoning. Results indicate that from pretest to posttest, students make progress in their level of molecular reasoning and are better able to connect intermolecular forces and phase change in their explanations. The paper presents the results through the lens of improvement patterns and the metaphor of the "ladder of molecular reasoning," and discusses how this adds to our understanding of the benefits of interacting with dynamic molecular visualizations.

  17. Concise NMR approach for molecular dynamics characterizations in organic solids.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E; Courtier-Murias, Denis

    2013-08-22

    Molecular dynamics characterisations in solids can be carried out selectively using dipolar-dephasing experiments. Here we show that the introduction of a sum of Lorentzian and Gaussian functions greatly improve fittings of the "intensity versus time" data for protonated carbons in dipolar-dephasing experiments. The Lorentzian term accounts for remote intra- and intermolecular (1)H-(13)C dipole-dipole interactions, which vary from one molecule to another or for different carbons within the same molecule. Thus, by separating contributions from weak remote interactions, more accurate Gaussian decay constants, T(dd), can be extracted for directly bonded (1)H-(13)C dipole-dipole interactions. Reorientations of the (1)H-(13)C bonds lead to the increase of T(dd), and by measuring dipolar-dephasing constants, insight can be gained into dynamics in solids. We have demonstrated advantages of the method using comparative dynamics studies in the α and γ polymorphs of glycine, cyclic amino acids L-proline, DL-proline and trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline, the Ala residue in different dipeptides, as well as adamantane and hexamethylenetetramine. It was possible to distinguish subtle differences in dynamics of different carbon sites within a molecule in polymorphs and in L- and DL-forms. The presence of overall molecular motions is shown to lead to particularly large differences in dipolar-dephasing experiments. The differences in dynamics can be attributed to differences in noncovalent interactions. In the case of hexamethylenetetramine, for example, the presence of C-H···N interactions leads to nearly rigid molecules. Overall, the method allows one to gain insight into the role of noncovalent interactions in solids and their influence on the molecular dynamics.

  18. Decoding molecular interactions in microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Nicole A; Taga, Michiko E

    2016-09-01

    Microbial communities govern numerous fundamental processes on earth. Discovering and tracking molecular interactions among microbes is critical for understanding how single species and complex communities impact their associated host or natural environment. While recent technological developments in DNA sequencing and functional imaging have led to new and deeper levels of understanding, we are limited now by our inability to predict and interpret the intricate relationships and interspecies dependencies within these communities. In this review, we highlight the multifaceted approaches investigators have taken within their areas of research to decode interspecies molecular interactions that occur between microbes. Understanding these principles can give us greater insight into ecological interactions in natural environments and within synthetic consortia. PMID:27417261

  19. Molecular interactions of quinidine with phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Villena, F; Bagnara, M; Sotomayor, C P

    1995-01-01

    Quinidine (QUIN) is one of the most important and efficient antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD). It belongs to class I, which are the drugs that exert their action at the level of the sodium channels in the membrane of the myocard. Several hypotheses support the idea that the molecular mechanism of action of the AAD is via nonspecific interactions with phospholipids sited in the neighborhood of the channels. In order to probe the validity of these hypotheses, QUIN was made to interact with the phospholipids dimyristoylphosphadidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE). These interactions were performed in a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic medium under a wide range of molar ratios. The resulting products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. QUIN solutions were also made to interact with DMPC liposomes, which were studied by fluorescent spectroscopy. Finally, human erythrocytes which were incubated with QUIN solutions were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results of these experiments proved that QUIN indeed interacted with phospholipid bilayers. PMID:7546041

  20. Dynamic and interacting complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickison, Mark E.

    This thesis employs methods of statistical mechanics and numerical simulations to study some aspects of dynamic and interacting complex networks. The mapping of various social and physical phenomena to complex networks has been a rich field in the past few decades. Subjects as broad as petroleum engineering, scientific collaborations, and the structure of the internet have all been analyzed in a network physics context, with useful and universal results. In the first chapter we introduce basic concepts in networks, including the two types of network configurations that are studied and the statistical physics and epidemiological models that form the framework of the network research, as well as covering various previously-derived results in network theory that are used in the work in the following chapters. In the second chapter we introduce a model for dynamic networks, where the links or the strengths of the links change over time. We solve the model by mapping dynamic networks to the problem of directed percolation, where the direction corresponds to the time evolution of the network. We show that the dynamic network undergoes a percolation phase transition at a critical concentration pc, that decreases with the rate r at which the network links are changed. The behavior near criticality is universal and independent of r. We find that for dynamic random networks fundamental laws are changed: i) The size of the giant component at criticality scales with the network size N for all values of r, rather than as N2/3 in static network, ii) In the presence of a broad distribution of disorder, the optimal path length between two nodes in a dynamic network scales as N1/2, compared to N1/3 in a static network. The third chapter consists of a study of the effect of quarantine on the propagation of epidemics on an adaptive network of social contacts. For this purpose, we analyze the susceptible-infected-recovered model in the presence of quarantine, where susceptible

  1. Interactive rendering of dynamic geometry.

    PubMed

    Ponchio, Federico; Hormann, Kai

    2008-01-01

    Fluid simulations typically produce complex three-dimensional (3D) isosurfaces whose geometry and topology change over time. The standard way of representing such "dynamic geometry" is by a set of isosurfaces that are extracted individually at certain time steps. An alternative strategy is to represent the whole sequence as a four-dimensional (4D) tetrahedral mesh. The iso-surface at a specific time step can then be computed by intersecting the tetrahedral mesh with a 3D hyperplane. This not only allows the animation of the surface continuously over time without having to worry about the topological changes, but also enables simplification algorithms to exploit temporal coherence. We show how to interactively render such 4D tetrahedral meshes by improving previous GPU-accelerated techniques and building an out-of-core multi-resolution structure based on quadric error simplification. As a second application, we apply our framework to time-varying surfaces that result from morphing one triangle mesh into another. PMID:18467764

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Coulomb Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Bringa, E M

    2002-05-17

    A swift ion creates a track of electronic excitations in the target material. A net repulsion inside the track can cause a ''Coulomb Explosion'', which can lead to damage and sputtering of the material. Here we report results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of Coulomb explosion for a cylindrical track as a function of charge density and neutralization/quenching time, {tau}. Screening by the free electrons is accounted for using a screened Coulomb potential for the interaction among charges. The yield exhibits a prompt component from the track core and a component, which dominates at higher excitation density, from the heated region produced. For the cases studied, the number of atoms ejected per incident ion, i.e. the sputtering yield Y, is quadratic with charge density along the track as suggested by simple models. Y({tau} = 0.2 Debye periods) is nearly 20% of the yield when there is no neutralization ({tau} {yields} {infinity}). The connections between ''Coulomb explosions'', thermal spikes and measurements of electronic sputtering are discussed.

  3. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I.

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  4. Molecular scale dynamics of large ring polymers.

    PubMed

    Gooßen, S; Brás, A R; Krutyeva, M; Sharp, M; Falus, P; Feoktystov, A; Gasser, U; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W; Wischnewski, A; Richter, D

    2014-10-17

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture. PMID:25361284

  5. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, C E; Self, J L; Copley, J R D; Faraone, A

    2016-07-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids. PMID:27394112

  6. Molecular scale dynamics of large ring polymers.

    PubMed

    Gooßen, S; Brás, A R; Krutyeva, M; Sharp, M; Falus, P; Feoktystov, A; Gasser, U; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W; Wischnewski, A; Richter, D

    2014-10-17

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture.

  7. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, C. E.; Self, J. L.; Copley, J. R. D.; Faraone, A.

    2016-07-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids.

  8. Numerical methods for molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Skeel, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes our research progress to date on the use of multigrid methods for three-dimensional elliptic partial differential equations, with particular emphasis on application to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics. This research is motivated by the need for fast and accurate numerical solution techniques for three-dimensional problems arising in physics and engineering. In many applications these problems must be solved repeatedly, and the extremely large number of discrete unknowns required to accurately approximate solutions to partial differential equations in three-dimensional regions necessitates the use of efficient solution methods. This situation makes clear the importance of developing methods which are of optimal order (or nearly so), meaning that the number of operations required to solve the discrete problem is on the order of the number of discrete unknowns. Multigrid methods are generally regarded as being in this class of methods, and are in fact provably optimal order for an increasingly large class of problems. The fundamental goal of this research is to develop a fast and accurate numerical technique, based on multi-level principles, for the solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics and similar equations occurring in other applications. An outline of the report is as follows. We first present some background material, followed by a survey of the literature on the use of multigrid methods for solving problems similar to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. A short description of the software we have developed so far is then given, and numerical results are discussed. Finally, our research plans for the coming year are presented.

  9. Semiclassical guided optimal control of molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kondorskiy, A.; Mil'nikov, G.; Nakamura, H.

    2005-10-15

    An efficient semiclassical optimal control theory applicable to multidimensional systems is formulated for controlling wave packet dynamics on a single adiabatic potential energy surface. The approach combines advantages of different formulations of optimal control theory: quantum and classical on one hand and global and local on the other. Numerical applications to the control of HCN-CNH isomerization demonstrate that this theory can provide an efficient tool to manipulate molecular dynamics of many degrees of freedom by laser pulses.

  10. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene.

    PubMed

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando; Dressel, Martin; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2016-02-01

    Controlling the dynamics of spins on surfaces is pivotal to the design of spintronic and quantum computing devices. Proposed schemes involve the interaction of spins with graphene to enable surface-state spintronics and electrical spin manipulation. However, the influence of the graphene environment on the spin systems has yet to be unravelled. Here we explore the spin-graphene interaction by studying the classical and quantum dynamics of molecular magnets on graphene. Whereas the static spin response remains unaltered, the quantum spin dynamics and associated selection rules are profoundly modulated. The couplings to graphene phonons, to other spins, and to Dirac fermions are quantified using a newly developed model. Coupling to Dirac electrons introduces a dominant quantum relaxation channel that, by driving the spins over Villain's threshold, gives rise to fully coherent, resonant spin tunnelling. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the interaction between spins and graphene, establishing the basis for electrical spin manipulation in graphene nanodevices. PMID:26641019

  11. Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Structures and Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrides, Constantinos

    This dissertation consists of topics in two related areas of research that together provide quantum mechanical descriptions of atomic and molecular interactions and reactions. The first is the ab initio electronic structure calculation that provides the atomic and molecular interaction potential, including the long-range potential. The second is the quantum theory of interactions that uses such potentials to understand scattering, long-range molecules, and reactions. In ab initio electronic structure calculations, we present results of dynamic polarizabilities for a variety of atoms and molecules, and the long-range dispersion coefficients for a number of atom-atom and atom-molecule cases. We also present results of a potential energy surface for the triatomic lithium-ytterbium-lithium system, aimed at understanding the related chemical reactions. In the quantum theory of interactions, we present a multichannel quantum-defect theory (MQDT) for atomic interactions in a magnetic field. This subject, which is complex especially for atoms with hyperfine structure, is essential for the understanding and the realization of control and tuning of atomic interactions by a magnetic field: a key feature that has popularized cold atom physics in its investigations of few-body and many-body quantum systems. Through the example of LiK, we show how MQDT provides a systematic and an efficient understanding of atomic interaction in a magnetic field, especially magnetic Feshbach resonances in nonzero partial waves.

  12. A Dynamic Interactive Theory of Person Construal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Jonathan B.; Ambady, Nalini

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic interactive theory of person construal is proposed. It assumes that the perception of other people is accomplished by a dynamical system involving continuous interaction between social categories, stereotypes, high-level cognitive states, and the low-level processing of facial, vocal, and bodily cues. This system permits lower-level…

  13. Multiple time step integrators in ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Luehr, Nathan; Martínez, Todd J.; Markland, Thomas E.

    2014-02-28

    Multiple time-scale algorithms exploit the natural separation of time-scales in chemical systems to greatly accelerate the efficiency of molecular dynamics simulations. Although the utility of these methods in systems where the interactions are described by empirical potentials is now well established, their application to ab initio molecular dynamics calculations has been limited by difficulties associated with splitting the ab initio potential into fast and slowly varying components. Here we present two schemes that enable efficient time-scale separation in ab initio calculations: one based on fragment decomposition and the other on range separation of the Coulomb operator in the electronic Hamiltonian. We demonstrate for both water clusters and a solvated hydroxide ion that multiple time-scale molecular dynamics allows for outer time steps of 2.5 fs, which are as large as those obtained when such schemes are applied to empirical potentials, while still allowing for bonds to be broken and reformed throughout the dynamics. This permits computational speedups of up to 4.4x, compared to standard Born-Oppenheimer ab initio molecular dynamics with a 0.5 fs time step, while maintaining the same energy conservation and accuracy.

  14. Molecular Exchange Dynamics in Block Copolymer Micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Frank; Lu, Jie; Choi, Soohyung; Lodge, Timothy

    2012-02-01

    Poly(styrene-b-ethylene propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymers were mixed with squalane (C30H62) at 1% by weight resulting in the formation of spherical micelles. The structure and dynamics of molecular exchange were characterized by synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and time resolved small-angle neutron scattering (TR-SANS), respectively, between 100 C and 160 C. TR-SANS measurements were performed with solutions initially containing deuterium labeled micelle cores and normal cores dispersed in a contrast matched squalane. Monitoring the reduction in scattering intensity as a function of time at various temperatures revealed molecular exchange dynamics highly sensitive to the core molecular weight and molecular weight distribution. Time-temperature superposition of data acquired at different temperatures produced a single master curve for all the mixtures. Experiments conducted with isotopically labeled micelle cores, each formed from two different but relatively mondisperse PS blocks, confirmed a simple dynamical model based on first order kinetics and core Rouse single chain relaxation. These findings demonstrate a dramatic transition to nonergodicity with increasing micelle core molecular weight and confirm the origins of the logarithmic exchange kinetics in such systems.

  15. Reaction dynamics in polyatomic molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is the development of theoretical methods and models for describing the dynamics of chemical reactions, with specific interest for application to polyatomic molecular systems of special interest and relevance. There is interest in developing the most rigorous possible theoretical approaches and also in more approximate treatments that are more readily applicable to complex systems.

  16. Quench dynamics in long-range interacting quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zhexuan

    2016-05-01

    A distinctive feature of atomic, molecular, and optical systems is that interactions between particles are often long-ranged. Control techniques from quantum optics often allow one to tune the pattern of these long-range interactions, creating an entirely new degree of freedom, absent in typical condensed matter systems. These tunable long-range interactions can result in very different far-from-equilibrium dynamics compared to systems with only short-range interactions. In the first half of the talk, I will describe how very general types of long-range interactions can qualitatively change the entanglement and correlation growth shortly after a quantum quench. In the second half of the talk I will show that, at longer times, long-range interactions can lead to exotic quasi-stationary states and dynamical phase transitions. These theoretical ideas have been explored in recent trapped-ion experiments, and connections to these experiments will be emphasized in both parts of the talk.

  17. An implicit divalent counterion force field for RNA molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, Paul S.; Mak, Chi H.

    2016-03-01

    How to properly account for polyvalent counterions in a molecular dynamics simulation of polyelectrolytes such as nucleic acids remains an open question. Not only do counterions such as Mg2+ screen electrostatic interactions, they also produce attractive intrachain interactions that stabilize secondary and tertiary structures. Here, we show how a simple force field derived from a recently reported implicit counterion model can be integrated into a molecular dynamics simulation for RNAs to realistically reproduce key structural details of both single-stranded and base-paired RNA constructs. This divalent counterion model is computationally efficient. It works with existing atomistic force fields, or coarse-grained models may be tuned to work with it. We provide optimized parameters for a coarse-grained RNA model that takes advantage of this new counterion force field. Using the new model, we illustrate how the structural flexibility of RNA two-way junctions is modified under different salt conditions.

  18. Rational Prediction with Molecular Dynamics for Hit Identification

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Sara E; Swift, Robert V; Amaro, Rommie E

    2012-01-01

    Although the motions of proteins are fundamental for their function, for pragmatic reasons, the consideration of protein elasticity has traditionally been neglected in drug discovery and design. This review details protein motion, its relevance to biomolecular interactions and how it can be sampled using molecular dynamics simulations. Within this context, two major areas of research in structure-based prediction that can benefit from considering protein flexibility, binding site detection and molecular docking, are discussed. Basic classification metrics and statistical analysis techniques, which can facilitate performance analysis, are also reviewed. With hardware and software advances, molecular dynamics in combination with traditional structure-based prediction methods can potentially reduce the time and costs involved in the hit identification pipeline. PMID:23110535

  19. Multiscale coupling of molecular dynamics and peridynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Qi; Li, Shaofan

    2016-10-01

    We propose a multiscale computational model to couple molecular dynamics and peridynamics. The multiscale coupling model is based on a previously developed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD) theory, which has three dynamics equations at three different scales, namely, microscale, mesoscale, and macroscale. In the proposed multiscale coupling approach, we divide the simulation domain into atomistic region and macroscale region. Molecular dynamics is used to simulate atom motions in atomistic region, and peridynamics is used to simulate macroscale material point motions in macroscale region, and both methods are nonlocal particle methods. A transition zone is introduced as a messenger to pass the information between the two regions or scales. We employ the "supercell" developed in the MMMD theory as the transition element, which is named as the adaptive multiscale element due to its ability of passing information from different scales, because the adaptive multiscale element can realize both top-down and bottom-up communications. We introduce the Cauchy-Born rule based stress evaluation into state-based peridynamics formulation to formulate atomistic-enriched constitutive relations. To mitigate the issue of wave reflection on the interface, a filter is constructed by switching on and off the MMMD dynamic equations at different scales. Benchmark tests of one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) wave propagations from atomistic region to macro region are presented. The mechanical wave can transit through the interface smoothly without spurious wave deflections, and the filtering process is proven to be efficient.

  20. Nanoscale swimmers: hydrodynamic interactions and propulsion of molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaue, T.; Kapral, R.; Mikhailov, A. S.

    2010-06-01

    Molecular machines execute nearly regular cyclic conformational changes as a result of ligand binding and product release. This cyclic conformational dynamics is generally non-reciprocal so that under time reversal a different sequence of machine conformations is visited. Since such changes occur in a solvent, coupling to solvent hydrodynamic modes will generally result in self-propulsion of the molecular machine. These effects are investigated for a class of coarse grained models of protein machines consisting of a set of beads interacting through pair-wise additive potentials. Hydrodynamic effects are incorporated through a configuration-dependent mobility tensor, and expressions for the propulsion linear and angular velocities, as well as the stall force, are obtained. In the limit where conformational changes are small so that linear response theory is applicable, it is shown that propulsion is exponentially small; thus, propulsion is nonlinear phenomenon. The results are illustrated by computations on a simple model molecular machine.

  1. MDMovie: a molecular dynamics viewing tool.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J P

    1996-10-01

    The graphics program MDMovie (Molecular Dynamics Movie), written in C using IRIS GL graphics library calls, is designed to facilitate the visualization and interpretation of empirical force field data. MDMovie was created and initially adapted in accord with the needs of physical chemists and thereafter became an expandable analysis tool. Capabilities include the display of chemical structure, animation of molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo trajectories, and the visual representation of various vector and scalar dynamical properties. In addition to being a research tool, MDMovie has features for creating presentation videos and hardcopy output. A library is also available for linking to Fortran simulation codes running on a remote machine and connecting to MDMovie via a socket connection. MDMovie continues to be an ongoing research project and new features are actively being added in collaboration with various research groups. Future plans include porting to OpenGL and the design of an XII-based user interface.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations and modelling of the residue interaction networks in the BRAF kinase complexes with small molecule inhibitors: probing the allosteric effects of ligand-induced kinase dimerization and paradoxical activation.

    PubMed

    Verkhivker, G M

    2016-10-20

    Protein kinases are central to proper functioning of cellular networks and are an integral part of many signal transduction pathways. The family of protein kinases represents by far the largest and most important class of therapeutic targets in oncology. Dimerization-induced activation has emerged as a common mechanism of allosteric regulation in BRAF kinases, which play an important role in growth factor signalling and human diseases. Recent studies have revealed that most of the BRAF inhibitors can induce dimerization and paradoxically stimulate enzyme transactivation by conferring an active conformation in the second monomer of the kinase dimer. The emerging connections between inhibitor binding and BRAF kinase domain dimerization have suggested a molecular basis of the activation mechanism in which BRAF inhibitors may allosterically modulate the stability of the dimerization interface and affect the organization of residue interaction networks in BRAF kinase dimers. In this work, we integrated structural bioinformatics analysis, molecular dynamics and binding free energy simulations with the protein structure network analysis of the BRAF crystal structures to determine dynamic signatures of BRAF conformations in complexes with different types of inhibitors and probe the mechanisms of the inhibitor-induced dimerization and paradoxical activation. The results of this study highlight previously unexplored relationships between types of BRAF inhibitors, inhibitor-induced changes in the residue interaction networks and allosteric modulation of the kinase activity. This study suggests a mechanism by which BRAF inhibitors could promote or interfere with the paradoxical activation of BRAF kinases, which may be useful in informing discovery efforts to minimize the unanticipated adverse biological consequences of these therapeutic agents.

