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Sample records for dynamic pore-to-gate coupling

  1. Dynamic coupling of plasmonic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Suyeon; Park, Q.-Han

    2016-02-01

    We clarify the nature of dynamic coupling in plasmonic resonators and determine the dynamic coupling coefficient using a simple analytic model. We show that plasmonic resonators, such as subwavelength holes in a metal film which can be treated as bound charge oscillators, couple to each other through the retarded interaction of oscillating screened charges. Our dynamic coupling model offers, for the first time, a quantitative analytic description of the fundamental symmetric and anti-symmetric modes of coupled resonators which agrees with experimental results. Our model also reveals that plasmonic electromagnetically induced transparency arises in any coupled resonators of slightly unequal lengths, as confirmed by a rigorous numerical calculation and experiments.

  2. Dynamic coupling of plasmonic resonators

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suyeon; Park, Q-Han

    2016-01-01

    We clarify the nature of dynamic coupling in plasmonic resonators and determine the dynamic coupling coefficient using a simple analytic model. We show that plasmonic resonators, such as subwavelength holes in a metal film which can be treated as bound charge oscillators, couple to each other through the retarded interaction of oscillating screened charges. Our dynamic coupling model offers, for the first time, a quantitative analytic description of the fundamental symmetric and anti-symmetric modes of coupled resonators which agrees with experimental results. Our model also reveals that plasmonic electromagnetically induced transparency arises in any coupled resonators of slightly unequal lengths, as confirmed by a rigorous numerical calculation and experiments. PMID:26911786

  3. Dynamics of coupled thalamocortical modules.

    PubMed

    Drover, Jonathan D; Schiff, Nicholas D; Victor, Jonathan D

    2010-06-01

    We develop a model of thalamocortical dynamics using a shared population of thalamic neurons to couple distant cortical regions. Behavior of the model is determined as a function of the connection strengths with shared and unshared populations in the thalamus, either within a relay nucleus or the reticular nucleus. When the coupling is via the reticular nucleus, we locate solutions of the model where distant cortical regions maintain the same activity level, and regions where one region maintains an elevated activity level, suppressing activity in the other. We locate and investigate a region where both types of solutions exist and are stable, yielding a mechanism for spontaneous changes in global activity patterns. Power spectra and coherence are computed, and marked differences in the coherence are found between the two kinds of modes. When, on the other hand, the coupling is via a shared relay nuclei, the features seen with the reticular coupling are absent. These considerations suggest a role for the reticular nucleus in modulating long distance cortical communication.

  4. Vehicle systems: coupled and interactive dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantsevich, Vladimir V.

    2014-11-01

    This article formulates a new direction in vehicle dynamics, described as coupled and interactive vehicle system dynamics. Formalised procedures and analysis of case studies are presented. An analytical consideration, which explains the physics of coupled system dynamics and its consequences for dynamics of a vehicle, is given for several sets of systems including: (i) driveline and suspension of a 6×6 truck, (ii) a brake mechanism and a limited slip differential of a drive axle and (iii) a 4×4 vehicle steering system and driveline system. The article introduces a formal procedure to turn coupled system dynamics into interactive dynamics of systems. A new research direction in interactive dynamics of an active steering and a hybrid-electric power transmitting unit is presented and analysed to control power distribution between the drive axles of a 4×4 vehicle. A control strategy integrates energy efficiency and lateral dynamics by decoupling dynamics of the two systems thus forming their interactive dynamics.

  5. The Challenges to Coupling Dynamic Geospatial Models

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N

    2006-06-23

    Many applications of modeling spatial dynamic systems focus on a single system and a single process, ignoring the geographic and systemic context of the processes being modeled. A solution to this problem is the coupled modeling of spatial dynamic systems. Coupled modeling is challenging for both technical reasons, as well as conceptual reasons. This paper explores the benefits and challenges to coupling or linking spatial dynamic models, from loose coupling, where information transfer between models is done by hand, to tight coupling, where two (or more) models are merged as one. To illustrate the challenges, a coupled model of Urbanization and Wildfire Risk is presented. This model, called Vesta, was applied to the Santa Barbara, California region (using real geospatial data), where Urbanization and Wildfires occur and recur, respectively. The preliminary results of the model coupling illustrate that coupled modeling can lead to insight into the consequences of processes acting on their own.

  6. Coupling Dynamics in Aircraft: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    Coupling dynamics can produce either adverse or beneficial stability and controllability, depending on the characteristics of the aircraft. This report presents archival anecdotes and analyses of coupling problems experienced by the X-series, Century series, and Space Shuttle aircraft. The three catastrophic sequential coupling modes of the X-2 airplane and the two simultaneous unstable modes of the X-15 and Space Shuttle aircraft are discussed. In addition, the most complex of the coupling interactions, inertia roll coupling, is discussed for the X-2, X-3, F-100A, and YF-102 aircraft. The mechanics of gyroscopics, centrifugal effect, and resonance in coupling dynamics are described. The coupling modes discussed are interacting multiple degrees of freedom of inertial and aerodynamic forces and moments. The aircraft are assumed to be rigid bodies. Structural couplings are not addressed. Various solutions for coupling instabilities are discussed.

  7. Dynamical decoupling and dynamical isolation in temporally modulated coupled pendulums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Grazia; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically study the dynamics of a pair of coupled pendulums subject to a periodic temporal modulation of their oscillation frequency. Inspired from analogous developments in quantum mechanics, we anticipate dynamical localization and dynamical isolation effects, as well as the occurrence of non-trivial coupling phases. Perspectives in the direction of studying synthetic gauge fields in a classical mechanics context are outlined.

  8. Designing the Dynamics of Globally Coupled Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orosz, G.; Moehlis, J.; Ashwin, P.

    2009-09-01

    A method for designing cluster states with prescribed stability is presented for coupled phase oscillator systems with all-to-all coupling. We determine criteria for the coupling function that ensure the existence and stability of a large variety of clustered configurations. We show that such criteria can be satisfied by choosing Fourier coefficients of the coupling function. We demonstrate that using simple trigonometric and localized coupling functions one can realize arbitrary patterns of stable clusters and that the designed systems are capable of performing finite state computation. The design principles may be relevant when engineering complex dynamical behavior of coupled systems, e.g. the emergent dynamics of artificial neural networks, coupled chemical oscillators and robotic swarms.

  9. Dynamic mode coupling in terahertz metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaoqiang; Ouyang, Chunmei; Xu, Ningning; Tan, Siyu; Gu, Jianqiang; Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Zhang, Shuang; Yan, Fengping; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2015-01-01

    The near and far field coupling behavior in plasmonic and metamaterial systems have been extensively studied over last few years. However, most of the coupling mechanisms reported in the past have been passive in nature which actually fail to control the coupling mechanism dynamically in the plasmonic metamaterial lattice array. Here, we demonstrate a dynamic mode coupling between resonators in a hybrid metal-semiconductor metamaterial comprised of metallic concentric rings that are physically connected with silicon bridges. The dielectric function of silicon can be instantaneously modified by photodoped carriers thus tailoring the coupling characteristics between the metallic resonators. Based on the experimental results, a theoretical model is developed, which shows that the optical responses depend on mode coupling that originates from the variation of the damping rate and coupling coefficient of the resonance modes. This particular scheme enables an in-depth understanding of the fundamental coupling mechanism and, therefore, the dynamic coupling enables functionalities and applications for designing on-demand reconfigurable metamaterial and plasmonic devices. PMID:26035057

  10. Dynamic mode coupling in terahertz metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaoqiang; Ouyang, Chunmei; Xu, Ningning; Tan, Siyu; Gu, Jianqiang; Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Zhang, Shuang; Yan, Fengping; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2015-06-02

    The near and far field coupling behavior in plasmonic and metamaterial systems have been extensively studied over last few years. However, most of the coupling mechanisms reported in the past have been passive in nature which actually fail to control the coupling mechanism dynamically in the plasmonic metamaterial lattice array. Here, we demonstrate a dynamic mode coupling between resonators in a hybrid metal-semiconductor metamaterial comprised of metallic concentric rings that are physically connected with silicon bridges. The dielectric function of silicon can be instantaneously modified by photodoped carriers thus tailoring the coupling characteristics between the metallic resonators. Based on the experimental results, a theoretical model is developed, which shows that the optical responses depend on mode coupling that originates from the variation of the damping rate and coupling coefficient of the resonance modes. This particular scheme enables an in-depth understanding of the fundamental coupling mechanism and, therefore, the dynamic coupling enables functionalities and applications for designing on-demand reconfigurable metamaterial and plasmonic devices.

  11. Coupled dynamics analysis of wind energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A qualitative description of all key elements of a complete wind energy system computer analysis code is presented. The analysis system addresses the coupled dynamics characteristics of wind energy systems, including the interactions of the rotor, tower, nacelle, power train, control system, and electrical network. The coupled dynamics are analyzed in both the frequency and time domain to provide the basic motions and loads data required for design, performance verification and operations analysis activities. Elements of the coupled analysis code were used to design and analyze candidate rotor articulation concepts. Fundamental results and conclusions derived from these studies are presented.

  12. Novel coupling scheme to control dynamics of coupled discrete systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekatkar, Snehal M.; Ambika, G.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new coupling scheme to control spatio-temporal patterns and chimeras on 1-d and 2-d lattices and random networks of discrete dynamical systems. The scheme involves coupling with an external lattice or network of damped systems. When the system network and external network are set in a feedback loop, the system network can be controlled to a homogeneous steady state or synchronized periodic state with suppression of the chaotic dynamics of the individual units. The control scheme has the advantage that its design does not require any prior information about the system dynamics or its parameters and works effectively for a range of parameters of the control network. We analyze the stability of the controlled steady state or amplitude death state of lattices using the theory of circulant matrices and Routh-Hurwitz criterion for discrete systems and this helps to isolate regions of effective control in the relevant parameter planes. The conditions thus obtained are found to agree well with those obtained from direct numerical simulations in the specific context of lattices with logistic map and Henon map as on-site system dynamics. We show how chimera states developed in an experimentally realizable 2-d lattice can be controlled using this scheme. We propose this mechanism can provide a phenomenological model for the control of spatio-temporal patterns in coupled neurons due to non-synaptic coupling with the extra cellular medium. We extend the control scheme to regulate dynamics on random networks and adapt the master stability function method to analyze the stability of the controlled state for various topologies and coupling strengths.

  13. Uncertain destination dynamics of delay coupled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Santinath; Poria, Swarup

    2015-03-01

    Certain dynamical systems exhibit sensitivity to initial conditions in which the asymptotic state is selected from multiple possible states. The associated uncertain destination dynamics can be analyzed by an appropriate reduction of the full system to a subsystem that explicitly yields the dynamics [1]. These types of systems are known as multistable systems. In this paper, a scheme for designing delay coupled multistable systems is proposed. The scheme considers delay coupled Lorenz-Stenflo systems. The scheme is based on Lyapunov's stability theorem. Numerical simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  14. Dynamical robustness of coupled heterogeneous oscillators.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Gouhei; Morino, Kai; Daido, Hiroaki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-05-01

    We study tolerance of dynamic behavior in networks of coupled heterogeneous oscillators to deterioration of the individual oscillator components. As the deterioration proceeds with reduction in dynamic behavior of the oscillators, an order parameter evaluating the level of global oscillation decreases and then vanishes at a certain critical point. We present a method to analytically derive a general formula for this critical point and an approximate formula for the order parameter in the vicinity of the critical point in networks of coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators. Using the critical point as a measure for dynamical robustness of oscillator networks, we show that the more heterogeneous the oscillator components are, the more robust the oscillatory behavior of the network is to the component deterioration. This property is confirmed also in networks of Morris-Lecar neuron models coupled through electrical synapses. Our approach could provide a useful framework for theoretically understanding the role of population heterogeneity in robustness of biological networks.

  15. Synchronization Dynamics of Coupled Chemical Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, Nathan

    The synchronization dynamics of complex networks have been extensively studied over the past few decades due to their ubiquity in the natural world. Prominent examples include cardiac rhythms, circadian rhythms, the flashing of fireflies, predator/prey population dynamics, mammalian gait, human applause, pendulum clocks, the electrical grid, and of the course the brain. Detailed experiments have been done to map the topology of many of these systems and significant advances have been made to describe the mathematics of these networks. Compared to these bodies of work relatively little has been done to directly test the role of topology in the synchronization dynamics of coupled oscillators. This Dissertation develops technology to examine the dynamics due to topology within networks of discrete oscillatory components. The oscillatory system used here consists of the photo-inhibitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction water-in-oil emulsion where the oscillatory drops are diffusively coupled to one another and the topology is defined by the geometry of the diffusive connections. Ring networks are created from a close-packed 2D array of drops using the Programmable Illumination Microscope (PIM) in order to test Turing's theory of morphogenesis directly. Further technology is developed to create custom planar networks of BZ drops in more complicated topologies which can be individually perturbed using illumination from the PIM. The work presented here establishes the validity of using the BZ emulsion system with a PIM to study the topology induced effects on the synchronization dynamics of coupled chemical oscillators, tests the successes and limitations of Turing's theory of morphogenesis, and develops new technology to further probe the effects of network topology on a system of coupled oscillators. Finally, this Dissertation concludes by describing ongoing experiments which utilize this new technology to examine topology induced transitions of synchronization

  16. Dynamics of strongly-coupled spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Bressloff, P C; Coombes, S

    2000-01-01

    We present a dynamical theory of integrate-and-fire neurons with strong synaptic coupling. We show how phase-locked states that are stable in the weak coupling regime can destabilize as the coupling is increased, leading to states characterized by spatiotemporal variations in the interspike intervals (ISIs). The dynamics is compared with that of a corresponding network of analog neurons in which the outputs of the neurons are taken to be mean firing rates. A fundamental result is that for slow interactions, there is good agreement between the two models (on an appropriately defined timescale). Various examples of desynchronization in the strong coupling regime are presented. First, a globally coupled network of identical neurons with strong inhibitory coupling is shown to exhibit oscillator death in which some of the neurons suppress the activity of others. However, the stability of the synchronous state persists for very large networks and fast synapses. Second, an asymmetric network with a mixture of excitation and inhibition is shown to exhibit periodic bursting patterns. Finally, a one-dimensional network of neurons with long-range interactions is shown to desynchronize to a state with a spatially periodic pattern of mean firing rates across the network. This is modulated by deterministic fluctuations of the instantaneous firing rate whose size is an increasing function of the speed of synaptic response. PMID:10636934

  17. Multiscale coupling of molecular dynamics and peridynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Qi; Li, Shaofan

    2016-10-01

    We propose a multiscale computational model to couple molecular dynamics and peridynamics. The multiscale coupling model is based on a previously developed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD) theory, which has three dynamics equations at three different scales, namely, microscale, mesoscale, and macroscale. In the proposed multiscale coupling approach, we divide the simulation domain into atomistic region and macroscale region. Molecular dynamics is used to simulate atom motions in atomistic region, and peridynamics is used to simulate macroscale material point motions in macroscale region, and both methods are nonlocal particle methods. A transition zone is introduced as a messenger to pass the information between the two regions or scales. We employ the "supercell" developed in the MMMD theory as the transition element, which is named as the adaptive multiscale element due to its ability of passing information from different scales, because the adaptive multiscale element can realize both top-down and bottom-up communications. We introduce the Cauchy-Born rule based stress evaluation into state-based peridynamics formulation to formulate atomistic-enriched constitutive relations. To mitigate the issue of wave reflection on the interface, a filter is constructed by switching on and off the MMMD dynamic equations at different scales. Benchmark tests of one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) wave propagations from atomistic region to macro region are presented. The mechanical wave can transit through the interface smoothly without spurious wave deflections, and the filtering process is proven to be efficient.

  18. Vicinal coupling constants and protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hoch, J C; Dobson, C M; Karplus, M

    1985-07-16

    The effects of motional averaging on the analysis of vicinal spin-spin coupling constants derived from proton NMR studies of proteins have been examined. Trajectories obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and of hen egg white lysozyme were used in conjunction with an expression for the dependence of the coupling constant on the intervening dihedral angle to calculate the time-dependent behavior of the coupling constants. Despite large fluctuations, the time-average values of the coupling constants are not far from those computed for the average structure in the cases where fluctuations occur about a single potential well. The calculated differences show a high correlation with the variation in the magnitude of the fluctuations of individual dihedral angles. For the cases where fluctuations involve multiple sites, large differences are found between the time-average values and the average structure values for the coupling constants. Comparison of the simulation results with the experimental trends suggests that side chains with more than one position are more common in proteins than is inferred from X-ray results. It is concluded that for the main chain, motional effects do not introduce significant errors where vicinal coupling constants are used in structure determinations; however, for side chains, the motional average can alter deductions about the structure. Accurately measured coupling constants are shown to provide information concerning the magnitude of dihedral angle fluctuations.

  19. Exceptional points in coupled dissipative dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jung-Wan; Son, Woo-Sik; Hwang, Dong-Uk; Lee, Soo-Young; Kim, Sang Wook

    2015-05-01

    We study the transient behavior in coupled dissipative dynamical systems based on the linear analysis around the steady state. We find that the transient time is minimized at a specific set of system parameters and show that at this parameter set, two eigenvalues and two eigenvectors of the Jacobian matrix coalesce at the same time; this degenerate point is called the exceptional point. For the case of coupled limit-cycle oscillators, we investigate the transient behavior into the amplitude death state, and clarify that the exceptional point is associated with a critical point of frequency locking, as well as the transition of the envelope oscillation.

  20. Modeling coupled avulsion and earthquake timescale dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, M. D.; Steckler, M. S.; Paola, C.; Seeber, L.

    2014-12-01

    River avulsions and earthquakes can be hazardous events, and many researchers work to better understand and predict their timescales. Improvements in the understanding of the intrinsic processes of deposition and strain accumulation that lead to these events have resulted in better constraints on the timescales of each process individually. There are however several mechanisms by which these two systems may plausibly become linked. River deposition and avulsion can affect the stress on underlying faults through differential loading by sediment or water. Conversely, earthquakes can affect river avulsion patterns through altering the topography. These interactions may alter the event recurrence timescales, but this dynamic has not yet been explored. We present results of a simple numerical model, in which two systems have intrinsic rates of approach to failure thresholds, but the state of one system contributes to the other's approach to failure through coupling functions. The model is first explored for the simplest case of two linear approaches to failure, and linearly proportional coupling terms. Intriguing coupling dynamics emerge: the system settles into cycles of repeating earthquake and avulsion timescales, which are approached at an exponential decay rate that depends on the coupling terms. The ratio of the number of events of each type and the timescale values also depend on the coupling coefficients and the threshold values. We then adapt the model to a more complex and realistic scenario, in which a river avulses between either side of a fault, with parameters corresponding to the Brahmaputra River / Dauki fault system in Bangladesh. Here the tectonic activity alters the topography by gradually subsiding during the interseismic time, and abruptly increasing during an earthquake. The river strengthens the fault by sediment loading when in one path, and weakens it when in the other. We show this coupling can significantly affect earthquake and avulsion

  1. Dynamics of weakly coupled parametrically forced oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado Sánchez, P.; Porter, J.; Tinao, I.; Laverón-Simavilla, A.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of two weakly coupled parametric oscillators are studied in the neighborhood of the primary subharmonic instability. The nature of both primary and secondary instabilities depends in a critical way on the permutation symmetries, if any, that remain after coupling is considered, and this depends on the relative phases of the parametric forcing terms. Detailed bifurcation sets, revealing a complex series of transitions organized in part by Bogdanov-Takens points, are calculated for representative sets of parameters. In the particular case of out-of-phase forcing the predictions of the coupled oscillator model are compared with direct numerical simulations and with recent experiments on modulated cross waves. Both the initial Hopf bifurcation and the subsequent saddle-node heteroclinic bifurcation are confirmed.

  2. Complex mode dynamics of coupled wave oscillators.

    PubMed

    Alexander, T J; Yan, D; Kevrekidis, P G

    2013-12-01

    We explore how nonlinear coherent waves localized in a few wells of a periodic potential can act analogously to a chain of coupled oscillators. We identify the small-amplitude oscillation modes of these "coupled wave oscillators" and find that they can be extended into the large amplitude regime, where some "ring" for long times. We also reveal the appearance of complex behavior such as the breakdown of Josephson-like oscillations, the destabilization of fundamental oscillation modes, and the emergence of chaotic oscillations for large amplitude excitations. We show that the dynamics may be accurately described by a discrete model with nearest-neighbor coupling, in which the lattice oscillators bear an effective mass.

  3. Dynamics of weakly coupled parametrically forced oscillators.

    PubMed

    Salgado Sánchez, P; Porter, J; Tinao, I; Laverón-Simavilla, A

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of two weakly coupled parametric oscillators are studied in the neighborhood of the primary subharmonic instability. The nature of both primary and secondary instabilities depends in a critical way on the permutation symmetries, if any, that remain after coupling is considered, and this depends on the relative phases of the parametric forcing terms. Detailed bifurcation sets, revealing a complex series of transitions organized in part by Bogdanov-Takens points, are calculated for representative sets of parameters. In the particular case of out-of-phase forcing the predictions of the coupled oscillator model are compared with direct numerical simulations and with recent experiments on modulated cross waves. Both the initial Hopf bifurcation and the subsequent saddle-node heteroclinic bifurcation are confirmed.

  4. Coupling of protein dynamics with the solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliskan, Gokhan; Sauzan, Azzam; Mehtani, Disha; Sokolov, Alexei

    2003-03-01

    Glycerol and trehalose are among the many viscous solvents that are widely used for biostabilization and controlling the dynamics of proteins. It is believed that the suppression of the structural relaxations by high viscosity of solvent is responsible for improved stability in proteins. However, results of [1] and [2] demonstrate stronger suppression of biochemical activity and dynamics of proteins by liquid glycerol than by solid trehalose in a wide temperature range. The authors tried to explain the counterintuitive observations by a possible decoupling of the dynamics of the protein from trehalose. In order to test the validity of this assumption and to investigate the influence of the fast dynamics in proteins, the low frequency Raman scattering spectroscopy technique is used. Both relaxational and vibrational dynamics of glycerol, trehalose, and lysozyme in glycerol and in trehalose are studied in a wide temperature range. Dynamics of lysozyme in glycerol follows the strong temperature dependence of relaxational and vibrational dynamics of the bulk glycerol. On the other hand, the weak temperature dependence of dynamics of lysozyme in trehalose follows exactly the behavior of pure trehalose. This proves that there is a strong dynamic coupling between the protein and the solvents used. Interestingly, stronger relaxations in solid trehalose as compared to liquid glycerol are observed in the GHz region at low temperatures. This could be the reason for the enhanced protein activity observed in trehalose, compared to that in glycerol in this temperature range. Suppression of these fast relaxations should be the key for providing long-term stability to proteins. 1. Sastry, G.M. and N. Agmon, Trehalose prevents myoglobin collapse and preserves its internal mobility. BIOCHEMISTRY, 1997, 36(23): p. 7097-108. 2. Caliskan, G., et al., Influence of solvent on dynamics and stability of a protein. Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids, 2002, 307-310: p. 887-893.

  5. Coupling analysis of transient cardiovascular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Müller, Andreas; Riedl, Maik; Penzel, Thomas; Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Kurths, Jürgen; Wessel, Niels

    2013-04-01

    The analysis of effects from coupling in and between systems is important in data-driven investigations as practiced in many scientific fields. It allows deeper insights into the mechanisms of interaction emerging among individual smaller systems when forming complex systems as in the human circulatory system. For systems featuring various regimes, usually only the epochs before and after a transition between different regimes are analyzed, although relevant information might be hidden within these transitions. Transient behavior of cardiovascular variables may emerge, on the one hand, from the recovery of the system after a severe disturbance or, on the other hand, from adaptive behavior throughout changes of states. It contains important information about the processes involved and the relations between state variables such as heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration. Therefore, we apply an ensemble approach to extend the method of symbolic coupling traces to time-variant coupling analysis. These new ensemble symbolic coupling traces are capable of determining coupling direction, strength, and time offset τ from transient dynamics in multivariate cardiovascular data. We use this method to analyze data recorded during an orthostatic test to reveal a transient structure that cannot be detected by classic methods.

  6. Coupling geodynamic earthquake cycles and dynamic ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zelst, Iris; van Dinther, Ylona; Gabriel, Alice-Agnes; Heuret, Arnauld

    2016-04-01

    Studying the seismicity in a subduction zone and its effects on tsunamis requires diverse modelling methods that span spatial and temporal scales. Hundreds of years are necessary to build the stresses and strengths on a fault, while consequent earthquake rupture propagation is determined by both these initial fault conditions and the feedback of seismic waves over periods of seconds up to minutes. This dynamic rupture displaces the sea floor, thereby causing tsunamis. The aim of the ASCETE (Advanced Simulations of Coupled Earthquake and Tsunami Events) project is to study all these aspects and their interactions. Here, we present preliminary results of the first aspects in this modelling chain: the coupling of a seismo-thermo-mechanical (STM) code to the dynamic rupture model SeisSol. STM models of earthquake cycles have the advantage of solving multiple earthquake events in a self-consistent manner concerning stress, strength and geometry. However, the drawback of these models is that they often lack in spatial or temporal resolution and do not include wave propagation. In contrast, dynamic rupture models solve for frictional failure coupled to seismic wave propagation. We use the software package SeisSol (www.seissol.org) based on an ADER-DG discretization allowing high-order accuracy in space and time as well as flexible tetrahedral meshing. However, such simulations require assumptions on the initial fault stresses and strengths and its geometry, which are hard to constrain due to the lack of near-field observations and the complexity of coseismic conditions. By adapting the geometry as well as the stress and strength properties of the self-consistently developing non-finite fault zones from the geodynamic models as initial conditions for the dynamic rupture models, the advantages of both methods are exploited and modelling results may be compared. Our results show that a dynamic rupture can be triggered spontaneously and that the propagating rupture is

  7. Dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in coupled ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chenguang; Fan, Jiahua; Zhu, Lin

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in a photonic system of two coupled ring resonators. A bus waveguide is used to couple light in and out of one of the coupled resonators. Based on the coupling from the bus to the resonator, the coupling between the resonators and the intrinsic loss of each individual resonator, the system transmission spectrum can be classified by three different categories: coupled-resonator-induced absorption, coupled-resonator-induced transparency and over coupled resonance splitting. Dynamic thermal optical effects due to linear absorption have been analyzed for each category as a function of the input power. The heat power in each resonator determines the thermal dynamics in this coupled resonator system. Multiple "shark fins" and power competition between resonators can be foreseen. Also, the nonlinear absorption induced thermal effects have been discussed.

  8. Restoration of rhythmicity in diffusively coupled dynamical networks

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wei; Senthilkumar, D. V.; Nagao, Raphael; Kiss, István Z.; Tang, Yang; Koseska, Aneta; Duan, Jinqiao; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Oscillatory behaviour is essential for proper functioning of various physical and biological processes. However, diffusive coupling is capable of suppressing intrinsic oscillations due to the manifestation of the phenomena of amplitude and oscillation deaths. Here we present a scheme to revoke these quenching states in diffusively coupled dynamical networks, and demonstrate the approach in experiments with an oscillatory chemical reaction. By introducing a simple feedback factor in the diffusive coupling, we show that the stable (in)homogeneous steady states can be effectively destabilized to restore dynamic behaviours of coupled systems. Even a feeble deviation from the normal diffusive coupling drastically shrinks the death regions in the parameter space. The generality of our method is corroborated in diverse non-linear systems of diffusively coupled paradigmatic models with various death scenarios. Our study provides a general framework to strengthen the robustness of dynamic activity in diffusively coupled dynamical networks. PMID:26173555

  9. Restoration of rhythmicity in diffusively coupled dynamical networks.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Senthilkumar, D V; Nagao, Raphael; Kiss, István Z; Tang, Yang; Koseska, Aneta; Duan, Jinqiao; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Oscillatory behaviour is essential for proper functioning of various physical and biological processes. However, diffusive coupling is capable of suppressing intrinsic oscillations due to the manifestation of the phenomena of amplitude and oscillation deaths. Here we present a scheme to revoke these quenching states in diffusively coupled dynamical networks, and demonstrate the approach in experiments with an oscillatory chemical reaction. By introducing a simple feedback factor in the diffusive coupling, we show that the stable (in)homogeneous steady states can be effectively destabilized to restore dynamic behaviours of coupled systems. Even a feeble deviation from the normal diffusive coupling drastically shrinks the death regions in the parameter space. The generality of our method is corroborated in diverse non-linear systems of diffusively coupled paradigmatic models with various death scenarios. Our study provides a general framework to strengthen the robustness of dynamic activity in diffusively coupled dynamical networks. PMID:26173555

  10. Restoration of rhythmicity in diffusively coupled dynamical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Wei; Senthilkumar, D. V.; Nagao, Raphael; Kiss, István Z.; Tang, Yang; Koseska, Aneta; Duan, Jinqiao; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Oscillatory behaviour is essential for proper functioning of various physical and biological processes. However, diffusive coupling is capable of suppressing intrinsic oscillations due to the manifestation of the phenomena of amplitude and oscillation deaths. Here we present a scheme to revoke these quenching states in diffusively coupled dynamical networks, and demonstrate the approach in experiments with an oscillatory chemical reaction. By introducing a simple feedback factor in the diffusive coupling, we show that the stable (in)homogeneous steady states can be effectively destabilized to restore dynamic behaviours of coupled systems. Even a feeble deviation from the normal diffusive coupling drastically shrinks the death regions in the parameter space. The generality of our method is corroborated in diverse non-linear systems of diffusively coupled paradigmatic models with various death scenarios. Our study provides a general framework to strengthen the robustness of dynamic activity in diffusively coupled dynamical networks.

  11. Coupled dynamic systems and Le Chatelier's principle in noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidanik, G.; Becker, K. J.

    2001-05-01

    Investigation of coupling an externally driven dynamic system-a master dynamic system-to a passive one-an adjunct dynamic system-reveals that the response of the adjunct dynamic system affects the precoupled response of the master dynamic system. The responses, in the two dynamic systems when coupled, are estimated by the stored energies (Es) and (E0), respectively. Since the adjunct dynamic system, prior to coupling, was with zero (0) stored energy, E0s=0, the precoupled stored energy (E00) in the master dynamic system is expected to be reduced to (E0) when coupling is instituted; i.e., one expects E0dynamic system would result from the coupling. It is argued that the change in the disposition of the stored energies as just described may not be the only change. The coupling may influence the external input power into the master dynamic system which may interfere with the expected noise control. Indeed, the coupling may influence the external input power such that the expected beneficial noise control may not materialize. Examples of these kinds of noise control reversals are cited.

  12. Average dynamics of a finite set of coupled phase oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Dima, Germán C. Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2014-06-15

    We study the solutions of a dynamical system describing the average activity of an infinitely large set of driven coupled excitable units. We compared their topological organization with that reconstructed from the numerical integration of finite sets. In this way, we present a strategy to establish the pertinence of approximating the dynamics of finite sets of coupled nonlinear units by the dynamics of its infinitely large surrogate.

  13. Dynamics of dark energy with a coupling to dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Maartens, Roy; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2008-07-15

    Dark energy and dark matter are the dominant sources in the evolution of the late universe. They are currently only indirectly detected via their gravitational effects, and there could be a coupling between them without violating observational constraints. We investigate the background dynamics when dark energy is modeled as exponential quintessence and is coupled to dark matter via simple models of energy exchange. We introduce a new form of dark sector coupling, which leads to a more complicated dynamical phase space and has a better physical motivation than previous mathematically similar couplings.

  14. Influence of electronic—nuclear coupling on dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Ricardo; Diz, Agustín; Deumens, Erik; Öhrn, Yngve

    1994-04-01

    Electronic nuclear dynamics (END), a recently developed explicitly time-dependent theory treats fully the electronic—nuclear coupling. The END theory at the level of a model that employs a single complex spin-unrestricted determinantal wavefunction for the electrons and classical nuclei has been implemented in the computer code ENDyne. It permits comparisons of the full dynamics at this level of treatment with one where the electronic—nuclear coupling is neglected. The neglect of coupling terms is shown to have quite drastic influence on the detailed dynamics of ion—atom and ion—molecule collisions.

  15. Impulsive synchronization of coupled dynamical networks with nonidentical Duffing oscillators and coupling delays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengxin; Duan, Zhisheng; Cao, Jinde

    2012-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate the synchronization problem of coupled dynamical networks with nonidentical Duffing-type oscillators without or with coupling delays. Different from cluster synchronization of nonidentical dynamical networks in the previous literature, this paper focuses on the problem of complete synchronization, which is more challenging than cluster synchronization. By applying an impulsive controller, some sufficient criteria are obtained for complete synchronization of the coupled dynamical networks of nonidentical oscillators. Furthermore, numerical simulations are given to verify the theoretical results. PMID:22463016

  16. CHARACTERIZING COUPLED CHARGE TRANSPORT WITH MULTISCALE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Jessica

    2011-08-31

    This is the final progress report for Award DE-SC0004920, entitled 'Characterizing coupled charge transport with multi scale molecular dynamics'. The technical abstract will be provided in the uploaded report.

  17. Dynamics of a network of phase oscillators with plastic couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekorkin, V. I.; Kasatkin, D. V.

    2016-06-01

    The processes of synchronization and phase cluster formation are investigated in a complex network of dynamically coupled phase oscillators. Coupling weights evolve dynamically depending on the phase relations between the oscillators. It is shown that the network exhibits several types of behavior: the globally synchronized state, two-cluster and multi-cluster states, different synchronous states with a fixed phase relationship between the oscillators and chaotic desynchronized state.

  18. Effective quantum dynamics of interacting systems with inhomogeneous coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, C. E.; Retamal, J. C.; Christ, H.; Solano, E.

    2007-03-15

    We study the quantum dynamics of a single mode (particle) interacting inhomogeneously with a large number of particles and introduce an effective approach to find the accessible Hilbert space, where the dynamics takes place. Two relevant examples are given: the inhomogeneous Tavis-Cummings model (e.g., N atomic qubits coupled to a single cavity mode, or to a motional mode in trapped ions) and the inhomogeneous coupling of an electron spin to N nuclear spins in a quantum dot.

  19. Dynamics of symmetry breaking in strongly coupled QED

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1988-10-01

    I review the dynamical structure of strong coupled QED in the quenched planar limit. The symmetry structure of this theory is examined with reference to the nature of both chiral and scale symmetry breaking. The renormalization structure of the strong coupled phase is analysed. The compatibility of spontaneous scale and chiral symmetry breaking is studied using effective lagrangian methods. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Nonadiabatic multichannel dynamics of a spin-orbit-coupled condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Zheng, Jun-hui; Wang, Daw-wei

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the nonadiabatic dynamics of a driven spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in both weak and strong driven force. It is shown that the standard Landau-Zener (LZ) tunneling fails in the regime of weak driven force and/or strong spin-orbital coupling, where the full nonadiabatic dynamics requires a new mechanism through multichannel effects. Beyond the semiclassical approach, our numerical and analytical results show an oscillating power-law decay in the quantum limit, different from the exponential decay in the semiclassical limit of the LZ effect. Furthermore, the condensate density profile is found to be dynamically fragmented by the multichannel effects and enhanced by interaction effects. Our work therefore provides a complete picture to understand the nonadiabatic dynamics of a spin-orbit coupled condensate, including various ranges of driven force and interaction effects through multichannel interference. The experimental indication of these nonadiabatic dynamics is also discussed.

  1. Superlinearly scalable noise robustness of redundant coupled dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Lindner, John F; Ditto, William L

    2016-03-01

    We illustrate through theory and numerical simulations that redundant coupled dynamical systems can be extremely robust against local noise in comparison to uncoupled dynamical systems evolving in the same noisy environment. Previous studies have shown that the noise robustness of redundant coupled dynamical systems is linearly scalable and deviations due to noise can be minimized by increasing the number of coupled units. Here, we demonstrate that the noise robustness can actually be scaled superlinearly if some conditions are met and very high noise robustness can be realized with very few coupled units. We discuss these conditions and show that this superlinear scalability depends on the nonlinearity of the individual dynamical units. The phenomenon is demonstrated in discrete as well as continuous dynamical systems. This superlinear scalability not only provides us an opportunity to exploit the nonlinearity of physical systems without being bogged down by noise but may also help us in understanding the functional role of coupled redundancy found in many biological systems. Moreover, engineers can exploit superlinear noise suppression by starting a coupled system near (not necessarily at) the appropriate initial condition.

  2. Superlinearly scalable noise robustness of redundant coupled dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Lindner, John F.; Ditto, William L.

    2016-03-01

    We illustrate through theory and numerical simulations that redundant coupled dynamical systems can be extremely robust against local noise in comparison to uncoupled dynamical systems evolving in the same noisy environment. Previous studies have shown that the noise robustness of redundant coupled dynamical systems is linearly scalable and deviations due to noise can be minimized by increasing the number of coupled units. Here, we demonstrate that the noise robustness can actually be scaled superlinearly if some conditions are met and very high noise robustness can be realized with very few coupled units. We discuss these conditions and show that this superlinear scalability depends on the nonlinearity of the individual dynamical units. The phenomenon is demonstrated in discrete as well as continuous dynamical systems. This superlinear scalability not only provides us an opportunity to exploit the nonlinearity of physical systems without being bogged down by noise but may also help us in understanding the functional role of coupled redundancy found in many biological systems. Moreover, engineers can exploit superlinear noise suppression by starting a coupled system near (not necessarily at) the appropriate initial condition.

  3. Molecular dynamics study of naturally existing cavity couplings in proteins.

    PubMed

    Barbany, Montserrat; Meyer, Tim; Hospital, Adam; Faustino, Ignacio; D'Abramo, Marco; Morata, Jordi; Orozco, Modesto; de la Cruz, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Couplings between protein sub-structures are a common property of protein dynamics. Some of these couplings are especially interesting since they relate to function and its regulation. In this article we have studied the case of cavity couplings because cavities can host functional sites, allosteric sites, and are the locus of interactions with the cell milieu. We have divided this problem into two parts. In the first part, we have explored the presence of cavity couplings in the natural dynamics of 75 proteins, using 20 ns molecular dynamics simulations. For each of these proteins, we have obtained two trajectories around their native state. After applying a stringent filtering procedure, we found significant cavity correlations in 60% of the proteins. We analyze and discuss the structure origins of these correlations, including neighbourhood, cavity distance, etc. In the second part of our study, we have used longer simulations (≥100 ns) from the MoDEL project, to obtain a broader view of cavity couplings, particularly about their dependence on time. Using moving window computations we explored the fluctuations of cavity couplings along time, finding that these couplings could fluctuate substantially during the trajectory, reaching in several cases correlations above 0.25/0.5. In summary, we describe the structural origin and the variations with time of cavity couplings. We complete our work with a brief discussion of the biological implications of these results.

  4. Nontrivial asymptotically nonfree gauge theories and dynamical unification of couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, J.

    1995-12-01

    Evidence for the nontriviality of asymptotically nonfree (ANF) Yang-Mills theories is found on the basis of optimized perturbation theory. It is argued that these theories with matter couplings can be made nontrivial by means of the reduction of couplings, leading to the idea of the dynamical unification of couplings (DUC). The second-order reduction of couplings in the ANF SU(3)-gauged Higgs-Yukawa theory, which is assumed to be nontrivial here, is carried out to motivate independent investigations on its nontriviality and DUC.

  5. Nonequilibrium dynamics of spin-orbit-coupled lattice bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, H. T.

    2015-10-01

    We study the nonequilibrium dynamics of two-component bosonic atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice in the presence of spin-orbit coupling. In the Mott-insulating regime, the two-component bosonic system at unity filling can be described by the quantum spin X X Z model. The atoms are initially prepared in their lower spin states. The system becomes out of equilibrium by suddenly introducing spin-orbit coupling to the atoms. The system shows the relaxation and nonstationary dynamics, respectively, in the different interaction regimes. We find that the time average of magnetization is useful to characterize the many-body dynamics. The effects of even and odd numbers of sites are discussed. Our result sheds light on nonequilibrium dynamics due to the interplay between spin-orbit coupling and atomic interactions.

  6. PROTON-COUPLED DYNAMICS IN LACTOSE PERMEASE

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Magnus; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Freites, J. Alfredo; Tobias, Douglas J.; Kaback, H. Ronald; White, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Lactose permease of Escherichia coli (LacY) catalyzes symport of a galactopyranoside and an H+ via an alternating access mechanism. The transition from an inward- to an outward-facing conformation of LacY involves sugar-release followed by deprotonation. Because the transition depends intimately upon the dynamics of LacY in a bilayer environment, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations may be the only means of following the accompanying structural changes in atomic detail. We describe here MD simulations of wild-type apo LacY in phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) lipids that features two protonation states of the critical Glu325. While the protonated system displays configurational stability, deprotonation of Glu325 causes significant structural rearrangements that bring into proximity sidechains important for H+ translocation and sugar binding and closes the internal cavity. Moreover, protonated LacY in phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipids shows that the observed dynamics are lipid-dependent. Together, the simulations describe early dynamics of the inward-to-outward transition of LacY that agree well with experimental data. PMID:23000385

  7. The Dynamics of Coupled Oscillator Phase Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, R. J.; Maccarini, P. F.; York, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    Arrays of coupled oscillators have been proposed as means of realizing high power rf sources via coherent spatial power combining. In such applications, a uniform phase distribution over the aperture is usually desired. However, it has been shown that by detuning some of the oscillators away from the oscillation frequency of the ensemble of oscillators, one may achieve other useful aperture phase distributions. Of particular interest among those achievable are linear phase distributions because these result in steering of the output rf beam away from the broadside direction. The theory describing the behavior of such arrays of coupled oscillators is quite complicated since the phenomena involved are inherently nonlinear. However, a simplified theory has been developed which facilitates intuitive understanding. This simplified theory is based on a "continuum model" in which the aperture phase is represented by a continuous function of the aperture coordinates. A challenging aspect of the development of this theory is the derivation of appropriate boundary conditions at the edges or ends of the array.

  8. Stochastic dynamics of coupled active particles in an overdamped limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ann, Minjung; Lee, Kong-Ju-Bock; Park, Pyeong Jun

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a model for Brownian dynamics of coupled active particles in an overdamped limit. Our system consists of several identical active particles and one passive particle. Each active particle is elastically coupled to the passive particle and there is no direct coupling among the active particles. We investigate the dynamics of the system with respect to the number of active particles, viscous friction, and coupling between the active and passive particles. For this purpose, we consider an intracellular transport process as an application of our model and perform a Brownian dynamics simulation using realistic parameters for processive molecular motors such as kinesin-1. We determine an adequate energy conversion function for molecular motors and study the dynamics of intracellular transport by multiple motors. The results show that the average velocity of the coupled system is not affected by the number of active motors and that the stall force increases linearly as the number of motors increases. Our results are consistent with well-known experimental observations. We also examine the effects of coupling between the motors and the cargo, as well as of the spatial distribution of the motors around the cargo. Our model might provide a physical explanation of the cooperation among active motors in the cellular transport processes.

  9. Dynamics of coupled vortices in perpendicular field

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Shikha; Novosad, Valentyn Fradin, Frank Y.; Pearson, John E.; Bader, Samuel D.

    2014-02-24

    We explore the coupling mechanism of two magnetic vortices in the presence of a perpendicular bias field by pre-selecting the polarity combinations using the resonant-spin-ordering approach. First, out of the four vortex polarity combinations (two of which are degenerate), three stable core polarity states are achieved by lifting the degeneracy of one of the states. Second, the response of the stiffness constant for the vortex pair (similar polarity) in perpendicular bias is found to be asymmetric around the zero field, in contrast to the response obtained from a single vortex core. Finally, the collective response of the system for antiparallel core polarities is symmetric around zero bias. The vortex core whose polarization is opposite to the bias field dominates the response.

  10. Dynamic plasticity in coupled avian midbrain maps.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Gurinder Singh

    2004-12-01

    Internal mapping of the external environment is carried out using the receptive fields of topographic neurons in the brain, and in a normal barn owl the aural and visual subcortical maps are aligned from early experiences. However, instantaneous misalignment of the aural and visual stimuli has been observed to result in adaptive behavior, manifested by functional and anatomical changes of the auditory processing system. Using methods of information theory and statistical mechanics a model of the adaptive dynamics of the aural receptive field is presented and analyzed. The dynamics is determined by maximizing the mutual information between the neural output and the weighted sensory neural inputs, admixed with noise, subject to biophysical constraints. The reduced costs of neural rewiring, as in the case of young barn owls, reveal two qualitatively different types of receptive field adaptation depending on the magnitude of the audiovisual misalignment. By letting the misalignment increase with time, it is shown that the ability to adapt can be increased even when neural rewiring costs are high, in agreement with recent experimental reports of the increased plasticity of the auditory space map in adult barn owls due to incremental learning. Finally, a critical speed of misalignment is identified, demarcating the crossover from adaptive to nonadaptive behavior.

  11. Dynamic plasticity in coupled avian midbrain maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwal, Gurinder Singh

    2004-12-01

    Internal mapping of the external environment is carried out using the receptive fields of topographic neurons in the brain, and in a normal barn owl the aural and visual subcortical maps are aligned from early experiences. However, instantaneous misalignment of the aural and visual stimuli has been observed to result in adaptive behavior, manifested by functional and anatomical changes of the auditory processing system. Using methods of information theory and statistical mechanics a model of the adaptive dynamics of the aural receptive field is presented and analyzed. The dynamics is determined by maximizing the mutual information between the neural output and the weighted sensory neural inputs, admixed with noise, subject to biophysical constraints. The reduced costs of neural rewiring, as in the case of young barn owls, reveal two qualitatively different types of receptive field adaptation depending on the magnitude of the audiovisual misalignment. By letting the misalignment increase with time, it is shown that the ability to adapt can be increased even when neural rewiring costs are high, in agreement with recent experimental reports of the increased plasticity of the auditory space map in adult barn owls due to incremental learning. Finally, a critical speed of misalignment is identified, demarcating the crossover from adaptive to nonadaptive behavior.

  12. Pinning impulsive directed coupled delayed dynamical network and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chunnan; Wu, Quanjun; Xiang, Lan; Zhou, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the present paper is to further investigate pinning synchronisation of a complex delayed dynamical network with directionally coupling by a single impulsive controller. By developing the analysis procedure of pinning impulsive stability for undirected coupled dynamical network previously, some simple yet general criteria of pinning impulsive synchronisation for such directed coupled network are derived analytically. It is shown that a single impulsive controller can always pin a given directed coupled network to a desired homogenous solution, including an equilibrium point, a periodic orbit, or a chaotic orbit. Subsequently, the theoretical results are illustrated by a directed small-world complex network which is a cellular neural network (CNN) and a directed scale-free complex network with the well-known Hodgkin-Huxley neuron oscillators. Numerical simulations are finally given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control methodology.

  13. Collective dynamics in strongly coupled dusty plasma medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amita; Dharodi, Vikram; Tiwari, Sanat; Tiwari

    2014-12-01

    A simplified description of dynamical response of strongly coupled medium is desirable in many contexts of physics. The dusty plasma medium can play an important role in this regard due to its uniqueness, as its dynamical response typically falls within the perceptible grasp of human senses. Furthermore, even at room temperature and normal densities it can be easily prepared to be in a strongly coupled regime. A simplified phenomenological fluid model based on the visco - elastic behaviour of the medium is often invoked to represent the collective dynamical response of a strongly coupled dusty plasma medium. The manuscript reviews the role of this particular Generalized Hydrodynamic (GHD) fluid model in capturing the collective properties exhibited by the medium. In addition the paper also provides new insights on the collective behaviour predicted by the model for the medium, in terms of coherent structures, instabilities, transport and mixing properties.

  14. Reconstructing embedding spaces of coupled dynamical systems from multivariate data.

    PubMed

    Boccaletti, S; Valladares, D L; Pecora, Louis M; Geffert, Hite P; Carroll, T

    2002-03-01

    A method for reconstructing dimensions of subspaces for weakly coupled dynamical systems is offered. The tool is able to extrapolate the subspace dimensions from the zero coupling limit, where the division of dimensions as per the algorithm is exact. Implementation of the proposed technique to multivariate data demonstrates its effectiveness in disentangling subspace dimensionalities also in the case of emergent synchronized motions, for both numerical and experimental systems.

  15. Inferring coupling strength from event-related dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łęski, Szymon; Wójcik, Daniel K.

    2008-10-01

    We propose an approach for inferring strength of coupling between two systems from their transient dynamics. This is of vital importance in cases where most information is carried by the transients, for instance, in evoked potentials measured commonly in electrophysiology. We show viability of our approach using nonlinear and linear measures of synchronization on a population model of thalamocortical loop and on a system of two coupled Rössler-type oscillators in nonchaotic regime.

  16. Dynamic Plasticity of Coupled Cortical Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwal, G. S.

    2003-03-01

    Spatiotemporal location of an object may be achieved by inference from a combination of different noisy stimuli such as in the case of barn owls which locate prey using both aural and visual stimuli. The symbolic representation of an event is carried out using the receptive fields of neurons in the cortex, and in a normal barn owl the aural and visual receptive fields are aligned from early experiences. However, misalignment induced by the wearing of prismatic glasses may result in adaptive behavior, manifested by physical modification of the receptive fields. A model of this dynamic plasticity is presented and analyzed by maximising the weighted information of both sensory neural outputs, demonstrating a transition from adaptive to non-adaptive behavior as the rate of misalignment increases.

  17. Coupling Dynamical And Collisional Evolution Of Dust In Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnoz, Sebastien

    2010-10-01

    Gaseous circumstellar disks are rich in dust and are thought to be both accretionaly and dynamically active. Unfortunately large bodies that could be embedded in these disks are still difficult to observe and their putative properties are indirectly inferred from the observable small dust content. It is why constraining the size distribution coupled with dust-dynamics is so critical. Unfortunately, coupling effects such as a realistic time-dependant dynamics, fragmentation and coagulation, has been recognized as numerically challenging and almost no attempt really succeeded with a generic approach. In these disks, the dust dynamics is driven by a variety of processes (gravity, gas drag, radiation pressure..) inducing a size-dependant dynamics, and, at the same time collisional evolution changes the local size distributions. These two effects are intimately coupled because the local dynamics and size-distribution determines the local collision rates, that, in-turn, determines the size-distribution and modifies the particle's dynamics. Here we report on a new algorithm that overcomes these difficulties by using a hybrid approach extending the work of Charnoz & Morbidelli (Icarus, 2004, 2007). We will briefly present the method and focus on gaseous protoplanetary disks either laminar or turbulent (the time dependant transport and dust evolution will be shown) . We will show how the taking into account of a 3D dynamics helps to determine disantengle the dust size-distribution in the disk's photosphere and in the midplane and thus may provide observational signatures of accretion. We will show how the coupling of turbulence with fragmentation may significantly affect the dust/ratio for the smallest bodies. Finally, we will show that an accurate description of the time dependant dynamics of larger dusts (those with Stokes numbers >= 1) may provide a possible path to the formation of bodies larger than the accretion barrier, through accretion in a transitory regime.

  18. Nonadiabatic dynamics of two strongly coupled nanomechanical resonator modes.

    PubMed

    Faust, Thomas; Rieger, Johannes; Seitner, Maximilian J; Krenn, Peter; Kotthaus, Jörg P; Weig, Eva M

    2012-07-20

    The Landau-Zener transition is a fundamental concept for dynamical quantum systems and has been studied in numerous fields of physics. Here, we present a classical mechanical model system exhibiting analogous behavior using two inversely tunable, strongly coupled modes of the same nanomechanical beam resonator. In the adiabatic limit, the anticrossing between the two modes is observed and the coupling strength extracted. Sweeping an initialized mode across the coupling region allows mapping of the progression from diabatic to adiabatic transitions as a function of the sweep rate.

  19. Nuclear Hybrid Energy System Modeling: RELAP5 Dynamic Coupling Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson; Haihua Zhao; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; George Mesina

    2012-09-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) research team is currently developing a dynamic simulation of an integrated hybrid energy system. A detailed simulation of proposed NHES architectures will allow initial computational demonstration of a tightly coupled NHES to identify key reactor subsystem requirements, identify candidate reactor technologies for a hybrid system, and identify key challenges to operation of the coupled system. This work will provide a baseline for later coupling of design-specific reactor models through industry collaboration. The modeling capability addressed in this report focuses on the reactor subsystem simulation.

  20. Coupled dynamics of translation and collapse of acoustically driven microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Anil J; Szeri, Andrew J

    2002-10-01

    Pressure gradients drive the motion of microbubbles relative to liquids in which they are suspended. Examples include the hydrostatic pressure due to a gravitational field, and the pressure gradients in a sound field, useful for acoustic levitation. In this paper, the equations describing the coupled dynamics of radial oscillation and translation of a microbubble are given. The formulation is based on a recently derived expression for the hydrodynamic force on a bubble of changing size in an incompressible liquid [J. Magnaudet and D. Legendre, Phys. Fluids 10, 550-556 (1998)]. The complex interaction between radial and translation dynamics is best understood by examination of the added momentum associated with the liquid motion caused by the moving bubble. Translation is maximized when the bubble collapses violently. The new theory for coupled collapse and translation dynamics is compared to past experiments and to previous theories for decoupled translation dynamics. Special attention is paid to bubbles of relevance in biomedical applications. PMID:12398441

  1. Coupled dynamics of translation and collapse of acoustically driven microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Anil J; Szeri, Andrew J

    2002-10-01

    Pressure gradients drive the motion of microbubbles relative to liquids in which they are suspended. Examples include the hydrostatic pressure due to a gravitational field, and the pressure gradients in a sound field, useful for acoustic levitation. In this paper, the equations describing the coupled dynamics of radial oscillation and translation of a microbubble are given. The formulation is based on a recently derived expression for the hydrodynamic force on a bubble of changing size in an incompressible liquid [J. Magnaudet and D. Legendre, Phys. Fluids 10, 550-556 (1998)]. The complex interaction between radial and translation dynamics is best understood by examination of the added momentum associated with the liquid motion caused by the moving bubble. Translation is maximized when the bubble collapses violently. The new theory for coupled collapse and translation dynamics is compared to past experiments and to previous theories for decoupled translation dynamics. Special attention is paid to bubbles of relevance in biomedical applications.

  2. Dynamic regimes of hydrodynamically coupled self-propelling particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llopis, I.; Pagonabarraga, I.

    2006-09-01

    We analyze the collective dynamics of self-propelling particles (spps) which move at small Reynolds numbers including the hydrodynamic coupling to the suspending solvent through numerical simulations. The velocity distribution functions show marked deviations from Gaussian behavior at short times, and the mean-square displacement at long times shows a transition from diffusive to ballistic motion for appropriate driving mechanism at low concentrations. We discuss the structures the spps form at long times and how they correlate to their dynamic behavior.

  3. Coupling Dynamics Interlip Coordination in Lower Lip Load Compensation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Lieshout, Pascal; Neufeld, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of lower lip loading on lower and upper lip movements and their coordination to test predictions on coupling dynamics derived from studies in limb control. Method: Movement data were acquired using electromagnetic midsagittal articulography under 4 conditions: (a) without restrictions, serving as a baseline; (b) with…

  4. Effect of Coriolis coupling in chemical reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tian-Shu; Han, Ke-Li

    2008-05-14

    It is essential to evaluate the role of Coriolis coupling effect in molecular reaction dynamics. Here we consider Coriolis coupling effect in quantum reactive scattering calculations in the context of both adiabaticity and nonadiabaticity, with particular emphasis on examining the role of Coriolis coupling effect in reaction dynamics of triatomic molecular systems. We present the results of our own calculations by the time-dependent quantum wave packet approach for H + D2 and F(2P3/2,2P1/2) + H2 as well as for the ion-molecule collisions of He + H2 +, D(-) + H2, H(-) + D2, and D+ + H2, after reviewing in detail other related research efforts on this issue.

  5. Coriolis coupling and nonadiabaticity in chemical reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Emilia L

    2010-12-01

    The nonadiabatic quantum dynamics and Coriolis coupling effect in chemical reaction have been reviewed, with emphasis on recent progress in using the time-dependent wave packet approach to study the Coriolis coupling and nonadiabatic effects, which was done by K. L. Han and his group. Several typical chemical reactions, for example, H+D(2), F+H(2)/D(2)/HD, D(+)+H(2), O+H(2), and He+H(2)(+), have been discussed. One can find that there is a significant role of Coriolis coupling in reaction dynamics for the ion-molecule collisions of D(+)+H(2), Ne+H(2)(+), and He+H(2)(+) in both adiabatic and nonadiabatic context.

  6. Coupled Elastic-Thermal Dynamics of Deployable Mesh Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, H.; Yang, B.; Thomson, M.; Fang, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled elastic-thermal dynamic model and a quasi-static strategy on the analysis of the reflector dynamics in the space mission. The linearized model, its natural frequencies and mode shapes are then derived upon the nonlinear static equilibrium of the structure. The numerical example is provided to fully adapt the strategy and investigate the dynamic behaviors of the structure. Finally the proposed method is applied on the sample of the deployable mesh reflector and the simulation results are presented. The research work delivered in the paper will be used to design the feedback surface in future.

  7. Quench dynamics of two coupled zig-zag ion chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, Andrea; Liebchen, Benno; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We explore the non-equilibrium dynamics of two coupled zig-zag chains of trapped ions in a double well potential. Following a quench of the potential barrier between both wells, the induced coupling between both chains due to the long-range interaction of the ions leads to the complete loss of order in the radial direction. The resulting dynamics is however not exclusively irregular but leads to phases of motion during which various ordered structures appear with ions arranged in arcs, lines and crosses. We quantify the emerging order by introducing a suitable measure and complement our analysis of the ion dynamics using a normal mode analysis showing a decisive population transfer between only a few distinguished modes.

  8. Quantum emitters dynamically coupled to a quantum field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2013-12-01

    We study theoretically the dynamical response of a set of solid-state quantum emitters arbitrarily coupled to a single-mode microcavity system. Ramping the matter-field coupling strength in round trips, we quantify the hysteresis or irreversible quantum dynamics. The matter-field system is modeled as a finite-size Dicke model which has previously been used to describe equilibrium (including quantum phase transition) properties of systems such as quantum dots in a microcavity. Here we extend this model to address non-equilibrium situations. Analyzing the system's quantum fidelity, we find that the near-adiabatic regime exhibits the richest phenomena, with a strong asymmetry in the internal collective dynamics depending on which phase is chosen as the starting point. We also explore signatures of the crossing of the critical points on the radiation subsystem by monitoring its Wigner function; then, the subsystem can exhibit the emergence of non-classicality and complexity.

  9. Quantum emitters dynamically coupled to a quantum field

    SciTech Connect

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2013-12-04

    We study theoretically the dynamical response of a set of solid-state quantum emitters arbitrarily coupled to a single-mode microcavity system. Ramping the matter-field coupling strength in round trips, we quantify the hysteresis or irreversible quantum dynamics. The matter-field system is modeled as a finite-size Dicke model which has previously been used to describe equilibrium (including quantum phase transition) properties of systems such as quantum dots in a microcavity. Here we extend this model to address non-equilibrium situations. Analyzing the system’s quantum fidelity, we find that the near-adiabatic regime exhibits the richest phenomena, with a strong asymmetry in the internal collective dynamics depending on which phase is chosen as the starting point. We also explore signatures of the crossing of the critical points on the radiation subsystem by monitoring its Wigner function; then, the subsystem can exhibit the emergence of non-classicality and complexity.

  10. Dynamic Jahn-Teller coupling and high T c superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Dennis P.; Johnson, Keith H.; McHenry, Michael E.

    1989-12-01

    Based on the cooperative dynamic Jahn-Teller effect, a universal model of superconductivity is sketched which accounts for many aspects of conventional BCS and high T c superconductors. Within the quasi-molecular approximation, a real space vibronic coupling of degenerate (or nearly degenerate) electronic states to anharmonically mixed nuclear distortions is shown to lead to electron pairing. The crossover from electron-phonon behavior to electronic behavior as a function of Jahn-Teller coupling and anharmonic mixing is illustrated for the case of a CuO 4 cluster having D 4 h symmetry.

  11. Coupled disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Andrews, Michael A.; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Wang, Lin; Bauch, Chris T.

    2015-12-01

    It is increasingly recognized that a key component of successful infection control efforts is understanding the complex, two-way interaction between disease dynamics and human behavioral and social dynamics. Human behavior such as contact precautions and social distancing clearly influence disease prevalence, but disease prevalence can in turn alter human behavior, forming a coupled, nonlinear system. Moreover, in many cases, the spatial structure of the population cannot be ignored, such that social and behavioral processes and/or transmission of infection must be represented with complex networks. Research on studying coupled disease-behavior dynamics in complex networks in particular is growing rapidly, and frequently makes use of analysis methods and concepts from statistical physics. Here, we review some of the growing literature in this area. We contrast network-based approaches to homogeneous-mixing approaches, point out how their predictions differ, and describe the rich and often surprising behavior of disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks, and compare them to processes in statistical physics. We discuss how these models can capture the dynamics that characterize many real-world scenarios, thereby suggesting ways that policy makers can better design effective prevention strategies. We also describe the growing sources of digital data that are facilitating research in this area. Finally, we suggest pitfalls which might be faced by researchers in the field, and we suggest several ways in which the field could move forward in the coming years.

  12. Coupled disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks: A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Andrews, Michael A; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Wang, Lin; Bauch, Chris T

    2015-12-01

    It is increasingly recognized that a key component of successful infection control efforts is understanding the complex, two-way interaction between disease dynamics and human behavioral and social dynamics. Human behavior such as contact precautions and social distancing clearly influence disease prevalence, but disease prevalence can in turn alter human behavior, forming a coupled, nonlinear system. Moreover, in many cases, the spatial structure of the population cannot be ignored, such that social and behavioral processes and/or transmission of infection must be represented with complex networks. Research on studying coupled disease-behavior dynamics in complex networks in particular is growing rapidly, and frequently makes use of analysis methods and concepts from statistical physics. Here, we review some of the growing literature in this area. We contrast network-based approaches to homogeneous-mixing approaches, point out how their predictions differ, and describe the rich and often surprising behavior of disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks, and compare them to processes in statistical physics. We discuss how these models can capture the dynamics that characterize many real-world scenarios, thereby suggesting ways that policy makers can better design effective prevention strategies. We also describe the growing sources of digital data that are facilitating research in this area. Finally, we suggest pitfalls which might be faced by researchers in the field, and we suggest several ways in which the field could move forward in the coming years.

  13. Coupled Ultrafast Lattice and Polarization Dynamics in Ferroelectric Nanolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Korff Schmising, C. v.; Bargheer, M.; Kiel, M.; Zhavoronkov, N.; Woerner, M.; Elsaesser, T.; Vrejoiu, I.; Hesse, D.; Alexe, M.

    2007-06-22

    We report the first analysis of the polarization and lattice dynamics in a metal/ferroelectric/metal nanolayer system by femtosecond x-ray diffraction. Two Bragg reflections provide information on the coupled dynamics of the two relevant phonon modes for ferroelectricity in perovskites, the tetragonal distortion and the soft mode. Optical excitation of the SrRuO{sub 3} metal layers generates giant stress (>1 GPa) compressing the PbZr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} layers by up to 2%. The resulting change of tetragonality reaches a maximum after 1.3 ps. As a result, the ferroelectric polarization P is reduced by up to 100% with a slight delay that is due to the anharmonic coupling of the two modes.

  14. Dynamic positive feedback source-coupled logic (D-PFSCL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Kirti; Pandey, Neeta; Gupta, Maneesha

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents dynamic positive feedback source-coupled logic (D-PFSCL) style which is derived from positive feedback source-coupled logic (PFSCL). The proposed logic style uses dynamic current source in contrast to constant current source of PFSCL to attain lower power consumption. Two techniques for D-PFSCL style-based multistage applications are suggested. Several D-PFSCL gates are simulated and compared with the respective PFSCL counterparts through SPICE simulations by using Taiwan semiconductor manufacturing company 0.18 µm CMOS technology parameters. A maximum power reduction of 84% is achieved for D-PFSCL gates. The effect of process variation on the power consumption of the D-PFSCL gates shows a maximum variation factor of 1.5 between the best and the worst cases.

  15. Sequential dynamics in the motif of excitatory coupled elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, Alexander G.; Kazakov, Alexey O.; Osipov, Grigory V.

    2015-11-01

    In this article a new model of motif (small ensemble) of neuron-like elements is proposed. It is built with the use of the generalized Lotka-Volterra model with excitatory couplings. The main motivation for this work comes from the problems of neuroscience where excitatory couplings are proved to be the predominant type of interaction between neurons of the brain. In this paper it is shown that there are two modes depending on the type of coupling between the elements: the mode with a stable heteroclinic cycle and the mode with a stable limit cycle. Our second goal is to examine the chaotic dynamics of the generalized three-dimensional Lotka-Volterra model.

  16. Phase dynamics of two parallel stacks of coupled Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Plecenik, A.; Seidel, P.; Ilʼichev, E.; Nawrocki, W.

    2014-12-01

    Two parallel stacks of coupled Josephson junctions (JJs) are investigated to clarify the physics of transitions between the rotating and oscillating states and their effect on the IV-characteristics of the system. The detailed study of phase dynamics and bias dependence of the superconducting and diffusion currents allows one to explain all features of simulated IV-characteristics and demonstrate the correspondence in their behavior. The coupling between JJ in the stacks leads to the branching of IV-characteristics and a decrease in the hysteretic region. The crucial role of the diffusion current in the formation of the IV-characteristic of the parallel stacks of coupled JJs is demonstrated. We discuss the effect of symmetry in a number of junctions in the stacks and show a decrease of the branching in the symmetrical stacks. The observed effects might be useful for development of superconducting electronic devices based on intrinsic JJs.

  17. Pinning synchronization of discrete dynamical networks with delay coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ranran; Peng, Mingshu; Zuo, Jun

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the pinning synchronization analysis for nonlinear coupled delayed discrete dynamical networks with the identical or nonidentical topological structure. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, pinning control method and linear matrix inequalities, several adaptive synchronization criteria via two kinds of pinning control method are obtained. Two examples based on Rulkov chaotic system are included to illustrate the effectiveness and verification of theoretical analysis.