  3. Phase transitions of methane using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sheikh, S. M.; Barakat, K.; Salem, N. M.

    2006-03-01

    Using a short ranged Lennard-Jones interaction and a long ranged electrostatic potential, CH4under high pressure was modeled. Molecular dynamics simulations on small clusters (108 and 256molecules) were used to explore the phase diagram. Regarding phase transitions at different temperatures, our numerical findings are consistent with experimental results to a great degree. In addition, the hysteresis effect is displayed in our results.

  4. Phase transitions of methane using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    El-Sheikh, S M; Barakat, K; Salem, N M

    2006-03-28

    Using a short ranged Lennard-Jones interaction and a long ranged electrostatic potential, CH4 under high pressure was modeled. Molecular dynamics simulations on small clusters (108 and 256 molecules) were used to explore the phase diagram. Regarding phase transitions at different temperatures, our numerical findings are consistent with experimental results to a great degree. In addition, the hysteresis effect is displayed in our results.

  5. Screened Electrostatic Interactions in Molecular Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-10-14

    In a typical application of molecular mechanics (MM), the electrostatic interactions are calculated from parametrized partial atomic charges treated as point charges interacting by radial Coulomb potentials. This does not usually yield accurate electrostatic interactions at van der Waals distances, but this is compensated by additional parametrized terms, for example Lennard-Jones potentials. In the present work, we present a scheme involving radial screened Coulomb potentials that reproduces the accurate electrostatics much more accurately. The screening accounts for charge penetration of one subsystem's charge cloud into that of another subsystem, and it is incorporated into the interaction potential in a way similar to what we proposed in a previous article (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2010, 6, 3330) for combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations, but the screening parameters are reoptimized for MM. The optimization is carried out with electrostatic-potential-fitted partial atomic charges, but the optimized parameters should be useful with any realistic charge model. In the model we employ, the charge density of an atom is approximated as the sum of a point charge representing the nucleus and inner electrons and a smeared charge representing the outermost electrons; in particular, for all atoms except hydrogens, the smeared charge represents the two outermost electrons in the present model. We find that the charge penetration effect can cause very significant deviations from the popular point-charge model, and by comparison to electrostatic interactions calculated by symmetry-adapted perturbation theory, we find that the present results are considerably more accurate than point-charge electrostatic interactions. The mean unsigned error in electrostatics for a large and diverse data set (192 interaction energies) decreases from 9.2 to 3.3 kcal/mol, and the error in the electrostatics for 10 water dimers decreases from 1.7 to 0.5 kcal

  6. Screened Electrostatic Interactions in Molecular Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-10-14

    In a typical application of molecular mechanics (MM), the electrostatic interactions are calculated from parametrized partial atomic charges treated as point charges interacting by radial Coulomb potentials. This does not usually yield accurate electrostatic interactions at van der Waals distances, but this is compensated by additional parametrized terms, for example Lennard-Jones potentials. In the present work, we present a scheme involving radial screened Coulomb potentials that reproduces the accurate electrostatics much more accurately. The screening accounts for charge penetration of one subsystem's charge cloud into that of another subsystem, and it is incorporated into the interaction potential in a way similar to what we proposed in a previous article (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2010, 6, 3330) for combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations, but the screening parameters are reoptimized for MM. The optimization is carried out with electrostatic-potential-fitted partial atomic charges, but the optimized parameters should be useful with any realistic charge model. In the model we employ, the charge density of an atom is approximated as the sum of a point charge representing the nucleus and inner electrons and a smeared charge representing the outermost electrons; in particular, for all atoms except hydrogens, the smeared charge represents the two outermost electrons in the present model. We find that the charge penetration effect can cause very significant deviations from the popular point-charge model, and by comparison to electrostatic interactions calculated by symmetry-adapted perturbation theory, we find that the present results are considerably more accurate than point-charge electrostatic interactions. The mean unsigned error in electrostatics for a large and diverse data set (192 interaction energies) decreases from 9.2 to 3.3 kcal/mol, and the error in the electrostatics for 10 water dimers decreases from 1.7 to 0.5 kcal

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Lignin Peroxidase in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Francesca Gerini, M.; Roccatano, Danilo; Baciocchi, Enrico; Nola, Alfredo Di

    2003-01-01

    The dynamical and structural properties of lignin peroxidase and its Trp171Ala mutant have been investigated in aqueous solution using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In both cases, the enzyme retained its overall backbone structure and all its noncovalent interactions in the course of the MD simulations. Very interestingly, the analysis of the MD trajectories showed the presence of large fluctuations in correspondence of the residues forming the heme access channel; these movements enlarge the opening and facilitate the access of substrates to the enzyme active site. Moreover, steered molecular dynamics docking simulations have shown that lignin peroxidase natural substrate (veratryl alcohol) can easily approach the heme edge through the access channel. PMID:12770894

  8. Molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction at implantation.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lien M; Coward, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Successful pregnancy is dependent upon the implantation of a competent embryo into a receptive endometrium. Despite major advancement in our understanding of reproductive medicine over the last few decades, implantation failure still occurs in both normal pregnancies and those created artificially by assisted reproductive technology (ART). Consequently, there is significant interest in elucidating the etiology of implantation failure. The complex multistep process of implantation begins when the developing embryo first makes contact with the plasma membrane of epithelial cells within the uterine environment. However, although this biological interaction marks the beginning of a fundamental developmental process, our knowledge of the intricate physiological and molecular processes involved remains sparse. In this synopsis, we aim to provide an overview of our current understanding of the morphological changes which occur to the plasma membrane of the uterine endothelium, and the molecular mechanisms that control communication between the early embryo and the endometrium during implantation. A multitude of molecular factors have been implicated in this complex process, including endometrial integrins, extracellular matrix molecules, adhesion molecules, growth factors, and ion channels. We also explore the development of in vitro models for embryo implantation to help researchers investigate mechanisms which may underlie implantation failure. Understanding the precise molecular pathways associated with implantation failure could help us to generate new prognostic/diagnostic biomarkers, and may identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:26969610

  9. Laser-enhanced dynamics in molecular rate processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. F.; Zimmerman, I. H.; Devries, P. L.; Yuan, J.-M.; Lam, K.-S.; Bellum, J. C.; Lee, H.-W.; Slutsky, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    The present discussion deals with some theoretical aspects associated with the description of molecular rate processes in the presence of intense laser radiation, where the radiation actually interacts with the molecular dynamics. Whereas for weak and even moderately intense radiation, the absorption and stimulated emission of photons by a molecular system can be described by perturbative methods, for intense radiation, perturbation theory is usually not adequate. Limiting the analysis to the gas phase, an attempt is made to describe nonperturbative approaches applicable to the description of such processes (in the presence of intense laser radiation) as electronic energy transfer in molecular (in particular atom-atom) collisions; collision-induced ionization and emission; and unimolecular dissociation.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of interfacial adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Yarovsky, I.; Chaffee, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Chromium salts are often used in the pretreatment stages of steel painting processes in order to improve adhesion at the metal oxide/primer interface. Although well established empirically, the chemical basis for the improved adhesion conferred by chromia is not well understood. A molecular level understanding of this behaviour should provide a foundation for the design of materials offering improved adhesion control. Molecular modelling of adhesion involves simulation and analysis of molecular behaviour at the interface between two interacting phases. The present study concerns behaviour at the boundary between the metal coated steel surface (with or without chromium pretreatment) and an organic primer based on a solid epoxide resin produced from bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin. An epoxy resin oligomer of molecular weight 3750 was used as the model for the primer.

  11. Open boundary molecular dynamics of sheared star-polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Sablić, Jurij; Praprotnik, Matej; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael

    2016-02-28

    Open boundary molecular dynamics (OBMD) simulations of a sheared star polymer melt under isothermal conditions are performed to study the rheology and molecular structure of the melt under a fixed normal load. Comparison is made with the standard molecular dynamics (MD) in periodic (closed) boxes at a fixed shear rate (using the SLLOD dynamics). The OBMD system exchanges mass and momentum with adjacent reservoirs (buffers) where the external pressure tensor is imposed. Insertion of molecules in the buffers is made feasible by implementing there a low resolution model (blob-molecules with soft effective interactions) and then using the adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) to connect with the bulk MD. Straining with increasing shear stress induces melt expansion and a significantly different redistribution of pressure compared with the closed case. In the open sample, the shear viscosity is also a bit lowered but more stable against the viscous heating. At a given Weissenberg number, molecular deformations and material properties (recoverable shear strain and normal stress ratio) are found to be similar in both setups. We also study the modelling effect of normal and tangential friction between monomers implemented in a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) thermostat. Interestingly, the tangential friction substantially enhances the elastic response of the melt due to a reduction of the kinetic stress viscous contribution. PMID:26820315

  12. Clustering Molecular Dynamics Trajectories for Optimizing Docking Experiments

    PubMed Central

    De Paris, Renata; Quevedo, Christian V.; Ruiz, Duncan D.; Norberto de Souza, Osmar; Barros, Rodrigo C.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein receptors have become an attractive tool for rational drug discovery. However, the high computational cost of employing molecular dynamics trajectories in virtual screening of large repositories threats the feasibility of this task. Computational intelligence techniques have been applied in this context, with the ultimate goal of reducing the overall computational cost so the task can become feasible. Particularly, clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce the dimensionality of molecular dynamics trajectories. In this paper, we develop a novel methodology for clustering entire trajectories using structural features from the substrate-binding cavity of the receptor in order to optimize docking experiments on a cloud-based environment. The resulting partition was selected based on three clustering validity criteria, and it was further validated by analyzing the interactions between 20 ligands and a fully flexible receptor (FFR) model containing a 20 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectory. Our proposed methodology shows that taking into account features of the substrate-binding cavity as input for the k-means algorithm is a promising technique for accurately selecting ensembles of representative structures tailored to a specific ligand. PMID:25873944

  13. Clustering molecular dynamics trajectories for optimizing docking experiments.

    PubMed

    De Paris, Renata; Quevedo, Christian V; Ruiz, Duncan D; Norberto de Souza, Osmar; Barros, Rodrigo C

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein receptors have become an attractive tool for rational drug discovery. However, the high computational cost of employing molecular dynamics trajectories in virtual screening of large repositories threats the feasibility of this task. Computational intelligence techniques have been applied in this context, with the ultimate goal of reducing the overall computational cost so the task can become feasible. Particularly, clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce the dimensionality of molecular dynamics trajectories. In this paper, we develop a novel methodology for clustering entire trajectories using structural features from the substrate-binding cavity of the receptor in order to optimize docking experiments on a cloud-based environment. The resulting partition was selected based on three clustering validity criteria, and it was further validated by analyzing the interactions between 20 ligands and a fully flexible receptor (FFR) model containing a 20 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectory. Our proposed methodology shows that taking into account features of the substrate-binding cavity as input for the k-means algorithm is a promising technique for accurately selecting ensembles of representative structures tailored to a specific ligand.

  14. Clustering molecular dynamics trajectories for optimizing docking experiments.

    PubMed

    De Paris, Renata; Quevedo, Christian V; Ruiz, Duncan D; Norberto de Souza, Osmar; Barros, Rodrigo C

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein receptors have become an attractive tool for rational drug discovery. However, the high computational cost of employing molecular dynamics trajectories in virtual screening of large repositories threats the feasibility of this task. Computational intelligence techniques have been applied in this context, with the ultimate goal of reducing the overall computational cost so the task can become feasible. Particularly, clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce the dimensionality of molecular dynamics trajectories. In this paper, we develop a novel methodology for clustering entire trajectories using structural features from the substrate-binding cavity of the receptor in order to optimize docking experiments on a cloud-based environment. The resulting partition was selected based on three clustering validity criteria, and it was further validated by analyzing the interactions between 20 ligands and a fully flexible receptor (FFR) model containing a 20 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectory. Our proposed methodology shows that taking into account features of the substrate-binding cavity as input for the k-means algorithm is a promising technique for accurately selecting ensembles of representative structures tailored to a specific ligand. PMID:25873944

  15. Spin–orbit interaction mediated molecular dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkonen, E. Jänkälä, K.; Kettunen, J. A.; Heinäsmäki, S.; Karpenko, A.; Huttula, M.; Löytynoja, T.

    2014-05-14

    The effect of the spin–orbit interaction to photofragmentation is investigated in the mercury(II) bromide (HgBr{sub 2}) molecule. Changes in the fragmentation between the two spin–orbit components of Hg 5d photoionization, as well as within the molecular-field-splitted levels of these components are observed. Dissociation subsequent to photoionization is studied with synchrotron radiation and photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy. The experimental results are accompanied by relativistic ab initio analysis of the photoelectron spectrum.

  16. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Santander, María; Nunez, Alvaro S.; Roldán-Molina, A.; Troncoso, Roberto E.

    2015-12-01

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation.

  17. Exciton dynamics in perturbed vibronic molecular aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, C.; Wehner, J.; Hausner, J.; Wenzel, M.; Engel, V.

    2015-01-01

    A site specific perturbation of a photo-excited molecular aggregate can lead to a localization of excitonic energy. We investigate this localization dynamics for laser-prepared excited states. Changing the parameters of the electric field significantly influences the exciton localization which offers the possibility for a selective control of this process. This is demonstrated for aggregates possessing a single vibrational degree of freedom per monomer unit. It is shown that the effects identified for the molecular dimer can be generalized to larger aggregates with a high density of vibronic states. PMID:26798840

  18. Quantum dynamics of light-driven chiral molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Shin-ichiro; Hoki, Kunihito; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi

    2009-03-21

    The results of theoretical studies on quantum dynamics of light-driven molecular motors with internal rotation are presented. Characteristic features of chiral motors driven by a non-helical, linearly polarized electric field of light are explained on the basis of symmetry argument. The rotational potential of the chiral motor is characterized by a ratchet form. The asymmetric potential determines the directional motion: the rotational direction is toward the gentle slope of the asymmetric potential. This direction is called the intuitive direction. To confirm the unidirectional rotational motion, results of quantum dynamical calculations of randomly-oriented molecular motors are presented. A theoretical design of the smallest light-driven molecular machine is presented. The smallest chiral molecular machine has an optically driven engine and a running propeller on its body. The mechanisms of transmission of driving forces from the engine to the propeller are elucidated by using a quantum dynamical treatment. The results provide a principle for control of optically-driven molecular bevel gears. Temperature effects are discussed using the density operator formalism. An effective method for ultrafast control of rotational motions in any desired direction is presented with the help of a quantum control theory. In this method, visible or UV light pulses are applied to drive the motor via an electronic excited state. A method for driving a large molecular motor consisting of an aromatic hydrocarbon is presented. The molecular motor is operated by interactions between the induced dipole of the molecular motor and the electric field of light pulses. PMID:19290336

  19. Vortex dynamics during blade-vortex interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Di; Gregory, James W.

    2015-05-01

    Vortex dynamics during parallel blade-vortex interactions (BVIs) were investigated in a subsonic wind tunnel using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Vortices were generated by applying a rapid pitch-up motion to an airfoil through a pneumatic system, and the subsequent interactions with a downstream, unloaded target airfoil were studied. The blade-vortex interactions may be classified into three categories in terms of vortex behavior: close interaction, very close interaction, and collision. For each type of interaction, the vortex trajectory and strength variation were obtained from phase-averaged PIV data. The PIV results revealed the mechanisms of vortex decay and the effects of several key parameters on vortex dynamics, including separation distance (h/c), Reynolds number, and vortex sense. Generally, BVI has two main stages: interaction between vortex and leading edge (vortex-LE interaction) and interaction between vortex and boundary layer (vortex-BL interaction). Vortex-LE interaction, with its small separation distance, is dominated by inviscid decay of vortex strength due to pressure gradients near the leading edge. Therefore, the decay rate is determined by separation distance and vortex strength, but it is relatively insensitive to Reynolds number. Vortex-LE interaction will become a viscous-type interaction if there is enough separation distance. Vortex-BL interaction is inherently dominated by viscous effects, so the decay rate is dependent on Reynolds number. Vortex sense also has great impact on vortex-BL interaction because it changes the velocity field and shear stress near the surface.

  20. Efficient Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Multiple Radical Center Systems Based on the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Hiroya; Schmidt, Michael W; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-10-16

    The fully analytic energy gradient has been developed and implemented for the restricted open-shell Hartree–Fock (ROHF) method based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) theory for systems that have multiple open-shell molecules. The accuracy of the analytic ROHF energy gradient is compared with the corresponding numerical gradient, illustrating the accuracy of the analytic gradient. The ROHF analytic gradient is used to perform molecular dynamics simulations of an unusual open-shell system, liquid oxygen, and mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen. These molecular dynamics simulations provide some insight about how triplet oxygen molecules interact with each other. Timings reveal that the method can calculate the energy gradient for a system containing 4000 atoms in only 6 h. Therefore, it is concluded that the FMO-ROHF method will be useful for investigating systems with multiple open shells.

  1. Efficient molecular dynamics simulations of multiple radical center systems based on the fragment molecular orbital method.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroya; Schmidt, Michael W; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-10-16

    The fully analytic energy gradient has been developed and implemented for the restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF) method based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) theory for systems that have multiple open-shell molecules. The accuracy of the analytic ROHF energy gradient is compared with the corresponding numerical gradient, illustrating the accuracy of the analytic gradient. The ROHF analytic gradient is used to perform molecular dynamics simulations of an unusual open-shell system, liquid oxygen, and mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen. These molecular dynamics simulations provide some insight about how triplet oxygen molecules interact with each other. Timings reveal that the method can calculate the energy gradient for a system containing 4000 atoms in only 6 h. Therefore, it is concluded that the FMO-ROHF method will be useful for investigating systems with multiple open shells.

  2. Molecular dynamic simulation methods for anisotropic liquids.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Keiko M; Yoneya, Makoto; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2004-03-22

    Methods of molecular dynamics simulations for anisotropic molecules are presented. The new methods, with an anisotropic factor in the cell dynamics, dramatically reduce the artifacts related to cell shapes and overcome the difficulties of simulating anisotropic molecules under constant hydrostatic pressure or constant volume. The methods are especially effective for anisotropic liquids, such as smectic liquid crystals and membranes, of which the stacks of layers are compressible (elastic in direction perpendicular to the layers) while the layer itself is liquid and only elastic under uniform compressive force. The methods can also be used for crystals and isotropic liquids as well.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Alpha-synuclein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammalkorpi, Maria; Schreck, Carl; Nath, Abhinav; Dewitt, David; Rhoades, Elizabeth; O'Hern, Corey

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the conformational dynamics of single alpha-synuclein proteins, which have been implicated in amyloid diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, in solution using unconstrained and constrained all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. The constraints on inter-residue separations are obtained from our single-molecule FRET measurements of eleven FRET pairs that span the protein. By comparing the simulation data satisfying different combinations of FRET constraints, we are able to identify those constraints that are most important in determining the radius of gyration and key features of the contact map of the protein.

  4. Aromatic interactions impact ligand binding and function at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics results validated by experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania; Villa, Nancy; Fang, Lijuan; Booth, Raymond G.

    2014-02-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5-HT2 G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family consists of types 2A, 2B, and 2C that share ∼75% transmembrane (TM) sequence identity. Agonists for 5-HT2C receptors are under development for psychoses; whereas, at 5-HT2A receptors, antipsychotic effects are associated with antagonists - in fact, 5-HT2A agonists can cause hallucinations and 5-HT2B agonists cause cardiotoxicity. It is known that 5-HT2A TM6 residues W6.48, F6.51, and F6.52 impact ligand binding and function; however, ligand interactions with these residues at the 5-HT2C receptor have not been reported. To predict and validate molecular determinants for 5-HT2C-specific activation, results from receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics simulation studies were compared with experimental results for ligand binding and function at wild type and W6.48A, F6.51A, and F6.52A point-mutated 5-HT2C receptors.

  5. Study on the Characteristics of Gas Molecular Mean Free Path in Nanopores by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qixin; Cai, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents studies on the characteristics of gas molecular mean free path in nanopores by molecular dynamics simulation. Our study results indicate that the mean free path of all molecules in nanopores depend on both the radius of the nanopore and the gas-solid interaction strength. Besides mean free path of all molecules in the nanopore, this paper highlights the gas molecular mean free path at different positions of the nanopore and the anisotropy of the gas molecular mean free path at nanopores. The molecular mean free path varies with the molecule’s distance from the center of the nanopore. The least value of the mean free path occurs at the wall surface of the nanopore. The present paper found that the gas molecular mean free path is anisotropic when gas is confined in nanopores. The radial gas molecular mean free path is much smaller than the mean free path including all molecular collisions occuring in three directions. Our study results also indicate that when gas is confined in nanopores the gas molecule number density does not affect the gas molecular mean free path in the same way as it does for the gas in unbounded space. These study results may bring new insights into understanding the gas flow’s characteristic at nanoscale. PMID:25046745

  6. Molecular dynamics at constant Cauchy stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ronald E.; Tadmor, Ellad B.; Gibson, Joshua S.; Bernstein, Noam; Pavia, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    The Parrinello-Rahman algorithm for imposing a general state of stress in periodic molecular dynamics simulations is widely used in the literature and has been implemented in many readily available molecular dynamics codes. However, what is often overlooked is that this algorithm controls the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress as opposed to the true (Cauchy) stress. This can lead to misinterpretation of simulation results because (1) the true stress that is imposed during the simulation depends on the deformation of the periodic cell, (2) the true stress is potentially very different from the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff stress, and (3) the true stress can vary significantly during the simulation even if the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff is constant. We propose a simple modification to the algorithm that allows the true Cauchy stress to be controlled directly. We then demonstrate the efficacy of the new algorithm with the example of martensitic phase transformations under applied stress.

  7. New faster CHARMM molecular dynamics engine

    PubMed Central

    Hynninen, Antti-Pekka; Crowley, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new faster molecular dynamics (MD) engine into the CHARMM software package. The new MD engine is faster both in serial (i.e., single CPU core) and parallel execution. Serial performance is approximately two times higher than in the previous version of CHARMM. The newly programmed parallelization method allows the MD engine to parallelize up to hundreds of CPU cores. PMID:24302199

  8. Nanoindentation of Zr by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu (芦子哲), Zizhe; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Noordhoek, Mark J.; Sinnott, Susan B.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2015-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation are used to study the deformation behaviors of single crystal Zr for four different surface orientations. The comparison of results for two different potentials, an embedded atom method potential and a charged optimized many body potential, reveals the influence of stable and unstable stacking fault energy on dislocation behaviors under nanoindentation. The load-displacement curve, hardness and deformation behaviors of the various surface orientations Zr are compared and the elastic and plastic deformation behaviors are analyzed.

  9. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J.

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  10. Structure and dynamics of complex liquid water: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Indrajith V.; Natesan, Baskaran

    2015-06-01

    We have carried out detailed structure and dynamical studies of complex liquid water using molecular dynamics simulations. Three different model potentials, namely, TIP3P, TIP4P and SPC-E have been used in the simulations, in order to arrive at the best possible potential function that could reproduce the structure of experimental bulk water. All the simulations were performed in the NVE micro canonical ensemble using LAMMPS. The radial distribution functions, gOO, gOH and gHH and the self diffusion coefficient, Ds, were calculated for all three models. We conclude from our results that the structure and dynamical parameters obtained for SPC-E model matched well with the experimental values, suggesting that among the models studied here, the SPC-E model gives the best structure and dynamics of bulk water.

  11. Molecular Basis of Chemokine CXCL5-Glycosaminoglycan Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Nagarajan, Balaji; Desai, Umesh R; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-09-23

    Chemokines, a large family of highly versatile small soluble proteins, play crucial roles in defining innate and adaptive immune responses by regulating the trafficking of leukocytes, and also play a key role in various aspects of human physiology. Chemokines share the characteristic feature of reversibly existing as monomers and dimers, and their functional response is intimately coupled to interaction with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Currently, nothing is known regarding the structural basis or molecular mechanisms underlying CXCL5-GAG interactions. To address this missing knowledge, we characterized the interaction of a panel of heparin oligosaccharides to CXCL5 using solution NMR, isothermal titration calorimetry, and molecular dynamics simulations. NMR studies indicated that the dimer is the high-affinity GAG binding ligand and that lysine residues from the N-loop, 40s turn, β3 strand, and C-terminal helix mediate binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry indicated a stoichiometry of two oligosaccharides per CXCL5 dimer. NMR-based structural models reveal that these residues form a contiguous surface within a monomer and, interestingly, that the GAG-binding domain overlaps with the receptor-binding domain, indicating that a GAG-bound chemokine cannot activate the receptor. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the roles of the individual lysines are not equivalent and that helical lysines play a more prominent role in determining binding geometry and affinity. Further, binding interactions and GAG geometry in CXCL5 are novel and distinctly different compared with the related chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL8. We conclude that a finely tuned balance between the GAG-bound dimer and free soluble monomer regulates CXCL5-mediated receptor signaling and function.

  12. Molecular Basis of Chemokine CXCL5-Glycosaminoglycan Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Nagarajan, Balaji; Desai, Umesh R; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-09-23

    Chemokines, a large family of highly versatile small soluble proteins, play crucial roles in defining innate and adaptive immune responses by regulating the trafficking of leukocytes, and also play a key role in various aspects of human physiology. Chemokines share the characteristic feature of reversibly existing as monomers and dimers, and their functional response is intimately coupled to interaction with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Currently, nothing is known regarding the structural basis or molecular mechanisms underlying CXCL5-GAG interactions. To address this missing knowledge, we characterized the interaction of a panel of heparin oligosaccharides to CXCL5 using solution NMR, isothermal titration calorimetry, and molecular dynamics simulations. NMR studies indicated that the dimer is the high-affinity GAG binding ligand and that lysine residues from the N-loop, 40s turn, β3 strand, and C-terminal helix mediate binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry indicated a stoichiometry of two oligosaccharides per CXCL5 dimer. NMR-based structural models reveal that these residues form a contiguous surface within a monomer and, interestingly, that the GAG-binding domain overlaps with the receptor-binding domain, indicating that a GAG-bound chemokine cannot activate the receptor. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the roles of the individual lysines are not equivalent and that helical lysines play a more prominent role in determining binding geometry and affinity. Further, binding interactions and GAG geometry in CXCL5 are novel and distinctly different compared with the related chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL8. We conclude that a finely tuned balance between the GAG-bound dimer and free soluble monomer regulates CXCL5-mediated receptor signaling and function. PMID:27471273

  13. Control-volume representation of molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Smith, E R; Heyes, D M; Dini, D; Zaki, T A

    2012-05-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) parallel to the control volume (CV) formulation of fluid mechanics is developed by integrating the formulas of Irving and Kirkwood [J. Chem. Phys. 18, 817 (1950)] over a finite cubic volume of molecular dimensions. The Lagrangian molecular system is expressed in terms of an Eulerian CV, which yields an equivalent to Reynolds' transport theorem for the discrete system. This approach casts the dynamics of the molecular system into a form that can be readily compared to the continuum equations. The MD equations of motion are reinterpreted in terms of a Lagrangian-to-control-volume (LCV) conversion function ϑ(i) for each molecule i. The LCV function and its spatial derivatives are used to express fluxes and relevant forces across the control surfaces. The relationship between the local pressures computed using the volume average [Lutsko, J. Appl. Phys. 64, 1152 (1988)] techniques and the method of planes [Todd et al., Phys. Rev. E 52, 1627 (1995)] emerges naturally from the treatment. Numerical experiments using the MD CV method are reported for equilibrium and nonequilibrium (start-up Couette flow) model liquids, which demonstrate the advantages of the formulation. The CV formulation of the MD is shown to be exactly conservative and is, therefore, ideally suited to obtain macroscopic properties from a discrete system.

  14. Control-volume representation of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. R.; Heyes, D. M.; Dini, D.; Zaki, T. A.

    2012-05-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) parallel to the control volume (CV) formulation of fluid mechanics is developed by integrating the formulas of Irving and Kirkwood [J. Chem. Phys.JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.1747782 18, 817 (1950)] over a finite cubic volume of molecular dimensions. The Lagrangian molecular system is expressed in terms of an Eulerian CV, which yields an equivalent to Reynolds’ transport theorem for the discrete system. This approach casts the dynamics of the molecular system into a form that can be readily compared to the continuum equations. The MD equations of motion are reinterpreted in terms of a Lagrangian-to-control-volume (LCV) conversion function ϑi for each molecule i. The LCV function and its spatial derivatives are used to express fluxes and relevant forces across the control surfaces. The relationship between the local pressures computed using the volume average [Lutsko, J. Appl. Phys.JAPIAU0021-897910.1063/1.341877 64, 1152 (1988)] techniques and the method of planes [Todd , Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.52.1627 52, 1627 (1995)] emerges naturally from the treatment. Numerical experiments using the MD CV method are reported for equilibrium and nonequilibrium (start-up Couette flow) model liquids, which demonstrate the advantages of the formulation. The CV formulation of the MD is shown to be exactly conservative and is, therefore, ideally suited to obtain macroscopic properties from a discrete system.

  15. Experimental, computational and chemometrics studies of BSA-vitamin B6 interaction by UV-Vis, FT-IR, fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulation and hard-soft modeling methods.

    PubMed

    Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Izadmanesh, Yahya; Aghaee, Elham; Ghasemi, Jahan B

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of pyridoxine (Vitamin B6) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) is investigated under pseudo-physiological conditions by UV-Vis, fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy. The intrinsic fluorescence of BSA was quenched by VB6, which was rationalized in terms of the static quenching mechanism. According to fluorescence quenching calculations, the bimolecular quenching constant (kq), dynamic quenching (KSV) and static quenching (KLB) at 310K were obtained. The efficiency of energy transfer and the distance between the donor (BSA) and the acceptor (VB6) were calculated by Foster's non-radiative energy transfer theory and were equal to 41.1% and 2.11nm. The collected UV-Vis and fluorescence spectra were combined into a row-and column-wise augmented matrix and resolved by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). MCR-ALS helped to estimate the stoichiometry of interactions, concentration profiles and pure spectra for three species (BSA, VB6 and VB6-BSA complex) existed in the interaction procedure. Based on the MCR-ALS results, using mass balance equations, a model was developed and binding constant of complex was calculated using non-linear least squares curve fitting. FT-IR spectra showed that the conformation of proteins was altered in presence of VB6. Finally, the combined docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to estimate the binding affinity of VB6 to BSA. Five-nanosecond MD simulations were performed on bovine serum albumin (BSA) to study the conformational features of its ligand binding site. From MD results, eleven BSA snapshots were extracted, at every 0.5ns, to explore the binding affinity (GOLD score) of VB6 using a docking procedure. MD simulations indicated that there is a considerable flexibility in the structure of protein that affected ligand recognition. Structural analyses and docking simulations indicated that VB6 binds to site I and GOLD score values depend on the conformations of both BSA and ligand

  16. Experimental, computational and chemometrics studies of BSA-vitamin B6 interaction by UV-Vis, FT-IR, fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulation and hard-soft modeling methods.

    PubMed

    Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Izadmanesh, Yahya; Aghaee, Elham; Ghasemi, Jahan B

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of pyridoxine (Vitamin B6) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) is investigated under pseudo-physiological conditions by UV-Vis, fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy. The intrinsic fluorescence of BSA was quenched by VB6, which was rationalized in terms of the static quenching mechanism. According to fluorescence quenching calculations, the bimolecular quenching constant (kq), dynamic quenching (KSV) and static quenching (KLB) at 310K were obtained. The efficiency of energy transfer and the distance between the donor (BSA) and the acceptor (VB6) were calculated by Foster's non-radiative energy transfer theory and were equal to 41.1% and 2.11nm. The collected UV-Vis and fluorescence spectra were combined into a row-and column-wise augmented matrix and resolved by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). MCR-ALS helped to estimate the stoichiometry of interactions, concentration profiles and pure spectra for three species (BSA, VB6 and VB6-BSA complex) existed in the interaction procedure. Based on the MCR-ALS results, using mass balance equations, a model was developed and binding constant of complex was calculated using non-linear least squares curve fitting. FT-IR spectra showed that the conformation of proteins was altered in presence of VB6. Finally, the combined docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to estimate the binding affinity of VB6 to BSA. Five-nanosecond MD simulations were performed on bovine serum albumin (BSA) to study the conformational features of its ligand binding site. From MD results, eleven BSA snapshots were extracted, at every 0.5ns, to explore the binding affinity (GOLD score) of VB6 using a docking procedure. MD simulations indicated that there is a considerable flexibility in the structure of protein that affected ligand recognition. Structural analyses and docking simulations indicated that VB6 binds to site I and GOLD score values depend on the conformations of both BSA and ligand

  17. Interactive visualization of vegetation dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, B.C.; Swets, D.; Bard, L.; Brown, J.; Rowland, J.

    2001-01-01

    Satellite imagery provides a mechanism for observing seasonal dynamics of the landscape that have implications for near real-time monitoring of agriculture, forest, and range resources. This study illustrates a technique for visualizing timely information on key events during the growing season (e.g., onset, peak, duration, and end of growing season), as well as the status of the current growing season with respect to the recent historical average. Using time-series analysis of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) satellite sensor, seasonal dynamics can be derived. We have developed a set of Java-based visualization and analysis tools to make comparisons between the seasonal dynamics of the current year with those from the past twelve years. In addition, the visualization tools allow the user to query underlying databases such as land cover or administrative boundaries to analyze the seasonal dynamics of areas of their own interest. The Java-based tools (data exploration and visualization analysis or DEVA) use a Web-based client-server model for processing the data. The resulting visualization and analysis, available via the Internet, is of value to those responsible for land management decisions, resource allocation, and at-risk population targeting.

  18. Thermodynamic molecular switch in macromolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Chun, P W

    2000-01-01

    It is known that most living systems can live and operate optimally only at a sharply defined temperature, or over a limited temperature range, at best, which implies that many basic biochemical interactions exhibit a well-defined Gibbs free energy minimum as a function of temperature. The Gibbs free energy change, deltaG(o) (T), for biological systems shows a complicated behavior, in which deltaG(o)(T) changes from positive to negative, then reaches a negative value of maximum magnitude (favorable), and finally becomes positive as temperature increases. The critical factor in this complicated thermodynamic behavior is a temperature-dependent heat capacity change (deltaCp(o)(T) of reaction, which is positive at low temperature, but switches to a negative value at a temperature well below the ambient range. Thus, the thermodynamic molecular switch determines the behavior patterns of the Gibbs free energy change, and hence a change in the equilibrium constant, Keq, and/or spontaneity. The subsequent, mathematically predictable changes in deltaH(o)(T), deltaS(o)(T), deltaW(o)(T), and deltaG(o)(T) give rise to the classically observed behavior patterns in biological reactivity, as demonstrated in three interacting protein systems: the acid dimerization reaction of alpha-chymotrypsin at low pH, interaction of chromogranin A with the intraluminal loop peptide of the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor at pH 5.5, and the binding of L-arabinose and D-galactose to the L-arabinose binding protein of Escherichia coli. In cases of protein unfolding of four mutants of phage T4 lysozyme, no thermodynamic molecular switch is observed.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation study of methanesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Canales, Manel; Alemán, Carlos

    2014-03-27

    A molecular dynamics simulation study of methanesulfonic acid has been carried out using a reliable force field in a large range of temperatures. Several thermodynamic, structural, and dynamical properties have been calculated and compared with the available experimental data. The density, the shear viscosity, the heat of vaporization, and the melting temperature results, calculated from this force field, are in a good agreement with the experimental data. Analysis of the influence of the hydrogen bonds in structural and dynamical properties has also been performed. The continuous and interrupted methodologies to compute hydrogen bonding lifetimes have been applied. The interrupted hydrogen bond lifetimes values are consistent with the diffusion and viscosity coefficients. The activation energies of the self-diffusion, the reorientational motions, and the hydrogen bonding lifetimes are coincident.

  20. Molecular Determinants in Phagocyte-Bacteria Interactions.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Dorhoi, Anca

    2016-03-15

    Phagocytes are crucial for host defense against bacterial pathogens. As first demonstrated by Metchnikoff, neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes share the capacity to engulf, kill, and digest microbial invaders. Generally, neutrophils focus on extracellular, and mononuclear phagocytes on intracellular, pathogens. Reciprocally, extracellular pathogens often capitalize on hindering phagocytosis and killing of phagocytes, whereas intracellular bacteria frequently allow their engulfment and then block intracellular killing. As foreseen by Metchnikoff, phagocytes become highly versatile by acquiring diverse phenotypes, but still retaining some plasticity. Further, phagocytes engage in active crosstalk with parenchymal and immune cells to promote adjunctive reactions, including inflammation, tissue healing, and remodeling. This dynamic network allows the host to cope with different types of microbial invaders. Here we present an update of molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying phagocyte functions in antibacterial defense. We focus on four exemplary bacteria ranging from an opportunistic extracellular to a persistent intracellular pathogen. PMID:26982355

  1. Polymer Fluid Dynamics: Continuum and Molecular Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bird, R B; Giacomin, A J

    2016-06-01

    To solve problems in polymer fluid dynamics, one needs the equations of continuity, motion, and energy. The last two equations contain the stress tensor and the heat-flux vector for the material. There are two ways to formulate the stress tensor: (a) One can write a continuum expression for the stress tensor in terms of kinematic tensors, or (b) one can select a molecular model that represents the polymer molecule and then develop an expression for the stress tensor from kinetic theory. The advantage of the kinetic theory approach is that one gets information about the relation between the molecular structure of the polymers and the rheological properties. We restrict the discussion primarily to the simplest stress tensor expressions or constitutive equations containing from two to four adjustable parameters, although we do indicate how these formulations may be extended to give more complicated expressions. We also explore how these simplest expressions are recovered as special cases of a more general framework, the Oldroyd 8-constant model. Studying the simplest models allows us to discover which types of empiricisms or molecular models seem to be worth investigating further. We also explore equivalences between continuum and molecular approaches. We restrict the discussion to several types of simple flows, such as shearing flows and extensional flows, which are of greatest importance in industrial operations. Furthermore, if these simple flows cannot be well described by continuum or molecular models, then it is not necessary to lavish time and energy to apply them to more complex flow problems. PMID:27276553

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation: A tool for exploration and discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaport, Dennis C.

    2009-03-01

    The exploratory and didactic aspects of science both benefit from the ever-growing role played by computer simulation. One particularly important simulational approach is the molecular dynamics method, used for studying the nature of matter from the molecular to much larger scales. The effectiveness of molecular dynamics can be enhanced considerably by employing visualization and interactivity during the course of the computation and afterwards, allowing the modeler not only to observe the detailed behavior of the systems simulated in different ways, but also to steer the computations in alternative directions by manipulating parameters that govern the actual behavior. This facilitates the creation of potentially rich simulational environments for examining a multitude of complex phenomena, as well as offering an opportunity for enriching the learning process. A series of relatively advanced examples involving molecular dynamics will be used to demonstrate the value of this approach, in particular, atomistic simulations of spontaneously emergent structured fluid flows (the classic Rayleigh--B'enard and Taylor--Couette problems), supramolecular self-assembly of highly symmetric shell structures (involved in the formation of viral capsids), and that most counterintuitive of phenomena, granular segregation (e.g., axial and radial separation in a rotating cylinder).

  3. The dynamics of role interaction.

    PubMed

    Barnett, E M

    1996-02-01

    Success in our respective business environments is not totally dependent on technical expertise; we must be able to also effectively interact with people. The necessity of successful leadership is assumed; however, we often fail to recognize the value of strategically subordinating ourselves to others. Both roles must be emphasized with the knowledge that preferred individual styles are valid.

  4. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations: synergies between theory and experiments.