  18. Quench dynamics of a disordered array of dissipative coupled cavities

    PubMed Central

    Creatore, C.; Fazio, R.; Keeling, J.; Türeci, H. E.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the mean-field dynamics of a system of interacting photons in an array of coupled cavities in the presence of dissipation and disorder. We follow the evolution of an initially prepared Fock state, and show how the interplay between dissipation and disorder affects the coherence properties of the cavity emission, and show that these properties can be used as signatures of the many-body phase of the whole array. PMID:25197253

  19. Relationship dynamics around depression in gay and lesbian couples.

    PubMed

    Thomeer, Mieke Beth; Reczek, Corinne; Umberson, Debra

    2015-12-01

    Research on intimate relationship dynamics around depression has primarily focused on heterosexual couples. This body of work shows that wives are more likely than husbands to offer support to a depressed spouse. Moreover, when wives are depressed, they are more likely than husbands to try and shield their spouse from the stress of their own depression. Yet, previous research has not examined depression and relationship dynamics in gay and lesbian couples. We analyze in-depth interviews with 26 gay and lesbian couples (N = 52 individuals) in which one or both partners reported depression. We find evidence that dominant gender scripts are both upheld and challenged within gay and lesbian couples, providing important insight into how gender operates in relation to depression within same-sex contexts. Our results indicate that most gay and lesbian partners offer support to a depressed partner, yet lesbian couples tend to follow a unique pattern in that they provide support both as the non-depressed and depressed partner. Support around depression is sometimes viewed as improving the relationship, but if the support is intensive or rejected, it is often viewed as contributing to relationship strain. Support is also sometimes withdrawn by the non-depressed partner because of caregiver exhaustion or the perception that the support is unhelpful. This study points to the importance of considering depression within gay and lesbian relational contexts, revealing new ways support sustains and strains intimate partnerships. We emphasize the usefulness of deploying couple-level approaches to better understand depression in sexual minority populations.

  20. The coupled nonlinear dynamics of a lift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, Rafael Sánchez; Kaczmarczyk, Stefan; Picton, Phil; Su, Huijuan

    2014-12-01

    Coupled lateral and longitudinal vibrations of suspension and compensating ropes in a high-rise lift system are often induced by the building motions due to wind or seismic excitations. When the frequencies of the building become near the natural frequencies of the ropes, large resonance motions of the system may result. This leads to adverse coupled dynamic phenomena involving nonplanar motions of the ropes, impact loads between the ropes and the shaft walls, as well as vertical vibrations of the car, counterweight and compensating sheave. Such an adverse dynamic behaviour of the system endangers the safety of the installation. This paper presents two mathematical models describing the nonlinear responses of a suspension/ compensating rope system coupled with the elevator car / compensating sheave motions. The models accommodate the nonlinear couplings between the lateral and longitudinal modes, with and without longitudinal inertia of the ropes. The partial differential nonlinear equations of motion are derived using Hamilton Principle. Then, the Galerkin method is used to discretise the equations of motion and to develop a nonlinear ordinary differential equation model. Approximate numerical solutions are determined and the behaviour of the system is analysed.

  1. The coupled nonlinear dynamics of a lift system

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo, Rafael Sánchez E-mail: stefan.kaczmarczyk@northampton.ac.uk E-mail: huijuan.su@northampton.ac.uk; Kaczmarczyk, Stefan E-mail: stefan.kaczmarczyk@northampton.ac.uk E-mail: huijuan.su@northampton.ac.uk; Picton, Phil E-mail: stefan.kaczmarczyk@northampton.ac.uk E-mail: huijuan.su@northampton.ac.uk; Su, Huijuan E-mail: stefan.kaczmarczyk@northampton.ac.uk E-mail: huijuan.su@northampton.ac.uk

    2014-12-10

    Coupled lateral and longitudinal vibrations of suspension and compensating ropes in a high-rise lift system are often induced by the building motions due to wind or seismic excitations. When the frequencies of the building become near the natural frequencies of the ropes, large resonance motions of the system may result. This leads to adverse coupled dynamic phenomena involving nonplanar motions of the ropes, impact loads between the ropes and the shaft walls, as well as vertical vibrations of the car, counterweight and compensating sheave. Such an adverse dynamic behaviour of the system endangers the safety of the installation. This paper presents two mathematical models describing the nonlinear responses of a suspension/ compensating rope system coupled with the elevator car / compensating sheave motions. The models accommodate the nonlinear couplings between the lateral and longitudinal modes, with and without longitudinal inertia of the ropes. The partial differential nonlinear equations of motion are derived using Hamilton Principle. Then, the Galerkin method is used to discretise the equations of motion and to develop a nonlinear ordinary differential equation model. Approximate numerical solutions are determined and the behaviour of the system is analysed.

  2. Dynamical Coupled-channels Effects on Pion Photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Julia-Diaz, B; Lee, T -S. H.; Matsuyama, A; Sato, T; Smith, L C

    2007-12-18

    The electromagnetic pion production reactions are investigated within the dynamical coupled-channels model developed in {\\bf Physics Reports, 439, 193 (2007)}. The meson-baryon channels included in this study are $\\gamma N$, $\\pi N$, $\\eta N$, and the $\\pi\\Delta$, $\\rho N$ and $\\sigma N$ resonant components of the $\\pi\\pi N$ channel. With the hadronic parameters of the model determined in a recent study of $\\pi N$ scattering, we show that the pion photoproduction data up to the second resonance region can be described to a very large extent by only adjusting the bare $\\gamma N \\rightarrow N^*$ helicity amplitudes, while the non-resonant electromagnetic couplings are taken from previous works. It is found that the coupled-channels effects can contribute about 10 - 20 $\\%$ of the production cross sections in the $\\Delta$ (1232) resonance region, and can drastically change the magnitude and shape of the cross sections in the second resonance region. The importance of the off-shell effects in a dynamical approach is also demonstrated. The meson cloud effects as well as the coupled-channels contributions to the $\\gamma N \\rightarrow N^*$ form factors are found to be mainly in the low $Q^2$ region. For the magnetic M1 $\\gamma N \\rightarrow \\Delta$ (1232) form factor, the results are close to that of the Sato-Lee Model. Necessary improvements to the model and future developments are discussed.

  3. Dynamical coupled-channels effects on pion photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Julia-Diaz, B.; Lee, T.-S. H.; Matsuyama, A.; Sato, T.; Smith, L. C.

    2008-04-15

    The electromagnetic pion production reactions are investigated within the dynamical coupled-channels model developed by Matsuyama, Sato, and Lee [Phys. Rep. 439, 193 (2007)]. The meson-baryon channels included in this study are {gamma}N,{pi}N,{eta}N, and the {pi}{delta},{rho}N, and {sigma}N resonant components of the {pi}{pi}N channel. With the hadronic parameters of the model determined in a recent study of {pi}N scattering, we show that the pion photoproduction data up to the second resonance region can be described to a very large extent by only adjusting the bare {gamma}N{yields}N* helicity amplitudes, while the nonresonant electromagnetic couplings are taken from previous works. It is found that the coupled-channels effects can contribute about 30-40 % of the production cross sections in the {delta} (1232) resonance region, and can drastically change the magnitude and shape of the cross sections in the second resonance region. The importance of the loop-integrations in a dynamical approach is also demonstrated. The meson cloud effects as well as the coupled-channels contributions to the {gamma}N{yields}N* form factors are found to be mainly in the low Q{sup 2} region. Necessary improvements to the model and future developments are discussed.

  4. Dynamical regimes of four almost identical chemical oscillators coupled via pulse inhibitory coupling with time delay.

    PubMed

    Vanag, Vladimir K; Smelov, Pavel S; Klinshov, Vladimir V

    2016-02-21

    The dynamic regimes in networks of four almost identical spike oscillators with pulsatile coupling via inhibitor are systematically studied. We used two models to describe individual oscillators: a phase-oscillator model and a model for the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. A time delay τ between a spike in one oscillator and the spike-induced inhibitory perturbation of other oscillators is introduced. Diagrams of all rhythms found for three different types of connectivities (unidirectional on a ring, mutual on a ring, and all-to-all) are built in the plane C(inh)-τ, where C(inh) is the coupling strength. It is shown analytically and numerically that only four regular rhythms are stable for unidirectional coupling: walk (phase shift between spikes of neighbouring oscillators equals the quarter of the global period T), walk-reverse (the same as walk but consecutive spikes take place in the direction opposite to the direction of connectivity), anti-phase (any two neighbouring oscillators are anti-phase), and in-phase oscillations. In the case of mutual on the ring coupling, an additional in-phase-anti-phase mode emerges. For all-to-all coupling, two new asymmetrical patterns (two-cluster and three-cluster modes) have been found. More complex rhythms are observed at large C(inh), when some oscillators are suppressed completely or generate smaller number of spikes than others.

  5. Observation of chaotic dynamics of coupled nonlinear oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Van Buskirk, R.; Jeffries, C.

    1985-05-01

    The nonlinear charge storage property of driven Si p-n junction passive resonators gives rise to chaotic dynamics: period doubling, chaos, periodic windows, and an extended period-adding sequence corresponding to entrainment of the resonator by successive subharmonics of the driving frequency. The physical system is described; equations of motion and iterative maps are reviewed. Computed behavior is compared to data, with reasonable agreement for Poincare sections, bifurcation diagrams, and phase diagrams in parameter space (drive voltage, drive frequency). N = 2 symmetrically coupled resonators are found to display period doubling, Hopf bifurcations, entrainment horns (''Arnol'd tongues''), breakup of the torus, and chaos. This behavior is in reasonable agreement with theoretical models based on the characteristics of single-junction resonators. The breakup of the torus is studied in detail, by Poincare sections and by power spectra. Also studied are oscillations of the torus and cyclic crises. A phase diagram of the coupled resonators can be understood from the model. Poincare sections show self-similarity and fractal structure, with measured values of fractal dimension d = 2.03 and d = 2.23 for N = 1 and N = 2 resonators, respectively. Two line-coupled resonators display first a Hopf bifurcation as the drive parameter is increased, in agreement with the model. For N = 4 and N = 12 line-coupled resonators complex quasiperiodic behavior is observed with up to 3 and 4 incommensurate frequencies, respectively.

  6. Phase and amplitude dynamics of nonlinearly coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Cudmore, P; Holmes, C A

    2015-02-01

    This paper addresses the amplitude and phase dynamics of a large system of nonlinearly coupled, non-identical damped harmonic oscillators, which is based on recent research in coupled oscillation in optomechanics. Our goal is to investigate the existence and stability of collective behaviour which occurs due to a play-off between the distribution of individual oscillator frequency and the type of nonlinear coupling. We show that this system exhibits synchronisation, where all oscillators are rotating at the same rate, and that in the synchronised state the system has a regular structure related to the distribution of the frequencies of the individual oscillators. Using a geometric description, we show how changes in the non-linear coupling function can cause pitchfork and saddle-node bifurcations which create or destroy stable and unstable synchronised solutions. We apply these results to show how in-phase and anti-phase solutions are created in a system with a bi-modal distribution of frequencies.

  7. Bell states and entanglement dynamics on two coupled quantum molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, P.A.; Sanz, L.

    2015-05-15

    This work provides a complete description of entanglement properties between electrons inside coupled quantum molecules, nanoestructures which consist of two quantum dots. Each electron can tunnel between the two quantum dots inside the molecule, being also coupled by Coulomb interaction. First, it is shown that Bell states act as a natural basis for the description of this physical system, defining the characteristics of the energy spectrum and the eigenstates. Then, the entanglement properties of the eigenstates are discussed, shedding light on the roles of each physical parameters on experimental setup. Finally, a detailed analysis of the dynamics shows the path to generate states with a high degree of entanglement, as well as physical conditions associated with coherent oscillations between separable and Bell states.

  8. An investigation of helicopter dynamic coupling using an analytical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Jeffrey D.

    1995-01-01

    Many attempts have been made in recent years to predict the off-axis response of a helicopter to control inputs, and most have had little success. Since physical insight is limited by the complexity of numerical simulation models, this paper examines the off-axis response problem using an analytical model, with the goal of understanding the mechanics of the coupling. A new induced velocity model is extended to include the effects of wake distortion from pitch rate. It is shown that the inclusion of these results in a significant change in the lateral flap response to a steady pitch rate. The proposed inflow model is coupled with the full rotor/body dynamics, and comparisons are made between the model and flight test data for a UH-60 in hover. Results show that inclusion of induced velocity variations due to shaft rate improves correlation in the pitch response to lateral cycle inputs.

  9. Calcium dynamics in astrocyte processes during neurovascular coupling

    PubMed Central

    Otsu, Yo; Couchman, Kiri; Lyons, Declan G; Collot, Mayeul; Agarwal, Amit; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Pfrieger, Frank W; Bergles, Dwight E; Charpak, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced neuronal activity in the brain triggers a local increase in blood flow, termed functional hyperemia, via several mechanisms, including calcium (Ca2+) signaling in astrocytes. However, recent in vivo studies have questioned the role of astrocytes in functional hyperemia because of the slow and sparse dynamics of their somatic Ca2+ signals and the absence of glutamate metabotropic receptor 5 in adults. Here, we reexamined their role in neurovascular coupling by selectively expressing a genetically encoded Ca2+ sensor in astrocytes of the olfactory bulb. We show that in anesthetized mice, the physiological activation of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) terminals reliably triggers Ca2+ increases in astrocyte processes but not in somata. These Ca2+ increases systematically precede the onset of functional hyperemia by 1–2 s, reestablishing astrocytes as potential regulators of neurovascular coupling. PMID:25531572

  10. Coupled nucleotide covariations reveal dynamic RNA interaction patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Gultyaev, A P; Franch, T; Gerdes, K

    2000-01-01

    Evolutionarily conserved structures in related RNA molecules contain coordinated variations (covariations) of paired nucleotides. Analysis of covariations is a very powerful approach to deduce phylogenetically conserved (i.e., functional) conformations, including tertiary interactions. Here we discuss conserved RNA folding pathways that are revealed by covariation patterns. In such pathways, structural requirements for alternative pairings cause some nucleotides to covary with two different partners. Such "coupled" covariations between three or more nucleotides were found in various types of RNAs. The analysis of coupled covariations can unravel important features of RNA folding dynamics and improve phylogeny reconstruction in some cases. Importantly, it is necessary to distinguish between multiple covariations determined by mutually exclusive structures and those determined by tertiary contacts. PMID:11105748

  11. Social strain, couple dynamics and gender differences in gambling problems: evidence from Chinese married couples.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Nicole W T

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of the influence of couple dynamics on gender differences in gambling behavior remains meager. Building on general strain theory from the sociology of deviance and stress crossover theory from social psychology, we argue that the strain encountered by one partner in a social setting may affect his or her spouse. For instance, the wife of a man under more social strain may experience more strain in turn and thus be at a higher risk of developing disordered gambling than the wife of a man under less social strain. Using community survey data of 1620 Chinese married couples, we performed multilevel dyad analyses to address social strain and couple dynamics, in addition to their roles as predictors of gambling behavior in both spouses. This was a community survey of Hong Kong and therefore was not representative of China. Based on the DSM-IV screen, the rates of probable problem gambling and pathological gambling among male partners (12.8% vs. 2.5%) were twice those among female partners (5.2% vs. 0.3%). We also found that the social strain experienced by a male partner significantly predicted both his and his wife's likelihood of developing gambling problems. Although a female partner's exposure to social strain was a significant correlate of her gambling problem, it had no significant association with her husband's gambling behavior. These results suggest that the cross-spouse transference of social strain may be a gendered process. PMID:25452063

  12. Dynamic optimization of metabolic networks coupled with gene expression.

    PubMed

    Waldherr, Steffen; Oyarzún, Diego A; Bockmayr, Alexander

    2015-01-21

    The regulation of metabolic activity by tuning enzyme expression levels is crucial to sustain cellular growth in changing environments. Metabolic networks are often studied at steady state using constraint-based models and optimization techniques. However, metabolic adaptations driven by changes in gene expression cannot be analyzed by steady state models, as these do not account for temporal changes in biomass composition. Here we present a dynamic optimization framework that integrates the metabolic network with the dynamics of biomass production and composition. An approximation by a timescale separation leads to a coupled model of quasi-steady state constraints on the metabolic reactions, and differential equations for the substrate concentrations and biomass composition. We propose a dynamic optimization approach to determine reaction fluxes for this model, explicitly taking into account enzyme production costs and enzymatic capacity. In contrast to the established dynamic flux balance analysis, our approach allows predicting dynamic changes in both the metabolic fluxes and the biomass composition during metabolic adaptations. Discretization of the optimization problems leads to a linear program that can be efficiently solved. We applied our algorithm in two case studies: a minimal nutrient uptake network, and an abstraction of core metabolic processes in bacteria. In the minimal model, we show that the optimized uptake rates reproduce the empirical Monod growth for bacterial cultures. For the network of core metabolic processes, the dynamic optimization algorithm predicted commonly observed metabolic adaptations, such as a diauxic switch with a preference ranking for different nutrients, re-utilization of waste products after depletion of the original substrate, and metabolic adaptation to an impending nutrient depletion. These examples illustrate how dynamic adaptations of enzyme expression can be predicted solely from an optimization principle.

  13. Coupled Dynamic Modeling of Floating Wind Turbine Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wayman, E. N.; Sclavounos, P. D.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2006-03-01

    This article presents a collaborative research program that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have undertaken to develop innovative and cost-effective floating and mooring systems for offshore wind turbines in water depths of 10-200 m. Methods for the coupled structural, hydrodynamic, and aerodynamic analysis of floating wind turbine systems are presented in the frequency domain. This analysis was conducted by coupling the aerodynamics and structural dynamics code FAST [4] developed at NREL with the wave load and response simulation code WAMIT (Wave Analysis at MIT) [15] developed at MIT. Analysis tools were developed to consider coupled interactions between the wind turbine and the floating system. These include the gyroscopic loads of the wind turbine rotor on the tower and floater, the aerodynamic damping introduced by the wind turbine rotor, the hydrodynamic damping introduced by wave-body interactions, and the hydrodynamic forces caused by wave excitation. Analyses were conducted for two floater concepts coupled with the NREL 5-MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine in water depths of 10-200 m: the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge (SDB) and the MIT/NREL Tension Leg Platform (TLP). These concepts were chosen to represent two different methods of achieving stability to identify differences in performance and cost of the different stability methods. The static and dynamic analyses of these structures evaluate the systems' responses to wave excitation at a range of frequencies, the systems' natural frequencies, and the standard deviations of the systems' motions in each degree of freedom in various wind and wave environments. This article in various wind and wave environments. This article explores the effects of coupling the wind turbine with the floating platform, the effects of water depth, and the effects of wind speed on the systems' performance. An economic feasibility analysis of the two concepts

  14. Dynamic Binding of Driven Interfaces in Coupled Ultrathin Ferromagnetic Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, P. J.; Stamps, R. L.; Jamet, J.-P.; Ferré, J.; Baltz, V.; Rodmacq, B.; Politi, P.

    2010-06-01

    We demonstrate experimentally dynamic interface binding in a system consisting of two coupled ferromagnetic layers. While domain walls in each layer have different velocity-field responses, for two broad ranges of the driving field H, walls in the two layers are bound and move at a common velocity. The bound states have their own velocity-field response and arise when the isolated wall velocities in each layer are close, a condition which always occurs as H→0. Several features of the bound states are reproduced using a one-dimensional model, illustrating their general nature.

  15. Dynamic binding of driven interfaces in coupled ultrathin ferromagnetic layers.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, P J; Stamps, R L; Jamet, J-P; Ferré, J; Baltz, V; Rodmacq, B; Politi, P

    2010-06-11

    We demonstrate experimentally dynamic interface binding in a system consisting of two coupled ferromagnetic layers. While domain walls in each layer have different velocity-field responses, for two broad ranges of the driving field H, walls in the two layers are bound and move at a common velocity. The bound states have their own velocity-field response and arise when the isolated wall velocities in each layer are close, a condition which always occurs as H→0. Several features of the bound states are reproduced using a one-dimensional model, illustrating their general nature. PMID:20867268

  16. Dynamic stabilization of a coupled ultracold atom-molecule system.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Chang; Ye, Chong

    2015-12-01

    We numerically demonstrate the dynamic stabilization of a strongly interacting many-body bosonic system which can be realized by coupled ultracold atom-molecule gases. The system is initialized to an unstable equilibrium state corresponding to a saddle point in the classical phase space, where subsequent free evolution gives rise to atom-molecule conversion. To control and stabilize the system, periodic modulation is applied that suddenly shifts the relative phase between the atomic and the molecular modes and limits their further interconversion. The stability diagram for the range of modulation amplitudes and periods that stabilize the dynamics is given. The validity of the phase diagram obtained from the time-average calculation is discussed by using the orbit tracking method, and the difference in contrast with the maximum absolute deviation analysis is shown as well. A brief quantum analysis shows that quantum fluctuations can put serious limitations on the applicability of the mean-field results. PMID:26764672

  17. Emerging dynamics in neuronal networks of diffusively coupled hard oscillators.

    PubMed

    Ponta, L; Lanza, V; Bonnin, M; Corinto, F

    2011-06-01

    Oscillatory networks are a special class of neural networks where each neuron exhibits time periodic behavior. They represent bio-inspired architectures which can be exploited to model biological processes such as the binding problem and selective attention. In this paper we investigate the dynamics of networks whose neurons are hard oscillators, namely they exhibit the coexistence of different stable attractors. We consider a constant external stimulus applied to each neuron, which influences the neuron's own natural frequency. We show that, due to the interaction between different kinds of attractors, as well as between attractors and repellors, new interesting dynamics arises, in the form of synchronous oscillations of various amplitudes. We also show that neurons subject to different stimuli are able to synchronize if their couplings are strong enough.

  18. Dynamic stabilization of a coupled ultracold atom-molecule system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng-Chang; Ye, Chong

    2015-12-01

    We numerically demonstrate the dynamic stabilization of a strongly interacting many-body bosonic system which can be realized by coupled ultracold atom-molecule gases. The system is initialized to an unstable equilibrium state corresponding to a saddle point in the classical phase space, where subsequent free evolution gives rise to atom-molecule conversion. To control and stabilize the system, periodic modulation is applied that suddenly shifts the relative phase between the atomic and the molecular modes and limits their further interconversion. The stability diagram for the range of modulation amplitudes and periods that stabilize the dynamics is given. The validity of the phase diagram obtained from the time-average calculation is discussed by using the orbit tracking method, and the difference in contrast with the maximum absolute deviation analysis is shown as well. A brief quantum analysis shows that quantum fluctuations can put serious limitations on the applicability of the mean-field results.

  19. Coupling in goshawk and grouse population dynamics in Finland.

    PubMed

    Tornberg, Risto; Lindén, Andreas; Byholm, Patrik; Ranta, Esa; Valkama, Jari; Helle, Pekka; Lindén, Harto

    2013-04-01

    Different prey species can vary in their significance to a particular predator. In the simplest case, the total available density or biomass of a guild of several prey species might be most relevant to the predator, but behavioural and ecological traits of different prey species can alter the picture. We studied the population dynamics of a predator-prey setting in Finland by fitting first-order log-linear vector autoregressive models to long-term count data from active breeding sites of the northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis; 1986-2009), and to three of its main prey species (1983-2010): hazel grouse (Bonasa bonasia), black grouse (Tetrao tetrix) and capercaillie (T. urogallus), which belong to the same forest grouse guild and show synchronous fluctuations. Our focus was on modelling the relative significance of prey species and estimating the tightness of predator-prey coupling in order to explain the observed population dynamics, simultaneously accounting for effects of density dependence, winter severity and spatial correlation. We established nine competing candidate models, where different combinations of grouse species affect goshawk dynamics with lags of 1-3 years. Effects of goshawk on grouse were investigated using one model for each grouse species. The most parsimonious model for goshawk indicated separate density effects of hazel grouse and black grouse, and different effects with lags of 1 and 3 years. Capercaillie showed no effects on goshawk populations, while the effect of goshawk on grouse was clearly negative only in capercaillie. Winter severity had significant adverse effects on goshawk and hazel grouse populations. In combination, large-scale goshawk-grouse population dynamics are coupled, but there are no clear mutual effects for any of the individual guild members. In a broader context, our study suggests that pooling data on closely related, synchronously fluctuating prey species can result in the loss of relevant information, rather than

  20. Coupled Radiative-Dynamical GCM Simulations of Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, Adam P.; Fortney, J. J.; Lian, Y.; Marley, M. S.

    2007-10-01

    The stellar flux incident on hot Jupiters is expected to drive an atmospheric circulation that shapes the day-night temperature difference, infrared lightcurve, spectra, albedo, and atmospheric composition. Recent Spitzer lightcurve observations show that on some hot Jupiters, including HD189733b and HD209458b, the circulation efficiently homogenizes the temperature, whereas other planets such as Ups And b may exhibit large day-night temperature differences. Moreover, Spitzer infrared photometry and spectra constrain the vertical temperature structure in the atmosphere, which may deviate strongly from radiative equilibrium. Several groups have investigated the atmospheric circulation with a variety of 2D and 3D models (Showman and Guillot 2002; Cho et al. 2003, 2006; Langton and Laughlin 2007; Cooper and Showman 2005, 2006; Dobbs-Dixon and Lin 2007). However, all of these models drive the dynamics with simplified heating/cooling schemes that preclude robust predictions for the 3D temperature patterns, spectra, and lightcurves. Here, we present the first simulations of cloud-free hot Jupiters from a 3D general circulation model (GCM) that couples the atmospheric dynamics to a realistic representation of radiative transfer. For the dynamics, we adopt the MITgcm, which is a state-of-the-art circulation model that solves the 3D primitive equations of meteorology. Our radiation model is that of Marley and McKay (1999), which solves the two-stream radiative-transfer equations using the correlated-k method for the opacities; this radiative-transfer model has been extensively applied to brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets by Marley, Fortney, and collaborators. By coupling these components, the GCM provides a much more realistic representation of the radiative-dynamical interaction than possible with previous models. Here, we will present simulations of HD209458b and HD189733b, compare the predicted temperatures, spectra, and lightcurves with existing data, and make

  1. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of hydrodynamically-coupled stainless steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.

    1996-12-01

    Spent nuclear fuel is usually stored temporarily on the site of nuclear power plants. The spent fuel storage racks are nuclear-safety-related stainless steel structures required to be analyzed for seismic loads. When the storage pool is subjected to three-dimensional (3-D) floor seismic excitations, rack modules, stored fuel bundles, adjacent racks and pool walls, and surrounding water are hydrodynamically coupled. Hydrodynamic coupling (HC) significantly affects the dynamic responses of the racks that are free-standing and submerged in water within the pool. A nonlinear time-history dynamic analysis is usually needed to describe the motion behavior of the racks that are both geometrically nonlinear and material nonlinear in nature. The nonlinearities include the friction resistance between the rack supporting legs and the pool floor, and various potential impacts of fuel-rack, rack-rack, and rack-pool wall. The HC induced should be included in the nonlinear dynamic analysis using the added-hydrodynamic-mass concept based on potential theory per the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) acceptance criteria. To this end, a finite element analysis constitutes a feasible and effective tool. However, most people perform somewhat simplified 1-D, or 2-D, or 3-D single rack and 2-D multiple rack analyses. These analyses are incomplete because a 3-D single rack model behaves quite differently from a 2-D mode. Furthermore, a 3-D whole pool multi-rack model behaves differently than a 3-D single rack model, especially when the strong HC effects are unsymmetrical. In this paper 3-D nonlinear dynamic time-history analyses were performed in a more quantitative manner using sophisticated finite element models developed for a single rack as well as all twelve racks in the whole-pool. Typical response results due to different HC effects are determined and discussed.

  2. Physical Modeling of Dynamic Coupling between Chromosomal Loci.

    PubMed

    Lampo, Thomas J; Kennard, Andrew S; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2016-01-19

    The motion of chromosomal DNA is essential to many biological processes, including segregation, transcriptional regulation, recombination, and packaging. Physical understanding of these processes would be dramatically enhanced through predictive, quantitative modeling of chromosome dynamics of multiple loci. Using a polymer dynamics framework, we develop a prediction for the correlation in the velocities of two loci on a single chromosome or otherwise connected by chromatin. These predictions reveal that the signature of correlated motion between two loci can be identified by varying the lag time between locus position measurements. In general, this theory predicts that as the lag time interval increases, the dual-loci dynamic behavior transitions from being completely uncorrelated to behaving as an effective single locus. This transition corresponds to the timescale of the stress communication between loci through the intervening segment. This relatively simple framework makes quantitative predictions based on a single timescale fit parameter that can be directly compared to the in vivo motion of fluorescently labeled chromosome loci. Furthermore, this theoretical framework enables the detection of dynamically coupled chromosome regions from the signature of their correlated motion.

  3. Physical Modeling of Dynamic Coupling between Chromosomal Loci.

    PubMed

    Lampo, Thomas J; Kennard, Andrew S; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2016-01-19

    The motion of chromosomal DNA is essential to many biological processes, including segregation, transcriptional regulation, recombination, and packaging. Physical understanding of these processes would be dramatically enhanced through predictive, quantitative modeling of chromosome dynamics of multiple loci. Using a polymer dynamics framework, we develop a prediction for the correlation in the velocities of two loci on a single chromosome or otherwise connected by chromatin. These predictions reveal that the signature of correlated motion between two loci can be identified by varying the lag time between locus position measurements. In general, this theory predicts that as the lag time interval increases, the dual-loci dynamic behavior transitions from being completely uncorrelated to behaving as an effective single locus. This transition corresponds to the timescale of the stress communication between loci through the intervening segment. This relatively simple framework makes quantitative predictions based on a single timescale fit parameter that can be directly compared to the in vivo motion of fluorescently labeled chromosome loci. Furthermore, this theoretical framework enables the detection of dynamically coupled chromosome regions from the signature of their correlated motion. PMID:26789757

  4. Strong Coulomb Coupling in Relativistic Quantum Constraint Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawin, M.; Cugnon, J.; Sazdjian, H.

    We study, in the framework of relativistic quantum constraint dynamics, the bound state problem of two oppositely charged spin 1/2 particles, with masses m1 and m2, in mutual electromagnetic interaction. We search for the critical value of the coupling constant α for which the bound state energy reaches the lower continuum, thus indicating the instability of the heavier particle or of the strongly coupled QED vacuum in the equal mass case. Two different choices of the electromagnetic potential are considered, corresponding to different extensions of the substitution rule into the nonperturbative region of α: (i) the Todorov potential, already introduced in the quasipotential approach and used by Crater and Van Alstine in Constraint Dynamics; (ii) a second potential (potential II), characterized by a regular behavior at short distances. For the Todorov potential we find that for m2>m1 there is always a critical value αc of α, depending on m2/m1, for which instability occurs. In the equal mass case, instability is reached at αc=1/2 with a vanishing value of the cutoff radius, generally needed for this potential at short distances. For potential II, on the other hand, we find that instability occurs only for m2>2.16 m1.

  5. Dynamics of learning in coupled oscillators tutored with delayed reinforcements.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, M A; Bouzat, S; Samengo, I; Mindlin, G B

    2005-07-01

    In this work we analyze the solutions of a simple system of coupled phase oscillators in which the connectivity is learned dynamically. The model is inspired by the process of learning of birdsongs by oscine birds. An oscillator acts as the generator of a basic rhythm and drives slave oscillators which are responsible for different motor actions. The driving signal arrives at each driven oscillator through two different pathways. One of them is a direct pathway. The other one is a reinforcement pathway, through which the signal arrives delayed. The coupling coefficients between the driving oscillator and the slave ones evolve in time following a Hebbian-like rule. We discuss the conditions under which a driven oscillator is capable of learning to lock to the driver. The resulting phase difference and connectivity are a function of the delay of the reinforcement. Around some specific delays, the system is capable of generating dramatic changes in the phase difference between the driver and the driven systems. We discuss the dynamical mechanism responsible for this effect and possible applications of this learning scheme.

  6. Model of bound interface dynamics for coupled magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politi, P.; Metaxas, P. J.; Jamet, J.-P.; Stamps, R. L.; Ferré, J.

    2011-08-01

    A domain wall in a ferromagnetic system will move under the action of an external magnetic field. Ultrathin Co layers sandwiched between Pt have been shown to be a suitable experimental realization of a weakly disordered 2D medium in which to study the dynamics of 1D interfaces (magnetic domain walls). The behavior of these systems is encapsulated in the velocity-field response v(H) of the domain walls. In a recent paper [P. J. Metaxas , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.237206 104, 237206 (2010)] we studied the effect of ferromagnetic coupling between two such ultrathin layers, each exhibiting different v(H) characteristics. The main result was the existence of bound states over finite-width field ranges, wherein walls in the two layers moved together at the same speed. Here we discuss in detail the theory of domain wall dynamics in coupled systems. In particular, we show that a bound creep state is expected for vanishing H and we give the analytical, parameter free expression for its velocity which agrees well with experimental results.

  7. Dynamics of learning in coupled oscillators tutored with delayed reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisan, M. A.; Bouzat, S.; Samengo, I.; Mindlin, G. B.

    2005-07-01

    In this work we analyze the solutions of a simple system of coupled phase oscillators in which the connectivity is learned dynamically. The model is inspired by the process of learning of birdsongs by oscine birds. An oscillator acts as the generator of a basic rhythm and drives slave oscillators which are responsible for different motor actions. The driving signal arrives at each driven oscillator through two different pathways. One of them is a direct pathway. The other one is a reinforcement pathway, through which the signal arrives delayed. The coupling coefficients between the driving oscillator and the slave ones evolve in time following a Hebbian-like rule. We discuss the conditions under which a driven oscillator is capable of learning to lock to the driver. The resulting phase difference and connectivity are a function of the delay of the reinforcement. Around some specific delays, the system is capable of generating dramatic changes in the phase difference between the driver and the driven systems. We discuss the dynamical mechanism responsible for this effect and possible applications of this learning scheme.

  8. Dynamics of learning in coupled oscillators tutored with delayed reinforcements.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, M A; Bouzat, S; Samengo, I; Mindlin, G B

    2005-07-01

    In this work we analyze the solutions of a simple system of coupled phase oscillators in which the connectivity is learned dynamically. The model is inspired by the process of learning of birdsongs by oscine birds. An oscillator acts as the generator of a basic rhythm and drives slave oscillators which are responsible for different motor actions. The driving signal arrives at each driven oscillator through two different pathways. One of them is a direct pathway. The other one is a reinforcement pathway, through which the signal arrives delayed. The coupling coefficients between the driving oscillator and the slave ones evolve in time following a Hebbian-like rule. We discuss the conditions under which a driven oscillator is capable of learning to lock to the driver. The resulting phase difference and connectivity are a function of the delay of the reinforcement. Around some specific delays, the system is capable of generating dramatic changes in the phase difference between the driver and the driven systems. We discuss the dynamical mechanism responsible for this effect and possible applications of this learning scheme. PMID:16090001

  9. Coupling a geodynamic seismic cycling model to rupture dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Alice; van Dinther, Ylona

    2014-05-01

    The relevance and results of dynamic rupture scenarios are implicitly linked to the geometry and pre-existing stress and strength state on a fault. The absolute stresses stored along faults during interseismic periods, are largely unquantifiable. They are, however, pivotal in defining coseismic rupture styles, near-field ground motion, and macroscopic source properties (Gabriel et al., 2012). Obtaining these in a physically consistent manner requires seismic cycling models, which directly couple long-term deformation processes (over 1000 year periods), the self-consistent development of faults, and the resulting dynamic ruptures. One promising approach to study seismic cycling enables both the generation of spontaneous fault geometries and the development of thermo-mechanically consistent fault stresses. This seismo-thermo-mechanical model has been developed using a methodology similar to that employed to study long-term lithospheric deformation (van Dinther et al., 2013a,b, using I2ELVIS of Gerya and Yuen, 2007). We will innovatively include the absolute stress and strength values along physically consistent evolving non-finite fault zones (regions of strain accumulation) from the geodynamic model into dynamic rupture simulations as an initial condition. The dynamic rupture simulations will be performed using SeisSol, an arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) scheme (Pelties et al., 2012). The dynamic rupture models are able to incorporate the large degree of fault geometry complexity arising in naturally evolving geodynamic models. We focus on subduction zone settings with and without a splay fault. Due to the novelty of the coupling, we first focus on methodological challenges, e.g. the synchronization of both methods regarding the nucleation of events, the localization of fault planes, and the incorporation of similar frictional constitutive relations. We then study the importance of physically consistent fault stress, strength, and

  10. Cavity-coupled molecular vibrational spectra and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owrutsky, Jeffrey; Dunkelberger, Adam; Long, James; Fears, Kenan; Dressick, Walter; Compton, Ryan; Spann, Bryan; Simpkins, Blake

    Coherent coupling between an optical transition and confined optical mode, when sufficiently strong, gives rise to new modes separated by the vacuum Rabi splitting. Such systems have been investigated for electronic-state transitions, for quantum wells and dots, however, only very recently have vibrational transitions been explored. Both static and dynamic results are described for vibrational bands strongly coupled to optical cavities. First, we experimentally and numerically describe coupling between a Fabry-Perot cavity and carbonyl stretch (~1730 cm1) in poly-methylmethacrylate as a function of several parameters of the system including absorber strength and concentration as well as cavity length. Similar studies are carried out for anions both in solution and exchanged into cationic polymers. Ultrafast pump-probe studies are performed on W(CO)6 in solution which reveals changes to the transient spectra and modified relaxation rates. We believe these modified relaxation rates are a consequence of the energy separation between the vibration-cavity polariton modes and excited state transitions. Cavity-modified vibrational states and energy transfer may provide a new avenue for systematic control of molecular processes and chemistry. The work supported by the Office of Naval Research through the Naval Research Laboratory.

  11. CIDGA - Coupling of Interior Dynamic models with Global Atmosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Breuer, Doris

    2010-05-01

    Atmosphere temperatures and in particular the surface temperatures mostly depend on the solar heat flux and the atmospheric composition. The latter can be influenced by interior processes of the planet, i.e. volcanism that releases greenhouse gases such as H2O, CO2 and methane into the atmosphere and plate tectonics through which atmospheric CO2 is recycled via carbonates into the mantle. An increasing concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere results in an increase of the surface temperature. Changes in the surface temperature on the other hand may influence the cooling behaviour of the planet and hence influence its volcanic activity [Phillips et al., 2001]. This feedback relation between mantle convection and atmosphere is not very well understood, since until now mostly either the interior dynamic of a planet or its atmosphere was investigated separately. 2D or 3D mantle convection models to the authors' knowledge haven't been coupled to the atmosphere so far. We have used the 3D spherical simulation code GAIA [Hüttig et al., 2008] including partial melt production and coupled it with the atmosphere module CIDGA using a gray greenhouse model for varying H2O concentrations. This way, not only the influence of mantle dynamics on the atmosphere can be investigated, but also the recoupling effect, that the surface temperature has on the mantle dynamics. So far, we consider one-plate planets without crustal and thus volatile recycling. Phillips et al. [2001] already investigated the coupling effect of the surface temperature on mantle dynamics by using simple parameterized convection models for Venus. In their model a positive feedback mechanism has been observed, i.e., an increase of the surface temperature leads to an increase of partial melt and hence an increase of atmosphere density and surface temperature. Applying our model to Venus, we show that an increase of surface temperature leads not only to an increase of partial melt in the mantle; it also

  12. Large mass hierarchies from strongly-coupled dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athenodorou, Andreas; Bennett, Ed; Bergner, Georg; Elander, Daniel; Lin, C.-J. David; Lucini, Biagio; Piai, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    Besides the Higgs particle discovered in 2012, with mass 125 GeV, recent LHC data show tentative signals for new resonances in diboson as well as diphoton searches at high center-of-mass energies (2 TeV and 750 GeV, respectively). If these signals are confirmed (or other new resonances are discovered at the TeV scale), the large hierarchies between masses of new bosons require a dynamical explanation. Motivated by these tentative signals of new physics, we investigate the theoretical possibility that large hierarchies in the masses of glueballs could arise dynamically in new strongly-coupled gauge theories extending the standard model of particle physics. We study lattice data on non-Abelian gauge theories in the (near-)conformal regime as well as a simple toy model in the context of gauge/gravity dualities. We focus our attention on the ratio R between the mass of the lightest spin-2 and spin-0 resonances, that for technical reasons is a particularly convenient and clean observable to study. For models in which (non-perturbative) large anomalous dimensions arise dynamically, we show indications that this mass ratio can be large, with R>5. Moreover,our results suggest that R might be related to universal properties of the IR fixed point. Our findings provide an interesting step towards understanding large mass ratios in the non-perturbative regime of quantum field theories with (near) IR conformal behaviour.

  13. Coriolis-coupled wave packet dynamics of H + HLi reaction.

    PubMed

    Padmanaban, R; Mahapatra, S

    2006-05-11

    We investigated the effect of Coriolis coupling (CC) on the initial state-selected dynamics of H+HLi reaction by a time-dependent wave packet (WP) approach. Exact quantum scattering calculations were obtained by a WP propagation method based on the Chebyshev polynomial scheme and ab initio potential energy surface of the reacting system. Partial wave contributions up to the total angular momentum J=30 were found to be necessary for the scattering of HLi in its vibrational and rotational ground state up to a collision energy approximately 0.75 eV. For each J value, the projection quantum number K was varied from 0 to min (J, K(max)), with K(max)=8 until J=20 and K(max)=4 for further higher J values. This is because further higher values of K do not have much effect on the dynamics and also because one wishes to maintain the large computational overhead for each calculation within the affordable limit. The initial state-selected integral reaction cross sections and thermal rate constants were calculated by summing up the contributions from all partial waves. These were compared with our previous results on the title system, obtained within the centrifugal sudden and J-shifting approximations, to demonstrate the impact of CC on the dynamics of this system.

  14. Coupled nonlinear aeroelasticity and flight dynamics of fully flexible aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Weihua

    This dissertation introduces an approach to effectively model and analyze the coupled nonlinear aeroelasticity and flight dynamics of highly flexible aircraft. A reduced-order, nonlinear, strain-based finite element framework is used, which is capable of assessing the fundamental impact of structural nonlinear effects in preliminary vehicle design and control synthesis. The cross-sectional stiffness and inertia properties of the wings are calculated along the wing span, and then incorporated into the one-dimensional nonlinear beam formulation. Finite-state unsteady subsonic aerodynamics is used to compute airloads along lifting surfaces. Flight dynamic equations are then introduced to complete the aeroelastic/flight dynamic system equations of motion. Instead of merely considering the flexibility of the wings, the current work allows all members of the vehicle to be flexible. Due to their characteristics of being slender structures, the wings, tail, and fuselage of highly flexible aircraft can be modeled as beams undergoing three dimensional displacements and rotations. New kinematic relationships are developed to handle the split beam systems, such that fully flexible vehicles can be effectively modeled within the existing framework. Different aircraft configurations are modeled and studied, including Single-Wing, Joined-Wing, Blended-Wing-Body, and Flying-Wing configurations. The Lagrange Multiplier Method is applied to model the nodal displacement constraints at the joint locations. Based on the proposed models, roll response and stability studies are conducted on fully flexible and rigidized models. The impacts of the flexibility of different vehicle members on flutter with rigid body motion constraints, flutter in free flight condition, and roll maneuver performance are presented. Also, the static stability of the compressive member of the Joined-Wing configuration is studied. A spatially-distributed discrete gust model is incorporated into the time simulation

  15. Hybrid dynamics in delay-coupled swarms with ``mothership'' networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindes, Jason; Schwartz, Ira

    Swarming behavior continues to be a subject of immense interest because of its centrality in many naturally occurring systems in biology and physics. Moreover, the development of autonomous mobile agents that can mimic the behavior of swarms and can be engineered to perform complex tasks without constant intervention is a very active field of practical research. Here we examine the effects on delay-coupled swarm pattern formation from the inclusion of a small fraction of highly connected nodes, ``motherships'', in the swarm interaction network. We find a variety of new behaviors and bifurcations, including new hybrid motions of previously analyzed patterns. Both numerical and analytic techniques are used to classify the dynamics and construct the phase diagram. The implications for swarm control and robustness from topological heterogeneity are also discussed. This research was funded by the office of Naval Research (ONR), and was performed while JH held a National Research Council Research Associateship Award.

  16. Dynamics of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling including turbulent transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, R. L.; Dum, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    A two dimensional two-fluid MHD model including anomalous resistivity was used to investigate the dynamics of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. When a field-aligned current is generated on auroral field lines, the disturbance propagates towards the ionosphere in the form of a kinetic Alfven wave. When the current exceeds a critical value, microscopic turbulence is produced, which modifies the propagation of the Alfven wave. This process is modeled by a nonlinear collision frequency, which increases with the excess of the drift velocity over the critical value. Turbulence leads to absorption and reflection of the Alfven wave, partially decoupling the generator from the ionosphere. The approach to a steady-state is strongly dependent on the presence or absence of the turbulence. The current is self-limiting, since a current in excess of critical causes a diffusion of the magnetic field perturbation and a reduction of current.

  17. Spin torque driven dynamics of a coupled two-layer structure: Interplay between conservative and dissipative coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romera, M.; Lacoste, B.; Ebels, U.; Buda-Prejbeanu, L. D.

    2016-09-01

    The general concepts of spin wave theory are adapted to the spin torque driven dynamics of a self-polarized system based on two layers coupled via interlayer exchange (conservative coupling) and mutual spin torque (dissipative coupling). An analytical description of the nonlinear dynamics is proposed and validated through numerical simulations. In contrast to the single layer model, the phase equation of the coupled system has a contribution coming from the dissipative part of the LLGS equation. It is shown that this is a major contribution to the frequency mandatory to describe well the most basic features of the dynamics of this coupled system. Using the proposed model a specific feature of coupled dynamics is addressed: the redshift to blueshift transition observed in the frequency current dependence of this kind of exchange coupled systems upon increasing the applied field. It is found that the blueshift regime can only occur in a region of field where the two linear eigenmodes contribute equally to the steady state mode (i.e., high mode hybridization). Finally, a general perturbed Hamiltonian equation for the coupled system is proposed.

  18. Vibrational Dynamics and Guest-Host Coupling in Clathrate Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koza, Michael M.; Schober, Helmut

    Clathrate hydrates may turn out either a blessing or a curse for mankind. On one hand, they constitute a huge reservoir of fossil fuel. On the other hand, their decomposition may liberate large amounts of green house gas and have disastrous consequences on sea floor stability. It is thus of paramount importance to understand the formation and stability of these guest-host compounds. Neutron diffraction has successfully occupied a prominent place on the stage of these scientific investigations. Complete understanding, however, is not achieved without an explanation for the thermal properties of clathrates. In particular, the thermal conductivity has a large influence on clathrate formation and conservation. Neutron spectroscopy allows probing the microscopic dynamics of clathrate hydrates. We will show how comparative studies of vibrations in clathrate hydrates give insight into the coupling of the guest to the host lattice. This coupling together with the anharmonicity of the vibrational modes is shown to lay the foundations for the peculiar thermodynamic properties of clathrate hydrates. The results obtained reach far beyond the specific clathrate system. Similar mechanisms are expected to be at work in any guest-host complex.

  19. Finite-amplitude dynamics of coupled cylindrical menisci.

    PubMed

    Cox, B L; Steen, P H

    2011-10-01

    The cylindrical meniscus is a liquid/gas interface of circular-cap cross-section constrained along its axis and bounded by end-planes. The inviscid motions of coupled cylindrical menisci are studied here. Motions result from the competition between inertia and surface tension forces. Restriction to shapes that are of circular-cap cross-section leads to an ordinary differential equation (ode) model, with the advantage that finite-amplitude stability can be examined. The second-order nonlinear ode model has a Hamiltonian structure, showing dynamical behavior like the Duffing-oscillator. The energy landscape has either a single- or double-welled potential depending on the extent of volume overfill. Total liquid volume is a bifurcation parameter, as in the corresponding problem for coupled spherical-cap droplets. Unlike the spherical-cap problem, however, axial disturbances can also destabilize, depending on overfill. For large volumes, previously known axial stability results are applied to find the limit at which axial symmetry is lost and comparison is made to the Plateau-Rayleigh limit. PMID:21723560

  20. Finite-amplitude dynamics of coupled cylindrical menisci.

    PubMed

    Cox, B L; Steen, P H

    2011-10-01

    The cylindrical meniscus is a liquid/gas interface of circular-cap cross-section constrained along its axis and bounded by end-planes. The inviscid motions of coupled cylindrical menisci are studied here. Motions result from the competition between inertia and surface tension forces. Restriction to shapes that are of circular-cap cross-section leads to an ordinary differential equation (ode) model, with the advantage that finite-amplitude stability can be examined. The second-order nonlinear ode model has a Hamiltonian structure, showing dynamical behavior like the Duffing-oscillator. The energy landscape has either a single- or double-welled potential depending on the extent of volume overfill. Total liquid volume is a bifurcation parameter, as in the corresponding problem for coupled spherical-cap droplets. Unlike the spherical-cap problem, however, axial disturbances can also destabilize, depending on overfill. For large volumes, previously known axial stability results are applied to find the limit at which axial symmetry is lost and comparison is made to the Plateau-Rayleigh limit.

  1. Dynamical recurrence and the quantum control of coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Genoni, Marco G; Serafini, Alessio; Kim, M S; Burgarth, Daniel

    2012-04-13

    Controllability--the possibility of performing any target dynamics by applying a set of available operations--is a fundamental requirement for the practical use of any physical system. For finite-dimensional systems, such as spin systems, precise criteria to establish controllability, such as the so-called rank criterion, are well known. However, most physical systems require a description in terms of an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space whose controllability properties are poorly understood. Here, we investigate infinite-dimensional bosonic quantum systems--encompassing quantum light, ensembles of bosonic atoms, motional degrees of freedom of ions, and nanomechanical oscillators--governed by quadratic Hamiltonians (such that their evolution is analogous to coupled harmonic oscillators). After having highlighted the intimate connection between controllability and recurrence in the Hilbert space, we prove that, for coupled oscillators, a simple extra condition has to be fulfilled to extend the rank criterion to infinite-dimensional quadratic systems. Further, we present a useful application of our finding, by proving indirect controllability of a chain of harmonic oscillators.

  2. Dynamic Coupling among Protein Binding, Sliding, and DNA Bending Revealed by Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cheng; Terakawa, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Shoji

    2016-07-13

    Protein binding to DNA changes the DNA's structure, and altered DNA structure can, in turn, modulate the dynamics of protein binding. This mutual dependency is poorly understood. Here we investigated dynamic couplings among protein binding to DNA, protein sliding on DNA, and DNA bending by applying a coarse-grained simulation method to the bacterial architectural protein HU and 14 other DNA-binding proteins. First, we verified our method by showing that the simulated HU exhibits a weak preference for A/T-rich regions of DNA and a much higher affinity for gapped and nicked DNA, consistent with biochemical experiments. The high affinity was attributed to a local DNA bend, but not the specific chemical moiety of the gap/nick. The long-time dynamic analysis revealed that HU sliding is associated with the movement of the local DNA bending site. Deciphering single sliding steps, we found the coupling between HU sliding and DNA bending is akin to neither induced-fit nor population-shift; instead they moved concomitantly. This is reminiscent of a cation transfer on DNA and can be viewed as a protein version of polaron-like sliding. Interestingly, on shorter time scales, HU paused when the DNA was highly bent at the bound position and escaped from pauses once the DNA spontaneously returned to a less bent structure. The HU sliding is largely regulated by DNA bending dynamics. With 14 other proteins, we explored the generality and versatility of the dynamic coupling and found that 6 of the 15 assayed proteins exhibit the polaron-like sliding. PMID:27309278

  3. Drift dynamics in a coupled model initialized for decadal forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Gomez, Emilia; Cassou, Christophe; Ruprich-Robert, Yohan; Fernandez, Elodie; Terray, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Drifts are always present in models when initialized from observed conditions because of intrinsic model errors; those potentially affect any type of climate predictions based on numerical experiments. Model drifts are usually removed through more or less sophisticated techniques for skill assessment, but they are rarely analysed. In this study, we provide a detailed physical and dynamical description of the drifts in the CNRM-CM5 coupled model using a set of decadal retrospective forecasts produced within CMIP5. The scope of the paper is to give some physical insights and lines of approach to, on one hand, implement more appropriate techniques of initialisation that minimize the drift in forecast mode, and on the other hand, eventually reduce the systematic biases of the models. We first document a novel protocol for ocean initialization adopted by the CNRM-CERFACS group for forecasting purpose in CMIP5. Initial states for starting dates of the predictions are obtained from a preliminary integration of the coupled model where full-field ocean surface temperature and salinity are restored everywhere to observations through flux derivative terms and full-field subsurface fields (below the prognostic ocean mixed layer) are nudged towards NEMOVAR reanalyses. Nudging is applied only outside the 15°S-15°N band allowing for dynamical balance between the depth and tilt of the tropical thermocline and the model intrinsic biased wind. A sensitivity experiment to the latitudinal extension of no-nudging zone (1°S-1°N instead of 15°, hereafter referred to as NOEQ) has been carried out. In this paper, we concentrate our analyses on two specific regions: the tropical Pacific and the North Atlantic basins. In the Pacific, we show that the first year of the forecasts is characterized by a quasi-systematic excitation of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) warm events whatever the starting dates. This, through ocean-to-atmosphere heat transfer materialized by diabatic heating

  4. Dynamically reconfigurable nanoscale modulators utilizing coupled hybrid plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Charles; Helmy, Amr S.

    2015-01-01

    The balance between extinction ratio (ER) and insertion loss (IL) dictates strict trade-off when designing travelling-wave electro-optic modulators. This in turn entails significant compromise in device footprint (L3dB) or energy consumption (E). In this work, we report a nanoscale modulator architecture that alleviates this trade-off while providing dynamic reconfigurability that was previously unattainable. This is achieved with the aide of three mechanisms: (1) Utilization of epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) effect, which maximizes the attainable attenuation that an ultra-thin active material can inflict on an optical mode. (2) Non-resonant coupled-plasmonic structure which supports modes with athermal long-range propagation. (3) Triode-like biasing scheme for flexible manipulation of field symmetry and subsequently waveguide attributes. By electrically inducing indium tin oxide (ITO) to be in a local ENZ state, we show that a Si/ITO/HfO2/Al/HfO2/ITO/Si coupled-plasmonic waveguide can provide amplitude modulation with ER = 4.83 dB/μm, IL = 0.03 dB/μm, L3dB = 622 nm, and E = 14.8 fJ, showing at least an order of magnitude improvement in modulator figure-of-merit and power efficiency compared to other waveguide platforms. Employing different biasing permutations, the same waveguide can then be reconfigured for phase and 4-quadrature-amplitude modulation, with actively device length of only 5.53 μm and 17.78  μm respectively. PMID:26189813

  5. Dynamically reconfigurable nanoscale modulators utilizing coupled hybrid plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Charles; Helmy, Amr S.

    2015-07-01

    The balance between extinction ratio (ER) and insertion loss (IL) dictates strict trade-off when designing travelling-wave electro-optic modulators. This in turn entails significant compromise in device footprint (L3dB) or energy consumption (E). In this work, we report a nanoscale modulator architecture that alleviates this trade-off while providing dynamic reconfigurability that was previously unattainable. This is achieved with the aide of three mechanisms: (1) Utilization of epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) effect, which maximizes the attainable attenuation that an ultra-thin active material can inflict on an optical mode. (2) Non-resonant coupled-plasmonic structure which supports modes with athermal long-range propagation. (3) Triode-like biasing scheme for flexible manipulation of field symmetry and subsequently waveguide attributes. By electrically inducing indium tin oxide (ITO) to be in a local ENZ state, we show that a Si/ITO/HfO2/Al/HfO2/ITO/Si coupled-plasmonic waveguide can provide amplitude modulation with ER = 4.83 dB/μm, IL = 0.03 dB/μm, L3dB = 622 nm, and E = 14.8 fJ, showing at least an order of magnitude improvement in modulator figure-of-merit and power efficiency compared to other waveguide platforms. Employing different biasing permutations, the same waveguide can then be reconfigured for phase and 4-quadrature-amplitude modulation, with actively device length of only 5.53 μm and 17.78  μm respectively.

  6. Dynamically reconfigurable nanoscale modulators utilizing coupled hybrid plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Charles; Helmy, Amr S

    2015-01-01

    The balance between extinction ratio (ER) and insertion loss (IL) dictates strict trade-off when designing travelling-wave electro-optic modulators. This in turn entails significant compromise in device footprint (L3dB) or energy consumption (E). In this work, we report a nanoscale modulator architecture that alleviates this trade-off while providing dynamic reconfigurability that was previously unattainable. This is achieved with the aide of three mechanisms: (1) Utilization of epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) effect, which maximizes the attainable attenuation that an ultra-thin active material can inflict on an optical mode. (2) Non-resonant coupled-plasmonic structure which supports modes with athermal long-range propagation. (3) Triode-like biasing scheme for flexible manipulation of field symmetry and subsequently waveguide attributes. By electrically inducing indium tin oxide (ITO) to be in a local ENZ state, we show that a Si/ITO/HfO2/Al/HfO2/ITO/Si coupled-plasmonic waveguide can provide amplitude modulation with ER = 4.83 dB/μm, IL = 0.03 dB/μm, L3dB = 622 nm, and E = 14.8 fJ, showing at least an order of magnitude improvement in modulator figure-of-merit and power efficiency compared to other waveguide platforms. Employing different biasing permutations, the same waveguide can then be reconfigured for phase and 4-quadrature-amplitude modulation, with actively device length of only 5.53 μm and 17.78  μm respectively. PMID:26189813

  7. Dynamically reconfigurable nanoscale modulators utilizing coupled hybrid plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Charles; Helmy, Amr S

    2015-07-20

    The balance between extinction ratio (ER) and insertion loss (IL) dictates strict trade-off when designing travelling-wave electro-optic modulators. This in turn entails significant compromise in device footprint (L3dB) or energy consumption (E). In this work, we report a nanoscale modulator architecture that alleviates this trade-off while providing dynamic reconfigurability that was previously unattainable. This is achieved with the aide of three mechanisms: (1) Utilization of epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) effect, which maximizes the attainable attenuation that an ultra-thin active material can inflict on an optical mode. (2) Non-resonant coupled-plasmonic structure which supports modes with athermal long-range propagation. (3) Triode-like biasing scheme for flexible manipulation of field symmetry and subsequently waveguide attributes. By electrically inducing indium tin oxide (ITO) to be in a local ENZ state, we show that a Si/ITO/HfO2/Al/HfO2/ITO/Si coupled-plasmonic waveguide can provide amplitude modulation with ER = 4.83 dB/μm, IL = 0.03 dB/μm, L3dB = 622 nm, and E = 14.8 fJ, showing at least an order of magnitude improvement in modulator figure-of-merit and power efficiency compared to other waveguide platforms. Employing different biasing permutations, the same waveguide can then be reconfigured for phase and 4-quadrature-amplitude modulation, with actively device length of only 5.53 μm and 17.78  μm respectively.

  8. Dynamics of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling including turbulent transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, R. L.; Dum, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamics of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling has been investigated by means of a two-dimensional two-fluid MHD model including anomalous resistivity. When field-aligned current is generated on auroral field lines, the disturbance propagates toward the ionosphere in the form of a kinetic Alfven wave. When the current exceeds a critical value, microscopic turbulence is produced, which modifies the propagation of the Alfven wave. This process is modeled by a nonlinear collision frequency, which increases with the excess of the drift velocity over the critical value. The system evolves toward an electrostatic structure, with the perpendicular electric field having a shorter scale than the field-aligned current. The approach to a steady state is strongly dependent on the presence or absence of the turbulence and on the boundary conditions imposed in the generator. As current is increased or scale size is decreased, the turbulent region reflects and absorbs most of the Alfven wave energy, decoupling the generator from the ionosphere.

  9. Wealth distribution of simple exchange models coupled with extremal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagatella-Flores, N.; Rodríguez-Achach, M.; Coronel-Brizio, H. F.; Hernández-Montoya, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Punctuated Equilibrium (PE) states that after long periods of evolutionary quiescence, species evolution can take place in short time intervals, where sudden differentiation makes new species emerge and some species extinct. In this paper, we introduce and study the effect of punctuated equilibrium on two different asset exchange models: the yard sale model (YS, winner gets a random fraction of a poorer player's wealth) and the theft and fraud model (TF, winner gets a random fraction of the loser's wealth). The resulting wealth distribution is characterized using the Gini index. In order to do this, we consider PE as a perturbation with probability ρ of being applied. We compare the resulting values of the Gini index at different increasing values of ρ in both models. We found that in the case of the TF model, the Gini index reduces as the perturbation ρ increases, not showing dependence with the agents number. While for YS we observe a phase transition which happens around ρc = 0.79. For perturbations ρ <ρc the Gini index reaches the value of one as time increases (an extreme wealth condensation state), whereas for perturbations greater than or equal to ρc the Gini index becomes different to one, avoiding the system reaches this extreme state. We show that both simple exchange models coupled with PE dynamics give more realistic results. In particular for YS, we observe a power low decay of wealth distribution.

  10. Coupling all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of ions in water with Brownian dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of ions (K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Cl−) in aqueous solutions are investigated. Water is described using the SPC/E model. A stochastic coarse-grained description for ion behaviour is presented and parametrized using MD simulations. It is given as a system of coupled stochastic and ordinary differential equations, describing the ion position, velocity and acceleration. The stochastic coarse-grained model provides an intermediate description between all-atom MD simulations and Brownian dynamics (BD) models. It is used to develop a multiscale method which uses all-atom MD simulations in parts of the computational domain and (less detailed) BD simulations in the remainder of the domain. PMID:27118886

  11. Coupled Radiative-Dynamical GCM Simulations of Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, Adam P.; Fortney, J. J.; Lian, Y.; Marley, M. S.; Knutson, H. A.; Charbonneau, D.

    2008-09-01

    The stellar flux incident on hot Jupiters -- gas giants within 0.1 AU of their stars -- is expected to drive an atmospheric circulation that shapes the day-night temperature difference, infrared lightcurves, spectrum, albedo, and atmospheric composition. Although several atmospheric-dynamics models of these objects have been published, all adopt simplified heating/cooling schemes that preclude robust predictions for the 3D temperature patterns, spectra, and lightcurves. Here, we present cloud-free simulations of hot Jupiters from the first 3D general circulation model (GCM) that couples the atmospheric dynamics to a realistic representation of radiative transfer. We emphasize HD189733b and HD209458b, which are the best observationally constrained hot Jupiters and which represent an interesting pair because one (HD209458b) appears to have a dayside stratosphere while the other (HD189733b) does not. Our simulations develop large day-night temperature contrasts and winds reaching speeds of several km/sec. A prograde equatorial jet forms with retrograde flows at higher latitudes, which leads to an eastward displacement of the hottest regions from the substellar point and coldest regions from the antistellar point. For HD189733b, our predicted lightcurves compare favorably with lightcurves observed at 8 and 24 microns with the Spitzer Space Telescope, including the modest day-night flux variation and offset of the flux peak from the time of secondary eclipse. The simulated temperatures decrease with altitude, leading to a spectrum dominated by absorption features. For HD209458b, inclusion of TiO and VO opacity leads to a dayside thermal inversion layer (stratosphere) where temperatures rise above 2000 K, consistent with suggestions offered to explain the observed secondary-eclipse spectrum. Interestingly, however, our 3D models do not match the observed spectrum, which suggests that our simulated stratosphere does not yet have the correct properties (e.g., altitude and

  12. Energy Band and Josephson Dynamics of Spin-Orbit Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Yu, Zi-Fa; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2015-10-01

    We theoretically investigate the energy band structure and Josephson dynamics of a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a double-well potential. We study the energy band structure and the corresponding tunneling dynamics of the system by properly adjusting the SO coupling, Raman coupling, Zeeman field and atomic interactions. The coupled effects of SO coupling, Raman coupling, Zeeman field and atomic interactions lead to the appearance of complex energy band structure including the loop structure. Particularly, the emergence of the loop structure in energy band also depends on SO coupling, Raman coupling, Zeeman field and atomic interactions. Correspondingly, the Josephson dynamics of the system are strongly related to the energy band structure. Especially, the emergence of the loop structure results in complex tunneling dynamics, including suppression-revival transitions and self-trapping of atoms transfer between two spin states and two wells. This engineering provides a possible means for studying energy level and corresponding dynamics of two-species SO coupled BECs. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11274255 and 11305132, by Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20136203110001, by the Natural Science Foundation of Gansu province under Grant No. 2011GS04358, and by Creation of Science and Technology of Northwest Normal University under Grant Nos. NWNU-KJCXGC-03-48, NWNU-LKQN-12-12

  13. Quantum dynamics with fermion coupled coherent states: Theory and application to electron dynamics in laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kirrander, Adam; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.

    2011-09-15

    We present an alternate version of the coupled-coherent-state method, specifically adapted for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for multielectron dynamics in atoms and molecules. This theory takes explicit account of the exchange symmetry of fermion particles, and it uses fermion molecular dynamics to propagate trajectories. As a demonstration, calculations in the He atom are performed using the full Hamiltonian and accurate experimental parameters. Single- and double-ionization yields by 160-fs and 780-nm laser pulses are calculated as a function of field intensity in the range 10{sup 14}-10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}, and good agreement with experiments by Walker et al. is obtained. Since this method is trajectory based, mechanistic analysis of the dynamics is straightforward. We also calculate semiclassical momentum distributions for double ionization following 25-fs and 795-nm pulses at 1.5x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, in order to compare them with the detailed experiments by Rudenko et al. For this more challenging task, full convergence is not achieved. However, major effects such as the fingerlike structures in the momentum distribution are reproduced.

  14. Suppression of dynamics and frequency synchronization in coupled slow and fast dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Kajari; Ambika, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present our study on the emergent states of two interacting nonlinear systems with differing dynamical time scales. We find that the inability of the interacting systems to fall in step leads to difference in phase as well as change in amplitude. If the mismatch is small, the systems settle to a frequency synchronized state with constant phase difference. But as mismatch in time scale increases, the systems have to compromise to a state of no oscillations. We illustrate this for standard nonlinear systems and identify the regions of quenched dynamics in the parameter plane. The transition curves to this state are studied analytically and confirmed by direct numerical simulations. As an important special case, we revisit the well-known model of coupled ocean-atmosphere system used in climate studies for the interactive dynamics of a fast oscillating atmosphere and slowly changing ocean. Our study in this context indicates occurrence of multi stable periodic states and steady states of convection coexisting in the system, with a complex basin structure.

  15. Routes to complex dynamics in a ring of unidirectionally coupled systems.

    PubMed

    Perlikowski, P; Yanchuk, S; Wolfrum, M; Stefanski, A; Mosiolek, P; Kapitaniak, T

    2010-03-01

    We study the dynamics of a ring of unidirectionally coupled autonomous Duffing oscillators. Starting from a situation where the individual oscillator without coupling has only trivial equilibrium dynamics, the coupling induces complicated transitions to periodic, quasiperiodic, chaotic, and hyperchaotic behavior. We study these transitions in detail for small and large numbers of oscillators. Particular attention is paid to the role of unstable periodic solutions for the appearance of chaotic rotating waves, spatiotemporal structures, and the Eckhaus effect for a large number of oscillators. Our analytical and numerical results are confirmed by a simple experiment based on the electronic implementation of coupled Duffing oscillators. PMID:20370266

  16. Interhemispheric Dynamical Coupling to the Southern Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Damian; Alexander, Simon; Vincent, Robert

    The 15-year set of radar observations of Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) winds obtained from Davis station in Antarctica (69S, 78E) provide an opportunity for studies of interhemispheric coupling. Observations and modelling described by Becker and Fritts [2006] suggests that wintertime planetary wave activity, and the gravity wave filtering associated with it, affect the global meridional residual circulation that drives the summer mesosphere from radiative equilibrium. In this context, southern hemisphere stations have the advantage that planetary wave activity of their opposite hemisphere is of greater magnitude making a vari-able response likely. This study uses correlation and superposed epoch analysis, and proposed coupling mechanisms [e.g. Karlsson et al., 2009] to identify atmospheric regions that are po-tentially coupled to the polar MLT. The seasonal variation of that coupling and the influences on that coupling of large scale waves such as the QBO are also investigated. References: Becker, E. and Fritts, D. C., Enhanced gravity-wave activity and interhemispheric coupling during the MACWAVE/MIDAS northern summer program 2002, Ann Geophys, 24, 1175-1188, 2006. Karlsson, B, McLandress, M. and Shepherd, T. G., Inter-hemispheric mesospheric coupling in a comprehensive middle atmosphere model, J. Atmos, Sol-Terr Phys., 71, 518-530, 2009.