    PubMed

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2015-03-17

    Recent developments in nonadiabatic dynamics enabled ab inito simulations of complex ultrafast processes in the condensed phase. These advances have opened new avenues in the study of many photophysical and photochemical reactions triggered by the absorption of electromagnetic radiation. In particular, theoretical investigations can be combined with the most sophisticated femtosecond experimental techniques to guide the interpretation of measured time-resolved observables. At the same time, the availability of experimental data at high (spatial and time) resolution offers a unique opportunity for the benchmarking and the improvement of those theoretical models used to describe complex molecular systems in their natural environment. The established synergy between theory and experiments can produce a better understanding of new ultrafast physical and chemical processes at atomistic scale resolution. Furthermore, reliable ab inito molecular dynamics simulations can already be successfully employed as predictive tools to guide new experiments as well as the design of novel and better performing materials. In this paper, I will give a concise account on the state of the art of molecular dynamics simulations of complex molecular systems in their excited states. The principal aim of this approach is the description of a given system of interest under the most realistic ambient conditions including all environmental effects that influence experiments, for instance, the interaction with the solvent and with external time-dependent electric fields, temperature, and pressure. To this end, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is among the most efficient and accurate methods for the representation of the electronic dynamics, while trajectory surface hopping gives a valuable representation of the nuclear quantum dynamics in the excited states (including nonadiabatic effects). Concerning the environment and its effects on the dynamics, the quantum mechanics/molecular

  5. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations: synergies between theory and experiments.

    PubMed

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2015-03-17

    Recent developments in nonadiabatic dynamics enabled ab inito simulations of complex ultrafast processes in the condensed phase. These advances have opened new avenues in the study of many photophysical and photochemical reactions triggered by the absorption of electromagnetic radiation. In particular, theoretical investigations can be combined with the most sophisticated femtosecond experimental techniques to guide the interpretation of measured time-resolved observables. At the same time, the availability of experimental data at high (spatial and time) resolution offers a unique opportunity for the benchmarking and the improvement of those theoretical models used to describe complex molecular systems in their natural environment. The established synergy between theory and experiments can produce a better understanding of new ultrafast physical and chemical processes at atomistic scale resolution. Furthermore, reliable ab inito molecular dynamics simulations can already be successfully employed as predictive tools to guide new experiments as well as the design of novel and better performing materials. In this paper, I will give a concise account on the state of the art of molecular dynamics simulations of complex molecular systems in their excited states. The principal aim of this approach is the description of a given system of interest under the most realistic ambient conditions including all environmental effects that influence experiments, for instance, the interaction with the solvent and with external time-dependent electric fields, temperature, and pressure. To this end, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is among the most efficient and accurate methods for the representation of the electronic dynamics, while trajectory surface hopping gives a valuable representation of the nuclear quantum dynamics in the excited states (including nonadiabatic effects). Concerning the environment and its effects on the dynamics, the quantum mechanics/molecular

  6. Dynamic Heterogeneity in Interacting Miscible Polymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Ashish; Lodge, Timothy

    2008-03-01

    Dynamic heterogeneity leading to time-temperature superposition (tTS) failure has been widely reported in non-interacting/weakly interacting miscible polymer blends. However, coupling of the component dynamic response in blends, even with a huge dynamic asymmetry in the pure components, is possible with H-bonding interactions. This study is focused on finding the minimum level of interaction necessary for thermo-rheological simplicity in blends. Blends of styrene-co-vinylphenol (PSVPh) and poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) were chosen. Incorporation of styrene provides an effective way to modulate H-bonding interactions in the system. Linear viscoelastic data indicate that tTS fails for PS/PVME blends, whereas data obtained for different PVPh/PVME blends showed that tTS was obeyed a over wide temperature range. For PSVPh/PVME blends with low PSVPh content, tTS was successful. This suggests that the presence of alternating styrene and vinyl phenol units was insufficient for dynamic response decoupling. Further studies are in progress, with varying vinyl phenol content in PSVPh, to explore the influence of H-bonding on dynamic heterogeneity and blend dynamics.

  7. VUV studies of molecular photofragmentation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.G.

    1993-12-01

    State-resolved, photoion and photoelectron methods are used to study the neutral fragmentation and ionization dynamics of small molecules relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. Photodissociation and ionization are initiated by coherent VUV radiation and the fragmentation dynamics are extracted from measurements of product rovibronic state distributions, kinetic energies and angular distributions. The general aim of these studies is to investigate the multichannel interactions between the electronic and nuclear motions which determine the evolution of the photoexcited {open_quotes}complex{close_quotes} into the observed asymptotic channels.

  8. Influenza virus binds its host cell using multiple dynamic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sieben, Christian; Kappel, Christian; Zhu, Rong; Wozniak, Anna; Rankl, Christian; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Grubmüller, Helmut; Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus belongs to a wide range of enveloped viruses. The major spike protein hemagglutinin binds sialic acid residues of glycoproteins and glycolipids with dissociation constants in the millimolar range [Sauter NK, et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31:9609–9621], indicating a multivalent binding mode. Here, we characterized the attachment of influenza virus to host cell receptors using three independent approaches. Optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed very low interaction forces. Further, the observation of sequential unbinding events strongly suggests a multivalent binding mode between virus and cell membrane. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal a variety of unbinding pathways that indicate a highly dynamic interaction between HA and its receptor, allowing rationalization of influenza virus–cell binding quantitatively at the molecular level. PMID:22869709

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Dynamic Response of Beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Aidan P.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Baskes, Michael I.; Desjarlais, Michael P.

    2009-06-01

    The response of beryllium to dynamic loading has been extensively studied, both experimentally and theoretically, due to its importance in several technological areas. Compared to other metals, it is quite challenging to accurately represent the various anomalous behaviors of beryllium using classical interatomic potentials. The spherically-symmetric EAM potential can not reproduce the observed c/a ratio for α-Be under ambient conditions, which is significantly smaller than the ideal HCP value. The directional-dependence of the MEAM potential overcomes this problem, but introduces additional complexity. We will compare predictions of these classical potentials to experimental measurements of beryllium at ambient conditions, and also to theoretical calculations at high temperatures and pressures. Finally, we will present initial results from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of beryllium under dynamic loading. This work is supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories.

  10. Molecular energetics in the capsomere of virus-like particle revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Tang, Ronghong; Bai, Shu; Connors, Natalie K; Lua, Linda H L; Chuan, Yap P; Middelberg, Anton P J; Sun, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are highly organized nanoparticles that have great potential in vaccinology, gene therapy, drug delivery, and materials science. However, the application of VLPs is hindered by obstacles in their design and production due to low efficiency of self-assembly. In the present study, all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method are utilized to examine the molecular interactions in the capsomere of a murine polyomavirus (MPV) VLP. It is found that both low ionic strength and the intracapsomere disulfide bonds are favorable for maintaining a stable capsomere. Simulation results examining the effects of solution conditions on the stabilization of a capsomere were verified by calorimetry experiments. Simulation results of free energy decomposition indicate that hydrophobic interaction is favorable for the formation of a capsomere, whereas electrostatic interaction is unfavorable. With increasing ionic strength, the dominant interaction for the stabilization of a capsomere changes from hydrophobic to electrostatic. By comprehensive analyses, the key amino acid residues (hot spots) in VP1 protein aiding formation of a capsomere in different solution conditions have been identified. These results provide molecular insights into the stabilization of building blocks for VLP and are expected to have implications in their partitioning between the correct and off-pathway reactions in VLP assembly. PMID:23586433

  11. Local Refinements in Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fackeldey, Konstantin; Weber, Marcus

    2014-03-01

    Quantum mechanics provide a detailed description of the physical and chemical behavior of molecules. However, with increasing size of the system the complexity rises exponentially, which is prohibitive for efficient dynamical simulation. In contrast, classical molecular dynamics procure a coarser description by using less degrees of freedom. Thus, it seems natural to seek for an adequate trade-off between accurateness and computational feasibility in the simulation of molecules. Here, we propose a novel method, which combines classical molecular simulations with quantum mechanics for molecular systems. For this we decompose the state space of the respective molecule into subsets, by employing a meshfree partition of unity. We show, that this partition allows us to localize an empirical force field and to run locally constrained classical trajectories. Within each subset, we compute the energy on the quantum level for a fixed number of spatial states (ab initio points). With these energy values from the ab initio points we have a local scattered data problem, which can be solved by the moving least squares method.

  12. Hydrophobic Interactions Are a Key to MDM2 Inhibition by Polyphenols as Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and MM/PBSA Free Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sharad; Grover, Sonam; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Singh, Aditi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    p53, a tumor suppressor protein, has been proven to regulate the cell cycle, apoptosis, and DNA repair to prevent malignant transformation. MDM2 regulates activity of p53 and inhibits its binding to DNA. In the present study, we elucidated the MDM2 inhibition potential of polyphenols (Apigenin, Fisetin, Galangin and Luteolin) by MD simulation and MM/PBSA free energy calculations. All polyphenols bind to hydrophobic groove of MDM2 and the binding was found to be stable throughout MD simulation. Luteolin showed the highest negative binding free energy value of -173.80 kJ/mol followed by Fisetin with value of -172.25 kJ/mol. It was found by free energy calculations, that hydrophobic interactions (vdW energy) have major contribution in binding free energy.

  13. Hydrophobic Interactions Are a Key to MDM2 Inhibition by Polyphenols as Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and MM/PBSA Free Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sharad; Grover, Sonam; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Singh, Aditi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    p53, a tumor suppressor protein, has been proven to regulate the cell cycle, apoptosis, and DNA repair to prevent malignant transformation. MDM2 regulates activity of p53 and inhibits its binding to DNA. In the present study, we elucidated the MDM2 inhibition potential of polyphenols (Apigenin, Fisetin, Galangin and Luteolin) by MD simulation and MM/PBSA free energy calculations. All polyphenols bind to hydrophobic groove of MDM2 and the binding was found to be stable throughout MD simulation. Luteolin showed the highest negative binding free energy value of -173.80 kJ/mol followed by Fisetin with value of -172.25 kJ/mol. It was found by free energy calculations, that hydrophobic interactions (vdW energy) have major contribution in binding free energy. PMID:26863418

  14. Hydrophobic Interactions Are a Key to MDM2 Inhibition by Polyphenols as Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and MM/PBSA Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sharad; Grover, Sonam; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Singh, Aditi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    p53, a tumor suppressor protein, has been proven to regulate the cell cycle, apoptosis, and DNA repair to prevent malignant transformation. MDM2 regulates activity of p53 and inhibits its binding to DNA. In the present study, we elucidated the MDM2 inhibition potential of polyphenols (Apigenin, Fisetin, Galangin and Luteolin) by MD simulation and MM/PBSA free energy calculations. All polyphenols bind to hydrophobic groove of MDM2 and the binding was found to be stable throughout MD simulation. Luteolin showed the highest negative binding free energy value of -173.80 kJ/mol followed by Fisetin with value of -172.25 kJ/mol. It was found by free energy calculations, that hydrophobic interactions (vdW energy) have major contribution in binding free energy. PMID:26863418

  15. Clustering effects in ionic polymers: Molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agrawal, Anupriya; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-08-18

    Ionic clusters control the structure, dynamics, and transport in soft matter. Incorporating a small fraction of ionizable groups in polymers substantially reduces the mobility of the macromolecules in melts. Furthermore, these ionic groups often associate into random clusters in melts, where the distribution and morphology of the clusters impact the transport in these materials. Here, using molecular dynamic simulations we demonstrate a clear correlation between cluster size and morphology with the polymer mobility in melts of sulfonated polystyrene. We show that in low dielectric media ladderlike clusters that are lower in energy compared with spherical assemblies are formed. Reducing themore » electrostatic interactions by enhancing the dielectric constant leads to morphological transformation from ladderlike clusters to globular assemblies. Finally, decrease in electrostatic interaction significantly enhances the mobility of the polymer.« less

  16. Clustering effects in ionic polymers: Molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Anupriya; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-08-18

    Ionic clusters control the structure, dynamics, and transport in soft matter. Incorporating a small fraction of ionizable groups in polymers substantially reduces the mobility of the macromolecules in melts. Furthermore, these ionic groups often associate into random clusters in melts, where the distribution and morphology of the clusters impact the transport in these materials. Here, using molecular dynamic simulations we demonstrate a clear correlation between cluster size and morphology with the polymer mobility in melts of sulfonated polystyrene. We show that in low dielectric media ladderlike clusters that are lower in energy compared with spherical assemblies are formed. Reducing the electrostatic interactions by enhancing the dielectric constant leads to morphological transformation from ladderlike clusters to globular assemblies. Finally, decrease in electrostatic interaction significantly enhances the mobility of the polymer.

  17. Hepatitis A virus: host interactions, molecular epidemiology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Gilberto; Goncalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Forbi, Joseph C; de Paula, Vanessa S; Purdy, Michael A; Xia, Guoliang; Khudyakov, Yury E

    2014-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the commonest viral cause of liver disease and presents an important public health problem worldwide. Several unique HAV properties and molecular mechanisms of its interaction with host were recently discovered and should aid in clarifying the pathogenesis of hepatitis A. Genetic characterization of HAV strains have resulted in the identification of different genotypes and subtypes, which exhibit a characteristic worldwide distribution. Shifts in HAV endemicity occurring in different parts of the world, introduction of genetically diverse strains from geographically distant regions, genotype displacement observed in some countries and population expansion detected in the last decades of the 20th century using phylogenetic analysis are important factors contributing to the complex dynamics of HAV infections worldwide. Strong selection pressures, some of which, like usage of deoptimized codons, are unique to HAV, limit genetic variability of the virus. Analysis of subgenomic regions has been proven useful for outbreak investigations. However, sharing short sequences among epidemiologically unrelated strains indicates that specific identification of HAV strains for molecular surveillance can be achieved only using whole-genome sequences. Here, we present up-to-date information on the HAV molecular epidemiology and evolution, and highlight the most relevant features of the HAV-host interactions.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation and NMR investigation of the association of the β-blockers atenolol and propranolol with a chiral molecular micelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Kevin F.; Billiot, Eugene J.; Billiot, Fereshteh H.; Hoffman, Charlene B.; Gladis, Ashley A.; Lipkowitz, Kenny B.; Southerland, William M.; Fang, Yayin

    2015-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy were used to compare the binding of two β-blocker drugs to the chiral molecular micelle poly-(sodium undecyl-(L)-leucine-valine). The molecular micelle is used as a chiral selector in capillary electrophoresis. This study is part of a larger effort to understand the mechanism of chiral recognition in capillary electrophoresis by characterizing the molecular micelle binding of chiral compounds with different geometries and charges. Propranolol and atenolol were chosen because their structures are similar, but their chiral interactions with the molecular micelle are different. Molecular dynamics simulations showed both propranolol enantiomers inserted their aromatic rings into the molecular micelle core and that (S)-propranolol associated more strongly with the molecular micelle than (R)-propranolol. This difference was attributed to stronger molecular micelle hydrogen bonding interactions experienced by (S)-propranolol. Atenolol enantiomers were found to bind near the molecular micelle surface and to have similar molecular micelle binding free energies.

  19. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Ronny P; Liu, Kang K L; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems. PMID:26555073

  20. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Ronny P.; Liu, Kang K. L.; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems. PMID:26555073

  1. Are automated molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy calculations realistic tools in lead optimization? An evaluation of the linear interaction energy (LIE) method.

    PubMed

    Stjernschantz, Eva; Marelius, John; Medina, Carmen; Jacobsson, Micael; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2006-01-01

    An extensive evaluation of the linear interaction energy (LIE) method for the prediction of binding affinity of docked compounds has been performed, with an emphasis on its applicability in lead optimization. An automated setup is presented, which allows for the use of the method in an industrial setting. Calculations are performed for four realistic examples, retinoic acid receptor gamma, matrix metalloprotease 3, estrogen receptor alpha, and dihydrofolate reductase, focusing on different aspects of the procedure. The obtained LIE models are evaluated in terms of the root-mean-square (RMS) errors from experimental binding free energies and the ability to rank compounds appropriately. The results are compared to the best empirical scoring function, selected from a set of 10 scoring functions. In all cases, good LIE models can be obtained in terms of free-energy RMS errors, although reasonable ranking of the ligands of dihydrofolate reductase proves difficult for both the LIE method and scoring functions. For the other proteins, the LIE model results in better predictions than the best performing scoring function. These results indicate that the LIE approach, as a tool to evaluate docking results, can be a valuable asset in computational lead optimization programs.

  2. Self-Assembly and Dynamics of Organic 2D Molecular Sieves: Ab Initio and Molecular Dynamics Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. John, Alexander; Wexler, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous molecular self-assembly is a promising route for bottom-up manufacturing of two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures with specific topologies on atomically flat surfaces. Of particular interest is the possibility of selective lock-and-key interaction of guest molecules inside cavities formed by complex self-assembled host structures. Our host structure is a monolayer consisting of interdigitated 1,3,5-tristyrylbenzene substituted by alkoxy peripheral chains containing n = 6, 8, 10, 12, or 14 carbon atoms (TSB3,5-C n) deposited on a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface. Using ab initio methods from quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations, we construct and analyze the structure and functionality of the TSB3,5-C n monolayer as a molecular sieve. Supported by ACS-PRF 52696-ND5.

  3. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  4. Molecular stopwatches, cogwheels and ``spinflakes'': studying the dynamics of molecular superrotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Alexander; Hepburn, John; Milner, Valery

    2015-05-01

    Using the technique of an optical centrifuge, we excite diatomic molecules to ultrafast synchronous rotation. Femtosecond velocity-map imaging allows us to visualize and study the coherent dynamics of molecular superrotors under field free conditions and in external magnetic field. We demonstrate that when the created rotational wave packet is narrow, its free evolution is nondispersing and follows the motion of a classically rotating dumbbell or a hand of the smallest natural stopwatch. For wider rotational distributions, we observe the breakdown of classical rotation, when a dumbbell shape changes to that of a ``quantum cogwheel'' - a molecular state simultaneously aligned along multiple direction. Our measurements in external magnetic field reveal other peculiar aspects of the rich dynamics of molecular superrotors. The rotation of a non-magnetic molecule interacts with the applied field only weakly, giving rise to slow precession of the molecular angular momentum around the field direction. In contrast, the electronic spin of a paramagnetic superrotor mediates this interaction, causing the initial disk-like angular distribution to split into several spatial components, each precessing with its own frequency determined by the spin projection.

  5. Overcoming the Barrier on Time Step Size in Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Molecular Liquids.

    PubMed

    Omelyan, Igor P; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2012-01-10

    We propose and validate a new multiscale technique, the extrapolative isokinetic Nóse-Hoover chain orientational (EINO) motion multiple time step algorithm for rigid interaction site models of molecular liquids. It nontrivially combines the multiple time step decomposition operator method with a specific extrapolation of intermolecular interactions, complemented by an extended isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain approach in the presence of translational and orientational degrees of freedom. The EINO algorithm obviates the limitations on time step size in molecular dynamics simulations. While the best existing multistep algorithms can advance from a 5 fs single step to a maximum 100 fs outer step, we show on the basis of molecular dynamics simulations of the TIP4P water that our EINO technique overcomes this barrier. Specifically, we have achieved giant time steps on the order of 500 fs up to 5 ps, which now become available in the study of equilibrium and conformational properties of molecular liquids without a loss of stability and accuracy.

  6. Visual verification and analysis of cluster detection for molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Grottel, Sebastian; Reina, Guido; Vrabec, Jadran; Ertl, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    A current research topic in molecular thermodynamics is the condensation of vapor to liquid and the investigation of this process at the molecular level. Condensation is found in many physical phenomena, e.g. the formation of atmospheric clouds or the processes inside steam turbines, where a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of condensation processes will help to optimize energy efficiency and avoid problems with droplets of macroscopic size. The key properties of these processes are the nucleation rate and the critical cluster size. For the calculation of these properties it is essential to make use of a meaningful definition of molecular clusters, which currently is a not completely resolved issue. In this paper a framework capable of interactively visualizing molecular datasets of such nucleation simulations is presented, with an emphasis on the detected molecular clusters. To check the quality of the results of the cluster detection, our framework introduces the concept of flow groups to highlight potential cluster evolution over time which is not detected by the employed algorithm. To confirm the findings of the visual analysis, we coupled the rendering view with a schematic view of the clusters' evolution. This allows to rapidly assess the quality of the molecular cluster detection algorithm and to identify locations in the simulation data in space as well as in time where the cluster detection fails. Thus, thermodynamics researchers can eliminate weaknesses in their cluster detection algorithms. Several examples for the effective and efficient usage of our tool are presented. PMID:17968118

  7. Visual verification and analysis of cluster detection for molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Grottel, Sebastian; Reina, Guido; Vrabec, Jadran; Ertl, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    A current research topic in molecular thermodynamics is the condensation of vapor to liquid and the investigation of this process at the molecular level. Condensation is found in many physical phenomena, e.g. the formation of atmospheric clouds or the processes inside steam turbines, where a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of condensation processes will help to optimize energy efficiency and avoid problems with droplets of macroscopic size. The key properties of these processes are the nucleation rate and the critical cluster size. For the calculation of these properties it is essential to make use of a meaningful definition of molecular clusters, which currently is a not completely resolved issue. In this paper a framework capable of interactively visualizing molecular datasets of such nucleation simulations is presented, with an emphasis on the detected molecular clusters. To check the quality of the results of the cluster detection, our framework introduces the concept of flow groups to highlight potential cluster evolution over time which is not detected by the employed algorithm. To confirm the findings of the visual analysis, we coupled the rendering view with a schematic view of the clusters' evolution. This allows to rapidly assess the quality of the molecular cluster detection algorithm and to identify locations in the simulation data in space as well as in time where the cluster detection fails. Thus, thermodynamics researchers can eliminate weaknesses in their cluster detection algorithms. Several examples for the effective and efficient usage of our tool are presented.

  8. Frontiers in molecular dynamics simulations of DNA.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Alberto; Luque, F Javier; Orozco, Modesto

    2012-02-21

    It has been known for decades that DNA is extremely flexible and polymorphic, but our knowledge of its accessible conformational space remains limited. Structural data, primarily from X-ray diffraction studies, is sparse in comparison to the manifold configurations possible, and direct experimental examinations of DNA's flexibility still suffer from many limitations. In the face of these shortcomings, molecular dynamics (MD) is now an essential tool in the study of DNA. It affords detailed structural and dynamical insights, which explains its recent transition from a small number of highly specialized laboratories to a large variety of groups dealing with challenging biological problems. MD is now making an irreversible journey to the mainstream of research in biology, with the attendant opportunities and challenges. But given the speed with which MD studies of DNA have spread, the roots remain somewhat shallow: in many cases, there is a lack of deep knowledge about the foundations, strengths, and limits of the technique. In this Account, we discuss how MD has become the most important source of structural and flexibility data on DNA, focusing on advances since 2007 of atomistic MD in the description of DNA under near-physiological conditions and highlighting the possibilities and shortcomings of the technique. The evolution in the field over the past four years is a prelude to the ongoing revolution. The technique has gained in robustness and predictive power, which when coupled with the spectacular improvements in software and hardware has enabled the tackling of systems of increasing complexity. Simulation times of microseconds have now been achieved, with even longer times when specialized hardware is used. As a result, we have seen the first real-time simulation of large conformational transitions, including folding and unfolding of short DNA duplexes. Noteworthy advances have also been made in the study of DNA-ligand interactions, and we predict that a global

  9. Interactive Beam-Dynamics Program

    2001-01-08

    TRACE3D is an interactive program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined system. The transport system may consist of the following elements: drift, thin lens, quadrupole, permanent magnet quadrupole, solenoid, doublet, triplet, bending magnet, edge angle (for bend), RF gap, radio-frequency-quadrupole cell, RF cavity, coupled-cavity tank, user-desired element, coordinate rotation, and identical element. The beam is represented by a 6X6 matrix defining a hyper-ellipsoid in six-dimensional phasemore » space. The projection of this hyperellipsoid on any two-dimensional plane is an ellipse that defines the boundary of the beam in that plane.« less

  10. Hyperdynamics: Accelerated Molecular Dynamics of Infrequent Events

    SciTech Connect

    Voter, A.F.

    1997-05-01

    I derive a general method for accelerating the molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation of infrequent events in solids. A bias potential ({Delta}V{sub b}) raises the energy in regions other than the transition states between potential basins. Transitions occur at an accelerated rate and the elapsed time becomes a statistical property of the system. {Delta}V{sub b} can be constructed without knowing the location of the transition states and implementation requires only first derivatives. I examine the diffusion mechanisms of a 10-atom Ag cluster on the Ag(111) surface using a 220 {mu}s hyper-MD simulation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. [Oligoglycine surface structures: molecular dynamics simulation].

    PubMed

    Gus'kova, O A; Khalatur, P G; Khokhlov, A R; Chinarev, A A; Tsygankova, S V; Bovin, N V

    2010-01-01

    The full-atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of adsorption mode for diantennary oligoglycines [H-Gly4-NH(CH2)5]2 onto graphite and mica surface is described. The resulting structure of adsorption layers is analyzed. The peptide second structure motives have been studied by both STRIDE (structural identification) and DSSP (dictionary of secondary structure of proteins) methods. The obtained results confirm the possibility of polyglycine II (PGII) structure formation in diantennary oligoglycine (DAOG) monolayers deposited onto graphite surface, which was earlier estimated based on atomic-force microscopy measurements.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of ice XII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzsák, István; Cummings, Peter T.

    1999-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on the newly discovered metastable ice XII. This new crystalline ice phase [C. Lobban, J.L. Finney, W.F. Kuhs, Nature (London) 391 (1998) 268] is proton-disordered. Thus 90 possible configurations of the unit cell can be constructed which differ only in the orientations of the water molecules. The simulation used the TIP4P potential model for water at constant temperature and density. About one-quarter of the initial configurations did not melt in the course of the simulation. This result is supportive of the experimental structure and also demonstrates the ability of this water model to study ice phases.

  13. Crystallization of nickel nanoclusters by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamati, H.; Gaminchev, K.

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the melting properties of bulk nickel and the crystallization of nickel nanocrystals via molecular dynamics using a potential in the framework of the second moment approximation of tight-binding theory. The melting behavior was simulated with the hysteresis approach by subsequently heating and cooling gradually the system over a wide range of temperatures. The crystallization of nickel nanoclusters consisting of 55, 147 and 309 atoms was achieved after repeatedly annealing and quenching the corresponding quasicrystals several times to avoid being trapped in a local energy minimum. The time over which the global minimum was reached was found to increase with the cluster size.

  14. Dynamical Simulations of Molecular Clouds in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Jesus; Morris, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The formation of the central massive cluster of young stars orbiting the Galactic black hole, Sgr A*, has been modeled by several groups by invoking an almost radially infalling molecular cloud that interacts with the black hole and creates a dense, gaseous disk in which stars can then form. However, the dynamical origin of such a cloud remains an open question. We present simulations of the central 30-100 pc of the Milky Way, starting from a population of molecular clouds located in a disk with scale height of ~30 pc, using the N-body/smoothed-particle hydrodynamics code, Gadget2. We followed the dynamical evolution of clouds in a galactic potential that includes a bar to explore whether cloud collisions or a succession of cloud scatterings can remove sufficient angular momentum from a massive cloud to endow it with a predominantly radial orbit. Initial results illustrate the importance of tidal shear; while dense cloud cores remain identifiable for extended periods of time, much of the molecular mass ends up in tidal streams, so cannot be deflected onto low angular momentum orbits by their mutual interactions. At the completion of our ongoing computations, we will report on whether the cloud cores can undergo sufficient scattering to achieve low-angular-momentum orbits.

  15. Spiking dynamics of interacting oscillatory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantsev, V. B.; Nekorkin, V. I.; Binczak, S.; Jacquir, S.; Bilbault, J. M.

    2005-06-01

    Spiking sequences emerging from dynamical interaction in a pair of oscillatory neurons are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The model comprises two unidirectionally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units with modified excitability (MFHN). The first (master) unit exhibits a periodic spike sequence with a certain frequency. The second (slave) unit is in its excitable mode and responds on the input signal with a complex (chaotic) spike trains. We analyze the dynamic mechanisms underlying different response behavior depending on interaction strength. Spiking phase maps describing the response dynamics are obtained. Complex phase locking and chaotic sequences are investigated. We show how the response spike trains can be effectively controlled by the interaction parameter and discuss the problem of neuronal information encoding.

  16. Collisional deactivation of CF 3I - a molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svedung, Harald; Marković, Nikola; Nordholm, Sture

    1999-10-01

    The detailed mechanisms of ro-vibrational energy transfer in collisions between CF 3I and argon or propane are investigated. Molecular dynamics simulations of collisions between a reactant CF 3I molecule at energies from 50 to 200 kJ/mol with medium argon or propane at selected initial temperatures are interpreted in terms of ergodic collision limits. The intramolecular potential used for CF 3I is a Morse-stretch/harmonic-bend type function with parameters fitted to equilibrium structure, normal mode frequencies and dissociation energies. Simple generic Buckingham type pair-potentials are used for intermolecular atom-atom interactions. Energy transfer is related to (i) geometry of collision, (ii) impact parameter, (iii) number of atom-atom encounters, (iv) average dynamical hardness of interaction at atom-atom collisions, (v) number of minima in the center of mass separation and (vi) lifetime of the collisional complex. The energy transfer in our molecular dynamics calculations is compared with experimental results for the same colliders. The observed trends are interpreted in terms of detailed collisional mechanisms. Our results highlight the importance of rotational excitation and the repulsive part of the intermolecular potential.

  17. Virtual reality visualization of parallel molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Disz, T.; Papka, M.; Stevens, R.; Pellegrino, M.; Taylor, V.

    1995-12-31

    When performing communications mapping experiments for massively parallel processors, it is important to be able to visualize the mappings and resulting communications. In a molecular dynamics model, visualization of the atom to atom interaction and the processor mappings provides insight into the effectiveness of the communications algorithms. The basic quantities available for visualization in a model of this type are the number of molecules per unit volume, the mass, and velocity of each molecule. The computational information available for visualization is the atom to atom interaction within each time step, the atom to processor mapping, and the energy resealing events. We use the CAVE (CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment) to provide interactive, immersive visualization experiences.

  18. Molecular design of responsive fluids: molecular dynamics studies of viscoelastic surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boek, E. S.; Jusufi, A.; Löwen, H.; Maitland, G. C.

    2002-10-01

    Understanding how macroscopic properties depend on intermolecular interactions for complex fluid systems is an enormous challenge in statistical mechanics. This issue is of particular importance for designing optimal industrial fluid formulations such as responsive oilfield fluids, based on viscoelastic surfactant solutions. We have carried out extensive molecular dynamics simulations, resolving the full chemical details in order to study how the structure of the lamellar phase of viscoelastic surfactant solutions depends on the head group (HG) chemistry of the surfactant. In particular, we consider anionic carboxylate and quaternary ammonium HGs with erucyl tails in aqueous solutions together with their sodium and chloride counterions at room temperature. We find a strong HG dependence of the lamellar structure as characterized by suitable pair correlation functions and density distributions. The depth of penetration of water into the bilayer membrane, the nature of counterion condensation on the HGs and even the order and correlation of the tails in the lamellae depend sensitively on the chemical details of the HG. We also determine the compressibility of the lamellar system as a first step to using atom-resolved molecular dynamics in order to link the molecular and macroscopic scales of length and time. The results give important insight into the links between molecular details and surfactant phase structure which is being exploited to develop more systematic procedures for the molecular design and formulation of industrial systems.

  19. Molecular-level dynamics of refractory dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niggemann, J.; Gerdts, G.; Dittmar, T.

    2012-04-01

    Refractory dissolved organic matter (DOM) accounts for most of the global oceanic organic carbon inventory. Processes leading to its formation and factors determining its stability are still largely unknown. We hypothesize that refractory DOM carries a universal molecular signature. Characterizing spatial and temporal variability in this universal signature is a key to understanding dynamics of refractory DOM. We present results from a long-term study of the DOM geo-metabolome in the open North Sea. Geo-metabolomics considers the entity of DOM as a population of compounds, each characterized by a specific function and reactivity in the cycling of energy and elements. Ten-thousands of molecular formulae were identified in DOM by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry analysis (FT-ICR-MS, Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry). The DOM pool in the North Sea was influenced by a complex interplay of processes that produced, transformed and degraded dissolved molecules. We identified a stable fraction in North Sea DOM with a molecular composition similar to deep ocean DOM. Molecular-level changes in this stable fraction provide novel information on dynamics and interactions of refractory DOM.

  20. Molecular interactions with ice: Molecular embedding, adsorption, detection, and release

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, K. D.; Langlois, Grant G.; Li, Wenxin; Sibener, S. J.; Killelea, Daniel R.

    2014-11-14

    The interaction of atomic and molecular species with water and ice is of fundamental importance for chemistry. In a previous series of publications, we demonstrated that translational energy activates the embedding of Xe and Kr atoms in the near surface region of ice surfaces. In this paper, we show that inert molecular species may be absorbed in a similar fashion. We also revisit Xe embedding, and further probe the nature of the absorption into the selvedge. CF{sub 4} molecules with high translational energies (≥3 eV) were observed to embed in amorphous solid water. Just as with Xe, the initial adsorption rate is strongly activated by translational energy, but the CF{sub 4} embedding probability is much less than for Xe. In addition, a larger molecule, SF{sub 6}, did not embed at the same translational energies that both CF{sub 4} and Xe embedded. The embedding rate for a given energy thus goes in the order Xe > CF{sub 4} > SF{sub 6}. We do not have as much data for Kr, but it appears to have a rate that is between that of Xe and CF{sub 4}. Tentatively, this order suggests that for Xe and CF{sub 4}, which have similar van der Waals radii, the momentum is the key factor in determining whether the incident atom or molecule can penetrate deeply enough below the surface to embed. The more massive SF{sub 6} molecule also has a larger van der Waals radius, which appears to prevent it from stably embedding in the selvedge. We also determined that the maximum depth of embedding is less than the equivalent of four layers of hexagonal ice, while some of the atoms just below the ice surface can escape before ice desorption begins. These results show that energetic ballistic embedding in ice is a general phenomenon, and represents a significant new channel by which incident species can be trapped under conditions where they would otherwise not be bound stably as surface adsorbates. These findings have implications for many fields including environmental science, trace gas

  1. Molecular basis for polyol-induced protein stability revealed by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Ji, Luo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 in different polyols (glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, trehalose, and sucrose) at 363 K were performed to probe the molecular basis of the stabilizing effect, and the data in water, ethanol, and glycol were compared. It is found that protein protection by polyols is positively correlated with both the molecular volume and the fractional polar surface area, and the former contributes more significantly to the protein's stability. Polyol molecules have only a few direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, and the number of hydrogen bonds between a polyol and the protein is similar for different polyols. Thus, it is concluded that the direct interactions contribute little to the stabilizing effect. It is clarified that the preferential exclusion of the polyols is the origin of their protective effects, and it increases with increasing polyol size. Namely, there is preferential hydration on the protein surface (2 Å), and polyol molecules cluster around the protein at a distance of about 4 Å. The preferential exclusion of polyols leads to indirect interactions that prevent the protein from thermal unfolding. The water structure becomes more ordered with increasing the polyol size. So, the entropy of water in the first hydration shell decreases, and a larger extent of decrease is observed with increasing polyol size, leading to larger transfer free energy. The findings suggest that polyols protect the protein from thermal unfolding via indirect interactions. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of structural stability of the protein in polyol solutions.

  2. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, N. J.; Hoyle, R. B.

    2012-08-01

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)], 10.1021/j150544a010 on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods.

  3. MDLab: a molecular dynamics simulation prototyping environment.

    PubMed

    Cickovski, Trevor; Chatterjee, Santanu; Wenger, Jacob; Sweet, Christopher R; Izaguirre, Jesús A

    2010-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation involves solving Newton's equations of motion for a system of atoms, by calculating forces and updating atomic positions and velocities over a timestep Deltat. Despite the large amount of computing power currently available, the timescale of MD simulations is limited by both the small timestep required for propagation, and the expensive algorithm for computing pairwise forces. These issues are currently addressed through the development of efficient simulation methods, some of which make acceptable approximations and as a result can afford larger timesteps. We present MDLab, a development environment for MD simulations built with Python which facilitates prototyping, testing, and debugging of these methods. MDLab provides constructs which allow the development of propagators, force calculators, and high level sampling protocols that run several instances of molecular dynamics. For computationally demanding sampling protocols which require testing on large biomolecules, MDL includes an interface to the OpenMM libraries of Friedrichs et al. which execute on graphical processing units (GPUs) and achieve considerable speedup over execution on the CPU. As an example of an interesting high level method developed in MDLab, we present a parallel implementation of the On-The-Fly string method of Maragliano and Vanden-Eijnden. MDLab is available at http://mdlab.sourceforge.net.

  4. Structure and Dynamics of Cellulose Molecular Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Howard; Zhang, Xin; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert

    Molecular dissolution of microcrystalline cellulose has been achieved through mixing with ionic liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc), and organic solvent dimethylformamide (DMF). The mechanism of cellulose dissolution in tertiary mixtures has been investigated by combining quasielastic and small angle neutron scattering (QENS and SANS). As SANS data show that cellulose chains take Gaussian-like conformations in homogenous solutions, which exhibit characteristics of having an upper critical solution temperature, the dynamic signals predominantly from EMIMAc molecules indicate strong association with cellulose in the dissolution state. The mean square displacement quantities support the observation of the stoichiometric 3:1 EMIMAc to cellulose unit molar ratio, which is a necessary criterion for the molecular dissolution of cellulose. Analyses of dynamics structure factors reveal the temperature dependence of a slow and a fast process for EMIMAc's bound to cellulose and in DMF, respectively, as well as a very fast process due possibly to the rotational motion of methyl groups, which persisted to near the absolute zero.

  5. A molecular dynamics study of freezing in a confined geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Wen-Jong; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls is studied by computer simulation. The time development of ordering is quantified and a novel freezing mechanism is observed. The liquid forms layers and subsequent in-plane ordering within a layer is accompanied by a sharpening of the layer in the transverse direction. The effects of channel size, the methods of quench, the liquid-wall interaction and the roughness of walls on the freezing mechanism are elucidated. Comparison with recent experiments on freezing in confined geometries is presented.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Telomere and TRF1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaburagi, Masaaki; Fukuda, Masaki; Yamada, Hironao; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Morikawa, Ryota; Takasu, Masako; Kato, Takamitsu A.; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    Telomeres play a central role in determining longevity of a cell. Our study focuses on the interaction between telomeric guanines and TRF1 as a means to observe the telomeric based mechanism of the genome protection. In this research, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of a telomeric DNA and TRF1. Our results show a stable structure with a high affinity for the specific protein. Additionally, we calculated the distance between guanines and the protein in their complex state. From this comparison, we found the calculated values of distance to be very similar, and the angle of guanines in their complex states was larger than that in their single state.

  7. Calcium Binding to Calmodulin by Molecular Dynamics with Effective Polarization.

    PubMed

    Kohagen, Miriam; Lepšík, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-11-20

    Calcium represents a key biological signaling ion with the EF-hand loops being its most prevalent binding motif in proteins. We show using molecular dynamics simulations with umbrella sampling that including electronic polarization effects via ionic charge rescaling dramatically improves agreements with experiment in terms of the strength of calcium binding and structures of the calmodulin binding sites. The present study thus opens way to accurate calculations of interactions of calcium and other computationally difficult high-charge-density ions in biological contexts.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of calcium binding in gramicidin A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baştuğ, Turgut; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2006-06-01

    An important issue in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of biomolecules is whether membrane proteins can be described using nonpolarizable force fields. To shed further light into this question, we study calcium ion binding and blocking of the gramicidin A channel which has not been investigated in MD simulations before. Potential of mean force calculations for calcium and potassium ions using a nonpolarizable force field reveal that calcium binding to the channel is much weaker compared to potassium, and hence calcium block of potassium current cannot be described. Inclusion of polarization interaction in force fields may help to rectify this problem.

  9. Molecular dynamics modeling and characterization of graphene/polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Rezwanur

    The current work focuses on the characterization of graphene based nanocomposites using molecular dynamic simulation and multiscale modeling approaches. Both graphene-epoxy and graphene-cellulose nanocomposites were considered in this study. A hierarchical multiscale modeling approach has been proposed using peridynamics and molecular dynamics simulation. Firstly, the mechanical properties of crosslinked graphene/epoxy (G-Ep) nanocomposites were investigated by molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The influence of graphene's weight concentration, aspect ratio and dispersion on stress-strain response and elastic properties were studied. The results show significant improvement in Young's modulus and shear modulus for the G-Ep system in comparison to the neat epoxy resin. It appears that the RDF, molecular energy and aspect ratios are influenced by both graphene concentrations and aspect ratios. The graphene concentrations in the range of 1-3% are seen to improve Young's modulus and shorter graphenes are observed to be more effective than larger ones. In addition, the dispersed graphene system is more promising in enhancing in-plane elastic modulus than the agglomerated graphene system. The cohesive and pullout forces versus displacements data were plotted under normal and shear modes in order to characterize interfacial properties. The cohesive force is significantly improved by attaching the graphene with a chemical bond at the graphene-epoxy interface. In the second part of the work, cellulose was considered to study the mechanical properties of graphene-cellulose bionanocomposite. Similar to graphene-epoxy systems, the effect of graphene dispersion and agglomeration were studied in the stress-strain plots of graphene-cellulose system. A pcff forcefield was used to define intermolecular and intramolecular interactions. The effect of graphene's aspect ratio and weight concentration on the structural property of each unitcell was

  10. Dynamic transitions in molecular dynamics simulations of supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xiaojun; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Two dynamic transitions or crossovers, one at a low temperature (T* ≈ 1006 K) and the other at a high temperature (T0 ≈ 1384 K), are shown to emerge in supercooled liquid silicon using molecular dynamics simulations. The high-temperature transition (T0) marks the decoupling of stress, density, and energy relaxation mechanisms. At the low-temperature transition (T*), depending on the cooling rate, supercooled silicon can either undergo a high-density-liquid to low-density-liquid (HDL-LDL) phase transition or experience an HDL-HDL crossover. Dynamically heterogeneous domains that emerge with supercooling become prominent across the HDL-HDL transition at 1006 K, with well-separated mobile and immobile regions. Interestingly, across the HDL-LDL transition, the most mobile atoms form large prominent aggregates while the least mobile atoms get spatially dispersed akin to that in a crystalline state. The attendant partial return to spatial uniformity with the HDL-LDL phase transition indicates a dynamic mechanism for relieving the frustration in supercooled states.