  17. Dynamics of non-minimally coupled perfect fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, Dario; Liberati, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    We present a general formulation of the theory for a non-minimally coupled perfect fluid in which both conformal and disformal couplings are present. We discuss how such non-minimal coupling is compatible with the assumptions of a perfect fluid and derive both the Einstein and the fluid equations for such model. We found that, while the Euler equation is significantly modified with the introduction of an extra force related to the local gradients of the curvature, the continuity equation is unaltered, thus allowing for the definition of conserved quantities along the fluid flow. As an application to cosmology and astrophysics we compute the effects of the non-minimal coupling on a Friedmann-Lemaȋtre-Robertson-Walker metric at both background and linear perturbation level and on the Newtonian limit of our theory.

  18. Dynamic analysis of pretwisted elastically-coupled rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.; Hinnant, Howard E.

    1994-01-01

    The accuracy of using a one-dimensional analysis to predict frequencies of elastically-coupled highly-twisted rotor blades is addressed. Degrees of freedom associated with shear deformation are statically condensed from the formulation, so the analysis uses only those degrees of freedom associated with classical beam theory. The effects of cross section deformation (warping) are considered, and are shown to become significant for some types of elastic coupling. Improved results are demonstrated for highly-coupled blade structures through account of warping in a local cross section analysis, without explicit inclusion of these effects in the beam analysis. A convergence study is also provided which investigates the potential for improving efficiency of elastically-coupled beam analysis through implementation of a p-version beam finite element.

  19. Dynamic analysis of pretwisted elastically-coupled rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.; Hinnant, Howard E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the accuracy of using a one-dimensional analysis to predict frequencies of elastically-coupled highly-twisted rotor blades. Degrees of freedom associated with shear deformation are statically condensed from the formulation, so the analysis uses only those degrees of freedom associated with classical beam theory. The effects of cross section deformation (warping) are considered, and are shown to become significant for some types of elastic coupling. Improved results are demonstrated for highly-coupled blade structures through account of warping in a local cross section analysis, without explicit inclusion of these effects in the beam analysis. A convergence study is also provided which investigates the potential for improving efficiency of elastically-coupled beam analysis through implementation of a p-version beam finite element.

  20. Dynamics of the Bianchi I model with non-minimally coupled scalar field near the singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrycyna, Orest; Szydłowski, Marek

    2013-02-01

    Dynamical systems methods are used to study evolution of Bianchi I model with a scalar field. We show that inclusion of non-minimal coupling term between the scalar field and the curvature changes evolution of the model compared with the minimally coupled case. In the model with non-minimally coupled scalar field there is a new type of singularity dominated by the non-minimal coupling term. We examine the impact of non-minimal coupling on the anisotropy evolution and demonstrate the existence of its minimal value in the generic case.

  1. A multiscale coupling method for the modeling of dynamics of solids with application to brittle cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiantao Yang, Jerry Z. E, Weinan

    2010-05-20

    We present a multiscale model for numerical simulations of dynamics of crystalline solids. The method combines the continuum nonlinear elasto-dynamics model, which models the stress waves and physical loading conditions, and molecular dynamics model, which provides the nonlinear constitutive relation and resolves the atomic structures near local defects. The coupling of the two models is achieved based on a general framework for multiscale modeling - the heterogeneous multiscale method (HMM). We derive an explicit coupling condition at the atomistic/continuum interface. Application to the dynamics of brittle cracks under various loading conditions is presented as test examples.

  2. Dynamical coupled-channels study of meson production reactions from EBAC@Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroyuki Kamano

    2011-10-01

    We present the current status of a combined and simultaneous analysis of meson production reactions based on a dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) model, which is conducted at Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) of Jefferson Lab.

  3. Dynamic acousto-optic control of a strongly coupled photonic molecule.

    PubMed

    Kapfinger, Stephan; Reichert, Thorsten; Lichtmannecker, Stefan; Müller, Kai; Finley, Jonathan J; Wixforth, Achim; Kaniber, Michael; Krenner, Hubert J

    2015-01-01

    Strongly confined photonic modes can couple to quantum emitters and mechanical excitations. To harness the full potential in quantum photonic circuits, interactions between different constituents have to be precisely and dynamically controlled. Here, a prototypical coupled element, a photonic molecule defined in a photonic crystal membrane, is controlled by a radio frequency surface acoustic wave. The sound wave is tailored to deliberately switch on and off the bond of the photonic molecule on sub-nanosecond timescales. In time-resolved experiments, the acousto-optically controllable coupling is directly observed as clear anticrossings between the two nanophotonic modes. The coupling strength is determined directly from the experimental data. Both the time dependence of the tuning and the inter-cavity coupling strength are found to be in excellent agreement with numerical calculations. The demonstrated mechanical technique can be directly applied for dynamic quantum gate operations in state-of-the-art-coupled nanophotonic, quantum cavity electrodynamic and optomechanical systems. PMID:26436203

  4. Reconstruction of two-dimensional phase dynamics from experiments on coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Blaha, Karen A; Pikovsky, Arkady; Rosenblum, Michael; Clark, Matthew T; Rusin, Craig G; Hudson, John L

    2011-10-01

    Phase models are a powerful method to quantify the coupled dynamics of nonlinear oscillators from measured data. We use two phase modeling methods to quantify the dynamics of pairs of coupled electrochemical oscillators, based on the phases of the two oscillators independently and the phase difference, respectively. We discuss the benefits of the two-dimensional approach relative to the one-dimensional approach using phase difference. We quantify the dependence of the coupling functions on the coupling magnitude and coupling time delay. We show differences in synchronization predictions of the two models using a toy model. We show that the two-dimensional approach reveals behavior not detected by the one-dimensional model in a driven experimental oscillator. This approach is broadly applicable to quantify interactions between nonlinear oscillators, especially where intrinsic oscillator sensitivity and coupling evolve with time.

  5. Strain coupling and dynamic relaxation dynamics associated with ferroic and multiferroic phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Michael

    Almost any change that occurs in a crystal structure results in some lattice strain and it is inevitable that this will appear also as a change in elastic properties. It follows that one of the most characteristic features of phase transitions, whether driven by structural, magnetic or electronic effects, will be variations of elastic constants. In addition, transformation microstructures such as ferroelastic twins may be mobile under some conditions of temperature and stress and will give characteristic patterns of acoustic loss when measured by dynamical methods. Thanks substantially to the pioneering work of Dr Albert Migliori in developing the technique of Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS), it has been possible to follow the elastic and anelastic behaviour associated with phase transitions quantitatively as a function of temperature through the interval 2-1600 K. It is also possible to add magnetic and electric fields. The frequency window 0.1-2 MHz and inherently small strains of RUS appear to be particularly sensitive for observing the consequences of strain coupling and microstructure relaxation dynamics. Recent collaborative work carried out using the RUS facilities in Cambridge will be presented, relating to phase transitions in multiferroic perovskites, such as PbZr0.53Ti0.47O3-PbFe0.5Nb0.5O3 and Sr2FeMoO6, the ferroelectric/improper ferroelastic transition in GeTe, and magnetoelastic behaviour of EuTiO3. A common feature of these is softening of the shear modulus ahead of the transition that is not expected on the basis of linear/quadratic coupling between strain and the driving order parameter (improper ferroelastic). This appears to be due to coupling of acoustic modes with unseen central modes which are related to collective motions of domains with short range order. In some cases the ferroelastic twin walls have a well defined freezing interval (GeTe) whereas anelastic loss and stiffening over a wide temperature interval appears to be diagnostic

  6. An investigation of algebraic quantum dynamics for mesoscopic coupled electric circuits with mutual inductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavani, H.; Kolur, E. Rahmanpour

    2016-08-01

    Based on the electrical charge discreteness, the Hamiltonian operator for the mutual inductance coupled quantum mesoscopic LC circuits has been found. The persistent current on two driven coupled mesoscopic electric pure L circuits (two quantum loops) has been obtained by using algebraic quantum dynamic approach. The influence of the mutual inductance on energy spectrum and quantum fluctuations of the charge and current for two coupled quantum electric mesoscopic LC circuits have been investigated.

  7. A Dynamic Coupled Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Ring Current Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pembroke, Asher

    In this thesis we describe a coupled model of Earth's magnetosphere that consists of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation, the MIX ionosphere solver and the Rice Convection Model (RCM). We report some results of the coupled model using idealized inputs and model parameters. The algorithmic and physical components of the model are described, including the transfer of magnetic field information and plasma boundary conditions to the RCM and the return of ring current plasma properties to the LFM. Crucial aspects of the coupling include the restriction of RCM to regions where field-line averaged plasma-beta ¡=1, the use of a plasmasphere model, and the MIX ionosphere model. Compared to stand-alone MHD, the coupled model produces a substantial increase in ring current pressure and reduction of the magnetic field near the Earth. In the ionosphere, stronger region-1 and region-2 Birkeland currents are seen in the coupled model but with no significant change in the cross polar cap potential drop, while the region-2 currents shielded the low-latitude convection potential. In addition, oscillations in the magnetic field are produced at geosynchronous orbit with the coupled code. The diagnostics of entropy and mass content indicate that these oscillations are associated with low-entropy flow channels moving in from the tail and may be related to bursty bulk flows and bubbles seen in observations. As with most complex numerical models, there is the ongoing challenge of untangling numerical artifacts and physics, and we find that while there is still much room for improvement, the results presented here are encouraging. Finally, we introduce several new methods for magnetospheric visualization and analysis, including a fluid-spatial volume for RCM and a field-aligned analysis mesh for the LFM. The latter allows us to construct novel visualizations of flux tubes, drift surfaces, topological boundaries, and bursty-bulk flows.

  8. Collective dynamics of a spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fang-Qi; Wang, Jian-Jun; Yu, Zi-Fa; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2016-02-01

    We study the collective dynamics of the spin-orbit coupled two pseudospin components of a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in a quasi-one-dimensional harmonic potential, by using variational and directly numerical approach of binary mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii equations. The results show that, because of strong coupling of spin-orbit coupling (SOC), Rabi coupling, and atomic interaction, the collective dynamics of the system behave as complex characters. When the Rabi coupling is absent, the density profiles of the system preserve the Gauss type and the wave packets do harmonic oscillations. The amplitude of the collective oscillations increases with SOC. Furthermore, when the SOC strength increases, the dipole oscillations of the two pseudospin components undergo a transition from in-phase to out-of-phase oscillations. When the Rabi coupling present, there will exist a critical value of SOC strength (which depends on the Rabi coupling and atomic interaction). If the SOC strength is less than this critical value, the density profiles of the system can preserve the Gauss type and the wave packets do anharmonic (the frequency of dipole oscillations depends on SOC) oscillations synchronously (i.e., in-phase oscillations). However, if the SOC strength is larger than this critical value, the wave packets are dynamically fragmented and the stable dipole oscillations of the system can not exist. The collective dynamics of the system can be controlled by adjusting the atomic interaction, SOC, and Rabi-coupling strength.

  9. Collective dynamics of a spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fang-Qi; Wang, Jian-Jun; Yu, Zi-Fa; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2016-02-01

    We study the collective dynamics of the spin-orbit coupled two pseudospin components of a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in a quasi-one-dimensional harmonic potential, by using variational and directly numerical approach of binary mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii equations. The results show that, because of strong coupling of spin-orbit coupling (SOC), Rabi coupling, and atomic interaction, the collective dynamics of the system behave as complex characters. When the Rabi coupling is absent, the density profiles of the system preserve the Gauss type and the wave packets do harmonic oscillations. The amplitude of the collective oscillations increases with SOC. Furthermore, when the SOC strength increases, the dipole oscillations of the two pseudospin components undergo a transition from in-phase to out-of-phase oscillations. When the Rabi coupling present, there will exist a critical value of SOC strength (which depends on the Rabi coupling and atomic interaction). If the SOC strength is less than this critical value, the density profiles of the system can preserve the Gauss type and the wave packets do anharmonic (the frequency of dipole oscillations depends on SOC) oscillations synchronously (i.e., in-phase oscillations). However, if the SOC strength is larger than this critical value, the wave packets are dynamically fragmented and the stable dipole oscillations of the system can not exist. The collective dynamics of the system can be controlled by adjusting the atomic interaction, SOC, and Rabi-coupling strength.

  10. Coupled Thermo-Mechanical Analyses of Dynamically Loaded Rubber Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2000-01-01

    A procedure that models coupled thermo-mechanical deformations of viscoelastic rubber cylinders by employing the ABAQUS finite element code is described. Computational simulations of hysteretic heating are presented for several tall and short rubber cylinders both with and without a steel disk at their centers. The cylinders are compressed axially and are then cyclically loaded about the compressed state. The non-uniform hysteretic heating of the rubber cylinders containing a steel disk is presented. The analyses performed suggest that the coupling procedure should be considered for further development as a design tool for rubber degradation studies.

  11. Coupling dynamic analysis of spacecraft with multiple cylindrical tanks and flexible appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-Jun; Yue, Bao-Zeng; Huang, Hua

    2016-02-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the coupling dynamic analysis of a complex spacecraft consisting of one main rigid platform, multiple liquid-filled cylindrical tanks, and a number of flexible appendages. Firstly, the carrier potential function equations of liquid in the tanks are deduced according to the wall boundary conditions. Through employing the Fourier-Bessel series expansion method, the dynamic boundaries conditions on a curved free-surface under a low-gravity environment are transformed to general simple differential equations and the rigid-liquid coupled sloshing dynamic state equations of liquid in tanks are obtained. The state vectors of rigid-liquid coupled equations are composed with the modal coordinates of the relative potential function and the modal coordinates of wave height. Based on the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory and the D'Alembert's principle, the rigid-flexible coupled dynamic state equations of flexible appendages are directly derived, and the coordinate transform matrixes of maneuvering flexible appendages are precisely computed as time-varying. Then, the coupling dynamics state equations of the overall system of the spacecraft are modularly built by means of the Lagrange's equations in terms of quasi-coordinates. Lastly, the coupling dynamic performances of a typical complex spacecraft are studied. The availability and reliability of the presented method are also confirmed.

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Mechanics and Its Coupling to Cerebrovascular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linninger, Andreas A.; Tangen, Kevin; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Frim, David

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is not stagnant but displays fascinating oscillatory flow patterns inside the ventricular system and reversing fluid exchange between the cranial vault and spinal compartment. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of pulsatile CSF motion. Observations contradicting classical views about its bulk production and clearance are highlighted. A clinical account of diseases of abnormal CSF flow dynamics, including hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, Chiari malformation type 1, and pseudotumor cerebri, is also given. We survey medical imaging modalities used to observe intracranial dynamics in vivo. Additionally, we assess the state of the art in predictive models of CSF dynamics. The discussion addresses open questions regarding CSF dynamics as they relate to the understanding and management of diseases.

  13. Dynamic Coupling of Alaska Based Ecosystem and Geophysical Models into an Integrated Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, A.; Carman, T. B.

    2012-12-01

    As scientific models and the challenges they address have grown in complexity and scope, so has interest in dynamically coupling or integrating these models. Dynamic model coupling presents software engineering challenges stemming from differences in model architectures, differences in development styles between modeling groups, and memory and run time performance concerns. The Alaska Integrated Ecosystem Modeling (AIEM) project aims to dynamically couple three independently developed scientific models so that each model can exchange run-time data with each of the other models. The models being coupled are a stochastic fire dynamics model (ALFRESCO), a permafrost model (GIPL), and a soil and vegetation model (DVM-DOS-TEM). The scientific research objectives of the AIEM project are to: 1) use the coupled models for increasing our understanding of climate change and other stressors on landscape level physical and ecosystem processes, and; 2) provide support for resource conservation planning and decision making. The objectives related to the computer models themselves are modifiability, maintainability, and performance of the coupled and individual models. Modifiability and maintainability are especially important in a research context because source codes must be continually adapted to address new scientific concepts. Performance is crucial to delivering results in a timely manner. To achieve the objectives while addressing the challenges in dynamic model coupling, we have designed an architecture that emphasizes high cohesion for each individual model and loose coupling between the models. Each model will retain the ability to run independently, or to be available as a linked library to the coupled model. Performance is facilitated by parallelism in the spatial dimension. With close collaboration among modeling groups, the methodology described here has demonstrated the feasibility of coupling complex ecological and geophysical models to provide managers with more

  14. Memory and Depressive Symptoms Are Dynamically Linked among Married Couples: Longitudinal Evidence from the AHEAD Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerstorf, Denis; Hoppmann, Christiane A.; Kadlec, Kelly M.; McArdle, John J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined dyadic interrelations between episodic memory and depressive symptom trajectories of change in old and advanced old age. The authors applied dynamic models to 10-year incomplete longitudinal data of initially 1,599 married couples from the study of Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (M[subscript age] = 75 years at…

  15. Dynamics of two coupled semiconductor spin qubits in a noisy environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Sarma, S.; Throckmorton, Robert E.; Wu, Yang-Le

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically consider the temporal dynamics of two coupled spin qubits (e.g., semiconductor quantum dots) driven by the interqubit spin-spin coupling. The presence of environmental noise (e.g., charge traps, nuclear spins, random magnetic impurities) is accounted for by including random magnetic field and random interqubit coupling terms in the Hamiltonian. Both Heisenberg coupling and Ising coupling between the spin qubits are considered, corresponding respectively to exchange and capacitive gates as appropriate for single spin and singlet-triplet semiconductor qubit systems, respectively. Both exchange (Heisenberg) and capacitive (Ising) coupling situations can be solved numerically exactly even in the presence of noise, leading to the key findings that (i) the steady-state return probability to the initial state remains close to unity in the presence of strong noise for many, but not all, starting spin configurations, and (ii) the return probability as a function of time is oscillatory with a characteristic noise-controlled decay toward the steady-state value. We also provide results for the magnetization dynamics of the coupled two-qubit system. Our predicted dynamics can be directly tested in the already existing semiconductor spin qubit setups providing insight into their coherent interaction dynamics. Retention of the initial state spin memory even in the presence of strong environmental noise has important implications for quantum computation using spin qubits.

  16. Dynamical spin-density waves in a spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Qu, Chunlei; Zhang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2015-07-01

    Synthetic spin-orbit (SO) coupling, an important ingredient for quantum simulation of many exotic condensed matter physics, has recently attracted considerable attention. The static and dynamic properties of a SO-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) have been extensively studied in both theory and experiment. Here we numerically investigate the generation and propagation of a dynamical spin-density wave (SDW) in a SO-coupled BEC using a fast moving Gaussian-shaped barrier. We find that the SDW wavelength is sensitive to the barrier's velocity while varies slightly with the barrier's peak potential or width. We qualitatively explain the generation of SDW by considering a rectangular barrier in a one-dimensional system. Our results may motivate future experimental and theoretical investigations of rich dynamics in the SO-coupled BEC induced by a moving barrier.

  17. Improvement of bias stability for a micromachined gyroscope based on dynamic electrical balancing of coupling stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jianbin; Xiao, Dingbang; Wu, Xuezhong; Hou, Zhanqiang; Chen, Zhihua

    2013-07-01

    We present a dynamic electrical balancing of coupling stiffness for improving the bias stability of micromachined gyroscopes, which embeds the coupling stiffness in a closed-loop system to make the micromachined gyroscope possess more robust bias stability by suppressing the variation of coupling stiffness. The effect of the dynamic electrical balancing control is theoretically analyzed and implemented using a silicon micromachined gyroscope as an example case. It has been experimentally shown that, comparing with open loop detection, the proposed method increased the stability of the amplitude of the mechanical quadrature signal by 38 times, and therefore improved the bias stability by 5.2 times from 89 to 17 deg/h, and the temperature stability of scale factor by 2.7 times from 622 to 231 ppm/°C. Experimental results effectively indicated the theoretical model of dynamic electrical balancing of coupling stiffness.

  18. Dynamics of the locomotor-respiratory coupling at different frequencies.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Charles P; Bardy, Benoît G

    2015-05-01

    The locomotor-respiratory coupling (LRC) is a universal phenomenon reported for various forms of rhythmic exercise. In this study, we investigated the effect of movement and respiratory frequencies on LRC. Participants were instructed to cycle or breath in synchrony with a periodic auditory stimulation at preferred and non-preferred frequencies. LRC stability was assessed by frequency and phase coupling indexes using the theory of nonlinear coupled oscillators through the sine circle map model, and the Farey tree. Results showed a stabilizing effect of sound on LRC for all frequencies and for the two systems paced. The sound-induced effect was more prominent when the rhythm of the stimulation corresponded to the preferred frequencies. The adoption of cycling or respiratory frequencies far off preferential ones led to a loss of stability in LRC. Contrary to previous findings, our results suggest that LRC is not unidirectional-from locomotion onto respiration-but bidirectional between the two systems. They also suggest that auditory information plays an important role in the modulation of LRC. PMID:25796188

  19. Sediment dynamics in the Adriatic Sea investigated with coupled models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherwood, Christopher R.; Book, Jeffrey W.; Carniel, Sandro; Cavaleri, Luigi; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Das, Himangshu; Doyle, James D.; Harris, Courtney K.; Niedoroda, Alan W.; Perkins, Henry; Poulain, Pierre-Marie; Pullen, Julie; Reed, Christopher W.; Russo, Aniello; Sclavo, Mauro; Signell, Richard P.; Traykovski, Peter A.; Warner, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Several large research programs focused on the Adriatic Sea in winter 2002-2003, making it an exciting place for sediment dynamics modelers (Figure 1). Investigations of atmospheric forcing and oceanic response (including wave generation and propagation, water-mass formation, stratification, and circulation), suspended material, bottom boundary layer dynamics, bottom sediment, and small-scale stratigraphy were performed by European and North American researchers participating in several projects. The goal of EuroSTRATAFORM researchers is to improve our ability to understand and simulate the physical processes that deliver sediment to the marine environment and generate stratigraphic signatures. Scientists involved in the Po and Apennine Sediment Transport and Accumulation (PASTA) experiment benefited from other major research programs including ACE (Adriatic Circulation Experiment), DOLCE VITA (Dynamics of Localized Currents and Eddy Variability in the Adriatic), EACE (the Croatian East Adriatic Circulation Experiment project), WISE (West Istria Experiment), and ADRICOSM (Italian nowcasting and forecasting) studies.

  20. Phase-flip transition in nonlinear oscillators coupled by dynamic environment.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit; Shrimali, Manish Dev; Dana, Syamal Kumar

    2012-06-01

    We study the dynamics of nonlinear oscillators indirectly coupled through a dynamical environment or a common medium. We observed that this form of indirect coupling leads to synchronization and phase-flip transition in periodic as well as chaotic regime of oscillators. The phase-flip transition from in- to anti-phase synchronization or vise-versa is analyzed in the parameter plane with examples of Landau-Stuart and Rössler oscillators. The dynamical transitions are characterized using various indices such as average phase difference, frequency, and Lyapunov exponents. Experimental evidence of the phase-flip transition is shown using an electronic version of the van der Pol oscillators.

  1. Tandem strip mill's multi-parameter coupling dynamic modeling based on the thickness control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yan; Zhang, Yang; Sun, Jianliang; Zang, Yong

    2015-03-01

    The rolling process is determined by the interaction of a number of different movements, during which the relative movement occurs between the vibrating roll system and the rolled piece, and the roll system's vibration interacts with the strip's deformation and rigid movement. So many parameters being involved leads to a complex mechanism of this coupling effect. Through testing and analyzing the vibration signals of the mill in the rolling process, the rolling mill's coupled model is established with comprehensive consideration of the coupling interaction between the mill's vertical vibration, its torsional vibration and the working roll's horizontal vibration, and vibration characteristics of different forms of rolling mill's vibration are analyzed under the coupling effect. With comprehensive attention to the relationship between the roll system, the moving strip and the rolling parameters' dynamic properties, and also from the strip thickness control point of view, further research is done on the coupling mechanism between the roll system's movement and the moving strip's characteristics in the rolling process. As a result, the law of inertial coupling and the stiffness coupling effect caused by different forms of the roll system's vibration is determined and the existence of nonlinear characteristics caused by the elastic deformation of moving strip is also found. Furthermore, a multi-parameter coupling-dynamic model is established which takes the tandem strip mill as its research object by making a detailed kinematics analysis of the roll system and using the principle of virtual work. The coupling-dynamic model proposes the instruction to describe the roll system's movement, and analyzes its dynamic response and working stability, and provides a theoretical basis for the realization of the strip thickness' dynamic control.

  2. Quantum-Classical Nonadiabatic Dynamics: Coupled- vs Independent-Trajectory Methods.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Federica; Min, Seung Kyu; Abedi, Ali; Gross, E K U

    2016-05-10

    Trajectory-based mixed quantum-classical approaches to coupled electron-nuclear dynamics suffer from well-studied problems such as the lack of (or incorrect account for) decoherence in the trajectory surface hopping method and the inability of reproducing the spatial splitting of a nuclear wave packet in Ehrenfest-like dynamics. In the context of electronic nonadiabatic processes, these problems can result in wrong predictions for quantum populations and in unphysical outcomes for the nuclear dynamics. In this paper, we propose a solution to these issues by approximating the coupled electronic and nuclear equations within the framework of the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function. We present a simple quantum-classical scheme based on coupled classical trajectories and test it against the full quantum mechanical solution from wave packet dynamics for some model situations which represent particularly challenging problems for the above-mentioned traditional methods. PMID:27030209

  3. The effect of inertial coupling in the dynamics and control of flexible robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesar, Delbert; Curran, Carol Cockrell; Graves, Philip Lee

    1988-01-01

    A general model of the dynamics of flexible robotic manipulators is presented, including the gross motion of the links, the vibrations of the links and joints, and the dynamic coupling between the gross motions and vibrations. The vibrations in the links may be modeled using lumped parameters, truncated modal summation, a component mode synthesis method, or a mixture of these methods. The local link inertia matrix is derived to obtain the coupling terms between the gross motion of the link and the vibrations of the link. Coupling between the motions of the links results from the kinematic model, which utilizes the method of kinematic influence. The model is used to simulate the dynamics of a flexible space-based robotic manipulator which is attached to a spacecraft, and is free to move with respect to the inertial reference frame. This model may be used to study the dynamic response of the manipulator to the motions of its joints, or to externally applied disturbances.

  4. Dynamical transition between weak and strong coupling in Brillouin laser pulse amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schluck, F.; Lehmann, G.; Müller, C.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2016-08-01

    Short laser pulse amplification via stimulated Brillouin backscattering in plasma is considered. Previous work distinguishes between the weakly and strongly coupled regime and treats them separately. It is shown here that such a separation is not generally applicable because strong and weak coupling interaction regimes are entwined with each other. An initially weakly coupled amplification scenario may dynamically transform into strong coupling. This happens when the local seed amplitude grows and thus triggers the strongly driven plasma response. On the other hand, when in a strong coupling scenario, the pump pulse gets depleted, and its amplitude might drop below the strong coupling threshold. This may cause significant changes in the final seed pulse shape. Furthermore, experimentally used pump pulses are typically Gaussian-shaped. The intensity threshold for strong coupling may only be exceeded around the maximum and not in the wings of the pulse. Also here, a description valid in both strong and weak coupling regimes is required. We propose such a unified treatment which allows us, in particular, to study the dynamic transition between weak and strong coupling. Consequences for the pulse forms of the amplified seed are discussed.

  5. Trends in cardiac dynamics : towards coupled models of intracavity fluid dynamics and deformable wall mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelle, G.; Ohayon, J.; Oddou, C.

    1994-06-01

    We report here preliminary results in the development of a computational model in cardiac mechanics which takes into account the coupled effects of ventricular mechanics and intracardiac hemodynamics. In this first work, complex geometrical, architectural and rheological properties of the organ have been strongly simplified in order to propose a “quasi-analytical” model. We assume axisymmetrical geometry of the ventricle and myocardium material to be made of a sheath of a composite, collagenic, fibrous and active muscle medium inside which the blood dynamics is dominated by unsteady inertial effects. Moreover, we have made grossly simplifying assumptions concerning rather stringent and unusual functioning conditions about the mechanical behavior of the input and output valvular and vascular impedances as well as the biochemical action of the fiber. By imposing the time variation of the input and output flow rate and activation function, it is possible, assuming uniformity of the pressure stresses applied to the internal wall surface at every instant of the cardiac cycle, to calculate the overall distribution of fluid pressure and velocity inside the cavity as well as the distributions of stresses and strains inside the wall. It was shown that under the action of a given biochemical activation function, both kinematics of the wall and induced motion of the fluid are such that the boundary conditions concerning normal pressure stresses conservation was constantly satisfied. Moreover, the results concerning the dynamics of the blood flow, as viewed through the human clinical investigations using velocimetric technology based upon color doppler ultrasound, are in accordance with those obtained from such a model, at least during the ejection phase. In particular, contrarily to the filling phase processes, the ejection dynamics is such that the time evolution of the blood velocity measured along the cavity axis does not display any phase shift characterizing an

  6. Coupling Eruptive Dynamics Models to Multi-fluid Plasma Dynamic Simulations at Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paty, C. S.; Dufek, J.; Waite, J. H.; Tokar, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The interaction of Saturn's magnetosphere with Enceladus provides an exciting natural laboratory for expanding our understanding of charge-neutral-dust interactions and their impact on mass and momentum loading of the system and the associated magnetic perturbations. However, one of the more challenging questions regarding the Enceladus plume relates to the subsurface eruptive mechanism responsible for generating the observed jets of material that compose the plume, and the three-dimensional distribution of neutral gas and dust in the plume. In this work we implement a multiphase eruptive dynamics model [cf. Dufek & Bergantz, 2007; Dufek and Bergantz, 2005] to examine the evolution of the plume morphology for a given eruption. We model the eruptive mechanism in a two-part, coupled domain including a fissure model and a plume model. A high resolution, multiphase, fissure model examines eruptive processes in a fissure from fragmentation to the surface. The fissure model is two-dimensional and provides spatial and temporal information about the dust/ice grains and gas. The depth to the fragmentation surface is currently treated as a free parameter and we examine a range of fissure morphologies. We do not explicitly force choked conditions at the vent, but rather due to the geometry, the velocities of the particle and gas mixture approach the sound speed for a 'dusty' gas mixture. The fissure model provides a source for the 3D plume model which examines the morphology of the plume resulting from different fissure configurations and provides a self-consistent physical basis to link concentrations in different regions of the plume to an eruptive mechanism. These initial models describing the resulting gas and dust grain distribution will be presented in the context of existing observations. We will also demonstrate the first stages of integration of these results into the existing multi-fluid plasma dynamic simulations of Enceladus' interaction with Saturn

  7. The dynamics of a coupled soilscape-landscape evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welivitiya, Dimuth; Willgoose, Garry; Hancock, Greg

    2016-04-01

    In this study we present results obtained from a landform evolution model coupled with SSSPAM5D soilscape evolution model. This presentation will show a number of computer animations with this coupled model using a range of widely accepted soil profile weathering models, and erosion/armouring models. The animations clearly show that subtle changes in process can result in dramatic changes in long-term equilibrium hillslope and soilscape form. We will discuss the reasons for these differences, arguing from the various mathematical and physical assumptions modelled, and infer how observed hillslope form may provide identifiable (and perhaps quantifiable) landform and soilscape signatures of landscape and soilscape process, and in particular the coupling between the landscape and the soilscape. Specifically we have simulated soilscapes using 3 depth dependent weathering functions: 1) Exponential, 2) Humped and 3) Reversed exponential. The Exponential weathering function simulates physical weathering due to thermal effects, and the weathering rate exponentially decreases with depth. The Humped function simulates chemical and/or physical weathering with moisture feedbacks, where the highest weathering rate is at a finite depth below the surface and exponentially declines with depth. The Reversed exponential function simulates chemical weathering, and the highest weathering rate is at the soil-saprolite interface and exponentially decreases both above and below the interface. Both the Humped and Reversed exponential functions can be used as approximations to chemical weathering as they can be derived analytically by solving widely accepted geochemical weathering equations. The Humped function can arise where the weathering fluid is introduced at the top of the soil profile (e.g. rainfall equilibrated with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere), while the Reversed exponential can be derived when carbon dioxide is generated within the profile (e.g. by biodegradation of soil

  8. Proton Dynamics on Goethite Nanoparticles and Coupling to Electron Transport.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Piotr; Smith, Dayle M; Rosso, Kevin M

    2015-04-14

    The surface chemistry of metal oxide particles is governed by the charge that develops at the interface with aqueous solution. Mineral transformation, biogeochemical reactions, remediation, and sorption dynamics are profoundly affected in response. Here we report implementation of replica-exchange constant-pH molecular dynamics simulations that use classical molecular dynamics for exploring configurational space and Metropolis Monte Carlo walking through protonation space with a simulated annealing escape route from metastable configurations. By examining the archetypal metal oxide, goethite (α-FeOOH), we find that electrostatic potential gradients spontaneously arise between intersecting low-index crystal faces and across explicitly treated oxide nanoparticles at a magnitude exceeding the Johnson-Nyquist voltage fluctuation. Fluctuations in adsorbed proton density continuously repolarize the surface potential bias between edge-sharing crystal faces, at a rate slower than the reported electron-polaron hopping rate in goethite interiors. This suggests that these spontaneous surface potential fluctuations will control the net movement of charge carriers in the lattice. PMID:26574382

  9. Coupling dynamic blow down and pool evaporation model for LNG.

    PubMed

    Woodward, John L

    2007-02-20

    Treating the dynamic effects of accidental discharges of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is important for realistic predictions of pool radius. Two phenomena have important influence on pool spread dynamics, time-varying discharge (blow down) and pool ignition. Time-varying discharge occurs because a punctured LNG tanker or storage tank drains with a decreasing liquid head and decreasing head-space pressure. Pool ignition increases the evaporation rate of a pool and consequently decreases the ultimate pool area. This paper describes an approach to treat these phenomena in a dynamic pool evaporation model. The pool evaporation model developed here has two separate regimes. Early in the spill, momentum forces dominate and the pool spreads independently of pool evaporation rate and the corresponding heat transfer rate. After the average pool depth drops below a minimum value, momentum forces are largely dissipated and the thin edges of the pool completely evaporate, so pool area is established by the heat transfer rate. The maximum extent of a burning pool is predicted to be significantly less than that of an unignited pool because the duration of the first regime is reduced by higher heat transfer rates. The maximum extent of an LNG pool is predicted to be larger upon accounting for blow down compared with using a constant average discharge rate. However, the maximum pool extent occurs only momentarily before retreating. PMID:17184912

  10. Proton Dynamics on Goethite Nanoparticles and Coupling to Electron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Smith, Dayle MA; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-04-14

    The surface chemistry of metal oxide particles is governed by the charge that develops at the interface with aqueous solution. Mineral transformation, biogeochemical reactions, remediation, and sorption dynamics are profoundly affected in response. Here we report implementation of replica-exchange constant-pH molecular dynamics simulations that use classical molecular dynamics for exploring configurational space and Metropolis Monte Carlo walking through protonation space with a simulated annealing escape route from metastable configurations. By examining the archetypal metal oxide, goethite (α-FeOOH), we find that electrostatic potential gradients spontaneously arise between intersecting low-index crystal faces and across explicitly treated oxide nanoparticles at a magnitude exceeding the Johnson–Nyquist voltage fluctuation. Fluctuations in adsorbed proton density continuously repolarize the surface potential bias between edge-sharing crystal faces, at a rate slower than the reported electron–polaron hopping rate in goethite interiors. This suggests that these spontaneous surface potential fluctuations will control the net movement of charge carriers in the lattice.

  11. Dynamical network of residue–residue contacts reveals coupled allosteric effects in recognition, catalysis, and mutation

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Urmi; Holliday, Michael J.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Detailed understanding of how conformational dynamics orchestrates function in allosteric regulation of recognition and catalysis remains ambiguous. Here, we simulate CypA using multiple-microsecond-long atomistic molecular dynamics in explicit solvent and carry out NMR experiments. We analyze a large amount of time-dependent multidimensional data with a coarse-grained approach and map key dynamical features within individual macrostates by defining dynamics in terms of residue–residue contacts. The effects of substrate binding are observed to be largely sensed at a location over 15 Å from the active site, implying its importance in allostery. Using NMR experiments, we confirm that a dynamic cluster of residues in this distal region is directly coupled to the active site. Furthermore, the dynamical network of interresidue contacts is found to be coupled and temporally dispersed, ranging over 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. Finally, using network centrality measures we demonstrate the changes in the communication network, connectivity, and influence of CypA residues upon substrate binding, mutation, and during catalysis. We identify key residues that potentially act as a bottleneck in the communication flow through the distinct regions in CypA and, therefore, as targets for future mutational studies. Mapping these dynamical features and the coupling of dynamics to function has crucial ramifications in understanding allosteric regulation in enzymes and proteins, in general. PMID:27071107

  12. Phase-dependent dynamic potential of magnetically coupled two-degree-of-freedom bistable energy harvester

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pilkee; Nguyen, Minh Sang; Kwon, Ojin; Kim, Young-Jin; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    A system of magnetically coupled oscillators has been recently considered as a promising compact structure to integrate multiple bistable energy harvesters (BEHs), but its design is not straightforward owing to its varying potential energy pattern, which has not been understood completely yet. This study introduces the concept of phase-dependent dynamic potential in a magnetically coupled BEH system with two degrees of freedom (DOFs) to explain the underlying principle of the complicated dynamics of the system. Through theoretical simulations and analyses, two distinct dynamic regimes, called the out-of-phase and in-phase mode regimes in this report, are found to exist in the frequency regions of the 1st and 2nd primary intrawell resonances. For the out-of-phase mode regime, the frequency displacement (and output power) responses of the 2-DOF BEH system exhibit typical double-well dynamics, whereas for the in-phase mode regime, only single-well dynamics is observed though the system is statically bistable. These dynamic regimes are also revealed to be caused by the difference in the dynamic potential energy trajectories propagating on a high-dimensional potential energy surface. The present approach to the dynamics of the 2-DOF BEH system can be extended and applied to higher-DOF systems, which sheds light on compact and efficient designs of magnetically coupled BEH chain structures. PMID:27677356

  13. Phase-dependent dynamic potential of magnetically coupled two-degree-of-freedom bistable energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilkee; Nguyen, Minh Sang; Kwon, Ojin; Kim, Young-Jin; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2016-09-01

    A system of magnetically coupled oscillators has been recently considered as a promising compact structure to integrate multiple bistable energy harvesters (BEHs), but its design is not straightforward owing to its varying potential energy pattern, which has not been understood completely yet. This study introduces the concept of phase-dependent dynamic potential in a magnetically coupled BEH system with two degrees of freedom (DOFs) to explain the underlying principle of the complicated dynamics of the system. Through theoretical simulations and analyses, two distinct dynamic regimes, called the out-of-phase and in-phase mode regimes in this report, are found to exist in the frequency regions of the 1st and 2nd primary intrawell resonances. For the out-of-phase mode regime, the frequency displacement (and output power) responses of the 2-DOF BEH system exhibit typical double-well dynamics, whereas for the in-phase mode regime, only single-well dynamics is observed though the system is statically bistable. These dynamic regimes are also revealed to be caused by the difference in the dynamic potential energy trajectories propagating on a high-dimensional potential energy surface. The present approach to the dynamics of the 2-DOF BEH system can be extended and applied to higher-DOF systems, which sheds light on compact and efficient designs of magnetically coupled BEH chain structures.

  14. Coupled dynamics of flow, microstructure, and conductivity in sheared suspensions.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Tyler; Helal, Ahmed; McKinley, Gareth H; Kamrin, Ken

    2016-09-28

    We propose a model for the evolution of the conductivity tensor for a flowing suspension of electrically conductive particles. We use discrete particle numerical simulations together with a continuum physical framework to construct an evolution law for the suspension microstructure during flow. This model is then coupled with a relationship between the microstructure and the electrical conductivity tensor. Certain parameters of the joint model are fit experimentally using rheo-electrical conductivity measurements of carbon black suspensions under flow over a range of shear rates. The model is applied to the case of steady shearing as well as time-varying conductivity of unsteady flow experiments. We find that the model prediction agrees closely with the measured experimental data in all cases. PMID:27532243

  15. Dynamics of coupled maps with a conservation law.

    PubMed

    Grigoriev, R. O.; Cross, M. C.

    1997-06-01

    A particularly simple model belonging to a wide class of coupled maps which obey a local conservation law is studied. The phase structure of the system and the types of the phase transitions are determined. It is argued that the structure of the phase diagram is robust with respect to mild violations of the conservation law. Critical exponents possibly determining a new universality class are calculated for a set of independent order parameters. Numerical evidence is produced suggesting that the singularity in the density of Lyapunov exponents at lambda=0 is a reflection of the singularity in the density of Fourier modes (a "Van Hove" singularity) and disappears if the conservation law is broken. Applicability of the Lyapunov dimension to the description of spatiotemporal chaos in a system with a conservation law is discussed. (c) 1997 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Coupling surface and mantle dynamics: A novel experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiraly, Agnes; Faccenna, Claudio; Funiciello, Francesca; Sembroni, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Recent modeling shows that surface processes, such as erosion and deposition, may drive the deformation of the Earth's surface, interfering with deeper crustal and mantle signals. To investigate the coupling between the surface and deep process, we designed a three-dimensional laboratory apparatus, to analyze the role of erosion and sedimentation, triggered by deep mantle instability. The setup is constituted and scaled down to natural gravity field using a thin viscous sheet model, with mantle and lithosphere simulated by Newtonian viscous glucose syrup and silicon putty, respectively. The surface process is simulated assuming a simple erosion law producing the downhill flow of a thin viscous material away from high topography. The deep mantle upwelling is triggered by the rise of a buoyant sphere. The results of these models along with the parametric analysis show how surface processes influence uplift velocity and topography signals.

  17. Energetic Consistency and Coupling of the Mean and Covariance Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, Stephen E.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamical state of the ocean and atmosphere is taken to be a large dimensional random vector in a range of large-scale computational applications, including data assimilation, ensemble prediction, sensitivity analysis, and predictability studies. In each of these applications, numerical evolution of the covariance matrix of the random state plays a central role, because this matrix is used to quantify uncertainty in the state of the dynamical system. Since atmospheric and ocean dynamics are nonlinear, there is no closed evolution equation for the covariance matrix, nor for the mean state. Therefore approximate evolution equations must be used. This article studies theoretical properties of the evolution equations for the mean state and covariance matrix that arise in the second-moment closure approximation (third- and higher-order moment discard). This approximation was introduced by EPSTEIN [1969] in an early effort to introduce a stochastic element into deterministic weather forecasting, and was studied further by FLEMING [1971a,b], EPSTEIN and PITCHER [1972], and PITCHER [1977], also in the context of atmospheric predictability. It has since fallen into disuse, with a simpler one being used in current large-scale applications. The theoretical results of this article make a case that this approximation should be reconsidered for use in large-scale applications, however, because the second moment closure equations possess a property of energetic consistency that the approximate equations now in common use do not possess. A number of properties of solutions of the second-moment closure equations that result from this energetic consistency will be established.

  18. Coupling dynamics and chemistry in the air pollution modelling of street canyons: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jian; Cai, Xiao-Ming; Bloss, William James

    2016-07-01

    Air pollutants emitted from vehicles in street canyons may be reactive, undergoing mixing and chemical processing before escaping into the overlying atmosphere. The deterioration of air quality in street canyons occurs due to combined effects of proximate emission sources, dynamical processes (reduced dispersion) and chemical processes (evolution of reactive primary and formation of secondary pollutants). The coupling between dynamics and chemistry plays a major role in determining street canyon air quality, and numerical model approaches to represent this coupling are reviewed in this article. Dynamical processes can be represented by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. The choice of CFD approach (mainly the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) models) depends on the computational cost, the accuracy required and hence the application. Simplified parameterisations of the overall integrated effect of dynamics in street canyons provide capability to handle relatively complex chemistry in practical applications. Chemical processes are represented by a chemical mechanism, which describes mathematically the chemical removal and formation of primary and secondary species. Coupling between these aspects needs to accommodate transport, dispersion and chemical reactions for reactive pollutants, especially fast chemical reactions with time scales comparable to or shorter than those of typical turbulent eddies inside the street canyon. Different approaches to dynamical and chemical coupling have varying strengths, costs and levels of accuracy, which must be considered in their use for provision of reference information concerning urban canopy air pollution to stakeholders considering traffic and urban planning policies. PMID:27149146

  19. Dynamics of coupled light waves and electron-acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P K; Stenflo, L; Hellberg, M

    2002-08-01

    The nonlinear interaction between coherent light waves and electron-acoustic waves in a two-electron plasma is considered. The interaction is governed by a pair of equations comprising a Schrödinger-like equation for the light wave envelope and a driven (by the light pressure) electron-acoustic wave equation. The newly derived nonlinear equations are used to study the formation and dynamics of envelope light wave solitons and light wave collapse. The implications of our investigation to space and laser-produced plasmas are pointed out.

  20. Dynamics of a tightly coupled mechanism for flagellar rotation. Bacterial motility, chemiosmotic coupling, protonmotive force.

    PubMed

    Meister, M; Caplan, S R; Berg, H C

    1989-05-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a molecular engine that couples the flow of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane to rotation of the flagellar filament. We analyze the steady-state behavior of an explicit mechanical model in which a fixed number of protons carries the filament through one revolution. Predictions of this model are compared with experimentally determined relationships between protonmotive force, proton flux, torque, and speed. All such tightly coupled mechanisms produce the same torque when the motor is stalled but vary greatly in their behavior at high speed. The speed at zero load predicted by our model is limited by the rates of association and dissociation of protons at binding sites on the rotor and by the mobility of force generators containing transmembrane channels that interact with these sites. Our analysis suggests that more could be learned about the motor if it were driven by an externally applied torque backwards (at negative speed) or forwards at speeds greater than the zero-load speed. PMID:2720081

  1. Theoretical investigation of the force and dynamically coupled torsional-axial-lateral dynamic response of eared rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, J. W.; Mitchell, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    Difficulties in solution methodology to be used to deal with the potentially higher nonlinear rotor equations when dynamic coupling is included. A solution methodology is selected to solve the nonlinear differential equations. The selected method was verified to give good results even at large nonlinearity levels. The transfer matrix methodology is extended to the solution of nonlinear problems.

  2. Dynamic coupling of bulk chemistry, trace elements and mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. H.; Heck, H. V.; Nowacki, A.; Wookey, J. M.; Elliott, T.; Porcelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    Fully dynamical models that not only track the evolution of chemical heterogeneities through the mantle, but also incorporate the effect of chemical heterogeneities on the dynamics of mantle convection are now emerging. Since in general analytical solutions to these complex problems are lacking, careful testing and investigations of the effect and usefulness of these models is needed. We extend our existing numerical mantle convection code that can track fluid flow in 3D spherical geometry and tracks both bulk chemical components (basal fraction) and different trace elements. The chemical components fractionate upon melting when and where the solidus is crossed. Now, the chemical information will effect the flow of the fluid in the following ways: The bulk composition will link to density and the (radioactive) trace element abundance to heat production. Results will be reported of the effect of different density structures; either starting with a primordial dense layer at the base of the mantle, having all density variation originate from melting (basalt production), or a combination between these two end-member scenarios. In particular we will focus on the connection between large scale bulk chemical structures in the (deep) mantle and the evolution of the distribution of noble gasses (He and Ar). The distribution of noble gasses depend upon 1) assumptions on the initial distributions in the mantle, 2) the mantle flow, 3) radioactive production and, 4) outgassing to the atmosphere upon melting close to the surface.

  3. SHARC: ab Initio Molecular Dynamics with Surface Hopping in the Adiabatic Representation Including Arbitrary Couplings.

    PubMed

    Richter, Martin; Marquetand, Philipp; González-Vázquez, Jesús; Sola, Ignacio; González, Leticia

    2011-05-10

    We present a semiclassical surface-hopping method which is able to treat arbitrary couplings in molecular systems including all degrees of freedom. A reformulation of the standard surface-hopping scheme in terms of a unitary transformation matrix allows for the description of interactions like spin-orbit coupling or transitions induced by laser fields. The accuracy of our method is demonstrated in two systems. The first one, consisting of two model electronic states, validates the semiclassical approach in the presence of an electric field. In the second one, the dynamics in the IBr molecule in the presence of spin-orbit coupling after laser excitation is investigated. Due to an avoided crossing that originates from spin-orbit coupling, IBr dissociates into two channels: I + Br((2)P3/2) and I + Br*((2)P1/2). In both systems, the obtained results are in very good agreement with those calculated from exact quantum dynamical simulations.

  4. Wind tunnel determination of dynamic cross-coupling derivatives - A new approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanff, E. S.; Orlik-Rueckemann, J.

    1980-01-01

    The latest developments in the NAE ongoing dynamic stability research program are briefly summarized. Emphasis is placed on the recently developed wind-tunnel data reduction procedures used to obtain cross and cross-coupling derivatives due to an oscillatory motion. These procedures, which account for the dynamic behaviour of the model-balance subsystem, are described for the balance configurations currently in use. The principles on which they are based, however, are quite general and can therefore be applied to other balance configurations. Two full-model dynamic stability apparatuses are described and typical results, obtained from dynamic calibrations as well as from wind-tunnel experiments, are presented.

  5. Morphological communication: exploiting coupled dynamics in a complex mechanical structure to achieve locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Rieffel, John A.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.; Lipson, Hod

    2010-01-01

    Traditional engineering approaches strive to avoid, or actively suppress, nonlinear dynamic coupling among components. Biological systems, in contrast, are often rife with these dynamics. Could there be, in some cases, a benefit to high degrees of dynamical coupling? Here we present a distributed robotic control scheme inspired by the biological phenomenon of tensegrity-based mechanotransduction. This emergence of morphology-as-information-conduit or ‘morphological communication’, enabled by time-sensitive spiking neural networks, presents a new paradigm for the decentralized control of large, coupled, modular systems. These results significantly bolster, both in magnitude and in form, the idea of morphological computation in robotic control. Furthermore, they lend further credence to ideas of embodied anatomical computation in biological systems, on scales ranging from cellular structures up to the tendinous networks of the human hand. PMID:19776146

  6. The VENUS/NWChem Software Package. Tight Coupling Between Chemical Dynamics Simulations and Electronic Structure Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lourderaj, Upakarasamy; Sun, Rui; De Jong, Wibe A.; Windus, Theresa L.; Hase, William L.

    2014-03-01

    The interface for VENUS and NWChem, and the resulting software package for direct dynamics simulations are described. The coupling of the two codes is considered to be a tight coupling. The two codes are compiled and linked together and act as one executable with data being passed between the two codes through routine calls. The advantages of this type of coupling are discussed. The interface has been designed to have as little interference as possible with the core codes of both VENUS and NWChem. VENUS is the code that propagates the direct dynamics trajectories and, therefore, is the program that drives the overall execution of VENUS/NWChem. VENUS has remained an essentially sequential code, which uses the highly parallel structure of NWChem. Subroutines of the interface which accomplish the data transmission and communication between the two computer programs are described. Recent examples of the use of VENUS/NWChem for direct dynamics simulations are summarized.

  7. NEW ACTIVE MEDIA AND ELEMENTS OF LASER SYSTEMS: Laser with resonators coupled by a dynamic hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, V. B.; Golyanov, A. V.; Luk'yanchuk, B. S.; Ogluzdin, Valerii E.; Rubtsova, I. L.; Sugrobov, V. A.; Khizhnyak, A. I.

    1987-11-01

    The nature of operation of a laser with a phase-conjugate mirror utilizing multibeam interaction was found to have a considerable influence on the coupling of its resonator to the resonator of a laser used to pump the mirror. A system of this kind with resonators coupled by a dynamic hologram exhibited "soft" lasing in the presence of a self-pumped phase-conjugate mirror.

  8. Quantum jumps and spin dynamics of interacting atoms in a strongly coupled atom-cavity system.

    PubMed

    Khudaverdyan, M; Alt, W; Kampschulte, T; Reick, S; Thobe, A; Widera, A; Meschede, D

    2009-09-18

    We experimentally investigate the spin dynamics of one and two neutral atoms strongly coupled to a high finesse optical cavity. We observe quantum jumps between hyperfine ground states of a single atom. The interaction-induced normal-mode splitting of the atom-cavity system is measured via the atomic excitation. Moreover, we observe the mutual influence of two atoms simultaneously coupled to the cavity mode.

  9. Coupling the dynamics of boundary layers and evolutionary dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Pablo; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2009-04-01

    A theoretical formulation and corresponding numerical solutions are presented for fluid flow and sediment transport past evolutionary sand dunes. Time-dependent curvilinear coordinates are employed to fully couple flow aloft with the developing landform. The differential conservation law that defines shape of the lower boundary depends on details of local surface stress, thereby favoring the large eddy simulation of the boundary layer. To shrink the gap between the time scales characteristic of planetary boundary layer flows O(103)s and sand dune evolution O(106)s , a hypothetical “severe-wind scenario” is adopted with the saltation flux amplified up to 3 orders of magnitude. While the results are largely insensitive to the rescaling, the efficacy of computations is greatly improved. The flux-form partial differential equation for the interface profile—via saltation and sand avalanches—is formulated as an advection-diffusion equation, to facilitate discrete integrations. Numerical experiments verify the adopted theoretical framework by reproducing scaling results reported in the literature. The versatility of the approach is illustrated with evolution of a sandhole—an example of application likely never addressed in the literature, yet realizable in nature.

  10. Street Canyon Atmospheric Composition: Coupling Dynamics and Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, V.; Bloss, W. J.; Cai, X.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric composition within the urban environment, particularly within street canyons (formed by a road running between two rows of buildings), has a direct effect on the air quality of an environment in which a large majority of people live and work. The composition of air within a street canyon is determined by the composition of background air mixed in from above, advection of air into and out of the canyon, vehicle exhaust and other emissions from within the street, together with the mixing and chemical processing of pollutants within the canyon. This occurs on a timescale of a few seconds to minutes and as a result, within-canyon atmospheric processes can have a significant effect on atmospheric composition on such timescales. This paper outlines a modelling study of street canyon atmospheric composition, integrating the combined effects of emissions, dynamics and chemistry. This work builds upon an existing dynamical model of canyon atmospheric motion (Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model) by adding a detailed chemical reaction scheme. Previous studies have considered basic NOx-O3 cycles with only a small number of chemical reactions included. Initially, a zero-dimensional box model was used to develop and assess the accuracy of a suitable reduced chemical scheme to be included within the LES. The reduced chemical scheme, based upon a subset of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM), includes 51 chemical species and 136 reactions. Vehicle emissions taken from the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) were subsequently added to the box model. These elements were then combined with the canyon dynamics simulated by the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model. Results demonstrate that the enhanced model is a suitable tool to be used to further investigate the combined effects of mixing and chemical processing upon air quality within the street canyon. Subsequently, a number of key questions relating to urban atmospheric composition are addressed using the

  11. Northern Forest Ecosystem Dynamics Using Coupled Models and Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. J.; Sun, G.; Knox, R. G.; Levine, E. R.; Weishampel, J. F.; Fifer, S. T.

    1999-01-01

    Forest ecosystem dynamics modeling, remote sensing data analysis, and a geographical information system (GIS) were used together to determine the possible growth and development of a northern forest in Maine, USA. Field measurements and airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data were used to produce maps of forest cover type and above ground biomass. These forest attribute maps, along with a conventional soils map, were used to identify the initial conditions for forest ecosystem model simulations. Using this information along with ecosystem model results enabled the development of predictive maps of forest development. The results obtained were consistent with observed forest conditions and expected successional trajectories. The study demonstrated that ecosystem models might be used in a spatial context when parameterized and used with georeferenced data sets.

  12. Dynamics of the future anthropogenic climate change in the Northern Hemisphere coupled stratosphere/troposphere system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omrani, Nour-Eddine

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing evidence that the response to future anthropogenic climate changes in Northern hemisphere is characterized by weakening of high-latitude westerlies in the coupled stratosphere/troposphere-system and strengthening of mid-latitude tropospheric eddy-driven jet with strong impact on large-scale precipitation. Here we show using different model experiments and wave geometry diagnostics that the overall dynamics of this response can be understood in the framework of two competing atmospheric bridges. One bridge is located in the stratosphere and connect the tropical Sea Surface Temperature (SST) with the coupled high-latitude stratosphere/troposphere system through changes in the upper flank of subtropical jet and downward stratosphere/troposphere dynamical coupling. This bridge is responsible for the weakening of the westerlies in high latitude stratosphere/troposphere system. The second bridge is in the troposphere and connects the tropical ocean warming with the extra-tropics trough changes in the static stability. This bridge is responsible for the wave-induced strengthening of the tropospheric eddy-driven jet. It is shown that the large-scale precipitation response in mid-to-high latitudes results mainly from the dynamical adjustment to wave-driven changes in the tropospheric meridional overturning circulation. The competing interaction between the stratospheric and tropospheric pathway constitutes another aspect of stratosphere/troposphere dynamical coupling. Her we will show how that such coupling can help understanding model discrepancies in the Northern Hemisphere future climate change.

  13. Simulating Entanglement Dynamics of Singlet-Triplet Qubits Coupled to a Classical Transmission Line Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Michael; Kestner, Jason

    Electrons confined in lateral quantum dots are promising candidates for scalable quantum bits. Particularly, singlet-triplet qubits can entangle electrostatically and offer long coherence times due to their weak interactions with the environment. However, fast two-qubit operations are challenging. We examine the dynamics of singlet triplet qubits capacitively coupled to a classical transmission line resonator driven near resonance. We numerically simulate the dynamics of the von Neumann entanglement entropy and investigate parameters of the coupling element that optimizes the operation time for the qubit.

  14. On the coupling of fluid dynamics and electromagnetism at the top of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A kinematic approach to short-term geomagnetism has recently been based upon pre-Maxwell frozen-flux electromagnetism. A complete dynamic theory requires coupling fluid dynamics to electromagnetism. A geophysically plausible simplifying assumption for the vertical vorticity balance, namely that the vertical Lorentz torque is negligible, is introduced and its consequences are developed. The simplified coupled magnetohydrodynamic system is shown to conserve a variety of magnetic and vorticity flux integrals. These provide constraints on eligible models for the geomagnetic main field, its secular variation, and the horizontal fluid motions at the top of the core, and so permit a number of tests of the underlying assumptions.

  15. Modeling dynamically coupled fluid-duct systems with finite line elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxon, J. B.

    1994-02-01

    Structural analysis of piping systems, especially dynamic analysis, typically considers the duct structure and the contained fluid column separately. Coupling of these two systems, however, forms a new dynamic system with characteristics not necessarily described by the superposition of the two component system's characteristics. Methods for modeling the two coupled components simultaneously using finite line elements are presented. Techniques for general duct intersections, area or direction changes, long radius bends, hydraulic losses, and hydraulic impedances are discussed. An example problem and results involving time transients are presented. Additionally, a program to enhance post-processing of line element models is discussed.

  16. Coupled orbit-attitude dynamics and relative state estimation of spacecraft near small Solar System bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Gaurav; Izadi, Maziar; Sanyal, Amit; Scheeres, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The effects of dynamical coupling between the rotational (attitude) and translational (orbital) motion of spacecraft near small Solar System bodies is investigated. This coupling arises due to the weak gravity of these bodies, as well as solar radiation pressure. The traditional approach assumes a point-mass spacecraft model to describe the translational motion of the spacecraft, while the attitude motion is considered to be completely decoupled from the translational motion. The model used here to describe the rigid-body spacecraft dynamics includes the non-uniform rotating gravity field of the small body up to second degree and order along with the attitude dependent terms, solar tide, and solar radiation pressure. This model shows that the second degree and order gravity terms due to the small body affect the dynamics of the spacecraft to the same extent as the orbit-attitude coupling due to the primary gravity (zeroth order) term. Variational integrators are used to simulate the dynamics of both the rigid spacecraft and the point mass. The small bodies considered here are modeled after Near-Earth Objects (NEO) 101955 Bennu, and 25143 Itokawa, and are assumed to be triaxial ellipsoids with uniform density. Differences in the numerically obtained trajectories of a rigid spacecraft and a point mass are then compared, to illustrate the impact of the orbit-attitude coupling on spacecraft dynamics in proximity of small bodies. Possible implications on the performance of model-based spacecraft control and on the station-keeping budget, if the orbit-attitude coupling is not accounted for in the model of the dynamics, are also discussed. An almost globally asymptotically stable motion estimation scheme based solely on visual/optical feedback that estimates the relative motion of the asteroid with respect to the spacecraft is also obtained. This estimation scheme does not require a model of the dynamics of the asteroid, which makes it perfectly suited for asteroids whose

  17. Coupled Dynamic Modeling to Assess Human Impact on Watershed Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, I. N.; Tsai, Y.; Turnbull, S.; Bomblies, A.; Zia, A.

    2014-12-01

    Humans are intrinsic to the hydrologic system, both as agents of change and as beneficiaries of ecosystem services. This connection has been underappreciated in hydrology. We present a modeling linkage framework of an agent-based land use change model with a physical-based watershed model. The coupled model framework presented constitutes part of an integrated assessment model that is being developed to study human-ecosystem interaction in Missisquoi Bay, spanning Vermont and Québec, which is experiencing high concentrations of nutrients from the Missisquoi River watershed. The integrated assessment approach proposed is comprised of linking two simulation models: the Interactive Land-Use Transition Agent-Based Model (ILUTABM) and a physically based process model, the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys). The ILUTABM treats both landscape and landowners as agents and simulates annual land-use patterns resulting from landowners annual land-use decisions and Best Management Practices (BMPs) adaptations to landowners utilities, land productivity and perceived impacts of floods. The Missisquoi River at Swanton watershed RHESSys model (drainage area of 2,200 km2) driven by climate data was first calibrated to daily streamflows and water quality sensor data at the watershed outlet. Simulated land-use patterns were then processed to drive the calibrated RHESSys model to obtain streamflow nutrient loading realizations. Nutrients loading realizations are then examined and routed back to the ILUTAB model to obtain public polices needed to manage the Missisquoi watershed as well as the Lake Champlain in general. We infer that the applicability of this approach can be generalized to other similar watersheds. Index Terms: 0402: Agricultural systems; 1800: Hydrology; 1803: Anthropogenic effects; 1834 Human impacts; 6344: System operation and management; 6334: Regional Planning

  18. The coupled dynamics of fluids and spacecraft in low gravity and low gravity fluid measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John; Peterson, Lee D.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1987-01-01

    The very large mass fraction of liquids stored on broad current and future generation spacecraft has made critical the technologies of describing the fluid-spacecraft dynamics and measuring or gauging the fluid. Combined efforts in these areas are described, and preliminary results are presented. The coupled dynamics of fluids and spacecraft in low gravity study is characterizing the parametric behavior of fluid-spacecraft systems in which interaction between the fluid and spacecraft dynamics is encountered. Particular emphasis is given to the importance of nonlinear fluid free surface phenomena to the coupled dynamics. An experimental apparatus has been developed for demonstrating a coupled fluid-spacecraft system. In these experiments, slosh force signals are fed back to a model tank actuator through a tunable analog second order integration circuit. In this manner, the tank motion is coupled to the resulting slosh force. Results are being obtained in 1-g and in low-g (on the NASA KC-135) using dynamic systems nondimensionally identical except for the Bond numbers.

  19. Nonlinear dynamic fluid-structure interaction calculations with coupled finite element and finite volume programs

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.W.; Kashiwa, B.A.; Meier, R.W.; Bishop, S.

    1994-08-01

    Two- and three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computer programs for the simulation of nonlinear dynamics were developed and applied to a number of problems. The programs were created by coupling Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite volume fluid dynamics programs with strictly Lagrangian finite element structural dynamics programs. The resulting coupled programs can use either fully explicit or implicit time integration. The implicit time integration is accomplished by iterations of the fluid dynamics pressure solver and the structural dynamics system solver. The coupled programs have been used to solve problems involving incompressible fluids, membrane and shell elements, compressible multiphase flows, explosions in both air and water, and large displacements. In this paper, we present the approach used for the coupling and describe test problems that verify the two-dimensional programs against an experiment and an analytical linear problem. The experiment involves an explosion underwater near an instrumented thin steel plate. The analytical linear problem is the vibration of an infinite cylinder surrounded by an incompressible fluid to a given radius.

  20. Nonlinear dynamic fluid-structure interaction calculations with coupled finite element and finite volume programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M. W.; Kashiwa, B. A.; Meier, R. W.; Bishop, S.

    1994-07-01

    Two- and three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computer programs for the simulation of nonlinear dynamics were developed and applied to a number of problems. The programs were created by coupling Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite volume fluid dynamics programs with strictly Lagrangian finite element structural dynamics programs. The resulting coupled programs can use either fully explicit or implicit time integration. The implicit time integration is accomplished by iterations of the fluid dynamics pressure solver and the structural dynamics system solver. The coupled programs have been used to solve problems involving incompressible fluids, membrane and shell elements, compressible multiphase flows, explosions in both air and water, and large displacements. In this paper, we present the approach used for the coupling and describe test problems that verify the two-dimensional programs against an experiment and an analytical linear problem. The experiment involves an explosion underwater near an instrumented thin steel plate. The analytical linear problem is the vibration of an infinite cylinder surrounded by an incompressible fluid to a given radius.

  1. Dynamical strong coupling and parametric amplification of mechanical modes of graphene drums.

    PubMed

    Mathew, John P; Patel, Raj N; Borah, Abhinandan; Vijay, R; Deshmukh, Mandar M

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical resonators are ubiquitous in modern information technology. With the possibility of coupling them to electromagnetic and plasmonic modes, they hold promise as the key building blocks in future quantum information technology. Graphene-based resonators are of interest for technological applications due to their high resonant frequencies, multiple mechanical modes and low mass. The tension-mediated nonlinear coupling between various modes of the resonator can be excited in a controllable manner. Here we engineer a graphene resonator with large frequency tunability at low temperatures, resulting in a large intermodal coupling strength. We observe the emergence of new eigenmodes and amplification of the coupled modes using red and blue parametric excitation, respectively. We demonstrate that the dynamical intermodal coupling is tunable. A cooperativity of 60 between two resonant modes of ∼100 MHz is achieved in the strong coupling regime. The ability to dynamically control the coupling between the high-frequency eigenmodes of a mechanical system opens up the possibility of quantum mechanical experiments at low temperatures. PMID:27294506

  2. Dynamical strong coupling and parametric amplification of mechanical modes of graphene drums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, John P.; Patel, Raj N.; Borah, Abhinandan; Vijay, R.; Deshmukh, Mandar M.