  11. Kinetic theory molecular dynamics and hot dense matter: theoretical foundations.

    PubMed

    Graziani, F R; Bauer, J D; Murillo, M S

    2014-09-01

    Electrons are weakly coupled in hot, dense matter that is created in high-energy-density experiments. They are also mildly quantum mechanical and the ions associated with them are classical and may be strongly coupled. In addition, the dynamical evolution of plasmas under these hot, dense matter conditions involve a variety of transport and energy exchange processes. Quantum kinetic theory is an ideal tool for treating the electrons but it is not adequate for treating the ions. Molecular dynamics is perfectly suited to describe the classical, strongly coupled ions but not the electrons. We develop a method that combines a Wigner kinetic treatment of the electrons with classical molecular dynamics for the ions. We refer to this hybrid method as "kinetic theory molecular dynamics," or KTMD. The purpose of this paper is to derive KTMD from first principles and place it on a firm theoretical foundation. The framework that KTMD provides for simulating plasmas in the hot, dense regime is particularly useful since current computational methods are generally limited by their inability to treat the dynamical quantum evolution of the electronic component. Using the N-body von Neumann equation for the electron-proton plasma, three variations of KTMD are obtained. Each variant is determined by the physical state of the plasma (e.g., collisional versus collisionless). The first variant of KTMD yields a closed set of equations consisting of a mean-field quantum kinetic equation for the electron one-particle distribution function coupled to a classical Liouville equation for the protons. The latter equation includes both proton-proton Coulombic interactions and an effective electron-proton interaction that involves the convolution of the electron density with the electron-proton Coulomb potential. The mean-field approach is then extended to incorporate equilibrium electron-proton correlations through the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander (STLS) ansatz. This is the second variant of KTMD

  12. Kinetic theory molecular dynamics and hot dense matter: theoretical foundations.

    PubMed

    Graziani, F R; Bauer, J D; Murillo, M S

    2014-09-01

    Electrons are weakly coupled in hot, dense matter that is created in high-energy-density experiments. They are also mildly quantum mechanical and the ions associated with them are classical and may be strongly coupled. In addition, the dynamical evolution of plasmas under these hot, dense matter conditions involve a variety of transport and energy exchange processes. Quantum kinetic theory is an ideal tool for treating the electrons but it is not adequate for treating the ions. Molecular dynamics is perfectly suited to describe the classical, strongly coupled ions but not the electrons. We develop a method that combines a Wigner kinetic treatment of the electrons with classical molecular dynamics for the ions. We refer to this hybrid method as "kinetic theory molecular dynamics," or KTMD. The purpose of this paper is to derive KTMD from first principles and place it on a firm theoretical foundation. The framework that KTMD provides for simulating plasmas in the hot, dense regime is particularly useful since current computational methods are generally limited by their inability to treat the dynamical quantum evolution of the electronic component. Using the N-body von Neumann equation for the electron-proton plasma, three variations of KTMD are obtained. Each variant is determined by the physical state of the plasma (e.g., collisional versus collisionless). The first variant of KTMD yields a closed set of equations consisting of a mean-field quantum kinetic equation for the electron one-particle distribution function coupled to a classical Liouville equation for the protons. The latter equation includes both proton-proton Coulombic interactions and an effective electron-proton interaction that involves the convolution of the electron density with the electron-proton Coulomb potential. The mean-field approach is then extended to incorporate equilibrium electron-proton correlations through the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander (STLS) ansatz. This is the second variant of KTMD

  13. Detecting Allosteric Networks Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, S; Wereszczynski, J

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric networks allow enzymes to transmit information and regulate their catalytic activities over vast distances. In principle, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be used to reveal the mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon; in practice, it can be difficult to discern allosteric signals from MD trajectories. Here, we describe how MD simulations can be analyzed to reveal correlated motions and allosteric networks, and provide an example of their use on the coagulation enzyme thrombin. Methods are discussed for calculating residue-pair correlations from atomic fluctuations and mutual information, which can be combined with contact information to identify allosteric networks and to dynamically cluster a system into highly correlated communities. In the case of thrombin, these methods show that binding of the antagonist hirugen significantly alters the enzyme's correlation landscape through a series of pathways between Exosite I and the catalytic core. Results suggest that hirugen binding curtails dynamic diversity and enforces stricter venues of influence, thus reducing the accessibility of thrombin to other molecules. PMID:27497176

  14. Dynamics simulations for engineering macromolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson-Mosher, Avi; Shinar, Tamar; Silver, Pamela A.; Way, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    The predictable engineering of well-behaved transcriptional circuits is a central goal of synthetic biology. The artificial attachment of promoters to transcription factor genes usually results in noisy or chaotic behaviors, and such systems are unlikely to be useful in practical applications. Natural transcriptional regulation relies extensively on protein-protein interactions to insure tightly controlled behavior, but such tight control has been elusive in engineered systems. To help engineer protein-protein interactions, we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation framework that simplifies features of proteins moving by constrained Brownian motion, with the goal of performing long simulations. The behavior of a simulated protein system is determined by summation of forces that include a Brownian force, a drag force, excluded volume constraints, relative position constraints, and binding constraints that relate to experimentally determined on-rates and off-rates for chosen protein elements in a system. Proteins are abstracted as spheres. Binding surfaces are defined radially within a protein. Peptide linkers are abstracted as small protein-like spheres with rigid connections. To address whether our framework could generate useful predictions, we simulated the behavior of an engineered fusion protein consisting of two 20 000 Da proteins attached by flexible glycine/serine-type linkers. The two protein elements remained closely associated, as if constrained by a random walk in three dimensions of the peptide linker, as opposed to showing a distribution of distances expected if movement were dominated by Brownian motion of the protein domains only. We also simulated the behavior of fluorescent proteins tethered by a linker of varying length, compared the predicted Förster resonance energy transfer with previous experimental observations, and obtained a good correspondence. Finally, we simulated the binding behavior of a fusion of two ligands that could

  15. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene

    PubMed Central

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando; Dressel, Martin; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the dynamics of spins on surfaces is pivotal to the design of spintronic1 and quantum computing2 devices. Proposed schemes involve the interaction of spins with graphene to enable surface-state spintronics3,4, and electrical spin-manipulation4-11. However, the influence of the graphene environment on the spin systems has yet to be unraveled12. Here we explore the spin-graphene interaction by studying the classical and quantum dynamics of molecular magnets13 on graphene. While the static spin response remains unaltered, the quantum spin dynamics and associated selection rules are profoundly modulated. The couplings to graphene phonons, to other spins, and to Dirac fermions are quantified using a newly-developed model. Coupling to Dirac electrons introduces a dominant quantum-relaxation channel that, by driving the spins over Villain’s threshold, gives rise to fully-coherent, resonant spin tunneling. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the interaction between spins and graphene, establishing the basis for electrical spin-manipulation in graphene nanodevices. PMID:26641019

  16. Interactions Dominate the Dynamics of Visual Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephen, Damian G.; Mirman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Many cognitive theories have described behavior as the summation of independent contributions from separate components. Contrasting views have emphasized the importance of multiplicative interactions and emergent structure. We describe a statistical approach to distinguishing additive and multiplicative processes and apply it to the dynamics of…

  17. Osmosis : a molecular dynamics computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Thomas

    Osmosis is a phenomenon of critical importance in a variety of processes ranging from the transport of ions across cell membranes and the regulation of blood salt levels by the kidneys to the desalination of water and the production of clean energy using potential osmotic power plants. However, despite its importance and over one hundred years of study, there is an ongoing confusion concerning the nature of the microscopic dynamics of the solvent particles in their transfer across the membrane. In this thesis the microscopic dynamical processes underlying osmotic pressure and concentration gradients are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. I first present a new derivation for the local pressure that can be used for determining osmotic pressure gradients. Using this result, the steady-state osmotic pressure is studied in a minimal model for an osmotic system and the steady-state density gradients are explained using a simple mechanistic hopping model for the solvent particles. The simulation setup is then modified, allowing us to explore the timescales involved in the relaxation dynamics of the system in the period preceding the steady state. Further consideration is also given to the relative roles of diffusive and non-diffusive solvent transport in this period. Finally, in a novel modification to the classic osmosis experiment, the solute particles are driven out-of-equilibrium by the input of energy. The effect of this modification on the osmotic pressure and the osmotic ow is studied and we find that active solute particles can cause reverse osmosis to occur. The possibility of defining a new "osmotic effective temperature" is also considered and compared to the results of diffusive and kinetic temperatures..

  18. Development of semiclassical molecular dynamics simulation method.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroki; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Teranishi, Yoshiaki; Ohta, Ayumi

    2016-04-28

    Various quantum mechanical effects such as nonadiabatic transitions, quantum mechanical tunneling and coherence play crucial roles in a variety of chemical and biological systems. In this paper, we propose a method to incorporate tunneling effects into the molecular dynamics (MD) method, which is purely based on classical mechanics. Caustics, which define the boundary between classically allowed and forbidden regions, are detected along classical trajectories and the optimal tunneling path with minimum action is determined by starting from each appropriate caustic. The real phase associated with tunneling can also be estimated. Numerical demonstration with use of a simple collinear chemical reaction O + HCl → OH + Cl is presented in order to help the reader to well comprehend the method proposed here. Generalization to the on-the-fly ab initio version is rather straightforward. By treating the nonadiabatic transitions at conical intersections by the Zhu-Nakamura theory, new semiclassical MD methods can be developed. PMID:27067383

  19. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: The first 25 years

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. |

    1992-08-01

    Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics has been generalized to simulate Nonequilibrium systems by adding sources of thermodynamic heat and work. This generalization incorporates microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress, and augments atomistic forces with special boundary, constraint, and driving forces capable of doing work on, and exchanging heat with, an otherwise Newtonian system. The underlying Lyapunov instability of these nonequilibrium equations of motion links microscopic time-reversible deterministic trajectories to macroscopic time-irreversible hydrodynamic behavior as described by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Green-Kubo linear-response theory has been checked. Nonlinear plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, shockwave propagation, and nonequilibrium phase transformation have all been simulated. The nonequilibrium techniques, coupled with qualitative improvements in parallel computer hardware, are enabling simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments.

  20. Extended Lagrangian free energy molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Steneteg, Peter; Bock, Nicolas

    2011-10-28

    Extended free energy Lagrangians are proposed for first principles molecular dynamics simulations at finite electronic temperatures for plane-wave pseudopotential and local orbital density matrix-based calculations. Thanks to the extended Lagrangian description, the electronic degrees of freedom can be integrated by stable geometric schemes that conserve the free energy. For the local orbital representations both the nuclear and electronic forces have simple and numerically efficient expressions that are well suited for reduced complexity calculations. A rapidly converging recursive Fermi operator expansion method that does not require the calculation of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for the construction of the fractionally occupied density matrix is discussed. An efficient expression for the Pulay force that is valid also for density matrices with fractional occupation occurring at finite electronic temperatures is also demonstrated.

  1. Development of semiclassical molecular dynamics simulation method.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroki; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Teranishi, Yoshiaki; Ohta, Ayumi

    2016-04-28

    Various quantum mechanical effects such as nonadiabatic transitions, quantum mechanical tunneling and coherence play crucial roles in a variety of chemical and biological systems. In this paper, we propose a method to incorporate tunneling effects into the molecular dynamics (MD) method, which is purely based on classical mechanics. Caustics, which define the boundary between classically allowed and forbidden regions, are detected along classical trajectories and the optimal tunneling path with minimum action is determined by starting from each appropriate caustic. The real phase associated with tunneling can also be estimated. Numerical demonstration with use of a simple collinear chemical reaction O + HCl → OH + Cl is presented in order to help the reader to well comprehend the method proposed here. Generalization to the on-the-fly ab initio version is rather straightforward. By treating the nonadiabatic transitions at conical intersections by the Zhu-Nakamura theory, new semiclassical MD methods can be developed.

  2. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarman, S. S.; Cummings, P. T.; Evans, D. J.

    1994-11-01

    During the last 15 years, noneyuilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) has been successfully applied to study transport phenomena in fluids that are isotropic at equilibrium. A natural extension is therefore to study liquid crystals, which are anisotropic al equilibrium. The lower symmetry of these systems means that the linear transport coefficients are considerably more complicated than in an isotropic system. Part of the reason for this is that there are crosscouplings between tensors of different rank and parity. Such couplings arc symmetry-forbidden in isotropic phases. In this paper. we review some of fundamental theoretical results we have derived concerning the rheology of liquid crystals. report NEMD simulations of thermal conductivity and shear viscosity of liquid crystals, and present NEMD simulations of shear cessation phenomena. All of the NEMD results are presented for a model liquid crystal fluid which is a modification of the Gay-Borne fluid. The results obtained are in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements on liquid crystal systems.

  3. Assessing Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Solvatochromism Modeling.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Tobias

    2015-08-20

    For the modeling of solvatochromism with an explicit representation of the solvent molecules, the quality of preceding molecular dynamics simulations is crucial. Therefore, the possibility to apply force fields which are derived with as little empiricism as possible seems desirable. Such an approach is tested here by exploiting the sensitive solvatochromism of p-nitroaniline, and the use of reliable excitation energies based on approximate second-order coupled cluster results within a polarizable embedding scheme. The quality of the various MD settings for four different solvents, water, methanol, ethanol, and dichloromethane, is assessed. In general, good agreement with the experiment is observed when polarizable force fields and special treatment of hydrogen bonding are applied. PMID:26220273

  4. Multipole Algorithms for Molecular Dynamics Simulation on High Performance Computers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, William Dewey

    1995-01-01

    A fundamental problem in modeling large molecular systems with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is the underlying N-body problem of computing the interactions between all pairs of N atoms. The simplest algorithm to compute pair-wise atomic interactions scales in runtime {cal O}(N^2), making it impractical for interesting biomolecular systems, which can contain millions of atoms. Recently, several algorithms have become available that solve the N-body problem by computing the effects of all pair-wise interactions while scaling in runtime less than {cal O}(N^2). One algorithm, which scales {cal O}(N) for a uniform distribution of particles, is called the Greengard-Rokhlin Fast Multipole Algorithm (FMA). This work describes an FMA-like algorithm called the Molecular Dynamics Multipole Algorithm (MDMA). The algorithm contains several features that are new to N-body algorithms. MDMA uses new, efficient series expansion equations to compute general 1/r^{n } potentials to arbitrary accuracy. In particular, the 1/r Coulomb potential and the 1/r^6 portion of the Lennard-Jones potential are implemented. The new equations are based on multivariate Taylor series expansions. In addition, MDMA uses a cell-to-cell interaction region of cells that is closely tied to worst case error bounds. The worst case error bounds for MDMA are derived in this work also. These bounds apply to other multipole algorithms as well. Several implementation enhancements are described which apply to MDMA as well as other N-body algorithms such as FMA and tree codes. The mathematics of the cell -to-cell interactions are converted to the Fourier domain for reduced operation count and faster computation. A relative indexing scheme was devised to locate cells in the interaction region which allows efficient pre-computation of redundant information and prestorage of much of the cell-to-cell interaction. Also, MDMA was integrated into the MD program SIgMA to demonstrate the performance of the program over

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation damage cascades in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Buchan, J. T.; Robinson, M.; Christie, H. J.; Roach, D. L.; Ross, D. K.; Marks, N. A.

    2015-06-28

    Radiation damage cascades in diamond are studied by molecular dynamics simulations employing the Environment Dependent Interaction Potential for carbon. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies up to 2.5 keV are considered and a uniformly distributed set of 25 initial PKA directions provide robust statistics. The simulations reveal the atomistic origins of radiation-resistance in diamond and provide a comprehensive computational analysis of cascade evolution and dynamics. As for the case of graphite, the atomic trajectories are found to have a fractal-like character, thermal spikes are absent and only isolated point defects are generated. Quantitative analysis shows that the instantaneous maximum kinetic energy decays exponentially with time, and that the timescale of the ballistic phase has a power-law dependence on PKA energy. Defect recombination is efficient and independent of PKA energy, with only 50% of displacements resulting in defects, superior to graphite where the same quantity is nearly 75%.

  6. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Nanostructured Ceramic Materials on Parallel Computers

    SciTech Connect

    Vashishta, Priya; Kalia, Rajiv

    2005-02-24

    Large-scale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to gain insight into: (1) sintering, structure, and mechanical behavior of nanophase SiC and SiO2; (2) effects of dynamic charge transfers on the sintering of nanophase TiO2; (3) high-pressure structural transformation in bulk SiC and GaAs nanocrystals; (4) nanoindentation in Si3N4; and (5) lattice mismatched InAs/GaAs nanomesas. In addition, we have designed a multiscale simulation approach that seamlessly embeds MD and quantum-mechanical (QM) simulations in a continuum simulation. The above research activities have involved strong interactions with researchers at various universities, government laboratories, and industries. 33 papers have been published and 22 talks have been given based on the work described in this report.

  7. GPU-enabled molecular dynamics simulations of ankyrin kinase complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Vertika; Chong, Wei Lim; Wisitponchai, Tanchanok; Nimmanpipug, Piyarat; Zain, Sharifuddin M.; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd.; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2014-10-01

    The ankyrin repeat (AR) protein can be used as a versatile scaffold for protein-protein interactions. It has been found that the heterotrimeric complex between integrin-linked kinase (ILK), PINCH, and parvin is an essential signaling platform, serving as a convergence point for integrin and growth-factor signaling and regulating cell adhesion, spreading, and migration. Using ILK-AR with high affinity for the PINCH1 as our model system, we explored a structure-based computational protocol to probe and characterize binding affinity hot spots at protein-protein interfaces. In this study, the long time scale dynamics simulations with GPU accelerated molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in AMBER12 have been performed to locate the hot spots of protein-protein interaction by the analysis of the Molecular Mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area/Generalized Born Solvent Area (MM-PBSA/GBSA) of the MD trajectories. Our calculations suggest good binding affinity of the complex and also the residues critical in the binding.

  8. The MIntAct Project and Molecular Interaction Databases.

    PubMed

    Licata, Luana; Orchard, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Molecular interaction databases collect, organize, and enable the analysis of the increasing amounts of molecular interaction data being produced and published as we move towards a more complete understanding of the interactomes of key model organisms. The organization of these data in a structured format supports analyses such as the modeling of pairwise relationships between interactors into interaction networks and is a powerful tool for understanding the complex molecular machinery of the cell. This chapter gives an overview of the principal molecular interaction databases, in particular the IMEx databases, and their curation policies, use of standardized data formats and quality control rules. Special attention is given to the MIntAct project, in which IntAct and MINT joined forces to create a single resource to improve curation and software development efforts. This is exemplified as a model for the future of molecular interaction data collation and dissemination. PMID:27115627

  9. Pseudorotational Dynamics of Small Molecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2001-03-01

    A variety of dynamic effects related to the pseudorotation of triatomic singly charged species is explored using the Electron Nuclear Dynamics(END)Theory. The concepts relevant to the motion studied are developed through the analysis of the simplest polyatomic molecule, namely H3+. It is shown that the limiting situation of circular pseudorotation is unattainable for this case. This observation is explained by the anisotropy of the ground state potential energy surface caused by the interaction between the D3h ground state of the molecule and its twofold degenerate first excited state. Further, pseudorotational motion is demonstrated to induce a rotational mode which in turn couples the two shape oscillation modes by action of the Coriolis force. Analogous phenomena are found for Li3+. The Jahn-Teller system C3+ exhibits a range of new motional effects. Particularly, a characteristic frequency shift between the two shape oscillation modes is obtained, resulting from the anisotropy in the curvature of the C2v minimum of C3+. The Jahn-Teller parameters of the system are determined from Electron Nuclear Dynamics simulations.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of supramolecular polymer rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenlong; Djohari, Hadrian; Dormidontova, Elena E.