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical resonators are ubiquitous in modern information technology. With the possibility of coupling them to electromagnetic and plasmonic modes, they hold promise as the key building blocks in future quantum information technology. Graphene-based resonators are of interest for technological applications due to their high resonant frequencies, multiple mechanical modes and low mass. The tension-mediated nonlinear coupling between various modes of the resonator can be excited in a controllable manner. Here we engineer a graphene resonator with large frequency tunability at low temperatures, resulting in a large intermodal coupling strength. We observe the emergence of new eigenmodes and amplification of the coupled modes using red and blue parametric excitation, respectively. We demonstrate that the dynamical intermodal coupling is tunable. A cooperativity of 60 between two resonant modes of ∼100 MHz is achieved in the strong coupling regime. The ability to dynamically control the coupling between the high-frequency eigenmodes of a mechanical system opens up the possibility of quantum mechanical experiments at low temperatures.

  3. Disorder-induced dynamics in a pair of coupled heterogeneous phase oscillator networks.

    PubMed

    Laing, Carlo R

    2012-12-01

    We consider a pair of coupled heterogeneous phase oscillator networks and investigate their dynamics in the continuum limit as the intrinsic frequencies of the oscillators are made more and more disparate. The Ott/Antonsen Ansatz is used to reduce the system to three ordinary differential equations. We find that most of the interesting dynamics, such as chaotic behaviour, can be understood by analysing a gluing bifurcation of periodic orbits; these orbits can be thought of as "breathing chimeras" in the limit of identical oscillators. We also add Gaussian white noise to the oscillators' dynamics and derive a pair of coupled Fokker-Planck equations describing the dynamics in this case. Comparison with simulations of finite networks of oscillators is used to confirm many of the results.

  4. Lattice Dynamics of EuO: Evidence for Giant Spin-Phonon Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradip, R.; Piekarz, P.; Bosak, A.; Merkel, D. G.; Waller, O.; Seiler, A.; Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R.; Oleś, A. M.; Parlinski, K.; Krisch, M.; Baumbach, T.; Stankov, S.

    2016-05-01

    Comprehensive studies of lattice dynamics in the ferromagnetic semiconductor EuO have been performed by a combination of inelastic x-ray scattering, nuclear inelastic scattering, and ab initio calculations. A remarkably large broadening of the transverse acoustic phonons was discovered at temperatures above and below the Curie temperature TC=69 K . This result indicates a surprisingly strong momentum-dependent spin-phonon coupling induced by the spin dynamics in EuO.

  5. Cosmological dynamics with non-minimally coupled scalar field and a constant potential function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrycyna, Orest; Szydłowski, Marek

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical systems methods are used to investigate global behaviour of the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model in gravitational theory with a non-minimally coupled scalar field and a constant potential function. We show that the system can be reduced to an autonomous three-dimensional dynamical system and additionally is equipped with an invariant manifold corresponding to an accelerated expansion of the universe. Using this invariant manifold we find an exact solution of the reduced dynamics. We investigate all solutions for all admissible initial conditions using theory of dynamical systems to obtain a classification of all evolutional paths. The right-hand sides of the dynamical system depend crucially on the value of the non-minimal coupling constant therefore we study bifurcation values of this parameter under which the structure of the phase space changes qualitatively. We found a special bifurcation value of the non-minimal coupling constant which is distinguished by dynamics of the model and may suggest some additional symmetry in matter sector of the theory.

  6. A block iterative LU solver for weakly coupled linear systems. [in fluid dynamics equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    A hybrid technique, called the block iterative LU solver, is proposed for solving the linear equations resulting from a finite element numerical analysis of certain fluid dynamics problems where the equations are weakly coupled between distinct sets of variables. Either the block Jacobi iterative method or the block Gauss-Seidel iterative solver is combined with LU decomposition.

  7. Dynamic analysis of blast load of coupled shear walls on flexible foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Richard Rudolph

    An approximation technique is developed to compute the natural frequencies and mode shapes of coupled shear walls, which are on fixed or flexible foundations. This technique is extended to compute the deflection dynamics of coupled shear wall systems that are laterally loaded by an impulse load. The impulse load is the Mach stem of a blast wave generated by an above ground explosion. The Mach stem height is equal to the height of the coupled shear walls. The developed equations of motion and boundary conditions are derived using Hamilton's principle. The Ritz-Galerkin technique is used to develop matrix eigenvalue equations for computing the mode shapes and natural frequencies. A modal analysis, of infinite order, is chosen to solve the dynamic deflection equations. In order to uncouple the equations of motion, which describe the dynamics of the coupled shear wall system, it was necessary to derive two new orthogonality relations. The uncoupled equations are analytically solved using Duhamel's integral. Using the shape functions computed in the free vibration case, a truncated modal solution for the lateral and longitudinal deflections is derived. Using MATLAB, a program was written, which provides all computations and plots of both the shape functions and dynamic solutions. An example was presented to verify the model and to show the application of this technique.

  8. New iterative method for fractional gas dynamics and coupled Burger's equations.

    PubMed

    Al-Luhaibi, Mohamed S

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the approximate analytical solutions to solve the nonlinear gas dynamics and coupled Burger's equations with fractional time derivative. By using initial values, the explicit solutions of the equations are solved by using a reliable algorithm. Numerical results show that the new iterative method is easy to implement and accurate when applied to time-fractional partial differential equations.

  9. New Iterative Method for Fractional Gas Dynamics and Coupled Burger's Equations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the approximate analytical solutions to solve the nonlinear gas dynamics and coupled Burger's equations with fractional time derivative. By using initial values, the explicit solutions of the equations are solved by using a reliable algorithm. Numerical results show that the new iterative method is easy to implement and accurate when applied to time-fractional partial differential equations. PMID:25884018

  10. Stability analysis of a multibody system model for coupled slosh-vehicle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichkawde, Chetan; Harish, P. M.; Ananthkrishnan, N.

    2004-08-01

    The coupled slosh-vehicle dynamics of a rigid body in planar atmospheric flight carrying a sloshing liquid is considered as a multibody system with the sloshing motion modelled as a simple pendulum. The coupled, non-linear equations for the four-degree-of-freedom multibody system are derived using the method of Lagrangian dynamics. Careful non-dimensionalization reveals two crucial parameters that determine the extent of coupling between the rigid body and slosh modes, and also two important frequency parameters. Using a two-parameter continuation method, critical combinations of these four parameters for which the coupled slosh-vehicle dynamics can become unstable are computed. Results are displayed in the form of neutral stability curves (stability boundaries) in parameter space, and an analytical expression incorporating the four parameters that represents the neutral stability curves is obtained. Reduced-order linearized models and key transfer functions are derived in an effort to understand the instability phenomenon. Physically, the sloshing motion is seen to induce a static instability, sometimes called tumbling, in the vehicle pitch dynamics, depending on the slosh mass fraction and the location of the slosh pendulum hinge point above the rigid vehicle center of mass.

  11. The Dynamics of Small-Sized Ensembles of the Phase-Locked Loops with Unidirectional Couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, K. N.; V. Matrosov, V.; Shalfeev, V. D.

    2016-06-01

    We study collective dynamics of a small-sized chain of the unidirectionally coupled phase-locked loop. The conditions for the synchronous-regime existence are found, the asynchronous selfoscillation regimes and the transitions among them are studied, and the property of inheriting the structure of the parameter space of the chain when a new element is added to it is established.

  12. Synchronization dynamics of two coupled neural oscillators receiving shared and unshared noisy stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ly, Cheng; Ermentrout, G Bard

    2009-06-01

    The response of neurons to external stimuli greatly depends on the intrinsic dynamics of the network. Here, the intrinsic dynamics are modeled as coupling and the external input is modeled as shared and unshared noise. We assume the neurons are repetitively firing action potentials (i.e., neural oscillators), are weakly and identically coupled, and the external noise is weak. Shared noise can induce bistability between the synchronous and anti-phase states even though the anti-phase state is the only stable state in the absence of noise. We study the Fokker-Planck equation of the system and perform an asymptotic reduction rho(0). The rho(0) solution is more computationally efficient than both the Monte Carlo simulations and the 2D Fokker-Planck solver, and agrees remarkably well with the full system with weak noise and weak coupling. With moderate noise and coupling, rho(0) is still qualitatively correct despite the small noise and coupling assumption in the asymptotic reduction. Our phase model accurately predicts the behavior of a realistic synaptically coupled Morris-Lecar system.

  13. Mean-field dynamics of spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongping; Mao, Li; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2012-01-20

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the interaction between the spin and momentum of a quantum particle, is crucial for many important condensed matter phenomena. The recent experimental realization of SOC in neutral bosonic cold atoms provides a new and ideal platform for investigating spin-orbit coupled quantum many-body physics. In this Letter, we derive a generic Gross-Pitaevskii equation as the starting point for the study of many-body dynamics in spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensates. We show that different laser setups for realizing the same SOC may lead to different mean-field dynamics. Various ground state phases (stripe, phase separation, etc.) of the condensate are found in different parameter regions. A new oscillation period induced by the SOC, similar to the Zitterbewegung oscillation, is found in the center-of-mass motion of the condensate.

  14. The dynamics of the Schrödinger-Newton system with self-field coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, J.; Guo, Y.; Cole Newton, K.; Schlosshauer, M.

    2016-04-01

    We probe the dynamics of a modified form of the Schrödinger-Newton (SN) system of gravity coupled to single particle quantum mechanics. At the masses of interest here, the ones associated with the onset of ‘collapse’ (where the gravitational attraction is competitive with the quantum mechanical dissipation), we show that the Schrödinger ground state energies match the Dirac ones with an error of ˜ 10%. At the Planck mass scale, we predict the critical mass at which a potential collapse could occur for the self-coupled gravitational case, m≈ 3.3 Planck mass, and show that gravitational attraction opposes Gaussian spreading at around this value, which is a factor of two higher than the one predicted (and verified) for the SN system. Unlike the SN dynamics, we do not find that the self-coupled case tends to decay towards its ground state; there is no collapse in this case.

  15. Quantum dynamics of a vibronically coupled linear chain using a surrogate Hamiltonian approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong H; Troisi, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Vibronic coupling between the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom has been reported to play an important role in charge and exciton transport in organic photovoltaic materials, molecular aggregates, and light-harvesting complexes. Explicitly accounting for effective vibrational modes rather than treating them as a thermal environment has been shown to be crucial to describe the effect of vibronic coupling. We present a methodology to study dissipative quantum dynamics of vibronically coupled systems based on a surrogate Hamiltonian approach, which is in principle not limited by Markov approximation or weak system-bath interaction, using a vibronic basis. We apply vibronic surrogate Hamiltonian method to a linear chain system and discuss how different types of relaxation process, intramolecular vibrational relaxation and intermolecular vibronic relaxation, influence population dynamics of dissipative vibronic systems. PMID:27276944

  16. Dynamics in the Kuramoto model with a bi-harmonic coupling function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Di; Cui, Haitao; Tian, Junlong; Xiao, Yi; Zhang, Yingxin

    2016-09-01

    We study a variant of the Kuramoto model with a bi-harmonic coupling function, in which oscillators with positive first harmonic coupling strength are conformists and oscillators with negative first harmonic coupling strength are contrarians. We show that the model displays different synchronous dynamics and different dynamics may be characterized by the phase distributions of oscillators. There exist stationary synchronous states, travelling wave states, π state and, most interestingly, another type of nonstationary state: an oscillating π state. The phase distribution oscillates in a confined region and the phase difference between conformists and contrarians oscillates around π with a constant amplitude and a constant period in oscillating π state. Finally, the bifurcation diagram of the model in the parameter space is presented.

  17. Comparison of mode-coupling theory with molecular dynamics simulations from a unified point of view.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Takayuki; Tokuyama, Michio

    2011-08-01

    We study the tagged-particle dynamics by solving equations of the mode-coupling theory (MCT). The numerical solutions are compared with results obtained by the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations from a unified point of view proposed by Tokuyama [Phys. Rev. E 80, 031503 (2009)]. We propose a way of comparison in which the reduced long-time self-diffusion coefficient is used to characterize states of the system. The comparison reveals that the tagged-particle dynamics calculated from MCT qualitatively deviates from that obtained by MD. Our results suggest that the deviation originates from the starting equation of MCT.

  18. Coupled-Channels Approach for Dissipative Quantum Dynamics in Near-Barrier Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Torres, A.; Hinde, D. J.; Dasgupta, M.; Milburn, G. J.; Tostevin, J. A.

    2009-03-04

    A novel quantum dynamical model based on the dissipative quantum dynamics of open quantum systems is presented. It allows the treatment of both deep-inelastic processes and quantum tunneling (fusion) within a fully quantum mechanical coupled-channels approach. Model calculations show the transition from pure state (coherent) to mixed state (decoherent and dissipative) dynamics during a near-barrier nuclear collision. Energy dissipation, due to irreversible decay of giant-dipole excitations of the interacting nuclei, results in hindrance of quantum tunneling.

  19. Coupling of radiation transport with the gas dynamics for HYLIFE-II analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.M.; Schrock, V.E.; Peterson, P.F.

    1994-11-01

    Gas dynamics in an inertial confinement fusion reactor involves extremely high energy and temperatures. In those temperature range, gaseous radiation can be critical to the dynamics phenomenon. This study presents a method that couples a one-dimensional radiation transfer model with an Eulerian gas dynamics code for HYLIFE-II studies. The results reveal that radiation modifies the shock interaction pattern drastically. Although there are more sophisticated methods of computing one-dimensional radiation transport than the model implemented in current study, the methodology used here is extendible to two-dimensional schemes.

  20. Dynamic dissipative cooling of a mechanical resonator in strong coupling optomechanics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Chun; Xiao, Yun-Feng; Luan, Xingsheng; Wong, Chee Wei

    2013-04-12

    Cooling of mesoscopic mechanical resonators represents a primary concern in cavity optomechanics. In this Letter, in the strong optomechanical coupling regime, we propose to dynamically control the cavity dissipation, which is able to significantly accelerate the cooling process while strongly suppressing the heating noise. Furthermore, the dynamic control is capable of overcoming quantum backaction and reducing the cooling limit by several orders of magnitude. The dynamic dissipation control provides new insights for tailoring the optomechanical interaction and offers the prospect of exploring mesoscopic quantum physics.

  1. The Magnetospheric Constellation Mission. Dynamic Response and Coupling Observatory (DRACO): Understanding the Global Dynamics of the Structured Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetospheric Constellation Dynamic Response and Coupling Observatory (DRACO) is the Solar Terrestrial Probe (STP) designed to understand the nonlinear dynamics, responses, and connections within the Earth's structured magnetotail, using a constellation of approximately 50 to 100 distributed vector measurement spacecraft. DRACO will reveal magnetotail processes operating within a domain extending 20 Earth radii (R(sub E)) across the tail and 40 R(sub E)down the tail, on spatial and time scales accessible to global circulation models, i.e., approximately 2 R(sub E) and 10 seconds.

  2. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of a Network of Coupled Time-Delay Digital Tanlock Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Bishwajit; Banerjee, Tanmoy; Sarkar, B. C.

    The time-delay digital tanlock loop (TDTLs) is an important class of phase-locked loop that is widely used in electronic communication systems. Although nonlinear dynamics of an isolated TDTL has been studied in the past but the collective behavior of TDTLs in a network is an important topic of research and deserves special attention as in practical communication systems separate entities are rarely isolated. In this paper, we carry out the detailed analysis and numerical simulations to explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of a network of a one-dimensional ring of coupled TDTLs with nearest neighbor coupling. The equation representing the network is derived and we carry out analytical calculations using the circulant matrix formalism to obtain the stability criteria. An extensive numerical simulation reveals that with the variation of gain parameter and coupling strength the network shows a variety of spatiotemporal dynamics such as frozen random pattern, pattern selection, spatiotemporal intermittency and fully developed spatiotemporal chaos. We map the distinct dynamical regions of the system in two-parameter space. Finally, we quantify the spatiotemporal dynamics by using quantitative measures like Lyapunov exponent and the average quadratic deviation of the full network.

  3. Gender Dynamics Predict Changes in Marital Love Among African American Couples.

    PubMed

    Stanik, Christine E; McHale, Susan M; Crouter, Ann C

    2013-08-01

    This study examined the implications of gender attitudes and spouses' divisions of household labor, time with children, and parental knowledge for their trajectories of love in a sample of 146 African American couples. Multilevel modeling in the context of an accelerated longitudinal design accommodated 3 annual waves of data. The results revealed that traditionality in husbands' gender attitudes was linked to lower levels of love. Furthermore, divisions of household labor and parental knowledge moderated changes in love such that couples with more egalitarian divisions exhibited higher and more stable patterns of love, whereas more traditional couples exhibited significant declines in love over time. Finally, greater similarity between spouses' time with their children was linked to higher levels of marital love. The authors highlight the implications of gender dynamics for marital harmony among African American couples and discuss ways that this work may be applied and extended in practice and future research.

  4. Second-order quantized Hamilton dynamics coupled to classical heat bath

    SciTech Connect

    Heatwole, Eric M.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2005-06-15

    Starting with a quantum Langevin equation describing in the Heisenberg representation a quantum system coupled to a quantum bath, the Markov approximation and, further, the closure approximation are applied to derive a semiclassical Langevin equation for the second-order quantized Hamilton dynamics (QHD) coupled to a classical bath. The expectation values of the system operators are decomposed into products of the first and second moments of the position and momentum operators that incorporate zero-point energy and moderate tunneling effects. The random force and friction as well as the system-bath coupling are decomposed to the lowest classical level. The resulting Langevin equation describing QHD-2 coupled to classical bath is analyzed and applied to free particle, harmonic oscillator, and the Morse potential representing the OH stretch of the SPC-flexible water model.

  5. Mixed quantum-classical versus full quantum dynamics: Coupled quasiparticle-oscillator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanz, Holger; Esser, Bernd

    1997-05-01

    The relation between the dynamical properties of a coupled quasiparticle-oscillator system in the mixed quantum-classical and fully quantized descriptions is investigated. The system is considered as a model for applying a stepwise quantization. Features of the nonlinear dynamics in the mixed description such as the presence of a separatrix structure or regular and chaotic motion are shown to be reflected in the evolu- tion of the quantum state vector of the fully quantized system. In particular, it is demonstrated how wave packets propagate along the separatrix structure of the mixed description, and that chaotic dynamics leads to a strongly entangled quantum state vector. Special emphasis is given to viewing the system from a dyn- amical Born-Oppenheimer approximation defining integrable reference oscillators, and elucidating the role of the nonadiabatic couplings which complement this approximation into a rigorous quantization scheme.

  6. Complex interactions between dispersal and dynamics: Lessons from coupled logistic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, A. )

    1993-07-01

    A study of one of the simplest systems incorporating both dispersal and local dynamics, coupling two discrete time logistic equations, demonstrates several surprising features. Passive dispersal can cause chaotic dynamics to be replaced by simple periodic dynamics. Thus passive movement can be stabilizing, even in a deterministic model without underlying spatial variation in the dynamics. The boundary between initial conditions leading to qualitatively different dynamics can be a fractal, so it is essentially impossible to specify the asymptotic behavior in terms of the initial conditions. In accord with several recent studies of arthropods and earlier theoretical work, density dependence may only be detectable at a small enough spatial scale, so efforts to uncover density dependence must include investigations of movement. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  7. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  8. A spacetime, balance-law formulation of coupled atomistic and continuum dynamics for solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraczek, Brent

    Coupled dynamic atomistic and continuum computational methods for solids have received much interest recently, because many problems are not addressed well by either model alone. In most coupled methods more emphasis has been placed on damping spurious reflections than on balancing momentum and energy. I present a new method for concurrent coupling of dynamic atomistic and continuum simulations of solids that enforces these balance laws on the atom/element level while minimizing spurious reflections. The coupled formulation is composed of the continuum spacetime discontinuous Galerkin (SDG) method and the mathematically consistent, time finite element, atomistic discontinuous Galerkin (ADG) method. On the continuum side I develop a two- and three-field SDG formulations for linearized elastodynamics to illuminate the mathematical structure of the original one-field SDG formulation and to assist in making connections to the atomistic formulation. On the atomistic side I examine connections between the SDG and ADG methods, and then extend this to relationships with the Velocity Verlet integrator. The component SDG and ADG methods are coupled using the same Godunov flux solution as is used by the SDG method, to enforce weakly the jump conditions on momentum balance and kinematic compatibility. To obtain compatible fluxes on the atomistic side of the coupling boundary I define a boundary atomistic trace that can be optimized to minimize boundary reflections. The coupled SDG--ADG formulation preserves the characteristic structure of the hyperbolic problem, guarantees element/atom-wise momentum balance to machine precision and yields energy error that is small, dissipative and controllable. The flux-based coupling can also be used with the Velocity Verlet method in place of the ADG, although the SDG--VV method suffers from uncontrolled energy error for long-time simulations due to the mismatch in the mathematical models. I present the formulations in spacetime, with one

  9. Spatiotemporal dynamics of a digital phase-locked loop based coupled map lattice system

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Tanmoy Paul, Bishwajit; Sarkar, B. C.

    2014-03-15

    We explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of a coupled map lattice (CML) system, which is realized with a one dimensional array of locally coupled digital phase-locked loops (DPLLs). DPLL is a nonlinear feedback-controlled system widely used as an important building block of electronic communication systems. We derive the phase-error equation of the spatially extended system of coupled DPLLs, which resembles a form of the equation of a CML system. We carry out stability analysis for the synchronized homogeneous solutions using the circulant matrix formalism. It is shown through extensive numerical simulations that with the variation of nonlinearity parameter and coupling strength the system shows transitions among several generic features of spatiotemporal dynamics, viz., synchronized fixed point solution, frozen random pattern, pattern selection, spatiotemporal intermittency, and fully developed spatiotemporal chaos. We quantify the spatiotemporal dynamics using quantitative measures like average quadratic deviation and spatial correlation function. We emphasize that instead of using an idealized model of CML, which is usually employed to observe the spatiotemporal behaviors, we consider a real world physical system and establish the existence of spatiotemporal chaos and other patterns in this system. We also discuss the importance of the present study in engineering application like removal of clock-skew in parallel processors.

  10. In-situ coupling between kinase activities and protein dynamics within single focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yiqian; Zhang, Kaiwen; Seong, Jihye; Fan, Jason; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao; Lu, Shaoying

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic activation of oncogenic kinases and regulation of focal adhesions (FAs) are crucial molecular events modulating cell adhesion in cancer metastasis. However, it remains unclear how these events are temporally coordinated at single FA sites. Therefore, we targeted fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors toward subcellular FAs to report local molecular events during cancer cell adhesion. Employing single FA tracking and cross-correlation analysis, we quantified the dynamic coupling characteristics between biochemical kinase activities and structural FA within single FAs. We show that kinase activations and FA assembly are strongly and sequentially correlated, with the concurrent FA assembly and Src activation leading focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation by 42.6 ± 12.6 sec. Strikingly, the temporal coupling between kinase activation and individual FA assembly reflects the fate of FAs at later stages. The FAs with a tight coupling tend to grow and mature, while the less coupled FAs likely disassemble. During FA disassembly, however, kinase activations lead the disassembly, with FAK being activated earlier than Src. Therefore, by integrating subcellularly targeted FRET biosensors and computational analysis, our study reveals intricate interplays between Src and FAK in regulating the dynamic life of single FAs in cancer cells. PMID:27383747

  11. In-situ coupling between kinase activities and protein dynamics within single focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiqian; Zhang, Kaiwen; Seong, Jihye; Fan, Jason; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao; Lu, Shaoying

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic activation of oncogenic kinases and regulation of focal adhesions (FAs) are crucial molecular events modulating cell adhesion in cancer metastasis. However, it remains unclear how these events are temporally coordinated at single FA sites. Therefore, we targeted fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors toward subcellular FAs to report local molecular events during cancer cell adhesion. Employing single FA tracking and cross-correlation analysis, we quantified the dynamic coupling characteristics between biochemical kinase activities and structural FA within single FAs. We show that kinase activations and FA assembly are strongly and sequentially correlated, with the concurrent FA assembly and Src activation leading focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation by 42.6 ± 12.6 sec. Strikingly, the temporal coupling between kinase activation and individual FA assembly reflects the fate of FAs at later stages. The FAs with a tight coupling tend to grow and mature, while the less coupled FAs likely disassemble. During FA disassembly, however, kinase activations lead the disassembly, with FAK being activated earlier than Src. Therefore, by integrating subcellularly targeted FRET biosensors and computational analysis, our study reveals intricate interplays between Src and FAK in regulating the dynamic life of single FAs in cancer cells. PMID:27383747

  12. Coupled attitude-orbit dynamics and control for an electric sail in a heliocentric transfer mission.

    PubMed

    Huo, Mingying; Zhao, Jun; Xie, Shaobiao; Qi, Naiming

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the coupled attitude-orbit dynamics and control of an electric-sail-based spacecraft in a heliocentric transfer mission. The mathematical model characterizing the propulsive thrust is first described as a function of the orbital radius and the sail angle. Since the solar wind dynamic pressure acceleration is induced by the sail attitude, the orbital and attitude dynamics of electric sails are coupled, and are discussed together. Based on the coupled equations, the flight control is investigated, wherein the orbital control is studied in an optimal framework via a hybrid optimization method and the attitude controller is designed based on feedback linearization control. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, a transfer problem from Earth to Mars is considered. The numerical results show that the proposed strategy can control the coupled system very well, and a small control torque can control both the attitude and orbit. The study in this paper will contribute to the theory study and application of electric sail.

  13. Coupled attitude-orbit dynamics and control for an electric sail in a heliocentric transfer mission.

    PubMed

    Huo, Mingying; Zhao, Jun; Xie, Shaobiao; Qi, Naiming

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the coupled attitude-orbit dynamics and control of an electric-sail-based spacecraft in a heliocentric transfer mission. The mathematical model characterizing the propulsive thrust is first described as a function of the orbital radius and the sail angle. Since the solar wind dynamic pressure acceleration is induced by the sail attitude, the orbital and attitude dynamics of electric sails are coupled, and are discussed together. Based on the coupled equations, the flight control is investigated, wherein the orbital control is studied in an optimal framework via a hybrid optimization method and the attitude controller is designed based on feedback linearization control. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, a transfer problem from Earth to Mars is considered. The numerical results show that the proposed strategy can control the coupled system very well, and a small control torque can control both the attitude and orbit. The study in this paper will contribute to the theory study and application of electric sail. PMID:25950179

  14. Mirroring and beyond: coupled dynamics as a generalized framework for modelling social interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hasson, Uri; Frith, Chris D.

    2016-01-01

    When people observe one another, behavioural alignment can be detected at many levels, from the physical to the mental. Likewise, when people process the same highly complex stimulus sequences, such as films and stories, alignment is detected in the elicited brain activity. In early sensory areas, shared neural patterns are coupled to the low-level properties of the stimulus (shape, motion, volume, etc.), while in high-order brain areas, shared neural patterns are coupled to high-levels aspects of the stimulus, such as meaning. Successful social interactions require such alignments (both behavioural and neural), as communication cannot occur without shared understanding. However, we need to go beyond simple, symmetric (mirror) alignment once we start interacting. Interactions are dynamic processes, which involve continuous mutual adaptation, development of complementary behaviour and division of labour such as leader–follower roles. Here, we argue that interacting individuals are dynamically coupled rather than simply aligned. This broader framework for understanding interactions can encompass both processes by which behaviour and brain activity mirror each other (neural alignment), and situations in which behaviour and brain activity in one participant are coupled (but not mirrored) to the dynamics in the other participant. To apply these more sophisticated accounts of social interactions to the study of the underlying neural processes we need to develop new experimental paradigms and novel methods of data analysis PMID:27069044

  15. Mirroring and beyond: coupled dynamics as a generalized framework for modelling social interactions.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Uri; Frith, Chris D

    2016-05-01

    When people observe one another, behavioural alignment can be detected at many levels, from the physical to the mental. Likewise, when people process the same highly complex stimulus sequences, such as films and stories, alignment is detected in the elicited brain activity. In early sensory areas, shared neural patterns are coupled to the low-level properties of the stimulus (shape, motion, volume, etc.), while in high-order brain areas, shared neural patterns are coupled to high-levels aspects of the stimulus, such as meaning. Successful social interactions require such alignments (both behavioural and neural), as communication cannot occur without shared understanding. However, we need to go beyond simple, symmetric (mirror) alignment once we start interacting. Interactions are dynamic processes, which involve continuous mutual adaptation, development of complementary behaviour and division of labour such as leader-follower roles. Here, we argue that interacting individuals are dynamically coupled rather than simply aligned. This broader framework for understanding interactions can encompass both processes by which behaviour and brain activity mirror each other (neural alignment), and situations in which behaviour and brain activity in one participant are coupled (but not mirrored) to the dynamics in the other participant. To apply these more sophisticated accounts of social interactions to the study of the underlying neural processes we need to develop new experimental paradigms and novel methods of data analysis. PMID:27069044

  16. Spatiotemporal dynamics of a digital phase-locked loop based coupled map lattice system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tanmoy; Paul, Bishwajit; Sarkar, B. C.

    2014-03-01

    We explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of a coupled map lattice (CML) system, which is realized with a one dimensional array of locally coupled digital phase-locked loops (DPLLs). DPLL is a nonlinear feedback-controlled system widely used as an important building block of electronic communication systems. We derive the phase-error equation of the spatially extended system of coupled DPLLs, which resembles a form of the equation of a CML system. We carry out stability analysis for the synchronized homogeneous solutions using the circulant matrix formalism. It is shown through extensive numerical simulations that with the variation of nonlinearity parameter and coupling strength the system shows transitions among several generic features of spatiotemporal dynamics, viz., synchronized fixed point solution, frozen random pattern, pattern selection, spatiotemporal intermittency, and fully developed spatiotemporal chaos. We quantify the spatiotemporal dynamics using quantitative measures like average quadratic deviation and spatial correlation function. We emphasize that instead of using an idealized model of CML, which is usually employed to observe the spatiotemporal behaviors, we consider a real world physical system and establish the existence of spatiotemporal chaos and other patterns in this system. We also discuss the importance of the present study in engineering application like removal of clock-skew in parallel processors.

  17. Coupled Attitude-Orbit Dynamics and Control for an Electric Sail in a Heliocentric Transfer Mission

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Mingying; Zhao, Jun; Xie, Shaobiao; Qi, Naiming

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the coupled attitude-orbit dynamics and control of an electric-sail-based spacecraft in a heliocentric transfer mission. The mathematical model characterizing the propulsive thrust is first described as a function of the orbital radius and the sail angle. Since the solar wind dynamic pressure acceleration is induced by the sail attitude, the orbital and attitude dynamics of electric sails are coupled, and are discussed together. Based on the coupled equations, the flight control is investigated, wherein the orbital control is studied in an optimal framework via a hybrid optimization method and the attitude controller is designed based on feedback linearization control. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, a transfer problem from Earth to Mars is considered. The numerical results show that the proposed strategy can control the coupled system very well, and a small control torque can control both the attitude and orbit. The study in this paper will contribute to the theory study and application of electric sail. PMID:25950179

  18. Applications of time-domain spectroscopy to electron-phonon coupling dynamics at surfaces.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yoshiyasu

    2014-10-01

    Photochemistry is one of the most important branches in chemistry to promote and control chemical reactions. In particular, there has been growing interest in photoinduced processes at solid surfaces and interfaces with liquids such as water for developing efficient solar energy conversion. For example, photoinduced charge transfer between adsorbates and semiconductor substrates at the surfaces of metal oxides induced by photogenerated holes and electrons is a core process in photovoltaics and photocatalysis. In these photoinduced processes, electron-phonon coupling plays a central role. This paper describes how time-domain spectroscopy is applied to elucidate electron-phonon coupling dynamics at metal and semiconductor surfaces. Because nuclear dynamics induced by electronic excitation through electron-phonon coupling take place in the femtosecond time domain, the pump-and-probe method with ultrashort pulses used in time-domain spectroscopy is a natural choice for elucidating the electron-phonon coupling at metal and semiconductor surfaces. Starting with a phenomenological theory of coherent phonons generated by impulsive electronic excitation, this paper describes a couple of illustrative examples of the applications of linear and nonlinear time-domain spectroscopy to a simple adsorption system, alkali metal on Cu(111), and more complex photocatalyst systems. PMID:25139240

  19. Assessing spatial coupling in complex population dynamics using mutual prediction and continuity statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.M.; Moniz, L.; Nichols, J.D.; Pecora, L.M.; Cooch, E.

    2005-01-01

    A number of important questions in ecology involve the possibility of interactions or ?coupling? among potential components of ecological systems. The basic question of whether two components are coupled (exhibit dynamical interdependence) is relevant to investigations of movement of animals over space, population regulation, food webs and trophic interactions, and is also useful in the design of monitoring programs. For example, in spatially extended systems, coupling among populations in different locations implies the existence of redundant information in the system and the possibility of exploiting this redundancy in the development of spatial sampling designs. One approach to the identification of coupling involves study of the purported mechanisms linking system components. Another approach is based on time series of two potential components of the same system and, in previous ecological work, has relied on linear cross-correlation analysis. Here we present two different attractor-based approaches, continuity and mutual prediction, for determining the degree to which two population time series (e.g., at different spatial locations) are coupled. Both approaches are demonstrated on a one-dimensional predator?prey model system exhibiting complex dynamics. Of particular interest is the spatial asymmetry introduced into the model as linearly declining resource for the prey over the domain of the spatial coordinate. Results from these approaches are then compared to the more standard cross-correlation analysis. In contrast to cross-correlation, both continuity and mutual prediction are clearly able to discern the asymmetry in the flow of information through this system.

  20. Ionosphere/thermosphere heating determined from dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jiannan; Song, Paul; Vasyliūnas, Vytenis M.

    2011-09-01

    Ionosphere/thermosphere heating driven by magnetospheric convection is investigated through a three-fluid inductive (including Faraday's law) approach to describing magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling, for a 1-D stratified ionosphere/thermosphere in this initial study. It is shown that the response of the ionosphere/thermosphere and thus the heating is dynamic and height-dependent. The heating is essentially frictional in nature rather than Joule heating as commonly assumed. The heating rate reaches a quasi-steady state after about 25 Alfvén travel times. During the dynamic period, the heating can be enhanced and displays peaks at multiple times due to wave reflections. The dynamic heating rate can be more than twice greater than the quasi-steady state value. The heating is strongest in the E-layer but the heating rate per unit mass is concentrated around the F-layer peak height. This implies a potential mechanism of driving O+ upflow from O+ rich F-layer. It is shown that the ionosphere/thermosphere heating caused by the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling can be simply evaluated through the relative velocity between the plasma and neutrals without invoking field-aligned currents, ionospheric conductance, and electric field. The present study provides understanding of the dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling from the ionospheric/thermospheric view in addition to magnetospheric perspectives.

  1. The effect of quenched disorder on dynamical transitions in systems of coupled cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinshan; Singh, Rajeev; Garnier, Nicolas B.; Sinha, Sitabhra; Pumir, Alain

    2013-09-01

    Non-equilibrium systems are characterized by a rich variety of dynamical behaviors, which may sensitively depend on control parameters. Here, we investigate and provide a quantitative analysis of the role of disorder on the transitions between different dynamical regimes in extended heterogeneous systems of excitable and passive cells, induced by varying the strength of the coupling between cells. The random distribution of passive cells provides a quenched disorder in important biological contexts, such as the appearance of contractions in the pregnant uterus. We observe a large variability between different realizations of the disorder (replicas) in a lattice of excitable cells, each cell being coupled to a random number of passive cells. The statistics of these large disorder-induced fluctuations are related to the properties of the coarse-grained distribution of passive cells, in particular, to its extreme values. We show that these fluctuations can be characterized by a simple scaling relation, involving the strength of the coupling between excitable cells, the mean passive cell density and the logarithm of the system size. Our results provide a quantitative understanding of the important effect of a quenched disorder in the transition between dynamical regimes in extended dynamical systems.

  2. Quench dynamics of a Bose gas under synthetic spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tian-Shu; Zhang, Wei; Yi, Wei; Guo, Guang-Can; Wei Yi's Group Team; Wei Zhang`s Group Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We study the quench dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate under a Raman-asssited synthetic spin-orbit coupling. To model the dynamical process, we adopt a self-consistent Bogoliubov approach, which is equivalent to applying the time-dependent Bogoliubov-de-Gennes equations. We investigate the dynamics of the condensate fraction as well as the momentum distribution of the Bose gas following a sudden change of system parameters. Typically, the system evolves into a steady state in the long-time limit, which features a stationary condensate fraction and an oscillating momentum distribution. The condensate fraction of the steady state depends on the quench parameter. We investigate how different quench parameters such as the inter- and intra-species interactions and the spin-orbit-coupling parameters affect the condensate fraction in the steady state. Furthermore, we find that the oscillatory momentum distribution in the long-time limit can be described by a generalized Gibbs ensemble with two branches of momentum-dependent Gibbs temperatures. Our study is relevant to the experimental investigation of dynamical processes in a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate.

  3. Quench dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate under synthetic spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tian-Shu; Zhang, Wei; Yi, Wei; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-05-01

    We study the quench dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate under a Raman-assisted synthetic spin-orbit coupling. To model the dynamical process, we adopt a self-consistent Bogoliubov approach, which is equivalent to applying the time-dependent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. We investigate the dynamics of the condensate fraction as well as the momentum distribution of the Bose gas following a sudden change of system parameters. Typically, the system evolves into a steady state in the long-time limit, which features an oscillating momentum distribution and a stationary condensate fraction. We investigate how different quench parameters such as the inter- and intraspecies interactions and the spin-orbit-coupling parameters affect the condensate fraction in the steady state. Furthermore, we find that the time average of the oscillatory momentum distribution in the long-time limit can be described by a generalized Gibbs ensemble with two branches of momentum-dependent Gibbs temperatures. Our study is relevant to the experimental investigation of dynamical processes in a spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate.

  4. Collective dynamics of identical phase oscillators with high-order coupling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Can; Xiang, Hairong; Gao, Jian; Zheng, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework to investigate the collective dynamics in ensembles of globally coupled phase oscillators when higher-order modes dominate the coupling. The spatiotemporal properties of the attractors in various regions of parameter space are analyzed. Furthermore, a detailed linear stability analysis proves that the stationary symmetric distribution is only neutrally stable in the marginal regime which stems from the generalized time-reversal symmetry. Moreover, the critical parameters of the transition among various regimes are determined analytically by both the Ott-Antonsen method and linear stability analysis, the transient dynamics are further revealed in terms of the characteristic curves method. Finally, for the more general initial condition the symmetric dynamics could be reduced to a rigorous three-dimensional manifold which shows that the neutrally stable chaos could also occur in this model for particular parameters. Our theoretical analysis and numerical results are consistent with each other, which can help us understand the dynamical properties in general systems with higher-order harmonics couplings. PMID:27491401

  5. Collective dynamics of identical phase oscillators with high-order coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Can; Xiang, Hairong; Gao, Jian; Zheng, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework to investigate the collective dynamics in ensembles of globally coupled phase oscillators when higher-order modes dominate the coupling. The spatiotemporal properties of the attractors in various regions of parameter space are analyzed. Furthermore, a detailed linear stability analysis proves that the stationary symmetric distribution is only neutrally stable in the marginal regime which stems from the generalized time-reversal symmetry. Moreover, the critical parameters of the transition among various regimes are determined analytically by both the Ott-Antonsen method and linear stability analysis, the transient dynamics are further revealed in terms of the characteristic curves method. Finally, for the more general initial condition the symmetric dynamics could be reduced to a rigorous three-dimensional manifold which shows that the neutrally stable chaos could also occur in this model for particular parameters. Our theoretical analysis and numerical results are consistent with each other, which can help us understand the dynamical properties in general systems with higher-order harmonics couplings.

  6. The effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of an electrochemical oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Zülke, Alana A.; Varela, Hamilton

    2016-01-01

    The coupling among disparate time-scales is ubiquitous in many chemical and biological systems. We have recently investigated the effect of fast and, long-term, slow dynamics in surface processes underlying some electrocatalytic reactions. Herein we report on the effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of a model system, namely the electro-oxidation of formic acid on platinum studied at five temperatures between 5 and 45 °C. The main result was a turning point found at 25 °C, which clearly defines two regions for the temperature dependency on the overall kinetics. In addition, the long-term evolution allowed us to compare reaction steps related to fast and slow evolutions. Results were discussed in terms of the key role of PtO species, which chemically couple slow and fast dynamics. In summary we were able to: (a) identify the competition between two reaction steps as responsible for the occurrence of two temperature domains; (b) compare the relative activation energies of these two steps; and (c) suggest the role of a given reaction step on the period-increasing set of reactions involved in the oscillatory dynamics. The introduced methodology could be applied to other systems to uncover the temperature dependence of complex chemical networks. PMID:27079514

  7. Collective dynamics of identical phase oscillators with high-order coupling

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Can; Xiang, Hairong; Gao, Jian; Zheng, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework to investigate the collective dynamics in ensembles of globally coupled phase oscillators when higher-order modes dominate the coupling. The spatiotemporal properties of the attractors in various regions of parameter space are analyzed. Furthermore, a detailed linear stability analysis proves that the stationary symmetric distribution is only neutrally stable in the marginal regime which stems from the generalized time-reversal symmetry. Moreover, the critical parameters of the transition among various regimes are determined analytically by both the Ott-Antonsen method and linear stability analysis, the transient dynamics are further revealed in terms of the characteristic curves method. Finally, for the more general initial condition the symmetric dynamics could be reduced to a rigorous three-dimensional manifold which shows that the neutrally stable chaos could also occur in this model for particular parameters. Our theoretical analysis and numerical results are consistent with each other, which can help us understand the dynamical properties in general systems with higher-order harmonics couplings. PMID:27491401

  8. The effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of an electrochemical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zülke, Alana A.; Varela, Hamilton

    2016-04-01

    The coupling among disparate time-scales is ubiquitous in many chemical and biological systems. We have recently investigated the effect of fast and, long-term, slow dynamics in surface processes underlying some electrocatalytic reactions. Herein we report on the effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of a model system, namely the electro-oxidation of formic acid on platinum studied at five temperatures between 5 and 45 °C. The main result was a turning point found at 25 °C, which clearly defines two regions for the temperature dependency on the overall kinetics. In addition, the long-term evolution allowed us to compare reaction steps related to fast and slow evolutions. Results were discussed in terms of the key role of PtO species, which chemically couple slow and fast dynamics. In summary we were able to: (a) identify the competition between two reaction steps as responsible for the occurrence of two temperature domains; (b) compare the relative activation energies of these two steps; and (c) suggest the role of a given reaction step on the period-increasing set of reactions involved in the oscillatory dynamics. The introduced methodology could be applied to other systems to uncover the temperature dependence of complex chemical networks.

  9. Dynamically coupling the full Stokes equations and the SIA - the ISCAL method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlkrona, Josefin; Lötstedt, Per; Zwinger, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The ISCAL (Ice Sheet Coupled Approximation Level) is a new method for computing ice sheet flow, implemented in the community ice-sheet model Elmer/Ice. ISCAL combines the exact Stokes equations with the set of equations obained applying the Shallow Ice Approximation (SIA), confining the computationally cheap SIA to only those areas where it is accurate enough. The coupling is done dynamically and is based on SIA error estimates. In this way, the simulation times are significantly reduced, while the user has control over the error introduced by the approximations applied. Accuracy and efficiency is demonstrated using synthetic set-ups as well as for the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  10. Quantum dynamics of a microwave driven superconducting phase qubit coupled to a two-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guozhu; Wen, Xueda; Mao, Bo; Zhou, Zhongyuan; Yu, Yang; Wu, Peiheng; Han, Siyuan

    2010-10-01

    We present an analytical and comprehensive description of the quantum dynamics of a microwave resonantly driven superconducting phase qubit coupled to a microscopic two-level system (TLS), covering a wide range of the external microwave field strength. Our model predicts several interesting phenomena in such an ac driven four-level bipartite system including anomalous Rabi oscillations, high-contrast beatings of Rabi oscillations, and extraordinary two-photon transitions. Our experimental results in a coupled qubit-TLS system agree quantitatively very well with the predictions of the theoretical model.

  11. Driven Dynamics and Rotary Echo of a Qubit Tunably Coupled to a Harmonic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, S.; Bylander, J.; Yan, F.; Forn-Díaz, P.; Bolkhovsky, V.; Braje, D.; Fitch, G.; Harrabi, K.; Lennon, D.; Miloshi, J.; Murphy, P.; Slattery, R.; Spector, S.; Turek, B.; Weir, T.; Welander, P. B.; Yoshihara, F.; Cory, D. G.; Nakamura, Y.; Orlando, T. P.; Oliver, W. D.

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated the driven dynamics of a superconducting flux qubit that is tunably coupled to a microwave resonator. We find that the qubit experiences an oscillating field mediated by off-resonant driving of the resonator, leading to strong modifications of the qubit Rabi frequency. This opens an additional noise channel, and we find that low-frequency noise in the coupling parameter causes a reduction of the coherence time during driven evolution. The noise can be mitigated with the rotary-echo pulse sequence, which, for driven systems, is analogous to the Hahn-echo sequence.

  12. Driven Dynamics and Rotary Echo of a Qubit Tunably Coupled to a Harmonic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, William; Gustavsson, Simon; Bylander, Jonas; Yan, Fei; Forn-Diaz, Pol; Bolkhovsky, Vlad; Braje, Danielle; Fitch, George; Harrabi, Khalil; Lennon, Donna; Miloshi, Jovi; Murphy, Peter; Slattery, Rick; Spector, Steven; Turek, Ben; Weir, Terry; Welander, Paul; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Cory, David; Nakamura, Yasunobu; Orlando, Terry

    2013-03-01

    We have investigated the driven dynamics of a superconducting flux qubit that is tunably coupled to a microwave resonator. We find that the qubit experiences an oscillating field mediated by off-resonant driving of the resonator, leading to strong modifications of the qubit Rabi frequency. This opens an additional noise channel, and we find that low-frequency noise in the coupling parameter causes a reduction of the coherence time during driven evolution. The noise can be mitigated with the rotary-echo pulse sequence, which, for driven systems, is analogous to the Hahn-echo sequence.

  13. The situated HKB model: how sensorimotor spatial coupling can alter oscillatory brain dynamics.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Miguel; Bedia, Manuel G; Santos, Bruno A; Barandiaran, Xabier E

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increase of both dynamic and embodied/situated approaches in cognitive science, there is still little research on how coordination dynamics under a closed sensorimotor loop might induce qualitatively different patterns of neural oscillations compared to those found in isolated systems. We take as a departure point the Haken-Kelso-Bunz (HKB) model, a generic model for dynamic coordination between two oscillatory components, which has proven useful for a vast range of applications in cognitive science and whose dynamical properties are well understood. In order to explore the properties of this model under closed sensorimotor conditions we present what we call the situated HKB model: a robotic model that performs a gradient climbing task and whose "brain" is modeled by the HKB equation. We solve the differential equations that define the agent-environment coupling for increasing values of the agent's sensitivity (sensor gain), finding different behavioral strategies. These results are compared with two different models: a decoupled HKB with no sensory input and a passively-coupled HKB that is also decoupled but receives a structured input generated by a situated agent. We can precisely quantify and qualitatively describe how the properties of the system, when studied in coupled conditions, radically change in a manner that cannot be deduced from the decoupled HKB models alone. We also present the notion of neurodynamic signature as the dynamic pattern that correlates with a specific behavior and we show how only a situated agent can display this signature compared to an agent that simply receives the exact same sensory input. To our knowledge, this is the first analytical solution of the HKB equation in a sensorimotor loop and qualitative and quantitative analytic comparison of spatially coupled vs. decoupled oscillatory controllers. Finally, we discuss the limitations and possible generalization of our model to contemporary neuroscience and philosophy of

  14. The situated HKB model: how sensorimotor spatial coupling can alter oscillatory brain dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Miguel; Bedia, Manuel G.; Santos, Bruno A.; Barandiaran, Xabier E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increase of both dynamic and embodied/situated approaches in cognitive science, there is still little research on how coordination dynamics under a closed sensorimotor loop might induce qualitatively different patterns of neural oscillations compared to those found in isolated systems. We take as a departure point the Haken-Kelso-Bunz (HKB) model, a generic model for dynamic coordination between two oscillatory components, which has proven useful for a vast range of applications in cognitive science and whose dynamical properties are well understood. In order to explore the properties of this model under closed sensorimotor conditions we present what we call the situated HKB model: a robotic model that performs a gradient climbing task and whose “brain” is modeled by the HKB equation. We solve the differential equations that define the agent-environment coupling for increasing values of the agent's sensitivity (sensor gain), finding different behavioral strategies. These results are compared with two different models: a decoupled HKB with no sensory input and a passively-coupled HKB that is also decoupled but receives a structured input generated by a situated agent. We can precisely quantify and qualitatively describe how the properties of the system, when studied in coupled conditions, radically change in a manner that cannot be deduced from the decoupled HKB models alone. We also present the notion of neurodynamic signature as the dynamic pattern that correlates with a specific behavior and we show how only a situated agent can display this signature compared to an agent that simply receives the exact same sensory input. To our knowledge, this is the first analytical solution of the HKB equation in a sensorimotor loop and qualitative and quantitative analytic comparison of spatially coupled vs. decoupled oscillatory controllers. Finally, we discuss the limitations and possible generalization of our model to contemporary neuroscience and

  15. Use of Generalized Mass in the Interpretation of Dynamic Response of BENDING-TORSION Coupled Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ESLIMY-ISFAHANY, S. H. R.; BANERJEE, J. R.

    2000-11-01

    The interpretation of mode shapes and dynamic response of bending-torsion coupled beams is assessed by using the concept of generalized mass. In the first part of this investigation, the free vibratory motion of bending-torsion coupled beams is studied in detail. The conventional method of interpreting the normal modes of vibration consisting of bending displacements and torsional rotations is shown to be inadequate and replaced by an alternative method which is focussed on the constituent parts of the generalized mass arising from bending and torsional displacements. Basically, the generalized mass in a particular mode is identified and examined in terms of bending, torsion and bending-torsion coupling effects. It is demonstrated that the contribution of individual components in the expression of the generalized mass of a normal mode is a much better indicator in characterizing a coupled mode. It is also shown that the usually adopted criteria of plotting bending displacement and torsional rotations to describe a coupled mode can be deceptive and misleading. In the second part of the investigation, attention is focussed on the dynamic response characteristics of bending-torsion coupled beams when subjected to random bending or torsional loads. A normal mode approach is used to establish the total response. The input random excitation is assumed to be stationary and ergodic so that with the linearity assumption, the output spectrum of the response is obtained by using the frequency response function. The contribution of each normal mode to the overall response is isolated. Particular emphasis is placed on bending-induced torsional response and torsion-induced bending response. A number of case studies involving different types of bending-torsion coupled beams with Cantilever end conditions are presented. The limitations of existing methods of modal interpretation are highlighted, and an insight into the mode selection for response analysis is provided.

  16. Force feedback coupling with dynamics for physical simulation of product assembly and operation performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenyu; Tan, Jianrong; Duan, Guifang; Fu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Most existing force feedback methods are still difficult to meet the requirements of real-time force calculation in virtual assembly and operation with complex objects. In addition, there is often an assumption that the controlled objects are completely free and the target object is only completely fixed or free, thus, the dynamics of the kinematic chain where the controlled objects are located are neglected during the physical simulation of the product manipulation with force feedback interaction. This paper proposes a physical simulation method of product assembly and operation manipulation based on statistically learned contact force prediction model and the coupling of force feedback and dynamics. In the proposed method, based on hidden Markov model (HMM) and local weighting learning (LWL), contact force prediction model is constructed, which can estimate the contact force in real time during interaction. Based on computational load balance model, the computing resources are dynamically assigned and the dynamics integral step is optimized. In addition, smoothing process is performed to the force feedback on the synchronization points. Consequently, we can solve the coupling and synchronization problems of high-frequency feedback force servo, low-frequency dynamics solver servo and scene rendering servo, and realize highly stable and accurate force feedback in the physical simulation of product assembly and operation manipulation. This research proposes a physical simulation method of product assembly and operation manipulation.

  17. Coexistence of regular and irregular dynamics in complex networks of pulse-coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Timme, Marc; Wolf, Fred; Geisel, Theo

    2002-12-16

    For general networks of pulse-coupled oscillators, including regular, random, and more complex networks, we develop an exact stability analysis of synchronous states. As opposed to conventional stability analysis, here stability is determined by a multitude of linear operators. We treat this multioperator problem exactly and show that for inhibitory interactions the synchronous state is stable, independent of the parameters and the network connectivity. In randomly connected networks with strong interactions this synchronous state, displaying regular dynamics, coexists with a balanced state exhibiting irregular dynamics. External signals may switch the network between qualitatively distinct states.

  18. Lattice Dynamics of EuO: Evidence for Giant Spin-Phonon Coupling.

    PubMed

    Pradip, R; Piekarz, P; Bosak, A; Merkel, D G; Waller, O; Seiler, A; Chumakov, A I; Rüffer, R; Oleś, A M; Parlinski, K; Krisch, M; Baumbach, T; Stankov, S

    2016-05-01

    Comprehensive studies of lattice dynamics in the ferromagnetic semiconductor EuO have been performed by a combination of inelastic x-ray scattering, nuclear inelastic scattering, and ab initio calculations. A remarkably large broadening of the transverse acoustic phonons was discovered at temperatures above and below the Curie temperature T_{C}=69  K. This result indicates a surprisingly strong momentum-dependent spin-phonon coupling induced by the spin dynamics in EuO. PMID:27203332

  19. Order preserving contact transformations and dynamical symmetries of scalar and coupled Riccati and Abel chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladwin Pradeep, R.; Chandrasekar, V. K.; Mohanasubha, R.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-07-01

    We identify contact transformations which linearize the given equations in the Riccati and Abel chains of nonlinear scalar and coupled ordinary differential equations to the same order. The identified contact transformations are not of Cole-Hopf type and are new to the literature. The linearization of Abel chain of equations is also demonstrated explicitly for the first time. The contact transformations can be utilized to derive dynamical symmetries of the associated nonlinear ODEs. The wider applicability of identifying this type of contact transformations and the method of deriving dynamical symmetries by using them is illustrated through two dimensional generalizations of the Riccati and Abel chains as well.

  20. Shape memory alloy nanostructures with coupled dynamic thermo-mechanical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhote, R. P.; Gomez, H.; Melnik, R. N. V.; Zu, J.

    2015-07-01

    Employing the Ginzburg-Landau phase-field theory, a new coupled dynamic thermo-mechanical 3D model has been proposed for modeling the cubic-to-tetragonal martensitic transformations in shape memory alloy (SMA) nanostructures. The stress-induced phase transformations and thermo-mechanical behavior of nanostructured SMAs have been investigated. The mechanical and thermal hysteresis phenomena, local non-uniform phase transformations and corresponding non-uniform temperatures and deformations' distributions are captured successfully using the developed model. The predicted microstructure evolution qualitatively matches with the experimental observations. The developed coupled dynamic model has provided a better understanding of underlying martensitic transformation mechanisms in SMAs, as well as their effect on the thermo-mechanical behavior of nanostructures.

  1. Controllable quantum dynamics of inhomogeneous nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles coupled to superconducting resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wan-Lu; Yang, Wan-Li; Yin, Zhang-Qi; Chen, Chang-Yong; Feng, Mang

    2016-09-01

    We explore controllable quantum dynamics of a hybrid system, which consists of an array of mutually coupled superconducting resonators (SRs) with each containing a nitrogen-vacancy center spin ensemble (NVE) in the presence of inhomogeneous broadening. We focus on a three-site model, which compared with the two-site case, shows more complicated and richer dynamical behavior, and displays a series of damped oscillations under various experimental situations, reflecting the intricate balance and competition between the NVE-SR collective coupling and the adjacent-site photon hopping. Particularly, we find that the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble can suppress the population transfer between the SR and the local NVE. In this context, although the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble diminishes entanglement among the NVEs, optimal entanglement, characterized by averaging the lower bound of concurrence, could be achieved through accurately adjusting the tunable parameters.

  2. Entanglement dynamics of the ultrastrong-coupling three-qubit Dicke model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Lijun; Liu, Yanxia; Zhang, Yunbo

    2016-05-01

    We give an analytical description of the dynamics of the three-qubit Dicke model using the adiabatic approximation in the parameter regime where the qubit transition frequencies are far off-resonance with the field frequency and the interaction strengths reach the ultrastrong-coupling regimes. Qualitative differences arise upon comparison to single- and two-qubit systems. Simple analytic formulas show that three revival sequences produce a three-frequency beat note in the time evolution of the population. We find an explicit way to estimate the dynamics for qubit-field and qubit-qubit entanglement inside the three-qubit system in the ultrastrong-coupling regime, and the resistance to sudden death proves that the entanglement in the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state is more robust than that in the W state.

  3. Dynamical behaviors in time-delay systems with delayed feedback and digitized coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Chiranjit; Ambika, G.; Banerjee, Soumitro

    2014-12-01

    We consider a network of delay dynamical systems connected in a ring via unidirectional positive feedback with constant delay in coupling. For the specific case of Mackey-Glass systems on the ring topology, we capture the phenomena of amplitude death, isochronous synchronization and phase-flip bifurcation as the relevant parameters are tuned. Using linear stability analysis and master stability function approach, we predict the region of amplitude death and synchronized states respectively in the parameter space and study the nature of transitions between the different states. For a large number of systems in the same dynamical configuration, we observe splay states, mixed splay states and phase locked clusters. We extend the study to the case of digitized coupling and observe that these emergent states still persist. However, the sampling and quantization reduce the regions of amplitude death and induce phase-flip bifurcation.

  4. Controllable quantum dynamics of inhomogeneous nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles coupled to superconducting resonators

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wan-lu; Yang, Wan-li; Yin, Zhang-qi; Chen, Chang-yong; Feng, Mang

    2016-01-01

    We explore controllable quantum dynamics of a hybrid system, which consists of an array of mutually coupled superconducting resonators (SRs) with each containing a nitrogen-vacancy center spin ensemble (NVE) in the presence of inhomogeneous broadening. We focus on a three-site model, which compared with the two-site case, shows more complicated and richer dynamical behavior, and displays a series of damped oscillations under various experimental situations, reflecting the intricate balance and competition between the NVE-SR collective coupling and the adjacent-site photon hopping. Particularly, we find that the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble can suppress the population transfer between the SR and the local NVE. In this context, although the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble diminishes entanglement among the NVEs, optimal entanglement, characterized by averaging the lower bound of concurrence, could be achieved through accurately adjusting the tunable parameters. PMID:27627994

  5. Inlet-Compressor Analysis Performed Using Coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Gary L.; Suresh, Ambady; Townsend, Scott

    1999-01-01

    A thorough understanding of dynamic interactions between inlets and compressors is extremely important to the design and development of propulsion control systems, particularly for supersonic aircraft such as the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are routinely used to analyze individual propulsion components. By coupling the appropriate CFD component codes, it is possible to investigate inlet-compressor interactions. The objectives of this work were to gain a better understanding of inlet-compressor interaction physics, formulate a more realistic compressor-face boundary condition for time-accurate CFD simulations of inlets, and to take a first step toward the CFD simulation of an entire engine by coupling multidimensional component codes. This work was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center by a team of civil servants and support service contractors as part of the High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCCP).

  6. Exact dynamics and squeezing in two harmonic modes coupled through angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canosa, N.; Mandal, Swapan; Rossignoli, R.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the exact dynamics of a system of two independent harmonic oscillators coupled through their angular momentum. The exact analytic solution of the equations of motion for the field operators is derived, and the conditions for dynamical stability are obtained. As for the application, we examine the emergence of squeezing and mode entanglement for an arbitrary separable coherent initial state. It is shown that close to instability, the system develops considerable entanglement, which is accompanied with simultaneous squeezing in the coordinate of one oscillator and the momentum of the other oscillator. In contrast, for weak coupling away from instability, the generated entanglement is small, with weak alternating squeezing in the coordinate and momentum of each oscillator. Approximate expressions describing these regimes are also provided.

  7. Switch programming of reflectivity control devices for the coupled dynamics of a solar sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tianjian; Gong, Shengping; Mu, Junshan; Li, Junfeng; Wang, Tianshu; Qian, Weiping

    2016-03-01

    As demonstrated in the Interplanetary Kite-craft Accelerated by Radiation Of the Sun (IKAROS), reflectivity control devices (RCDs) are switched on or off independently with each other, which has nevertheless been ignored by many previous researches. This paper emphasizes the discrete property of RCDs, and aims to obtain an appropriate switch law of RCDs for a rigid spinning solar sail. First, the coupled attitude-orbit dynamics is derived from the basic solar force and torque model into an underdetermined linear system with a binary set constraint. Subsequently, the coupled dynamics is reformulated into a constrained quadratic programming and a basic gradient projection method is designed to search for the optimal solution. Finally, a circular sail flying in the Venus rendezvous mission demonstrates the model and method numerically, which illustrates approximately 103 km terminal position error and 0.5 m/s terminal velocity error as 80 independent RCDs are switched on or off appropriately.

  8. Controllable quantum dynamics of inhomogeneous nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles coupled to superconducting resonators.

    PubMed

    Song, Wan-Lu; Yang, Wan-Li; Yin, Zhang-Qi; Chen, Chang-Yong; Feng, Mang

    2016-01-01

    We explore controllable quantum dynamics of a hybrid system, which consists of an array of mutually coupled superconducting resonators (SRs) with each containing a nitrogen-vacancy center spin ensemble (NVE) in the presence of inhomogeneous broadening. We focus on a three-site model, which compared with the two-site case, shows more complicated and richer dynamical behavior, and displays a series of damped oscillations under various experimental situations, reflecting the intricate balance and competition between the NVE-SR collective coupling and the adjacent-site photon hopping. Particularly, we find that the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble can suppress the population transfer between the SR and the local NVE. In this context, although the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble diminishes entanglement among the NVEs, optimal entanglement, characterized by averaging the lower bound of concurrence, could be achieved through accurately adjusting the tunable parameters. PMID:27627994

  9. Dynamics of compressional Mach cones in a strongly coupled complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, P. Dey, R.; Sen, Abhijit; Kadyan, Sangeeta

    2014-10-15

    Using a Generalised-Hydrodynamic (GH) fluid model, we study the influence of strong coupling induced modification of the fluid compressibility on the dynamics of compressional Mach cones in a dusty plasma medium. A significant structural change of lateral wakes for a given Mach number and Epstein drag force is found in the strongly coupled regime. With the increase of fluid compressibility, the peak amplitude of the normalised perturbed dust density first increases and then decreases monotonically after reaching its maximum value. It is also noticed that the opening angle of the cone structure decreases with the increase of the compressibility of the medium and the arm of the Mach cone breaks up into small structures in the velocity vector profile when the coupling between the dust particles increases.

  10. Arm motion coupling during locomotion-like actions: An experimental study and a dynamic model

    PubMed Central

    Shapkova, E.Yu; Terekhov, A.V.; Latash, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the coordination of arm movements in standing persons who performed an out-of-phase arm-swinging task while stepping in place or while standing. The subjects were instructed to stop one of the arms in response to an auditory signal while trying to keep the rest of the movement pattern unchanged. A significant increase was observed in the amplitude of the arm that continued swinging under both the stepping and standing conditions. This increase was similar between the right and left arms. A dynamic model was developed including two coupled non-linear van der Pol oscillators. We assumed that stopping an arm did not eliminate the coupling but introduced a new constraint. Within the model, superposition of two factors, a command to stop the ongoing movement of one arm and the coupling between the two oscillators, has been able to account for the observed effects. The model makes predictions for future experiments. PMID:21628725

  11. Arm motion coupling during locomotion-like actions: an experimental study and a dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Shapkova, E Yu; Terekhov, A V; Latash, M L

    2011-04-01

    We studied the coordination of arm movements in standing persons who performed an out-of-phase arm-swinging task while stepping in place or while standing. The subjects were instructed to stop one of the arms in response to an auditory signal while trying to keep the rest of the movement pattern unchanged. A significant increase was observed in the amplitude of the arm that continued swinging under both the stepping and standing conditions. This increase was similar between the right and left arms. A dynamic model was developed including two coupled nonlinear van der Pol oscillators. We assumed that stopping an arm did not eliminate the coupling but introduced a new constraint. Within the model, superposition of two factors, a command to stop the ongoing movement of one arm and the coupling between the two oscillators, has been able to account for the observed effects. The model makes predictions for future experiments. PMID:21628725

  12. Three-Dimensional Molecular Theory of Solvation Coupled with Molecular Dynamics in Amber

    SciTech Connect

    Luchko, T.; Simmerling, C.; Gusarov, S.; Roe, D.R., Case, D.A.; Tuszynski, J.; Kovalenko, A.

    2010-02-01

    We present the three-dimensional molecular theory of solvation (also known as 3D-RISM) coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation by contracting solvent degrees of freedom, accelerated by extrapolating solvent-induced forces and applying them in large multiple time steps (up to 20 fs) to enable simulation of large biomolecules. The method has been implemented in the Amber molecular modeling package and is illustrated here on alanine-dipeptide and protein-G.

  13. Dynamical Coupled-Channel Model of Meson Production Reactions in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    T.-S. H. Lee; A. Matsuyama; T. Sato

    2006-11-15

    A dynamical coupled-channel model is presented for investigating the nucleon resonances (N*) in the meson production reactions induced by pions and photons. Our objective is to extract the N* parameters and to investigate the meson production reaction mechanisms for mapping out the quark-gluon substructure of N* from the data. The model is based on an energy-independent Hamiltonian which is derived from a set of Lagrangians by using a unitary transformation method.

  14. Mode Coupling Theory and the Glass Transition in Molecular Dynamics Simulated NiZr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichler, H.

    1996-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for a NiZr model adapted to Hausleitner-Hafner interatomic potentials are analyzed within the mode coupling theory (MCT). Fitting numerical solutions of the (modified) schematic MCT equation with the self-intermediate scattering function of the MD system demonstrates unambiguously the transition scenario from liquidlike to nearly arrested behavior predicted by the MCT as precursor of the glass transition (around 1120 K for the present NiZr model).

  15. Three-dimensional molecular theory of solvation coupled with molecular dynamics in Amber

    PubMed Central

    Luchko, Tyler; Gusarov, Sergey; Roe, Daniel R.; Simmerling, Carlos; Case, David A.; Tuszynski, Jack; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2010-01-01

    We present the three-dimensional molecular theory of solvation (also known as 3D-RISM) coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation by contracting solvent degrees of freedom, accelerated by extrapolating solvent-induced forces and applying them in large multi-time steps (up to 20 fs) to enable simulation of large biomolecules. The method has been implemented in the Amber molecular modeling package, and is illustrated here on alanine dipeptide and protein G. PMID:20440377

  16. Light-Quark Baryon Spectroscopy within ANL-Osaka Dynamical Coupled-Channels Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamano, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Recent results on the study of light-quark baryons with the ANL-Osaka dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) approach are presented, which contain the N^* and Δ ^* spectroscopy via the analysis of π N and γ N reactions and the Λ ^* and Σ ^* spectroscopy via the analysis of K^- p reactions. A recent application of our DCC approach to neutrino-nucleon reactions in the resonance region is also presented.

  17. A new coupled model of the ionosphere-magnetosphere interhemispheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya, J.; Marchaudon, A.; Peymirat, C.; Blelly, P.-L.

    2012-04-01

    The ionosphere is known to play a key role in the electrodynamics of the magnetosphere, but the interhemispheric asymmetries and the connexions between the two hemispheres along the closed magnetic field lines introduce a new feature, the interhemispheric dynamics, which may have a significant contribution to the overall equilibrium. In order to access this dynamics, we have built a new interhemispheric model of the ionosphere, issued from the TRANSCAR family of ionospheric models (Blelly et al., 2005) and based on a 16-moment approximation. This new code has the ability to be used at all latitudes, and as it was the case for the previous generation, it accounts for the magnetosphere electrodynamics in transport of the ionospheric species along the field lines. However, the core of the new model is the dynamical and consistent coupling of the ionospheric transport to the magnetospheric transport through the development of an interface with the magnetosphere model IMM (Hurtaud et al. 2007), which accounts for the interhemispheric asymmetries in the ionospheric electrodynamics. The TRANSCAR-IMM retroactive coupled system is a pseudo 3D ionosphere-magnetosphere model, coupling a 1D approach along the magnetic field lines (TRANSCAR) and a 2D approach in the magnetic equatorial plane (IMM). It has been ported to a parallel architecture based on the Message Passing Interface (MPI) that allows for the simulation of large computational domains. The system is used to study the seasonal asymmetries between the northern and southern hemispheres, the resulting transport and energy transfer and the coupled effects between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere for many different latitudes and solar illumination conditions. We will present this new model and the initial results we obtain on the interhemispheric dynamics in condition of asymmetries between the two hemispheres.

  18. Balancing accuracy, robustness, and efficiency in simulations of coupled magma/mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, R. F.

    2011-12-01

    Magmatism plays a central role in many Earth-science problems, and is particularly important for the chemical evolution of the mantle. The standard theory for coupled magma/mantle dynamics is fundamentally multi-physical, comprising mass and force balance for two phases, plus conservation of energy and composition in a two-component (minimum) thermochemical system. The tight coupling of these various aspects of the physics makes obtaining numerical solutions a significant challenge. Previous authors have advanced by making drastic simplifications, but these have limited applicability. Here I discuss progress, enabled by advanced numerical software libraries, in obtaining numerical solutions to the full system of governing equations. The goals in developing the code are as usual: accuracy of solutions, robustness of the simulation to non-linearities, and efficiency of code execution. I use the cutting-edge example of magma genesis and migration in a heterogeneous mantle to elucidate these issues. I describe the approximations employed and their consequences, as a means to frame the question of where and how to make improvements. I conclude that the capabilities needed to advance multi-physics simulation are, in part, distinct from those of problems with weaker coupling, or fewer coupled equations. Chief among these distinct requirements is the need to dynamically adjust the solution algorithm to maintain robustness in the face of coupled nonlinearities that would otherwise inhibit convergence. This may mean introducing Picard iteration rather than full coupling, switching between semi-implicit and explicit time-stepping, or adaptively increasing the strength of preconditioners. All of these can be accomplished by the user with, for example, PETSc. Formalising this adaptivity should be a goal for future development of software packages that seek to enable multi-physics simulation.

  19. Dynamically coupled plasmon-phonon modes in GaP: An indirect-gap polar semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishioka, Kunie; Brixius, Kristina; Höfer, Ulrich; Rustagi, Avinash; Thatcher, Evan M.; Stanton, Christopher J.; Petek, Hrvoje

    2015-11-01

    The ultrafast coupling dynamics of coherent optical phonons and the photoexcited electron-hole plasma in the indirect gap semiconductor GaP are investigated by experiment and theory. For below-gap excitation and probing by 800-nm light, only the bare longitudinal optical (LO) phonons are observed. For above-gap excitation with 400-nm light, the photoexcitation creates a high density, nonequilibrium e -h plasma, which introduces an additional, faster decaying oscillation due to an LO phonon-plasmon coupled (LOPC) mode. The LOPC mode frequency exhibits very similar behavior for both n - and p -doped GaP, downshifting from the LO to the transverse optical (TO) phonon frequency limits with increasing photoexcited carrier density. We assign the LOPC mode to the LO phonons coupled with the photoexcited multicomponent plasma. For the 400-nm excitation, the majority of the photoexcited electrons are scattered from the Γ valley into the satellite X valley, while the light and spin-split holes are scattered into the heavy hole band, within 30 fs. The resulting mixed plasma is strongly damped, leading to the LOPC frequency appearing in the reststrahlen gap. Due to the large effective masses of the X electrons and heavy holes, the coupled mode appears most distinctly at carrier densities ≳5 ×1018cm-3 . We perform theoretical calculations of the nuclear motions and the electronic polarizations following an excitation with an ultrashort optical pulse to obtain the transient reflectivity responses of the coupled modes. We find that, while the longitudinal diffusion of photoexcited carriers is insignificant, the lateral inhomogeneity of the photoexcited carriers due to the laser intensity profile should be taken into account to reproduce the major features of the observed coupled mode dynamics.

  20. Role of protein dynamics in ion selectivity and allosteric coupling in the NaK channel

    PubMed Central

    Brettmann, Joshua B.; Urusova, Darya; Tonelli, Marco; Silva, Jonathan R.; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Flux-dependent inactivation that arises from functional coupling between the inner gate and the selectivity filter is widespread in ion channels. The structural basis of this coupling has only been well characterized in KcsA. Here we present NMR data demonstrating structural and dynamic coupling between the selectivity filter and intracellular constriction point in the bacterial nonselective cation channel, NaK. This transmembrane allosteric communication must be structurally different from KcsA because the NaK selectivity filter does not collapse under low-cation conditions. Comparison of NMR spectra of the nonselective NaK and potassium-selective NaK2K indicates that the number of ion binding sites in the selectivity filter shifts the equilibrium distribution of structural states throughout the channel. This finding was unexpected given the nearly identical crystal structure of NaK and NaK2K outside the immediate vicinity of the selectivity filter. Our results highlight the tight structural and dynamic coupling between the selectivity filter and the channel scaffold, which has significant implications for channel function. NaK offers a distinct model to study the physiologically essential connection between ion conduction and channel gating. PMID:26621745

  1. Consistent temperature coupling with thermal fluctuations of smooth particle hydrodynamics and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ganzenmüller, Georg C; Hiermaier, Stefan; Steinhauser, Martin O

    2012-01-01

    We propose a thermodynamically consistent and energy-conserving temperature coupling scheme between the atomistic and the continuum domain. The coupling scheme links the two domains using the DPDE (Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy) thermostat and is designed to handle strong temperature gradients across the atomistic/continuum domain interface. The fundamentally different definitions of temperature in the continuum and atomistic domain - internal energy and heat capacity versus particle velocity - are accounted for in a straightforward and conceptually intuitive way by the DPDE thermostat. We verify the here-proposed scheme using a fluid, which is simultaneously represented as a continuum using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics, and as an atomistically resolved liquid using Molecular Dynamics. In the case of equilibrium contact between both domains, we show that the correct microscopic equilibrium properties of the atomistic fluid are obtained. As an example of a strong non-equilibrium situation, we consider the propagation of a steady shock-wave from the continuum domain into the atomistic domain, and show that the coupling scheme conserves both energy and shock-wave dynamics. To demonstrate the applicability of our scheme to real systems, we consider shock loading of a phospholipid bilayer immersed in water in a multi-scale simulation, an interesting topic of biological relevance.

  2. The coupling of fluids, dynamics, and controls on advanced architecture computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    This grant provided for the demonstration of coupled controls, body dynamics, and fluids computations in a workstation cluster environment; and an investigation of the impact of peer-peer communication on flow solver performance and robustness. The findings of these investigations were documented in the conference articles.The attached publication, 'Towards Distributed Fluids/Controls Simulations', documents the solution and scaling of the coupled Navier-Stokes, Euler rigid-body dynamics, and state feedback control equations for a two-dimensional canard-wing. The poor scaling shown was due to serialized grid connectivity computation and Ethernet bandwidth limits. The scaling of a peer-to-peer communication flow code on an IBM SP-2 was also shown. The scaling of the code on the switched fabric-linked nodes was good, with a 2.4 percent loss due to communication of intergrid boundary point information. The code performance on 30 worker nodes was 1.7 (mu)s/point/iteration, or a factor of three over a Cray C-90 head. The attached paper, 'Nonlinear Fluid Computations in a Distributed Environment', documents the effect of several computational rate enhancing methods on convergence. For the cases shown, the highest throughput was achieved using boundary updates at each step, with the manager process performing communication tasks only. Constrained domain decomposition of the implicit fluid equations did not degrade the convergence rate or final solution. The scaling of a coupled body/fluid dynamics problem on an Ethernet-linked cluster was also shown.

  3. Dynamically Coupled Food-web and Hydrodynamic Modeling with ADH-CASM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piercy, C.; Swannack, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    Oysters and freshwater mussels are "ecological engineers," modifying the local water quality by filtering zooplankton and other suspended particulate matter from the water column and flow hydraulics by impinging on the near-bed flow environment. The success of sessile, benthic invertebrates such as oysters depends on environmental factors including but not limited to temperature, salinity, and flow regime. Typically food-web and other types of ecological models use flow and water quality data as direct input without regard to the feedback between the ecosystem and the physical environment. The USACE-ERDC has developed a coupled hydrodynamic-ecological modeling approach that dynamically couples a 2-D hydrodynamic and constituent transport model, Adaptive Hydraulics (ADH), with a bioenergetics food-web model, the Comprehensive Aquatics Systems Model (CASM), which captures the dynamic feedback between aquatic ecological systems and the environment. We present modeling results from restored oyster reefs in the Great Wicomico River on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay, which quantify ecosystem services such as the influence of the benthic ecosystem on water quality. Preliminary results indicate that while the influence of oyster reefs on bulk flow dynamics is limited due to the localized influence of oyster reefs, large reefs and the associated benthic ecosystem can create measurable changes in the concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon in the areas around reefs. We also present a sensitivity analysis to quantify the relative sensitivity of the coupled ADH-CASM model to both hydrodynamic and ecological parameter choice.

  4. How coupled elementary units determine the dynamics of macroscopic glass-forming systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehwald, Christian; Heuer, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a binary mixture Lennard-Jones system of different system sizes with respect to the importance of the properties of the underlying potential energy landscape (PEL). We show that the dynamics of small systems can be very well described within the continuous time random walk formalism, which is determined solely by PEL parameters. Finite size analysis shows that the diffusivity of large and small systems are very similar. This suggests that the PEL parameters of the small system also determine the local dynamics in large systems. The structural relaxation time, however, displays significant finite size effects. Furthermore, using a nonequilibrium configuration of a large system, we find that causal connections exist between nearby regions of the system. These findings can be described by the coupled landscape model for which a macroscopic system is described by a superposition of elementary systems, each described by its PEL. A minimum coupling is introduced which accounts for the finite size behavior. The coupling strength, as the single adjustable parameter, becomes smaller closer to the glass transition.

  5. Sexual Risk for HIV among Gay Male Couples: A Longitudinal Study of the Impact of Relationship Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Darbes, Lynae A.; Chakravarty, Deepalika; Neilands, Torsten B.; Beougher, Sean C.; Hoff, Colleen C.

    2015-01-01

    While the relationship context itself is increasingly being examined to understand sexual risk behavior among gay male couples, few studies have examined relationship dynamics and HIV risk longitudinally. We aimed to investigate relationship dynamics and psychosocial predictors of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with outside partners of serodiscordant or unknown HIV serostatus (UAIOUT) over time as well as UAI with primary partner in serodiscordant couples (UAIPP). We recruited a sample of 566 ethnically diverse, seroconcordant and serodiscordant couples and interviewed them six times over the course of three years. The surveys encompassed relationship dynamics between the partners and sexual behavior with primary and outside partners. We fit generalized linear mixed models for both the UAI outcomes with time and relationship dynamics as predictors while controlling for relationship length. Analyses of the longitudinal data revealed that, in both categories of couples, those with higher levels of positive relationship dynamics (e.g., commitment, satisfaction) were less likely to engage in UAIOUT. Higher investment in sexual agreement and communication were among the factors that significantly predicted less UAI for seroconcordant couples, but not for serodiscordant couples. For serodiscordant couples, greater levels of attachment and intimacy were associated with greater odds of UAIPP while increased HIV-specific social support was associated with lower odds of UAIPP. These results underscore the importance of creating and tailoring interventions for gay couples that help maintain and strengthen positive relationship dynamics as they have the potential to produce significant changes in HIV risk behavior and thereby in HIV transmission. PMID:24233329

  6. Sexual risk for HIV among gay male couples: a longitudinal study of the impact of relationship dynamics.

    PubMed

    Darbes, Lynne A; Chakravarty, Deepalika; Neilands, Torsten B; Beougher, Sean C; Hoff, Colleen C

    2014-01-01

    While the relationship context itself is increasingly being examined to understand sexual risk behavior among gay male couples, few studies have examined relationship dynamics and HIV risk longitudinally. We aimed to investigate relationship dynamics and psychosocial predictors of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with outside partners of serodiscordant or unknown HIV serostatus (UAIOUT) over time as well as UAI with primary partner in serodiscordant couples (UAIPP). We recruited a sample of 566 ethnically diverse, seroconcordant and serodiscordant couples and interviewed them six times over the course of 3 years. The surveys encompassed relationship dynamics between the partners and sexual behavior with primary and outside partners. We fit generalized linear mixed models for both the UAI outcomes with time and relationship dynamics as predictors while controlling for relationship length. Analyses of the longitudinal data revealed that, in both categories of couples, those with higher levels of positive relationship dynamics (e.g., commitment, satisfaction) were less likely to engage in UAIOUT. Higher investment in sexual agreement and communication were among the factors that significantly predicted less UAIOUT for seroconcordant couples, but not for the serodiscordant couples. For serodiscordant couples, greater levels of attachment and intimacy were associated with greater odds of UAIPP while increased HIV-specific social support was associated with lower odds of UAIPP. These results underscore the importance of creating and tailoring interventions for gay couples that help maintain and strengthen positive relationship dynamics as they have the potential to produce significant changes in HIV risk behavior and thereby in HIV transmission.

  7. Coupled iterated map models of action potential dynamics in a one-dimensional cable of cardiac cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shihong; Xie, Yuanfang; Qu, Zhilin

    2008-05-01

    Low-dimensional iterated map models have been widely used to study action potential dynamics in isolated cardiac cells. Coupled iterated map models have also been widely used to investigate action potential propagation dynamics in one-dimensional (1D) coupled cardiac cells, however, these models are usually empirical and not carefully validated. In this study, we first developed two coupled iterated map models which are the standard forms of diffusively coupled maps and overcome the limitations of the previous models. We then determined the coupling strength and space constant by quantitatively comparing the 1D action potential duration profile from the coupled cardiac cell model described by differential equations with that of the coupled iterated map models. To further validate the coupled iterated map models, we compared the stability conditions of the spatially uniform state of the coupled iterated maps and those of the 1D ionic model and showed that the coupled iterated map model could well recapitulate the stability conditions, i.e. the spatially uniform state is stable unless the state is chaotic. Finally, we combined conduction into the developed coupled iterated map model to study the effects of coupling strength on wave stabilities and showed that the diffusive coupling between cardiac cells tends to suppress instabilities during reentry in a 1D ring and the onset of discordant alternans in a periodically paced 1D cable.

  8. Ultrafast XUV spectroscopy: Unveiling the nature of electronic couplings in molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmers, Henry Robert

    Molecules are traditionally treated quantum mechanically using the Born-Oppenheimer formalism. In this formalism, different electronic states of the molecule are treated independently. However, most photo-initiated phenomena occurring in nature are driven by the couplings between different electronic states in both isolated molecules and molecular aggregates, and therefore occur beyond the Born-Oppenheimer formalism. These couplings are relevant in reactions relating to the perception of vision in the human eye, the oxidative damage and repair of DNA, the harvesting of light in photosynthesis, and the transfer of charge across large chains of molecules. While these reaction dynamics have traditionally been studied with visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy, attosecond XUV pulses formed through the process of high harmonic generation form a perfect tool for probing coupled electronic dynamics in molecules. In this thesis, I will present our work in using ultrafast, XUV spectroscopy to study these dynamics in molecules of increasing complexity. We begin by probing the relaxation dynamics of superexcited states in diatomic O 2. These states can relax via two types of electronic couplings, either through autoionization or neutral dissociation. We find that our pump-probe scheme can disentangle the two relaxation mechanisms and independently measure their contributing lifetimes. Next, we present our work in observing a coherent electron hole wavepacket initiated by the ionization of polyatomic CO 2 near a conical intersection. The electron-nuclear couplings near the conical intersection drive the electron hole between different orbital configurations. We find that we can not only measure the lifetime of quantum coherence in the electron hole wavepacket, but also control its evolution with a strong, infrared probing field. Finally, we propose an experiment to observe the migration of an electron hole across iodobenzene on the few-femtosecond timescale. We present

  9. Impact of Sea Surface Salinity on Coupled Dynamics for the Tropical Indo Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busalacchi, A. J.; Hackert, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    In this presentation we assess the impact of in situ and satellite sea surface salinity (SSS) observations on seasonal to interannual variability of tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean dynamics as well as on dynamical ENSO forecasts using a Hybrid Coupled Model (HCM) for 1993-2007 (cf., Hackert et al., 2011) and August 2011 until February 2014 (cf., Hackert et al., 2014). The HCM is composed of a primitive equation ocean model coupled with a SVD-based statistical atmospheric model for the tropical Indo-Pacific region. An Ensemble Reduced Order Kalman Filter (EROKF) is used to assimilate observations to constrain dynamics and thermodynamics for initialization of the HCM. Including SSS generally improves NINO3 sea surface temperature anomaly validation. Assimilating SSS gives significant improvement versus just subsurface temperature for all forecast lead times after 5 months. We find that the positive impact of SSS assimilation is brought about by surface freshening in the western Pacific warm pool that leads to increased barrier layer thickness (BLT) and shallower mixed layer depths. Thus, in the west the net effect of assimilating SSS is to increase stability and reduce mixing, which concentrates the wind impact of ENSO coupling. Specifically, the main benefit of SSS assimilation for 1993-2007 comes from improvement to the Spring Predictability Barrier (SPB) period. In the east, the impact of Aquarius satellite SSS is to induce more cooling in the NINO3 region as a result of being relatively more salty than in situ SSS in the eastern Pacific leading to increased mixing and entrainment. This, in turn, sets up an enhanced west to east SST gradient and intensified Bjerknes coupling. For the 2011-2014 period, consensus coupled model forecasts compiled by the IRI tend to erroneously predict NINO3 warming; SSS assimilation corrects this defect. Finally, we plan to update our analysis and report on the dynamical impact of including Aquarius SSS for the most-recent, ongoing 2014

  10. Spatio-temporal dynamics induced by competing instabilities in two asymmetrically coupled nonlinear evolution equations

    SciTech Connect

    Schüler, D.; Alonso, S.; Bär, M.; Torcini, A.

    2014-12-15

    Pattern formation often occurs in spatially extended physical, biological, and chemical systems due to an instability of the homogeneous steady state. The type of the instability usually prescribes the resulting spatio-temporal patterns and their characteristic length scales. However, patterns resulting from the simultaneous occurrence of instabilities cannot be expected to be simple superposition of the patterns associated with the considered instabilities. To address this issue, we design two simple models composed by two asymmetrically coupled equations of non-conserved (Swift-Hohenberg equations) or conserved (Cahn-Hilliard equations) order parameters with different characteristic wave lengths. The patterns arising in these systems range from coexisting static patterns of different wavelengths to traveling waves. A linear stability analysis allows to derive a two parameter phase diagram for the studied models, in particular, revealing for the Swift-Hohenberg equations, a co-dimension two bifurcation point of Turing and wave instability and a region of coexistence of stationary and traveling patterns. The nonlinear dynamics of the coupled evolution equations is investigated by performing accurate numerical simulations. These reveal more complex patterns, ranging from traveling waves with embedded Turing patterns domains to spatio-temporal chaos, and a wide hysteretic region, where waves or Turing patterns coexist. For the coupled Cahn-Hilliard equations the presence of a weak coupling is sufficient to arrest the coarsening process and to lead to the emergence of purely periodic patterns. The final states are characterized by domains with a characteristic length, which diverges logarithmically with the coupling amplitude.

  11. A Statistical Approach for the Concurrent Coupling of Molecular Dynamics and Finite Element Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, E.; Yamakov, V.; Glaessgen, E.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) methods are opening new opportunities for simulating the fundamental processes of material behavior at the atomistic level. However, increasing the size of the MD domain quickly presents intractable computational demands. A robust approach to surmount this computational limitation has been to unite continuum modeling procedures such as the finite element method (FEM) with MD analyses thereby reducing the region of atomic scale refinement. The challenging problem is to seamlessly connect the two inherently different simulation techniques at their interface. In the present work, a new approach to MD-FEM coupling is developed based on a restatement of the typical boundary value problem used to define a coupled domain. The method uses statistical averaging of the atomistic MD domain to provide displacement interface boundary conditions to the surrounding continuum FEM region, which, in return, generates interface reaction forces applied as piecewise constant traction boundary conditions to the MD domain. The two systems are computationally disconnected and communicate only through a continuous update of their boundary conditions. With the use of statistical averages of the atomistic quantities to couple the two computational schemes, the developed approach is referred to as an embedded statistical coupling method (ESCM) as opposed to a direct coupling method where interface atoms and FEM nodes are individually related. The methodology is inherently applicable to three-dimensional domains, avoids discretization of the continuum model down to atomic scales, and permits arbitrary temperatures to be applied.

  12. Dynamics of atom-field probability amplitudes in a coupled cavity system with Kerr non-linearity

    SciTech Connect

    Priyesh, K. V.; Thayyullathil, Ramesh Babu

    2014-01-28

    We have investigated the dynamics of two cavities coupled together via photon hopping, filled with Kerr non-linear medium and each containing a two level atom in it. The evolution of various atom (field) state probabilities of the coupled cavity system in two excitation sub space are obtained numerically. Detailed analysis has been done by taking different initial conditions of the system, with various coupling strengths and by varying the susceptibility of the medium. The role of susceptibility factor, on the dynamics atom field probability has been examined. In a coupled cavity system with strong photon hopping it is found that the susceptibility factor modifies the behaviour of probability amplitudes.

  13. Adaptive spacetime method using Riemann jump conditions for coupled atomistic-continuum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraczek, B.; Miller, S. T.; Haber, R. B.; Johnson, D. D.

    2010-03-01

    We combine the Spacetime Discontinuous Galerkin (SDG) method for elastodynamics with the mathematically consistent Atomistic Discontinuous Galerkin (ADG) method in a new scheme that concurrently couples continuum and atomistic models of dynamic response in solids. The formulation couples non-overlapping continuum and atomistic models across sharp interfaces by weakly enforcing jump conditions, for both momentum balance and kinematic compatibility, using Riemann values to preserve the characteristic structure of the underlying hyperbolic system. Momentum balances to within machine-precision accuracy over every element, on each atom, and over the coupled system, with small, controllable energy dissipation in the continuum region that ensures numerical stability. When implemented on suitable unstructured spacetime grids, the continuum SDG model offers linear computational complexity in the number of elements and powerful adaptive analysis capabilities that readily bridge between atomic and continuum scales in both space and time. A special trace operator for the atomic velocities and an associated atomistic traction field enter the jump conditions at the coupling interface. The trace operator depends on parameters that specify, at the scale of the atomic spacing, the position of the coupling interface relative to the atoms. In a key finding, we demonstrate that optimizing these parameters suppresses spurious reflections at the coupling interface without the use of non-physical damping or special boundary conditions. We formulate the implicit SDG-ADG coupling scheme in up to three spatial dimensions, and describe an efficient iterative solution scheme that outperforms common explicit schemes, such as the Velocity Verlet integrator. Numerical examples, in 1d×time and employing both linear and nonlinear potentials, demonstrate the performance of the SDG-ADG method and show how adaptive spacetime meshing reconciles disparate time steps and resolves atomic-scale signals

  14. Adaptive spacetime method using Riemann jump conditions for coupled atomistic-continuum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kraczek, B. Miller, S.T. Haber, R.B. Johnson, D.D.

    2010-03-20

    We combine the Spacetime Discontinuous Galerkin (SDG) method for elastodynamics with the mathematically consistent Atomistic Discontinuous Galerkin (ADG) method in a new scheme that concurrently couples continuum and atomistic models of dynamic response in solids. The formulation couples non-overlapping continuum and atomistic models across sharp interfaces by weakly enforcing jump conditions, for both momentum balance and kinematic compatibility, using Riemann values to preserve the characteristic structure of the underlying hyperbolic system. Momentum balances to within machine-precision accuracy over every element, on each atom, and over the coupled system, with small, controllable energy dissipation in the continuum region that ensures numerical stability. When implemented on suitable unstructured spacetime grids, the continuum SDG model offers linear computational complexity in the number of elements and powerful adaptive analysis capabilities that readily bridge between atomic and continuum scales in both space and time. A special trace operator for the atomic velocities and an associated atomistic traction field enter the jump conditions at the coupling interface. The trace operator depends on parameters that specify, at the scale of the atomic spacing, the position of the coupling interface relative to the atoms. In a key finding, we demonstrate that optimizing these parameters suppresses spurious reflections at the coupling interface without the use of non-physical damping or special boundary conditions. We formulate the implicit SDG-ADG coupling scheme in up to three spatial dimensions, and describe an efficient iterative solution scheme that outperforms common explicit schemes, such as the Velocity Verlet integrator. Numerical examples, in 1dxtime and employing both linear and nonlinear potentials, demonstrate the performance of the SDG-ADG method and show how adaptive spacetime meshing reconciles disparate time steps and resolves atomic-scale signals in

  15. A New Concurrent Multiscale Methodology for Coupling Molecular Dynamics and Finite Element Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakov, Vesselin; Saether, Erik; Glaessgen, Edward H/.

    2008-01-01

    The coupling of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with finite element methods (FEM) yields computationally efficient models that link fundamental material processes at the atomistic level with continuum field responses at higher length scales. The theoretical challenge involves developing a seamless connection along an interface between two inherently different simulation frameworks. Various specialized methods have been developed to solve particular classes of problems. Many of these methods link the kinematics of individual MD atoms with FEM nodes at their common interface, necessarily requiring that the finite element mesh be refined to atomic resolution. Some of these coupling approaches also require simulations to be carried out at 0 K and restrict modeling to two-dimensional material domains due to difficulties in simulating full three-dimensional material processes. In the present work, a new approach to MD-FEM coupling is developed based on a restatement of the standard boundary value problem used to define a coupled domain. The method replaces a direct linkage of individual MD atoms and finite element (FE) nodes with a statistical averaging of atomistic displacements in local atomic volumes associated with each FE node in an interface region. The FEM and MD computational systems are effectively independent and communicate only through an iterative update of their boundary conditions. With the use of statistical averages of the atomistic quantities to couple the two computational schemes, the developed approach is referred to as an embedded statistical coupling method (ESCM). ESCM provides an enhanced coupling methodology that is inherently applicable to three-dimensional domains, avoids discretization of the continuum model to atomic scale resolution, and permits finite temperature states to be applied.

  16. An Embedded Statistical Method for Coupling Molecular Dynamics and Finite Element Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, E.; Glaessgen, E.H.; Yamakov, V.

    2008-01-01

    The coupling of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with finite element methods (FEM) yields computationally efficient models that link fundamental material processes at the atomistic level with continuum field responses at higher length scales. The theoretical challenge involves developing a seamless connection along an interface between two inherently different simulation frameworks. Various specialized methods have been developed to solve particular classes of problems. Many of these methods link the kinematics of individual MD atoms with FEM nodes at their common interface, necessarily requiring that the finite element mesh be refined to atomic resolution. Some of these coupling approaches also require simulations to be carried out at 0 K and restrict modeling to two-dimensional material domains due to difficulties in simulating full three-dimensional material processes. In the present work, a new approach to MD-FEM coupling is developed based on a restatement of the standard boundary value problem used to define a coupled domain. The method replaces a direct linkage of individual MD atoms and finite element (FE) nodes with a statistical averaging of atomistic displacements in local atomic volumes associated with each FE node in an interface region. The FEM and MD computational systems are effectively independent and communicate only through an iterative update of their boundary conditions. With the use of statistical averages of the atomistic quantities to couple the two computational schemes, the developed approach is referred to as an embedded statistical coupling method (ESCM). ESCM provides an enhanced coupling methodology that is inherently applicable to three-dimensional domains, avoids discretization of the continuum model to atomic scale resolution, and permits finite temperature states to be applied.

  17. Carbon Cycle and Vegetation Dynamics in the GFDL-Princeton University Coupled Atmosphere-Biosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevliakova, E.; Pacala, S. W.; Malyshev, S.; Hurtt, G. C.; Caspersen, J. P.

    2003-12-01

    Modeling global interactions between the atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere continues to pose a significant challenge, because of the tight and complex coupling of flows of water, energy, greenhouse gases, and ecosystem dynamics. We developed a comprehensive dynamic land surface model (LM3) able to simulate carbon and vegetation dynamics on time scales from minutes to centuries, as well as the exchange of water and energy among the land, LM3 predicts carbon dynamics in vegetation and soil in response to environmental conditions (weather, climate and soil type), ambient concentration of CO2, natural disturbances (e.g. fire), and anthropogenic land use changes (e.g. deforestation, agricultural cropland abandonment and forest management). A suite of the historical 300 years land cover change scenarios (developed at University of New Hampshire) is used to represent direct anthropogenic forcing on the terrestrial carbon system. Here we analyze the behavior of LM3 forced with observed atmospheric data and coupled with GFDL atmospheric circulation model AM2. The series of experiments indicates that our model adequately simulates climatic gradients of net primary productivity (NPP), leaf area index (LAI), biomass accumulation, evapotranspiration, and runoff. Additionally, analysis of the simulations suggests that anthropogenic land use has been a major forcing on the terrestrial carbon cycle, with large sources of CO2 caused primarily by deforestation and timber harvesting in the current tropics and past north temperate zone, and large current north temperate sinks caused primarily by secondary forest growth.

  18. Dynamics of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates coupled with the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Yajiang; Gu Qiang

    2011-04-15

    We investigate the dynamics of an open Bose-Einstein condensate system consisting of two hyperfine states of the same atomic species which are coupled by a tunable Raman laser. It has already been suggested that the detuning between the laser frequency and transition frequency affect significantly the dynamics of the pure condensate. Here we show that the detuning effect is suppressed by noise and dissipation caused by the environment. The increase of coherence and purity are also displayed for specific parameters. As a verification of the lowest order approximation we derive the hierarchy of motion equations in the second-order approximation. It turns out that the former one can describe the dynamical evolution qualitatively for weak noise and dissipation and quantitatively for strong noise and dissipation.

  19. Coherent dynamic structure factors of strongly coupled plasmas: A generalized hydrodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Di; Zhao, Bin; Hu, GuangYue; Gong, Tao; Xia, YuQing; Zheng, Jian

    2016-05-01

    A generalized hydrodynamic fluctuation model is proposed to simplify the calculation of the dynamic structure factor S(ω, k) of non-ideal plasmas using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. In this model, the kinetic and correlation effects are both included in hydrodynamic coefficients, which are considered as functions of the coupling strength (Γ) and collision parameter (kλei), where λei is the electron-ion mean free path. A particle-particle particle-mesh molecular dynamics simulation code is also developed to simulate the dynamic structure factors, which are used to benchmark the calculation of our model. A good agreement between the two different approaches confirms the reliability of our model.

  20. Universal transport dynamics in a quenched tunnel-coupled Luttinger liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambetta, F. M.; Cavaliere, F.; Citro, R.; Sassetti, M.

    2016-07-01

    The transport dynamics of a quenched Luttinger liquid tunnel-coupled to a fermionic reservoir is investigated. In the transient dynamics, we show that for a sudden quench of the electron interaction universal power-law decay in time of the tunneling current occurs, ascribed to the presence of entangled compound excitations created by the quench. In sharp contrast to the usual nonuniversal power-law behavior of a zero-temperature nonquenched Luttinger liquid, the steady-state tunneling current is Ohmic and can be explained in terms of an effective quench-activated heating of the system. Our study unveils an unconventional dynamics for a quenched Luttinger liquid that could be identified in quenched cold Fermi gases.

  1. Physics and Dynamics Coupling Across Scales in the Next Generation CESM. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bacmeister, Julio T.

    2015-06-12

    This project examines physics/dynamics coupling, that is, exchange of meteorological profiles and tendencies between an atmospheric model’s dynamical core and its various physics parameterizations. Most model physics parameterizations seek to represent processes that occur on scales smaller than the smallest scale resolved by the dynamical core. As a consequence a key conceptual aspect of parameterizations is an assumption about the subgrid variability of quantities such as temperature, humidity or vertical wind. Most existing parameterizations of processes such as turbulence, convection, cloud, and gravity wave drag make relatively ad hoc assumptions about this variability and are forced to introduce empirical parameters, i.e., “tuning knobs” to obtain realistic simulations. These knobs make systematic dependences on model grid size difficult to quantify.

  2. Two-step approach to the dynamics of coupled anharmonic oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, N. N.; Chew, L. Y.

    2009-07-15

    We have further extended the two-step approach developed by Chung and Chew [N. N. Chung and L. Y. Chew, Phys. Rev. A 76, 032113 (2007)] to the solution of the quantum dynamics of general systems of N-coupled anharmonic oscillators. The idea is to employ an optimized basis set to represent the dynamical quantum states of these oscillator systems. The set is generated via the action of the optimized Bogoliubov transformed bosonic operators on the optimal squeezed vacuum product state. The procedure requires (i) applying the two-step approach to the eigendecomposition of the time evolution operator and (ii) transforming the representation of the initial state from the original to the optimal bases. We have applied the formalism to examine the dynamics of squeezing and entanglement of several anharmonic oscillator systems.

  3. Family planning decisions, perceptions and gender dynamics among couples in Mwanza, Tanzania: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Contraceptive use is low in developing countries which are still largely driven by male dominated culture and patriarchal values. This study explored family planning (FP) decisions, perceptions and gender dynamics among couples in Mwanza region of Tanzania. Methods Twelve focus group discussions and six in-depth interviews were used to collect information from married or cohabiting males and females aged 18–49. The participants were purposively selected. Qualitative methods were used to explore family planning decisions, perceptions and gender dynamics among couples. A guide with questions related to family planning perceptions, decisions and gender dynamics was used. The discussions and interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed manually and subjected to content analysis. Results Four themes emerged during the study. First, “risks and costs” which refer to the side effects of FP methods and the treatment of side -effects as well as the costs inherit in being labeled as an unfaithful spouse. Second, “male involvement” as men showed little interest in participating in family planning issues. However, the same men were mentioned as key decision-makers even on the number of children a couple should have and the child spacing of these children. Third, “gender relations and communication” as participants indicated that few women participated in decision-making on family planning and the number of children to have. Fourth, “urban–rural differences”, life in rural favoring having more children than urban areas therefore, the value of children depended on the place of residence. Conclusion Family Planning programs should adapt the promotion of communication as well as joint decision-making on FP among couples as a strategy aimed at enhancing FP use. PMID:23721196

  4. On the use of a weak-coupling thermostat in replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhixiong; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2015-07-21

    In a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, various thermostat algorithms, including Langevin dynamics (LD), Nosé-Hoover (NH), and weak-coupling (WC) thermostats, can be used to keep the simulation temperature constant. A canonical ensemble is generated by the use of LD and NH, while the nature of the ensemble produced by WC has not yet been identified. A few years ago, it was shown that when using a WC thermostat with particular values of the temperature coupling time for liquid water at ambient temperature and pressure, the distribution of the potential energy is less wide than the canonical one. This led to an artifact in temperature replica-exchange molecular dynamics (T-REMD) simulations in which the potential energy distributions appear not to be equal to the ones of standard MD simulations. In this paper, we re-investigate this problem. We show that this artifact is probably due to the ensemble generated by WC being incompatible with the T-REMD replica-exchange criterion, which assumes a canonical configurational ensemble. We also show, however, that this artifact can be reduced or even eliminated by particular choices of the temperature coupling time of WC and the replica-exchange time period of T-REMD, i.e., when the temperature coupling time is chosen very close to the MD time step or when the exchange time period is chosen large enough. An attempt to develop a T-REMD replica-exchange criterion which is likely to be more compatible with the WC configurational ensemble is reported. Furthermore, an exchange criterion which is compatible with a microcanonical ensemble is used in total energy REMD simulations.

  5. A Three-Wave Model of the Stratosphere with Coupled Dynamics, Radiation and Photochemistry. Appendix M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shia, Run-Lie; Zhou, Shuntai; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Salstein, David; Cady-Pereira, Karen

    1997-01-01

    A zonal mean chemistry transport model (2-D CTM) coupled with a semi-spectral dynamical model is used to simulate the distributions of trace gases in the present day atmosphere. The zonal-mean and eddy equations for the velocity and the geopotential height are solved in the semi-spectral dynamical model. The residual mean circulation is derived from these dynamical variables and used to advect the chemical species in the 2- D CTM. Based on a linearized wave transport equation, the eddy diffusion coefficients for chemical tracers are expressed in terms of the amplitude, frequency and growth rate of dynamical waves; local chemical loss rates; and a time constant parameterizing small scale mixing. The contributions to eddy flux are from the time varying wave amplitude (transient eddy), chemical reactions (chemical eddy) and small scale mixing. In spite of the high truncation in the dynamical module (only three longest waves are resolved), the model has simulated many observed characteristics of stratospheric dynamics and distribution of chemical species including ozone. Compared with the values commonly used in 2-D CTMs, the eddy diffusion coefficients for chemical species calculated in this model are smaller, especially in the subtropics. It is also found that the chemical eddy diffusion has only a small effects in determining the distribution of most slow species, including ozone in the stratosphere.

  6. Ultrafast Study of Dynamic interfacial Exchange Coupling in Ferromagnet/Oxide/Semiconductor Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Yu-Sheng; Chiu, Yi-Hsin; Harmon, Nicholas; Odenthal, Patrick; Sheffield, Matthew; Chilcote, Michael; Kawakami, Roland; Flatté, Michael; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel

    Time-resolved Kerr/Faraday rotation (TRKR/TRFR) is employed to study GaAs spin dynamics in the regime of strong and dynamic exchange coupling to an adjacent MgO/Fe layer. This study reveals a dramatic, resonant suppression in the inhomogeneous spin lifetime (T2*) in the GaAs layer. Further investigation of the magnetization dynamics of the neighboring Fe layer, also using TRKR/TRFR, reveals not only the expected Kittel-dispersion but also additional lower frequency modes with very short lifetime (65 ps) that are not easily observed with conventional ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) techniques. These results suggest the intriguing possibility of resonant dynamic spin transfer between the GaAs and Fe spin systems. We discuss the potential for this work to establish GaAs spin dynamics as an efficient detector of spin dissipation and transport in the regime of dynamically-driven spin injection in ferromagnet/semiconductor heterostructures. Center for Emergent Materials; U.S. Department of Energy.

  7. Orbital dynamics and equilibrium points around an asteroid with gravitational orbit-attitude coupling perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Xu, Shijie

    2016-07-01

    The strongly perturbed dynamical environment near asteroids has been a great challenge for the mission design. Besides the non-spherical gravity, solar radiation pressure, and solar tide, the orbital motion actually suffers from another perturbation caused by the gravitational orbit-attitude coupling of the spacecraft. This gravitational orbit-attitude coupling perturbation (GOACP) has its origin in the fact that the gravity acting on a non-spherical extended body, the real case of the spacecraft, is actually different from that acting on a point mass, the approximation of the spacecraft in the orbital dynamics. We intend to take into account GOACP besides the non-spherical gravity to improve the previous close-proximity orbital dynamics. GOACP depends on the spacecraft attitude, which is assumed to be controlled ideally with respect to the asteroid in this study. Then, we focus on the orbital motion perturbed by the non-spherical gravity and GOACP with the given attitude. This new orbital model can be called the attitude-restricted orbital dynamics, where restricted means that the orbital motion is studied as a restricted problem at a given attitude. In the present paper, equilibrium points of the attitude-restricted orbital dynamics in the second degree and order gravity field of a uniformly rotating asteroid are investigated. Two kinds of equilibria are obtained: on and off the asteroid equatorial principal axis. These equilibria are different from and more diverse than those in the classical orbital dynamics without GOACP. In the case of a large spacecraft, the off-axis equilibrium points can exist at an arbitrary longitude in the equatorial plane. These results are useful for close-proximity operations, such as the asteroid body-fixed hovering.

  8. Coupled nonlinear flight dynamics, aeroelasticity, and control of very flexible aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Christopher M.

    Flight dynamics and control of rigid aircraft motion coupled with linearized structural dynamics has been studied for several decades. However, new requirements for very flexible aircraft are challenging the validity of most rigid body coupled linearized structural motion formulations, due to the presence of large elastic motions. This dissertation presents, the flight dynamics, integration, and control of the six degree-of-freedom equations of motion of a reference point on a very flexible aircraft coupled with the aeroelastic equations which govern the geometrically nonlinear structural response of the vehicle. A low-order strain-based nonlinear structural analysis coupled with unsteady finite-state potential flow aerodynamics form the basis for the aeroelastic formulation. The nonlinear beam structural model is based upon the finite strain approach. Kinematic differential equations are used to provide orientation and position of the fixed reference point. The resulting governing differential equations are non-linear, first- and second-order differential algebraic equations and provide a low-order complete nonlinear aircraft formulation. The resulting equations are integrated using an implicit Modified Newmark Method. The method incorporates both first- and second-order nonlinear equations without the necessity of transforming second-order equations to first-order form. The method also incorporates a Newton-Raphson sub-iteration scheme to reduce residual error. Due to the inherent flexibility of these aircraft, the low order structural modes couple directly with the rigid body modes. This creates a system which cannot be separated as in traditional control schemes. Trajectory control techniques are developed based upon a combination of linear and nonlinear inner-loop tracking and an outer-loop nonlinear transformation from desired trajectories to reference frame velocities. Numerical simulations are presented validating the proposed integration scheme and the

  9. Comparison of different coupling schemes between counterions and charged nanoparticles in multiparticle collision dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dahirel, Vincent; Zhao, Xudong; Jardat, Marie

    2016-08-01

    We applied the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) simulation technique to highly asymmetric electrolytes in solution, i.e., charged nanoparticles and their counterions in a solvent. These systems belong to a domain of solute size which ranges between the electrolyte and the colloidal domains, where most analytical theories are expected to fail, and efficient simulation techniques are still missing. MPC is a mesoscopic simulation method which mimics hydrodynamics properties of a fluid, includes thermal fluctuations, and can be coupled to a molecular dynamics of solutes. We took advantage of the size asymmetry between nanoparticles and counterions to treat the coupling between solutes and the solvent bath within the MPC method. Counterions were coupled to the solvent bath during the collision step and nanoparticles either through a direct interaction force or with stochastic rotation rules which mimic stick boundary conditions. Moreover, we adapted the simulation procedure to address the issue of the strong electrostatic interactions between solutes of opposite charges. We show that the short-ranged repulsion between counterions and nanoparticles can be modeled by stochastic reflection rules. This simulation scheme is very efficient from a computational point of view. We have also computed the transport coefficients for various densities. The diffusion of counterions was found in one case to increase slightly with the volume fraction of nanoparticles. The deviation of the electric conductivity from the ideal behavior (solutes at infinite dilution without any direct interactions) is found to be strong. PMID:27627422

  10. Dynamic Jahn-Teller Coupling, Anharmonic Oxygen Vibrations and HIGH-Tc Superconductivity in Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. H.; Clougherty, D. P.; McHenry, M. E.

    A universal dynamic Jahn-Teller (DJT) mechanism for superconductivity and its applications to CuO and BaBiO3 high-Tc oxides are reviewed. Dynamical interconversion between the shallow "double-well" potentials of degenerate delocalized oxygen-oxygen "pπ-bonds" at the Fermi energy (EF) induces anharmonic oxygen vibrations, lattice-electron coupling, and Cooper pairing. This mechanism yields high Tc's and small-to-vanishing isotope shifts for cuprates, where O(pπ)-O(pπ) bond overlap at EF is promoted by Cu(dπ*)-O(pπ) hybridization. It yields lower Tc's and larger isotope shifts for BaBiO3's, where O(pπ)-O(pπ) overlap is small. For vanishing bond overlap at EF, DJT coupling reduces to harmonic phonon coupling in BCS theory. Simple formulae for calculating Tc and isotope shifts for any superconductor from the "real-space" chemical bonding at EF are presented, yielding (Tc)max ≈ 230 K.

  11. Complex dynamics analysis of impulsively coupled Duffing oscillators with ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Li-Ping; Yu, Jian-Jiang

    2015-02-01

    Impulsively coupled systems are high-dimensional non-smooth systems that can exhibit rich and complex dynamics. This paper studies the complex dynamics of a non-smooth system which is unidirectionally impulsively coupled by three Duffing oscillators in a ring structure. By constructing a proper Poincaré map of the non-smooth system, an analytical expression of the Jacobian matrix of Poincaré map is given. Two-parameter Hopf bifurcation sets are obtained by combining the shooting method and the Runge-Kutta method. When the period is fixed and the coupling strength changes, the system undergoes stable, periodic, quasi-periodic, and hyper-chaotic solutions, etc. Floquet theory is used to study the stability of the periodic solutions of the system and their bifurcations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11402224, 11202180, 61273106, and 11171290), the Qing Lan Project of the Jiangsu Higher Educational Institutions of China, and the Jiangsu Overseas Research and Training Program for University Prominent Young and Middle-aged Teachers and Presidents.

  12. Experimental mapping of nonlinear dynamics in synchronized coupled semiconductor laser networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyris, Apostolos; Bourmpos, Michail; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2015-05-01

    The potential of conventional semiconductor lasers to generate complex and chaotic dynamics at a bandwidth that extends up to tens of GHz turns them into useful components in applications oriented to sensing and security. Specifically, latest theoretical and experimental works have demonstrated the capability of mutually coupled semiconductor lasers to exhibit a joint behaviour under various conditions. In an uncoupled network consisting of N similar SLs - representing autonomous nodes in the network - each node emits an optical signal of various dynamics depending on its biasing conditions and internal properties. These nodes remain unsynchronized unless appropriate coupling and biasing conditions apply. A synchronized behaviour can be in principle observed in sub-groups of lasers or in the overall laser network. In the present work, experimental topologies that employ eight SLs, under diverse biasing and coupling conditions, are built and investigated. The deployed systems incorporate off-the-shelf fiber-optic communications components operating at the 1550nm spectral window. The role of emission wavelength detuning of each participating node in the network - at GHz level - is evaluated.

  13. Dynamic coupling of regulated binding sites and cycling myosin heads in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kenneth S

    2014-03-01

    In an activated muscle, binding sites on the thin filament and myosin heads switch frequently between different states. Because the status of the binding sites influences the status of the heads, and vice versa, the binding sites and myosin heads are dynamically coupled. The functional consequences of this coupling were investigated using MyoSim, a new computer model of muscle. MyoSim extends existing models based on Huxley-type distribution techniques by incorporating Ca(2+) activation and cooperative effects. It can also simulate arbitrary cross-bridge schemes set by the researcher. Initial calculations investigated the effects of altering the relative speeds of binding-site and cross-bridge kinetics, and of manipulating cooperative processes. Subsequent tests fitted simulated force records to experimental data recorded using permeabilized myocardial preparations. These calculations suggest that the rate of force development at maximum activation is limited by myosin cycling kinetics, whereas the rate at lower levels of activation is limited by how quickly binding sites become available. Additional tests investigated the behavior of transiently activated cells by driving simulations with experimentally recorded Ca(2+) signals. The unloaded shortening profile of a twitching myocyte could be reproduced using a model with two myosin states, cooperative activation, and strain-dependent kinetics. Collectively, these results demonstrate that dynamic coupling of binding sites and myosin heads is important for contractile function.

  14. Intrinsic Islet Heterogeneity and Gap Junction Coupling Determine Spatiotemporal Ca2+ Wave Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Benninger, Richard K.P.; Hutchens, Troy; Head, W. Steven; McCaughey, Michael J.; Zhang, Min; Le Marchand, Sylvain J.; Satin, Leslie S.; Piston, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is released from the islets of Langerhans in discrete pulses that are linked to synchronized oscillations of intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i). Associated with each synchronized oscillation is a propagating calcium wave mediated by Connexin36 (Cx36) gap junctions. A computational islet model predicted that waves emerge due to heterogeneity in β-cell function throughout the islet. To test this, we applied defined patterns of glucose stimulation across the islet using a microfluidic device and measured how these perturbations affect calcium wave propagation. We further investigated how gap junction coupling regulates spatiotemporal [Ca2+]i dynamics in the face of heterogeneous glucose stimulation. Calcium waves were found to originate in regions of the islet having elevated excitability, and this heterogeneity is an intrinsic property of islet β-cells. The extent of [Ca2+]i elevation across the islet in the presence of heterogeneity is gap-junction dependent, which reveals a glucose dependence of gap junction coupling. To better describe these observations, we had to modify the computational islet model to consider the electrochemical gradient between neighboring β-cells. These results reveal how the spatiotemporal [Ca2+]i dynamics of the islet depend on β-cell heterogeneity and cell-cell coupling, and are important for understanding the regulation of coordinated insulin release across the islet. PMID:25468351

  15. Comparison of different coupling schemes between counterions and charged nanoparticles in multiparticle collision dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahirel, Vincent; Zhao, Xudong; Jardat, Marie

    2016-08-01

    We applied the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) simulation technique to highly asymmetric electrolytes in solution, i.e., charged nanoparticles and their counterions in a solvent. These systems belong to a domain of solute size which ranges between the electrolyte and the colloidal domains, where most analytical theories are expected to fail, and efficient simulation techniques are still missing. MPC is a mesoscopic simulation method which mimics hydrodynamics properties of a fluid, includes thermal fluctuations, and can be coupled to a molecular dynamics of solutes. We took advantage of the size asymmetry between nanoparticles and counterions to treat the coupling between solutes and the solvent bath within the MPC method. Counterions were coupled to the solvent bath during the collision step and nanoparticles either through a direct interaction force or with stochastic rotation rules which mimic stick boundary conditions. Moreover, we adapted the simulation procedure to address the issue of the strong electrostatic interactions between solutes of opposite charges. We show that the short-ranged repulsion between counterions and nanoparticles can be modeled by stochastic reflection rules. This simulation scheme is very efficient from a computational point of view. We have also computed the transport coefficients for various densities. The diffusion of counterions was found in one case to increase slightly with the volume fraction of nanoparticles. The deviation of the electric conductivity from the ideal behavior (solutes at infinite dilution without any direct interactions) is found to be strong.

  16. Characterizing the dynamics of coupled pendulums via symbolic time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Polsi, G.; Cabeza, C.; Marti, A. C.; Masoller, C.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a novel method of symbolic time-series analysis aimed at characterizing the regular or chaotic dynamics of coupled oscillators. The method is applied to two identical pendulums mounted on a frictionless platform, resembling Huygens' clocks. Employing a transformation rule inspired in ordinal analysis [C. Bandt and B. Pompe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 174102 (2002)], the dynamics of the coupled system is represented by a sequence of symbols that are determined by the order in which the trajectory of each pendulum intersects an appropriately chosen hyperplane in the phase space. For two coupled pendulums we use four symbols corresponding to the crossings of the vertical axis (at the bottom equilibrium point), either clock-wise or anti-clock wise. The complexity of the motion, quantified in terms of the entropy of the symbolic sequence, is compared with the degree of chaos, quantified in terms of the largest Lyapunov exponent. We demonstrate that the symbolic entropy sheds light into the large variety of different periodic and chaotic motions, with different types synchronization, that cannot be inferred from the Lyapunov analysis.

  17. New coupling limits, dynamical symmetries and microscopic operators of IBM/TQM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paar, V.

    1985-01-01

    A new particle-core basis having approximate supersymmetric (SUSY) features associated with SU(3) dynamical symmetry is introduced. The SUSY and CO-SUSY limits of IBFM/PTQM appear for the characteristic intermediate coupling strengths Γ/δ=±(Γ/δ)SUSY. The CO-SUSY limit is a truncated analog of the Stephens rotation-aligned scheme. A paradox was found in the relation of the SUSY and truncated strong coupling (TSC) limits to the strong coupling limit of the Bohr-Mottelson model. Microscopic dyson and Holstein-Primakoff realizations of RPA collective quadrupole phonon operators are explicitly constructed. Employing this mapping procedure in conjunction with the leading RPA diagrams, various operators of IBM/TQM, IBFM/PTQM have been derived in the particle-hole channel: E2 operator, one-particle transfer operator, two-particle transfer operator etc. In addition to the standard terms, this derivation gives in the same diagrammatic order the additional terms also. A new model was introduced for the odd-odd nuclei in the framework of IBM/TQM. For the SU(3) core the truncated analog of Gallagher-Moszkowski bands appears as the approximate SUSY pattern, of the same intrinsic structure as in the odd-even system. The idea of boson-fermion dynamical symmetry and supersymmetry is extended to odd-odd nuclei and hypernuclei.

  18. Dynamic coupling of complex brain networks and dual-task behavior.

    PubMed

    Alavash, Mohsen; Thiel, Christiane M; Gießing, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    Multi-tasking is a familiar situation where behavioral performance is often challenged. To date, fMRI studies investigating the neural underpinning of dual-task interference have mostly relied on local brain activation maps or static brain connectivity networks. Here, based on task fMRI we explored how fluctuations in behavior during concurrent performance of a visuospatial and a speech task relate to alternations in the topology of dynamic brain connectivity networks. We combined a time-resolved functional connectivity and complex network analysis with a sliding window approach applied to the trial by trial behavioral responses to investigate the coupling between dynamic brain networks and dual-task behavior at close temporal proximity. Participants showed fluctuations in their dual-task behavior over time, with the accuracy in the component tasks being statistically independent from one another. On the global level of brain networks we found that dynamic changes of network topology were differentially coupled with the behavior in each component task during the course of dual-tasking. While momentary decrease in the global efficiency of dynamic brain networks correlated with subsequent increase in visuospatial accuracy, better speech performance was preceded by higher global network efficiency and was followed by an increase in between-module connectivity over time. Additionally, dynamic alternations in the modular organization of brain networks at the posterior cingulate cortex were differentially predictive for the visuospatial as compared to the speech accuracy over time. Our results provide the first evidence that, during the course of dual-tasking, each component task is supported by a distinct topological configuration of brain connectivity networks. This finding suggests that the failure of functional brain connectivity networks to adapt to an optimal topology supporting the performance in both component tasks at the same time contributes to the moment to

  19. Study of the Ionization Dynamics and Equation of State of a Strongly Coupled Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R; Audebert, P; Geindre, J P; Iglesias, C; Foord, M; Rogers, F; Gauthier, J C; Springer, P

    2003-02-06

    Preliminary experiments to study the ionization dynamics and equation of state of a strongly coupled plasma have been performed at the LLNL COMET laser facility. In these experiment, a 1.0 J, 500 fs, 532 nm laser was used to create a uniform, warm dense plasma.The primary diagnostic, Fourier Domain Interferometry (FDI), was used to provide information about the position of the critical density of the target and thus the expansion hydrodynamics, laying the ground work for the plasma characterization. The plasmas were determined to be strongly coupled. In addition work was performed characterizing the back-lighter. A von Hamos spectrograph coupled to a 500 fs X-ray streak camera (TREX-VHS) developed at LLNL was used for these measurements. This diagnostic combines high collection efficiency ({approx} 10{sup -4} steradians) with fast temporal response ({approx} 500 fs), allowing resolution of extremely transient spectral variations. The TREX-VHS will be used to determine the time history, intensity, and spectral content of the back-lighter resulting in absorption measurements that provide insight into bound states in strongly coupled conditions.

  20. Income dynamics in couples and the dissolution of marriage and cohabitation.

    PubMed

    Kalmijn, Matthijs; Loeve, Anneke; Manting, Dorien

    2007-02-01

    Several studies have shown that a wife's strong (socio)economic position is associated with an increase in the risk of divorce. Less is known about such effects for cohabiting relationships. Using a unique and large-scale sample of administrative records from The Netherlands, we analyze the link between couples' income dynamics and union dissolution for married and cohabiting unions over a 10-year period. We find negative effects of household income on separation and positive effects of the woman's relative income, in line with earlier studies. The shape of the effect of the woman's relative income, however, depends on the type of union. Movements away from income equality toward a male-dominant pattern tend to increase the dissolution risk for cohabiting couples, whereas they reduce the dissolution risk for married couples. Movements away from income equality toward a female-dominant pattern (reverse specialization) increase the dissolution risks for both marriage and cohabitation. The findings suggest that equality is more protective for cohabitation, whereas specialization is more protective for marriage, although only when it fits a traditional pattern. Finally, we find that the stabilizing effects of income equality are more pronounced early in the marriage and that income equality also reduces the dissolution risk for same-sex couples.

  1. Three-mode coupling interference patterns in the dynamic structure factor of a relaxor ferroelectric

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Manley, M. E.; Abernathy, D. L.; Sahul, R.; Stonaha, P. J.; Budai, J. D.

    2016-09-22

    A long-standing controversy for relaxor ferroelectrics has been the origin of the waterfall effect in the phonon dispersion curves, in which low-energy transverse phonons cascade into vertical columns. Originally interpreted as phonons interacting with polar nanoregions (PNRs), it was later explained as an interference effect of coupling damped optic and acoustic phonons. In light of a recently discovered PNR vibrational mode near the waterfall wavevector [M. E. Manley, J. W. Lynn, D. L. Abernathy, E. D. Specht, O. Delaire, A. R. Bishop, R. Sahul, and J. D. Budai, Nat. Commun. 5, 3683 (2014)] we have reexamined this feature using neutronmore » scattering on [100]-poled PMN-30%PT (0.6Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 0.3PbTiO3). In addition, we find that the PNR mode couples to both optic and acoustic phonons, and that this results in complex patterns in the dynamic structure factor, including intensity pockets and peaks localized in momentum-energy space. These features are fully explained by extending the mode-coupling model to include three coupled damped harmonic oscillators representing the transverse optic, acoustic, and PNR modes.« less

  2. Three-mode coupling interference patterns in the dynamic structure factor of a relaxor ferroelectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, M. E.; Abernathy, D. L.; Sahul, R.; Stonaha, P. J.; Budai, J. D.

    2016-09-01

    A longstanding controversy for relaxor ferroelectrics has been the origin of the "waterfall" effect in the phonon dispersion curves, in which low-energy transverse phonons cascade into vertical columns. Originally interpreted as phonons interacting with polar nanoregions (PNRs), it was later explained as an interference effect of coupling damped optic and acoustic phonons. In light of a recently discovered PNR vibrational mode near the "waterfall" wave vector [M. E. Manley, J. W. Lynn, D. L. Abernathy, E. D. Specht, O. Delaire, A. R. Bishop, R. Sahul, and J. D. Budai, Nat. Commun. 5, 3683 (2014), 10.1038/ncomms4683], we have reexamined this feature using neutron scattering on [100]-poled PMN-30%PT [0.6 Pb (M g1 /3N b2 /3 ) O3-0.3 PbTi O3] . We find that the PNR mode couples to both optic and acoustic phonons and that this results in complex patterns in the dynamic structure factor, including intensity pockets and peaks localized in momentum-energy space. These features are fully explained by extending the mode-coupling model to include three coupled damped harmonic oscillators representing the transverse optic, acoustic, and PNR modes.

  3. NMR J-coupling constants in cisplatin derivatives studied by molecular dynamics and relativistic DFT.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Kiplangat; Truflandier, Lionel A; Autschbach, Jochen

    2011-06-01

    Solvent effects on J((195)Pt-(15)N) one-bond nuclear spin-spin coupling constants (J(PtN)) of cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)] and three cisplatin derivatives are investigated using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio molecular dynamics (aiMD) and all-electron relativistic DFT NMR calculations employing the two-component relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA). Good agreement with experiment is obtained when explicit solvent molecules are considered and when the computations are performed with a hybrid functional. Spin-orbit coupling causes only small effects on J(PtN) . Key factors contributing to the magnitude of coupling constants are elucidated, with the most significant being the presence of solvent as well as the quality of the density functional and basis set combination. The solvent effects are of the same magnitude as J(PtN) calculated for gas-phase geometries. However, the trends of J(PtN) among the complexes are already present in the gas phase. Results obtained with a continuum solvent model agree quite well with the aiMD results, provided that the Pt solvent-accessible radius is carefully chosen. The aiMD results support the existence of a partial hydrogen-bond-like inverse-hydration-type interaction affording a weak (1)J(Pt⋅⋅⋅H(w)) coupling between the complexes and the coordinating water molecule.

  4. Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System and its CSDMS Modeling Tool to couple models and data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syvitski, J. P.; Csdms Scientific; Software Team

    2010-12-01

    CSDMS is the virtual home for a diverse community who foster and promote the modeling of earth surface processes, with emphasis on the movement of fluids, sediment and solutes through landscapes, seascapes and through their sedimentary basins. CSDMS develops, integrates, disseminates & archives software (> 150 models and 3million+ lines of code) that reflects and predicts earth surface processes over a broad range of time and space scales. CSDMS deals with the Earth's surface—the ever-changing, dynamic interface between lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere. CSDMS employs state-of-the-art architectures, interface standards and frameworks that make it possible to convert stand-alone models into flexible, "plug-and-play" components that can be assembled into larger applications. The CSDMS model-coupling environment offers language interoperability, structured and unstructured grids, and serves as a migration pathway for surface dynamics modelers towards High-Performance Computing (HPC). The CSDMS Modeling Tool is a key product of the overall project, as it allows earth scientists with relatively modest computer coding experience to use the CSDMS modules for earth surface dynamics research and education. The CMT Tool is platform independent. CMT can easily couple models that have followed the CSDMS protocols for model contribution: 1) Open-source license; 2) Available; 3) Vetted; 4) Open-source language; 5) Refactored for componentization; 6) Metadata & test files; 7) Clean and documented using keywords.

  5. Quantum spin dynamics in a spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ting Fung Jeffrey; Liu, Xiong-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Spin-orbit-coupled bosons can exhibit rich equilibrium phases at low temperature and in the presence of particle-particle interactions. In the case with a 1D synthetic spin-orbit interaction, it has been observed that the ground state of a Bose gas can be a normal phase, stripe phase, or magnetized phase in different parameter regimes. The magnetized states are doubly degenerate and consist of a many-particle two-state system. In this work, we investigate the nonequilibrium quantum dynamics by switching on a simple one-dimensional optical lattice potential as external perturbation to induce resonant couplings between the magnetized phases, and predict a quantum spin dynamics which cannot be obtained in the single-particle systems. In particular, due to particle-particle interactions, the transition of the Bose condensate from one magnetized phase to the other is forbidden when the external perturbation strength is less than a critical value, and a full transition can occur only when the perturbation exceeds such critical strength. This phenomenon manifests itself a dynamical phase transition, with the order parameter defined by the time-averaged magnetization over an oscillation period, and the critical point behavior being exactly solvable. The thermal fluctuations are also considered in detail. From numerical simulations and exact analytic studies we show that the predicted many-body effects can be well observed with the current experiments.

  6. Testing coupled rotor blade lag damper vibration using real-time dynamic substructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, M. I.; Wagg, D. J.; Neild, S. A.; Bunniss, P.; Lieven, N. A. J.; Crewe, A. J.

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we present new results from laboratory tests of a helicopter rotor blade coupled with a lag damper from the EH101 helicopter. Previous modelling of this combined system has been purely numerical. However, this has proved challenging due to the nonlinear behaviour of the dampers involved—the fluid filled lag damper is known to have approximate piecewise linear force-velocity characteristics, due to blow-off valves which are triggered at a certain force level, combined with a strongly hysteretic dynamic profile. The novelty of the results presented here, is that the use of a hybrid numerical-experimental testing technique called real-time dynamic substructuring, allowed a numerical model of the rotor to be combined with the physical testing of a flight certified lag damper unit. These hybrid tests, which are similar in concept to hardware-in-the-loop, were carried out in real-time such that there is bi-directional coupling between the numerical blade model and the experimental lag damper. The new results obtained from these tests (for steady-state flight conditions) reveal how the inclusion of a real damper produces a more realistic representation of the dynamic characteristics of the overall blade system (during operational flight conditions) than numerical modelling alone.

  7. Dynamics of dipoles and vortices in nonlinearly coupled three-dimensional field oscillators.

    PubMed

    Driben, R; Konotop, V V; Malomed, B A; Meier, T

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of a pair of harmonic oscillators represented by three-dimensional fields coupled with a repulsive cubic nonlinearity is investigated through direct simulations of the respective field equations and with the help of the finite-mode Galerkin approximation (GA), which represents the two interacting fields by a superposition of 3+3 harmonic-oscillator p-wave eigenfunctions with orbital and magnetic quantum numbers l=1 and m=1, 0, -1. The system can be implemented in binary Bose-Einstein condensates, demonstrating the potential of the atomic condensates to emulate various complex modes predicted by classical field theories. First, the GA very accurately predicts a broadly degenerate set of the system's ground states in the p-wave manifold, in the form of complexes built of a dipole coaxial with another dipole or vortex, as well as complexes built of mutually orthogonal dipoles. Next, pairs of noncoaxial vortices and/or dipoles, including pairs of mutually perpendicular vortices, develop remarkably stable dynamical regimes, which feature periodic exchange of the angular momentum and periodic switching between dipoles and vortices. For a moderately strong nonlinearity, simulations of the coupled-field equations agree very well with results produced by the GA, demonstrating that the dynamics is accurately spanned by the set of six modes limited to l=1. PMID:27575123

  8. Dynamics of dipoles and vortices in nonlinearly coupled three-dimensional field oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driben, R.; Konotop, V. V.; Malomed, B. A.; Meier, T.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of a pair of harmonic oscillators represented by three-dimensional fields coupled with a repulsive cubic nonlinearity is investigated through direct simulations of the respective field equations and with the help of the finite-mode Galerkin approximation (GA), which represents the two interacting fields by a superposition of 3 +3 harmonic-oscillator p -wave eigenfunctions with orbital and magnetic quantum numbers l =1 and m =1 , 0, -1 . The system can be implemented in binary Bose-Einstein condensates, demonstrating the potential of the atomic condensates to emulate various complex modes predicted by classical field theories. First, the GA very accurately predicts a broadly degenerate set of the system's ground states in the p -wave manifold, in the form of complexes built of a dipole coaxial with another dipole or vortex, as well as complexes built of mutually orthogonal dipoles. Next, pairs of noncoaxial vortices and/or dipoles, including pairs of mutually perpendicular vortices, develop remarkably stable dynamical regimes, which feature periodic exchange of the angular momentum and periodic switching between dipoles and vortices. For a moderately strong nonlinearity, simulations of the coupled-field equations agree very well with results produced by the GA, demonstrating that the dynamics is accurately spanned by the set of six modes limited to l =1 .