    2010-11-01

    Using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we studied the equilibrium and rheological properties of dilute and semidilute solutions of head-to-tail associating polymers. In our simulation model, a spontaneous complementary reversible association between the donor and the acceptor groups at the ends of oligomers was achieved by introducing a combination of truncated pseudo-Coulombic attractive potential and Lennard Jones repulsive potential between donor, acceptor, and neighboring groups. We have calculated the equilibrium properties of supramolecular polymers, such as the ring/chain equilibrium, average molecular weight, and molecular weight distribution of self-assembled chains and rings, which all agree well with previous analytical and computer modeling results. We have investigated shear thinning of solutions of 8- and 20-bead associating oligomers with different association energies at different temperatures and oligomer volume fractions. All reduced viscosity data for a given oligomer length can be collapsed into one master curve, exhibiting two power-law regions of shear-thinning behavior with an exponent of -0.55 at intermediate ranges of the reduced shear rate β and -0.8 (or -0.9) at larger shear rates. The equilibrium viscosity of supramolecular solutions with different oligomer lengths and associating energies is found to obey a power-law scaling dependence on oligomer volume fraction with an exponent of 1.5, in agreement with the experimental observations for several dilute or semidilute solutions of supramolecular polymers. This implies that dilute and semidilute supramolecular polymer solutions exhibit high polydispersity but may not be sufficiently entangled to follow the reptation mechanism of relaxation.

  11. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Monticelli, Luca; Heberle, Frederick A; Kucerka, Norbert; Tieleman, D. Peter; Katsaras, John

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  12. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics studies of hydralazine with human DNA methyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narender; Dueñas-González, Alfonso; Lyko, Frank; Medina-Franco, Jose L

    2009-05-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) are a family of enzymes that methylate DNA at the C5 position of cytosine residues, and their inhibition is a promising strategy for the treatment of various developmental and proliferative diseases, particularly cancers. In the present study, a binding model for hydralazine, with a validated homology model of human DNMT, was developed by the use of automated molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The docking protocol was validated by predicting the binding mode of 2'-deoxycytidine, 5-azacytidine, and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. The inhibitory activity of hydralazine toward DNMT may be rationalized at the molecular level by similar interactions within the binding pocket (e.g., by a similar pharmacophore) as established by substrate-like deoxycytidine analogues. These interactions involve a complex network of hydrogen bonds with arginine and glutamic acid residues that also play a major role in the mechanism of DNA methylation. Despite the different scaffolds of other non-nucleoside DNMT inhibitors such as procaine and procainamide, the current modeling work reveals that these drugs exhibit similar interactions within the DNMT1 binding site. These findings are valuable in guiding the rational design and virtual screening of novel DNMT inhibitors.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of carbon nanotube-based gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn

    1997-09-01

    We use a molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with 0957-4484/8/3/001/img1. Brenner's reactive hydrocarbon potential is used to model interatomic forces within each molecular gear. A Lennard - Jones 6 - 12 potential or the Buckingham 0957-4484/8/3/001/img2 potential plus electrostatic interaction terms are used for intermolecular interactions between gears. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations are simulated on parallel computers. One gear is powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the nanotube to rotate, and a second gear is allowed to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its nanotube constrained to a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50 - 100 GHz in a vacuum at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering the temperature and/or rotation rate.

  14. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  15. Molecular-dynamic study of liquid ethylenediamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabaev, N. K.; Kraevskii, S. V.; Rodnikova, M. N.; Solonina, I. A.

    2016-10-01

    Models of liquid ethylenediamine (ED) are built using the molecular dynamics approach at temperatures of 293-363 K and a size of 1000 molecules in a basic cell as a cuboid. The structural and dynamic characteristics of liquid ED versus temperature are derived. The gauche conformation of the ED molecule that is characteristic of the gas phase is shown to transition easily into the trans conformation of the molecules in the liquid. NH···N hydrogen bonds are analyzed in liquid ED. The number of H-bonds per ED molecule is found to vary from 5.02 at 293 K to 3.86 at 363 K. The lifetimes in the range of the temperatures and dissociation activation energy for several H-bonds in liquid ED are found to range from 0.574 to 4.524 ps at 293 K; the activation energies are 8.8 kJ/mol for 50% of the H-bonds and 16.3 kJ/mol for 6.25% of them. A weaker and more mobile spatial grid of H-bonds in liquid ED is observed, compared to data calculated earlier for monoethanolamine.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of liquid crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Pu

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of the phase behavior, the response to an applied field of nematic liquid crystalline (LC) materials and interactions of nanoparticles in isotropic mesogenic materials are presented in this work. Molecular models used include the rigid bead-necklace model and soft spherocylinders. Free energy calculations applying thermodynamic integration and the Gibbs-Duhem integration method were used to establish the (T, P) phase diagram of the repulsive bead-necklace model, subsequently the Gibbs-Duhem integration method was further utilized to investigate the influence of attractive interactions on the phase behavior of the bead-necklace model. Analysis of order and thermodynamics of LC phase transitions (Isotropic-Nematic transition and Nematic-Smectic A transition) demonstrate that this simple model can capture the basic physics of liquid crystalline phases, and good agreement with experimental results is obtained. Further addition of chemical details to this multiple interaction sites model is much easier than to the idealized models (Gay-Berne, Spherocylinders) while the computation cost increase with respect to these idealized models is minimal. With a mean field representation of field-molecules interaction, MD simulation studies of the switching behavior of nematic LC, which is the basis of many LC devices, were performed. The switching mechanisms were explained in terms of the compromise between the elastic energy and field-molecules interactions. Qualitative agreement with experiments confirmed the validity of the mean field approximation. Finally, using the standard umbrella sampling technique and MD simulations, the potential of mean force between two nanoparticles in solvent of spherocylinders is calculated. It is found that while dispersed nanoparticles will delay the Isotropic-Nematics transition to higher density (lower temperature), they can induce local ordering fluctuations (within a few molecular lengths of the

  17. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Y. Murakawa, T. Shimamura, K. Oishi, M. Ohyama, T. Kurita, N.

    2015-02-27

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA.

  18. Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics: A Foundation for Multiscale Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Internal coordinates such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles (BAT) are natural coordinates for describing a bonded molecular system. However, the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods that are widely used for proteins, DNA, and polymers are based on Cartesian coordinates owing to the mathematical simplicity of the equations of motion. However, constraints are often needed with Cartesian MD simulations to enhance the conformational sampling. This makes the equations of motion in the Cartesian coordinates differential-algebraic, which adversely impacts the complexity and the robustness of the simulations. On the other hand, constraints can be easily placed in BAT coordinates by removing the degrees of freedom that need to be constrained. Thus, the internal coordinate MD (ICMD) offers an attractive alternative to Cartesian coordinate MD for developing multiscale MD method. The torsional MD method is a special adaptation of the ICMD method, where all the bond lengths and bond angles are kept rigid. The advantages of ICMD simulation methods are the longer time step size afforded by freezing high frequency degrees of freedom and performing a conformational search in the more important low frequency torsional degrees of freedom. However, the advancements in the ICMD simulations have been slow and stifled by long-standing mathematical bottlenecks. In this review, we summarize the recent mathematical advancements we have made based on spatial operator algebra, in developing a robust long time scale ICMD simulation toolkit useful for various applications. We also present the applications of ICMD simulations to study conformational changes in proteins and protein structure refinement. We review the advantages of the ICMD simulations over the Cartesian simulations when used with enhanced sampling methods and project the future use of ICMD simulations in protein dynamics. PMID:25517406

  19. Nanochannel flow past permeable walls via molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jian-Fei; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2016-07-01

    The nanochannel flow past permeable walls with nanopores is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, including the density distribution, velocity field, molecular penetration mechanism and surface friction coefficient. A low density distribution has been found at the gas-wall interface demonstrating the low pressure region. In addition, there exists a jump of the gas density on the permeable surface, which indicates the discontinuity of the density distribution across the permeable surface. On the other hand, the nanoscale vortices are observed in nanopores of the permeable wall, and the reduced mass flux of the flow in nanopores results in a shifted hydrodynamic boundary above the permeable surface. Particularly the slip length of the gas flow on the permeable surface is pronounced a non-linear function of the molecular mean free path, which produces a large value of the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) and a big portion of the diffusive refection. Moreover, the gas-gas interaction and multi-collision among gas molecules may take place in nanopores, which contribute to large values of TMAC. Consequently the boundary friction coefficient on the permeable surface is increased because of the energy dissipation consumed by the nanoscale vortices in nanopores. The molecular boundary condition provides us with a new picture of the nanochannel flow past the permeable wall with nanopores.

  20. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by two genistein derivatives: kinetic analysis, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiansong; Wu, Ping; Yang, Ranyao; Gao, Li; Li, Chao; Wang, Dongmei; Wu, Song; Liu, Ai-Lin; Du, Guan-Hua

    2014-12-01

    In this study two genistein derivatives (G1 and G2) are reported as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), and differences in the inhibition of AChE are described. Although they differ in structure by a single methyl group, the inhibitory effect of G1 (IC50=264 nmol/L) on AChE was 80 times stronger than that of G2 (IC50=21,210 nmol/L). Enzyme-kinetic analysis, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to better understand the molecular basis for this difference. The results obtained by kinetic analysis demonstrated that G1 can interact with both the catalytic active site and peripheral anionic site of AChE. The predicted binding free energies of two complexes calculated by the molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area (MM/GBSA) method were consistent with the experimental data. The analysis of the individual energy terms suggested that a difference between the net electrostatic contributions (ΔE ele+ΔG GB) was responsible for the binding affinities of these two inhibitors. Additionally, analysis of the molecular mechanics and MM/GBSA free energy decomposition revealed that the difference between G1 and G2 originated from interactions with Tyr124, Glu292, Val294 and Phe338 of AChE. In conclusion, the results reveal significant differences at the molecular level in the mechanism of inhibition of AChE by these structurally related compounds. PMID:26579414

  1. Structure and dynamics of DNA loops on nucleosomes studied with atomistic, microsecond-scale molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pasi, Marco; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    DNA loop formation on nucleosomes is strongly implicated in chromatin remodeling and occurs spontaneously in nucleosomes subjected to superhelical stress. The nature of such loops depends crucially on the balance between DNA deformation and DNA interaction with the nucleosome core. Currently, no high-resolution structural data on these loops exist. Although uniform rod models have been used to study loop size and shape, these models make assumptions concerning DNA mechanics and DNA–core binding. We present here atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations for two different loop sizes. The results point to the key role of localized DNA kinking within the loops. Kinks enable the relaxation of DNA bending strain to be coupled with improved DNA–core interactions. Kinks lead to small, irregularly shaped loops that are asymmetrically positioned with respect to the nucleosome core. We also find that loop position can influence the dynamics of the DNA segments at the extremities of the nucleosome. PMID:27098037

  2. Anharmonic infrared and Raman spectra in Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliai, Marco; Cavazzoni, Carlo; Cardini, Gianni; Erbacci, Giovanni; Parrinello, Michele; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2008-06-01

    The infrared and Raman spectra of naphthalene crystal with inclusion of anharmonic effects have been calculated by adopting the generalized variational density functional perturbation theory in the framework of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. The computational approach has been generalized for cells of arbitrary shape. The intermolecular interactions have been analyzed with and without the van der Waals corrections, showing the importance of such interactions in the naphthalene crystal to reproduce the structural, dynamical, and spectroscopic properties.

  3. Gas dynamics in interacting and merging galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    A three dimensional model of the dynamics of gas clouds in interacting galaxies is developed. The gas clouds move under the combined gravitational influence of two galaxies passing close to each other. By performing a multipole expansion of the gravitational field the effects of self-gravity within a galaxy are included. This allows the case to be modeled in which the two galaxies merge. The gas clouds are allowed to interact with one another by colliding. They either coalesce to form a larger cloud or are disrupted, depending on their relative kinetic energy as compared to the total gravitational binding energy of the two-cloud system. Various cases are considered by varying such parameters as impact parameter, inclination of the gaseous disk of a galaxy to the orbital plane of the two, interacting galaxies, relative velocity of the galaxies, the mass ratio of the galaxies, and the presence of gas in the second galaxy. As the strength of the interaction increases the more disturbed the interstellar medium becomes. The clouds collide at an increased rate and with larger velocities so that the fraction of collisions which disrupt the clouds rises as the strength of the interaction increases. Since interacting galaxies are observed to have elevated star formation rates, it is concluded that the star formation induced by the interaction of two galaxies is related to the high velocity, disruptive cloud-cloud collisions.

  4. EDITORIAL: 18th European Conference on Dynamics of Molecular Systems 18th European Conference on Dynamics of Molecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varandas, A. J. C.

    2011-08-01

    This special section of Comments on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (CAMOP) in Physica Scripta collects some of the papers that have been presented at the 18th European Conference on Dynamics of Molecular Systems MOLEC 2010 held in September 2010 in Curia, Portugal, as part of a series of biennial MOLEC conferences. This started in 1976 in Trento, Italy, and has continued, visiting 17 cities in 11 countries, namely Denmark, The Netherlands, Israel, France, Italy, Germany, Czech Republic, Spain, United Kingdom, Turkey and Russia. Following the MOLEC tradition, the scientific programme of the Curia meeting focused on experimental and theoretical studies of molecular interactions, collision dynamics, spectroscopy, and related fields. It included invited speakers from 22 countries, who were asked to summarize the problems reported in their presentations with the objective of revealing the current thinking of leading researchers in atomic, molecular and optical physics. It is hoped that their authoritative contributions presented in this CAMOP special section will also appeal to non-specialists through their clear and broad introductions to the field as well as references to the accessible literature. This CAMOP special section comprises ten contributions, which cover theoretical studies on the electronic structure of molecules and clusters as well as dynamics of elastic, inelastic and reactive encounters between atoms, molecules, ions, clusters and surfaces. Specifically, it includes electronic structure calculations using the traditional coupled-cluster method (Barreto et al 028111), the electron-attached equation-of-motion coupled cluster method (Hansen et al 028110), the diffusion Monte Carlo method (López-Durán et al 028107) and the path-integral Monte Carlo method (Barragán et al 028109). The contributions on molecular dynamics include on-the-fly quasi-classical trajectories on a five-atom molecule (Yu 028104), quantum reaction dynamics on triatomics

  5. Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo Simulations, and Langevin Dynamics: A Computational Review

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Eric; Viktor, Herna L.

    2015-01-01

    Macromolecular structures, such as neuraminidases, hemagglutinins, and monoclonal antibodies, are not rigid entities. Rather, they are characterised by their flexibility, which is the result of the interaction and collective motion of their constituent atoms. This conformational diversity has a significant impact on their physicochemical and biological properties. Among these are their structural stability, the transport of ions through the M2 channel, drug resistance, macromolecular docking, binding energy, and rational epitope design. To assess these properties and to calculate the associated thermodynamical observables, the conformational space must be efficiently sampled and the dynamic of the constituent atoms must be simulated. This paper presents algorithms and techniques that address the abovementioned issues. To this end, a computational review of molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulations, Langevin dynamics, and free energy calculation is presented. The exposition is made from first principles to promote a better understanding of the potentialities, limitations, applications, and interrelations of these computational methods. PMID:25785262

  6. Computational Studies on the Anharmonic Dynamics of Molecular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, John S.

    Molecular nanoclusters present ideal systems to probe the physical forces and dynamics that drive the behavior of larger bulk systems. At the nanocluster limit the first instances of several phenomena can be observed including the breaking of hydrogen and molecular bonds. Advancements in experimental and theoretical techniques have made it possible to explore these phenomena in great detail. The most fruitful of these studies have involved the use of both experimental and theoretical techniques to leverage to strengths of the two approaches. This dissertation seeks to explore several important phenomena of molecular clusters using new and existing theoretical methodologies. Three specific systems are considered, hydrogen chloride clusters, mixed water and hydrogen chloride clusters and the first cluster where hydrogen chloride autoionization occurs. The focus of these studies remain as close as possible to experimentally observable phenomena with the intention of validating, simulating and expanding on experimental work. Specifically, the properties of interested are those related to the vibrational ground and excited state dynamics of these systems. Studies are performed using full and reduced dimensional potential energy surface alongside advanced quantum mechanical methods including diffusion Monte Carlo, vibrational configuration interaction theory and quasi-classical molecular dynamics. The insight gained from these studies are great and varied. A new on-they-fly ab initio method for studying molecular clusters is validated for (HCl)1--6. A landmark study of the dissociation energy and predissociation mechanism of (HCl)3 is reported. The ground states of mixed (HCl)n(H2O)m are found to be highly delocalized across multiple stationary point configurations. Furthermore, it is identified that the consideration of this delocalization is required in vibrational excited state calculations to achieve agreement with experimental measurements. Finally, the theoretical

  7. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  8. Structure and dynamics of surfactant and hydrocarbon aggregates on graphite: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Sammalkorpi, Maria; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Haataja, Mikko

    2008-03-13

    We have examined the structure and dynamics of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecane (C12) molecular aggregates at varying surface coverages on the basal plane of graphite via classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our results suggest that graphite-hydrocarbon chain interactions favor specific molecular orientations at the single-molecule level via alignment of the tail along the crystallographic directions. This orientational bias is reduced greatly upon increasing the surface coverage for both molecules due to intermolecular interactions, leading to very weak bias at intermediate surface coverages. Interestingly, for complete monolayers, we find a re-emergent orientational bias. Furthermore, by comparing the SDS behavior with C12, we demonstrate that the charged head group plays a key role in the aggregate structures: SDS molecules display a tendency to form linear file-like aggregates while C12 forms tightly bound planar ones. The observed orientational bias for SDS molecules is in agreement with experimental observations of hemimicelle orientation and provides support for the belief that an initial oriented layer governs the orientation of hemimicellar aggregates.

  9. How Dynamic Visualization Technology Can Support Molecular Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Dalit

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study aimed at exploring the advantages of dynamic visualization for the development of better understanding of molecular processes. We designed a technology-enhanced curriculum module in which high school chemistry students conduct virtual experiments with dynamic molecular visualizations of solid, liquid, and…

  10. Estimation of atomic hydrophobicities using molecular dynamics simulation of peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Marie; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2007-12-01

    The hydrophobic force is one of the main driving forces in protein folding and binding. However, its nature is not yet well understood and consequently there are more than 80 different scales published trying to quantify it. Most of the hydrophobicity scales are amino acid-based, but the interaction between the molecular surface of the proteins (and DNA) and surfaces they are immobilized on, e.g., on biomedical micro/nanodevices, occurs on fractions of, rather than whole amino acids. This fragmented structure of the biomolecular surface requires the derivation of atom-level hydrophobicity. Most attempts for the evaluation of atomic hydrophobicities are derived from amino acid-based values, which ignore dynamic and steric factors. This contribution reports on the Molecular Dynamics simulations that aim to overcome this simplification. The calculations examine various tripeptides in an aqueous solution and the analysis focuses on the distance of the nearest water molecules to the individual atoms in the peptides. Different environments result in a variation of average distances for similar atoms in different tripeptides. Comparison with the atomic hydrophobicities derived from the amino acid-based hydrophobicity obtained from peptide partition in water-octanol (Dgoct) and transport through the membrane interface (Dgwif) shows a similar trend to the calculated distances. The variations are likely due to the steric differences of similar types of atoms in different geometric contexts. Therefore, Molecular Dynamics simulations proved convenient for the evaluation of atomic hydrophobicities and open new research avenues. The atomic hydrophobicities can be used to design surfaces that mimic the biomolecular surfaces and therefore elicit an expected biomolecular activity from the immobilized biomolecules.