  9. Probing the holographic principle using dynamical gauge effects from open spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianshi; Price, Craig; Liu, Qi; Gemelke, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    Dynamical gauge fields result from locally defined symmetries and an effective over-labeling of quantum states. Coupling atoms weakly to a reservoir of laser modes can create an effective dynamical gauge field purely due to the disregard of information in the optical states. Here we report measurements revealing effects of open spin-orbit coupling in a system where an effective model can be formed from a non-abelian SU(2) × U(1) field theory following the Yang-Mills construct. Forming a close analogy to dynamical gauge effects in quantum chromodynamics, we extract a measure of atomic motion which reveals the analog of a closing mass gap for the relevant gauge boson, shedding insight on long standing open problems in gauge-fixing scale anomalies. Using arguments following the holographic principle, we measure scaling relations which can be understood by quantifying information present in the local potential. New prospects using these techniques for developing fractionalization of multi-particle and macroscopic systems using dissipative and non-abelian gauge fields will also be discussed. We acknowledge support from NSF Award No. 1068570, and the Charles E. Kaufman Foundation.

  10. Coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator: Model and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, Melke A.; Nagao, Raphael; Eiswirth, Markus; Varela, Hamilton

    2014-12-21

    The co-existence of disparate time scales is pervasive in many systems. In particular for surface reactions, it has been shown that the long-term evolution of the core oscillator is decisively influenced by slow surface changes, such as progressing deactivation. Here we present an in-depth numerical investigation of the coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator. The model consists of four nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, investigated over a wide parameter range. Besides the conventional bifurcation analysis, the system was studied by means of high-resolution period and Lyapunov diagrams. It was observed that the bifurcation diagram changes considerably as the irreversible surface poisoning evolves, and the oscillatory region shrinks. The qualitative dynamics changes accordingly and the chaotic oscillations are dramatically suppressed. Nevertheless, periodic cascades are preserved in a confined region of the resistance vs. voltage diagram. Numerical results are compared to experiments published earlier and the latter reinterpreted. Finally, the comprehensive description of the time-evolution in the period and Lyapunov diagrams suggests further experimental studies correlating the evolution of the system's dynamics with changes of the catalyst structure.

  11. Dynamics of dipoles and vortices in nonlinearly coupled three-dimensional field oscillators.

    PubMed

    Driben, R; Konotop, V V; Malomed, B A; Meier, T

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of a pair of harmonic oscillators represented by three-dimensional fields coupled with a repulsive cubic nonlinearity is investigated through direct simulations of the respective field equations and with the help of the finite-mode Galerkin approximation (GA), which represents the two interacting fields by a superposition of 3+3 harmonic-oscillator p-wave eigenfunctions with orbital and magnetic quantum numbers l=1 and m=1, 0, -1. The system can be implemented in binary Bose-Einstein condensates, demonstrating the potential of the atomic condensates to emulate various complex modes predicted by classical field theories. First, the GA very accurately predicts a broadly degenerate set of the system's ground states in the p-wave manifold, in the form of complexes built of a dipole coaxial with another dipole or vortex, as well as complexes built of mutually orthogonal dipoles. Next, pairs of noncoaxial vortices and/or dipoles, including pairs of mutually perpendicular vortices, develop remarkably stable dynamical regimes, which feature periodic exchange of the angular momentum and periodic switching between dipoles and vortices. For a moderately strong nonlinearity, simulations of the coupled-field equations agree very well with results produced by the GA, demonstrating that the dynamics is accurately spanned by the set of six modes limited to l=1.

  12. Direct simulation of proton-coupled electron transfer reaction dynamics and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Miller, Thomas F., III

    2014-03-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, in which both an electron and an associated proton undergo reactive transfer, play an important role in many chemical and biological systems. Due to the complexity of this class of reactions, a variety of different mechanisms fall under the umbrella of PCET. However, the physical driving forces that determine the preferred mechanism in a given system still remain poorly understood. Towards this end, we extend ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD), a path-integral quantum dynamics method, to enable the direct simulation and characterization of PCET reaction dynamics in both fully atomistic and system-bath models of organometallic catalysts. In addition to providing validation for the simulation method via extensive comparison with existing PCET rate theories, we analyze the RPMD trajectories to investigate the competition between the concerted and sequential reaction mechanisms for PCET, elucidating the large role of the solvent in controlling the preferred mechanism. We further employ RPMD to determine the kinetics and mechanistic features of concerted PCET reactions across different regimes of electronic and vibrational coupling, providing evidence for a new and distinct PCET reaction mechanism.

  13. Dynamical evolution of a scalar field coupling to Einstein's tensor in the Reissner-Nordstroem black hole spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Songbai; Jing Jiliang

    2010-10-15

    We study the dynamical evolution of a scalar field coupling to Einstein's tensor in the background of a Reissner-Nordstroem black hole. Our results show that the coupling constant {eta} imprints in the wave dynamics of a scalar perturbation. In the weak coupling, we find that with the increase of the coupling constant {eta} the real parts of the fundamental quasinormal frequencies decrease and the absolute values of imaginary parts increase for fixed charge q and multipole number l. In the strong coupling, we find that for l{ne}0 the instability occurs when {eta} is larger than a certain threshold value {eta}{sub c} which deceases with the multipole number l and charge q. However, for the lowest l=0, we find that there does not exist such a threshold value and the scalar field always decays for arbitrary coupling constant.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of mechanical systems with friction contacts: Coupled static and dynamic Multi-Harmonic Balance Method and multiple solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, Stefano; Firrone, Christian Maria

    2014-02-01

    Real applications in structural mechanics where the dynamic behavior is linear are rare. Usually, structures are made of components assembled together by means of joints whose behavior maybe highly nonlinear. Depending on the amount of excitation, joints can dramatically change the dynamic behavior of the whole system, and the modeling of this type of constraint is therefore crucial for a correct prediction of the amount of vibration. The solution of the nonlinear equilibrium equations by means of the Harmonic Balance Method (HBM) is widely accepted as an effective approach to calculate the steady-state forced response in the frequency domain, in spite of Direct Time Integration (DTI). The state-of-the-art contact element used to model the friction forces at the joint interfaces is a node-to-node contact element, where the local contact compliance is modeled by means of linear springs and Coulomb's law is used to govern the friction phenomena. In the literature, when the HBM is applied to vibrating systems with joint interfaces and the state-of-the-art contact model is used, an uncoupled approach is mostly employed: the static governing equations are solved in advance to compute the pre-stress effects and then the dynamic governing equations are solved to predict the vibration amplitude of the system. As a result, the HBM steady-state solution may lead to a poor correlation with the DTI solution, where static and dynamic loads are accounted for simultaneously. In this paper, the HBM performances are investigated by comparing the uncoupled approach to a fully coupled static/dynamic approach. In order to highlight the main differences between the two approaches, a lumped parameter system, characterized by a single friction contact, is considered in order to show the different levels of accuracy that the proposed approaches can provide for different configurations.

  15. Precession and nutation dynamics of nonlinearly coupled non-coaxial three-dimensional matter wave vortices

    PubMed Central

    Driben, R.; Konotop, V. V.; Meier, T.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinearity is the driving force for numerous important effects in nature typically showing transitions between different regimes, regular, chaotic or catastrophic behavior. Localized nonlinear modes have been the focus of intense research in areas such as fluid and gas dynamics, photonics, atomic and solid state physics etc. Due to the richness of the behavior of nonlinear systems and due to the severe numerical demands of accurate three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations presently only little knowledge is available on the dynamics of complex nonlinear modes in 3D. Here, we investigate the dynamics of 3D non-coaxial matter wave vortices that are trapped in a parabolic potential and interact via a repulsive nonlinearity. Our numerical simulations demonstrate the existence of an unexpected and fascinating nonlinear regime that starts immediately when the nonlinearity is switched-on and is characterized by a smooth dynamics representing torque-free precession with nutations. The reported motion is proven to be robust regarding various effects such as the number of particles, dissipation and trap deformations and thus should be observable in suitably designed experiments. Since our theoretical approach, i.e., coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, is quite generic, we expect that the obtained novel dynamical behavior should also exist in other nonlinear systems. PMID:26964759

  16. Photoinduced homogeneous proton-coupled electron transfer: model study of isotope effects on reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Charulatha; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2009-10-21

    A model Hamiltonian for photoinduced homogeneous proton-coupled electron transfer reactions is presented, and the equations of motion for the reduced density matrix elements in an electron-proton vibronic basis are derived. This formalism enables a detailed analysis of the proton vibrational dynamics, as well as the dynamics of the electronic state populations, following photoexcitation. The application of this theory to model systems provides insight into the fundamental physical principles underlying these types of processes. The initial nonequilibrium state is prepared by vertical photoexcitation from the ground electronic state to a coherent vibrational mixture in the donor electronic state. This nonstationary state relaxes to the equilibrium distributions in the donor and acceptor electronic states via dynamical processes arising from nonadiabatic transitions between the donor and acceptor vibronic states concurrent with energy dissipation to the bath. During the initial stage, when the proton vibrational population in the donor state is distributed among higher vibrational states and the donor proton wavepacket is oscillating with large amplitude, the electronic state population dynamics exhibits virtually no hydrogen/deuterium isotope effect. After vibrational relaxation, when the proton vibrational population in the donor state becomes concentrated in the lower vibrational states and the donor proton wavepacket becomes more localized near the minimum of the donor potential, a significant hydrogen/deuterium isotope effect on the electronic state population dynamics is exhibited. These model system calculations lead to experimentally testable predictions about the qualitative behavior of these isotope effects. PMID:20568867

  17. Precession and nutation dynamics of nonlinearly coupled non-coaxial three-dimensional matter wave vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driben, R.; Konotop, V. V.; Meier, T.

    2016-03-01

    Nonlinearity is the driving force for numerous important effects in nature typically showing transitions between different regimes, regular, chaotic or catastrophic behavior. Localized nonlinear modes have been the focus of intense research in areas such as fluid and gas dynamics, photonics, atomic and solid state physics etc. Due to the richness of the behavior of nonlinear systems and due to the severe numerical demands of accurate three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations presently only little knowledge is available on the dynamics of complex nonlinear modes in 3D. Here, we investigate the dynamics of 3D non-coaxial matter wave vortices that are trapped in a parabolic potential and interact via a repulsive nonlinearity. Our numerical simulations demonstrate the existence of an unexpected and fascinating nonlinear regime that starts immediately when the nonlinearity is switched-on and is characterized by a smooth dynamics representing torque-free precession with nutations. The reported motion is proven to be robust regarding various effects such as the number of particles, dissipation and trap deformations and thus should be observable in suitably designed experiments. Since our theoretical approach, i.e., coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, is quite generic, we expect that the obtained novel dynamical behavior should also exist in other nonlinear systems.

  18. A Coupled Phase-Temperature Model for Dynamics of Transient Neuronal Signal in Mammals Cold Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kirana, Firman Ahmad; Husein, Irzaman Sulaiman

    2016-01-01

    We propose a theoretical model consisting of coupled differential equation of membrane potential phase and temperature for describing the neuronal signal in mammals cold receptor. Based on the results from previous work by Roper et al., we modified a nonstochastic phase model for cold receptor neuronal signaling dynamics in mammals. We introduce a new set of temperature adjusted functional parameters which allow saturation characteristic at high and low steady temperatures. The modified model also accommodates the transient neuronal signaling process from high to low temperature by introducing a nonlinear differential equation for the “effective temperature” changes which is coupled to the phase differential equation. This simple model can be considered as a candidate for describing qualitatively the physical mechanism of the corresponding transient process. PMID:27774102

  19. Methanol coupling in the zeolite chabazite studied via Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Cynthia; Giurumescu, Claudiu A.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Trout, Bernhardt L.

    We have used Car-Parrinello constrained molecular dynamics to study the coupling of two molecules of methanol in the zeolite chabazite to form ethanol and water. We have chosen to study this reaction because it represents the formation of the first C-C bond, which is thought to be the rate limiting step for the MTO and MTG processes. We have elucidated a new mechanism for this reaction that does not require the prior formation of surface methoxy groups or dimethyl ether intermediates. The mechanism involves stable intermediates of methane and protonated formaldehyde. We have also calculated an upper bound of the free energy barrier for the overall reaction, and found that it compares favourably with the rough experimental measurements available. Finally, we consider what are the natural reaction coordinates for the methanol-methanol coupling process.

  20. Oscillatory dynamics in the hippocampus support dentate gyrus–CA3 coupling.

    PubMed

    Akam, Thomas; Oren, Iris; Mantoan, Laura; Ferenczi, Emily; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2012-05-01

    Gamma oscillations in the dentate gyrus and hippocampal CA3 show variable coherence in vivo, but the mechanisms and relevance for information flow are unknown. We found that carbachol-induced oscillations in rat CA3 have biphasic phase-response curves, consistent with the ability to couple with oscillations in afferent projections. Differences in response to stimulation of either the intrinsic feedback circuit or the dentate gyrus were well described by varying an impulse vector in a two-dimensional dynamical system, representing the relative input to excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Responses to sinusoidally modulated optogenetic stimulation confirmed that the CA3 network oscillation can entrain to periodic inputs, with a steep dependence of entrainment phase on input frequency. CA3 oscillations are therefore suited to coupling with oscillations in the dentate gyrus over a broad range of frequencies. PMID:22466505

  1. The influence of auditory-motor coupling on fractal dynamics in human gait.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Nathaniel; McGrath, Denise; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Humans exhibit an innate ability to synchronize their movements to music. The field of gait rehabilitation has sought to capitalize on this phenomenon by invoking patients to walk in time to rhythmic auditory cues with a view to improving pathological gait. However, the temporal structure of the auditory cue, and hence the temporal structure of the target behavior has not been sufficiently explored. This study reveals the plasticity of auditory-motor coupling in human walking in relation to 'complex' auditory cues. The authors demonstrate that auditory-motor coupling can be driven by different coloured auditory noise signals (e.g. white, brown), shifting the fractal temporal structure of gait dynamics towards the statistical properties of the signals used. This adaptive capability observed in whole-body movement, could potentially be harnessed for targeted neuromuscular rehabilitation in patient groups, depending on the specific treatment goal. PMID:25080936

  2. Decoherence dynamics of interacting qubits coupled to a bath of local optical phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lone, Muzaffar Qadir; Yarlagadda, S.

    2016-04-01

    We study decoherence in an interacting qubit system described by infinite range Heisenberg model (IRHM) in a situation where the system is coupled to a bath of local optical phonons. Using perturbation theory in polaron frame of reference, we derive an effective Hamiltonian that is valid in the regime of strong spin-phonon coupling under nonadiabatic conditions. It is shown that the effective Hamiltonian commutes with the IRHM upto leading orders of perturbation and thus has the same eigenstates as the IRHM. Using a quantum master equation with Markovian approximation of dynamical evolution, we show that the off-diagonal elements of the density matrix do not decay in the energy eigen basis of IRHM.

  3. The influence of auditory-motor coupling on fractal dynamics in human gait

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Nathaniel; McGrath, Denise; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Humans exhibit an innate ability to synchronize their movements to music. The field of gait rehabilitation has sought to capitalize on this phenomenon by invoking patients to walk in time to rhythmic auditory cues with a view to improving pathological gait. However, the temporal structure of the auditory cue, and hence the temporal structure of the target behavior has not been sufficiently explored. This study reveals the plasticity of auditory-motor coupling in human walking in relation to ‘complex' auditory cues. The authors demonstrate that auditory-motor coupling can be driven by different coloured auditory noise signals (e.g. white, brown), shifting the fractal temporal structure of gait dynamics towards the statistical properties of the signals used. This adaptive capability observed in whole-body movement, could potentially be harnessed for targeted neuromuscular rehabilitation in patient groups, depending on the specific treatment goal. PMID:25080936

  4. Synchronization of Stochastically Coupled Oscillators: Dynamical Phase Transitions and Large Deviations Theory (or Birds and Frogs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Razvan

    2009-10-01

    Systems of oscillators coupled non-linearly (stochastically or not) are ubiquitous in nature and can explain many complex phenomena: coupled Josephson junction arrays, cardiac pacemaker cells, swarms or flocks of insects and birds, etc. They are know to have a non-trivial phase diagram, which includes chaotic, partially synchronized, and fully synchronized phases. A traditional model for this class of problems is the Kuramoto system of oscillators, which has been studied extensively for the last three decades. The model is a canonical example for non-equilibrium, dynamical phase transitions, so little understood in physics. From a stochastic analysis point of view, the transition is described by the large deviations principle, which offers little information on the scaling behavior near the critical point. I will discuss a special case of the model, which allows a rigorous analysis of the critical properties of the model, and reveals a new, anomalous scaling behavior in the vicinity of the critical point.

  5. Tight Coupling of Metabolic Oscillations and Intracellular Water Dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Thoke, Henrik Seir; Tobiesen, Asger; Brewer, Jonathan; Hansen, Per Lyngs; Stock, Roberto P.; Olsen, Lars F.; Bagatolli, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    We detected very strong coupling between the oscillating concentration of ATP and the dynamics of intracellular water during glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results indicate that: i) dipolar relaxation of intracellular water is heterogeneous within the cell and different from dilute conditions, ii) water dipolar relaxation oscillates with glycolysis and in phase with ATP concentration, iii) this phenomenon is scale-invariant from the subcellular to the ensemble of synchronized cells and, iv) the periodicity of both glycolytic oscillations and dipolar relaxation are equally affected by D2O in a dose-dependent manner. These results offer a new insight into the coupling of an emergent intensive physicochemical property of the cell, i.e. cell-wide water dipolar relaxation, and a central metabolite (ATP) produced by a robustly oscillating metabolic process. PMID:25705902

  6. Dynamical analysis of modified gravity with nonminimal gravitational coupling to matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Rui; Xu, Xiaodong; Wang, Bin; Gong, Yungui

    2016-05-01

    We perform a phase space analysis of a generalized modified gravity theory with nonminimally coupling between geometry and matter. We apply the dynamical system approach to this generalized model and find that in the cosmological context, different choices of Lagrangian density will apparently result in different phases of the Universe. By carefully choosing the variables, we prove that there is an attractor solution to describe the late time accelerating universe when the modified gravity is chosen in a simple power-law form of the curvature scalar. We further examine the temperature evolution based on the thermodynamic understanding of the model. Confronting the model with supernova type Ia data sets, we find that the nonminimally coupled theory of gravity is a viable model to describe the late time Universe acceleration.

  7. Double and single pion photoproduction within a dynamical coupled-channels model

    SciTech Connect

    Kamano, H.; Julia-Diaz, B.; Lee, T.-S. H.; Matsuyama, A.; Sato, T.

    2009-12-15

    Within a dynamical coupled-channels model that has already been fixed by analyzing the data of the {pi}N{yields}{pi}N and {gamma}N{yields}{pi}N reactions, we present the predicted double pion photoproduction cross sections up to the second resonance region, W<1.7 GeV. The roles played by the different mechanisms within our model in determining both the single and double pion photoproduction reactions are analyzed, focusing on the effects attributable to the direct {gamma}N{yields}{pi}{pi}N mechanism, the interplay between the resonant and nonresonant amplitudes, and the coupled-channels effects. The model parameters that can be determined most effectively in the combined studies of both the single and double pion photoproduction data are identified for future studies.

  8. Double and single pion photoproduction within a dynamical coupled-channels model

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroyuki Kamano; Julia-Diaz, Bruno; Lee, T. -S. H.; Matsuyama, Akihiko; Sato, Toru

    2009-12-16

    Within a dynamical coupled-channels model which has already been fixed from analyzing the data of the πN → πN and γN → πN reactions, we present the predicted double pion photoproduction cross sections up to the second resonance region, W < 1.7 GeV. The roles played by the different mechanisms within our model in determining both the single and double pion photoproduction reactions are analyzed, focusing on the effects due to the direct γN → ππN mechanism, the interplay between the resonant and non-resonant amplitudes, and the coupled-channels effects. As a result, the model parameters which can be determined most effectively in the combined studies of both the single and double pion photoproduction data are identified for future studies.

  9. Double and single pion photoproduction within a dynamical coupled-channels model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hiroyuki Kamano; Julia-Diaz, Bruno; Lee, T. -S. H.; Matsuyama, Akihiko; Sato, Toru

    2009-12-16

    Within a dynamical coupled-channels model which has already been fixed from analyzing the data of the πN → πN and γN → πN reactions, we present the predicted double pion photoproduction cross sections up to the second resonance region, W < 1.7 GeV. The roles played by the different mechanisms within our model in determining both the single and double pion photoproduction reactions are analyzed, focusing on the effects due to the direct γN → ππN mechanism, the interplay between the resonant and non-resonant amplitudes, and the coupled-channels effects. As a result, the model parameters which can be determined mostmore » effectively in the combined studies of both the single and double pion photoproduction data are identified for future studies.« less

  10. The coupling of mechanical dynamics and induced currents in plates and surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenburger, D.W.; Bialek, J.M.

    1986-10-01

    Significant mechanical reactions and deflections may be produced when electrical eddy currents induced in a conducting structure by transformer-like electromotive forces interact with background magnetic fields. Additional eddy currents induced by structural motion through the background fields modify both the mechanical and electrical dynamic behavior of the system. The observed effects of these motional eddy currents are sometimes referred to as magnetic damping and magnetic stiffness. This paper addresses the coupled structural deformation and eddy currents in flat plates and simple two-dimensional surfaces in three-space. A coupled system of equations has been formulated using finite element techniques for the mechanical aspects and a mesh network method for the electrical aspects of the problem.

  11. Dynamic selective switching in antiferromagnetically-coupled bilayers close to the spin reorientation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-Pacheco, A. Mansell, R.; Petit, D.; Lee, J. H.; Cowburn, R. P.; Ummelen, F. C.; Swagten, H. J. M.

    2014-09-01

    We have designed a bilayer synthetic antiferromagnet where the order of layer reversal can be selected by varying the sweep rate of the applied magnetic field. The system is formed by two ultra-thin ferromagnetic layers with different proximities to the spin reorientation transition, coupled antiferromagnetically using Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions. The different dynamic magnetic reversal behavior of both layers produces a crossover in their switching fields for field rates in the kOe/s range. This effect is due to the different effective anisotropy of both layers, added to an appropriate asymmetric antiferromagnetic coupling between them. Field-rate controlled selective switching of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy layers as shown here can be exploited in sensing and memory applications.

  12. Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics in a Simple Midlatitude Climate Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, David; Frankignoul, Claude; Marshall, John

    2001-09-01

    Midlatitude air-sea interactions are investigated by coupling a stochastically forced two-layer quasigeostrophic channel atmosphere to a simple ocean model. The stochastic forcing has a large-scale standing pattern to simulate the main modes of low-frequency atmospheric variability. When the atmosphere interacts with an oceanic mixed layer via surface heat exchanges, the white noise forcing generates an approximately red noise sea surface temperature (SST) response. As the SST adjusts to the air temperature changes at low frequency, thus decreasing the heat flux damping, the atmospheric spectra are slightly reddened, the power enhancement increasing with the zonal scale because of atmospheric dynamics. Decadal variability is enhanced by considering a first baroclinic oceanic mode that is forced by Ekman pumping and modulates the SST by entrainment and horizontal advection. The ocean interior is bounded at its eastern edge, and a radiation condition is used in the west. Primarily in wintertime conditions, a positive feedback takes place between the atmosphere and the ocean when the atmospheric response to the SST is equivalent barotropic. Then, the ocean interior modulates the SST in a way that leads to a reinforcement of its forcing by the wind stress, although the heat flux feedback is negative. The coupled mode propagates slowly westward with exponentially increasing amplitude, and it is fetch limited. The atmospheric and SST spectral power increase at all periods longer than 10 yr when the coupling with the ocean interior occurs by entrainment. When it occurs by advection, the power increase is primarily found at near-decadal periods, resulting in a slightly oscillatory behavior of the coupled system. Ocean dynamics thus leads to a small, but significant, long-term climate predictability, up to about 6 yr in advance in the entrainment case.

  13. Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics: Charge migration and charge transfer initiated near a conical intersection

    SciTech Connect

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2013-07-28

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, implemented using the Ehrenfest method, has been used to study charge migration with fixed nuclei, together with charge transfer when nuclei are allowed to move. Simulations were initiated at reference geometries of neutral benzene and 2-phenylethylamine (PEA), and at geometries close to potential energy surface crossings in the cations. Cationic eigenstates, and the so-called sudden approximation, involving removal of an electron from a correlated ground-state wavefunction for the neutral species, were used as initial conditions. Charge migration without coupled nuclear motion could be observed if the Ehrenfest simulation, using the sudden approximation, was started near a conical intersection where the states were both strongly coupled and quasi-degenerate. Further, the main features associated with charge migration were still recognizable when the nuclear motion was allowed to couple. In the benzene radical cation, starting from the reference neutral geometry with the sudden approximation, one could observe sub-femtosecond charge migration with a small amplitude, which results from weak interaction with higher electronic states. However, we were able to engineer large amplitude charge migration, with a period between 10 and 100 fs, corresponding to oscillation of the electronic structure between the quinoid and anti-quinoid cationic electronic configurations, by distorting the geometry along the derivative coupling vector from the D{sub 6h} Jahn-Teller crossing to lower symmetry where the states are not degenerate. When the nuclear motion becomes coupled, the period changes only slightly. In PEA, in an Ehrenfest trajectory starting from the D{sub 2} eigenstate and reference geometry, a partial charge transfer occurs after about 12 fs near the first crossing between D{sub 1}, D{sub 2} (N{sup +}-Phenyl, N-Phenyl{sup +}). If the Ehrenfest propagation is started near this point, using the sudden approximation without coupled

  14. Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics: Charge migration and charge transfer initiated near a conical intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2013-07-01

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, implemented using the Ehrenfest method, has been used to study charge migration with fixed nuclei, together with charge transfer when nuclei are allowed to move. Simulations were initiated at reference geometries of neutral benzene and 2-phenylethylamine (PEA), and at geometries close to potential energy surface crossings in the cations. Cationic eigenstates, and the so-called sudden approximation, involving removal of an electron from a correlated ground-state wavefunction for the neutral species, were used as initial conditions. Charge migration without coupled nuclear motion could be observed if the Ehrenfest simulation, using the sudden approximation, was started near a conical intersection where the states were both strongly coupled and quasi-degenerate. Further, the main features associated with charge migration were still recognizable when the nuclear motion was allowed to couple. In the benzene radical cation, starting from the reference neutral geometry with the sudden approximation, one could observe sub-femtosecond charge migration with a small amplitude, which results from weak interaction with higher electronic states. However, we were able to engineer large amplitude charge migration, with a period between 10 and 100 fs, corresponding to oscillation of the electronic structure between the quinoid and anti-quinoid cationic electronic configurations, by distorting the geometry along the derivative coupling vector from the D6h Jahn-Teller crossing to lower symmetry where the states are not degenerate. When the nuclear motion becomes coupled, the period changes only slightly. In PEA, in an Ehrenfest trajectory starting from the D2 eigenstate and reference geometry, a partial charge transfer occurs after about 12 fs near the first crossing between D1, D2 (N+-Phenyl, N-Phenyl+). If the Ehrenfest propagation is started near this point, using the sudden approximation without coupled nuclear motion, one observes an

  15. Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics: charge migration and charge transfer initiated near a conical intersection.

    PubMed

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J; Robb, Michael A

    2013-07-28

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, implemented using the Ehrenfest method, has been used to study charge migration with fixed nuclei, together with charge transfer when nuclei are allowed to move. Simulations were initiated at reference geometries of neutral benzene and 2-phenylethylamine (PEA), and at geometries close to potential energy surface crossings in the cations. Cationic eigenstates, and the so-called sudden approximation, involving removal of an electron from a correlated ground-state wavefunction for the neutral species, were used as initial conditions. Charge migration without coupled nuclear motion could be observed if the Ehrenfest simulation, using the sudden approximation, was started near a conical intersection where the states were both strongly coupled and quasi-degenerate. Further, the main features associated with charge migration were still recognizable when the nuclear motion was allowed to couple. In the benzene radical cation, starting from the reference neutral geometry with the sudden approximation, one could observe sub-femtosecond charge migration with a small amplitude, which results from weak interaction with higher electronic states. However, we were able to engineer large amplitude charge migration, with a period between 10 and 100 fs, corresponding to oscillation of the electronic structure between the quinoid and anti-quinoid cationic electronic configurations, by distorting the geometry along the derivative coupling vector from the D6h Jahn-Teller crossing to lower symmetry where the states are not degenerate. When the nuclear motion becomes coupled, the period changes only slightly. In PEA, in an Ehrenfest trajectory starting from the D2 eigenstate and reference geometry, a partial charge transfer occurs after about 12 fs near the first crossing between D1, D2 (N(+)-Phenyl, N-Phenyl(+)). If the Ehrenfest propagation is started near this point, using the sudden approximation without coupled nuclear motion, one observes an

  16. Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics: charge migration and charge transfer initiated near a conical intersection.

    PubMed

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J; Robb, Michael A

    2013-07-28

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, implemented using the Ehrenfest method, has been used to study charge migration with fixed nuclei, together with charge transfer when nuclei are allowed to move. Simulations were initiated at reference geometries of neutral benzene and 2-phenylethylamine (PEA), and at geometries close to potential energy surface crossings in the cations. Cationic eigenstates, and the so-called sudden approximation, involving removal of an electron from a correlated ground-state wavefunction for the neutral species, were used as initial conditions. Charge migration without coupled nuclear motion could be observed if the Ehrenfest simulation, using the sudden approximation, was started near a conical intersection where the states were both strongly coupled and quasi-degenerate. Further, the main features associated with charge migration were still recognizable when the nuclear motion was allowed to couple. In the benzene radical cation, starting from the reference neutral geometry with the sudden approximation, one could observe sub-femtosecond charge migration with a small amplitude, which results from weak interaction with higher electronic states. However, we were able to engineer large amplitude charge migration, with a period between 10 and 100 fs, corresponding to oscillation of the electronic structure between the quinoid and anti-quinoid cationic electronic configurations, by distorting the geometry along the derivative coupling vector from the D6h Jahn-Teller crossing to lower symmetry where the states are not degenerate. When the nuclear motion becomes coupled, the period changes only slightly. In PEA, in an Ehrenfest trajectory starting from the D2 eigenstate and reference geometry, a partial charge transfer occurs after about 12 fs near the first crossing between D1, D2 (N(+)-Phenyl, N-Phenyl(+)). If the Ehrenfest propagation is started near this point, using the sudden approximation without coupled nuclear motion, one observes an

  17. An Asymptotic Analysis of a 2-D Model of Dynamically Active Compartments Coupled by Bulk Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, J.; Ward, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    A class of coupled cell-bulk ODE-PDE models is formulated and analyzed in a two-dimensional domain, which is relevant to studying quorum-sensing behavior on thin substrates. In this model, spatially segregated dynamically active signaling cells of a common small radius ɛ ≪ 1 are coupled through a passive bulk diffusion field. For this coupled system, the method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to construct steady-state solutions and to formulate a spectral problem that characterizes the linear stability properties of the steady-state solutions, with the aim of predicting whether temporal oscillations can be triggered by the cell-bulk coupling. Phase diagrams in parameter space where such collective oscillations can occur, as obtained from our linear stability analysis, are illustrated for two specific choices of the intracellular kinetics. In the limit of very large bulk diffusion, it is shown that solutions to the ODE-PDE cell-bulk system can be approximated by a finite-dimensional dynamical system. This limiting system is studied both analytically, using a linear stability analysis and, globally, using numerical bifurcation software. For one illustrative example of the theory, it is shown that when the number of cells exceeds some critical number, i.e., when a quorum is attained, the passive bulk diffusion field can trigger oscillations through a Hopf bifurcation that would otherwise not occur without the coupling. Moreover, for two specific models for the intracellular dynamics, we show that there are rather wide regions in parameter space where these triggered oscillations are synchronous in nature. Unless the bulk diffusivity is asymptotically large, it is shown that a diffusion-sensing behavior is possible whereby more clustered spatial configurations of cells inside the domain lead to larger regions in parameter space where synchronous collective oscillations between the small cells can occur. Finally, the linear stability analysis for these cell

  18. Multistability and complex dynamics in coupled semiconductor lasers with time-delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakin, M.; Kochkurov, L.; Melnikov, L.; Astakhov, V.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate complex dynamics of two coupled nonidentical Land-Kobayashi oscillators. It is shown that at low values of feedback rate variation of delay only leads to alternation of periodic and stationary regimes. The analysis of characteristic regimes of the system in a wide range of parameters is provided. We demonstrate that the system under study is multistable. With the variation of control parameters sole fixed point repeatedly undergoes supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcations, which leads to an increase in the number of limit cycles co-existing in the phase space. It is shown that multistable states are formed by different combinations of the periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic regimes.

  19. Voltage-morphology coupling in biomimetic membranes: dynamics of giant vesicles in applied electric fields.

    PubMed

    Vlahovska, Petia M

    2015-10-01

    An electric potential difference across the plasma membrane is common to all living cells and is essential to physiological functions such as the generation of action potentials for cell-to-cell communication. While the basics of cell electrical activity are well established (e.g. the Hodgkin-Huxley model of the action potential), the reciprocal coupling of voltage and membrane deformation has received limited attention. In recent years, studies of biomimetic membranes in externally applied electric fields have revealed a plethora of intriguing dynamics (formation of edges, pearling, and phase separation) that challenge the current understanding of membrane electromechanics. PMID:26314545

  20. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Dynamical entanglement for Fermi coupled stretching and bending modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xi-Wen; Cheng, Chuan-Ming

    2009-07-01

    The dynamical entanglement for Fermi coupled C-H stretch and bend vibrations in molecule CHD3 is studied in terms of two negativities and the reduced von Neumann entropy, where initial states are taken to be direct products of photon-added coherent states on each mode. It is demonstrated that the negativity defined by the sum of negative eigenvalues of the partial transpose of density matrices is positively correlated with the von Neumann entropy. The entanglement difference between photon-added coherent states and usual coherent states is discussed as well.

  1. Peculiarities of phase dynamics of coupled Josephson junctions in CCJJ and CCJJ+DC models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Y. U. M.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Demery, M. E. L.

    2010-11-01

    The phase dynamics of the coupled Josephson junctions in the framework of CCJJ and CCJJ+DC models is studied. The current voltage characteristics (CVC) are numerically calculated for the stacks with different number of junctions at different model parameters. We manifest the difference of these models for the branching at I = Ic and in the hysteretic region. The essential difference is observed in the breakpoint region, where the longitudinal plasma wave is created. We discuss the main features of both models, related with the role of the diffusion current between the superconducting layers.

  2. Investigating protein conformational energy landscapes and atomic resolution dynamics from NMR dipolar couplings: a review.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Loïc; Blackledge, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is exquisitely sensitive to protein dynamics. In particular inter-nuclear dipolar couplings, that become measurable in solution when the protein is dissolved in a dilute liquid crystalline solution, report on all conformations sampled up to millisecond timescales. As such they provide the opportunity to describe the Boltzmann distribution present in solution at atomic resolution, and thereby to map the conformational energy landscape in unprecedented detail. The development of analytical methods and approaches based on numerical simulation and their application to numerous biologically important systems is presented. PMID:26517337

  3. Dynamics of an optomechanical system with quadratic coupling: Effect of first order correction to adiabatic elimination

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Cheng; Cui, Yuanshun; Chen, Guibin

    2016-01-01

    We explore theoretically the dynamics of an optomechanical system in which a resonantly driven cavity mode is quadratically coupled to the displacement of a mechanical resonator. Considering the first order correction to adiabatic elimination, we obtain the analytical expression of optomechanical damping rate which is negative and depends on the position of the mechanical resonator. After comparing the numerical results between the full simulation of Langevin equations, adiabatic elimination, and first order correction to adiabatic elimination, we explain the dynamics of the system in terms of overall mechanical potential and optomechanical damping rate. The antidamping induced by radiation pressure can result in self-sustained oscillation of the mechanical resonator. Finally, we discuss the time evolution of the intracavity photon number, which also shows that the effect of first order correction cannot be neglected when the ratio of the cavity decay rate to the mechanical resonance frequency becomes smaller than a critical value. PMID:27752125

  4. Dynamics of Spin-Orbit Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates in a Random Potential.

    PubMed

    Mardonov, Sh; Modugno, M; Sherman, E Ya

    2015-10-30

    Disorder plays a crucial role in spin dynamics in solids and condensed matter systems. We demonstrate that for a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a random potential two mechanisms of spin evolution that can be characterized as "precessional" and "anomalous" are at work simultaneously. The precessional mechanism, typical for solids, is due to the condensate displacement. The unconventional anomalous mechanism is due to the spin-dependent velocity producing the distribution of the condensate spin polarization. The condensate expansion is accompanied by a random displacement and fragmentation, where it becomes sparse, as clearly revealed in the spin dynamics. Thus, different stages of the evolution can be characterized by looking at the condensate spin.

  5. Dynamics of Spin-Orbit Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates in a Random Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardonov, Sh.; Modugno, M.; Sherman, E. Ya.

    2015-10-01

    Disorder plays a crucial role in spin dynamics in solids and condensed matter systems. We demonstrate that for a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a random potential two mechanisms of spin evolution that can be characterized as "precessional" and "anomalous" are at work simultaneously. The precessional mechanism, typical for solids, is due to the condensate displacement. The unconventional anomalous mechanism is due to the spin-dependent velocity producing the distribution of the condensate spin polarization. The condensate expansion is accompanied by a random displacement and fragmentation, where it becomes sparse, as clearly revealed in the spin dynamics. Thus, different stages of the evolution can be characterized by looking at the condensate spin.

  6. Robust adaptive control of spacecraft proximity maneuvers under dynamic coupling and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liang; Huo, Wei

    2015-11-01

    This paper provides a solution for the position tracking and attitude synchronization problem of the close proximity phase in spacecraft rendezvous and docking. The chaser spacecraft must be driven to a certain fixed position along the docking port direction of the target spacecraft, while the attitude of the two spacecraft must be synchronized for subsequent docking operations. The kinematics and dynamics for relative position and relative attitude are modeled considering dynamic coupling, parametric uncertainties and external disturbances. The relative motion model has a new form with a novel definition of the unknown parameters. An original robust adaptive control method is developed for the concerned problem, and a proof of the asymptotic stability is given for the six degrees of freedom closed-loop system. A numerical example is displayed in simulation to verify the theoretical results.

  7. Diffusion Dynamics of Charged Dust Particles in Capacitively Coupled RF Discharge System

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, W. X.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.; Yap, S. L.; Tan, K. S.

    2011-03-30

    Dusty plasma is loosely defined as electron-ion plasma with additional charged components of micron-sized dust particles. In this study, we developed a particle diagnostic technique based on light scattering and particle tracking velocimetry to investigate the dynamics of micron-sized titanium oxide particles in Argon gas capacitively coupled rf-discharge. The particle trajectories are constructed from sequence of image frames and treated as sample paths of charged Brownian motion. At specific sets of plasma parameters, disordered liquid-like dust particle configuration are observed. Mean-square-displacement of the particle trajectories are determined to characterize the transport dynamics. We showed that the dust particles in disordered liquid phase exhibit anomalous diffusion with different scaling exponents for short and large time scales, indicating the presence of slow and fast modes which can be related to caging effect and dispersive transport, respectively.

  8. Dynamics of Freely Oscillating and Coupled Hair Cell Bundles under Mechanical Deflection

    PubMed Central

    Fredrickson-Hemsing, Lea; Strimbu, C. Elliott; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Bozovic, Dolores

    2012-01-01

    In vitro, attachment to the overlying membrane was found to affect the resting position of the hair cell bundles of the bullfrog sacculus. To assess the effects of such a deflection on mechanically decoupled hair bundles, comparable offsets were imposed on decoupled spontaneously oscillating bundles. Strong modulation was observed in their dynamic state under deflection, with qualitative changes in the oscillation profile, amplitude, and characteristic frequency of oscillation seen in response to stimulus. Large offsets were found to arrest spontaneous oscillation, with subsequent recovery upon reversal of the stimulus. The dynamic state of the hair bundle displayed hysteresis and a dependence on the direction of the imposed offset. The coupled system of hair bundles, with the overlying membrane left on top of the preparation, also exhibited a dependence on offset position, with an increase in the linear response function observed under deflections in the inhibitory direction. PMID:22768934

  9. Dynamics of freely oscillating and coupled hair cell bundles under mechanical deflection.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson-Hemsing, Lea; Strimbu, C Elliott; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Bozovic, Dolores

    2012-04-18

    In vitro, attachment to the overlying membrane was found to affect the resting position of the hair cell bundles of the bullfrog sacculus. To assess the effects of such a deflection on mechanically decoupled hair bundles, comparable offsets were imposed on decoupled spontaneously oscillating bundles. Strong modulation was observed in their dynamic state under deflection, with qualitative changes in the oscillation profile, amplitude, and characteristic frequency of oscillation seen in response to stimulus. Large offsets were found to arrest spontaneous oscillation, with subsequent recovery upon reversal of the stimulus. The dynamic state of the hair bundle displayed hysteresis and a dependence on the direction of the imposed offset. The coupled system of hair bundles, with the overlying membrane left on top of the preparation, also exhibited a dependence on offset position, with an increase in the linear response function observed under deflections in the inhibitory direction. PMID:22768934

  10. Dynamical quorum-sensing in oscillators coupled through an external medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David J.; Baetica, Ania; Mehta, Pankaj

    2012-11-01

    Many biological and physical systems exhibit population-density-dependent transitions to synchronized oscillations in a process often termed “dynamical quorum sensing”. Synchronization frequently arises through chemical communication via signaling molecules distributed through an external medium. We study a simple theoretical model for dynamical quorum sensing: a heterogenous population of limit-cycle oscillators diffusively coupled through a common medium. We show that this model exhibits a rich phase diagram with four qualitatively distinct physical mechanisms that can lead to a loss of coherent population-level oscillations, including a novel mechanism arising from effective time-delays introduced by the external medium. We derive a single pair of analytic equations that allow us to calculate phase boundaries as a function of population density and show that the model reproduces many of the qualitative features of recent experiments on Belousov-Zhabotinsky catalytic particles as well as synthetically engineered bacteria.

  11. Dynamical coupling between magnetic equilibrium and transport in tokamak scenario modelling, with application to current ramps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fable, E.; Angioni, C.; Ivanov, A. A.; Lackner, K.; Maj, O.; Medvedev, S. Yu; Pautasso, G.; Pereverzev, G. V.; Treutterer, W.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2013-07-01

    The modelling of tokamak scenarios requires the simultaneous solution of both the time evolution of the plasma kinetic profiles and of the magnetic equilibrium. Their dynamical coupling involves additional complications, which are not present when the two physical problems are solved separately. Difficulties arise in maintaining consistency in the time evolution among quantities which appear in both the transport and the Grad-Shafranov equations, specifically the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fluxes as a function of each other and of the geometry. The required consistency can be obtained by means of iteration cycles, which are performed outside the equilibrium code and which can have different convergence properties depending on the chosen numerical scheme. When these external iterations are performed, the stability of the coupled system becomes a concern. In contrast, if these iterations are not performed, the coupled system is numerically stable, but can become physically inconsistent. By employing a novel scheme (Fable E et al 2012 Nucl. Fusion submitted), which ensures stability and physical consistency among the same quantities that appear in both the transport and magnetic equilibrium equations, a newly developed version of the ASTRA transport code (Pereverzev G V et al 1991 IPP Report 5/42), which is coupled to the SPIDER equilibrium code (Ivanov A A et al 2005 32nd EPS Conf. on Plasma Physics (Tarragona, 27 June-1 July) vol 29C (ECA) P-5.063), in both prescribed- and free-boundary modes is presented here for the first time. The ASTRA-SPIDER coupled system is then applied to the specific study of the modelling of controlled current ramp-up in ASDEX Upgrade discharges.

  12. Spatio-temporal dynamics induced by competing instabilities in two asymmetrically coupled nonlinear evolution equations.

    PubMed

    Schüler, D; Alonso, S; Torcini, A; Bär, M

    2014-12-01

    Pattern formation often occurs in spatially extended physical, biological, and chemical systems due to an instability of the homogeneous steady state. The type of the instability usually prescribes the resulting spatio-temporal patterns and their characteristic length scales. However, patterns resulting from the simultaneous occurrence of instabilities cannot be expected to be simple superposition of the patterns associated with the considered instabilities. To address this issue, we design two simple models composed by two asymmetrically coupled equations of non-conserved (Swift-Hohenberg equations) or conserved (Cahn-Hilliard equations) order parameters with different characteristic wave lengths. The patterns arising in these systems range from coexisting static patterns of different wavelengths to traveling waves. A linear stability analysis allows to derive a two parameter phase diagram for the studied models, in particular, revealing for the Swift-Hohenberg equations, a co-dimension two bifurcation point of Turing and wave instability and a region of coexistence of stationary and traveling patterns. The nonlinear dynamics of the coupled evolution equations is investigated by performing accurate numerical simulations. These reveal more complex patterns, ranging from traveling waves with embedded Turing patterns domains to spatio-temporal chaos, and a wide hysteretic region, where waves or Turing patterns coexist. For the coupled Cahn-Hilliard equations the presence of a weak coupling is sufficient to arrest the coarsening process and to lead to the emergence of purely periodic patterns. The final states are characterized by domains with a characteristic length, which diverges logarithmically with the coupling amplitude. PMID:25554062

  13. Forest Succession and Climate Change: Coupling Land-Surface Processes and Ecological Dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Philippe

    Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that humans are in the process of inadvertently modifying the Earth's climate by increasing the atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other radiatively active trace gases. The present man-induced climatic change, often referred to as the "greenhouse effect", is different from natural changes because of its unprecedented pace and our incomplete knowledge of its consequences. As some scientists put it, humanity is performing on itself a "global experiment" which may entail a number of surprises. The potential changes in the behavior of atmosphere/biosphere interactions are of particular importance. Such changes could affect atmospheric dynamics, the local and regional hydrology, the global biogeochemistry, and, therefore, human societies. In the present thesis, five distinct aspects of climate/vegetation interactions are examined. First, the climatically and physiologically mediated impacts of increases in the concentration of carbon dioxide on the evaporation from agricultural crops, grassland, and forests are investigated using the Penman-Monteith combination equation. Second, the degree of coupling between the vegetation and the atmosphere, as defined by Jarvis and McNaughton, is reexamined taking radiative losses from the vegetation to the atmosphere into account. Third, the effects of changes in the mean vs. the variance of climatic variables are investigated using a modified version of the forest dynamics model developed by Pastor and Post, LINK-AGES. Fourth, using the same model, changes in the production of non -methane hydrocarbons are estimated as climate and/or vegetation change. Finally, the main part of the thesis focuses on the response of forests to climatic changes using a model treating the physics of energy and water exchange in detail. Because the Energy, water, and momentum eXchange, and Ecological dynamics model (EXE), couples the land-surface processes and the ecological dynamics of forests of

  14. Computational Modeling of Seizure Dynamics Using Coupled Neuronal Networks: Factors Shaping Epileptiform Activity

    PubMed Central

    Naze, Sebastien; Bernard, Christophe; Jirsa, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Epileptic seizure dynamics span multiple scales in space and time. Understanding seizure mechanisms requires identifying the relations between seizure components within and across these scales, together with the analysis of their dynamical repertoire. Mathematical models have been developed to reproduce seizure dynamics across scales ranging from the single neuron to the neural population. In this study, we develop a network model of spiking neurons and systematically investigate the conditions, under which the network displays the emergent dynamic behaviors known from the Epileptor, which is a well-investigated abstract model of epileptic neural activity. This approach allows us to study the biophysical parameters and variables leading to epileptiform discharges at cellular and network levels. Our network model is composed of two neuronal populations, characterized by fast excitatory bursting neurons and regular spiking inhibitory neurons, embedded in a common extracellular environment represented by a slow variable. By systematically analyzing the parameter landscape offered by the simulation framework, we reproduce typical sequences of neural activity observed during status epilepticus. We find that exogenous fluctuations from extracellular environment and electro-tonic couplings play a major role in the progression of the seizure, which supports previous studies and further validates our model. We also investigate the influence of chemical synaptic coupling in the generation of spontaneous seizure-like events. Our results argue towards a temporal shift of typical spike waves with fast discharges as synaptic strengths are varied. We demonstrate that spike waves, including interictal spikes, are generated primarily by inhibitory neurons, whereas fast discharges during the wave part are due to excitatory neurons. Simulated traces are compared with in vivo experimental data from rodents at different stages of the disorder. We draw the conclusion that slow

  15. Computational modeling of seizure dynamics using coupled neuronal networks: factors shaping epileptiform activity.

    PubMed

    Naze, Sebastien; Bernard, Christophe; Jirsa, Viktor

    2015-05-01

    Epileptic seizure dynamics span multiple scales in space and time. Understanding seizure mechanisms requires identifying the relations between seizure components within and across these scales, together with the analysis of their dynamical repertoire. Mathematical models have been developed to reproduce seizure dynamics across scales ranging from the single neuron to the neural population. In this study, we develop a network model of spiking neurons and systematically investigate the conditions, under which the network displays the emergent dynamic behaviors known from the Epileptor, which is a well-investigated abstract model of epileptic neural activity. This approach allows us to study the biophysical parameters and variables leading to epileptiform discharges at cellular and network levels. Our network model is composed of two neuronal populations, characterized by fast excitatory bursting neurons and regular spiking inhibitory neurons, embedded in a common extracellular environment represented by a slow variable. By systematically analyzing the parameter landscape offered by the simulation framework, we reproduce typical sequences of neural activity observed during status epilepticus. We find that exogenous fluctuations from extracellular environment and electro-tonic couplings play a major role in the progression of the seizure, which supports previous studies and further validates our model. We also investigate the influence of chemical synaptic coupling in the generation of spontaneous seizure-like events. Our results argue towards a temporal shift of typical spike waves with fast discharges as synaptic strengths are varied. We demonstrate that spike waves, including interictal spikes, are generated primarily by inhibitory neurons, whereas fast discharges during the wave part are due to excitatory neurons. Simulated traces are compared with in vivo experimental data from rodents at different stages of the disorder. We draw the conclusion that slow

  16. Numerical simulations of dynamic coupling between shallow-water sloshing and horizontal vessel motion with baffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemi Ardakani, H.; Turner, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    The coupled motion between shallow water sloshing in a moving vessel with baffles and the vessel dynamics is considered. Here the vessel dynamics is restricted to horizontal motion such as in tuned liquid dampers. It was shown by (Turner et al 2013 Phys. Fluids 25 112102) that partitioning a moving vessel into n separate compartments leads to an interesting dynamical behaviour of the system. Also, under particular input parameter values an internal (n+1)-fold 1:\\cdots :1 resonance can be generated, where the frequency of the sloshing fluid in each compartment is equal, and equal to the frequency of the vessel itself. Here the form of the sloshing eigenmodes at this resonance are derived in the shallow-water limit. Using the Lagrangian formulation of the problem, an efficient numerical algorithm is implemented to solve the fully nonlinear system of equations based on the implicit midpoint rule. This algorithm is simple, fast and maintains the energy partition between the vessel and the fluid over long times. In this work numerical results are presented for dynamical vessel/sloshing motion attached to a nonlinear spring.

  17. Study on dynamic characteristics of coupled model for deep-water lifting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yunxia; Lu, Jianhui; Zhang, Chunlei

    2016-10-01

    The underwater installation of marine equipment in deep-water development requires safe lifting and accurate positioning. The heave compensation system is an important technology to ensure normal operation and improve work accuracy. To provide a theoretical basis for the heave compensation system, in this paper, the continuous modeling method is employed to build up a coupled model of deep-water lifting systems in vertical direction. The response characteristics of dynamic movement are investigated. The simulation results show that the resonance problem appears in the process of the whole releasing load, the lifting system generates resonance and the displacement response of the lifting load is maximal when the sinking depth is about 2000 m. This paper also analyzes the main influencing factors on the dynamic response of load including cable stiffness, damping coefficient of the lifting system, mass and added mass of lifting load, among which cable stiffness and damping coefficient of the lifting system have the greatest influence on dynamic response of lifting load when installation load is determined. So the vertical dynamic movement response of the load is reduced by installing a damper on the lifting cable and selecting the appropriate cable stiffness.

  18. Bounded Confidence under Preferential Flip: A Coupled Dynamics of Structural Balance and Opinions

    PubMed Central

    Parravano, Antonio; Andina-Díaz, Ascensión; Meléndez-Jiménez, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the coupled dynamics of social balance and opinion formation. We propose a model where agents form opinions under bounded confidence, but only considering the opinions of their friends. The signs of social ties -friendships and enmities- evolve seeking for social balance, taking into account how similar agents’ opinions are. We consider both the case where opinions have one and two dimensions. We find that our dynamics produces the segregation of agents into two cliques, with the opinions of agents in one clique differing from those in the other. Depending on the level of bounded confidence, the dynamics can produce either consensus of opinions within each clique or the coexistence of several opinion clusters in a clique. For the uni-dimensional case, the opinions in one clique are all below the opinions in the other clique, hence defining a “left clique” and a “right clique”. In the two-dimensional case, our numerical results suggest that the two cliques are separated by a hyperplane in the opinion space. We also show that the phenomenon of unidimensional opinions identified by DeMarzo, Vayanos and Zwiebel (Q J Econ 2003) extends partially to our dynamics. Finally, in the context of politics, we comment about the possible relation of our results to the fragmentation of an ideology and the emergence of new political parties. PMID:27716815

  19. Kibble-Zurek dynamics in an array of coupled binary Bose condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Wu, Shuyuan; Qin, Xizhou; Huang, Jiahao; Ke, Yongguan; Zhong, Honghua; Lee, Chaohong

    2016-03-01

    Universal dynamics of spontaneous symmetry breaking is central to understanding the universal behavior of spontaneous defect formation in various systems from the early universe, condensed-matter systems to ultracold atomic systems. We explore the universal real-time dynamics in an array of coupled binary atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices, which undergo a spontaneous symmetry breaking from the symmetric Rabi oscillation to the broken-symmetry self-trapping. In addition to Goldstone modes, there exist gapped Higgs modes whose excitation gap vanishes at the critical point. In the slow passage through the critical point, we analytically find that the symmetry-breaking dynamics obeys the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. From the scalings of bifurcation delay and domain formation, we numerically extract two Kibble-Zurek exponents, b1=ν/(1+ν z) and b2=1/(1+ν z) , which give the static correlation-length critical exponent ν and the dynamic critical exponent z. Our approach provides an efficient way for the simultaneous determination of the critical exponents ν and z for a continuous phase transition.

  20. Coupling of caged molecule dynamics to Johari-Goldstein β-relaxation in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Ngai, K. L.; Wang, W. H.; Capaccioli, S.

    2016-01-01

    Three recently published papers have discovered a general property of the fast caged dynamics observed in the glassy states of polyalcohols (S. Capaccioli et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 8800 (2015)), amorphous polymers (K. L. Ngai et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 12502 (2015)), and van der Waals molecular glass-formers (K. L. Ngai et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 12519 (2015)). The fast caged dynamics are manifested as nearly constant loss (NCL) in dielectric and mechanical susceptibility. Shown before in these papers is the intensity of the caged dynamics change temperature dependence at a temperature THF nearly coincident with the secondary glass transition temperature Tgβ, at which the Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation time τJG reaches ˜103 s. Evidently this finding indicates the coupling of the caged dynamics to the secondary glass transition. The glass-formers considered so far are all soft matters. However, the generality of the phenomenon and its explanation implies that the relation, THF ≈ Tgβ, should be observed in other classes of glass-formers. In this paper, we extend the consideration of the phenomenon and explanation to metallic glasses, which are not soft matter. The experimental data presented show the same phenomenon, supporting its generality and fundamental importance in the physics of glass and glass transition.

  1. Hessian facilitated analysis of optimally controlled quantum dynamics of systems with coupled primary and secondary states.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Edwalds, Melanie; Shabani, Alireza; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-07-28

    The efficacy of optimal control of quantum dynamics depends on the topology and associated local structure of the underlying control landscape defined as the objective as a function of the control field. A commonly studied control objective involves maximization of the transition probability for steering the quantum system from one state to another state. This paper invokes landscape Hessian analysis performed at an optimal solution to gain insight into the controlled dynamics, where the Hessian is the second-order functional derivative of the control objective with respect to the control field. Specifically, we consider a quantum system composed of coupled primary and secondary subspaces of energy levels with the initial and target states lying in the primary subspace. The primary and secondary subspaces may arise in various scenarios, for example, respectively, as sub-manifolds of ground and excited electronic states of a poly-atomic molecule, with each possessing a set of rotational-vibrational levels. The control field may engage the system through electric dipole transitions that occur either (I) only in the primary subspace, (II) between the two subspaces, or (III) only in the secondary subspace. Important insights about the resultant dynamics in each case are revealed in the structural patterns of the corresponding Hessian. The Fourier spectrum of the Hessian is shown to often be complementary to mechanistic insights provided by the optimal control field and population dynamics.

  2. Dynamic stress analysis of sewage centrifugal pump impeller based on two-way coupling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ji; Yuan, Shouqi; Yuan, Jianping

    2014-03-01

    Current research on the operational reliability of centrifugal pumps has mainly focused on hydrodynamic instability. However, the interaction between the fluid and structure has not been sufficiently considered; this interaction can cause vibration and dynamic stress, which can affect the reliability. In this study, the dynamic stresses in a single-blade centrifugal pump impeller are analysed under different operating conditions; the two-way coupling method is used to calculate the fluid-structure interaction. Three-dimensional unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved with the SST k-ω turbulence model for the fluid in the whole flow passage, while transient structure dynamic analysis is used with the finite element method for the structure side. The dynamic stresses in the rotor system are computed according to the fourth strength theory. The stress results show that the highest stress is near the loose bearing and that the equivalent stress increases with the flow rate because the dynamic stresses are closely related to the pressure load. The stress distributions on the blade pressure side, suction side, leading edge, and trailing edge are each analysed for different flow rates; the highest stress distribution is found on the pressure side. On the blade pressure side, a relatively large stress is found near the trailing edge and hub side. Based on these results, a stress distribution prediction method is proposed for centrifugal pumps, which considers the interaction between the fluid and structure. The method can be used to check the dynamic stress at different flow rates when optimising the pump design to increase the pump reliability.

  3. Ultrafast Hydration Dynamics and Coupled Water-Protein Fluctuations in Apomyoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Zhang, Luyuan; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2009-06-01

    Protein hydration dynamics are of fundamental importance to its structure and function. Here, we characterize the global solvation dynamics and anisotropy dynamics around the apomyoglobin surface in different conformational states (native and molten globule) by measuring the Stokes shift and anisotropy decay of tryptophan with femtosecond-resolved fluorescence upconversion. With site-directed mutagenesis, we designed sixteen mutants with one tryptophan in each, and placed the probe at a desirable position ranging from buried in the protein core to fully solvent-exposed on the protein surface. In all protein sites studied, two distinct solvation relaxations (1-8 ps and 20-200 ps) were observed, reflecting the initial collective water relaxation and subsequent hydrogen-bond network restructuring, respectively, and both are strongly correlated with protein's local structures and chemical properties. The hydration dynamics of the mutants in molten globule state are faster than those observed in native state, indicating that the protein becomes more flexible and less structured when its conformation is converted from fully-folded native state to partially-folded molten globule state. Complementary, fluorescence anisotropy dynamics of all mutants in native state show an increasing trend of wobbling times (40-260 ps) when the location of the probe is changed from a loop, to a lateral helix, and then, to the compact protein core. Such an increase in wobbling times is related to the local protein structural rigidity, which relates the interaction of water with side chains. The ultrafast hydration dynamics and related side-chain motion around the protein surface unravel the coupled water-protein fluctuations on the picosecond time scales and indicate that the local protein motions are slaved by hydrating water fluctuations.

  4. Coupling of the hydration water dynamics and the internal dynamics of actin detected by quasielastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Satoru; Plazanet, Marie; Oda, Toshiro

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Quasielastic neutron scattering spectra of F-actin and G-actin were measured. ► Analysis of the samples in D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O provided the spectra of hydration water. ► The first layer hydration water around F-actin is less mobile than around G-actin. ► This difference in hydration water is in concert with the internal dynamics of actin. ► Water outside the first layer behaves bulk-like but influenced by the first layer. -- Abstract: In order to characterize dynamics of water molecules around F-actin and G-actin, quasielastic neutron scattering experiments were performed on powder samples of F-actin and G-actin, hydrated either with D{sub 2}O or H{sub 2}O, at hydration ratios of 0.4 and 1.0. By combined analysis of the quasielastic neutron scattering spectra, the parameter values characterizing the dynamics of the water molecules in the first hydration layer and those of the water molecules outside of the first layer were obtained. The translational diffusion coefficients (D{sub T}) of the hydration water in the first layer were found to be 1.2 × 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}/s and 1.7 × 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}/s for F-actin and G-actin, respectively, while that for bulk water was 2.8 × 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}/s. The residence times were 6.6 ps and 5.0 ps for F-actin and G-actin, respectively, while that for bulk water was 0.62 ps. These differences between F-actin and G-actin, indicating that the hydration water around G-actin is more mobile than that around F-actin, are in concert with the results of the internal dynamics of F-actin and G-actin, showing that G-actin fluctuates more rapidly than F-actin. This implies that the dynamics of the hydration water is coupled to the internal dynamics of the actin molecules. The D{sub T} values of the water molecules outside of the first hydration layer were found to be similar to that of bulk water though the residence times are strongly affected by the first hydration layer. This supports the

  5. Strongly nonlinear dynamics and acoustics of coupled granular sonic vacua: Theoretical and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md Arif

    In this dissertation, we aim to analyze the strongly nonlinear dynamics of coupled ordered granular media and investigate interesting response regimes such as, passive wave redirection / redistribution and targeted energy transfer (TET). These studies are performed using numerical computations, analytical calculations, and experimental tests. In particular, we consider weakly coupled granular chains with or without on-site potentials, as well as two-dimensional granular networks with regularly placed intruders that act as effective coupling elements. Unlike previous studies of weakly coupled oscillatory chains, the dynamical systems considered herein incorporate both non-smooth effects due to possible separations between interacting neighboring beads (granules), as well as strongly nonlinear inter-particle Hertzian interactions. We show that these systems exhibit very rich and complex dynamics that, however, can be completely captured by our analytical approximations. For the case of weakly interacting granular networks, three independent mechanisms of efficient transport of energy from one chain to another are found. The first mechanism is a simple exchange of energy between the weakly interacting granular chains providing equi-partition of Nesterenko solitary waves through the chains. The second mechanism is a complete and recurrent exchange of energy (beating phenomenon) between the propagating breathers through the weakly coupled granular chains laying on a strong elastic foundation. The last mechanism is the most intriguing one and demonstrates targeted (irreversible) energy transfer between coupled granular chains due to appropriate stratification of their elastic foundations, in a macroscopic analogue of the well-known Landau-Zener Quantum effect in space. The aforementioned mechanisms of energy transfer and redirection in highly nonlinear granular chains are conceptually new and were presented for the first time. Analytical and computational studies of

  6. Dynamics of a macroscopic spin qubit in spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardonov, Sh; Modugno, M.; Sherman, E. Ya

    2015-06-01

    We consider a macroscopic spin qubit based on spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensates, where, in addition to the spin-orbit coupling (SOC), spin dynamics strongly depends on the interaction between particles. The evolution of the spin for freely expanding, trapped, and externally driven condensates is investigated. For condensates oscillating at the frequency corresponding to the Zeeman splitting in the synthetic magnetic field, the spin Rabi frequency does not depend on the interaction between the atoms since it produces only internal forces and does not change the total momentum. However, interactions and SOC bring the system into a mixed spin state, where the total spin is inside rather than on the Bloch sphere. This greatly extends the available spin space making it three-dimensional, but imposes limitations on the reliable spin manipulation of such a macroscopic qubit. The spin dynamics can be modified by introducing suitable spin-dependent initial phases, determined by the SOC, in the spinor wave function.

  7. Dynamics and thermodynamics of a nonlocal Polyakov--Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model with running coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Hell, T.; Roessner, S.; Cristoforetti, M.; Weise, W.

    2009-01-01

    A nonlocal covariant extension of the two-flavor Nambu and Jona-Lasinio model is constructed, with built-in constraints from the running coupling of QCD at high-momentum and instanton physics at low-momentum scales. Chiral low-energy theorems and basic current algebra relations involving pion properties are shown to be reproduced. The momentum-dependent dynamical quark mass derived from this approach is in agreement with results from Dyson-Schwinger equations and lattice QCD. At finite temperature, inclusion of the Polyakov loop and its gauge invariant coupling to quarks reproduces the dynamical entanglement of the chiral and deconfinement crossover transitions as in the (local) Polyakov-loop-extended Nambu and Jona-Lasinio model, but now without the requirement of introducing an artificial momentum cutoff. Steps beyond the mean-field approximation are made including mesonic correlations through quark-antiquark ring summations. Various quantities of interest (pressure, energy density, speed of sound, etc.) are calculated and discussed in comparison with lattice QCD thermodynamics at zero chemical potential. The extension to finite quark chemical potential and the phase diagram in the (T,{mu})-plane are also discussed.

  8. Strongly coupled dynamics of fluids and rigid-body systems with the immersed boundary projection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chengjie; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2015-08-01

    A strong coupling algorithm is presented for simulating the dynamic interactions between incompressible viscous flows and rigid-body systems in both two- and three-dimensional problems. In this work, the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow are solved on a uniform Cartesian grid by the vorticity-based immersed boundary projection method of Colonius and Taira. Dynamical equations for arbitrary rigid-body systems are also developed. The proposed coupling method attempts to unify the treatment of constraints in the fluid and structure-the incompressibility of the fluid, the linkages in the rigid-body system, and the conditions at the interface-through the use of Lagrange multipliers. The resulting partitioned system of equations is solved with a simple relaxation scheme, based on an identification of virtual inertia from the fluid. The scheme achieves convergence in only 2 to 5 iterations per time step for a wide variety of mass ratios. The formulation requires that only a subset of the discrete fluid equations be solved in each iteration. Several two- and three-dimensional numerical tests are conducted to validate and demonstrate the method, including a falling cylinder, flapping of flexible wings, self-excited oscillations of a system of many linked plates in a free stream, and passive pivoting of a finite aspect ratio plate under the influence of gravity in a free stream. The results from the current method are compared with previous experimental and numerical results and good agreement is achieved.

  9. Intelligent Object-Oriented GIS Engine W/dynamic Coupling to Modeled Objects

    1997-02-12

    The GEOVIEWER is an intelligent object-oriented Geographic Information System (GIS) engine that provides not only a spatially-optimized object representation, but also direct linkage to the underlying object, its data and behaviors. Tools are incorporated to perform tasks involving typical GIS functionality, data ingestion, linkage to external models, and integration with other application frameworks. The GOEVIEWER module was designed to provide GIS functionality to create, query, view, and manipulate software objects within a selected area undermore » investigation in a simulation system. Many of these objects are not stored in a format conductive to efficient GIS usage. Their dynamic nature, complexity, and the sheer number of possible entity classes preclude effective integration with traditional GIS technologies due to the loosely coupled nature of their data representations. The primary difference between GEOVIEWER and standard GIS packages is that standard GIS packages offer static views of geospatial data while GEOVIEWER can be dynamically coupled to models and/or applications producing data and, therefore, display changes in geometry, attributes or behavior as they occur in the simulation.« less

  10. Coupled ice-ocean dynamics in the marginal ice zones Upwelling/downwelling and eddy generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, S.

    1986-01-01

    This study is aimed at modeling mesoscale processes such as upwelling/downwelling and ice edge eddies in the marginal ice zones. A two-dimensional coupled ice-ocean model is used for the study. The ice model is coupled to the reduced gravity ocean model through interfacial stresses. The parameters of the ocean model were chosen so that the dynamics would be nonlinear. The model was tested by studying the dynamics of upwelling. Wings parallel to the ice edge with the ice on the right produce upwelling because the air-ice momentum flux is much greater than air-ocean momentum flux; thus the Ekman transport is greater than the ice than in the open water. The stability of the upwelling and downwelling jets is discussed. The downwelling jet is found to be far more unstable than the upwelling jet because the upwelling jet is stabilized by the divergence. The constant wind field exerted on a varying ice cover will generate vorticity leading to enhanced upwelling/downwelling regions, i.e., wind-forced vortices. Steepening and strengthening of vortices are provided by the nonlinear terms. When forcing is time-varying, the advection terms will also redistribute the vorticity. The wind reversals will separate the vortices from the ice edge, so that the upwelling enhancements are pushed to the open ocean and the downwelling enhancements are pushed underneath the ice.

  11. Dynamical decoupling design for identifying weakly coupled nuclear spins in a bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nan; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2014-09-01

    Identifying weakly coupled nuclear spins around single electron spins is a key step toward implementing quantum information processing using coupled electron-nuclei spin systems or sensing like single-spin nuclear magnetic resonance detection using diamond defect spins. Dynamical decoupling control of the center electron spin with periodic pulse sequences [e.g., the Carre-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence] has been successfully used to identify single nuclear spins and to resolve structure of nuclear spin clusters. Here, we design a type of pulse sequence by replacing the repetition unit (a single π pulse) of the CPMG sequence with a group of nonuniformly spaced π pulses. Using the nitrogen-vacancy center system in diamond, we theoretically demonstrate that the designed pulse sequence improves the resolution of nuclear spin noise spectroscopy, and more information about the surrounding nuclear spins is extracted. The principle of dynamical decoupling design proposed in this paper is useful in many systems (e.g., defect spin qubit in solids, trapped ion, and superconducting qubit) for high-resolution noise spectroscopy.

  12. Strongly Coupled Fluid-Body Dynamics in the Immersed Boundary Projection Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chengjie; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2014-11-01

    A computational algorithm is developed to simulate dynamically coupled interaction between fluid and rigid bodies. The basic computational framework is built upon a multi-domain immersed boundary method library, whirl, developed in previous work. In this library, the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow are solved on a uniform Cartesian grid by the vorticity-based immersed boundary projection method of Colonius and Taira. A solver for the dynamics of rigid-body systems is also included. The fluid and rigid-body solvers are strongly coupled with an iterative approach based on the block Gauss-Seidel method. Interfacial force, with its intimate connection with the Lagrange multipliers used in the fluid solver, is used as the primary iteration variable. Relaxation, developed from a stability analysis of the iterative scheme, is used to achieve convergence in only 2-4 iterations per time step. Several two- and three-dimensional numerical tests are conducted to validate and demonstrate the method, including flapping of flexible wings, self-excited oscillations of a system of linked plates and three-dimensional propulsion of flexible fluked tail. This work has been supported by AFOSR, under Award FA9550-11-1-0098.

  13. Simulating Regional Dynamic Vegetation and Water Resources with Coupled Biophysical and Hydrologic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, A. D.; Basso, B.; Hyndman, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    Climate change, population growth, biofuel production, and a host of other global forces are driving alterations of agricultural production worldwide, with little comprehensive understanding of the impacts these changes will have on water resources. While plot-scale soil-plant-water interactions have been intensively studied and simulated for decades, few tools are available to quantify watershed-to-basin scale impacts of shifting agricultural production systems. A recent class of fully-distributed models that simulate the complete terrestrial hydrologic cycle are well suited for fine-resolution, basin-scale studies. Here we present the first coupling of such a model, the Integrated Landscape Hydrology Model (ILHM), with a dynamic vegetation/crop growth model, the Systems Approach to Land Use Sustainability (SALUS) model. The coupled SALUS-ILHM code was first tested for a series of plots with both intensively monitored agricultural and natural land uses in Michigan. We then simulate a regional watershed in Michigan under current and statistically-downscaled forecast climate to demonstrate the capabilities of the coupled models and validate their performance. Model-predicted leaf area index (LAI) and agricultural yields are compared to remotely-sensed and county-aggregate statistics, respectively. Impacts of explicitly simulating vegetation and root growth on hydrologic model performance are presented. Preliminary climate change forecast scenarios indicate significant alterations to Michigan’s hydrologic and agroecological systems, including longer growing seasons, altered yields for current-generation crops, reduced seasonal snowpacks, and lower summer stream flows.

  14. Experimental and analytical investigation of dynamic characteristics of extension-twist-coupled composite tubular spars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Renee C.; Izadpanah, Amir P.; Baucom, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The results from a study aimed at improving the dynamic and aerodynamic characteristics of composite rotor blades through the use of extension-twist coupling are presented. A set of extension-twist-coupled composite spars was manufactured with four plies of graphite-epoxy cloth prepreg. These spars were noncircular in cross-section design and were therefore subject to warping deformations. Three different cross-sectional geometries were developed: D-shape, square, and flattened ellipse. Three spars of each type were fabricated to assess the degree of repeatability in the manufacturing process of extension-twist-coupled structures. Results from free-free vibration tests of the spars were compared with results from normal modes and frequency analyses of companion shell-finite-element models. Five global modes were identified within the frequency range from 0 to 2000 Hz for each spar. The experimental results for only one D-shape spar could be determined, however, and agreed within 13.8 percent of the analytical results. Frequencies corresponding to the five global modes for the three square spars agreed within 9.5, 11.6, and 8.5 percent of the respective analytical results and for the three elliptical spars agreed within 4.9, 7.7, and 9.6 percent of the respective analytical results.

  15. Coupling WRF with LEAFHYDRO: introducing groundwater and a fully dynamic water table in regional climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez de La Torre, A.; Rios Entenza, A.; Gestal Souto, L.; Miguez Macho, G.

    2010-09-01

    Here we present a soil-vegetation-hydrology model, LEAFHYDRO coupled with the WRF model. LEAFHYDRO includes a groundwater parameterization with a dynamic water table and river routing and it can be run at a finer resolution than the atmosphere within WRF. Offline multiyear simulations over the Iberian Peninsula at 2.5 km resolution with the LEAFHYDRO model with and without groundwater indicate that introducing the water table parameterization has a significant impact on soil moisture amounts, soil moisture persistence and evapotranspiration fluxes. This is particularly true over the semiarid flat plateaus of the Iberian interior, where the atmospheric source of precipitation is scarce and the water table is naturally shallow due to slow drainage and lateral flow convergence from the surrounding mountains. Climatic simulations with the coupled WRF-HYDRO system suggest that the memory induced in the soil by the water table significantly impact the simulated precipitation, especially in the spring, when the land-surface atmospheric coupling is strong and rainfall amounts have their annual peak inland Iberia.

  16. Dynamic mechanisms of generation of oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled chemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotstein, Horacio G.; Wu, Hui

    2012-09-01

    We use simulations and dynamical systems tools to investigate the mechanisms of generation of phase-locked and localized oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled Oregonator model where the activator receives global feedback from the inhibitor, mimicking experimental results observed in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. A homogeneous two-cluster system (two clusters with equal cluster size) displays antiphase patterns. Heterogenous two-cluster systems (two clusters with different sizes) display both phase-locked and localized patterns depending on the parameter values. In a localized pattern the oscillation amplitude of the largest cluster is roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the oscillation amplitude of the smaller cluster, reflecting the effect of self-inhibition exerted by the global feedback term. The transition from phase-locked to localized cluster patterns occurs as the intensity of global feedback increases. Three qualitatively different basic mechanisms, described previously for a globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo model, are involved in the generation of the observed patterns. The swing-and-release mechanism is related to the canard phenomenon (canard explosion of limit cycles) in relaxation oscillators. The hold-and-release and hold-and-escape mechanisms are related to the release and escape mechanisms in synaptically connected neural models. The methods we use can be extended to the investigation of oscillatory chemical reactions with other types of non-local coupling.

  17. Dynamic mechanisms of generation of oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled chemical system.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, Horacio G; Wu, Hui

    2012-09-14

    We use simulations and dynamical systems tools to investigate the mechanisms of generation of phase-locked and localized oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled Oregonator model where the activator receives global feedback from the inhibitor, mimicking experimental results observed in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. A homogeneous two-cluster system (two clusters with equal cluster size) displays antiphase patterns. Heterogenous two-cluster systems (two clusters with different sizes) display both phase-locked and localized patterns depending on the parameter values. In a localized pattern the oscillation amplitude of the largest cluster is roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the oscillation amplitude of the smaller cluster, reflecting the effect of self-inhibition exerted by the global feedback term. The transition from phase-locked to localized cluster patterns occurs as the intensity of global feedback increases. Three qualitatively different basic mechanisms, described previously for a globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo model, are involved in the generation of the observed patterns. The swing-and-release mechanism is related to the canard phenomenon (canard explosion of limit cycles) in relaxation oscillators. The hold-and-release and hold-and-escape mechanisms are related to the release and escape mechanisms in synaptically connected neural models. The methods we use can be extended to the investigation of oscillatory chemical reactions with other types of non-local coupling. PMID:22979891

  18. Quantifying through-space charge transfer dynamics in π-coupled molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Arunabh; Kladnik, Gregor; Vázquez, Héctor; Meisner, Jeffrey S.; Floreano, Luca; Nuckolls, Colin; Cvetko, Dean; Morgante, Alberto; Venkataraman, Latha

    2012-09-01

    Understanding the role of intermolecular interaction on through-space charge transfer characteristics in π-stacked molecular systems is central to the rational design of electronic materials. However, a quantitative study of charge transfer in such systems is often difficult because of poor control over molecular morphology. Here we use the core-hole clock implementation of resonant photoemission spectroscopy to study the femtosecond charge-transfer dynamics in cyclophanes, which consist of two precisely stacked π-systems held together by aliphatic chains. We study two systems, [2,2]paracyclophane (22PCP) and [4,4]paracyclophane (44PCP), with inter-ring separations of 3.0 and 4.0 Å, respectively. We find that charge transfer across the π-coupled system of 44PCP is 20 times slower than in 22PCP. We attribute this difference to the decreased inter-ring electronic coupling in 44PCP. These measurements illustrate the use of core-hole clock spectroscopy as a general tool for quantifying through-space coupling in π-stacked systems.

  19. Dynamics of quantized vortices in Bose-Einstein condensates with laser-induced spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasamatsu, Kenichi

    2015-12-01

    We study vortex dynamics in trapped two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with a laser-induced spin-orbit coupling using the numerical analysis of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The spin-orbit coupling leads to three distinct ground-state phases, which depend on some experimentally controllable parameters. When a vortex is put in one or both of the two-component condensates, the vortex dynamics exhibits very different behaviors in each phase, which can be observed in experiments. These dynamical behaviors can be understood by clarifying the stable vortex structure realized in each phase.

  20. An Implicit Solver for Simulating Inductive-Dynamic Magnetosphere-Ionosphere/Thermosphere Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, J.; Song, P.

    2011-12-01

    We present a model based on three-fluid (electrons, ions, and neutrals) and time-dependent electromagnetic field theory to describe the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling, from the ionosphere-thermosphere perspective. The present model self-consistently solves time-dependent continuity, momentum, and energy equations for the electrons, ions and neutrals, as well as Maxwell equations (Ampere's and Faraday's laws). The coupled nonlinear partial differential equation system involves various time scales with the collision time scale being as short as ~10-6 s at 80 km altitude. The very short collision time scale makes the equation system strongly stiff. It is challenging to solve such stiff equations explicitly because a very small time step is required to obtain stable numerical solutions. In this study we develop an implicit algorithm, which avoids the stringent requirement on the time step by the explicit algorithms and thus greatly reduces the CPU time consumption, to solve the equation system. The difference equations derived from the implicit scheme are mathematically more complicated, consisting of a set of nonlinear algebraic equations with unknowns on the spatial grids that are globally coupled. We apply an iterative and Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method to efficiently obtain numerical solutions for the nonlinear algebraic equations. The comparison of the implicit algorithm with explicit methods under simple situations has shown differences less than 0.01% and improvement of 105 times in time stepping. Simulation results for the 1-D ionosphere/thermosphere response to an imposed convection velocity at the top boundary are presented to show the performance of the numerical scheme and illustrate the physics of the inductive-dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling.

  1. Dynamical coupled-channels study of {pi}N{yields}{pi}{pi}N reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kamano, H.; Julia-Diaz, B.; Lee, T.-S. H.; Matsuyama, A.; Sato, T.

    2009-02-15

    As a step toward performing a complete coupled-channels analysis of the world data of {pi}N,{gamma}*N{yields}{pi}N,{eta}N,{pi}{pi}N reactions, the {pi}N{yields}{pi}{pi}N reactions are investigated starting with the dynamical coupled-channels model developed in Phys. Rev. C 76, 065201 (2007). The channels included are {pi}N,{eta}N, and {pi}{pi}N which has {pi}{delta},{rho}N, and {sigma}N resonant components. The nonresonant amplitudes are generated from solving a set of coupled-channels equations with the meson-baryon potentials defined by effective Lagrangians. The resonant amplitudes are generated from 16 bare excited nucleon (N*) states that are dressed by the nonresonant interactions as constrained by the unitarity condition. The data of total cross sections and {pi}N and {pi}{pi} invariant mass distributions of {pi}{sup +}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}n,{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}p and {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n,{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}p,{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}n reactions from threshold to the invariant mass W=2 GeV can be described to a very large extent. We show the importance of the coupled-channels effects and the strong interference among the contributions from the {pi}{delta},{sigma}N, and {rho}N channels. The large interference between the resonant and nonresonant amplitudes is also demonstrated. Possible future developments are discussed.

  2. A socio-hydrologic model of coupled water-agriculture dynamics with emphasis on farm size.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugger, D. R.; Maneta, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural land cover dynamics in the U.S. are dominated by two trends: 1) total agricultural land is decreasing and 2) average farm size is increasing. These trends have important implications for the future of water resources because 1) growing more food on less land is due in large part to increased groundwater withdrawal and 2) larger farms can better afford both more efficient irrigation and more groundwater access. However, these large-scale trends are due to individual farm operators responding to many factors including climate, economics, and policy. It is therefore difficult to incorporate the trends into watershed-scale hydrologic models. Traditional scenario-based approaches are valuable for many applications, but there is typically no feedback between the hydrologic model and the agricultural dynamics and so limited insight is gained into the how agriculture co-evolves with water resources. We present a socio-hydrologic model that couples simplified hydrologic and agricultural economic dynamics, accounting for many factors that depend on farm size such as irrigation efficiency and returns to scale. We introduce an "economic memory" (EM) state variable that is driven by agricultural revenue and affects whether farms are sold when land market values exceed expected returns from agriculture. The model uses a Generalized Mixture Model of Gaussians to approximate the distribution of farm sizes in a study area, effectively lumping farms into "small," "medium," and "large" groups that have independent parameterizations. We apply the model in a semi-arid watershed in the upper Columbia River Basin, calibrating to data on streamflow, total agricultural land cover, and farm size distribution. The model is used to investigate the sensitivity of the coupled system to various hydrologic and economic scenarios such as increasing market value of land, reduced surface water availability, and increased irrigation efficiency in small farms.

  3. Mouse Hair Cycle Expression Dynamics Modeled as Coupled Mesenchymal and Epithelial Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Tasseff, Ryan; Bheda-Malge, Anjali; DiColandrea, Teresa; Bascom, Charles C.; Isfort, Robert J.; Gelinas, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The hair cycle is a dynamic process where follicles repeatedly move through phases of growth, retraction, and relative quiescence. This process is an example of temporal and spatial biological complexity. Understanding of the hair cycle and its regulation would shed light on many other complex systems relevant to biological and medical research. Currently, a systematic characterization of gene expression and summarization within the context of a mathematical model is not yet available. Given the cyclic nature of the hair cycle, we felt it was important to consider a subset of genes with periodic expression. To this end, we combined several mathematical approaches with high-throughput, whole mouse skin, mRNA expression data to characterize aspects of the dynamics and the possible cell populations corresponding to potentially periodic patterns. In particular two gene clusters, demonstrating properties of out-of-phase synchronized expression, were identified. A mean field, phase coupled oscillator model was shown to quantitatively recapitulate the synchronization observed in the data. Furthermore, we found only one configuration of positive-negative coupling to be dynamically stable, which provided insight on general features of the regulation. Subsequent bifurcation analysis was able to identify and describe alternate states based on perturbation of system parameters. A 2-population mixture model and cell type enrichment was used to associate the two gene clusters to features of background mesenchymal populations and rapidly expanding follicular epithelial cells. Distinct timing and localization of expression was also shown by RNA and protein imaging for representative genes. Taken together, the evidence suggests that synchronization between expanding epithelial and background mesenchymal cells may be maintained, in part, by inhibitory regulation, and potential mediators of this regulation were identified. Furthermore, the model suggests that impairing this negative

  4. Spatial structure, environmental heterogeneity, and population dynamics: analysis of the coupled logistic map.

    PubMed

    Kendall, B E; Fox, G A

    1998-08-01

    Spatial extent can have two important consequences for population dynamics: It can generate spatial structure, in which individuals interact more intensely with neighbors than with more distant conspecifics, and it allows for environmental heterogeneity, in which habitat quality varies spatially. Studies of these features are difficult to interpret because the models are complex and sometimes idiosyncratic. Here we analyze one of the simplest possible spatial population models, to understand the mathematical basis for the observed patterns: two patches coupled by dispersal, with dynamics in each patch governed by the logistic map. With suitable choices of parameters, this model can represent spatial structure, environmental heterogeneity, or both in combination. We synthesize previous work and new analyses on this model, with two goals: to provide a comprehensive baseline to aid our understanding of more complex spatial models, and to generate predictions about the effects of spatial structure and environmental heterogeneity on population dynamics. Spatial structure alone can generate positive, negative, or zero spatial correlations between patches when dispersal rates are high, medium, or low relative to the complexity of the local dynamics. It can also lead to quasiperiodicity and hyperchaos, which are not present in the nonspatial model. With density-independent dispersal, spatial structure cannot destabilize equilibria or periodic orbits that would be stable in the absence of space. When densities in the two patches are uncorrelated, the probability that the population in a patch reaches extreme low densities is reduced relative to the same patch in isolation; this "rescue effect" would reduce the probability of metapopulation extinction beyond the simple effect of spreading of risk. Pure environmental heterogeneity always produces positive spatial correlations. The dynamics of the entire population is approximated by a nonspatial model with mean patch

  5. Modeling the coupled return-spread high frequency dynamics of large tick assets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curato, Gianbiagio; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Large tick assets, i.e. assets where one tick movement is a significant fraction of the price and bid-ask spread is almost always equal to one tick, display a dynamics in which price changes and spread are strongly coupled. We present an approach based on the hidden Markov model, also known in econometrics as the Markov switching model, for the dynamics of price changes, where the latent Markov process is described by the transitions between spreads. We then use a finite Markov mixture of logit regressions on past squared price changes to describe temporal dependencies in the dynamics of price changes. The model can thus be seen as a double chain Markov model. We show that the model describes the shape of the price change distribution at different time scales, volatility clustering, and the anomalous decrease of kurtosis. We calibrate our models based on Nasdaq stocks and we show that this model reproduces remarkably well the statistical properties of real data.

  6. A coupled biogeochemical-Dynamic Energy Budget model as a tool for managing fish production ponds.

    PubMed

    Serpa, Dalila; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Caetano, Miguel; Cancela da Fonseca, Luís; Dinis, Maria Teresa; Duarte, Pedro

    2013-10-01

    The sustainability of semi-intensive aquaculture relies on management practices that simultaneously improve production efficiency and minimize the environmental impacts of this activity. The purpose of the present work was to develop a mathematical model that reproduced the dynamics of a semi-intensive fish earth pond, to simulate different management scenarios for optimizing fish production. The modeling approach consisted of coupling a biogeochemical model that simulated the dynamics of the elements that are more likely to affect fish production and cause undesirable environmental impacts (nitrogen, phosphorus and oxygen) to a fish growth model based on the Dynamic Energy Budget approach. The biogeochemical sub-model successfully simulated most water column and sediment variables. A good model fit was also found between predicted and observed white seabream (Diplodus sargus) growth data over a production cycle. In order to optimize fish production, different management scenarios were analysed with the model (e.g. increase stocking densities, decrease/increase water exchange rates, decrease/increase feeding rates, decrease phosphorus content in fish feeds, increase food assimilation efficiency and decrease pellets sinking velocity) to test their effects on the pond environment as well as on fish yields and effluent nutrient discharges. Scenarios were quantitatively evaluated and compared using the Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP) methodology. The best management options that allow the maximization of fish production while maintaining a good pond environment and minimum impacts on the adjacent coastal system were to double standard stocking densities and to improve food assimilation efficiency.

  7. Coupled dynamic response analysis of a multi-column tension-leg-type floating wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong-sheng; Yang, Jian-min; He, Yan-ping; Gu, Min-tong

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a coupled dynamic response analysis of a multi-column tension-leg-type floating wind turbine (WindStar TLP system) under normal operation and parked conditions. Wind-only load cases, wave-only load cases and combined wind and wave load cases were analyzed separately for the WindStar TLP system to identify the dominant excitation loads. Comparisons between an NREL offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine installed on land and the WindStar TLP system were performed. Statistics of selected response variables in specified design load cases (DLCs) were obtained and analyzed. It is found that the proposed WindStar TLP system has small dynamic responses to environmental loads and it thus has almost the same mean generator power output under operating conditions as the land-based system. The tension mooring system has a sufficient safety factor, and the minimum tendon tension is always positive in all selected DLCs. The ratio of ultimate load of the tower base fore-aft bending moment for the WindStar TLP system versus the land-based system can be as high as 1.9 in all of the DLCs considered. These results will help elucidate the dynamic characteristics of the proposed WindStar TLP system, identify the difference in load effect between it and land-based systems, and thus make relevant modifications to the initial design for the WindStar TLP system.

  8. Dynamic response and robust control of coupled maglev vehicle and guideway system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Eunho; Song, Ji-Seok; Kang, Bu-Byoung; Na, Sungsoo

    2011-12-01

    This study develops a computational model of the dynamic characteristics of the actively controlled, magnetically levitated (maglev) system moving on a flexible guideway. The 5-dof (degree-of-freedom) vehicle model, the modeling of the EMS (electromagnetic suspension ), guideway, and guideway irregularity are described, respectively. In this sense, the dynamic response of a coupled vehicle and guideway system is investigated with different vehicle speeds and masses. Furthermore, the formulation of SMC (sliding mode control) based on the Kalman filter is addressed for the control of the dynamic response of the maglev system for various prescribed running speeds. For numerical simulation, the Runge-Kutta method is used to solve the state-space equation, which includes information about the vehicle, guideway and controller. The results reveal that both the air gap fluctuation and the cabin CG (center of gravity) vertical acceleration are strongly affected by the vehicle speed and guideway irregularity, but only slightly affected by the vehicle mass. Moreover, SMC based on the Kalman filter considerably reduces the air gap fluctuation and cabin CG vertical acceleration responses, and the efficiency of the adopted control methodology is demonstrated even at higher critical speed conditions.

  9. Modeling coupled aerodynamics and vocal fold dynamics using immersed boundary methods.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Comer; Zhai, Guangnian; Scherer, Ronald

    2006-11-01

    The penalty immersed boundary (PIB) method, originally introduced by Peskin (1972) to model the function of the mammalian heart, is tested as a fluid-structure interaction model of the closely coupled dynamics of the vocal folds and aerodynamics in phonation. Two-dimensional vocal folds are simulated with material properties chosen to result in self-oscillation and volume flows in physiological frequency ranges. Properties of the glottal flow field, including vorticity, are studied in conjunction with the dynamic vocal fold motion. The results of using the PIB method to model self-oscillating vocal folds for the case of 8 cm H20 as the transglottal pressure gradient are described. The volume flow at 8 cm H20, the transglottal pressure, and vortex dynamics associated with the self-oscillating model are shown. Volume flow is also given for 2, 4, and 12 cm H2O, illustrating the robustness of the model to a range of transglottal pressures. The results indicate that the PIB method applied to modeling phonation has good potential for the study of the interdependence of aerodynamics and vocal fold motion.

  10. Vortex Dynamics in a Spin-Orbit-Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetter, Alexander L.

    2015-07-01

    Vortices in a one-component dilute atomic ultracold Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) usually arise as a response to externally driven rotation. Apart from a few special situations, these vortices are singly quantized with unit circulation (Fetter, Rev Mod Phys 81, 647-691, 2009). Recently, the NIST group has constructed a two-component BEC with a spin-orbit-coupled Hamiltonian involving Pauli matrices (Spielman, Phys Rev A 79, 063613, 2009; Y.-J. Lin et al., Nature 462, 628-632, 2009; Y.-J. Lin et al., Nature 471, 83-87, 2011), and I here study the dynamics of a two-component vortex in such a spin-orbit-coupled condensate. These spin-orbit-coupled BECs use an applied magnetic field to split the hyperfine levels. Hence, they rely on a focused laser beam to trap the atoms. In addition, two Raman laser beams create an effective (or synthetic) gauge potential. The resulting spin-orbit Hamiltonian is discussed in some detail. The various laser beams are fixed in the laboratory, so that it is not feasible to nucleate a vortex by an applied rotation that would need to rotate all the laser beams and the magnetic field. In a one-component BEC, a vortex can also be created by a thermal quench, starting from the normal state and suddenly cooling deep into the condensed state (Freilich et al., Science 329, 1182-1185, 2010). I propose that a similar method would work for a vortex in a spin-orbit-coupled BEC. Such a vortex has two components, and each has its own circulation quantum number (typically ). If both components have the same circulation, I find that the composite vortex should execute uniform precession, like that observed in a single-component BEC (Freilich et al., Science 329, 1182-1185, 2010). In contrast, if one component has unit circulation and the other has zero circulation, then some fraction of the dynamical vortex trajectories should eventually leave the condensate, providing clear experimental evidence for this unusual vortex structure. In the context of

  11. Vortical flows in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids under external forcing - A molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Rajaraman; Charan, Harish

    2016-07-01

    Understanding vortical flows under external forcing in two dimensional (2D) fluids is a fundamental paradigm for structure formation in driven, dissipative systems. Considering Yukawa liquid as a prototype for strongly correlated or strongly coupled plasmas characterized by coupling strength (Γ, the ratio of average potential to kinetic energy per particle) and screening parameter (κ, ratio of mean inter-particle distance to shielding length), we address two important problems: 1. Onset of Rayleigh Benard convection cell (RBCC) in 2D Yukawa liquids subject to gravity and external temperature gradient 2. Onset of von Karman vortices in 2D Yukawa liquid under external pressure head, using large scale, first principles molecular dynamics simulations. For typical values of (Γ,κ), existence of a critical external temperature difference is demonstrated, beyond which RBCC are seen to set in. Beyond this critical external temperature difference, the strength of the maximum convective flow velocity is shown to exhibit a new, hitherto unsuspected linear relationship with external temperature difference and with a slope independent of (Γ,κ). The time taken for the transients to settle down to a steady state RBCC τ_s, is found to be maximum close to the above said critical external temperature difference and is seen to reduce with increasing external temperature difference. For the range of values of (Γ, κ) considered here, τ_s ≃ 10 000-20 000;ω^{-1}_{pd}, where ω_{pd} is dust plasma frequency. As Γ is increased to very high values, due to strong coupling effects, RBC cells are seen to be in a transient state without attaining a steady state for as long as 100 000;ω^{-1}_{pd}, even for a very high external temperature difference. In the second part, we address the existence of universal relation between Strouhal (St) and Rayleigh (Ry) numbers for Yukawa liquid using first principles based classical molecular dynamics. The flow past an obstacle is seen to indeed

  12. Reconstruction of the Greenland ice sheet dynamics in a fully coupled Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybak, Oleg; Volodin, Evgeny; Huybrechts, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Earth system models (ESMs) are undoubtedly effective tools for studying climate dynamics. Incorporation of evolving ice sheets to ESMs is a challenging task because response times of the climate system and of ice sheets differ by several orders of magnitude. Besides, AO GCMs operate on spatial and temporal resolutions substantially differing from those of ice sheet models (ICMs). Therefore elaboration of an effective coupling methodology of an AO GCM and an ICM is the key problem of an ESM construction and utilization. Several downscaling strategies of varying complexity exist now of data exchange between modeled climate system and ice sheets. Application of a particular strategy depends on the research objectives. In our view, the optimum approach for model studying of significant environmental changes (e.g. glacial/interglacial transitions) when ice sheets undergo substantial evolution of geometry and volume would be an asynchronous coupling. The latter allows simulation in the interactive way of growth and decay of ice sheets in the changing climatic conditions. In the focus of the presentation, is the overview of coupling aspects of an AO GCM INMCM32 elaborated in the Institute of Numerical Mathematics (Moscow, Russia) to the Greenland ice sheet model (GrISM, Vrije Uninersiteit Brussel, Belgium). To provide interactive coupling of INMCM32 (spatial resolution 5°×4°, 21 vertical layers and temporal resolution 6 min. in the atmospheric block) and GrISM (spatial resolution 20×20 km, 51 vertical layers and 1 yr temporal resolution), we employ a special energy- and water balance model (EWBM-G), which serves as a buffer providing effective data exchange between INMCM32 and GrISM. EWBM-G operates in a rectangle domain including Greenland. Transfer of daily meanings of simulated climatic variables (air surface temperature and specific humidity) is provided on the lateral boundarias of the domain and inside the domain (sea level air pressure, wind speed and total

  13. Antarctic Circumpolar Wave dynamics in a simplified ocean- atmosphere coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maze, G.; D'Andrea, F.; Colin de Verdiere, A.

    2004-12-01

    The Antarctic Circumpolar Wave (ACW) is one of the main pattern of variability in the Ocean-Atmosphere system in the southern Hemisphere extratropics. It involves sea surface temperature (SST), sea level pressure (SLP) and other variables, and consists of a wave train of zonal number 2, travelling around Antarctica at the speed of 6-8 cm s-1, hence taking around 8 years to complete a circle. A fundamental feature of this observed pattern is that anomalies are eastward propagating and seem to be phase locked: for example SST and SLP are in quadrature (high downstream of warm SST). Nevertheless the atmospheric part of the wave has been questioned by some observational studies. Different analytical and numerical studies have veen proposed, but a convincing theoretical explanation for the ACW is still missing. In this work we study the ACW as simulated by a simple dynamical model, in order to determine the basic physical processes that characterize it. The model used is an atmospheric quasi-geostrophic tridimensional model coupled to an ocean "slab" mixed layer, which includes mean geostrophic advection by the antarctic circumpolar current (ACC). The atmosphere-ocean coupling is obtained via surface sensible heat fluxes. We analyse three configuration of the model, a "passive ocean" one, where the ocean responds to the atmopheric forcing but does not feeds back to the atmosphere; a "passive atmosphere" one, where the stationary reponse of the atmosphere to prescribed SST anomalies; and a fully coupled one. The two forced experiment show separately a positive feedback in the coupled system.The passive ocean experiment shows an ACW-type low frequency variability in the ocean, ie a propagating SST anomaly with 4 years period. SSTa amplitude created were around 0.5C wich is less than observed anomalies (1.5oC). This means that the stochastic focing of the atmosphere is sufficient to substain a variability of the SST whose periodicity is set by the mean advection

  14. Dynamics of a metastable state nonlinearly coupled to a heat bath driven by external noise.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray; Barik, Debashis; Banik, Suman Kumar

    2006-12-01

    Based on a system-reservoir model, where the system is nonlinearly coupled to a heat bath and the heat bath is modulated by an external stationary Gaussian noise, we derive the generalized Langevin equation with space-dependent friction and multiplicative noise and construct the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation, valid for short correlation time, with space-dependent diffusion coefficient to study the escape rate from a metastable state in the moderate- to large-damping regime. By considering the dynamics in a model cubic potential we analyze the results numerically which are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. It has been shown numerically that enhancement of the rate is possible by properly tuning the correlation time of the external noise. PMID:17280050

  15. Dynamics of a Many-Body-Localized System Coupled to a Bath.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Mark H; Maksymenko, Mykola; Altman, Ehud

    2016-04-22

    Coupling a many-body-localized system to a dissipative bath necessarily leads to delocalization. Here, we investigate the nature of the ensuing relaxation dynamics and the information it holds on the many-body-localized state. We formulate the relevant Lindblad equation in terms of the local integrals of motion of the underlying localized Hamiltonian. This allows us to map the quantum evolution deep in the localized state to tractable classical rate equations. We consider two different types of dissipation relevant to systems of ultracold atoms: dephasing due to inelastic scattering on the lattice lasers and particle loss. Our approach allows us to characterize their different effects in the limiting cases of weak and strong interactions. PMID:27152775

  16. Dynamical behavior of quantum correlations between two qubits coupled to an external environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jin-Long; Li, Xing-Li; Zhang, Xi-Zheng; Guo, Jin-Liang

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of quantum correlations of a two-qubit system coupled to an external environment. We have considered both cases: a spin environment and a bosonic environment. In all cases, we have chosen the Bell-diagonal state as the initial state and computed the evolution of quantum correlations in terms of entanglement, quantum discord and trace distance geometric quantum discord. Special attention is paid to the singular quantum phenomena, such as entanglement sudden death, sudden transition and double sudden transitions from classical to quantum decoherence, which all depend on the initial state and the parameters related to the system and the environment. We find the trace distance geometric quantum discord has a good robustness in resisting the spin and bosonic environmental noise.

  17. Isospin decomposition of γ N →N* transitions within a dynamical coupled-channels model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamano, H.; Nakamura, S. X.; Lee, T.-S. H.; Sato, T.

    2016-07-01

    By extending the dynamical coupled-channels analysis performed in our previous work [Phys. Rev. C 88, 035209 (2013)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.88.035209 to include the available data of photoproduction of π mesons off neutrons, the transition amplitudes for the photoexcitation of the neutron-to-nucleon resonances, γ n →N* , at the resonance pole positions are determined. The combined fits to the data for both the proton- and neutron-target reactions also revise our results for the resonance pole positions and the γ p →N* transition amplitudes. Our results allow an isospin decomposition of the γ N →N* transition amplitudes for the isospin I =1/2 N* resonances, which is necessary for testing hadron structure models and gives crucial inputs for constructing models of neutrino-induced reactions in the nucleon resonance region.

  18. Investigating Human Neurovascular Coupling Using Functional Neuroimaging: A Critical Review of Dynamic Models

    PubMed Central

    Huneau, Clément; Benali, Habib; Chabriat, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that link a transient neural activity to the corresponding increase of cerebral blood flow (CBF) are termed neurovascular coupling (NVC). They are possibly impaired at early stages of small vessel or neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of NVC in humans has been made possible with the development of various neuroimaging techniques based on variations of local hemodynamics during neural activity. Specific dynamic models are currently used for interpreting these data that can include biophysical parameters related to NVC. After a brief review of the current knowledge about possible mechanisms acting in NVC we selected seven models with explicit integration of NVC found in the literature. All these models were described using the same procedure. We compared their physiological assumptions, mathematical formalism, and validation. In particular, we pointed out their strong differences in terms of complexity. Finally, we discussed their validity and their potential applications. These models may provide key information to investigate various aspects of NVC in human pathology. PMID:26733782

  19. Tunable magnetization dynamics in disordered FePdPt ternary alloys: Effects of spin orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, L.; Fan, W. J. Chen, F. L.; Zhou, S. M.; Li, S. F.; Lai, T. S.; He, P.; Xu, X. G.; Jiang, Y.

    2014-09-21

    The magnetization dynamics of disordered Fe₀.₅(Pd{sub 1–x}Pt{sub x})₀.₅ alloy films was studied by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect and ferromagnetic resonance. The intrinsic Gilbert damping parameter α₀ and the resonance linewidth change linearly with the Pt atomic concentration. In particular, the induced in-plane uniaxial anisotropy constant K{sub U} also increases for x increasing from 0 to 1. All these results can be attributed to the tuning effect of the spin orbit coupling. For the disordered ternary alloys, an approach is proposed to control the induced in-plane uniaxial anisotropy, different from conventional thermal treat methods, which is helpful to design and fabrications of spintronic devices.

  20. Coupled Dzyaloshinskii walls and their current-induced dynamics by the spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez, Eduardo

    2014-07-14

    The nucleation of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic/heavy-metal bilayers is studied by means of micromagnetic simulations. In the presence of interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, the nucleated walls naturally adopt a homochiral configuration with internal magnetization pointing antiparallely. The interaction between these walls was analyzed and described in terms of a classical dipolar force between the magnetic moments of the walls, which couples their dynamics. Additionally, the current-induced motion of two homochiral walls in the presence of longitudinal fields was also studied by means of a simple one-dimensional model and micromagnetic modeling, considering both one free-defect strip and another one with random edge roughness. It is evidenced that in the presence of pinning due to edge roughness, the in-plane longitudinal field introduces an asymmetry in the current-induced depinning, in agreement with recent experimental results.

  1. Reprint of : Dynamics of coupled vibration modes in a quantum non-linear mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labadze, G.; Dukalski, M.; Blanter, Ya. M.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the behaviour of two non-linearly coupled flexural modes of a doubly clamped suspended beam (nanomechanical resonator). One of the modes is externally driven. We demonstrate that classically, the behavior of the non-driven mode is reminiscent of that of a parametrically driven linear oscillator: it exhibits a threshold behavior, with the amplitude of this mode below the threshold being exactly zero. Quantum-mechanically, we were able to access the dynamics of this mode below the classical parametric threshold. We show that whereas the mean displacement of this mode is still zero, the mean squared displacement is finite and at the threshold corresponds to the occupation number of 1/2. This finite displacement of the non-driven mode can serve as an experimentally verifiable quantum signature of quantum motion.

  2. Study of dynamic fluid-structure coupling with application to human phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurabh, Shakti; Faber, Justin; Bodony, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of a compressible, viscous fluid interacting with a non-linear, viscoelastic solid are used to study the generation of the human voice. The vocal fold (VF) tissues are modeled using a finite-strain fractional derivative constitutive model implemented in a quadratic finite element code and coupled to a high-order compressible Navier-Stokes solver through a boundary-fitted fluid-solid interface. The viscoelastic solver is validated through in-house experiments using Agarose Gel, a human tissue simulant, undergoing static and harmonic deformation measured with load cell and optical diagnostics. The phonation simulations highlight the role tissue nonlinearity and viscosity play in the glottal jet dynamics and in the radiated sound. Supported by the National Science Foundation (CAREER award number 1150439).

  3. Dynamics of a Many-Body-Localized System Coupled to a Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Mark; Maksymenko, Mykola; Altman, Ehud

    Coupling a many-body localized system to a dissipative bath necessarily leads to delocalization. Here we investigate the nature of the ensuing relaxation dynamics and the information it holds on the many-body localized state. To solve for the time evolution, we formulate the relevant Lindblad equation in terms of the local integrals of motion of the underlying localized Hamiltonian. This allows to map the quantum evolution deep in the localized state to tractable classical rate equations. We consider two different types of dissipation relevant to systems of ultra-cold atoms: particle loss and dephasing due to inelastic scattering on the lattice lasers. Only the first mechanism shows a pronounced effect of interactions on the relaxation of observables.

  4. Dynamics of a Many-Body-Localized System Coupled to a Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Mark H.; Maksymenko, Mykola; Altman, Ehud

    2016-04-01

    Coupling a many-body-localized system to a dissipative bath necessarily leads to delocalization. Here, we investigate the nature of the ensuing relaxation dynamics and the information it holds on the many-body-localized state. We formulate the relevant Lindblad equation in terms of the local integrals of motion of the underlying localized Hamiltonian. This allows us to map the quantum evolution deep in the localized state to tractable classical rate equations. We consider two different types of dissipation relevant to systems of ultracold atoms: dephasing due to inelastic scattering on the lattice lasers and particle loss. Our approach allows us to characterize their different effects in the limiting cases of weak and strong interactions.

  5. Partial Overhaul and Initial Parallel Optimization of KINETICS, a Coupled Dynamics and Chemistry Atmosphere Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Howard; Willacy, Karen; Allen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    KINETICS is a coupled dynamics and chemistry atmosphere model that is data intensive and computationally demanding. The potential performance gain from using a supercomputer motivates the adaptation from a serial version to a parallelized one. Although the initial parallelization had been done, bottlenecks caused by an abundance of communication calls between processors led to an unfavorable drop in performance. Before starting on the parallel optimization process, a partial overhaul was required because a large emphasis was placed on streamlining the code for user convenience and revising the program to accommodate the new supercomputers at Caltech and JPL. After the first round of optimizations, the partial runtime was reduced by a factor of 23; however, performance gains are dependent on the size of the data, the number of processors requested, and the computer used.

  6. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foda, Zachariah H.; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T.; Shaw, David E.; Seeliger, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity.

  7. A Coupled Meshless Technique/Molecular Dynamics Approach for Deformation Characterization of Mono-crystalline Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y. T.; Yarlagadda, Prasad K. D. V.

    2010-05-21

    This paper presents a multiscale study using the coupled Meshless technique/Molecular Dynamics (M{sup 2}) for exploring the deformation mechanism of mono-crystalline metal (focus on copper) under uniaxial tension. In M{sup 2}, an advanced transition algorithm using transition particles is employed to ensure the compatibility of both displacements and their gradients, and an effective local quasi-continuum approach is also applied to obtain the equivalent continuum strain energy density based on the atomistic potentials and Cauchy-Born rule. The key parameters used in M{sup 2} are firstly investigated using a benchmark problem. Then, M{sup 2} is applied to the multiscale simulation for a mono-crystalline copper bar. It has found that the mono-crystalline copper has very good elongation property, and the ultimate strength and Young's modulus are much higher than those obtained in macro-scale.

  8. Non-adiabatic dynamics around a conical intersection with surface-hopping coupled coherent states.

    PubMed

    Humeniuk, Alexander; Mitrić, Roland

    2016-06-21

    A surface-hopping extension of the coupled coherent states-method [D. Shalashilin and M. Child, Chem. Phys. 304, 103-120 (2004)] for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics with quantum effects of the nuclei is put forward. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei is solved in a moving basis set. The basis set is guided by classical trajectories, which can hop stochastically between different electronic potential energy surfaces. The non-adiabatic transitions are modelled by a modified version of Tully's fewest switches algorithm. The trajectories consist of Gaussians in the phase space of the nuclei (coherent states) combined with amplitudes for an electronic wave function. The time-dependent matrix elements between different coherent states determine the amplitude of each trajectory in the total multistate wave function; the diagonal matrix elements determine the hopping probabilities and gradients. In this way, both interference effects and non-adiabatic transitions can be described in a very compact fashion, leading to the exact solution if convergence with respect to the number of trajectories is achieved and the potential energy surfaces are known globally. The method is tested on a 2D model for a conical intersection [A. Ferretti, J. Chem. Phys. 104, 5517 (1996)], where a nuclear wavepacket encircles the point of degeneracy between two potential energy surfaces and interferes with itself. These interference effects are absent in classical trajectory-based molecular dynamics but can be fully incorpo rated if trajectories are replaced by surface hopping coupled coherent states. PMID:27334155

  9. Strain coupling, microstructure dynamics, and acoustic mode softening in germanium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D.; Chatterji, T.; Schiemer, J. A.; Carpenter, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    GeTe is a material of intense topical interest due to its potential in the context of phase-change and nanowire memory devices, as a base for thermoelectric materials, and as a ferroelectric. The combination of a soft optic mode and a Peierls distortion contributes large strains at the cubic-rhombohedral phase transition near 625 K and the role of these has been investigated through their influence on elastic and anelastic properties by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. The underlying physics is revealed by softening of the elastic constants by ˜30%-45%, due to strong coupling of shear and volume strains with the driving order parameter and consistent with an improper ferroelastic transition which is weakly first order. The magnitude of the softening is permissive of the transition mechanism involving a significant order/disorder component. A Debye loss peak in the vicinity of 180 K is attributed to freezing of the motion of ferroelastic twin walls and the activation energy of ˜0.07 eV is attributed to control by switching of the configuration of long and short Ge-Te bonds in the first coordination sphere around Ge. Precursor softening as the transition is approached from above can be described with a Vogel-Fulcher expression with a similar activation energy, which is attributed to coupling of acoustic modes with an unseen central mode that arises from dynamical clusters with local ordering of the Peierls distortion. The strain relaxation and ferroelastic behavior of GeTe depend on both displacive and order/disorder effects but the dynamics of switching will be determined by changes in the configuration of distorted GeT e6 octahedra, with a rather small activation energy barrier.

  10. Drivers of coupled model ENSO error dynamics and the spring predictability barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Sarah M.; Kirtman, Ben P.

    2016-07-01

    Despite recent improvements in ENSO simulations, ENSO predictions ultimately remain limited by error growth and model inadequacies. Determining the accompanying dynamical processes that drive the growth of certain types of errors may help the community better recognize which error sources provide an intrinsic limit to predictability. This study applies a dynamical analysis to previously developed CCSM4 error ensemble experiments that have been used to model noise-driven error growth. Analysis reveals that ENSO-independent error growth is instigated via a coupled instability mechanism. Daily error fields indicate that persistent stochastic zonal wind stress perturbations (τx^' } ) near the equatorial dateline activate the coupled instability, first driving local SST and anomalous zonal current changes that then induce upwelling anomalies and a clear thermocline response. In particular, March presents a window of opportunity for stochastic τx^' } to impose a lasting influence on the evolution of eastern Pacific SST through December, suggesting that stochastic τx^' } is an important contributor to the spring predictability barrier. Stochastic winds occurring in other months only temporarily affect eastern Pacific SST for 2-3 months. Comparison of a control simulation with an ENSO cycle and the ENSO-independent error ensemble experiments reveals that once the instability is initiated, the subsequent error growth is modulated via an ENSO-like mechanism, namely the seasonal strength of the Bjerknes feedback. Furthermore, unlike ENSO events that exhibit growth through the fall, the growth of ENSO-independent SST errors terminates once the seasonal strength of the Bjerknes feedback weakens in fall. Results imply that the heat content supplied by the subsurface precursor preceding the onset of an ENSO event is paramount to maintaining the growth of the instability (or event) through fall.

  11. Coupled metal partitioning dynamics and toxicodynamics at biointerfaces: a theory beyond the biotic ligand model framework.

    PubMed

    Duval, Jérôme F L

    2016-04-14

    A mechanistic understanding of the processes governing metal toxicity to microorganisms (bacteria, algae) calls for an adequate formulation of metal partitioning at biointerfaces during cell exposure. This includes the account of metal transport dynamics from bulk solution to biomembrane and the kinetics of metal internalisation, both potentially controlling the intracellular and surface metal fractions that originate cell growth inhibition. A theoretical rationale is developed here for such coupled toxicodynamics and interfacial metal partitioning dynamics under non-complexing medium conditions with integration of the defining cell electrostatic properties. The formalism explicitly considers intertwined metal adsorption at the biointerface, intracellular metal excretion, cell growth and metal depletion from bulk solution. The theory is derived under relevant steady-state metal transport conditions on the basis of coupled Nernst-Planck equation and continuous logistic equation modified to include metal-induced cell growth inhibition and cell size changes. Computational examples are discussed to identify limitations of the classical Biotic Ligand Model (BLM) in evaluating metal toxicity over time. In particular, BLM is shown to severely underestimate metal toxicity depending on cell exposure time, metal internalisation kinetics, cell surface electrostatics and initial cell density. Analytical expressions are provided for the interfacial metal concentration profiles in the limit where cell-growth is completely inhibited. A rigorous relationship between time-dependent cell density and metal concentrations at the biosurface and in bulk solution is further provided, which unifies previous equations formulated by Best and Duval under constant cell density and cell size conditions. The theory is sufficiently flexible to adapt to toxicity scenarios with involved cell survival-death processes.

  12. Comprehensive Representation of Hydrologic and Geomorphic Process Coupling in Numerical Models: Internal Dynamics and Basin Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istanbulluoglu, E.; Vivoni, E. R.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Bras, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    Landscape morphology has an important control on the spatial and temporal organization of basin hydrologic response to climate forcing, affecting soil moisture redistribution as well as vegetation function. On the other hand, erosion, driven by hydrology and modulated by vegetation, produces landforms over geologic time scales that reflect characteristic signatures of the dominant land forming process. Responding to extreme climate events or anthropogenic disturbances of the land surface, infrequent but rapid forms of erosion (e.g., arroyo development, landsliding) can modify topography such that basin hydrology is significantly influenced. Despite significant advances in both hydrologic and geomorphic modeling over the past two decades, the dynamic interactions between basin hydrology, geomorphology and terrestrial ecology are not adequately captured in current model frameworks. In order to investigate hydrologic-geomorphic-ecologic interactions at the basin scale we present initial efforts in integrating the CHILD landscape evolution model (Tucker et al. 2001) with the tRIBS hydrology model (Ivanov et al. 2004), both developed in a common software environment. In this talk, we present preliminary results of the numerical modeling of the coupled evolution of basin hydro-geomorphic response and resulting landscape morphology in two sets of examples. First, we discuss the long-term evolution of both the hydrologic response and the resulting basin morphology from an initially uplifted plateau. In the second set of modeling experiments, we implement changes in climate and land-use to an existing topography and compare basin hydrologic response to the model results when landscape form is fixed (e.g. no coupling between hydrology and geomorphology). Model results stress the importance of internal basin dynamics, including runoff generation mechanisms and hydrologic states, in shaping hydrologic response as well as the importance of employing comprehensive

  13. Non-adiabatic dynamics around a conical intersection with surface-hopping coupled coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeniuk, Alexander; Mitrić, Roland

    2016-06-01

    A surface-hopping extension of the coupled coherent states-method [D. Shalashilin and M. Child, Chem. Phys. 304, 103-120 (2004)] for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics with quantum effects of the nuclei is put forward. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei is solved in a moving basis set. The basis set is guided by classical trajectories, which can hop stochastically between different electronic potential energy surfaces. The non-adiabatic transitions are modelled by a modified version of Tully's fewest switches algorithm. The trajectories consist of Gaussians in the phase space of the nuclei (coherent states) combined with amplitudes for an electronic wave function. The time-dependent matrix elements between different coherent states determine the amplitude of each trajectory in the total multistate wave function; the diagonal matrix elements determine the hopping probabilities and gradients. In this way, both interference effects and non-adiabatic transitions can be described in a very compact fashion, leading to the exact solution if convergence with respect to the number of trajectories is achieved and the potential energy surfaces are known globally. The method is tested on a 2D model for a conical intersection [A. Ferretti, J. Chem. Phys. 104, 5517 (1996)], where a nuclear wavepacket encircles the point of degeneracy between two potential energy surfaces and interferes with itself. These interference effects are absent in classical trajectory-based molecular dynamics but can be fully incorpo rated if trajectories are replaced by surface hopping coupled coherent states.

  14. A physical-biological coupled model for algal dynamics in lakes.

    PubMed

    Franke, U; Hutter, K; Jöhnk, K

    1999-03-01

    A coupled model is presented for simulating physical and biological dynamics in fresh water lakes. The physical model rests upon the assumption that the turbulent kinetic energy in a water column of the lake is fully contained in a mixed layer of variable depth. Below this layer the mechanical energy content is assumed to vanish. Additionally, the horizontal currents are ignored. This one-dimensional two-layered model describes the internal conversion of the mechanical and thermal energy input from the atmosphere into an evolution of the mixed layer depth by entrainment and detrainment mechanisms. It is supposed to form the physical domain in which the simulation of the biological processes takes place. The biological model describes mathematically the typical properties of phyto- and zooplankton, their interactions and their response to the physical environment. This description then allows the study of the behaviour of Lagrangian clusters of virtual plankton that are subjected to such environments. The essence of the model is the dynamical simulation of an arbitrary number of nutrient limited phytoplankton species and one species of zooplankton. The members of the food web above and below affect the model only statically. The model is able to reproduce the typical progression of a predator-prey interaction between phyto- and zooplankton as well as the exploitative competition for nutrients between two phytoplankton species under grazing pressure of Daphnia. It suggests that the influence of the biological system on the physical system results in a weak increase of the surface temperature for coupled simulations, but a considerably higher seasonal thermocline in spring and a lower one in autumn.

  15. The role of asymmetrical and repulsive coupling in the dynamics of two coupled van der Pol oscillators.

    PubMed

    Astakhov, Sergey; Gulai, Artem; Fujiwara, Naoya; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    A system of two asymmetrically coupled van der Pol oscillators has been studied. We show that the introduction of a small asymmetry in coupling leads to the appearance of a "wideband synchronization channel" in the bifurcational structure of the parameter space. An increase of asymmetry and transition to repulsive interaction leads to the formation of multistability. As the result, the tip of the Arnold's tongue widens due to the formation of folds defined by saddle-node bifurcation curves for the limit cycles on the torus. PMID:26931583

  16. The role of asymmetrical and repulsive coupling in the dynamics of two coupled van der Pol oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astakhov, Sergey; Gulai, Artem; Fujiwara, Naoya; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    A system of two asymmetrically coupled van der Pol oscillators has been studied. We show that the introduction of a small asymmetry in coupling leads to the appearance of a "wideband synchronization channel" in the bifurcational structure of the parameter space. An increase of asymmetry and transition to repulsive interaction leads to the formation of multistability. As the result, the tip of the Arnold's tongue widens due to the formation of folds defined by saddle-node bifurcation curves for the limit cycles on the torus.

  17. Melt Segregation in Crustal Magmatic Systems: A Coupled Dynamics and Thermodynamics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    Compositional diversity in evolving magmatic systems is driven in large part by the multiphase dynamics of melt-crystal separation. Key to quantitative description of these systems is to accurately calculate the rate and timing of crystal-melt separation. This calculation involves three separate, but closely linked, problems: heat transfer, phase equilibria, and multiphase dynamics. To examine these problems we have developed a coupled fluid dynamics and thermodynamics approach. With this approach we can determine the spatial and temporal variability in composition, melt fraction, phase equilibrium, and velocities of different crystal phases and melt. We use a multiphase (Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian, EEL) approach to compute extraction in magmatic systems (Dufek and Bachmann, 2010). Each phase (melt or crystal phase) is represented by conservation equations for the mass, momentum and enthalpy. Enthalpy closure is determined from a version of rhyolite-MELTS with callable library functions that provide phase equilibrium results to the fluid dynamics code (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Gualda et al, 2011). This method accounts for the partitioning of latent and sensible heat in complex geochemical systems. Further, phase properties (for example density and heat capacity) are determined using MELTS, and as such are internally consistent with extensive thermodynamic and experimental data. Chemical species for each phase (major oxides) have separate transport equations permitting the exploration of fractionation behavior as well as providing detailed geochemical information that can be used to compare to field observations (e.g. solid solution in phases, major oxide composition of melts). A typical simulation involves millions of phase equilibrium calculations and transport of several crystalline phases. We have parallelized this approach to work on large cluster computers for extensive calculations, and are working toward a publically available version. We use this new model

  18. Using immersed boundary methods to couple a dynamical ocean model to a dynamical ice sheet/ice shelf model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asay-Davis, Xylar; Lipscomb, William; Price, Steven

    2010-05-01

    The melting of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), the world's largest marine ice sheet, would mean a ~5 meter sea level rise worldwide. About a third of the WAIS lies in the Amundsen Sea Embayment, where small ice shelves provide buttressing for outlet glaciers. Warming oceans may melt the supporting ice shelves leading to accelerated flow of the outlet glaciers. Perhaps more importantly, warming oceans may mean that warm circumpolar deep water can more easily reach the ice sheet grounding line, where it can melt grounded ice directly and force retreat. Previous theoretical work suggests that ice sheets, such as the WAIS, with seabeds that deepen inland may be unstable to grounding line retreat. We present simulations from a coupled dynamical ocean model (based on POP) and dynamical ice sheet/ice shelf model (Glimmer-CISM). This work is a stepping stone toward a global scale simulation of the southern ocean (using CCSM) together with the full Antarctic ice sheet (using Glimmer-CISM). The ocean model uses an immersed boundary method (IBM) to represent the complex, time-evolving geometry of the ice shelf. The IBM allows for accurate representation of the boundary conditions at the ocean/ice interface without the need for a modeling grid that conforms to the boundary or that changes in time. Using simplified seabed and ice shelf geometries, our simulations explore the effects of varying the seabed slope on the stability of ice sheets. We also investigate the melt rates that result from varying levels of seawater warming beneath the ice shelves.

  19. Energy coupling and plume dynamics during high power laser heating of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. |

    1997-05-01

    High power laser heating of metals was studied utilizing experimental and numerical methods with an emphasis on the laser energy coupling with a target and on the dynamics of the laser generated vapor flow. Rigorous theoretical modeling of the heating, melting, and evaporation of metals due to laser radiation with a power density below the plasma shielding threshold was carried out. Experimentally, the probe beam deflection technique was utilized to measure the propagation of a laser induced shock wave. The effects of a cylindrical cavity in a metal surface on the laser energy coupling with a solid were investigated utilizing photothermal deflection measurements. A numerical calculation of target temperature and photothermal deflection was performed to compare with the measured results. Reflection of the heating laser beam inside the cavity was found to increase the photothermal deflection amplitude significantly and to enhance the overall energy coupling between a heating laser beam and a solid. Next, unsteady vaporization of metals due to nanosecond pulsed laser heating with an ambient gas at finite pressure was analyzed with a one dimensional thermal evaporation model for target heating and one dimensional compressible flow equations for inviscid fluid for the vapor flow. Lastly, the propagation of a shock wave during excimer laser heating of aluminum was measured with the probe beam deflection technique. The transit time of the shock wave was measured at the elevation of the probe beam above the target surface; these results were compared with the predicted behavior using ideal blast wave theory. The propagation of a gaseous material plume was also observed from the deflection of the probe beam at later times.

  20. Dynamics of interacting Dicke model in a coupled-cavity array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badshah, Fazal; Qamar, Shahid; Paternostro, Mauro

    2014-09-01

    We consider the dynamics of an array of mutually interacting cavities, each containing an ensemble of N two-level atoms. By exploring the possibilities offered by ensembles of various dimensions and a range of atom-light and photon-hopping values, we investigate the generation of multisite entanglement, as well as the performance of excitation transfer across the array, resulting from the competition between on-site nonlinearities of the matter-light interaction and intersite photon hopping. In particular, for a three-cavity interacting system it is observed that the initial excitation in the first cavity completely transfers to the ensemble in the third cavity through the hopping of photons between the adjacent cavities. Probabilities of the transfer of excitation of the cavity modes and ensembles exhibit characteristics of fast and slow oscillations governed by coupling and hopping parameters, respectively. In the large-hopping case, by seeding an initial excitation in the cavity at the center of the array, a tripartite W state, as well as a bipartite maximally entangled state, is obtained, depending on the interaction time. Population of the ensemble in a cavity has a positive impact on the rate of excitation transfer between the ensembles and their local cavity modes. In particular, for ensembles of five to seven atoms, tripartite W states can be produced even when the hopping rate is comparable to the cavity-atom coupling rate. A similar behavior of the transfer of excitation is observed for a four-coupled-cavity system with two initial excitations.

  1. Dynamical coupled-channels approach to hadronic and electromagnetic kaon-hyperon production on the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Julia-Diaz, B.; Saghai, B.; Tabakin, F.

    2006-05-15

    A dynamical coupled-channels formalism for processes {pi}N{yields}KY and {gamma}N{yields}KY is presented that provides a comprehensive investigation of recent data on the {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}{lambda} reaction. The nonresonant interactions within the subspace KY+{pi}N are derived from effective Lagrangians, using a unitary transformation method. The calculations of photoproduction amplitudes are simplified by casting the coupled-channels equations into a form such that the empirical {gamma}N{yields}{pi}N amplitudes are input and only the parameters associated with the KY channel are determined by performing {chi}{sup 2} fits to all of the available data for {pi}{sup -}p{yields}K deg.{lambda},K deg.{sigma} deg., and {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}{lambda}. Good agreement between our models and those data are obtained. In the fits to {pi}N{yields}KY channels, most of the parameters are constrained within {+-}20% of the values given by the Particle Data Group and/or quark model predictions, whereas for {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}{lambda} parameters, ranges compatible with broken SU(6) x O(3) symmetry are imposed. The main reaction mechanisms in K{sup +}{lambda} photoproduction are singled out and issues related to newly suggested resonances S{sub 11},P{sub 13}, and D{sub 13} are studied. Results illustrating the importance of using a coupled-channels treatment are reported. Meson cloud effects on the {gamma}N{yields}N* transitions are also discussed.

  2. A Coupled Plasma Dynamics and Gas Flow Model for Semiconductor Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A continuum modeling approach by self-consistently coupling plasma dynamics and gas flow will be presented for the analysis of high density plasma reactors. Experimental data shows that gas flow distribution affects the etch rate uniformity even at low pressures (6-20 mTorr) and flow rates (20-70 sccm). This study will investigate the effects of gas flow and gas energy on bulk plasma densities and temperatures using a continuum model. The model solves multidimensional equations of mass balance for neutrals and ions, gas momentum, separate energy equations for electrons and neutrals and Maxwell's equations for power coupling. A test case of N2 plasma in a 300mm TCP etch reactor, for which hybrid model and Langmuir probe data are available, is chosen for this analysis. Our preliminary results show that modeling gas flow and energy improves the predictions of electron density and its spatial variation in the reactor when compared with the experimental data. The aim of this study is to identify the operating conditions for the TCP reactor when a self-consistent modeling of gas flow is important.

  3. Coupling calcium dynamics and mitochondrial bioenergetic: an in silico study to simulate cardiomyocyte dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Das, Phonindra Nath; Pedruzzi, Gabriele; Bairagi, Nandadulal; Chatterjee, Samrat

    2016-03-01

    The coupling of intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics with mitochondrial bioenergetic is crucial for the functioning of cardiomyocytes both in healthy and disease conditions. The pathophysiological signature of the Cardiomyocyte Dysfunction (CD) is commonly related to decreased ATP production due to mitochondrial functional impairment and to an increased mitochondrial calcium content ([Ca(2+)]m). These features advanced the therapeutic approaches which aim to reduce [Ca(2+)]m. But whether [Ca(2+)]m overload is the pathological trigger for CD or a physiological consequence, remained controversial. We addressed this issue in silico and showed that [Ca(2+)]m might not directly cause CD. Through model parameter recalibration, we demonstrated how mitochondria cope up with functionally impaired processes and consequently accumulate calcium. A strong coupling of the [Ca(2+)]m oscillations with the ATP synthesis rate ensures robust calcium cycling and avoids CD. We suggested a cardioprotective role of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter and predicted that a mitochondrial sodium calcium exchanger could be a potential therapeutic target to restore the normal functioning of the cardiomyocyte.

  4. Dynamic Characterization of Motorcycle Helmets: Modelling and Coupling with the Human Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WILLINGER, R.; BAUMGARTNER, D.; GUIMBERTEAU, T.

    2000-08-01

    Research into the protection of the human head calls for accurate modelling of both the protection system and the head. This study proposes a model incorporating both lumped parameters of the helmet and the head and their coupling during impact. The mechanical characteristics of the shell and of the helmet liner are determined by modal analysis and dynamic compression tests respectively. The coupling of these two components of the helmet is explored using numerical optimization methods based on impact tests which are also used to validate the model. A new dummy head, developed in a previous study and capable of simulating the relative brain-skull displacement was used in the parametric study of the helmet to optimize the density of the polystyrene liner. The ultimate purpose of the study is to devise methods of evaluating the protective aspects of the helmet and then to provide less-expensive methods for optimizing new products on the basis of biomechanical criteria. So far, the study has shown that the optimum density of the liner can be determined not only empirically but also theoretically. It has also shown that optimum helmet parameters depend on the mechanical properties of the dummy head used.

  5. Fully coupled, dynamic model of a magnetostrictive amorphous ribbon and its validation

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmair, Bernhard Huber, Thomas; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Fuger, Markus; Suess, Dieter

    2014-01-14

    Magnetostrictive amorphous ribbons are widely used in electronic article surveillance as well as for magnetoelastic sensors. Both applications utilize the fact that the ribbons' resonant frequency can be read out remotely by applying external magnetic AC fields. This paper proposes a magnetomechanical model to simulate the dynamics of such ribbons. The goal was to only use general material properties as input parameters, which are usually denoted in the data sheet of amorphous metals. Thus, only the magnetization curve at zero stress has to be gained via measurement. The magnetization under stress is calculated thereof. The equation of motion for a longitudinally oscillating ribbon is derived and coupled to Maxwell's equations for magnetostatics. The fully coupled initial value problem is solved simultaneously by a finite difference approach. The model is validated by comparing calculated and measured resonant frequencies of various amorphous ribbons, which turned out to be in good agreement. When slightly adapting single material properties from the data sheet, the match is almost perfect. The model is then used to calculate the local magnetic and mechanical properties inside static and vibrating ribbons. These local distributions can be directly linked to the field dependence of the resonant frequency and its higher harmonics.

  6. Partial synchronization dynamics of coupled ultradian oscillators comprising an insect neurosecretory cell system.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Toshio

    2009-12-01

    An insulin-related peptide, bombyxin, in the silkmoth Bombyx mori is secreted by four pairs of cerebral neurosecretory cells that form a weakly coupled oscillator system to produce a pulsatile pattern of hormone secretion. The activity of individual bombyxin-producing (BP) cells oscillated with different periods (20-70 min). The population of BP cells exhibited complex phase dynamics, including spontaneous synchronization and desynchronization of different combinations of cells. Statistical cross-correlation analyses of oscillation patterns between BP cells revealed that one cell usually correlated closely with a few particular cells of similar periodicity. Close investigation of the phase differences between individual active phases of the related cell pairs revealed that an inphase synchronous state was usually maintained for many cycles, whereas an antiphase state was transient, lasting for a few cycles. In contrast, antiphase synchronous states often occurred between several cell pairs when the brain containing the cerebral neurosecretory cell system was disconnected from the ventral nerve cord containing the neuronal mechanism that induced periodic heartbeat reversals at intervals of 80-110 min and exerted a periodic suppressive or phase-resetting effect on individual BP cells. These results suggest that the internal coupling mechanism in the BP cell system is not sufficient to maintain an in-phase synchronous state in the heterogeneous cell population, and that the external phase resetting mechanism may assist in-phase synchronization of many neurosecretory cells to generate an overall pulsatile pattern of bombyxin secretion.