  11. Dissecting the molecular origins of specific protein-nucleic acid recognition: hydrostatic pressure and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Thomas W; Kosztin, Dorina; McLean, Mark A; Schulten, Klaus; Sligar, Stephen G

    2002-01-01

    The fundamental processes by which proteins recognize and bind to nucleic acids are critical to understanding cellular function. To explore the factors involved in protein-DNA recognition, we used hydrostatic pressure to perturb the binding of the BamHI endonuclease to cognate DNA, both in experiment and in molecular dynamic simulations. A new technique of high-pressure gel mobility shift analysis was used to test the effects of elevated hydrostatic pressure on the binding of BamHI to its cognate recognition sequence. Upon application of a pressure of 500 bar, the equilibrium dissociation constant of BamHI binding to the cognate site was found to increase nearly 10-fold. A challenge has been to link this type of pure thermodynamic measurement to functional events occurring at the molecular level. Thus, we used molecular dynamic simulations at both ambient and elevated pressures to reveal details of the direct and water-mediated interactions between BamHI and cognate DNA, which allow explanation of the effects of pressure on site-specific protein-DNA binding and complex stability. PMID:11751298

  12. VISUALIZATION OF MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS BY FLUORESCENCE COMPLEMENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Kerppola, Tom K.

    2008-01-01

    The visualization of protein complexes in living cells enables validation of protein interactions in their normal environment and determination of their subcellular localization. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay has been used to visualize interactions among multiple proteins in many cell types and organisms. This assay is based on the association between two fluorescent-protein fragments when they are brought together by an interaction between proteins fused to the fragments. Modified forms of this assay have been used to visualize the competition between alternative interaction partners and the covalent modification of proteins by ubiquitin family peptides. PMID:16625152

  13. Probing ultrafast electronic and molecular dynamics with free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, L.; Osipov, T.; Murphy, B. F.; Rudenko, A.; Rolles, D.; Petrovic, V. S.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Berrah, N.

    2014-06-01

    Molecular dynamics is an active area of research, focusing on revealing fundamental information on molecular structures and photon-molecule interaction and with broad impacts in chemical and biological sciences. Experimental investigation of molecular dynamics has been advanced by the development of new light sources and techniques, deepening our understanding of natural processes and enabling possible control and modification of chemical and biomolecular processes. Free-electron lasers (FELs) deliver unprecedented intense and short photon pulses in the vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectral ranges, opening a new era for the study of electronic and nuclear dynamics in molecules. This review focuses on recent molecular dynamics investigations using FELs. We present recent work concerning dynamics of molecular interaction with FELs using an intrinsic clock within a single x-ray pulse as well as using an external clock in a pump-probe scheme. We review the latest developments on correlated and coincident spectroscopy in FEL-based research and recent results revealing photo-induced interaction dynamics using these techniques. We also describe new instrumentations to conduct x-ray pump-x-ray probe experiments with spectroscopy and imaging detectors.

  14. Animated molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated caesium-smectite interlayers

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Rebecca; Sposito, Garrison

    2002-01-01

    Computer animation of center of mass coordinates obtained from 800 ps molecular dynamics simulations of Cs-smectite hydrates (1/3 and 2/3 water monolayers) provided information concerning the structure and dynamics of the interlayer region that could not be obtained through traditional simulation analysis methods. Cs+ formed inner sphere complexes with the mineral surface, and could be seen to jump from one attracting location near a layer charge site to the next, while water molecules were observed to migrate from the hydration shell of one ion to that of another. Neighboring ions maintained a partial hydration shell by sharing water molecules, such that a single water molecule hydrated two ions simultaneously for hundreds of picoseconds. Cs-montmorillonite hydrates featured the largest extent of this sharing interaction, because interlayer ions were able to inhabit positions near surface cavities as well as at their edges, close to oxygen triads. The greater positional freedom of Cs+ within the montmorillonite interlayer, a result of structural hydroxyl orientation and low tetrahedral charge, promoted the optimization of distances between cations and water molecules required for water sharing. Preference of Cs+ for locations near oxygen triads was observed within interlayer beidellite and hectorite. Water molecules also could be seen to interact directly with the mineral surface, entering its surface cavities to approach attracting charge sites and structural hydroxyls. With increasing water content, water molecules exhibited increased frequency and duration of both cavity habitation and water sharing interactions. Competition between Cs+ and water molecules for surface sites was evident. These important cooperative and competitive features of interlayer molecular behavior were uniquely revealed by animation of an otherwise highly complex simulation output.

  15. Eucb: A C++ program for molecular dynamics trajectory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoulos, Ioannis G.; Stavrakoudis, Athanassios

    2011-03-01

    Eucb is a standalone program for geometrical analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories of protein systems. The program is written in GNU C++ and it can be installed in any operating system running a C++ compiler. The program performs its analytical tasks based on user supplied keywords. The source code is freely available from http://stavrakoudis.econ.uoi.gr/eucb under LGPL 3 license. Program summaryProgram title:Eucb Catalogue identifier: AEIC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEIC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 31 169 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 297 364 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: GNU C++ Computer: The tool is designed and tested on GNU/Linux systems Operating system: Unix/Linux systems RAM: 2 MB Supplementary material: Sample data files are available Classification: 3 Nature of problem: Analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories. Solution method: The program finds all possible interactions according to input files and the user instructions. Then it reads all the trajectory frames and finds those frames in which these interactions occur, under certain geometrical criteria. This is a blind search, without a priori knowledge if a certain interaction occurs or not. The program exports time series of these quantities (distance, angles, etc.) and appropriate descriptive statistics. Running time: Depends on the input data and the required options.

  16. POLYANA-A tool for the calculation of molecular radial distribution functions based on Molecular Dynamics trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitroulis, Christos; Raptis, Theophanes; Raptis, Vasilios

    2015-12-01

    We present an application for the calculation of radial distribution functions for molecular centres of mass, based on trajectories generated by molecular simulation methods (Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo). When designing this application, the emphasis was placed on ease of use as well as ease of further development. In its current version, the program can read trajectories generated by the well-known DL_POLY package, but it can be easily extended to handle other formats. It is also very easy to 'hack' the program so it can compute intermolecular radial distribution functions for groups of interaction sites rather than whole molecules.

  17. Rempi Studies of Molecular Reaction Dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, John Forbes

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Resonance-Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionisation (REMPI qv.) is used to prepare and probe systems undergoing unimolecular decomposition. It is shown that the highly efficient state selective nature of the REMPI process is well suited to both highly dynamical situations such as the "A-Band" dissociation of MeI at around 280nm and to the slower "Quasi-statistical" dissociations of the mainifold of states of the MeI(+) cation. In the study of the neutral dissociation we attempt to extract the population distributions of the quantum states "by implication" as has been done previously. We demonstrate the failings of the time-of-flight technique in being unable to do this effectively. A comparison with previous studies is made. We report the first rotationally resolved spectrum of a polyatomic (N atoms > 2) photofragment (Me from the "A-Band" photodissociation of MeI) and propose a mechanism to account for the observed differences of the rotational populations in the different dissociation channels. Two-photon linestrength theory incorporating alignment effects is extended to symmetric tops to analyse the data. The pre-dissociation dynamics of a high lying Rydberg state of the methyl radical have been extracted as part of a spectroscopic study performed on CH _3 and CD_3. The dynamics are compared to existing studies on the near-neighbours NH_3 and ND_3 with some apparent correlation. In the dissociations of the A and B states of the MeI(+) cation we are able to provide some more evidence for existing ideas that the A state dissociates by rapid inter-conversion to highly excited levels of the ground state whereas the B state dissociates in a more direct manner. We identify two existing features in the REMPI spectrum of MeI in the "A-Band" region as molecular Rydberg resonances and show that an interesting competition exists between the direct photodissociation and the "virtual" state involved in

  18. STALK : an interactive virtual molecular docking system.

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, D.; Facello, M.; Hallstrom, P.; Reeder, G.; Walenz, B.; Stevens, F.; Univ. of Illinois

    1997-04-01

    Several recent technologies-genetic algorithms, parallel and distributed computing, virtual reality, and high-speed networking-underlie a new approach to the computational study of how biomolecules interact or 'dock' together. With the Stalk system, a user in a virtual reality environment can interact with a genetic algorithm running on a parallel computer to help in the search for likely geometric configurations.

  19. Teaching Noncovalent Interactions Using Protein Molecular Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornasari, Maria Silvina; Parisi, Gustavo; Echave, Julian

    2008-01-01

    Noncovalent interactions and physicochemical properties of amino acids are important topics in biochemistry courses. Here, we present a computational laboratory where the capacity of each of the 20 amino acids to maintain different noncovalent interactions are used to investigate the stabilizing forces in a set of proteins coming from organisms…

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of unsaturated lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Alexander L.; Balabaev, Nikolay K.

    2001-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out for bilayers of lipid molecules having stearic acid (C18:0) chain in position '3-D' (using the nomenclature of M. Sundaralingam, 1972) and fatty acid chain C18:0, C18:1(omega 9), C18:2(omega 6), C18:3(omega 3), C20:4(omega 6) or C22:6(omega 3) in position '2-D'. To investigate the properties of the bilayers two models were considered. In the first model, the simulation cells of the bilayers consisted of 96 phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules and 2304 water molecules: 48 lipid molecules per layer and 24 H2O molecules per lipid. The water was modeled by explicit TIP3P water molecules. In the second model, the head group of the lipid molecules was treated as an effective sphere -- diacylglycerolipids (DGs) were considered, the interface of each monolayer was modeled by a flat surface; no water molecules were present explicitly. The bilayers consisted of 48 X 2 equals 96 glycerolipids arranged in a rectangular simulation cell. Various properties of the bilayers -- the C-H bond order parameter -SCH profiles of the hydrocarbon tails, the root-mean-square values of the positional fluctuations of the lipid chain carbons, mass density distributions of lipid molecules and water along the normals were investigated.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of unsaturated lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Alexander L.; Balabaev, Nikolay K.

    2000-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out for bilayers of lipid molecules having stearic acid (C18:0) chain in position '3-D' (using the nomenclature of M. Sundaralingam, 1972) and fatty acid chain C18:0, C18:1(omega 9), C18:2(omega 6), C18:3(omega 3), C20:4(omega 6) or C22:6(omega 3) in position '2-D'. To investigate the properties of the bilayers two models were considered. In the first model, the simulation cells of the bilayers consisted of 96 phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules and 2304 water molecules: 48 lipid molecules per layer and 24 H2O molecules per lipid. The water was modeled by explicit TIP3P water molecules. In the second model, the head group of the lipid molecules was treated as an effective sphere -- diacylglycerolipids (DGs) were considered, the interface of each monolayer was modeled by a flat surface; no water molecules were present explicitly. The bilayers consisted of 48 X 2 equals 96 glycerolipids arranged in a rectangular simulation cell. Various properties of the bilayers -- the C-H bond order parameter -SCH profiles of the hydrocarbon tails, the root-mean-square values of the positional fluctuations of the lipid chain carbons, mass density distributions of lipid molecules and water along the normals were investigated.

  2. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-08-14

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion. PMID:27431975

  3. Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Dudas, Gytis; Gregory, Victoria; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01914.001 PMID:24497547

  4. Fracture simulations via massively parallel molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, B.L.; Abraham, F.F.; Ravelo, R.

    1993-09-01

    Fracture simulations at the atomistic level have heretofore been carried out for relatively small systems of particles, typically 10,000 or less. In order to study anything approaching a macroscopic system, massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) must be employed. In two spatial dimensions (2D), it is feasible to simulate a sample that is 0.1 {mu}m on a side. We report on recent MD simulations of mode I crack extension under tensile loading at high strain rates. The method of uniaxial, homogeneously expanding periodic boundary conditions was employed to represent tensile stress conditions near the crack tip. The effects of strain rate, temperature, material properties (equation of state and defect energies), and system size were examined. We found that, in order to mimic a bulk sample, several tricks (in addition to expansion boundary conditions) need to be employed: (1) the sample must be pre-strained to nearly the condition at which the crack will spontaneously open; (2) to relieve the stresses at free surfaces, such as the initial notch, annealing by kinetic-energy quenching must be carried out to prevent unwanted rarefactions; (3) sound waves emitted as the crack tip opens and dislocations emitted from the crack tip during blunting must be absorbed by special reservoir regions. The tricks described briefly in this paper will be especially important to carrying out feasible massively parallel 3D simulations via MD.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of gold nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanting

    We have carried out Molecular Dynamics simulations to study the thermal stability and melting behavior of gold nanoclusters and gold nanorods. The surface is found to play a very important role in both gold nanomaterials. Upon cooling from the liquid, we find that gold nanoclusters with 600-3000 atoms crystallize into a Mackay icosahedron. Upon heating, the {111} facets on the surface of the Mackay icosahedral gold nanoclusters soften but do not premelt below the bulk melting temperature. We attribute this surface softening to the increasing mobility of vertex and edge atoms with temperature, which leads to inter-layer and intra-layer diffusion, and a shrinkage of the average facet size. Upon heating, our simulated gold nanorods undergo a shape transformation preceding the melting transition. The shape transformation is induced by a minimization of the surface free energy, and is accompanied by a complete reconstruction of the internal structure driven by the surface change. During the transformation, the atoms on the end caps of the rod move to the sides of the rods, leading the rods to be shorter and wider. After the transformation, the surface of the stable intermediate state rod is mostly covered by the more stable {111} facets, other than the less stable {110} and {100} facets covering the sides of the initial constructed rod.

  6. Molecular dynamics studies of lanthanum chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W.; Bopp, Ph. ); Probst, M.M. ); Spohr, E. ); Lin, J.L. )

    1990-05-31

    Molecular dynamics studies are reported for LaCl{sub 3} solutions at two different concentrations and temperatures, and for isolated aqueous La{sup 3+} ions. Ion-water clusters La(H{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup 3+} with n = 61 and n = 100 and systems consisting of one ion and 100 or 200 water molecules in the usual periodic box, as well as solutions of 7 (4) cations and 21 (12) anions in 190 (200) water molecules, corresponding to 2 and 1.1 m solutions, respectively, were investigated. The 2 m solution was investigated at two different temperatures. The results for the static structure, with special emphasis on the hydration structure of the La{sup 3+} ion, are discussed in terms of radial distribution functions and resulting hydration numbers, and various other correlations. These results are compared with X-ray data and discussed in light of the hydration numbers observed for aqueous ions in general.

  7. Efficient compression of molecular dynamics trajectory files.

    PubMed

    Marais, Patrick; Kenwood, Julian; Smith, Keegan Carruthers; Kuttel, Michelle M; Gain, James

    2012-10-15

    We investigate whether specific properties of molecular dynamics trajectory files can be exploited to achieve effective file compression. We explore two classes of lossy, quantized compression scheme: "interframe" predictors, which exploit temporal coherence between successive frames in a simulation, and more complex "intraframe" schemes, which compress each frame independently. Our interframe predictors are fast, memory-efficient and well suited to on-the-fly compression of massive simulation data sets, and significantly outperform the benchmark BZip2 application. Our schemes are configurable: atomic positional accuracy can be sacrificed to achieve greater compression. For high fidelity compression, our linear interframe predictor gives the best results at very little computational cost: at moderate levels of approximation (12-bit quantization, maximum error ≈ 10(-2) Å), we can compress a 1-2 fs trajectory file to 5-8% of its original size. For 200 fs time steps-typically used in fine grained water diffusion experiments-we can compress files to ~25% of their input size, still substantially better than BZip2. While compression performance degrades with high levels of quantization, the simulation error is typically much greater than the associated approximation error in such cases.

  8. Characterization of Sensory Properties of Flavanols - A Molecular Dynamic Approach.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Gallego, Raúl; Quijada-Morín, Natalia; Brás, Natércia F; Gomes, Paula; de Freitas, Victor; Rivas-Gonzalo, Julián C; Escribano-Bailón, M Teresa

    2015-07-01

    In this work, sensations elicited by catechin and procyanidins in comparison with those elicited by gallocatechin and prodelphinidins were evaluated by means of a sensory panel. To obtain further insights into the mechanisms of action, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD NMR) experiments have been performed. Results showed clear differences between the 2 types of flavanols. Dihydroxylated B-ring flavanols were more astringent, bitter, dry, rough, unripe, and persistent than trihydroxylated B-ring ones. Besides, these last compounds were smoother, more velvety, and viscous. MD simulations and STD NMR experiments support results obtained from tasting panel. MD results suggested that catechin binds to a human salivary proline-rich peptide IB714 faster than gallocatechin and this interaction is maintained longer. IB714 can interact with 2 catechin molecules concurrently while only interacts with 1 gallocatechin molecule. Accordingly, STD NMR experiments showed a greater affinity of catechin than gallocatechin for the peptide (K D = 2.7 and 25.7, respectively). Results indicate that the number of hydroxyl substituents present in B-ring of the flavanic nucleus is decisive for the interaction with salivary proteins and the development of astringency perception. PMID:25934978

  9. An Inside Look at Traube's Rule: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, Allison; Faller, Roland

    2006-03-01

    According to Traube's Rule [1], the alcohol concentration required to maintain the interfacial tension (γ) of a bilayer is reduced by a factor of three for each additional CH2 group that is added to the alkyl chain of the alcohol. Recent experimental work confirmed that Traube’s Rule applies to 1-stearoyl, 2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (SOPC) lipid bilayers that are exposed to alcohol solutions of methanol, ethanol, propanol, and butanol [2]. To examine the molecular mechanisms leading to Traube’s Rule, we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the interactions between a dipalmitoylphsphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer and ethanol, propanol, and butanol solutions. We first examine how the bilayer structure variation depends on alcohol chain length via the area per lipid headgroup, lipid chain disorder, and electron distribution functions. We also study the alcohol dynamics within the bilayer by monitoring the time length, number, and location of hydrogen bonds. Lipid mean squared displacements are also calculated to determine the extent to which lipid mobility is affected by alcohols. [1] I. Traube Liebigs Annalen (1891)[2] H. Ly, M. Longo Biophys J (2004)

  10. Molecular-Dynamics Study Melting Aluminum at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubin, S. A.; Maklashova, I. V.; Selezenev, A. A.; Kozlova, S. A.

    The dependence of the melting temperature versus the pressure under static conditions and under shock-wave compression of aluminum was calculated by molecular-dynamic modeling technique. The Morse potential and EAM potential (embedded atom method) was used for the interatomic interaction for the solid and liquid phases of aluminum. The calculations show a change of crystal structure of aluminum close to the melting range static compression and compression in the shock wave. Melting point was determined by analysis of the radial distribution function and the standard deviation of the atoms with the visualization of crystal structure. The results of molecular dynamics calculations are consistent with experimental data on the compressibility of the shock wave up to 200 GPa. Static melting results are consistent across the field of experimental data up to 30 GPa. A short-term compression in the shock wave, accompanied by the increase of entropy can be leads to overheating nonequilibrium substances. Under these conditions, the melting temperature under static and shock compression may be different from each other. However, the calculations showed on pressure in the shock wave 122 GPa aluminum melting occurs at temperatures close to the melting temperature in static conditions.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Binary Fluid in a Nanochannel

    SciTech Connect

    Mullick, Shanta; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Pathania, Y.

    2011-12-12

    This paper presents the results from a molecular dynamics simulation of binary fluid (mixture of argon and krypton) in the nanochannel flow. The computational software LAMMPS is used for carrying out the molecular dynamics simulations. Binary fluids of argon and krypton with varying concentration of atom species were taken for two densities 0.65 and 0.45. The fluid flow takes place between two parallel plates and is bounded by horizontal walls in one direction and periodic boundary conditions are imposed in the other two directions. To drive the flow, a constant force is applied in one direction. Each fluid atom interacts with other fluid atoms and wall atoms through Week-Chandler-Anderson (WCA) potential. The velocity profile has been looked at for three nanochannel widths i.e for 12{sigma}, 14{sigma} and 16{sigma} and also for the different concentration of two species. The velocity profile of the binary fluid predicted by the simulations agrees with the quadratic shape of the analytical solution of a Poiseuille flow in continuum theory.

  12. Molecular microenvironments: Solvent interactions with nucleic acid bases and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Pohorille, A.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of reconstructing plausible sequences of events in prebiotic molecular evolution is limited by the lack of fossil remains. However, with hindsight, one goal of molecular evolution was obvious: the development of molecular systems that became constituents of living systems. By understanding the interactions among molecules that are likely to have been present in the prebiotic environment, and that could have served as components in protobiotic molecular systems, plausible evolutionary sequences can be suggested. When stable aggregations of molecules form, a net decrease in free energy is observed in the system. Such changes occur when solvent molecules interact among themselves, as well as when they interact with organic species. A significant decrease in free energy, in systems of solvent and organic molecules, is due to entropy changes in the solvent. Entropy-driven interactioins played a major role in the organization of prebiotic systems, and understanding the energetics of them is essential to understanding molecular evolution.

  13. Molecular dynamics in cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra deconvolution</