  7. Mesoscale dynamic coupling of finite- and discrete-element methods for fluid-particle interactions.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, S; Yazdchi, K; Luding, S

    2014-08-01

    A new method for two-way fluid-particle coupling on an unstructured mesoscopically coarse mesh is presented. In this approach, we combine a (higher order) finite-element method (FEM) on the moving mesh for the fluid with a soft sphere discrete-element method for the particles. The novel feature of the proposed scheme is that the FEM mesh is a dynamic Delaunay triangulation based on the positions of the moving particles. Thus, the mesh can be multi-purpose: it provides (i) a framework for the discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations, (ii) a simple tool for detecting contacts between moving particles, (iii) a basis for coarse-graining or upscaling, and (iv) coupling with other physical fields (temperature, electromagnetic, etc.). This approach is suitable for a wide range of dilute and dense particulate flows, because the mesh resolution adapts with particle density in a given region. Two-way momentum exchange is implemented using semi-empirical drag laws akin to other popular approaches; for example, the discrete particle method, where a finite-volume solver on a coarser, fixed grid is used. We validate the methodology with several basic test cases, including single- and double-particle settling with analytical and empirical expectations, and flow through ordered and random porous media, when compared against finely resolved FEM simulations of flow through fixed arrays of particles. PMID:24982251

  8. Impact of asymptomatic infection on coupled disease-behavior dynamics in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Xie, Jia-Rong; Chen, Han-Shuang; Liu, Can; Small, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Studies on how to model the interplay between diseases and behavioral responses (so-called coupled disease-behavior interaction) have attracted increasing attention. Owing to the lack of obvious clinical evidence of diseases, or the incomplete information related to the disease, the risks of infection cannot be perceived and may lead to inappropriate behavioral responses. Therefore, how to quantitatively analyze the impacts of asymptomatic infection on the interplay between diseases and behavioral responses is of particular importance. In this letter, under the complex network framework, we study the coupled disease-behavior interaction model by dividing infectious individuals into two states: U-state (without evident clinical symptoms, labelled as U) and I-state (with evident clinical symptoms, labelled as I). A susceptible individual can be infected by U- or I-nodes, however, since the U-nodes cannot be easily observed, susceptible individuals take behavioral responses only when they contact I-nodes. The mechanism is considered in the improved Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) model and the improved Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model, respectively. Then, one of the most concerned problems in spreading dynamics: the epidemic thresholds for the two models are given by two methods. The analytic results quantitatively describe the influence of different factors, such as asymptomatic infection, the awareness rate, the network structure, and so forth, on the epidemic thresholds. Moreover, because of the irreversible process of the SIR model, the suppression effect of the improved SIR model is weaker than the improved SIS model.

  9. Lattice dynamics and electron-phonon coupling calculations using nondiagonal supercells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd-Williams, Jonathan H.; Monserrat, Bartomeu

    2015-11-01

    We study the direct calculation of total energy derivatives for lattice dynamics and electron-phonon coupling calculations using supercell matrices with nonzero off-diagonal elements. We show that it is possible to determine the response of a periodic system to a perturbation characterized by a wave vector with reduced fractional coordinates (m1/n1,m2/n2,m3/n3) using a supercell containing a number of primitive cells equal to the least common multiple of n1,n2, and n3. If only diagonal supercell matrices are used, a supercell containing n1n2n3 primitive cells is required. We demonstrate that the use of nondiagonal supercells significantly reduces the computational cost of obtaining converged zero-point energies and phonon dispersions for diamond and graphite. We also perform electron-phonon coupling calculations using the direct method to sample the vibrational Brillouin zone with grids of unprecedented size, which enables us to investigate the convergence of the zero-point renormalization to the thermal and optical band gaps of diamond.

  10. MODELING THE DYNAMICAL COUPLING OF SOLAR CONVECTION WITH THE RADIATIVE INTERIOR

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, Allan Sacha; Toomre, Juri

    2011-12-01

    The global dynamics of a rotating star like the Sun involves the coupling of a highly turbulent convective envelope overlying a seemingly benign radiative interior. We use the anelastic spherical harmonic code to develop a new class of three-dimensional models that nonlinearly couple the convective envelope to a deep stable radiative interior. The numerical simulation assumes a realistic solar stratification from r = 0.07 up to 0.97R (with R the solar radius), thus encompassing part of the nuclear core up through most of the convection zone. We find that a tachocline naturally establishes itself between the differentially rotating convective envelope and the solid body rotation of the interior, with a slow spreading that is here diffusively controlled. The rapid angular momentum redistribution in the convective envelope leads to a fast equator and slow poles, with a conical differential rotation achieved at mid-latitudes, much as has been deduced by helioseismology. The convective motions are able to overshoot downward about 0.04R into the radiative interior. However, the convective meridional circulation there is confined to a smaller penetration depth and is directed mostly equatorward at the base of the convection zone. Thermal wind balance is established in the lower convection zone and tachocline but departures are evident in the upper convection zone. Internal gravity waves are excited by the convective overshooting, yielding a complex wave field throughout the radiative interior.

  11. Anharmonic coupling in molecular dynamics simulations of ligand vibrational relaxation in bound carbonmonoxy myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Devereux, Michael; Meuwly, Markus

    2009-10-01

    Vibrational relaxation of CO bound to myoglobin (MbCO) following photoexcitation is investigated using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It is found that harmonic potential energy functions for bond vibrations are not suited to simultaneously and accurately describe vibrational de-excitation and the vibrational spectroscopy of the bound ligand. Only when anharmonic (e.g. Morse) potentials are introduced for both the C-O and the adjacent Fe-C(CO) bonds to allow anharmonic coupling, rapid (tens of ps) relaxation of the vibrationally excited CO is possible. To capture both relaxation and vibrational spectroscopy, the parameters of the potential energy functions are fitted by an interactive, nonlinear least-squares procedure using averages over multiple MD trajectories. The sensitivity of cooling rate to the difference in vibrational frequency between coupled modes is demonstrated. Potential cooling mechanisms are suggested, based on the sensitivity of the CO relaxation rate to changes in the force field parameters of local degrees of freedom. Accounting for quantum correction leads to relaxation rates around 20 ps, in good agreement with experiment. Finally, the importance of electronic effects is explored by fitting a 2D potential energy surface to ab initio data to describe the strengthening and weakening of the CO bond as a function of Fe-C(CO) bond length, and vice versa.

  12. Dynamic testing and analysis of extension-twist-coupled composite tubular spars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Renee C.; Izapanah, Amir P.; Baucon, Robert M.

    The results from a study aimed at improving the dynamic and aerodynamic characteristics of composite rotor blades through the use of extension-twist elastic coupling are presented. A set of extension-twist-coupled composite tubular spars, representative of the primary load carrying structure within a helicopter rotor blade, was manufactured using four plies of woven graphite/epoxy cloth 'prepreg.' These spars were non-circular in cross section design and were therefore subject to warping deformations. Three cross-sectional geometries were developed: square, D-shape, and flattened ellipse. Results from free-free vibration tests of the spars were compared with results from normal modes and frequency analyses of companion shell-finite-element models developed in MSC/NASTRAN. Five global or 'non-shell' modes were identified within the 0-2000 Hz range for each spar. The frequencies and associated mode shapes for the D-shape spar were correlated with analytical results, showing agreement within 13.8 percent. Frequencies corresponding to the five global mode shapes for the square spar agreed within 9.5 percent of the analytical results. Five global modes were similarly identified for the elliptical spar and agreed within 4.9 percent of the respective analytical results.

  13. Dynamic testing and analysis of extension-twist-coupled composite tubular spars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Renee C.; Izapanah, Amir P.; Baucon, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    The results from a study aimed at improving the dynamic and aerodynamic characteristics of composite rotor blades through the use of extension-twist elastic coupling are presented. A set of extension-twist-coupled composite tubular spars, representative of the primary load carrying structure within a helicopter rotor blade, was manufactured using four plies of woven graphite/epoxy cloth 'prepreg.' These spars were non-circular in cross section design and were therefore subject to warping deformations. Three cross-sectional geometries were developed: square, D-shape, and flattened ellipse. Results from free-free vibration tests of the spars were compared with results from normal modes and frequency analyses of companion shell-finite-element models developed in MSC/NASTRAN. Five global or 'non-shell' modes were identified within the 0-2000 Hz range for each spar. The frequencies and associated mode shapes for the D-shape spar were correlated with analytical results, showing agreement within 13.8 percent. Frequencies corresponding to the five global mode shapes for the square spar agreed within 9.5 percent of the analytical results. Five global modes were similarly identified for the elliptical spar and agreed within 4.9 percent of the respective analytical results.

  14. Judging rolling wheels: Dynamic and kinematic aspects of rotation-translation coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Heiko

    1993-01-01

    Four experiments were carried out to investigate observers' abilities to judge rolling motions. The experiments were designed to assess whether two important aspects of such motions are appreciated: the kinematic coupling of rotation and translation, and the dynamic effects of gravity. Different motion contexts of rolling wheels were created using computer-generated displays. The first experiment involved wheels rolling down an inclined plane. Observers spontaneously appreciated the anomaly of wheels that failed to accelerate, but they were not able to differentiate between different acceleration functions. Moreover, their judgements were almost exclusively based on the translation component of the rolling motion, neglecting the rotation component. In a second experiment it was found that observers could accurately estimate the perimeter of various objects. Thus, their inability to consider rotation information is not attributable to misperceptions of the geometry of wheels. In a third experiment the finding that rolling wheels appear to overrotate was replicated; however, findings from this experiment also showed, together with those from a fourth experiment, that observers are able to make very accurate judgments about translation-rotation coupling in rolling wheels when information is provided about the orientation of the wheel and the texture of the surface on which it rolls.

  15. Modeling the Dynamical Coupling of Solar Convection with the Radiative Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Allan Sacha; Miesch, Mark S.; Toomre, Juri

    2011-12-01

    The global dynamics of a rotating star like the Sun involves the coupling of a highly turbulent convective envelope overlying a seemingly benign radiative interior. We use the anelastic spherical harmonic code to develop a new class of three-dimensional models that nonlinearly couple the convective envelope to a deep stable radiative interior. The numerical simulation assumes a realistic solar stratification from r = 0.07 up to 0.97R (with R the solar radius), thus encompassing part of the nuclear core up through most of the convection zone. We find that a tachocline naturally establishes itself between the differentially rotating convective envelope and the solid body rotation of the interior, with a slow spreading that is here diffusively controlled. The rapid angular momentum redistribution in the convective envelope leads to a fast equator and slow poles, with a conical differential rotation achieved at mid-latitudes, much as has been deduced by helioseismology. The convective motions are able to overshoot downward about 0.04R into the radiative interior. However, the convective meridional circulation there is confined to a smaller penetration depth and is directed mostly equatorward at the base of the convection zone. Thermal wind balance is established in the lower convection zone and tachocline but departures are evident in the upper convection zone. Internal gravity waves are excited by the convective overshooting, yielding a complex wave field throughout the radiative interior.

  16. Optimal control strategy design based on dynamic programming for a dual-motor coupling-propulsion system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Chengning; Han, Guangwei; Wang, Qinghui

    2014-01-01

    A dual-motor coupling-propulsion electric bus (DMCPEB) is modeled, and its optimal control strategy is studied in this paper. The necessary dynamic features of energy loss for subsystems is modeled. Dynamic programming (DP) technique is applied to find the optimal control strategy including upshift threshold, downshift threshold, and power split ratio between the main motor and auxiliary motor. Improved control rules are extracted from the DP-based control solution, forming near-optimal control strategies. Simulation results demonstrate that a significant improvement in reducing energy loss due to the dual-motor coupling-propulsion system (DMCPS) running is realized without increasing the frequency of the mode switch.

  17. Dynamical mass generation in QED with magnetic fields: Arbitrary field strength and coupling constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Eduardo; Ayala, Alejandro; Bashir, Adnan; Raya, Alfredo

    2008-05-01

    We study the dynamical generation of masses for fundamental fermions in quenched quantum electrodynamics, in the presence of magnetics fields of arbitrary strength, by solving the Schwinger-Dyson equation for the fermion self-energy in the rainbow approximation. We employ the Ritus eigenfunction formalism which provides a neat solution to the technical problem of summing over all Landau levels. It is well known that magnetic fields catalyze the generation of fermion mass m for arbitrarily small values of electromagnetic coupling α. For intense fields it is also well known that m∝eB. Our approach allows us to span all regimes of parameters α and eB. We find that m∝eB provided α is small. However, when α increases beyond the critical value αc which marks the onslaught of dynamical fermion masses in vacuum, we find m∝Λ, the cutoff required to regularize the ultraviolet divergences. Our method permits us to verify the results available in literature for the limiting cases of eB and α. We also point out the relevance of our work for possible physical applications.

  18. HdeB chaperone activity is coupled to its intrinsic dynamic properties

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jienv; Yang, Chengfeng; Niu, Xiaogang; Hu, Yunfei; Jin, Changwen

    2015-01-01

    Enteric bacteria encounter extreme acidity when passing through hosts’ stomach. Since the bacterial periplasmic space quickly equilibrates with outer environment, an efficient acid resistance mechanism is essential in preventing irreversible protein denaturation/aggregation and maintaining bacteria viability. HdeB, along with its homolog HdeA, was identified as a periplasmic acid-resistant chaperone. Both proteins exist as homodimers and share similar monomeric structures under neutral pH, while showing different dimeric packing interfaces. Previous investigations show that HdeA functions through an acid-induced dimer-to-monomer transition and partial unfolding at low pH (pH 2–3), resulting in exposure of hydrophobic surfaces that bind substrate proteins. In contrast, HdeB appears to have a much higher optimal activation pH (pH 4–5), under which condition the protein maintains a well-folded dimer and the mechanism for its chaperone activity remains elusive. Herein, we present an NMR study of HdeB to investigate its dynamic properties. Our results reveal that HdeB undergoes significant micro- to milli-second timescale conformational exchanges at neutral to near-neutral pH, under the later condition it exhibits optimal activity. The current study indicates that HdeB activation is coupled to its intrinsic dynamics instead of structural changes, and therefore its functional mechanism is apparently different from HdeA. PMID:26593705

  19. Water dynamics in the rhizosphere - a new model of coupled water uptake and mucilage exudation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Eva; Holz, Maire; Ahmed, Mutez; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Bittelli, Marco; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The flow of water from soil to plant roots is affected by the narrow region of soil close to the roots, the so-called rhizosphere. The rhizosphere is influenced by mucilage, a polymeric gel exuded by roots that alters the hydraulic properties of the rhizosphere. Here we present a model that accounts for: (a) an increase in equilibrium water retention curve caused by the water holding capacity of mucilage, (b) a reduction of hydraulic conductivity at a given water content due to the higher viscosity of mucilage and (c) the swelling and shrinking dynamics by decoupling water content and water potential and introducing a non-equilibrium water retention curve. The model has been tested for mixtures of soil and mucilage and we applied it to simulate observations of previous experiments with real plants growing in soil that show evidences of altered hydraulic dynamics in the rhizosphere. Furthermore we present results about how the parameters of the model depend on soil texture and root age. Finally we couple our hydraulic model to a diffusion model of mucilage into the soil. Opposed to classical solute transport models here the water flow in the rhizosphere is affected by the concentration distribution of mucilage.

  20. Water dynamics in the rhizosphere - a new model of coupled water uptake and mucilage exudation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, E.

    2015-12-01

    The flow of water from soil to plant roots is affected by the narrow region of soil close to the roots, the so called rhizosphere. The rhizosphere is influenced by mucilage, a polymeric gel exuded by roots that alters the hydraulic properties of the rhizosphere. Here we present a model that accounts for: (a) an increase in equilibrium water retention curve caused by the water holding capacity of mucilage, (b) a reduction of hydraulic conductivity at same water content due to the higher viscosity of mucilage and (c) the swelling and shrinking dynamics by decoupling water content and water potential and introducing a non-equilibrium water retention curve. The model has been tested for mixtures of soil and mucilage and we applied it to simulate observations of previous experiments with real plants growing in soil that show evidences of altered hydraulic dynamics in the rhizosphere. Furthermore we presen results about how the parameters of the model depend on soil texture and root age. Finally we couple our hydraulic model to a diffusion model of mucilage into the soil. Opposed to classical solute transport experiments the water flow in the rhizosphere is affected by the concentration distribution of mucilage.

  1. Coupled acoustic-gravity field for dynamic evaluation of ion exchange with a single resin bead.

    PubMed

    Kanazaki, Takahiro; Hirawa, Shungo; Harada, Makoto; Okada, Tetsuo

    2010-06-01

    A coupled acoustic-gravity field is efficient for entrapping a particle at the position determined by its acoustic properties rather than its size. This field has been applied to the dynamic observation of ion-exchange reactions occurring in a single resin bead. The replacement of counterions in an ion-exchange resin induces changes in its acoustic properties, such as density and compressibility. Therefore, we can visually trace the advancement of an ion-exchange reaction as a time change in the levitation position of a resin bead entrapped in the field. Cation-exchange reactions occurring in resin beads with diameters of 40-120 microm are typically completed within 100-200 s. Ion-exchange equilibrium or kinetics is often evaluated with off-line chemical analyses, which require a batch amount of ion exchangers. Measurements with a single resin particle allow us to evaluate ion-exchange dynamics and kinetics of ions including those that are difficult to measure by usual off-line analyses. The diffusion properties of ions in resins have been successfully evaluated from the time change in the levitation positions of resin beads. PMID:20462180

  2. Exciton dynamics in a site-controlled quantum dot coupled to a photonic crystal cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Jarlov, C. Lyasota, A.; Ferrier, L.; Gallo, P.; Dwir, B.; Rudra, A.; Kapon, E.

    2015-11-09

    Exciton and cavity mode (CM) dynamics in site-controlled pyramidal quantum dots (QDs), integrated with linear photonic crystal membrane cavities, are investigated for a range of temperatures and photo-excitation power levels. The absence of spurious multi-excitonic effects, normally observed in similar structures based on self-assembled QDs, permits the observation of effects intrinsic to two-level systems embedded in a solid state matrix and interacting with optical cavity modes. The coupled exciton and CM dynamics follow the same trend, indicating that the CM is fed only by the exciton transition. The Purcell reduction of the QD and CM decay times is reproduced well by a theoretical model that includes exciton linewidth broadening and temperature dependent non-radiative processes, from which we extract a Purcell factor of 17 ± 5. For excitation powers above QD saturation, we show the influence of quantum wire barrier states at short delay time, and demonstrate the absence of multiexcitonic background emission.

  3. Conformational Dynamics of Single G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Bockenhauer, Samuel; Fürstenberg, Alexandre; Yao, Xiao Jie; Kobilka, Brian K.; Moerner, W. E.

    2011-01-01

    G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of seven-helix transmembrane proteins which regulate cellular signaling by sensing light, ligands, and binding proteins. The GPCR activation process, however, is not a simple on-off switch; current models suggest a complex conformational landscape in which the active, signaling state includes multiple conformations with similar downstream activity. The present study probes the conformational dynamics of single β2-Adrenergic Receptors (β2ARs) in the solution phase by Anti-Brownian ELectrokinetic (ABEL) trapping. The ABEL trap uses fast electrokinetic feedback in a microfluidic configuration to allow direct observation of a single fluorescently-labeled β2AR for hundreds of milliseconds to seconds. By choosing a reporter dye and labeling site sensitive to ligand binding, we observe a diversity of discrete fluorescence intensity and lifetime levels in single β2ARs, indicating a varying radiative lifetime and a range of discrete conformational states with dwell times of hundreds of milliseconds. We find that binding of agonist increases the dwell times of these states, and furthermore, we observe millisecond fluctuations within states. The intensity autocorrelations of these faster fluctuations are well-described by stretched exponential functions with stretching exponent β ~ 0.5, suggesting protein dynamics over a range of timescales. PMID:21928818

  4. Bacterial chemoreceptor dynamics correlate with activity state and are coupled over long distances

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Dipanjan; Borbat, Peter P.; Dzikovski, Boris; Freed, Jack H.; Crane, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics are hypothesized to play an important role in the transmission of signals across membranes by receptors. Bacterial chemoreceptors are long helical proteins that consist of a periplasmic ligand-binding domain; a transmembrane region; a cytoplasmic HAMP (histidine kinase, adenylyl cyclases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, and phosphatases) domain; and a kinase-control module (KCM). The KCM is further composed of adaptation, hinge, and protein interaction regions (PIRs), the latter of which binds the histidine kinase CheA and adaptor CheW. Fusions of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor KCM to HAMP domains of defined structure (H1-Tar vs. H1-2-Tar) give opposite responses in phosphotransfer and cellular assays, despite similar binding to CheA and CheW. Pulsed dipolar ESR spectroscopy (PDS) of these isolated on and off dimeric effectors reveals that, in the kinase-on state, the HAMP is more conformationally destabilized compared with the PIR, whereas in the kinase-off state, the HAMP is more compact, and the PIR samples a greater breadth of conformations. On and off HAMP states produce different conformational effects at the KCM junction, but these differences decrease through the adaptation region and into the hinge only to return with the inverted relationship in the PIR. Continuous wave–ESR of the spin-labeled proteins confirms that broader PDS distance distributions correlate with increased rates of dynamics. Conformational breadth in the adaptation region changes with charge alterations caused by modification enzymes. Activating modifications broaden the HAMP conformational ensemble but correspondingly, compact the PIR. Thus, chemoreceptors behave as coupled units, in which dynamics in regions proximal and distal to the membrane change coherently but with opposite sign. PMID:25675479

  5. Water protein dynamic coupling and new opportunities for probing it at low to physiological temperatures in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Both the structure and dynamics of biomolecules are known to be essential for their biological function. In the dehydrated state, the function of biomolecules, such as proteins, is severely impeded, so hydration is required for bioactivity. The dynamics of the hydrated biomolecules and their hydration water are related - but how closely? The problem involves several layers of complexity. Even for water in the bulk state, the contribution from various dynamic components to the overall dynamics is not fully understood. In biological systems, the effects of confinement on the hydration water further complicate the picture. Even if the various components of the hydration water dynamics are properly understood, which of them are coupled to the protein dynamics, and how? The studies of protein dynamics over the wide temperature range, from physiological to low temperatures, provide some answers to these question. At low temperatures, both the protein and its hydration water behave as solids, with only vibrational degrees of freedom. As the temperature is increased, non-vibrational dynamic components start contributing to the measurable dynamics and eventually become dominant at physiological temperatures. Thus, the temperature dependence of the dynamics of protein and its hydration water may allow probing various dynamic components separately. In order to suppress the water freezing, the low-temperature studies of protein rely on either low-hydrated samples (essentially, hydrated protein powders), or cryo-protective solutions. Both approaches introduce the hydration environments not characteristic of the protein environments in living systems, which are typically aqueous protein solutions of various concentrations. In this paper, we discuss the coupling between the dynamic components of the protein and its hydration water by critical examining of the existing literature, and then propose that proteins can be studied in an aqueous solution that is remarkably similar in

  6. Establishment and verification of three-dimensional dynamic model for heavy-haul train-track coupled system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengfei; Zhai, Wanming; Wang, Kaiyun

    2016-11-01

    For the long heavy-haul train, the basic principles of the inter-vehicle interaction and train-track dynamic interaction are analysed firstly. Based on the theories of train longitudinal dynamics and vehicle-track coupled dynamics, a three-dimensional (3-D) dynamic model of the heavy-haul train-track coupled system is established through a modularised method. Specifically, this model includes the subsystems such as the train control, the vehicle, the wheel-rail relation and the line geometries. And for the calculation of the wheel-rail interaction force under the driving or braking conditions, the large creep phenomenon that may occur within the wheel-rail contact patch is considered. For the coupler and draft gear system, the coupler forces in three directions and the coupler lateral tilt angles in curves are calculated. Then, according to the characteristics of the long heavy-haul train, an efficient solving method is developed to improve the computational efficiency for such a large system. Some basic principles which should be followed in order to meet the requirement of calculation accuracy are determined. Finally, the 3-D train-track coupled model is verified by comparing the calculated results with the running test results. It is indicated that the proposed dynamic model could simulate the dynamic performance of the heavy-haul train well.

  7. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of a Warming Event in a Coupled Tropical Atmosphere-Ocean Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battisti, David S.

    1988-10-01

    A simple coupled ocean-atmosphere model, similar to that of Zebiak and Cane, is used to examine the dynamic and thermodynamic processes associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The model is run for 300 years. The interannual variability which results is regular, with a period of either 3 or 4 years, quantized by the annual cycle. The amplitude (1.5 m s1 wind and 2°C SST anomalies), period and structure of the interannual variability compare well with observations. The model warm event is initiated in the spring prior to the event peak, and is well described as an instability of the coupled system. During instability growth, the sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly is primarily generated by vertical upwelling processes. The SST anomaly can be approximately described by the expression T/t = KTh (T, where T is the SST anomaly, t time, h the upper layer thickness (pycnocline) perturbation and ( an effective damping time which includes heat loss to the atmosphere. KT parameterizes vertical upwelling and mixed layer processes.Oceanic wave dynamics determines the fate of the growing instability. The warming of the SST produces westerly wind anomalies in the equator central Pacific, forcing equatorially trapped Rossby waves that propagate freely to the western boundary. These waves reflect at the western boundary, sending upwelling equatorial Kelvin waves back to the central basin. These cooling Kelvin waves act to terminate instability growth and rapidly plunge the coupled system into a cold regime. The western boundary reflection is necessary for event termination. The system returns from a cold regime via reduced heat flux to the atmosphere and, to a lesser extent, by wave induced processes like that which lead to the warm event termination. The interannual variability is not produced by vacillation between two equilibrium states: a cold and a warm state. The growth rate to either the cold or warm state is too slow for the system to achieve equilibrium

  8. Instability and dynamics of two nonlinearly coupled intense laser beams in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yunliang; Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.

    2013-01-15

    We consider nonlinear interactions between two relativistically strong laser beams and a quantum plasma composed of degenerate electron fluids and immobile ions. The collective behavior of degenerate electrons is modeled by quantum hydrodynamic equations composed of the electron continuity, quantum electron momentum (QEM) equation, as well as the Poisson and Maxwell equations. The QEM equation accounts the quantum statistical electron pressure, the quantum electron recoil due to electron tunneling through the quantum Bohm potential, electron-exchange, and electron-correlation effects caused by electron spin, and relativistic ponderomotive forces (RPFs) of two circularly polarized electromagnetic (CPEM) beams. The dynamics of the latter are governed by nonlinear wave equations that include nonlinear currents arising from the relativistic electron mass increase in the CPEM wave fields, as well as from the beating of the electron quiver velocity and electron density variations reinforced by the RPFs of the two CPEM waves. Furthermore, nonlinear electron density variations associated with the driven (by the RPFs) quantum electron plasma oscillations obey a coupled nonlinear Schroedinger and Poisson equations. The nonlinearly coupled equations for our purposes are then used to obtain a general dispersion relation (GDR) for studying the parametric instabilities and the localization of CPEM wave packets in a quantum plasma. Numerical analyses of the GDR reveal that the growth rate of a fastest growing parametrically unstable mode is in agreement with the result that has been deduced from numerical simulations of the governing nonlinear equations. Explicit numerical results for two-dimensional (2D) localized CPEM wave packets at nanoscales are also presented. Possible applications of our investigation to intense laser-solid density compressed plasma experiments are highlighted.

  9. Instability and dynamics of two nonlinearly coupled intense laser beams in a quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunliang; Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.

    2013-01-01

    We consider nonlinear interactions between two relativistically strong laser beams and a quantum plasma composed of degenerate electron fluids and immobile ions. The collective behavior of degenerate electrons is modeled by quantum hydrodynamic equations composed of the electron continuity, quantum electron momentum (QEM) equation, as well as the Poisson and Maxwell equations. The QEM equation accounts the quantum statistical electron pressure, the quantum electron recoil due to electron tunneling through the quantum Bohm potential, electron-exchange, and electron-correlation effects caused by electron spin, and relativistic ponderomotive forces (RPFs) of two circularly polarized electromagnetic (CPEM) beams. The dynamics of the latter are governed by nonlinear wave equations that include nonlinear currents arising from the relativistic electron mass increase in the CPEM wave fields, as well as from the beating of the electron quiver velocity and electron density variations reinforced by the RPFs of the two CPEM waves. Furthermore, nonlinear electron density variations associated with the driven (by the RPFs) quantum electron plasma oscillations obey a coupled nonlinear Schrödinger and Poisson equations. The nonlinearly coupled equations for our purposes are then used to obtain a general dispersion relation (GDR) for studying the parametric instabilities and the localization of CPEM wave packets in a quantum plasma. Numerical analyses of the GDR reveal that the growth rate of a fastest growing parametrically unstable mode is in agreement with the result that has been deduced from numerical simulations of the governing nonlinear equations. Explicit numerical results for two-dimensional (2D) localized CPEM wave packets at nanoscales are also presented. Possible applications of our investigation to intense laser-solid density compressed plasma experiments are highlighted.

  10. The National Science Foundation's Coupling, Energetics and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions (CEDAR) Student Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sox, L.; Duly, T.; Emery, B.

    2014-12-01

    The National Science Foundation sponsors Coupling, Energetics, and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions (CEDAR) Workshops, which have been held every summer, for the past 29 years. CEDAR Workshops are on the order of a week long and at various locations with the goal of being close to university campuses where CEDAR type scientific research is done. Although there is no formal student group within the CEDAR community, the workshops are very student-focused. Roughly half the Workshop participants are students. There are two Student Representatives on the CEDAR Science Steering Committee (CSSC), the group of scientists who organize the CEDAR Workshops. Each Student Representative is nominated by his or her peers, chosen by the CSSC and then serves a two year term. Each year, one of the Student Representatives is responsible for organizing and moderating a day-long session targeted for students, made up of tutorial talks, which aim to prepare both undergraduate and graduate students for the topics that will be discussed in the main CEDAR Workshop. The theme of this session changes every year. Past themes have included: upper atmospheric instrumentation, numerical modeling, atmospheric waves and tides, magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, equatorial aeronomy and many others. Frequently, the Student Workshop has ended with a panel of post-docs, researchers and professors who discuss pressing questions from the students about the next steps they will take in their careers. As the present and past CSSC Student Representatives, we will recount a brief history of the CEDAR Workshops, our experiences serving on the CSSC and organizing the Student Workshop, a summary of the feedback we collected about the Student Workshops and what it's like to be student in the CEDAR community.

  11. Peptaibol Zervamicin IIB Structure and Dynamics Refinement from Transhydrogen Bond J Couplings

    PubMed Central

    Shenkarev, Z. O.; Balashova, T. A.; Yakimenko, Z. A.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.; Arseniev, A. S.

    2004-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB (Zrv-IIB) is a channel-forming peptaibol antibiotic of fungal origin. The measured transhydrogen bond 3hJNC′ couplings in methanol solution heaving average value of −0.41 Hz indicate that the stability of the Zrv-IIB helix in this milieu is comparable to the stability of helices in globular proteins. The N-terminus of the peptide forms an α-helix, whereas 310-helical hydrogen bonds stabilize the C-terminus. However, two weak transhydrogen bond peaks are observed in a long-range HNCO spectrum for HN Aib12. Energy calculations using the Empirical Conformation Energy Program for Peptides (ECEPP)/2 force field and the implicit solvent model show that the middle of the peptide helix accommodates a bifurcated hydrogen bond that is simultaneously formed between HN Aib12 and CO Leu8 and CO Aib9. Several lowered 3hJNC′ on a polar face of the helix correlate with the conformational exchange process observed earlier and imply dynamic distortions of a hydrogen bond pattern with the predominant population of a properly folded helical structure. The refined structure of Zrv-IIB on the basis of the observed hydrogen bond pattern has a small (∼20°) angle of helix bending that is virtually identical to the angle of bending in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles, indicating the stability of a hinge region in different environments. NMR parameters (1HN chemical shifts and transpeptide bond 1JNC′ couplings) sensitive to hydrogen bonding along with the solvent accessible surface area of carbonyl oxygens indicate a large polar patch on the convex side of the helix formed by three exposed backbone carbonyls of Aib7, Aib9, and Hyp10 and polar side chains of Hyp10, Gln11, and Hyp13. The unique structural features, high helix stability and the enhanced polar patch, set apart Zrv-IIB from other peptaibols (for example, alamethicin) and possibly underlie its biological and physiological properties. PMID:15189865

  12. Phase-space-Lagrangian action principle and the generalized K-X theorem. [in covariant coupled equations for plasma dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Allan N.

    1987-01-01

    The covariant coupled equations for plasma dynamics and the Maxwell field are expressed as a phase-space-Lagrangian action principle. The linear interaction is transformed to the bilinear beat Hamiltonian by a gauge-invariant Lagrangian Lie transform. The result yields the generalized linear susceptibility directly.

  13. Physics and dynamics coupling across scales in the next generation CESM: Meeting the challenge of high resolution. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Vincent E.

    2015-02-21

    This is a final report for a SciDAC grant supported by BER. The project implemented a novel technique for coupling small-scale dynamics and microphysics into a community climate model. The technique uses subcolumns that are sampled in Monte Carlo fashion from a distribution of subgrid variability. The resulting global simulations show several improvements over the status quo.

  14. Spatiotemporal splitting of global eigenmodes due to cross-field coupling via vortex dynamics in drift wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C; Thakur, S C; Light, A D; Negrete, J; Tynan, G R

    2014-12-31

    Spatiotemporal splitting events of drift wave (DW) eigenmodes due to nonlinear coupling are investigated in a cylindrical helicon plasma device. DW eigenmodes in the radial-azimuthal cross section have been experimentally observed to split at radial locations and recombine into the global eigenmode with a time shorter than the typical DW period (t≪fDW(-1)). The number of splits correlates with the increase of turbulence. The observed dynamics can be theoretically reproduced by a Kuramoto-type model of a network of radially coupled azimuthal eigenmodes. Coupling by E×B-vortex convection cell dynamics and ion gyro radii motion leads to cross-field synchronization and occasional mode splitting events. PMID:25615346

  15. Spatiotemporal splitting of global eigenmodes due to cross-field coupling via vortex dynamics in drift wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C; Thakur, S C; Light, A D; Negrete, J; Tynan, G R

    2014-12-31

    Spatiotemporal splitting events of drift wave (DW) eigenmodes due to nonlinear coupling are investigated in a cylindrical helicon plasma device. DW eigenmodes in the radial-azimuthal cross section have been experimentally observed to split at radial locations and recombine into the global eigenmode with a time shorter than the typical DW period (t≪fDW(-1)). The number of splits correlates with the increase of turbulence. The observed dynamics can be theoretically reproduced by a Kuramoto-type model of a network of radially coupled azimuthal eigenmodes. Coupling by E×B-vortex convection cell dynamics and ion gyro radii motion leads to cross-field synchronization and occasional mode splitting events.

  16. Coupled flow-polymer dynamics via statistical field theory: Modeling and computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceniceros, Hector D.; Fredrickson, Glenn H.; Mohler, George O.

    2009-03-01

    Field-theoretic models, which replace interactions between polymers with interactions between polymers and one or more conjugate fields, offer a systematic framework for coarse-graining of complex fluids systems. While this approach has been used successfully to investigate a wide range of polymer formulations at equilibrium, field-theoretic models often fail to accurately capture the non-equilibrium behavior of polymers, especially in the early stages of phase separation. Here the "two-fluid" approach serves as a useful alternative, treating the motions of fluid components separately in order to incorporate asymmetries between polymer molecules. In this work we focus on the connection of these two theories, drawing upon the strengths of each of the approaches in order to couple polymer microstructure with the dynamics of the flow in a systematic way. For illustrative purposes we work with an inhomogeneous melt of elastic dumbbell polymers, though our methodology will apply more generally to a wide variety of inhomogeneous systems. First we derive the model, incorporating thermodynamic forces into a two-fluid model for the flow through the introduction of conjugate chemical potential and elastic strain fields for the polymer density and stress. The resulting equations are composed of a system of fourth order PDEs coupled with a non-linear, non-local optimization problem to determine the conjugate fields. The coupled system is severely stiff and with a high degree of computational complexity. Next, we overcome the formidable numerical challenges posed by the model by designing a robust semi-implicit method based on linear asymptotic behavior of the leading order terms at small scales, by exploiting the exponential structure of global (integral) operators, and by parallelizing the non-linear optimization problem. The semi-implicit method effectively removes the fourth order stability constraint associated with explicit methods and we observe only a first order time

  17. Dynamic coupling between fluid flow and vein growth in fractures: a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J.-O.; Enzmann, F.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid flow is one of the main mass transport mechanisms in the Earth's crust and abundant mineral vein networks are important indicators for fluid flow and fluid rock interaction. These systems are dynamic and part of the so called RTM processes (reaction-transport-mechanics). Understanding of mineral vein systems requires coupling of these processes. Here we present a conceptional model for dynamic vein growth of syntaxial, posttectonic veins generated by advective fluid flow and show first results of a numerical model for this scenario. Vein generation requires three processes to occur: (i) fracture generation by mechanical stress e.g. hydro-fracturing, (ii) flow of a supersaturated fluid on that fracture and (iii) crystallization of phase(s) on or in the fracture. 3D synthetic fractures are generated with the SynFrac code (Ogilvie, et al. 2006). Subsequently solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation for this fracture are computed by a computational fluid dynamics code called GeoDict (Wiegmann 2007). Transport (advective and diffusive) of chemical species to growth sites in the fracture and vein growth are computed by a self-written MATLAB script. The numerical model discretizes the wall rock and fracture geometry by volumetric pixels (voxels). Based on this representation, the model computes the three basic functions for vein generation: (a) nucleation, (b) fluid flow with transport of chemical species and (c) growth. The following conditions were chosen for these three modules. Nucleation is heterogeneous and occurs instantaneously at the wall rock/fracture interface. Advective and diffusive flow of a supersaturated fluid and related transport of chemical species occurs according to the computed fluid flow field by GeoDict. Concentration of chemical species at the inflow is constant, representing external fluid buffering. Changes/decrease in the concentration of chemical species occurs only due to vein growth. Growth of nuclei is limited either by transport of

  18. Coupling of Caged Molecule Dynamics to JG β-Relaxation II: Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ngai, K L; Capaccioli, S; Prevosto, D; Wang, Li-Min

    2015-09-24

    At temperatures below the nominal glass transition temperature Tgα, the structural α-relaxation and the Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation are too slow to contribute to susceptibility measured at frequencies higher than 1 GHz. This is particularly clear in the neighborhood of the secondary glass transition temperature Tgβ, which can be obtained directly by positronium annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and adiabatic calorimetry, or deduced from the temperature at which the JG β-relaxation time τβ reaches 1000 s. The fast process at such high frequencies comes from the vibrations and caged molecules dynamics manifested as the nearly constant loss (NCL) in susceptibility measurements, elastic scattering intensity, I(Q, T), or the mean-square-displacement, ⟨u(2)(T)⟩, in quasielastic neutron scattering experiment. Remarkably, we find for many different glass-formers that the NCL, I, or ⟨u(2)⟩ measured in the glassy state changes its temperature dependence at temperature THF near Tgβ. In paper I (Capaccioli, S.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2015, 119 (28), 8800-8808) we have made known this property in the case of the polyalcohols and a pharmaceutical glass former, flufenamic acid studied by THz dielectric spectroscopy, and explained it by the coupling of the NCL to the JG β-relaxation, and the density dependence of these processes. In this paper II, we extend the consideration of the high frequency response to broader range from 100 MHz to THz in the glassy state of many polymers observed by quasielastic light scattering, Brillouin scattering, quasielastic neutron scattering, and GHz-THz dielectric relaxation. In all cases, the NCL changes its T-dependence at some temperature, THF, below Tgα, which is approximately the same as Tgβ. The latter is independently determined by PALS, or adiabatic calorimetry, or low frequency dielectric and mechanical spectroscopy. The property, THF ≈ Tgβ, had not been pointed out before by others or in any of the

  19. The solar activity dependence of wave dynamical vertical coupling of atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, F. I.; Duggirala, P. R.; Lakshmi, T. V.; Reddy, M. A.; Veenadhari, B.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-12-01

    Analysis of oxygen dayglow emissions at OI 557.7, OI 630.0, and OI 777.4 nm showed that the wave dynamical vertical coupling of atmospheres is solar activity dependent. These emission intensities are obtained during January-March in the years 2011 and 2012 from Hyderabad (17.5oN, 78.5oE), India, using a high-spectral resolution multi-wavelength imaging echelle spectrograph (MISE). Spectral analysis of the variations revealed that oscillation periods near the atmospheric free-normal modes of 5, 10, 16, and 25 days (that are produced mainly in the troposphere) are found to register their presence in the upper atmospheric emission intensities. In an earlier study during high solar activity period (2001), the sunspot numbers (SSN) and the daily averaged OI 630.0 nm dayglow intensities were seen to be co-varying. In contrast, the variability in the dayglow emission intensities during relatively low solar activity period (2011) shows no or weaker correlation with that of the SSN but a greater similarity with that of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) strength. Whereas, oscillations of both lower atmospheric normal modes and those related to sunspot are found during moderate solar activity (2012). These results suggest that the upper atmosphere responds mainly to lower atmospheric forcing during low solar activity, to solar forcing during high solar activity, and to both lower atmosphere and solar forcings during moderate solar activity level. A statistical study of the shorter period variations in the gravity wave regime showed they are present in greater numbers in the thermosphere during higher solar activity, which is ascribed to be due to decreasing wave dissipation with increasing solar activity. These results will be presented in the context of short- and long-period wave dynamics in the whole atmosphere.

  20. Coupled Wave-Sediment Dynamics on the Atchafalaya shelf, Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, S.; Sheremet, A.; Allison, M.

    2006-12-01

    We present a set of field observations of wave, current and sediment dynamics on the muddy, shallow (less than 5-m water depth) inner Atchafalaya shelf, Louisiana, USA. Two instrumented platforms were deployed for over two months in Spring 2006, a period of the year characterized by transient, relatively energetic sea states associated with cold front passages. The platforms collected high-resolution measurements of wave, current, and sediment motion (e.g. downward-looking PC- ADPs sampled the velocity in the first 50 cm above the bottom at 2 Hz, in 17 3-cm bins). Suspended sediment concentration was monitored using optical backscatter sensors (OBS) and laser devices (LISST). Lutocline formation and the position of the bottom was monitored using the PC-ADP bottom-tracker beam and acoustic backscatter sensors (ABS). Episodic fluid mud layers are observed to form during and in the wake of, energetic wave events. Observations of bottom position and vertical current velocity structure suggest that high density sediment suspension (fluid mud) layers can be generated both through direct liquefaction of the bottom sediment by energetic swell, and by increased sediment concentration due to a combination of advection and sediment settling processes. Even though the bottom gradient in the area is very low (less than 0.001), in some instances the direction of the flow within the fluid mud layer was seaward, opposite to the direction of the upper water-column current, suggesting that the origin of the layer might be a gravitational flow. Surface wave dissipation is strongly correlated to fluid-mud layer formation, increasing from negligible values in relatively calm weather to about 60% wave energy loss over about 10 km in the presence of fluid muds. The observations suggest a significant coupling between wave, current, and sediment dynamics during energetic events. Continuous data analysis work focuses on the study of near-bottom wave nonlinearities, turbulence, and modeling

  1. Parallel shear flow instabilities in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids: A comparison of generalized hydrodynamic model and molecular dynamics results

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwin, J.; Ganesh, R.

    2010-10-15

    Using a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model, the growth rate spectra of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability has been obtained analytically for a step shear profile in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids. The class of shear flows studied is assumed to be incompressible in nature. The growth rate spectra calculated exhibit viscous damping at high mode numbers, destabilization at stronger coupling, and in the limit {tau}{sub m} (viscoelastic relaxation time){yields}0, reduce to the regular Navier-Stokes growth rate spectra. A direct comparison is made with previous molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [Ashwin J. and R. Ganesh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 215003 (2010)] of KH instability. We find that for a given value of Reynolds number R and coupling parameter 1<{Gamma}<100, the GH and MD growth rates are in a qualitative agreement. The inclusion of the effect of shear heating as an effective coupling parameter {Gamma}{sub e} appears to improve the quantitative comparison as well.

  2. Dynamical behavior and peak power reduction in a pair of energy storage oscillators coupled by delayed power price

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukunaga, Tomohiro; Imasaka, Tomoaki; Ito, Akira; Sugitani, Yoshiki; Konishi, Keiji; Hara, Naoyuki

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates dynamics of a management system for controlling a pair of energy storages. The system involves the following two characteristics: each storage behaves in a manner that reduces the number of charge noncharge cycles and begins to be charged when the price of power is lower than a particular price threshold. The price is proportional to the past total power flow from a power grid to all storages. A peak of the total power flow occurs when these storages are charged simultaneously. From the viewpoint of nonlinear dynamics, the energy storages can be considered as relaxation oscillators coupled by a delay connection. Our analytical results suggest that the peak can be reduced by inducing an antiphase synchronization in coupled oscillators. We confirm these analytical results through numerical simulations. In addition, we numerically investigate the dynamical behavior in 10 storages and find that time delay in the connection is important in reducing the peak.

  3. Dynamical behavior and peak power reduction in a pair of energy storage oscillators coupled by delayed power price.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Tomohiro; Imasaka, Tomoaki; Ito, Akira; Sugitani, Yoshiki; Konishi, Keiji; Hara, Naoyuki

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates dynamics of a management system for controlling a pair of energy storages. The system involves the following two characteristics: each storage behaves in a manner that reduces the number of charge noncharge cycles and begins to be charged when the price of power is lower than a particular price threshold. The price is proportional to the past total power flow from a power grid to all storages. A peak of the total power flow occurs when these storages are charged simultaneously. From the viewpoint of nonlinear dynamics, the energy storages can be considered as relaxation oscillators coupled by a delay connection. Our analytical results suggest that the peak can be reduced by inducing an antiphase synchronization in coupled oscillators. We confirm these analytical results through numerical simulations. In addition, we numerically investigate the dynamical behavior in 10 storages and find that time delay in the connection is important in reducing the peak.

  4. Movement dynamics reflect a functional role for weak coupling and role structure in dyadic problem solving.

    PubMed

    Abney, Drew H; Paxton, Alexandra; Dale, Rick; Kello, Christopher T

    2015-11-01

    Successful interaction requires complex coordination of body movements. Previous research has suggested a functional role for coordination and especially synchronization (i.e., time-locked movement across individuals) in different types of human interaction contexts. Although such coordination has been shown to be nearly ubiquitous in human interaction, less is known about its function. One proposal is that synchrony supports and facilitates communication (Topics Cogn Sci 1:305-319, 2009). However, questions still remain about what the properties of coordination for optimizing communication might look like. In the present study, dyads worked together to construct towers from uncooked spaghetti and marshmallows. Using cross-recurrence quantification analysis, we found that dyads with loosely coupled gross body movements performed better, supporting recent work suggesting that simple synchrony may not be the key to effective performance (Riley et al. 2011). We also found evidence that leader-follower dynamics-when sensitive to the specific role structure of the interaction-impact task performance. We discuss our results with respect to the functional role of coordination in human interaction.

  5. Coupled Attitude and Orbit Dynamics and Control in Formation Flying Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Yun-Jun; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Mason, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Formation flying systems can range from global constellations offering extended service coverage to clusters of highly coordinated vehicles that perform distributed sensing. Recently, the use of groups of micro-satellites in the areas of near Earth explorations, deep space explorations, and military applications has received considerable attention by researchers and practitioners. To date, most proposed control strategies are based on linear models (e.g., Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations) or nonlinear models that are restricted to circular reference orbits. Also, all models in the literature are uncoupled between relative position and relative attitude. In this paper, a generalized dynamic model is proposed. The reference orbit is not restricted to the circular case. In this formulation, the leader or follower satellite can be in either a circular or an elliptic orbit. In addition to maintaining a specified relative position, the satellites are also required to maintain specified relative attitudes. Thus the model presented couples vehicle attitude and orbit requirements. Orbit perturbations are also included. In particular, the J(sub 2) effects are accounted in the model. Finally, a sliding mode controller is developed and used to control the relative attitude of the formation and the simulation results are presented.

  6. Dynamic strain-mediated coupling of a single diamond spin to a mechanical resonator

    PubMed Central

    Ovartchaiyapong, Preeti; Lee, Kenneth W.; Myers, Bryan A.; Jayich, Ania C. Bleszynski

    2014-01-01

    The development of hybrid quantum systems is central to the advancement of emerging quantum technologies, including quantum information science and quantum-assisted sensing. The recent demonstration of high-quality single-crystal diamond resonators has led to significant interest in a hybrid system consisting of nitrogen–vacancy centre spins that interact with the resonant phonon modes of a macroscopic mechanical resonator through crystal strain. However, the nitrogen–vacancy spin–strain interaction has not been well characterized. Here, we demonstrate dynamic, strain-mediated coupling of the mechanical motion of a diamond cantilever to the spin of an embedded nitrogen–vacancy centre. Via quantum control of the spin, we quantitatively characterize the axial and transverse strain sensitivities of the nitrogen–vacancy ground-state spin. The nitrogen–vacancy centre is an atomic scale sensor and we demonstrate spin-based strain imaging with a strain sensitivity of 3 × 10−6 strain Hz−1/2. Finally, we show how this spin-resonator system could enable coherent spin–phonon interactions in the quantum regime. PMID:25034828

  7. PEATBOG: a biogeochemical model for analyzing coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics in northern peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Blodau, C.

    2013-03-01

    Elevated nitrogen deposition and climate change alter the vegetation communities and carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in peatlands. To address this issue we developed a new process-oriented biogeochemical model (PEATBOG) for analyzing coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics in northern peatlands. The model consists of four submodels, which simulate: (1) daily water table depth and depth profiles of soil moisture, temperature and oxygen levels; (2) competition among three plants functional types (PFTs), production and litter production of plants; (3) decomposition of peat; and (4) production, consumption, diffusion and export of dissolved C and N species in soil water. The model is novel in the integration of the C and N cycles, the explicit spatial resolution belowground, the consistent conceptualization of movement of water and solutes, the incorporation of stoichiometric controls on elemental fluxes and a consistent conceptualization of C and N reactivity in vegetation and soil organic matter. The model was evaluated for the Mer Bleue Bog, near Ottawa, Ontario, with regards to simulation of soil moisture and temperature and the most important processes in the C and N cycles. Model sensitivity was tested for nitrogen input, precipitation, and temperature, and the choices of the most uncertain parameters were justified. A simulation of nitrogen deposition over 40 yr demonstrates the advantages of the PEATBOG model in tracking biogeochemical effects and vegetation change in the ecosystem.

  8. PEATBOG: a biogeochemical model for analyzing coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics in northern peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Blodau, C.

    2013-08-01

    Elevated nitrogen deposition and climate change alter the vegetation communities and carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in peatlands. To address this issue we developed a new process-oriented biogeochemical model (PEATBOG) for analyzing coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics in northern peatlands. The model consists of four submodels, which simulate: (1) daily water table depth and depth profiles of soil moisture, temperature and oxygen levels; (2) competition among three plants functional types (PFTs), production and litter production of plants; (3) decomposition of peat; and (4) production, consumption, diffusion and export of dissolved C and N species in soil water. The model is novel in the integration of the C and N cycles, the explicit spatial resolution belowground, the consistent conceptualization of movement of water and solutes, the incorporation of stoichiometric controls on elemental fluxes and a consistent conceptualization of C and N reactivity in vegetation and soil organic matter. The model was evaluated for the Mer Bleue Bog, near Ottawa, Ontario, with regards to simulation of soil moisture and temperature and the most important processes in the C and N cycles. Model sensitivity was tested for nitrogen input, precipitation, and temperature, and the choices of the most uncertain parameters were justified. A simulation of nitrogen deposition over 40 yr demonstrates the advantages of the PEATBOG model in tracking biogeochemical effects and vegetation change in the ecosystem.

  9. Dynamics of a coupled spin-vortex pair in dipolar spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiantian; Yi, Su; Zhang, Yunbo

    2016-05-01

    The collisional and magnetic field quench dynamics of a coupled spin-vortex pair in dipolar spinor Bose-Einstein condensates in a double-well potential are numerically investigated in the mean-field theory. Upon a sudden release of the potential barrier the two layers of condensates collide with each other in the trap center with the chirality of the vortex pair exchanged after each collision, showing the typical signature of in-phase collision for the parallel spin-vortex phase, and out-of-phase collision for the antiparallel phase. When quenching the transverse magnetic field, the vortex center in the single-layered condensate starts to make a helical motion with oval-shaped trajectories and the displacement of the center position is found to exhibit a damped simple harmonic oscillation with an intrinsic frequency and damping rate. The oscillation mode of the spin-vortex pair may be tuned by the initial magnetic field and the height of the Gaussian barrier; e.g., the gyrotropic motions for a parallel spin-vortex pair are out of sync with each other in the two layers, while those for the antiparallel pair exhibit a double-helix structure with the vortex centers moving opposite to each other with the same amplitude.

  10. Quantifying shallow subsurface water and heat dynamics using coupled hydrological-thermal-geophysical inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuong Tran, Anh; Dafflon, Baptiste; Hubbard, Susan S.; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Long, Philip; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2016-08-01

    Improving our ability to estimate the parameters that control water and heat fluxes in the shallow subsurface is particularly important due to their strong control on recharge, evaporation and biogeochemical processes. The objectives of this study are to develop and test a new inversion scheme to simultaneously estimate subsurface hydrological, thermal and petrophysical parameters using hydrological, thermal and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data. The inversion scheme - which is based on a nonisothermal, multiphase hydrological model - provides the desired subsurface property estimates in high spatiotemporal resolution. A particularly novel aspect of the inversion scheme is the explicit incorporation of the dependence of the subsurface electrical resistivity on both moisture and temperature. The scheme was applied to synthetic case studies, as well as to real datasets that were autonomously collected at a biogeochemical field study site in Rifle, Colorado. At the Rifle site, the coupled hydrological-thermal-geophysical inversion approach well predicted the matric potential, temperature and apparent resistivity with the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency criterion greater than 0.92. Synthetic studies found that neglecting the subsurface temperature variability, and its effect on the electrical resistivity in the hydrogeophysical inversion, may lead to an incorrect estimation of the hydrological parameters. The approach is expected to be especially useful for the increasing number of studies that are taking advantage of autonomously collected ERT and soil measurements to explore complex terrestrial system dynamics.

  11. A molecular dynamics study of phase transition in strongly coupled pair-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baruah, Swati; Ganesh, R.; Avinash, K.

    2015-08-15

    Existence of phase transition in strongly coupled pair-ion plasmas with soft core is investigated. Extensive Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are performed in the canonical ensemble, for such plasmas, at different temperatures, to analyze phase stability. Our studies show interesting phase co-existence between liquid-like and vapor-like phases. The different phases are identified by calculating the ensemble averaged density. This and the corresponding critical properties are calculated directly from MD simulation. The critical temperature of vapor-liquid coexistence is obtained, and the corresponding critical value of density is also estimated for different sizes of the soft core. We have used a novel method that allows the location of phase coexistence through a constant density simulation in which the temperature is changed in a single time-step (quenching) in order to place the system in a thermodynamically and mechanically unstable state, resulting in spontaneous separation of two coexisting phases. The results obtained from this temperature quench MD method also show the coexistence of vapor-liquid phase in pair-ion plasmas. The critical exponents obtained directly from MD simulation are found to be in close agreement with the values predicted by a mean-field theory.

  12. Capacitively coupled hydrogen plasmas sustained by tailored voltage waveforms: excitation dynamics and ion flux asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneau, B.; Diomede, P.; Economou, D. J.; Longo, S.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.; Greb, A.; Johnson, E.; Booth, J.-P.

    2016-08-01

    Parallel plate capacitively coupled plasmas in hydrogen at relatively high pressure (~1 Torr) are excited with tailored voltage waveforms containing up to five frequencies. Predictions of a hybrid model combining a particle-in-cell simulation with Monte Carlo collisions and a fluid model are compared to phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy measurements, yielding information on the dynamics of the excitation rate in these discharges. When the discharge is excited with amplitude asymmetric waveforms, the discharge becomes electrically asymmetric, with different ion energies at each of the two electrodes. Unexpectedly, large differences in the \\text{H}2+ fluxes to each of the two electrodes are caused by the different \\text{H}3+ energies. When the discharge is excited with slope asymmetric waveforms, only weak electrical asymmetry of the discharge is observed. In this case, electron power absorption due to fast sheath expansion at one electrode is balanced by electron power absorption at the opposite electrode due to a strong electric field reversal.

  13. Trion fine structure and coupled spin–valley dynamics in monolayer tungsten disulfide

    PubMed Central

    Plechinger, Gerd; Nagler, Philipp; Arora, Ashish; Schmidt, Robert; Chernikov, Alexey; del Águila, Andrés Granados; Christianen, Peter C.M.; Bratschitsch, Rudolf; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as possible candidates for valleytronic applications, as the spin and valley pseudospin are directly coupled and stabilized by a large spin splitting. The optical properties of these two-dimensional crystals are dominated by tightly bound electron–hole pairs (excitons) and more complex quasiparticles such as charged excitons (trions). Here we investigate monolayer WS2 samples via photoluminescence and time-resolved Kerr rotation. In photoluminescence and in energy-dependent Kerr rotation measurements, we are able to resolve two different trion states, which we interpret as intravalley and intervalley trions. Using time-resolved Kerr rotation, we observe a rapid initial valley polarization decay for the A exciton and the trion states. Subsequently, we observe a crossover towards exciton–exciton interaction-related dynamics, consistent with the formation and decay of optically dark A excitons. By contrast, resonant excitation of the B exciton transition leads to a very slow decay of the Kerr signal. PMID:27586517

  14. Dynamical coupled-channels model for neutrino-induced meson productions in resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, S. X.; Kamano, H.; Sato, T.

    2015-10-01

    A dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) model for neutrino-nucleon reactions in the resonance region is developed. Starting from the DCC model that we have previously developed through an analysis of π N ,γ N →π N ,η N ,K Λ ,K Σ reaction data for W ≤2.1 GeV , we extend the model of the vector current to Q2≤3.0 (GeV /c )2 by analyzing electron-induced reaction data for both proton and neutron targets. We derive axial-current matrix elements that are related to the π N interactions of the DCC model through the partially conserved axial current (PCAC) relation. Consequently, the interference pattern between resonant and nonresonant amplitudes is uniquely determined. We calculate cross sections for neutrino-induced meson productions, and compare them with available data. Our result for the single-pion production reasonably agrees with the data. We also make a comparison with the double-pion production data. Our model is the first DCC model that can give the double-pion production cross sections in the resonance region. We also make comparison of our result with other existing models to reveal an importance of testing the models in the light of PCAC and electron reaction data. The DCC model developed here will be a useful input for constructing a neutrino-nucleus reaction model and a neutrino event generator for analyses of neutrino experiments.

  15. Trion fine structure and coupled spin-valley dynamics in monolayer tungsten disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechinger, Gerd; Nagler, Philipp; Arora, Ashish; Schmidt, Robert; Chernikov, Alexey; Del Águila, Andrés Granados; Christianen, Peter C. M.; Bratschitsch, Rudolf; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    Monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as possible candidates for valleytronic applications, as the spin and valley pseudospin are directly coupled and stabilized by a large spin splitting. The optical properties of these two-dimensional crystals are dominated by tightly bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) and more complex quasiparticles such as charged excitons (trions). Here we investigate monolayer WS2 samples via photoluminescence and time-resolved Kerr rotation. In photoluminescence and in energy-dependent Kerr rotation measurements, we are able to resolve two different trion states, which we interpret as intravalley and intervalley trions. Using time-resolved Kerr rotation, we observe a rapid initial valley polarization decay for the A exciton and the trion states. Subsequently, we observe a crossover towards exciton-exciton interaction-related dynamics, consistent with the formation and decay of optically dark A excitons. By contrast, resonant excitation of the B exciton transition leads to a very slow decay of the Kerr signal.

  16. Trion fine structure and coupled spin-valley dynamics in monolayer tungsten disulfide.

    PubMed

    Plechinger, Gerd; Nagler, Philipp; Arora, Ashish; Schmidt, Robert; Chernikov, Alexey; Del Águila, Andrés Granados; Christianen, Peter C M; Bratschitsch, Rudolf; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as possible candidates for valleytronic applications, as the spin and valley pseudospin are directly coupled and stabilized by a large spin splitting. The optical properties of these two-dimensional crystals are dominated by tightly bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) and more complex quasiparticles such as charged excitons (trions). Here we investigate monolayer WS2 samples via photoluminescence and time-resolved Kerr rotation. In photoluminescence and in energy-dependent Kerr rotation measurements, we are able to resolve two different trion states, which we interpret as intravalley and intervalley trions. Using time-resolved Kerr rotation, we observe a rapid initial valley polarization decay for the A exciton and the trion states. Subsequently, we observe a crossover towards exciton-exciton interaction-related dynamics, consistent with the formation and decay of optically dark A excitons. By contrast, resonant excitation of the B exciton transition leads to a very slow decay of the Kerr signal. PMID:27586517

  17. Quantifying shallow subsurface water and heat dynamics using coupled hydrological-thermal-geophysical inversion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tran, Anh Phuong; Dafflon, Baptiste; Hubbard, Susan S.; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Long, Philip; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2016-08-31

    Improving our ability to estimate the parameters that control water and heat fluxes in the shallow subsurface is particularly important due to their strong control on recharge, evaporation and biogeochemical processes. The objectives of this study are to develop and test a new inversion scheme to simultaneously estimate subsurface hydrological, thermal and petrophysical parameters using hydrological, thermal and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data. The inversion scheme – which is based on a nonisothermal, multiphase hydrological model – provides the desired subsurface property estimates in high spatiotemporal resolution. A particularly novel aspect of the inversion scheme is the explicit incorporation of themore » dependence of the subsurface electrical resistivity on both moisture and temperature. The scheme was applied to synthetic case studies, as well as to real datasets that were autonomously collected at a biogeochemical field study site in Rifle, Colorado. At the Rifle site, the coupled hydrological-thermal-geophysical inversion approach well predicted the matric potential, temperature and apparent resistivity with the Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency criterion greater than 0.92. Synthetic studies found that neglecting the subsurface temperature variability, and its effect on the electrical resistivity in the hydrogeophysical inversion, may lead to an incorrect estimation of the hydrological parameters. The approach is expected to be especially useful for the increasing number of studies that are taking advantage of autonomously collected ERT and soil measurements to explore complex terrestrial system dynamics.« less

  18. Extraction of Electromagnetic Transition Form Factors for Nucleon Resonances within a Dynamical Coupled-Channels Model

    SciTech Connect

    N. Suzuki, T. Sato, T.-S. H. Lee

    2010-10-01

    We explain the application of a recently developed analytic continuation method to extract the electromagnetic transition form factors for the nucleon resonances ($N^*$) within a dynamical coupled-channel model of meson-baryon reactions.Illustrative results of the obtained $N^*\\rightarrow \\gamma N$ transition form factors, defined at the resonance pole positions on the complex energy plane, for the well isolated $P_{33}$ and $D_{13}$, and the complicated $P_{11}$ resonances are presented. A formula has been developed to give an unified representation of the effects due to the first two $P_{11}$ poles, which are near the $\\pi\\Delta$ threshold, but are on different Riemann sheets. We also find that a simple formula, with its parameters determined in the Laurent expansions of $\\pi N \\rightarrow \\pi N$ and $\\gamma N \\rightarrow\\pi N$ amplitudes, can reproduce to a very large extent the exact solutions of the considered model at energies near the real parts of the extracted resonance positions. We indicate the differences between our results and those extracted from the approaches using the Breit-Wigner parametrization of resonant amplitudes to fit the data.

  19. Coupled Soil-Plant Water Dynamics During Drought-Rewetting Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkmann, T. H.; Haberer, K.; Gessler, A.; Weiler, M.

    2013-12-01

    The predicted climate and land-use changes could have dramatic effects on the water balance of the soil-vegetation system, particularly under frequent drought and subsequent rewetting conditions. Yet, estimation of these effects and associated consequences for the structure and functioning of ecosystems, groundwater recharge, drinking water availability, and the water cycle is currently impeded by gaps in our understanding of the spatiotemporal dynamics of soil water in the rooted soil horizons, the dynamics and driving physiological processes of plant water acquisition, and the transpiration from plant leaves under changing environmental conditions. Combining approaches from the disciplines of plant ecophysiology and soil and isotope hydrology, this work aims to fill this gap by quantitatively characterizing the interaction between plant water use - as affected by rooting patterns and ecophysiology of different plant functional groups - and the water balance of variably complex ecosystems with emphasis on drought and rewetting phases. Results from artificial drought and subsequent rewetting in field experiments using isotopically and dye (Brilliant Blue FCF) labeled water conducted on plots of various surface cover (bare soil, grass, beech, oak, vine) established on luvisol on loess in southwestern Germany are presented. Detailed spatiotemporal insights into the coupled short-term (hours to days) dynamics of soil and plant water during the experiments is facilitated by the application of newly developed techniques for high-frequency in-situ monitoring of stable isotope signatures in both pore water and transpired water using commercial laser-based spectrometers in conjunction with plant ecophysiological, soil physical state, and dye staining observations. On the one hand, the spatiotemporal patterns of plant water uptake are assessed and related to morphological and physiological traits driving plant water uptake, functional adaptations of plants to changes of

  20. Toward the design of a motion-free tunable coupling module for varying spatial beam profiles: foundations of optimal coupling of a Gaussian mode into a fiber collimator with a dynamic two-lens system.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Muhammad; Reza, Syed Azer

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present analytical expressions for the coupling of the fundamental Gaussian mode into a fiber collimator (FC) using a two-lens system. For this two-lens system, we also derive the limiting condition imposed on the focal lengths of the two individual lenses and their mutual separation for near-to-perfect mode coupling into the FC. Variations in the spatial mode profile of a Gaussian beam may occur due to various reasons. These include controlled changes in the beam profile inside mode-division multiplexed systems, and undesired spatial profile variations in beams that pass through turbulent media. The necessity of a dynamic mode-coupling module is dictated by the need to optimally couple Gaussian beams with dynamically changing spatial profiles. Using the analytical expressions derived for mode-coupling efficiency and the resulting lens separation condition that is imposed on a two-lens coupling system, we propose the design of a dynamic two-lens mode-coupling system with a pair of electronically controlled tunable lenses. The proposed dynamic coupling module is motion free and involves the movement of bulk components in order to achieve optimal coupling. The experimental results are also presented to verify the theoretical claims and the working principle of a two-lens mode-coupling system. The results of the experiments are discussed in detail and an excellent agreement is demonstrated between the proposed theoretical framework and the experimental results. PMID:26560578